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Sample records for additional glycosylation sites

  1. Identification of the N-linked glycosylation sites of vitamin K-dependent carboxylase and the effect of glycosylation on carboxylase function†

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Zheng, Mei-Yan; Pope, R. Marshall; Straight, David L.; Stafford, Darrel W.

    2014-01-01

    The vitamin K-dependent carboxylase is an integral membrane protein which is required for the post-translational modification of a variety of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Previous studies have suggested carboxylase is a glycoprotein with N-linked glycosylation sites. In the present study, we identified the N-glycosylation sites of carboxylase by mass spectrometric peptide mapping analyses combined with site-directed mutagenesis. Our mass spectrometric results show that the N-linked glycosylation in carboxylase occurs at positions N459, N550, N605, and N627. Eliminating these glycosylation sites by changing asparagine to glutamine caused the mutant carboxylase to migrate faster in SDS-PAGE gel analyses, adding further evidence that these sites are glycosylated. In addition, the mutation studies identified N525, a site not recoverable by mass spectroscopy analysis, as a glycosylation site. Furthermore, the potential glycosylation site at N570 is glycosylated only if all the five natural glycosylation sites are simultaneously mutated. Removal of the oligosaccharides by glycosidase from wild-type carboxylase or by eliminating the functional glycosylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis did not affect either the carboxylation or epoxidation activity when the small pentapeptide FLEEL was used as substrate, suggesting that N-linked glycosylation is not required for the enzymatic function of carboxylase. In contrast, when site N570 and the five natural glycosylation sites were mutated simultaneously, the resulting carboxylase protein was degraded. Our results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is not essential for carboxylase enzymatic activity but it is important for protein folding and stability. PMID:17144668

  2. Glycosylation of closely spaced acceptor sites in human glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shrimal, Shiteshu; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    Summary Asparagine-linked glycosylation of proteins by the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) occurs when acceptor sites or sequons (N-x≠P-T/S) on nascent polypeptides enter the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Metazoan organisms assemble two isoforms of the OST that have different catalytic subunits (STT3A or STT3B) and partially non-overlapping cellular roles. Potential glycosylation sites move past the STT3A complex, which is associated with the translocation channel, at the protein synthesis elongation rate. Here, we investigated whether close spacing between acceptor sites in a nascent protein promotes site skipping by the STT3A complex. Biosynthetic analysis of four human glycoproteins revealed that closely spaced sites are efficiently glycosylated by an STT3B-independent process unless the sequons contain non-optimal sequence features, including extreme close spacing between sequons (e.g. NxTNxT) or the presence of paired NxS sequons (e.g. NxSANxS). Many, but not all, glycosylation sites that are skipped by the STT3A complex can be glycosylated by the STT3B complex. Analysis of a murine glycoprotein database revealed that closely spaced sequons are surprisingly common, and are enriched for paired NxT sites when the gap between sequons is less than three residues. PMID:24105266

  3. Definition of the bacterial N-glycosylation site consensus sequence.

    PubMed

    Kowarik, Michael; Young, N Martin; Numao, Shin; Schulz, Benjamin L; Hug, Isabelle; Callewaert, Nico; Mills, Dominic C; Watson, David C; Hernandez, Marcela; Kelly, John F; Wacker, Michael; Aebi, Markus

    2006-05-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni pgl locus encodes an N-linked protein glycosylation machinery that can be functionally transferred into Escherichia coli. In this system, we analyzed the elements in the C. jejuni N-glycoprotein AcrA required for accepting an N-glycan. We found that the eukaryotic primary consensus sequence for N-glycosylation is N terminally extended to D/E-Y-N-X-S/T (Y, X not equalP) for recognition by the bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) PglB. However, not all consensus sequences were N-glycosylated when they were either artificially introduced or when they were present in non-C. jejuni proteins. We were able to produce recombinant glycoproteins with engineered N-glycosylation sites and confirmed the requirement for a negatively charged side chain at position -2 in C. jejuni N-glycoproteins. N-glycosylation of AcrA by the eukaryotic OST in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurred independent of the acidic residue at the -2 position. Thus, bacterial N-glycosylation site selection is more specific than the eukaryotic equivalent with respect to the polypeptide acceptor sequence. PMID:16619027

  4. Determination of Glycosylation Sites and Site-specific Heterogeneity in Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyun Joo; Froehlich, John W.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. At least 50% of human proteins are glycosylated with some estimates being as high as 70%. Glycoprotein analysis requires determining both the sites of glycosylation as well as the glycan structures associated with each site. Recent advances have led to the development of new analytical methods that employ mass spectrometry extensively making it possible to obtain the glycosylation site and the site microheterogeneity. These tools will be important for the eventual development of glycoproteomics. PMID:19700364

  5. Disulfide bond formation is a determinant of glycosylation site usage in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGinnes, L W; Morrison, T G

    1997-01-01

    Determinants of glycosylation site usage were explored by using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of the paramyxovirus Newcastle disease virus. The amino acid sequence of the HN protein, a type II glycoprotein, has six N-linked glycosylation addition sites, G1 to G6, two of which, G5 and G6, are not used for the addition of carbohydrate (L. McGinnes and T. Morrison, Virology 212:398-410, 1995). The sequence of this protein also has 13 cysteine residues in the ectodomain (C2 to C14). Mutation of either cysteine 13 or cysteine 14 resulted in the addition of another oligosaccharide chain to the protein. These cysteine residues flank the normally unused G6 glycosylation addition site, and mutation of the G6 site eliminated the extra glycosylation found in the cysteine mutants. These results suggested that failure to form an intramolecular disulfide bond resulted in the usage of a normally unused glycosylation site. This conclusion was confirmed by preventing cotranslational disulfide bond formation in cells by using dithiothreitol. Under these conditions, the wild-type protein acquired extra glycosylation, which was eliminated by mutation of the G6 site. These results suggest that localized folding events on the nascent chain, such as disulfide bond formation, which block access to the oligosaccharyl transferase are a determinant of glycosylation site usage. PMID:9060670

  6. Enhanced expression of heterologous proteins in yeast cells via the modification of N-glycosylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Han, Minghai; Yu, Xiaobin

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts are widely used for the production of heterologous proteins. Improving the expression of such proteins is a top priority for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. N-Glycosylation, a common form of protein modification in yeasts, facilitates proper protein folding and secretion. Accordingly, our previous study revealed that the attachment of additional N-glycans to recombinant elastase by introducing an N-glycosylation sequon at suitable locations could stimulate its expression. Interestingly, the sequon Asn-Xaa-Thr is N-glycosylated more efficiently than Asn-Xaa-Ser, so improving the N-glycosylation efficiency via the conversion of Ser to Thr in the sequon would enhance the efficiency of N-glycosylation and increase glycoprotein expression. Recently, the expression level of recombinant elastase was enhanced by this means in our lab. Actually, the modification of N-glycosylation sites can generally be achieved through site-directed mutagenesis; thus, the method described in this report represents a feasible means of improving heterologous protein expression in yeasts. PMID:25671496

  7. Identification of Novel N-Glycosylation Sites at Noncanonical Protein Consensus Motifs.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Mark S; Davis, Kiersta S; Formolo, Trina; Kilpatrick, Lisa E; Phinney, Karen W

    2016-07-01

    N-glycosylation of proteins is well known to occur at asparagine residues that fall within the canonical consensus sequence N-X-S/T but has also been identified at a small number of asparagine residues within N-X-C motifs, including the N491 residue of human serotransferrin. Here we report novel glycosylation sites within noncanonical consensus motifs, in the conformation N-X-C, based on mass spectrometry analysis of partially deglycosylated glycopeptide targets. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (A1AG) and serotransferrin (Tf) were observed for the first time to be N-glycosylated on asparagine residues within a total of six unique noncanonical motifs. N-glycosylation was initially predicted in silico based on the evolutionary conservation of the N-X-C motif among related mammalian species and demonstrated experimentally in A1AG from porcine, canine, and feline sources and in human serotransferrin. High-resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was employed to collect fragmentation data of predicted GlcNAcylated peptides and to assign modification sites within N-X-C motifs. A combination of targeted analytical techniques that includes complementary mass spectrometry platforms, enzymatic digestions, and partial-deglycosylation procedures was developed to confirm the novel observations. Additionally, we found that A1AG in porcine and canine sources is highly N-glycosylated at a noncanonical motif (N-Q-C) based on semiquantitative multiple reaction monitoring analysis-the first report of an N-X-C motif exhibiting substantial N-glycosylation. Although reports of N-X-C motif N-glycosylation are relatively uncommon in the literature, this work adds to a growing list of glycoproteins reported with glycosylation at various forms of noncanonical motifs. PMID:27246700

  8. Prediction of O-glycosylation Sites Using Random Forest and GA-Tuned PSO Technique

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hebatallah; Badr, Amr; Abdelhalim, MB

    2015-01-01

    O-glycosylation is one of the main types of the mammalian protein glycosylation; it occurs on the particular site of serine (S) or threonine (T). Several O-glycosylation site predictors have been developed. However, a need to get even better prediction tools remains. One challenge in training the classifiers is that the available datasets are highly imbalanced, which makes the classification accuracy for the minority class to become unsatisfactory. In our previous work, we have proposed a new classification approach, which is based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) and random forest (RF); this approach has considered the imbalanced dataset problem. The PSO parameters setting in the training process impacts the classification accuracy. Thus, in this paper, we perform parameters optimization for the PSO algorithm, based on genetic algorithm, in order to increase the classification accuracy. Our proposed genetic algorithm-based approach has shown better performance in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve against existing predictors. In addition, we implemented a glycosylation predictor tool based on that approach, and we demonstrated that this tool could successfully identify candidate glycosylation sites in case study protein. PMID:26244014

  9. Prediction of O-glycosylation Sites Using Random Forest and GA-Tuned PSO Technique.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hebatallah; Badr, Amr; Abdelhalim, M B

    2015-01-01

    O-glycosylation is one of the main types of the mammalian protein glycosylation; it occurs on the particular site of serine (S) or threonine (T). Several O-glycosylation site predictors have been developed. However, a need to get even better prediction tools remains. One challenge in training the classifiers is that the available datasets are highly imbalanced, which makes the classification accuracy for the minority class to become unsatisfactory. In our previous work, we have proposed a new classification approach, which is based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) and random forest (RF); this approach has considered the imbalanced dataset problem. The PSO parameters setting in the training process impacts the classification accuracy. Thus, in this paper, we perform parameters optimization for the PSO algorithm, based on genetic algorithm, in order to increase the classification accuracy. Our proposed genetic algorithm-based approach has shown better performance in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve against existing predictors. In addition, we implemented a glycosylation predictor tool based on that approach, and we demonstrated that this tool could successfully identify candidate glycosylation sites in case study protein. PMID:26244014

  10. Convenient and Precise Strategy for Mapping N-Glycosylation Sites Using Microwave-Assisted Acid Hydrolysis and Characteristic Ions Recognition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng; Qu, Jingyao; Meisner, Jeffrey; Zhao, Xinyuan; Li, Xu; Wu, Zhigang; Zhu, Hailiang; Yu, Zaikuan; Li, Lei; Guo, Yuxi; Song, Jing; Wang, Peng George

    2015-08-01

    N-glycosylation is one of the most prevalence protein post-translational modifications (PTM) which is involved in several biological processes. Alternation of N-glycosylation is associated with cellular malfunction and development of disease. Thus, investigation of protein N-glycosylation is crucial for diagnosis and treatment of disease. Currently, deglycosylation with peptide N-glycosidase F is the most commonly used technique in N-glycosylation analysis. Additionally, a common error in N-glycosylation site identification, resulting from protein chemical deamidation, has largely been ignored. In this study, we developed a convenient and precise approach for mapping N-glycosylation sites utilizing with optimized TFA hydrolysis, ZIC-HILIC enrichment, and characteristic ions of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) from higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation. Using this method, we identified a total of 257 N-glycosylation sites and 144 N-glycoproteins from healthy human serum. Compared to deglycosylation with endoglycosidase, this strategy is more convenient and efficient for large scale N-glycosylation sites identification and provides an important alternative approach for the study of N-glycoprotein function. PMID:26161579

  11. Mapping Sites of O-Glycosylation and Fringe Elongation on Drosophila Notch.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Beth M; Rana, Nadia A; Moss, Hillary; Leonardi, Jessica; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed; Haltiwanger, Robert S

    2016-07-29

    Glycosylation of the Notch receptor is essential for its activity and serves as an important modulator of signaling. Three major forms of O-glycosylation are predicted to occur at consensus sites within the epidermal growth factor-like repeats in the extracellular domain of the receptor: O-fucosylation, O-glucosylation, and O-GlcNAcylation. We have performed comprehensive mass spectral analyses of these three types of O-glycosylation on Drosophila Notch produced in S2 cells and identified peptides containing all 22 predicted O-fucose sites, all 18 predicted O-glucose sites, and all 18 putative O-GlcNAc sites. Using semiquantitative mass spectral methods, we have evaluated the occupancy and relative amounts of glycans at each site. The majority of the O-fucose sites were modified to high stoichiometries. Upon expression of the β3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase Fringe with Notch, we observed varying degrees of elongation beyond O-fucose monosaccharide, indicating that Fringe preferentially modifies certain sites more than others. Rumi modified O-glucose sites to high stoichiometries, although elongation of the O-glucose was site-specific. Although the current putative consensus sequence for O-GlcNAcylation predicts 18 O-GlcNAc sites on Notch, we only observed apparent O-GlcNAc modification at five sites. In addition, we performed mass spectral analysis on endogenous Notch purified from Drosophila embryos and found that the glycosylation states were similar to those found on Notch from S2 cells. These data provide foundational information for future studies investigating the mechanisms of how O-glycosylation regulates Notch activity. PMID:27268051

  12. Site-specific glycosylation of secretory immunoglobulin A from human colostrum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jincui; Guerrero, Andres; Parker, Evan; Strum, John S; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2015-03-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) is a major glycoprotein in milk and plays a key role in mediating immune protection of the gut mucosa. Although it is a highly glycosylated protein, its site-specific glycosylation and associated glycan micro-heterogeneity have still not been fully elucidated. In this study, the site-specific glycosylation of sIgA isolated from human colostrum (n = 3) was analyzed using a combination of LC-MS and LC-MS/MS and in-house software (Glycopeptide Finder). The majority of the glycans found are biantennary structures with one or more acidic Neu5Ac residues; however, a large fraction belonged to truncated complex structures with terminal GlcNAc. Multiple glycosites were identified with nearly 30 glycan compositions located at seven sites on the secretory component, six compositions at a single site on the J chain, and 16 compositions at five sites on the IgA heavy (H) chain. Site-specific heterogeneity and relative quantitation of each composition and the extent of occupation at each site were determined using nonspecific proteases. Additionally, 54 O-linked glycan compositions located at the IgA1 hinge region (HR) were identified by comparison against a theoretical O-glycopeptide library. This represents the most comprehensive report to date detailing the complexity of glycan micro-heterogeneity with relative quantitation of glycoforms for each glycosylation site on milk sIgA. This strategy further provides a general method for determining site-specific glycosylation in large protein complexes. PMID:25629924

  13. Absolute Quantitation of Glycosylation Site Occupancy Using Isotopically Labeled Standards and LC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhikai; Go, Eden P.; Desaire, Heather

    2014-06-01

    N-linked glycans are required to maintain appropriate biological functions on proteins. Underglycosylation leads to many diseases in plants and animals; therefore, characterizing the extent of glycosylation on proteins is an important step in understanding, diagnosing, and treating diseases. To determine the glycosylation site occupancy, protein N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) is typically used to detach the glycan from the protein, during which the formerly glycosylated asparagine undergoes deamidation to become an aspartic acid. By comparing the abundance of the resulting peptide containing aspartic acid against the one containing non-glycosylated asparagine, the glycosylation site occupancy can be evaluated. However, this approach can give inaccurate results when spontaneous chemical deamidation of the non-glycosylated asparagine occurs. To overcome this limitation, we developed a new method to measure the glycosylation site occupancy that does not rely on converting glycosylated peptides to their deglycosylated forms. Specifically, the overall protein concentration and the non-glycosylated portion of the protein are quantified simultaneously by using heavy isotope-labeled internal standards coupled with LC-MS analysis, and the extent of site occupancy is accurately determined. The efficacy of the method was demonstrated by quantifying the occupancy of a glycosylation site on bovine fetuin. The developed method is the first work that measures the glycosylation site occupancy without using PNGase F, and it can be done in parallel with glycopeptide analysis because the glycan remains intact throughout the workflow.

  14. Analysis of congenital disorder of glycosylation-Id in a yeast model system shows diverse site-specific under-glycosylation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Jamaluddin, Muhammad Fairuz; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2012-11-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of proteins in eukaryotes. Mutations in the human ALG3 gene cause changed levels and altered glycan structures on mature glycoproteins and are the cause of a severe congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG-Id). Diverse glycoproteins are also under-glycosylated in Saccharomyces cerevisae alg3 mutants. Here we analyzed site-specific glycosylation occupancy in this yeast model system using peptide-N-glycosidase F to label glycosylation sites with an asparagine-aspartate conversion that creates a new endoproteinase AspN cleavage site, followed by proteolytic digestion, and detection of peptides and glycopeptides by LC-ESI-MS/MS. We used this analytical method to identify and measure site-specific glycosylation occupancy in alg3 mutant and wild type yeast strains. We found decreased site-specific N-glycosylation occupancy in the alg3 knockout strain preferentially at Asn-Xaa-Ser sequences located in secondary structural elements, features previously associated with poor glycosylation efficiency. Furthermore, we identified 26 previously experimentally unverified glycosylation sites. Our results provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of disease in CDG-Id, and our methodology will be useful in site-specific glycosylation analysis in many model systems and clinical applications. PMID:23038983

  15. Automated measurement of site-specific N-glycosylation occupancy with SWATH-MS.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2015-07-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of proteins catalyzed by oligosaccharyltransferase that is important in regulating many aspects of protein function. Analysis of protein glycosylation, including glycoproteomic measurement of the site-specific extent of glycosylation, remains challenging. Here, we developed methods combining enzymatic deglycosylation and protease digestion with SWATH-MS to enable automated measurement of site-specific occupancy at many glycosylation sites. Deglycosylation with peptide-endoglycosidase H, leaving a remnant N-acetylglucosamine on asparagines previously carrying high-mannose glycans, followed by trypsin digestion allowed robust automated measurement of occupancy at many sites. Combining deglycosylation with the more general peptide-N-glycosidase F enzyme with AspN protease digest allowed robust automated differentiation of nonglycosylated and deglycosylated forms of a given glycosylation site. Ratiometric analysis of deglycosylated peptides and the total intensities of all peptides from the corresponding proteins allowed relative quantification of site-specific glycosylation occupancy between yeast strains with various isoforms of oligosaccharyltransferase. This approach also allowed robust measurement of glycosylation sites in human salivary glycoproteins. This method for automated relative quantification of site-specific glycosylation occupancy will be a useful tool for research with model systems and clinical samples. PMID:25737293

  16. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Recombinant Pentameric and Hexameric Human IgM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moh, Edward S. X.; Lin, Chi-Hung; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-04-01

    Glycosylation is known to play an important role in IgG antibody structure and function. Polymeric IgM, the largest known antibody in humans, displays five potential N-glycosylation sites on each heavy chain monomer. IgM can exist as a pentamer with a connecting singly N-glycosylated J-chain (with a total of 51 glycosylation sites) or as a hexamer (60 glycosylation sites). In this study, the N-glycosylation of recombinant pentameric and hexameric IgM produced by the same human cell type and culture conditions was site-specifically profiled by RP-LC-CID/ETD-MS/MS using HILIC-enriched tryptic and GluC glycopeptides. The occupancy of all putative N-glycosylation sites on the pentameric and hexameric IgM were able to be determined. Distinct glycosylation differences were observed between each of the five N-linked sites on the IgM heavy chains. While Asn171, Asn332, and Asn395 all had predominantly complex type glycans, differences in glycan branching and sialylation were observed between the sites. Asn563, a high mannose-rich glycosylation site that locates in the center of the IgM polymer, was only approximately 60% occupied in both the pentameric and hexameric IgM forms, with a difference in relative abundance of the glycan structures between the pentamer and hexamer. This study highlights the information obtained by characterization of the site-heterogeneity of a highly glycosylated protein of high molecular mass with quaternary structure, revealing differences that would not be seen by global glycan or deglycosylated peptide profiling.

  17. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Recombinant Pentameric and Hexameric Human IgM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moh, Edward S. X.; Lin, Chi-Hung; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-07-01

    Glycosylation is known to play an important role in IgG antibody structure and function. Polymeric IgM, the largest known antibody in humans, displays five potential N-glycosylation sites on each heavy chain monomer. IgM can exist as a pentamer with a connecting singly N-glycosylated J-chain (with a total of 51 glycosylation sites) or as a hexamer (60 glycosylation sites). In this study, the N-glycosylation of recombinant pentameric and hexameric IgM produced by the same human cell type and culture conditions was site-specifically profiled by RP-LC-CID/ETD-MS/MS using HILIC-enriched tryptic and GluC glycopeptides. The occupancy of all putative N-glycosylation sites on the pentameric and hexameric IgM were able to be determined. Distinct glycosylation differences were observed between each of the five N-linked sites on the IgM heavy chains. While Asn171, Asn332, and Asn395 all had predominantly complex type glycans, differences in glycan branching and sialylation were observed between the sites. Asn563, a high mannose-rich glycosylation site that locates in the center of the IgM polymer, was only approximately 60% occupied in both the pentameric and hexameric IgM forms, with a difference in relative abundance of the glycan structures between the pentamer and hexamer. This study highlights the information obtained by characterization of the site-heterogeneity of a highly glycosylated protein of high molecular mass with quaternary structure, revealing differences that would not be seen by global glycan or deglycosylated peptide profiling.

  18. Comprehensive identification of novel proteins and N-glycosylation sites in royal jelly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Royal jelly (RJ) is a proteinaceous secretion produced from the hypopharyngeal and mandibular glands of nurse bees. It plays vital roles in honeybee biology and in the improvement of human health. However, some proteins remain unknown in RJ, and mapping N-glycosylation modification sites on RJ proteins demands further investigation. We used two different liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry techniques, complementary N-glycopeptide enrichment strategies, and bioinformatic approaches to gain a better understanding of novel and glycosylated proteins in RJ. Results A total of 25 N-glycosylated proteins, carrying 53 N-glycosylation sites, were identified in RJ proteins, of which 42 N-linked glycosylation sites were mapped as novel on RJ proteins. Most of the glycosylated proteins were related to metabolic activities and health improvement. The 13 newly identified proteins were also mainly associated with metabolic processes and health improvement activities. Conclusion Our in-depth, large-scale mapping of novel glycosylation sites represents a crucial step toward systematically revealing the functionality of N-glycosylated RJ proteins, and is potentially useful for producing a protein with desirable pharmacokinetic and biological activity using a genetic engineering approach. The newly-identified proteins significantly extend the proteome coverage of RJ. These findings contribute vital and new knowledge to our understanding of the innate biochemical nature of RJ at both the proteome and glycoproteome levels. PMID:24529077

  19. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of the S-Locus Receptor Kinase and Its Role in the Self-Incompatibility Response of the Brassicaceae[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Tantikanjana, Titima; Nishio, Takeshi; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Nasrallah, June B.

    2014-01-01

    The S-locus receptor kinase SRK is a highly polymorphic transmembrane kinase of the stigma epidermis. Through allele-specific interaction with its pollen coat-localized ligand, the S-locus cysteine-rich protein SCR, SRK is responsible for recognition and inhibition of self pollen in the self-incompatibility response of the Brassicaceae. The SRK extracellular ligand binding domain contains several potential N-glycosylation sites that exhibit varying degrees of conservation among SRK variants. However, the glycosylation status and functional importance of these sites are currently unclear. We investigated this issue in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana stigmas that express the Arabidopsis lyrata SRKb variant and exhibit an incompatible response toward SCRb-expressing pollen. Analysis of single- and multiple-glycosylation site mutations of SRKb demonstrated that, although five of six potential N-glycosylation sites in SRKb are glycosylated in stigmas, N-glycosylation is not important for SCRb-dependent activation of SRKb. Rather, N-glycosylation functions primarily to ensure the proper and efficient subcellular trafficking of SRK to the plasma membrane. The study provides insight into the function of a receptor that regulates a critical phase of the plant life cycle and represents a valuable addition to the limited information available on the contribution of N-glycosylation to the subcellular trafficking and function of plant receptor kinases. PMID:25480368

  20. Ethenoguanines undergo glycosylation by nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferases at non-natural sites.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenjie; Paul, Debamita; Gao, Lina; Seckute, Jolita; Sangaiah, Ramiah; Jayaraj, Karupiah; Zhang, Zhenfa; Kaminski, P Alexandre; Ealick, Steven E; Gold, Avram; Ball, Louise M

    2014-01-01

    Deoxyribosyl transferases and functionally related purine nucleoside phosphorylases are used extensively for synthesis of non-natural deoxynucleosides as pharmaceuticals or standards for characterizing and quantitating DNA adducts. Hence exploring the conformational tolerance of the active sites of these enzymes is of considerable practical interest. We have determined the crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution of Lactobacillus helveticus purine deoxyribosyl transferase (PDT) with the tricyclic purine 8,9-dihydro-9-oxoimidazo[2,1-b]purine (N2,3-ethenoguanine) at the active site. The active site electron density map was compatible with four orientations, two consistent with sites for deoxyribosylation and two appearing to be unproductive. In accord with the crystal structure, Lactobacillus helveticus PDT glycosylates the 8,9-dihydro-9-oxoimidazo[2,1-b]purine at N7 and N1, with a marked preference for N7. The activity of Lactobacillus helveticus PDT was compared with that of the nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferase enzymes (DRT Type II) from Lactobacillus leichmannii and Lactobacillus fermentum, which were somewhat more effective in the deoxyribosylation than Lactobacillus helveticus PDT, glycosylating the substrate with product profiles dependent on the pH of the incubation. The purine nucleoside phosphorylase of Escherichia coli, also commonly used in ribosylation of non-natural bases, was an order of magnitude less efficient than the transferase enzymes. Modeling based on published active-site structures as templates suggests that in all cases, an active site Phe is critical in orienting the molecular plane of the purine derivative. Adventitious hydrogen bonding with additional active site residues appears to result in presentation of multiple nucleophilic sites on the periphery of the acceptor base for ribosylation to give a distribution of nucleosides. Chemical glycosylation of O9-benzylated 8,9-dihydro-9-oxoimidazo[2,1-b]purine also resulted in N7 and N1

  1. Ethenoguanines Undergo Glycosylation by Nucleoside 2′-Deoxyribosyltransferases at Non-Natural Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenjie; Paul, Debamita; Gao, Lina; Seckute, Jolita; Jayaraj, Karupiah; Zhang, Zhenfa; Kaminski, P. Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Deoxyribosyl transferases and functionally related purine nucleoside phosphorylases are used extensively for synthesis of non-natural deoxynucleosides as pharmaceuticals or standards for characterizing and quantitating DNA adducts. Hence exploring the conformational tolerance of the active sites of these enzymes is of considerable practical interest. We have determined the crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution of Lactobacillus helveticus purine deoxyribosyl transferase (PDT) with the tricyclic purine 8,9-dihydro-9-oxoimidazo[2,1-b]purine (N2,3-ethenoguanine) at the active site. The active site electron density map was compatible with four orientations, two consistent with sites for deoxyribosylation and two appearing to be unproductive. In accord with the crystal structure, Lactobacillus helveticus PDT glycosylates the 8,9-dihydro-9-oxoimidazo[2,1-b]purine at N7 and N1, with a marked preference for N7. The activity of Lactobacillus helveticus PDT was compared with that of the nucleoside 2′-deoxyribosyltransferase enzymes (DRT Type II) from Lactobacillus leichmannii and Lactobacillus fermentum, which were somewhat more effective in the deoxyribosylation than Lactobacillus helveticus PDT, glycosylating the substrate with product profiles dependent on the pH of the incubation. The purine nucleoside phosphorylase of Escherichia coli, also commonly used in ribosylation of non-natural bases, was an order of magnitude less efficient than the transferase enzymes. Modeling based on published active-site structures as templates suggests that in all cases, an active site Phe is critical in orienting the molecular plane of the purine derivative. Adventitious hydrogen bonding with additional active site residues appears to result in presentation of multiple nucleophilic sites on the periphery of the acceptor base for ribosylation to give a distribution of nucleosides. Chemical glycosylation of O9-benzylated 8,9-dihydro-9-oxoimidazo[2,1-b]purine also resulted in N7 and N1

  2. Identification of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 Pilin Glycosylation Site

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Jason E.; Marshall, Mark A.; Blanch, Vincent J.; Deal, Carolyn D.; Castric, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Previous work (P. Castric, F. J. Cassels, and R. W. Carlson, J. Biol. Chem. 276:26479-26485, 2001) has shown the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 pilin glycan to be covalently bound to a serine residue. N-terminal sequencing of pilin fragments produced from endopeptidase treatment and identified by reaction with a glycan-specific monoclonal antibody indicated that the glycan was present between residue 75 and the pilin carboxy terminus. Further sequencing of these peptides revealed that serine residues 75, 81, 84, 105, 106, and 108 were not modified. Conversion of serine 148, but not serine 118, to alanine by site-directed mutagenesis, resulted in loss of the ability to carry out pilin glycosylation when tested in an in vivo system. These results showed the pilin glycan to be attached to residue 148, the carboxy-terminal amino acid. The carboxy-proximal portion of the pilin disulfide loop, which is adjacent to the pilin glycan, was found to be a major linear B-cell epitope, as determined by peptide epitope mapping analysis. Immunization of mice with pure pili produced antibodies that recognized the pilin glycan. These sera also reacted with P. aeruginosa 1244 lipopolysaccharide as measured by Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:12010970

  3. Physical stability comparisons of IgG1-Fc variants: effects of N-glycosylation site occupancy and Asp/Gln residues at site Asn 297

    PubMed Central

    KIM, JAE HYUN; JOSHI, SANGEETA B.; MIDDAUGH, C. RUSSELL; TOLBERT, THOMAS J.; VOLKIN, DAVID B.

    2014-01-01

    The structural integrity and conformational stability of various IgG1-Fc proteins produced from the yeast Pichia pastoris with different glycosylation site occupancy (di-, mono-, and non- glycosylated) was determined. In addition, the physical stability profiles of three different forms of non-glycosylated Fc molecules (varying amino acid residues at site 297 in the CH2 domain due to point mutations and enzymatic digestion of the Fc glycoforms) were also examined. The physical stability of these IgG1-Fc glycoproteins was examined as a function of pH and temperature by high throughput biophysical analysis using multiple techniques combined with data visualization tools (three index empirical phase diagrams and radar charts). Across the pH range of 4.0 to 6.0, the di- and mono- glycosylated forms of the IgG1-Fc showed the highest and lowest levels of physical stability respectively, with the non-glycosylated forms showing intermediate stability depending on solution pH. In the aglycosylated Fc proteins, the introduction of Asp (D) residues at site 297 (QQ vs. DN vs. DD forms) resulted in more subtle changes in structural integrity and physical stability depending on solution pH. The utility of evaluating the conformational stability profile differences between the various IgG1-Fc glycoproteins is discussed in the context of analytical comparability studies. PMID:24740840

  4. Neuraminidase stalk length and additional glycosylation of the hemagglutinin influence the virulence of influenza H5N1 viruses for mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following passage of avian influenza H5 and H7 viruses in poultry, the hemagglutinin (HA) can acquire additional glycosylation sites and the neuraminidase (NA) stalk becomes shorter. We investigated whether these features play a role in the pathogenesis of infection in mammalian hosts. From 1996 t...

  5. Confident Assignment of Site-Specific Glycosylation in Complex Glycoproteins in a Single Step

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A glycoprotein may contain several sites of glycosylation, each of which is heterogeneous. As a consequence of glycoform diversity and signal suppression from nonglycosylated peptides that ionize more efficiently, typical reversed-phase LC–MS and bottom–up proteomics database searching workflows do not perform well for identification of site-specific glycosylation for complex glycoproteins. We present an LC–MS system for enrichment, separation, and analysis of glycopeptides from complex glycoproteins (>4 N-glycosylation sequons) in a single step. This system uses an online HILIC enrichment trap prior to reversed-phase C18-MS analysis. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the system using a set of glycoproteins including human transferrin (2 sequons), human alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (5 sequons), and influenza A virus hemagglutinin (9 sequons). The online enrichment renders glycopeptides the most abundant ions detected, thereby facilitating the generation of high-quality data-dependent tandem mass spectra. The tandem mass spectra exhibited product ions from both glycan and peptide backbone dissociation for a majority of the glycopeptides tested using collisionally activated dissociation that served to confidently assign site-specific glycosylation. We demonstrated the value of our system to define site-specific glycosylation using a hemagglutinin containing 9 N-glycosylation sequons from a single HILIC-C18-MS acquisition. PMID:25153361

  6. The Influence of Artificially Introduced N-Glycosylation Sites on the In Vitro Activity of Xenopus laevis Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Kazumichi; Meguro, Mizue; Sato, Kei; Tanizaki, Yuta; Nogawa-Kosaka, Nami; Kato, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the primary regulator of erythropoiesis, is a heavily glycosylated protein found in humans and several other mammals. Intriguingly, we have previously found that EPO in Xenopus laevis (xlEPO) has no N-glycosylation sites, and cross-reacts with the human EPO (huEPO) receptor despite low homology with huEPO. In this study, we introduced N-glycosylation sites into wild-type xlEPO at the positions homologous to those in huEPO, and tested whether the glycosylated mutein retained its biological activity. Seven xlEPO muteins, containing 1–3 additional N-linked carbohydrates at positions 24, 38, and/or 83, were expressed in COS-1 cells. The muteins exhibited lower secretion efficiency, higher hydrophilicity, and stronger acidic properties than the wild type. All muteins stimulated the proliferation of both cell lines, xlEPO receptor-expressing xlEPOR-FDC/P2 cells and huEPO receptor-expressing UT-7/EPO cells, in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the muteins retained their in vitro biological activities. The maximum effect on xlEPOR-FDC/P2 proliferation was decreased by the addition of N-linked carbohydrates, but that on UT-7/EPO proliferation was not changed, indicating that the muteins act as partial agonists to the xlEPO receptor, and near-full agonists to the huEPO receptor. Hence, the EPO-EPOR binding site in X. laevis locates the distal region of artificially introduced three N-glycosylation sites, demonstrating that the vital conformation to exert biological activity is conserved between humans and X. laevis, despite the low similarity in primary structures of EPO and EPOR. PMID:25898205

  7. Prevention of amyloid fibril formation of amyloidogenic chicken cystatin by site-specific glycosylation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianwei; Song, Youtao; Ueyama, Nobuhiro; Saito, Akira; Azakami, Hiroyuki; Kato, Akio

    2006-01-01

    To address the role of glycosylation on fibrillogenicity of amyloidogenic chicken cystatin, the consensus sequence for N-linked glycosylation (Asn106-Ile108 → Asn106-Thr108) was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis into the wild-type and amyloidogenic chicken cystatins to construct the glycosylated form of chicken cystatins. Both the glycosylated and unglycosylated forms of wild-type and amyloidogenic mutant I66Q cystatin were expressed and secreted in a culture medium of yeast Pichia pastoris transformants. Comparison of the amount of insoluble aggregate, the secondary structure, and fibrillogenicity has shown that the N-linked glycosylation could prevent amyloid fibril formation of amyloidogenic chicken cystatin secreted in yeast cells without affecting its inhibitory activities. Further study showed this glycosylation could inhibit the formation of cystatin dimers. Therefore, our data strongly suggested that the mechanism causing the prevention of amyloidogenic cystation fibril formation may be realized through suppression of the formation of three-dimensional domain-swapped dimers and oligomers of amyloidogenic cystatin by the glycosylated chains at position 106. PMID:16434741

  8. Loss of ancestral N-glycosylation sites in conserved proteins during human evolution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Seon; Choi, Dongjin; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2015-12-01

    N-linked protein glycosylation is involved in various biological processes, such as protein quality control and adhesion or signaling among cells. The loss of ancestrally conserved N-glycosylation sites may result in the evolution of protein structure and function. In the present study, a mouse glycoproteome dataset and mammalian proteome data were assessed to identify 40 ancestral N-glycosylation sites in 37 proteins that disappeared during human evolution since the last common ancestor of the Euarchonta (primates and treeshrews). The results showed that each of the human proteins, CELSR1, ST3GAL5 and VSIG10, lost an ancestrally conserved N-glycosylation site following human-chimpanzee divergence. Notably, CELSR1 and ST3GAL5 are crucial for normal development and function of the mammalian nervous system, suggesting an association with the evolution of human cognitive function. Thus, the lost ancestrally conserved N-glycosylation sites identified in the present study may be useful targets for functional analyses to identify molecular changes linked with the evolution of human phenotypes. PMID:26458842

  9. Identification of the N-glycosylation sites on glutamate carboxypeptidase II necessary for proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Barinka, Cyril; Sácha, Pavel; Sklenár, Jan; Man, Petr; Bezouska, Karel; Slusher, Barbara S; Konvalinka, Jan

    2004-06-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) is a membrane peptidase expressed in the prostate, central and peripheral nervous system, kidney, small intestine, and tumor-associated neovasculature. The GCPII form expressed in the central nervous system, termed NAALADase, is responsible for the cleavage of N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) yielding free glutamate in the synaptic cleft, and is implicated in various pathologic conditions associated with glutamate excitotoxicity. The prostate form of GCPII, termed prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is up-regulated in cancer and used as an effective prostate cancer marker. Little is known about the structure of this important pharmaceutical target. As a type II membrane protein, GCPII is heavily glycosylated. In this paper we show that N-glycosylation is vital for proper folding and subsequent secretion of human GCPII. Analysis of the predicted N-glycosylation sites also provides evidence that these sites are critical for GCPII carboxypeptidase activity. We confirm that all predicted N-glycosylation sites are occupied by an oligosaccharide moiety and show that glycosylation at sites distant from the putative catalytic domain is critical for the NAAG-hydrolyzing activity of GCPII calling the validity of previously described structural models of GCPII into question. PMID:15152093

  10. Low Abundant N-linked Glycosylation in Hen Egg White Lysozyme Is Localized at Nonconsensus Sites.

    PubMed

    Asperger, Arndt; Marx, Kristina; Albers, Christian; Molin, Laura; Pinato, Odra

    2015-06-01

    Although wild-type hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) is lacking the consensus sequence motif NX(S/T), in 1995 Trudel et al. (Biochem. Cell Biol. 1995, 73, 307-309) proposed the existence of a low abundant N-glycosylated form of HEL; however, the identity of active glycosylation sites in HEL remained a matter of speculation. For the first time since Trudel's initial work, we report here a comprehensive characterization by means of mass spectrometry of N-glycosylation in wild-type HEL. Our analytical approach comprised ZIC-HILIC enrichment of N-glycopeptides from HEL trypsin digest, deglycosylation by (18)O/PNGase F as well as by various endoglycosidases, and LC-MS/MS analysis of both intact and deglycosylated N-glycopeptides engaging multiple techniques of ionization and fragmentation. A novel data interpretation workflow based on MS/MS spectra classification and glycan database searching enabled the straightforward identification of the asparagine-rich N-glycopeptide [34-45] FESNFNTQATNR and allowed for compositional profiling of its modifying N-glycans. The overall heterogeneity profile of N-glycans in HEL comprised at least 26 different compositions. Results obtained from deglycosylation experiments provided clear evidence of asparagine residues N44 and N39 representing active glycosylation sites in HEL. Both of these sites do not fall into any known N-glycosylation-specific sequence motif but are localized in rarely observed nonconsensus sequons (NXN, NXQ). PMID:25964011

  11. Carbohydrates on Proteins: Site-Specific Glycosylation Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2015-07-01

    Glycosylation on proteins adds complexity and versatility to these biologically vital macromolecules. To unveil the structure-function relationship of glycoproteins, glycopeptide-centric analysis using mass spectrometry (MS) has become a method of choice because the glycan is preserved on the glycosylation site and site-specific glycosylation profiles of proteins can be readily determined. However, glycopeptide analysis is still challenging given that glycopeptides are usually low in abundance and relatively difficult to detect and the resulting data require expertise to analyze. Viewing the urgent need to address these challenges, emerging methods and techniques are being developed with the goal of analyzing glycopeptides in a sensitive, comprehensive, and high-throughput manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in glycoprotein and glycopeptide analysis, with topics covering sample preparation, analytical separation, MS and tandem MS techniques, as well as data interpretation and automation.

  12. The Patterns of Coevolution in Clade B HIV Envelope's N-Glycosylation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Garimalla, Swetha; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Pashov, Anastas D.

    2015-01-01

    The co-evolution of the potential N-glycosylation sites of HIV Clade B gp120 was mapped onto the coevolution network of the protein structure using mean field direct coupling analysis (mfDCA). This was possible for 327 positions with suitable entropy and gap content. Indications of pressure to preserve the evolving glycan shield are seen as well as strong dependencies between the majority of the potential N-glycosylation sites and the rest of the structure. These findings indicate that although mainly an adaptation against antibody neutralization, the evolving glycan shield is structurally related to the core polypeptide, which, thus, is also under pressure to reflect the changes in the N-glycosylation. The map we propose fills the gap in previous attempts to tease out sequon evolution by providing a more general molecular context. Thus, it will help design strategies guiding HIV gp120 evolution in a rational way. PMID:26110648

  13. Modification of N-glycosylation sites allows secretion of bacterial chondroitinase ABC from mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Elizabeth M.; Fyfe, Ian; Gardiner, Sonya; Li, Li; Warren, Philippa; Fawcett, James W.; Keynes, Roger J.; Rogers, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Although many eukaryotic proteins have been secreted by transfected bacterial cells, little is known about how a bacterial protein is treated as it passes through the secretory pathway when expressed in a eukaryotic cell. The eukaryotic N-glycosylation system could interfere with folding and secretion of prokaryotic proteins whose sequence has not been adapted for glycosylation in structurally appropriate locations. Here we show that such interference does indeed occur for chondroitinase ABC from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris, and can be overcome by eliminating potential N-glycosylation sites. Chondroitinase ABC was heavily glycosylated when expressed in mammalian cells or in a mammalian translation system, and this process prevented secretion of functional enzyme. Directed mutagenesis of selected N-glycosylation sites allowed efficient secretion of active chondroitinase. As these proteoglycans are known to inhibit regeneration of axons in the mammalian central nervous system, the modified chondroitinase gene is a potential tool for gene therapy to promote neural regeneration, ultimately in human spinal cord injury. PMID:19900493

  14. Site-specific O-Glycosylation Analysis of Human Blood Plasma Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marcus; Marx, Kristina; Reichl, Udo; Wuhrer, Manfred; Rapp, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific glycosylation analysis is key to investigate structure-function relationships of glycoproteins, e.g. in the context of antigenicity and disease progression. The analysis, though, is quite challenging and time consuming, in particular for O-glycosylated proteins. In consequence, despite their clinical and biopharmaceutical importance, many human blood plasma glycoproteins have not been characterized comprehensively with respect to their O-glycosylation. Here, we report on the site-specific O-glycosylation analysis of human blood plasma glycoproteins. To this end pooled human blood plasma of healthy donors was proteolytically digested using a broad-specific enzyme (Proteinase K), followed by a precipitation step, as well as a glycopeptide enrichment and fractionation step via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, the latter being optimized for intact O-glycopeptides carrying short mucin-type core-1 and -2 O-glycans, which represent the vast majority of O-glycans on human blood plasma proteins. Enriched O-glycopeptide fractions were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled online to an ion trap mass spectrometer operated in positive-ion mode. Peptide identity and glycan composition were derived from low-energy collision-induced dissociation fragment spectra acquired in multistage mode. To pinpoint the O-glycosylation sites glycopeptides were fragmented using electron transfer dissociation. Spectra were annotated by database searches as well as manually. Overall, 31 O-glycosylation sites and regions belonging to 22 proteins were identified, the majority being acute-phase proteins. Strikingly, also 11 novel O-glycosylation sites and regions were identified. In total 23 O-glycosylation sites could be pinpointed. Interestingly, the use of Proteinase K proved to be particularly beneficial in this context. The identified O-glycan compositions most probably correspond to mono- and disialylated core-1

  15. Substitute sweeteners: diverse bacterial oligosaccharyltransferases with unique N-glycosylation site preferences.

    PubMed

    Ollis, Anne A; Chai, Yi; Natarajan, Aravind; Perregaux, Emily; Jaroentomeechai, Thapakorn; Guarino, Cassandra; Smith, Jessica; Zhang, Sheng; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2015-01-01

    The central enzyme in the Campylobacter jejuni asparagine-linked glycosylation pathway is the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), PglB, which transfers preassembled glycans to specific asparagine residues in target proteins. While C. jejuni PglB (CjPglB) can transfer many diverse glycan structures, the acceptor sites that it recognizes are restricted predominantly to those having a negatively charged residue in the -2 position relative to the asparagine. Here, we investigated the acceptor-site preferences for 23 homologs with natural sequence variation compared to CjPglB. Using an ectopic trans-complementation assay for CjPglB function in glycosylation-competent Escherichia coli, we demonstrated in vivo activity for 16 of the candidate OSTs. Interestingly, the OSTs from Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter upsaliensis, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio gigas, and Desulfovibrio vulgaris, exhibited significantly relaxed specificity towards the -2 position compared to CjPglB. These enzymes glycosylated minimal N-X-T motifs in multiple targets and each followed unique, as yet unknown, rules governing acceptor-site preferences. One notable example is D. gigas PglB, which was the only bacterial OST to glycosylate the Fc domain of human immunoglobulin G at its native 'QYNST' sequon. Overall, we find that a subset of bacterial OSTs follow their own rules for acceptor-site specificity, thereby expanding the glycoengineering toolbox with previously unavailable biocatalytic diversity. PMID:26482295

  16. Substitute sweeteners: diverse bacterial oligosaccharyltransferases with unique N-glycosylation site preferences

    PubMed Central

    Ollis, Anne A.; Chai, Yi; Natarajan, Aravind; Perregaux, Emily; Jaroentomeechai, Thapakorn; Guarino, Cassandra; Smith, Jessica; Zhang, Sheng; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    The central enzyme in the Campylobacter jejuni asparagine-linked glycosylation pathway is the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), PglB, which transfers preassembled glycans to specific asparagine residues in target proteins. While C. jejuni PglB (CjPglB) can transfer many diverse glycan structures, the acceptor sites that it recognizes are restricted predominantly to those having a negatively charged residue in the −2 position relative to the asparagine. Here, we investigated the acceptor-site preferences for 23 homologs with natural sequence variation compared to CjPglB. Using an ectopic trans-complementation assay for CjPglB function in glycosylation-competent Escherichia coli, we demonstrated in vivo activity for 16 of the candidate OSTs. Interestingly, the OSTs from Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter upsaliensis, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio gigas, and Desulfovibrio vulgaris, exhibited significantly relaxed specificity towards the −2 position compared to CjPglB. These enzymes glycosylated minimal N-X-T motifs in multiple targets and each followed unique, as yet unknown, rules governing acceptor-site preferences. One notable example is D. gigas PglB, which was the only bacterial OST to glycosylate the Fc domain of human immunoglobulin G at its native ‘QYNST’ sequon. Overall, we find that a subset of bacterial OSTs follow their own rules for acceptor-site specificity, thereby expanding the glycoengineering toolbox with previously unavailable biocatalytic diversity. PMID:26482295

  17. The Middle X Residue Influences Cotranslational N-Glycosylation Consensus Site Skipping

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine (N)-linked glycosylation is essential for efficient protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and anterograde trafficking through the secretory pathway. N-Glycans are attached to nascent polypeptides at consensus sites, N-X-T/S (X ≠ P), by one of two enzymatic isoforms of the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), STT3A or STT3B. Here, we examined the effect of the consensus site X and hydroxyl residue on the distributions of co- and post-translational N-glycosylation of a type I transmembrane glycopeptide scaffold. Using rapid radioactive pulse–chase experiments to resolve co-translational (STT3A) and post-translational (STT3B) events, we determined that NXS consensus sites containing large hydrophobic and negatively charged middle residues are frequently skipped by STT3A during protein translation. Post-translational modification of the cotranslationally skipped sites by STT3B was similarly hindered by the middle X residue, resulting in hypoglycosylation of NXS sites containing large hydrophobic and negatively charged side chains. In contrast, NXT consensus sites (barring NWT) were efficiently modified by the cotranslational machinery, reducing STT3B’s role in modifying consensus sites skipped during protein translation. A strong correlation between cotranslational N-glycosylation efficiency and the rate of post-translational N-glycosylation was determined, showing that the OST STT3A and STT3B isoforms are similarly influenced by the hydroxyl and middle X consensus site residues. Substituting various middle X residues into an OST eubacterial homologous structure revealed that small and polar consensus site X residues fit well in the peptide binding site whereas large hydrophobic and negatively charged residues were harder to accommodate, indicating conserved enzymatic mechanisms for the mammalian OST isoforms. PMID:25029371

  18. N-glycosylation sites on the nicotinic ACh receptor subunits regulate receptor channel desensitization and conductance.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2003-06-10

    The present study investigated the effects of N-glycosylation sites on Torpedo acetylcholine (ACh) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by monitoring whole-cell membrane currents and single-channel currents from excised patches. Receptors with the mutant subunit at the asparagine residue on the conserved N-glycosylation site (mbetaN141D, mgammaN141D, or mdeltaN143D) or the serine/threonine residue (mbetaT143A, mgammaS143A, or mdeltaS145A) delayed the rate of current decay as compared with wild-type receptors, and the most striking effect was found with receptors with mbetaT143A or mgammaS143A. For wild-type receptors, the lectin concanavalin A, that binds to glycosylated membrane proteins with high affinity, mimicked this effect. Receptors with mbetaN141D or mdeltaN143D exhibited lower single-channel conductance, but those with mbetaT143A, mgammaS143A, or mdeltaS145A otherwise revealed higher conductance than wild-type receptors. Mean opening time of single-channel currents was little affected by the mutation. N-glycosylation sites, thus, appear to play a role in the regulation of ACh receptor desensitization and ion permeability. PMID:12829329

  19. Characterization of iduronate sulphatase mutants affecting N-glycosylation sites and the cysteine-84 residue.

    PubMed

    Millat, G; Froissart, R; Maire, I; Bozon, D

    1997-08-15

    Iduronate sulphatase (IDS) is responsible for mucopolysaccharidosis type II, a rare recessive X-linked lysosomal storage disease. The aim of this work was to evaluate the functional importance of each N-glycosylation site, and of the cysteine-84 residue. IDS mutant cDNAs, lacking one of the eight potential N-glycosylation sites, were expressed in COS cells. Although each of the potential sites was used, none of the eight glycosylation sites appeared to be essential for lysosomal targeting. Another important sulphatase co- or post-translational modification for generating catalytic activity involves the conversion of a cysteine residue surrounded by a conserved sequence C-X-P-S-R into a 2-amino-3-oxopropionic acid residue [Schmidt, Selmer, Ingendoh and von Figura (1995) Cell 82, 271-278]. This conserved cysteine, located at amino acid position 84 in IDS, was replaced either by an alanine (C84A) or by a threonine (C84T) using site-directed mutagenesis. C84A and C84T mutant cDNAs were expressed either in COS cells or in human lymphoblastoid cells deleted for the IDS gene. C84A had a drastic effect both for IDS processing and for catalytic activity. The C84T mutation produced a small amount of mature forms but also abolished enzyme activity, confirming that the cysteine residue at position 84 is required for IDS activity. PMID:9337875

  20. High-performance targeted mass spectrometry with precision data-independent acquisition reveals site-specific glycosylation macroheterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Yeo, K Y Benjamin; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis K; Nouwens, Amanda S; Marcellin, Esteban; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2016-10-01

    Protein glycosylation is a critical post-translational modification that regulates the structure, stability, and function of many proteins. Mass spectrometry is currently the preferred method for qualitative and quantitative characterization of glycosylation. However, the inherent heterogeneity of glycosylation makes its analysis difficult. Quantification of glycosylation occupancy, or macroheterogeneity, has proven to be especially challenging. Here, we used a variation of high-resolution multiple reaction monitoring (MRM(HR)) or pseudo-MRM for targeted data-independent acquisition that we term SWAT (sequential window acquisition of targeted fragment ions). We compared the analytical performance of SWATH (sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ions), SWAT, and SRM (selected reaction monitoring) using a suite of synthetic peptides spiked at various concentrations into a complex yeast tryptic digest sample. SWAT provided superior analytical performance to SWATH in a targeted approach. We then used SWAT to measure site-specific N-glycosylation occupancy in cell wall glycoproteins from yeast with defects in the glycosylation biosynthetic machinery. SWAT provided robust measurement of occupancy at more N-glycosylation sites and with higher precision than SWATH, allowing identification of novel glycosylation sites dependent on the Ost3p and Ost6p regulatory subunits of oligosaccharyltransferase. PMID:27318240

  1. Glycosylation sites selectively interfere with alpha-toxin binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Kreienkamp, H J; Sine, S M; Maeda, R K; Taylor, P

    1994-03-18

    Sequence analysis reveals unique features in the alpha-subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from the alpha-toxin-resistant cobra and mongoose. Included are N-linked glycosylation signals just amino-terminal to the Tyr190, Cys192-Cys193 region of the ligand binding domain, substitution of Trp187 and Phe189 by non-aromatic residues and alteration of the proline sequence Pro194-X-X-Pro197. Glycosylation signals were inserted into the toxin-sensitive mouse alpha-subunit by the mutations F189N and W187N/F189T. The F189N alpha-subunit, when transfected with beta, gamma and delta, showed a 140-fold loss of alpha-bungarotoxin affinity, whereas the W187N/F189T double mutation exhibited a divergence in alpha-toxin affinities at the two sites, one class showing a 600-fold and the other showing an 11-fold reduction. The W187N mutant and the double mutant F189N/S191A lacking the requisite glycosylation signals exhibited little alteration in affinity, as did the P194L and P197H mutations. The glycosylation sites had little or no influence on binding of toxins of intermediate (alpha-conotoxin, 1500 Da) or small mass (lophotoxin, 500 Da) and of the agonist, carbamylcholine. The two sites for the binding of alpha-conotoxin M1 have widely divergent dissociation constants of 2.1 and 14,800 nM. Expression of alpha/gamma- and alpha/delta-subunit pairs indicated that the high and low affinity sites are formed by the alpha/delta and alpha/gamma contacts, respectively. PMID:7907588

  2. Hemophilia A due to mutations that create new N-glycosylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Aly, A M; Higuchi, M; Kasper, C K; Kazazian, H H; Antonarakis, S E; Hoyer, L W

    1992-01-01

    In studying the molecular defects responsible for cross-reacting material-positive hemophilia A, we have identified two patients in whom the nonfunctional factor VIII-like protein has abnormal, slower-moving heavy or light chains on SDS/PAGE. Both patients have severe hemophilia A (less than 1% of normal factor VIII activity) with a normal plasma level of factor VIII antigen. The molecular defects were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis screening of PCR-amplified products of the factor VIII-coding DNA sequence followed by nucleotide sequencing of the abnormal PCR products. In patient ARC-21, a methionine-to-threonine substitution at position 1772 in the factor VIII light chain creates a potential new N-glycosylation site at asparagine-1770. In patient ARC-22, an isoleucine-to-threonine substitution at position 566 creates a potential new N-glycosylation site at asparagine-564 in the A2 domain of the factor VIII heavy chain. The mobility of these chains on SDS/PAGE was normal after N-Glycanase digestion and procoagulant activity was generated--to a maximum of 23% and 45% of control normal plasma. Abnormal N-glycosylation, blocking factor VIII procoagulant activity, represents a newly recognized mechanism for the pathogenesis of severe hemophilia A. Images PMID:1594597

  3. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry methodology for analyzing site-specific N-glycosylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Ozohanics, Oliver; Turiák, Lilla; Puerta, Angel; Vékey, Károly; Drahos, László

    2012-10-12

    Analysis of protein glycosylation is a major challenge in biochemistry, here we present a nano-UHPLC-MS(MS) based methodology, which is suitable to determine site-specific N-glycosylation patterns. A few pmol glycoprotein is sufficient to determine glycosylation patterns (which opens the way for biomedical applications) and requires at least two separate chromatographic runs. One is using tandem mass spectrometry (for structure identification); the other single stage MS mode (for semi-quantitation). Analysis relies heavily on data processing. The previously developed GlycoMiner algorithm and software was used to identify glycopeptides in MS/MS spectra. We have developed a new algorithm and software (GlycoPattern), which evaluates single stage mass spectra, both in terms of glycopeptide identification (for minor glycoforms) and semi-quantitation. Identification of glycopeptide structures based on MS/MS analysis has a false positive rate of 1%. Minor glycoforms (when sensitivity is insufficient to obtain an MS/MS spectrum) can be identified in single stage MS using GlycoPattern; but in such a case the false positive rate is increased to 5%. Glycosylation is studied at the glycopeptide level (i.e. following proteolytic digestion). This way the sugar chains can be unequivocally assigned to a given glycosylation site (site-specific glycosylation pattern). Glycopeptide analysis has the further advantage that protein-specific glycosylation patterns can be identified in complex mixtures and not only in purified samples. This opens the way for medium high throughput analysis of glycosylation. Specific examples of site-specific glycosylation patterns of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin and on a therapeutic monoclonal antibody, Infliximab are also discussed. PMID:22677411

  4. Structure-based Comparative Analysis and Prediction of N-linked Glycosylation Sites in Evolutionarily Distant Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Phuc Vinh Nguyen; Goldman, Radoslav; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Narsule, Tejas; Simonyan, Vahan; Soika, Valerii; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-01-01

    The asparagine-X-serine/threonine (NXS/T) motif, where X is any amino acid except proline, is the consensus motif for N-linked glycosylation. Significant numbers of high-resolution crystal structures of glycosylated proteins allow us to carry out structural analysis of the N-linked glycosylation sites (NGS). Our analysis shows that there is enough structural information from diverse glycoproteins to allow the development of rules which can be used to predict NGS. A Python-based tool was developed to investigate asparagines implicated in N-glycosylation in five species: Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our analysis shows that 78% of all asparagines of NXS/T motif involved in N-glycosylation are localized in the loop/turn conformation in the human proteome. Similar distribution was revealed for all the other species examined. Comparative analysis of the occurrence of NXS/T motifs not known to be glycosylated and their reverse sequence (S/TXN) shows a similar distribution across the secondary structural elements, indicating that the NXS/T motif in itself is not biologically relevant. Based on our analysis, we have defined rules to determine NGS. Using machine learning methods based on these rules we can predict with 93% accuracy if a particular site will be glycosylated. If structural information is not available the tool uses structural prediction results resulting in 74% accuracy. The tool was used to identify glycosylation sites in 108 human proteins with structures and 2247 proteins without structures that have acquired NXS/T site/s due to non-synonymous variation. The tool, Structure Feature Analysis Tool (SFAT), is freely available to the public at http://hive.biochemistry.gwu.edu/tools/sfat. PMID:23459159

  5. Evaluation of Different N-Glycopeptide Enrichment Methods for N-Glycosylation Sites Mapping in Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengqian; Ye, Zilu; Xue, Peng; Shu, Qingbo; Zhou, Yue; Ji, Yanlong; Fu, Ying; Wang, Jifeng; Yang, Fuquan

    2016-09-01

    N-Glycosylation of proteins plays a critical role in many biological pathways. Because highly heterogeneous N-glycopeptides are present in biological sources, the enrichment procedure is a crucial step for mass spectrometry analysis. Five enrichment methods, including IP-ZIC-HILIC, hydrazide chemistry, lectin affinity, ZIC-HILIC-FA, and TiO2 affinity were evaluated and compared in the study of mapping N-glycosylation sites in mouse brain. On the basis of our results, the identified N-glycosylation sites were 1891, 1241, 891, 869, and 710 and the FDR values were 3.29, 5.62, 9.54, 9.54, and 20.02%, respectively. Therefore, IP-ZIC-HILIC enrichment method displayed the highest sensitivity and specificity. In this work, we identified a total of 3446 unique glycosylation sites conforming to the N-glycosylation consensus motif (N-X-T/S/C; X ≠ P) with (18)O labeling in 1597 N-glycoproteins. N-glycosylation site information was used to confirm or correct the transmembrane topology of the 57 novel transmembrane N-glycoproteins. PMID:27480293

  6. Tissue-specific N-glycosylation, site-specific oligosaccharide patterns and lentil lectin recognition of rat Thy-1.

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, R B; Tse, A G; Dwek, R A; Williams, A F; Rademacher, T W

    1987-01-01

    To examine the extent to which protein structure and tissue-type influence glycosylation, we have determined the oligosaccharide structures at each of the three glycosylation sites (Asn-23, 74 and 98) of the cell surface glycoprotein Thy-1 isolated from rat brain and thymus. The results show that there is tissue-specificity of glycosylation and that superimposed on this is a significant degree of site-specificity. On the basis of the site distribution of oligosaccharides, we find that no Thy-1 molecules are in common between the two tissues despite the amino acid sequences being identical. We suggest, therefore, that by controlling N-glycosylation a tissue creates an unique set of glycoforms (same polypeptide but with oligosaccharides that differ either in sequence or disposition). The structures at each of the three sites were also determined for the thymocyte Thy-1 that binds to lentil lectin (Thy-1 L+) and for that which does not (Thy-1 L-). Segregation of intact thymus Thy-1 into two distinct sets of glycoforms by lentil lectin was found to be due to the structures at site 74. Analysis of oligosaccharide structures at the 'passenger' sites (23 and 98) suggests that either Thy-1 L+ and Thy-1 L- molecules are made in different cell-types or that the biosynthesis of oligosaccharides at one site is influenced by the glycosylation at other sites. PMID:2886334

  7. Extreme C-terminal sites are posttranslocationally glycosylated by the STT3B isoform of the OST

    PubMed Central

    Shrimal, Shiteshu; Trueman, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Metazoan organisms assemble two isoforms of the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) that have different catalytic subunits (STT3A or STT3B) and partially nonoverlapping roles in asparagine-linked glycosylation. The STT3A isoform of the OST is primarily responsible for co-translational glycosylation of the nascent polypeptide as it enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The C-terminal 65–75 residues of a glycoprotein will not contact the translocation channel–associated STT3A isoform of the OST complex before chain termination. Biosynthetic pulse labeling of five human glycoproteins showed that extreme C-terminal glycosylation sites were modified by an STT3B-dependent posttranslocational mechanism. The boundary for STT3B-dependent glycosylation of C-terminal sites was determined to fall between 50 and 55 residues from the C terminus of a protein. C-terminal NXT sites were glycosylated more rapidly and efficiently than C-terminal NXS sites. Bioinformatics analysis of glycopeptide databases from metazoan organisms revealed a lower density of C-terminal acceptor sites in glycoproteins because of reduced positive selection of NXT sites and negative selection of NXS sites. PMID:23530066

  8. Structural characterization of the N-glycan moiety and site of glycosylation in vitellogenin from the decapod crustacean Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Khalaila, Isam; Peter-Katalinic, Jasna; Tsang, Clarence; Radcliffe, Catherine M; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Harvey, David J; Dwek, Raymond A; Rudd, Pauline M; Sagi, Amir

    2004-09-01

    Glycosylation is of importance for the structure and function of proteins. In the case of vitellin (Vt), a ubiquitous protein accumulated into granules as the main yolk protein constituent of oocytes during oogenesis, glycosylation could be of importantance for the folding, processing and transport of the protein to the yolk and also provides a source of carbohydrate during embryogenesis. Vt from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus is synthesized as a precursor protein, vitellogenin (Vg), in the hepatopancreas, transferred to the hemolymph, and mobilized into the growing oocyte via receptor-mediated endocytosis. The gene sequence of C. quadricarinatus shows a 2584-amino-acid protein with 10 putative glycosylation sites. In this study a combined approach of lectin immunoblotting, in-gel deglycosylation, and mass spectrometry was used to identify the glycosylation sites and probe the structure of the glycan moieties using C. quadricarinatus Vg as a model system. Three of the consensus sites for N-glycosylation-namely, Asn(152), Asn(160) and Asn(2493)-were glycosylated with the high-mannose glycans, Man(5-9)GlcNAc(2), and the glucose-capped oligosaccharide Glc(1)Man(9)GlcNAc(2). PMID:15175255

  9. Evolutionary interactions between N-linked glycosylation sites in the HIV-1 envelope.

    PubMed

    Poon, Art F Y; Lewis, Fraser I; Pond, Sergei L Kosakovsky; Frost, Simon D W

    2007-01-19

    The addition of asparagine (N)-linked polysaccharide chains (i.e., glycans) to the gp120 and gp41 glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope is not only required for correct protein folding, but also may provide protection against neutralizing antibodies as a "glycan shield." As a result, strong host-specific selection is frequently associated with codon positions where nonsynonymous substitutions can create or disrupt potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGSs). Moreover, empirical data suggest that the individual contribution of PNGSs to the neutralization sensitivity or infectivity of HIV-1 may be critically dependent on the presence or absence of other PNGSs in the envelope sequence. Here we evaluate how glycan-glycan interactions have shaped the evolution of HIV-1 envelope sequences by analyzing the distribution of PNGSs in a large-sequence alignment. Using a "covarion"-type phylogenetic model, we find that the rates at which individual PNGSs are gained or lost vary significantly over time, suggesting that the selective advantage of having a PNGS may depend on the presence or absence of other PNGSs in the sequence. Consequently, we identify specific interactions between PNGSs in the alignment using a new paired-character phylogenetic model of evolution, and a Bayesian graphical model. Despite the fundamental differences between these two methods, several interactions are jointly identified by both. Mapping these interactions onto a structural model of HIV-1 gp120 reveals that negative (exclusive) interactions occur significantly more often between colocalized glycans, while positive (inclusive) interactions are restricted to more distant glycans. Our results imply that the adaptive repertoire of alternative configurations in the HIV-1 glycan shield is limited by functional interactions between the N-linked glycans. This represents a potential vulnerability of rapidly evolving HIV-1 populations that may provide useful glycan

  10. Parallel data acquisition of in-source fragmented glycopeptides to sequence the glycosylation sites of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingfu; Song, Ehwang; Zhu, Rui; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation plays important roles in maintaining protein stability and controlling biological processes. In recent years, the correlation between aberrant glycoproteins and many diseases has been reported. Hence, qualitative and quantitative analyses of glycoproteins are necessary to understand physiological processes. LC-MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides is faced with the low glycopeptide signal intensities and low peptide sequence identification. In our study, in-source fragmentation (ISF) was used in conjunction with LC-MS/MS to facilitate the parallel acquisition of peptide backbone sequence and glycan composition information. In ISF method, the identification of glycosylation sites depended on the detection of Y1 ion (ion of peptide backbone with an N-acetylglucosamine attached). To attain dominant Y1 ions, a range of source fragmentation voltages was studied using fetuin. A 45 V ISF voltage was found to be the most efficient voltage for the analysis of glycoproteins. ISF was employed to study the glycosylation sites of three model glycoproteins, including fetuin, α1-acid glycoprotein and porcine thyroglobulin. The approach was then used to analyze blood serum samples. Y1 ions of glycopeptides in tryptic digests of samples were detected. Y1 ions of glycopeptides with different sialic acid groups are observed at different retention times, representing the various numbers of sialic acid moieties associated with the same peptide backbone sequence. With ISF facilitating the peptide backbone sequencing of glycopeptides, identified peptide sequence coverage was increased. For example, identified fetuin sequence percentage was improved from 39 to 80% in MASCOT database searching compared to conventional CID method. The formation of Y1 ions and oxonium ions in ISF facilitates glycopeptide sequencing and glycan composition identification. PMID:26957414

  11. O-glycosylation sites identified from mucin core-1 type glycopeptides from human serum.

    PubMed

    Darula, Zsuzsanna; Sarnyai, Farkas; Medzihradszky, Katalin F

    2016-06-01

    In this work O-linked glycopeptides bearing mucin core-1 type structures were enriched from human serum. Since about 70 % of the O-glycans in human serum bind to the plant lectin Jacalin, we tested a previously successful protocol that combined Jacalin affinity enrichment on the protein- and peptide-level with ERLIC chromatography as a further enrichment step in between, to eliminate the high background of unmodified peptides. In parallel, we developed a simpler and significantly faster new workflow that used two lectins sequentially: wheat germ agglutinin and then Jacalin. The first lectin provides general glycopeptide enrichment, while the second specifically enriches O-linked glycopeptides with Galβ1-3GalNAcα structures. Mass spectrometric analysis of enriched samples showed that the new sample preparation method is more selective and sensitive than the former. Altogether, 52 unique glycosylation sites in 20 proteins were identified in this study. PMID:26729242

  12. Synthetic glycosylation of proteins using N-(beta-saccharide) iodoacetamides: applications in site-specific glycosylation and solid-phase enzymic oligosaccharide synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S Y; Guile, G R; Dwek, R A; Arsequell, G

    1994-01-01

    A simple and efficient synthetic glycosylation method suitable for use in solid-phase enzymic oligosaccharide synthesis and site-specific glycosylation of recombinant proteins to produce defined glycoforms is described. This strategy utilizes N-(beta-saccharide) haloacetamides for attaching oligosaccharides specifically to cysteine residues of proteins in solution to form neoglycoproteins. The alkylation reaction was tested using N-(beta-chitotriose) bromoacetamide and an unprotected synthetic hexapeptide containing a single cysteine residue. The glycosylated product was confirmed by amino acid and hexosamine analyses as well as laser desorption mass spectrometry. Similarly N-(beta-chitotriose) iodoacetamide was covalently linked to non-reduced BSA to produce a defined glycoform of this protein. The specific attachment of chitotriose at the single cysteine residue in non-reduced serum albumin was suggested by Ellman's assay for free thiols. This was verified by amino acid sequencing of tryptic glycopeptide derived from this neoglycoprotein. Multiple sugar attachment was accomplished using fully reduced serum albumin as demonstrated by the formation of two neoglycoproteins using iodoacetamide derivatives of galactose beta 1-3-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal beta 1-3GalNAc) and the major xylose/fucose-class plant-type oligosaccharide of horseradish peroxidase. These two neoglycoproteins with an average of 18-21 sugar residues attached were assayed positively for binding to peanut agglutinin and a sugar-specific anti-(horseradish peroxidase) monoclonal antibody YZ1/2.23 respectively. Sialylation of the neoglycoprotein containing Gal beta 1-3GalNAc was accomplished using alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase and radiolabelled CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid. Significantly, glycan attachment using this conjugation method is reversible as demonstrated by the release of oligosaccharides from these two neoglycoproteins using hydrazinolysis. Therefore this method could provide invaluable

  13. Low hygroscopic spray-dried powders with trans-glycosylated food additives enhance the solubility and oral bioavailability of ipriflavone.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Miki; Kadota, Kazunori; Kato, Kouki; Seto, Yoshiki; Onoue, Satomi; Sato, Hideyuki; Ueda, Hiroshi; Tozuka, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The improvement in the solubility and dissolution rate may promote a superior absorption property towards the human body. The spray-dried powders (SDPs) of ipriflavone, which was used as a model hydrophobic flavone, with trans-glycosylated rutin (Rutin-G) showed the highest solubilizing effect of ipriflavone among three types of trans-glycosylated food additives. The SDPs of ipriflavone with Rutin-G have both a significant higher dissolution rate and solubility enhancement of ipriflavone. This spray-dried formulation of ipriflavone with Rutin-G exhibited a low hygroscopicity as a critical factor in product preservation. In addition, an improvement in the oral absorption of ipriflavone was achieved by means of preparing composite particles of ipriflavone/Rutin-G via spray drying, indicating a 4.3-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve compared with that of untreated ipriflavone. These phenomena could be applicable to food ingredients involving hydrophobic flavones for producing healthy food with a high quality. PMID:26213075

  14. Glycosylation of Skeletal Calsequestrin

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Emiliano J.; Lewis, Kevin M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Nissen, Mark S.; Kang, ChulHee

    2012-01-01

    Calsequestrin (CASQ) serves as a major Ca2+ storage/buffer protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). When purified from skeletal muscle, CASQ1 is obtained in its glycosylated form. Here, we have confirmed the specific site and degree of glycosylation of native rabbit CASQ1 and have investigated its effect on critical properties of CASQ by comparison with the non-glycosylated recombinant form. Based on our comparative approach utilizing crystal structures, Ca2+ binding capacities, analytical ultracentrifugation, and light-scattering profiles of the native and recombinant rabbit CASQ1, we propose a novel and dynamic role for glycosylation in CASQ. CASQ undergoes a unique degree of mannose trimming as it is trafficked from the proximal endoplasmic reticulum to the SR. The major glycoform of CASQ (GlcNAc2Man9) found in the proximal endoplasmic reticulum can severely hinder formation of the back-to-back interface, potentially preventing premature Ca2+-dependent polymerization of CASQ and ensuring its continuous mobility to the SR. Only trimmed glycans can stabilize both front-to-front and the back-to-back interfaces of CASQ through extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions. Therefore, the mature glycoform of CASQ (GlcNAc2Man1–4) within the SR can be retained upon establishing a functional high capacity Ca2+ binding polymer. In addition, based on the high resolution structures, we propose a molecular mechanism for the catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT2) mutation, K206N. PMID:22170046

  15. Exploring Site-Specific N-Glycosylation Microheterogeneity of Haptoglobin using Glycopeptide CID Tandem Mass Spectra and Glycan Database Search

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Kevin Brown; Pompach, Petr; Goldman, Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation is a common protein modification with a significant role in many vital cellular processes and human diseases, making the characterization of protein-attached glycan structures important for understanding cell biology and disease processes. Direct analysis of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry of glycopeptides promises site-specific elucidation of N-glycan microheterogeneity, something which detached N-glycan and de-glycosylated peptide analyses cannot provide. However, successful implementation of direct N-glycopeptide analysis by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenge. In this work, we consider algorithmic techniques for the analysis of LC-MS/MS data acquired from glycopeptide-enriched fractions of enzymatic digests of purified proteins. We implement a computational strategy which takes advantage of the properties of CID fragmentation spectra of N-glycopeptides, matching the MS/MS spectra to peptide-glycan pairs from protein sequences and glycan structure databases. Significantly, we also propose a novel false-discovery-rate estimation technique to estimate and manage the number of false identifications. We use a human glycoprotein standard, haptoglobin, digested with trypsin and GluC, enriched for glycopeptides using HILIC chromatography, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS to demonstrate our algorithmic strategy and evaluate its performance. Our software, GlycoPeptideSearch (GPS), assigned glycopeptide identifications to 246 of the spectra at false-discovery-rate 5.58%, identifying 42 distinct haptoglobin peptide-glycan pairs at each of the four haptoglobin N-linked glycosylation sites. We further demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by analyzing plasma-derived haptoglobin, identifying 136 N-linked glycopeptide spectra at false-discovery-rate 0.4%, representing 15 distinct glycopeptides on at least three of the four N-linked glycosylation sites. The software, GlycoPeptideSearch, is available for download from http

  16. Integrated GlycoProteome Analyzer (I-GPA) for Automated Identification and Quantitation of Site-Specific N-Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Heeyoun; Lee, Ju Yeon; Ahn, Young Hee; Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Jeong, Hoi Keun; Yun, Ki Na; Kim, Yong-Sam; Ko, Jeong-Heon; An, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Han; Paik, Young-Ki; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2016-01-01

    Human glycoproteins exhibit enormous heterogeneity at each N-glycosite, but few studies have attempted to globally characterize the site-specific structural features. We have developed Integrated GlycoProteome Analyzer (I-GPA) including mapping system for complex N-glycoproteomes, which combines methods for tandem mass spectrometry with a database search and algorithmic suite. Using an N-glycopeptide database that we constructed, we created novel scoring algorithms with decoy glycopeptides, where 95 N-glycopeptides from standard α1-acid glycoprotein were identified with 0% false positives, giving the same results as manual validation. Additionally automated label-free quantitation method was first developed that utilizes the combined intensity of top three isotope peaks at three highest MS spectral points. The efficiency of I-GPA was demonstrated by automatically identifying 619 site-specific N-glycopeptides with FDR ≤ 1%, and simultaneously quantifying 598 N-glycopeptides, from human plasma samples that are known to contain highly glycosylated proteins. Thus, I-GPA platform could make a major breakthrough in high-throughput mapping of complex N-glycoproteomes, which can be applied to biomarker discovery and ongoing global human proteome project. PMID:26883985

  17. Integrated GlycoProteome Analyzer (I-GPA) for Automated Identification and Quantitation of Site-Specific N-Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Heeyoun; Lee, Ju Yeon; Ahn, Young Hee; Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Jeong, Hoi Keun; Yun, Ki Na; Kim, Yong-Sam; Ko, Jeong-Heon; An, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Han; Paik, Young-Ki; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2016-01-01

    Human glycoproteins exhibit enormous heterogeneity at each N-glycosite, but few studies have attempted to globally characterize the site-specific structural features. We have developed Integrated GlycoProteome Analyzer (I-GPA) including mapping system for complex N-glycoproteomes, which combines methods for tandem mass spectrometry with a database search and algorithmic suite. Using an N-glycopeptide database that we constructed, we created novel scoring algorithms with decoy glycopeptides, where 95 N-glycopeptides from standard α1-acid glycoprotein were identified with 0% false positives, giving the same results as manual validation. Additionally automated label-free quantitation method was first developed that utilizes the combined intensity of top three isotope peaks at three highest MS spectral points. The efficiency of I-GPA was demonstrated by automatically identifying 619 site-specific N-glycopeptides with FDR ≤ 1%, and simultaneously quantifying 598 N-glycopeptides, from human plasma samples that are known to contain highly glycosylated proteins. Thus, I-GPA platform could make a major breakthrough in high-throughput mapping of complex N-glycoproteomes, which can be applied to biomarker discovery and ongoing global human proteome project. PMID:26883985

  18. Prediction of mucin-type O-glycosylation sites in mammalian proteins using the composition of k-spaced amino acid pairs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong-Zi; Tang, Yu-Rong; Sheng, Zhi-Ya; Zhang, Ziding

    2008-01-01

    Background As one of the most common protein post-translational modifications, glycosylation is involved in a variety of important biological processes. Computational identification of glycosylation sites in protein sequences becomes increasingly important in the post-genomic era. A new encoding scheme was employed to improve the prediction of mucin-type O-glycosylation sites in mammalian proteins. Results A new protein bioinformatics tool, CKSAAP_OGlySite, was developed to predict mucin-type O-glycosylation serine/threonine (S/T) sites in mammalian proteins. Using the composition of k-spaced amino acid pairs (CKSAAP) based encoding scheme, the proposed method was trained and tested in a new and stringent O-glycosylation dataset with the assistance of Support Vector Machine (SVM). When the ratio of O-glycosylation to non-glycosylation sites in training datasets was set as 1:1, 10-fold cross-validation tests showed that the proposed method yielded a high accuracy of 83.1% and 81.4% in predicting O-glycosylated S and T sites, respectively. Based on the same datasets, CKSAAP_OGlySite resulted in a higher accuracy than the conventional binary encoding based method (about +5.0%). When trained and tested in 1:5 datasets, the CKSAAP encoding showed a more significant improvement than the binary encoding. We also merged the training datasets of S and T sites and integrated the prediction of S and T sites into one single predictor (i.e. S+T predictor). Either in 1:1 or 1:5 datasets, the performance of this S+T predictor was always slightly better than those predictors where S and T sites were independently predicted, suggesting that the molecular recognition of O-glycosylated S/T sites seems to be similar and the increase of the S+T predictor's accuracy may be a result of expanded training datasets. Moreover, CKSAAP_OGlySite was also shown to have better performance when benchmarked against two existing predictors. Conclusion Because of CKSAAP encoding's ability of

  19. Rates of processing of the high mannose oligosaccharide units at the three glycosylation sites of mouse thyrotropin and the two sites of free alpha-subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Y.; Perkel, V.S.; Magner, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    We have determined the structures of high mannose (Man) oligosaccharide units at individual glycosylation sites of mouse TSH. Mouse thyrotropic tumor tissue was incubated with D-(2-/sup 3/H)Man with or without (/sup 14/C)tyrosine ((/sup 14/C) Tyr) for 2, 3, or 6 h, and for a 3-h pulse followed by a 2-h chase. TSH heterodimers or free alpha-subunits were obtained from homogenates using specific antisera. After reduction and alkylation, subunits were treated with trypsin. The tryptic fragments were then loaded on a reverse phase HPLC column to separate tryptic fragments bearing labeled oligosaccharides. The N-linked oligosaccharides were released with endoglycosidase-H and analyzed by paper chromatography. Man9GlcNac2 and Man8GlcNac2 units predominated at each time point and at each specific glycosylation site, but the processing of high Man oligosaccharides differed at each glycosylation site. The processing at Asn23 of TSH beta-subunits was slower than that at Asn56 or Asn82 of alpha-subunits. The processing at Asn82 was slightly faster than that at Asn56 for both alpha-subunits of TSH heterodimers and free alpha-subunits. The present study demonstrates that the early processing of oligosaccharides differs at the individual glycosylation sites of TSH and free alpha-subunits, perhaps because of local conformational differences.

  20. Posttranslational modifications of bovine osteopontin: identification of twenty-eight phosphorylation and three O-glycosylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, E. S.; Højrup, P.; Petersen, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multiphosphorylated glycoprotein found in bone and other normal and malignant tissues, as well as in the physiological fluids urine and milk. The present study demonstrates that bovine milk osteopontin is phosphorylated at 27 serine residues and 1 threonine residue. Phosphoamino acids were identified by a combination of amino acid analysis, sequence analysis of S-ethylcysteine-derivatized phosphopeptides, and mass spectrometric analysis. Twenty-five phosphoserines and one phosphothreonine were located in Ser/Thr-X-Glu/Ser(P)/Asp motifs, and two phosphoserines were found in the sequence Ser-X-X-Glu/Ser(P). These sequence motifs are identical with the recognition sequences of mammary gland casein kinase and casein kinase II, respectively. Examination of the phosphorylation pattern revealed that the phosphorylations were clustered in groups of approximately three spanned by unphosphorylated regions of 11-32 amino acids. This pattern is probably of importance in the multiple functions of OPN involving interaction with Ca2+ and inorganic calcium salts. Furthermore, three O-glycosylated threonines (Thr 115, Thr 124, and Thr 129) have been identified in a threonine- and proline-rich region of the protein. Three putative N-glycosylation sites (Asn 63, Asn 85, and Asn 193) are present in bovine osteopontin, but sequence and mass spectrometric analysis showed that none of these asparagines were glycosylated in bovine mammary gland osteopontin. Alignment analysis showed that the majority of the phosphorylation sites in bovine osteopontin as well as all three O-glycosylation sites were conserved in other mammalian sequences. This conservation of serines, even in otherwise less well-conserved regions of the protein, indicates that the phosphorylation of osteopontin at specific sites is essential for the function of the protein. PMID:8535240

  1. Influence of surface charge, binding site residues and glycosylation on Thielavia terrestris cutinase biochemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shirke, Abhijit N; Basore, Danielle; Holton, Samantha; Su, An; Baugh, Evan; Butterfoss, Glenn L; Makhatadze, George; Bystroff, Christopher; Gross, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Cutinases are esterases of industrial importance for applications in recycling and surface modification of polyesters. The cutinase from Thielavia terrestris (TtC) is distinct in terms of its ability to retain its stability and activity in acidic pH. Stability and activity in acidic pHs are desirable for esterases as the pH of the reaction tends to go down with the generation of acid. The pH stability and activity are governed by the charged state of the residues involved in catalysis or in substrate binding. In this study, we performed the detailed structural and biochemical characterization of TtC coupled with surface charge analysis to understand its acidic tolerance. The stability of TtC in acidic pH was rationalized by evaluating the contribution of charge interactions to the Gibbs free energy of unfolding at varying pHs. The activity of TtC was found to be limited by substrate binding affinity, which is a function of the surface charge. Additionally, the presence of glycosylation affects the biochemical characteristics of TtC owing to steric interactions with residues involved in substrate binding. PMID:26758295

  2. Physical stability comparisons of IgG1-Fc variants: effects of N-glycosylation site occupancy and Asp/Gln residues at site Asn 297.

    PubMed

    Alsenaidy, Mohammad A; Okbazghi, Solomon Z; Kim, Jae Hyun; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Tolbert, Thomas J; Volkin, David B

    2014-06-01

    The structural integrity and conformational stability of various IgG1-Fc proteins produced from the yeast Pichia pastoris with different glycosylation site occupancy (di-, mono-, and nonglycosylated) were determined. In addition, the physical stability profiles of three different forms of nonglycosylated Fc molecules (varying amino-acid residues at site 297 in the CH 2 domain due to the point mutations and enzymatic digestion of the Fc glycoforms) were also examined. The physical stability of these IgG1-Fc glycoproteins was examined as a function of pH and temperature by high-throughput biophysical analysis using multiple techniques combined with data visualization tools (three index empirical phase diagrams and radar charts). Across the pH range of 4.0-6.0, the di- and monoglycosylated forms of the IgG1-Fc showed the highest and lowest levels of physical stability, respectively, with the nonglycosylated forms showing intermediate stability depending on solution pH. In the aglycosylated Fc proteins, the introduction of Asp (D) residues at site 297 (QQ vs. DN vs. DD forms) resulted in more subtle changes in structural integrity and physical stability depending on solution pH. The utility of evaluating the conformational stability profile differences between the various IgG1-Fc glycoproteins is discussed in the context of analytical comparability studies. PMID:24740840

  3. Exploring site-specific N-glycosylation microheterogeneity of haptoglobin using glycopeptide CID tandem mass spectra and glycan database search.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Kevin Brown; Pompach, Petr; Goldman, Radoslav; Edwards, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    Glycosylation is a common protein modification with a significant role in many vital cellular processes and human diseases, making the characterization of protein-attached glycan structures important for understanding cell biology and disease processes. Direct analysis of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry of glycopeptides promises site-specific elucidation of N-glycan microheterogeneity, something that detached N-glycan and deglycosylated peptide analyses cannot provide. However, successful implementation of direct N-glycopeptide analysis by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenge. In this work, we consider algorithmic techniques for the analysis of LC-MS/MS data acquired from glycopeptide-enriched fractions of enzymatic digests of purified proteins. We implement a computational strategy that takes advantage of the properties of CID fragmentation spectra of N-glycopeptides, matching the MS/MS spectra to peptide-glycan pairs from protein sequences and glycan structure databases. Significantly, we also propose a novel false discovery rate estimation technique to estimate and manage the number of false identifications. We use a human glycoprotein standard, haptoglobin, digested with trypsin and GluC, enriched for glycopeptides using HILIC chromatography, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS to demonstrate our algorithmic strategy and evaluate its performance. Our software, GlycoPeptideSearch (GPS), assigned glycopeptide identifications to 246 of the spectra at a false discovery rate of 5.58%, identifying 42 distinct haptoglobin peptide-glycan pairs at each of the four haptoglobin N-linked glycosylation sites. We further demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by analyzing plasma-derived haptoglobin, identifying 136 N-linked glycopeptide spectra at a false discovery rate of 0.4%, representing 15 distinct glycopeptides on at least three of the four N-linked glycosylation sites. The software, GlycoPeptideSearch, is available for download from http

  4. Mutation of a Single Envelope N-Linked Glycosylation Site Enhances the Pathogenicity of Bovine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, Amel Baya; Jacques, Jean-Rock; Cosse, Jean-Philippe; Gillet, Nicolas; Callebaut, Isabelle; Reichert, Michal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have coevolved with their host to ensure efficient replication and transmission without inducing excessive pathogenicity that would indirectly impair their persistence. This is exemplified by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) system in which lymphoproliferative disorders develop in ruminants after latency periods of several years. In principle, the equilibrium reached between the virus and its host could be disrupted by emergence of more pathogenic strains. Intriguingly but fortunately, such a hyperpathogenic BLV strain was never observed in the field or designed in vitro. In this study, we sought to understand the role of envelope N-linked glycosylation with the hypothesis that this posttranslational modification could either favor BLV infection by allowing viral entry or allow immune escape by using glycans as a shield. Using reverse genetics of an infectious molecular provirus, we identified a N-linked envelope glycosylation site (N230) that limits viral replication and pathogenicity. Indeed, mutation N230E unexpectedly leads to enhanced fusogenicity and protein stability. IMPORTANCE Infection by retroviruses requires the interaction of the viral envelope protein (SU) with a membrane-associated receptor allowing fusion and release of the viral genomic RNA into the cell. We show that N-linked glycosylation of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) SU protein is, as expected, essential for cell infection in vitro. Consistently, mutation of all glycosylation sites of a BLV provirus destroys infectivity in vivo. However, single mutations do not significantly modify replication in vivo. Instead, a particular mutation at SU codon 230 increases replication and accelerates pathogenesis. This unexpected observation has important consequences in terms of disease control and managing. PMID:26085161

  5. Stabilization of bacterially expressed erythropoietin by single site-specific introduction of short branched PEG chains at naturally occurring glycosylation sites.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E; Streichert, K; Nischan, N; Seitz, C; Brunner, T; Schwagerus, S; Hackenberger, C P R; Rubini, M

    2016-05-24

    The covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to therapeutic proteins can improve their physicochemical properties. In this work we utilized the non-natural amino acid p-azidophenylalanine (pAzF) in combination with the chemoselective Staudinger-phosphite reaction to install branched PEG chains to recombinant unglycosylated erythropoietin (EPO) at each single naturally occurring glycosylation site. PEGylation with two short 750 or 2000 Da PEG units at positions 24, 38, or 83 significantly decreased unspecific aggregation and proteolytic degradation while biological activity in vitro was preserved or even increased in comparison to full-glycosylated EPO. This site-specific bioconjugation approach permits to analyse the impact of PEGylation at single positions. These results represent an important step towards the engineering of site-specifically modified EPO variants from bacterial expression with increased therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26776361

  6. Glycosylation Substrate Specificity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 Pilin*S

    PubMed Central

    Horzempa, Joseph; Comer, Jason E.; Davis, Sheila A.; Castric, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The β-carbon of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 pilin C-terminal Ser is a site of glycosylation. The present study was conducted to determine the pilin structures necessary for glycosylation. It was found that although Thr could be tolerated at the pilin C terminus, the blocking of the Ser carboxyl group with the addition of an Ala prevented glycosylation. Pilin from strain PA103 was not glycosylated by P. aeruginosa 1244, even when the C-terminal residue was converted to Ser. Substituting the disulfide loop region of strain PA103 pilin with that of strain 1244 allowed glycosylation to take place. Neither conversion of 1244 pilin disulfide loop Cys residues to Ala nor the deletion of segments of this structure prevented glycosylation. It was noted that the PA103 pilin disulfide loop environment was electronegative, whereas that of strain 1244 pilin had an overall positive charge. Insertion of a positive charge into the PA103 pilin disulfide loop of a mutant containing Ser at the C terminus allowed glycosylation to take place. Extending the “tail” region of the PA103 mutant pilin containing Ser at its terminus resulted in robust glycosylation. These results suggest that the terminal Ser is the major pilin glycosylation recognition feature and that this residue cannot be substituted at its carboxyl group. Although no other specific recognition features are present, the pilin surface must be compatible with the reaction apparatus for glycosylation to occur. PMID:16286455

  7. Mapping of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator membrane topology by glycosylation site insertion.

    PubMed

    Chang, X B; Hou, Y X; Jensen, T J; Riordan, J R

    1994-07-15

    Technical difficulties in obtaining three-dimensional structures of intrinsic membrane proteins continues to limit understanding of their function. However, considerable insight can be gained from their two-dimensional topological arrangement in the lipid bilayer. Efficient molecular genetic approaches are available to discern the topology of prokaryotic but not of eukaryotic membrane proteins. The absolute asymmetry of the sidedness of their N-glycosylation was employed here to develop such a method using the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Insertion by in vitro mutagenesis of N-glycosylation consensus sequences (NXS/T) in predicted cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic loops between hydrophobic sequences capable of traversing the membrane established the membrane topology of CFTR. This provides the first experimental evaluation of the original topological model of CFTR based solely on hydropathy algorithms and a method which may be generally applicable for the in vivo evaluation of the topology of other mammalian membrane proteins. PMID:7518437

  8. Analysis of glycosylation motifs and glycosyltransferases in Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Tabish, Syed; Raza, Abbas; Nasir, Arshan; Zafar, Sadia; Bokhari, Habib

    2011-01-01

    The process of glycosylation has been studied extensively in prokaryotes but many questions still remain unanswered. Glycosyltransferase is the enzyme which mediates glycosylation and has its preference for the target glycosylation sites as well as for the type of glycosylation i.e. N-linked and O-linked glycosylation. In this study we carried out the bioinformatics analysis of one of the key enzymes of pgl locus from Campylobacter jejuni, known as PglB, which is distributed widely in bacteria and AglB from archaea. Relatively little sequence similarity was observed in the archaeal AglB(s) as compared to those of the bacterial PglB(s). In addition we tried to the answer the question of as to why not all the sequins Asp-X-Ser/Thr have an equal opportunity to be glycosylated by looking at the influence of the neighboring amino acids but no significant conserved pattern of the flanking sites could be identified. The software tool was developed to predict the potential glycosylation sites in autotransporter protein, the virulence factors of gram negative bacteria, and our results revealed that the frequency of glycosylation sites was higher in adhesins (a subclass of autotransporters) relative to the other classes of autotransporters. PMID:21738312

  9. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation Characterization of Windmill Palm Tree Peroxidase Using Novel Tools for Analysis of Plant Glycopeptide Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Tabb, David L; Ching, Travers; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Sakharov, Ivan Y; Li, Qing X

    2016-06-01

    Plant secretory (Class III) peroxidases are redox enzymes that rely on N-glycosylation for full enzyme activity and stability. Peroxidases from palm tree leaves comprise the most stable and active plant peroxidases characterized to date. Herein, site-specific glycosylation and microheterogeneity of windmill palm tree (Trachycarpus fortunei) peroxidase are reported. The workflow developed in this study includes novel tools, written in R, to aid plant glycan identification, pGlycoFilter, for annotation of glycopeptide fragmentation spectra, gPSMvalidator, and for relative quantitation of glycoforms, glycoRQ. Mass spectrometry analysis provided a detailed glycosylation profile at the 13 sites of N-linked glycosylation on windmill palm tree peroxidase. Glycan microheterogeneity was observed at each site. Site Asn211 was the most heterogeneous and contained 30 different glycans. Relative quantitation revealed 90% of each glycosylation site was occupied by three or fewer glycans, and two of the 13 sites were partially unoccupied. Although complex and hybrid glycans were identified, the majority of glycans were paucimannosidic, characteristic of plant vacuolar glycoproteins. Further studies pertaining to the glycan structure-activity relationships in plant peroxidases can benefit from the work outlined here. PMID:27151270

  10. Automated assignments of N- and O-site specific glycosylation with extensive glycan heterogeneity of glycoprotein mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Strum, John S.; Nwosu, Charles C.; Hua, Serenus; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Seipert, Richard R.; Bachelor, Robert J.; An, Hyun Joo; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific glycosylation (SSG) of glycoproteins remains a considerable challenge and limits further progress in the areas of proteomics and glycomics. Effective methods require new approaches in sample preparation, detection, and data analysis. While the field has advanced in sample preparation and detection, automated data analysis remains an important goal. A new bioinformatics approach implemented in software called GP Finder automatically distinguishes correct assignments from random matches and compliments experimental techniques that are optimal for glycopeptides, including non-specific proteolysis and high mass resolution LC/MS/MS. SSG for multiple N- and O-glycosylation sites, including extensive glycan heterogeneity, was annotated for single proteins and protein mixtures with a 5% false-discovery rate, generating hundreds of non-random glycopeptide matches and demonstrating the proof-of-concept for a self-consistency scoring algorithm shown to be compliant with the target-decoy approach (TDA). The approach was further applied to a mixture of N-glycoproteins from unprocessed human milk and O-glycoproteins from very-low-density-lipoprotein (vLDL) particles. PMID:23662732

  11. A study of the effects of altering the sites for N-glycosylation in alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor variants M and S.

    PubMed Central

    Samandari, T.; Brown, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    alpha-1-Proteinase inhibitor (A1Pi) is a monomeric secreted protein glycosylated at asparagines 46, 83, and 247. For this study cDNAs for M (normal) and S (Glu264-->Val) variants of A1Pi were altered by site-directed mutagenesis to produce the combinations of single, double, and triple mutants that can be generated by changing the codons normally specifying these Asn residues to encode Gln. The fates of the mutant proteins were followed in transiently transfected COS-1 cells. All variants with altered glycosylation sites are secreted at reduced rates, are partially degraded, accumulate intracellularly, and some form Nonidet P-40-insoluble aggregates. The carbohydrate attached at Asn83 seems to be of particular importance to the export of both A1PiM and A1PiS from the endoplasmic reticulum. All mutations affecting glycosylation of A1PiS notably reduce secretion, cause formation of insoluble aggregates, and influence degradation of the altered proteins. The variant of A1PiS missing all three glycosylation sites is poorly secreted, is incompletely degraded, and accumulates in unusual perinuclear vesicles. These studies show that N-linked oligosaccharides in A1Pi are vital to its efficient export from the endoplasmic reticulum and that the consequences of changing the normal pattern of glycosylation vary depending upon the sites altered and the variant of A1Pi bearing these alterations. PMID:8401226

  12. Human plasma protein N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Florent; Reiding, Karli R; Jansen, Bas C; Kammeijer, Guinevere S M; Bondt, Albert; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation is the most abundant and complex protein modification, and can have a profound structural and functional effect on the conjugate. The oligosaccharide fraction is recognized to be involved in multiple biological processes, and to affect proteins physical properties, and has consequentially been labeled a critical quality attribute of biopharmaceuticals. Additionally, due to recent advances in analytical methods and analysis software, glycosylation is targeted in the search for disease biomarkers for early diagnosis and patient stratification. Biofluids such as saliva, serum or plasma are of great use in this regard, as they are easily accessible and can provide relevant glycosylation information. Thus, as the assessment of protein glycosylation is becoming a major element in clinical and biopharmaceutical research, this review aims to convey the current state of knowledge on the N-glycosylation of the major plasma glycoproteins alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, antithrombin-III, apolipoprotein B-100, apolipoprotein D, apolipoprotein F, beta-2-glycoprotein 1, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, immunoglobulin (Ig) A, IgG, IgM, haptoglobin, hemopexin, histidine-rich glycoprotein, kininogen-1, serotransferrin, vitronectin, and zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein. In addition, the less abundant immunoglobulins D and E are included because of their major relevance in immunology and biopharmaceutical research. Where available, the glycosylation is described in a site-specific manner. In the discussion, we put the glycosylation of individual proteins into perspective and speculate how the individual proteins may contribute to a total plasma N-glycosylation profile determined at the released glycan level. PMID:26555091

  13. Glycosylation of Phenolic Compounds by the Site-Mutated β-Galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lili; Xu, Lijuan; Guo, Yuchuan; Zhang, Dayu; Qi, Tingting; Jin, Lan; Gu, Guofeng; Xu, Li; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    β-Galactosidases can transfer the galactosyl from lactose or galactoside donors to various acceptors and thus are especially useful for the synthesis of important glycosides. However, these enzymes have limitations in the glycosylation of phenolic compounds that have many physiological functions. In this work, the β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3 was subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis at the W980 residue. The recombinant pET-21b plasmid carrying the enzyme gene was used as the template for mutation. The mutant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli cells for screening. One recombinant mutant, W980F, exhibited increased yield of glycoside when using hydroquinone as the screening acceptor. The enzyme was purified and the effects of the mutation on enzyme properties were determined in detail. It showed improved transglycosylation activity on novel phenolic acceptors besides hydroquinone. The yields of the glycosides produced from phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol were increased by 7.6% to 53.1%. Moreover, it generated 32.3% glycosides from the pyrogallol that could not be glycosylated by the wild-type enzyme. Chemical structures of these glycoside products were further determined by MS and NMR analysis. Thus, a series of novel phenolic galactosides were achieved by β-galactosidase for the first time. This was a breakthrough in the enzymatic galactosylation of the challenging phenolic compounds of great values. PMID:25803778

  14. Site-specific O-Glycosylation on the MUC2 Mucin Protein Inhibits Cleavage by the Porphyromonas gingivalis Secreted Cysteine Protease (RgpB)*

    PubMed Central

    van der Post, Sjoerd; Subramani, Durai B.; Bäckström, Malin; Johansson, Malin E. V.; Vester-Christensen, Malene B.; Mandel, Ulla; Bennett, Eric P.; Clausen, Henrik; Dahlén, Gunnar; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2013-01-01

    The colonic epithelial surface is protected by an inner mucus layer that the commensal microflora cannot penetrate. We previously demonstrated that Entamoeba histolytica secretes a protease capable of dissolving this layer that is required for parasite penetration. Here, we asked whether there are bacteria that can secrete similar proteases. We screened bacterial culture supernatants for such activity using recombinant fragments of the MUC2 mucin, the major structural component, and the only gel-forming mucin in the colonic mucus. MUC2 has two central heavily O-glycosylated mucin domains that are protease-resistant and has cysteine-rich N and C termini responsible for polymerization. Culture supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium that secretes proteases responsible for periodontitis, cleaved the MUC2 C-terminal region, whereas the N-terminal region was unaffected. The active enzyme was isolated and identified as Arg-gingipain B (RgpB). Two cleavage sites were localized to IR↓TT and NR↓QA. IR↓TT cleavage will disrupt the MUC2 polymers. Because this site has two potential O-glycosylation sites, we tested whether recombinant GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) could glycosylate a synthetic peptide covering the IRTT sequence. Only GalNAc-T3 was able to glycosylate the second Thr in IRTT, rendering the sequence resistant to cleavage by RgpB. Furthermore, when GalNAc-T3 was expressed in CHO cells expressing the MUC2 C terminus, the second threonine was glycosylated, and the protein became resistant to RgpB cleavage. These findings suggest that bacteria can produce proteases capable of dissolving the inner protective mucus layer by specific cleavages in the MUC2 mucin and that this cleavage can be modulated by site-specific O-glycosylation. PMID:23546879

  15. Reliable Determination of Site-Specific In Vivo Protein N-Glycosylation Based on Collision-Induced MS/MS and Chromatographic Retention Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benlian; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Chance, Mark R.

    2014-05-01

    Site-specific glycopeptide mapping for simultaneous glycan and peptide characterization by MS is difficult because of the heterogeneity and diversity of glycosylation in proteins and the lack of complete fragmentation information for either peptides or glycans with current fragmentation technologies. Indeed, multiple peptide and glycan combinations can readily match the same mass of glycopeptides even with mass errors less than 5 ppm providing considerably ambiguity and analysis of complex mixtures of glycopeptides becomes quite challenging in the case of large proteins. Here we report a novel strategy to reliably determine site-specific N-glycosylation mapping by combining collision-induced dissociation (CID)-only fragmentation with chromatographic retention times of glycopeptides. This approach leverages an experimental pipeline with parallel analysis of glyco- and deglycopeptides. As the test case we chose ABCA4, a large integral membrane protein with 16 predicted sites for N-glycosylation. Taking advantage of CID features such as high scan speed and high intensity of fragment ions together combined with the retention times of glycopeptides to conclusively identify the non-glycolytic peptide from which the glycopeptide was derived, we obtained virtually complete information about glycan compositions and peptide sequences, as well as the N-glycosylation site occupancy and relative abundances of each glycoform at specific sites for ABCA4. The challenges provided by this example provide guidance in analyzing complex relatively pure glycoproteins and potentially even more complex glycoprotein mixtures.

  16. N- and O-linked glycosylation site profiling of the human basic salivary proline-rich protein 3M.

    PubMed

    Manconi, Barbara; Cabras, Tiziana; Sanna, Monica; Piras, Valentina; Liori, Barbara; Pisano, Elisabetta; Iavarone, Federica; Vincenzoni, Federica; Cordaro, Massimo; Faa, Gavino; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we show that the heterogeneous mixture of glycoforms of the basic salivary proline-rich protein 3M, encoded by PRB3-M locus, is a major component of the acidic soluble fraction of human whole saliva in the first years of life. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis of the intact proteoforms before and after N-deglycosylation with Peptide-N-Glycosidase F and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing of peptides obtained after Endoproteinase GluC digestion allowed the structural characterization of the peptide backbone and identification of N- and O-glycosylation sites. The heterogeneous mixture of the proteoforms derives from the combination of 8 different neutral and sialylated glycans O-linked to Threonine 50, and 33 different glycans N-linked to Asparagine residues at positions 66, 87, 108, 129, 150, 171, 192, and 213. PMID:26991339

  17. N-glycosylation microheterogeneity and site occupancy of an Asn-X-Cys sequon in plasma-derived and recombinant Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Velander, William H.; Van Cott, Kevin E.

    2009-01-01

    Human Protein C (hPC) is glycosylated at three Asn-X-Ser/Thr and one atypical Asn-X-Cys sequons. We have characterized the micro- and macro-heterogeneity of plasma-derived hPC and compared the glycosylation features with recombinant Protein C (tg-PC) produced in a transgenic pig bioreactor from two animals having approximately ten-fold different expression levels. The N-glycans of hPC are complex di- and tri-sialylated structures, and we measured 78% site occupancy at Asn-329 (the Asn-X-Cys sequon). The N-glycans of tg-PC are complex sialylated structures, but less branched and partially sialylated. The porcine mammary epithelial cells glycosylate the Asn-X-Cys sequon with a similar efficiency as human hepatocytes even at these high expression levels, and site occupancy at this sequon was not affected by expression level. A distinct bias for particular structures was present at each of the four glycosylation sites for both hPC and tg-PC. Interestingly, glycans with GalNAc in the antennae were predominant at the Asn-329 site. The N-glycan structures found for tg-PC are very similar to those reported for a recombinant Factor IX produced in transgenic pig milk, and similar to the endogenous milk protein lactoferrin, which may indicate that N-glycan processing in the porcine mammary epithelial cells is more uniform than in other tissues. PMID:19343721

  18. Glycosylation Might Provide Endothelial Zip Codes for Organ-Specific Leukocyte Traffic into Inflammatory Sites

    PubMed Central

    Renkonen, Jutta; Tynninen, Olli; Häyry, Pekka; Paavonen, Timo; Renkonen, Risto

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are characterized by the leukocyte infiltration into tissues. L-selectin on lymphocytes and its endothelial glycosylated ligands are instrumental in the initiation of lymphocyte extravasation. Immunohistochemical stainings with monoclonal antibodies against functionally active glycan-decorated L-selectin ligands, ie, sialyl-Lewis x (sLex, 2F3, and HECA-452) or sulfated extended core 1 lactosamine (MECA-79), were performed on more than 400 specimen representatives for thyroiditis, myocarditis, psoriasis, vasculitis, ulcerative colitis, and their corresponding noninflamed tissues. The endothelial expression of sLex or sulfo sLex glycans in postcapillary venules was either absent or low in control tissues. The de novo induction of endothelial expression of sLex or sulfo sLex glycans was detected in all inflamed tissues. Furthermore, each organ carried its own modification of sLex or sulfo sLex glycans, ie, zip code. Our results suggest that these zip code glycans may provide means for organ selective leukocyte traffic that could be used in selective leukocyte traffic inhibition. PMID:12163379

  19. N-Glycosylation Improves the Pepsin Resistance of Histidine Acid Phosphatase Phytases by Enhancing Their Stability at Acidic pHs and Reducing Pepsin's Accessibility to Its Cleavage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Canfang; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycosylation can modulate enzyme structure and function. In this study, we identified two pepsin-resistant histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases from Yersinia kristensenii (YkAPPA) and Yersinia rohdei (YrAPPA), each having an N-glycosylation motif, and one pepsin-sensitive HAP phytase from Yersinia enterocolitica (YeAPPA) that lacked an N-glycosylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct mutants by altering the N-glycosylation status of each enzyme, and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris for biochemical characterization. Compared with those of the N-glycosylation site deletion mutants and N-deglycosylated enzymes, all N-glycosylated counterparts exhibited enhanced pepsin resistance. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site into YeAPPA as YkAPPA and YrAPPA conferred pepsin resistance, shifted the pH optimum (0.5 and 1.5 pH units downward, respectively) and improved stability at acidic pH (83.2 and 98.8% residual activities at pH 2.0 for 1 h). Replacing the pepsin cleavage sites L197 and L396 in the immediate vicinity of the N-glycosylation motifs of YkAPPA and YrAPPA with V promoted their resistance to pepsin digestion when produced in Escherichia coli but had no effect on the pepsin resistance of N-glycosylated enzymes produced in P. pastoris. Thus, N-glycosylation may improve pepsin resistance by enhancing the stability at acidic pH and reducing pepsin's accessibility to peptic cleavage sites. This study provides a strategy, namely, the manipulation of N-glycosylation, for improvement of phytase properties for use in animal feed. PMID:26637601

  20. Stability-increasing effects of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang-Ling; Yu, Yu-Qi; Chen, Zhong-Jian; Wen, Guo-Song; Wei, Fu-Gang; Zheng, Quan; Wang, Chong-De; Xiao, Xing-Lei

    2017-01-01

    This review comprehensively summarizes the existing knowledge regarding the chemical implications of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation, the effects of acylation on the stability of acylated anthocyanins and the corresponding mechanisms. Anthocyanin glycosyl acylation commonly refers to the phenomenon in which the hydroxyl groups of anthocyanin glycosyls are esterified by aliphatic or aromatic acids, which is synthetically represented by the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups. Generally, glycosyl acylation increases the in vitro and in vivo chemical stability of acylated anthocyanins, and the mechanisms primarily involve physicochemical, stereochemical, photochemical, biochemical or environmental aspects under specific conditions. Additionally, the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups influence the stability of acylated anthocyanins to different degrees. This review could provide insight into the optimization of the stability of anthocyanins as well as the application of suitable anthocyanins in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:27507456

  1. Biochemical characteristics of an alkaline pectate lyase PelA from Volvariella volvacea: roles of the highly conserved N-glycosylation site in its secretion and activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aiqin; Hu, Hang; Zheng, Fei; Long, Liangkun; Ding, Shaojun

    2015-04-01

    Alkaline pectate lyases have great application potential in the bioscouring of textiles. They are isolated predominantly from bacteria and a few fungi. Here, we report the biochemical characteristics of a novel alkaline pectate lyase PelA from the basidiomycete Volvariella volvacea. The full-length pelA encodes a 321-amino-acid polypeptide containing a putative 18-residue signal peptide and a pectate lyase family 1 catalytic domain. It contains one conserved and one non-conserved potential N-glycosylation site (N-X-S/T) at the residues N95 and N198, respectively. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 60 °C and pH 10, although it was stable between pH 4 and pH 11. Additional Ca(2+) was not required to measure PelA activity in vitro, but it could significantly enhance its activity and thermal stability. The V max values using polygalacturonic acid as substrate were increased from 50.71 to 89.96 IU mg(-1) by the addition of 0.1 mM Ca(2+), whereas the K m values were decreased from 0.681 to 0.514 mg ml(-1). Site-directed mutagenesis revealed PelA has only one N-glycan attached to the residue N95. This N-glycan is crucial to its efficient secretion and activity possibly due to its role in maintaining the secondary structure of PelA. Amino acid substitution at the residue N198 had no effect on PelA secretion, but resulted in a slight (5.16 %) to modest (27.37 %) decrease in specific activity and less thermal stability, indicating the amino acid itself is also important for activity due to it being highly conserved and because of its proximity to the catalytic site. PMID:25341402

  2. Glycosylation Engineering of Glycoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadamoto, Reiko; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    Naturally occurring glycosylation of glycoproteins varies in glycosylation site and in the number and structure of glycans. The engineering of well-defined glycoproteins is an important technology for the preparation of pharmaceutically relevant glycoproteins and in the study of the relationship between glycans and proteins on a structure-function level. In pharmaceutical applications of glycoproteins, the presence of terminal sialic acids on glycans is particularly important for the in vivo circulatory half life, since sialic acid-terminated glycans are not recognized by asialoglycoprotein receptors. Therefore, there have been a number of attempts to control or modify cellular metabolism toward the expression of glycoproteins with glycosylation profiles similar to that of human glycoproteins. In this chapter, recent methods for glycoprotein engineering in various cell culture systems (mammalian cells, plant, yeast, and E. coli) and advances in the chemical approach to glycoprotein formation are described.

  3. In silico designing of hyper-glycosylated analogs for the human coagulation factor IX.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Fahimeh; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Khorramizadeh, M Reza

    2016-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a process during which a glycan moiety attaches to the asparagine residue in the N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn-Xxx-Ser/Thr), where Xxx can be any amino acid except proline. Introduction of a new N-glycosylation site into a protein backbone leads to its hyper-glycosylation, and may improve the protein properties such as solubility, folding, stability, and secretion. Glyco-engineering is an approach to facilitate the hyper-glycosylation of recombinant proteins by application of the site-directed mutagenesis methods. In this regard, selection of a suitable location on the surface of a protein for introduction of a new N-glycosylation site is a main concern. In this work, a computational approach was conducted to select suitable location(s) for introducing new N-glycosylation sites into the human coagulation factor IX (hFIX). With this aim, the first 45 residues of mature hFIX were explored to find out suitable positions for introducing either Asn or Ser/Thr residues, to create new N-glycosylation site(s). Our exploration lead to detection of five potential positions, for hyper-glycosylation. For each suggested position, an analog was defined and subjected for N-glycosylation efficiency prediction. After generation of three-dimensional structures, by homology-based modeling, the five designed analogs were examined by molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, to predict their stability levels and probable structural distortions caused by amino acid substitutions, relative to the native counterpart. Three out of five suggested analogs, namely; E15T, K22N, and R37N, reached equilibration state with relatively constant Root Mean Square Deviation values. Additional analysis on the data obtained during MD simulations, lead us to conclude that, R37N is the only qualified analog with the most similar structure and dynamic behavior to that of the native counterpart, to be considered for further experimental investigations. PMID:27356208

  4. Structure of glycosylated and unglycosylated gag polyproteins of Rauscher murine leukemia virus: carbohydrate attachment sites.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, A M; Lockhart, S M; Rabin, E M; Oroszlan, S

    1981-01-01

    The structural relationships among the gag polyproteins Pr65gag, Pr75gag, and gPr80gag of Rauscher murine leukemia virus were studied by endoglycosidase H digestion and formic acid cleavage. Fragments were identified by precipitation with specific antisera to constituent virion structural proteins followed by one-dimensional mapping. Endoglycosidase H reduced the size of gPr80gag to that of Pr75gag. By comparing fragments of gPr80gag and the apoprotein Pr75gag, the former was shown to contain two mannose-rich oligosaccharide units. By comparing fragments of Pr65gag and Pr75gag, the latter was shown to differ from Pr65gag at the amino terminus by the presence of a leader peptide approximately 7,000 daltons in size. The internal and carboxyl-terminal peptides of the two unglycosylated polyproteins were not detectably different. The location of the two N-linked carbohydrate chains in gPr80gag has been specified. One occurs in the carboxyl-terminal half of the polyprotein at asparagine177 of the p30 sequence and the other is found in a 23,000-dalton fragment located in the amino-terminal region of gPr80gag and containing the additional amino acid sequences not found in Pr65gag plus a substantial portion of p15. Images PMID:7241663

  5. Identification and Functional Characterization of Glycosylation of Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Mengmeng; Yu, Changming; Fang, Ting; Fu, Ling; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Ren, Jun; Xu, Junjie; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used system for heterologous protein expression. However, post-translational modifications, especially glycosylation, usually impede pharmaceutical application of recombinant proteins because of unexpected alterations in protein structure and function. The aim of this study was to identify glycosylation sites on recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB) secreted by P. pastoris, and investigate possible effects of O-linked glycans on PDGF-BB functional activity. PDGF-BB secreted by P. pastoris is very heterogeneous and contains multiple isoforms. We demonstrated that PDGF-BB was O-glycosylated during the secretion process and detected putative O-glycosylation sites using glycosylation staining and immunoblotting. By site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution LC/MS analysis, we, for the first time, identified two threonine residues at the C-terminus as the major O-glycosylation sites on rhPDGF-BB produced in P. pastoris. Although O-glycosylation resulted in heterogeneous protein expression, the removal of glycosylation sites did not affect rhPDGF-BB mitogenic activity. In addition, the unglycosylated PDGF-BBΔGly mutant exhibited the immunogenicity comparable to that of the wild-type form. Furthermore, antiserum against PDGF-BBΔGly also recognized glycosylated PDGF-BB, indicating that protein immunogenicity was unaltered by glycosylation. These findings elucidate the effect of glycosylation on PDGF-BB structure and biological activity, and can potentially contribute to the design and production of homogeneously expressed unglycosylated or human-type glycosylated PDGF-BB in P. pastoris for pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26701617

  6. Enhancing activity of N-glycosylation for constitutive proteins secretions in non-polarized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Nobutake; Ohno, Yuji; Fukuda, Takahiro; Manome, Yosinobu; Saito, Saburo

    2009-04-17

    Several fusion proteins of mouse Interleukins (mILs) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were expressed in fibroblast and epithelial cells. Among these proteins, the mIL-31 derivative was the most efficiently secreted into the medium in a N-glycosylation-dependent manner. From the analysis of deletion mutants, the minimal structure for constitutive secretions consisted of a signal peptide and N-glycosylation. Introduction of the signal sequence from mIL-31 to human p53 protein failed to secrete the products, but further addition of the N-glycosylation site resulted in constitutive secretion of biologically active p53 protein into the medium in the N-glycosylated form. In this report, we showed the importance of N-glycosylation for constitutive protein secretions, especially using non-polarized cells.

  7. Site Preference of Ternary Alloying Additions to AuTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of the site substitution behavior of several alloying additions, namely. Na, Mg, Al, Si. Sc, V, Cr, Mn. Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr. Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt in B2 TiAu is reported. The 30 elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice. Results of large scale simulations are also presented, distinguishing between additions that remain in solution from those that precipitate a second phase.

  8. 20. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. A(8-1), Military Construction, Materiel Command Flight Test Base, Muroc, California; Additional Construction, Location Plan, Sheet No. 2, October 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Identification of the Mycobacterium marinum Apa antigen O-mannosylation sites reveals important glycosylation variability with the M. tuberculosis Apa homologue.

    PubMed

    Coddeville, Bernadette; Wu, Sz-Wei; Fabre, Emeline; Brassart, Colette; Rombouts, Yoann; Burguière, Adeline; Kremer, Laurent; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Elass-Rochard, Elisabeth; Guérardel, Yann

    2012-10-22

    The 45/47 kDa Apa, an immuno-dominant antigen secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is O-mannosylated at multiple sites. Glycosylation of Apa plays a key role in colonization and invasion of the host cells by M. tuberculosis through interactions of Apa with the host immune system C-type lectins. Mycobacterium marinum (M.ma) a fish pathogen, phylogenetically close to M. tuberculosis, induces a granulomatous response with features similar to those described for M. tuberculosis in human. Although M.ma possesses an Apa homologue, its glycosylation status is unknown, and whether this represents a crucial element in the pathophysiology induced by M.ma remains to be addressed. To this aim, we have identified two concanavalin A-reactive 45/47 kDa proteins from M.ma, which have been further purified by a two-step anion exchange chromatography process. Advanced liquid chromatography-nanoESI mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of peptides, derived from either tryptic digestion alone or in combination with the Asp-N endoproteinase, established that M.ma Apa possesses up to seven distinct O-mannosylated sites with mainly single mannose substitutions, which can be further extended at the Ser/Thr/Pro rich region near the N-terminus. This opens the way to further studies focussing on the involvement and biological functions of Apa O-mannosylation using the M.ma/zebrafish model. PMID:22828516

  10. 19. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Grading & Paving Plan, Sheet No. 1 of 21, March 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Plan, February 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Glycosylation characterization of recombinant human erythropoietin produced in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bing; Burnina, Irina; Stadheim, Terrance A; Li, Huijuan

    2013-12-01

    Glycosylation plays a critical role in the in vivo efficacy of both endogenous and recombinant erythropoietin (EPO). Using mass spectrometry, we characterized the N-/O-linked glycosylation of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) produced in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris and compared with the glycosylation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-derived rhEPO. While the three predicted N-linked glycosylation sites (Asn24, Asn38 and Asn83) showed complete site occupancy, Pichia- and CHO-derived rhEPO showed distinct differences in the glycan structures with the former containing sialylated bi-antennary glycoforms and the latter containing a mixture of sialylated bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary structures. Additionally, the N-linked glycans from Pichia-produced rhEPO were similar across all three sites. A low level of O-linked mannosylation was detected on Pichia-produced rhEPO at position Ser126, which is also the O-linked glycosylation site for endogenous human EPO and CHO-derived rhEPO. In summary, the mass spectrometric analyses revealed that rhEPO derived from glycoengineered Pichia has a highly uniform bi-antennary N-linked glycan composition and preserves the orthogonal O-linked glycosylation site present on endogenous human EPO and CHO-derived rhEPO. PMID:24338886

  13. Glycosylation of Residue 141 of Subtype H7 Influenza A Hemagglutinin (HA) Affects HA-Pseudovirus Infectivity and Sensitivity to Site A Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Facundo, Esmeralda; Vassell, Russell; Schmeisser, Falko; Weir, Jerry P.; Weiss, Carol D.; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human infections with H7 subtype influenza virus have been reported, including an H7N7 outbreak in Netherlands in 2003 and H7N9 infections in China in 2013. Previously, we reported murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize the antigenic site A of H7 hemagglutinin (HA). To better understand protective immunity of H7 vaccines and vaccine candidate selection, we used these mAbs to assess the antigenic relatedness among two H7 HA isolated from past human infections and determine residues that affect susceptibility to neutralization. We found that these mAbs neutralize pseudoviruses bearing HA of A/Shanghai/02/2013(H7N9), but not A/Netherlands/219/2003(H7N7). Glycosylation of the asparagine residue at position 141 (N141) (N133, H3 HA numbering) in the HA of A/Netherlands/219/2003 HA is responsible for this resistance, and it affects the infectivity of HA-pseudoviruses. The presence of threonine at position 143 (T135, H3 HA numbering) in the HA of A/Netherlands/219/2003, rather than an alanine found in the HA of A/Shanghai/02/2013(H7N9), accounts for these differences. These results demonstrate a key role for glycosylation of residue N141 in affecting H7 influenza HA-mediated entry and sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies, which have implications for candidate vaccine design. PMID:26862918

  14. Increasing functional avidity of TCR-redirected T cells by removing defined N-glycosylation sites in the TCR constant domain

    PubMed Central

    Hauptrock, Beate; Malina, Victoria; Antunes, Edite; Voss, Ralf-Holger; Wolfl, Matthias; Strong, Roland; Theobald, Matthias; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes transduced with a T cell receptor (TCR) to impart tumor reactivity has been reported as a potential strategy to redirect immune responses to target cancer cells (Schumacher, T.N. 2002. Nat. Rev. Immunol. 2:512–519). However, the affinity of most TCRs specific for shared tumor antigens that can be isolated is usually low. Thus, strategies to increase the affinity of TCRs or the functional avidity of TCR-transduced T cells might be therapeutically beneficial. Because glycosylation affects the flexibility, movement, and interactions of surface molecules, we tested if selectively removing conserved N-glycoslyation sites in the constant regions of TCR α or β chains could increase the functional avidity of T cells transduced with such modified TCRs. We observed enhanced functional avidity and improved recognition of tumor cells by T cells harboring TCR chains with reduced N-glycosylation (ΔTCR) as compared with T cells with wild-type (WT) TCR chains. T cells transduced with WT or ΔTCR chains bound tetramer equivalently at 4°C, but tetramer binding was enhanced at 37°C, predominantly as a result of reduced tetramer dissociation. This suggested a temperature-dependent mechanism such as TCR movement in the cell surface or structural changes of the TCR allowing improved multimerization. This strategy was effective with mouse and human TCRs specific for different antigens and, thus, should be readily translated to TCRs with any specificity. PMID:19171765

  15. Specificity of site directed psoralen addition to RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teare, J; Wollenzien, P

    1989-01-01

    We describe the attachment of a psoralen derivative (site specific psoralen, SSP) to the 5' end of a DNA oligonucleotide and the hybridization and the photoreaction of this reagent with a complementary target site on an RNA molecule. SSP was coupled to a variety of DNA oligonucleotides to investigate the structural requirements for addition to the RNA. Efficient SSP photoadducts were made on specific uridines by designing an intercalation site at an unpaired nucleotide in the RNA strand within the heteroduplex region. The optimal location for this site was five nucleotides from the oligonucleotide 5' end and just 5' to the target uridine residue. Because the attachment of the SSP to the oligonucleotide is through a disulfide bond, the DNA oligonucleotide can be removed with reduction to leave SSP attached to the RNA strand. The SSP adduct made in this way will be useful for subsequent biochemical and biophysical experiments. Images PMID:2471154

  16. Effects of individually silenced N-glycosylation sites and non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the fusogenic function of human syncytin-2

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lina; Wang, Huiying; Lu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Ru; Li, Yue; Yang, Xiaokui; Jia, Wen-Tong; Zhao, Yangyu; Wang, Yongqing; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The placental syncytiotrophoblast, which is formed by the fusion of cytotrophoblast cells, is indispensable for the establishment and maintenance of normal pregnancy. The human endogenous retrovirus envelope glycoprotein syncytin-2 is the most important player in mediating trophoblast cell-cell fusion as a fusogen. We constructed expression plasmids of wild-type and 21 single-amino-acid substitution mutants of syncytin-2, including 10 N-glycosylation sites individually silenced by mutagenizing N to Q, 1 naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) N118S that introduced an N-glycosylation site, and another 10 non-synonymous SNPs located within important functional domains. We observed that syncytin-2 was highly fusogenic and that the mutants had different capacities in merging 293T cells. Of the 21 mutants, N133Q, N312Q, N443Q, C46R (in the CXXC motif) and R417H (in the heptad repeat region and immunosuppressive domain) lost their fusogenicity, whereas N332Q, N118S, T367M (in the fusion peptide), V483I (in the transmembrane domain) and T522M (in the cytoplasmic domain) enhanced the fusogenic activity. We also proved that N133, N146, N177, N220, N241, N247, N312, N332 and N443 were all glycosylated in 293T cells. A co-immunoprecipitation assay showed compromised interaction between mutants N443Q, C46R, T367M, R417H and the receptor MFSD2A, whereas N118S was associated with more receptors. We also sequenced the coding sequence of syncytin-2 in 125 severe pre-eclamptic patients and 272 normal pregnant Chinese women. Surprisingly, only 1 non-synonymous SNP T522M was found and the frequencies of heterozygous carriers were not significantly different. Taken together, our results suggest that N-glycans at residues 133, 312, 332 and 443 of syncytin-2 are required for optimal fusion induction, and that SNPs C46R, N118S, T367M, R417H, V483I and T522M can alter the fusogenic function of syncytin-2. PMID:26853155

  17. Chemoenzymatic Fc Glycosylation via Engineered Aldehyde Tags

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycoproteins with chemically defined glycosylation sites and structures are important biopharmaceutical targets and critical tools for glycobiology. One approach toward constructing such molecules involves chemical glycosylation of aldehyde-tagged proteins. Here, we report the installation of a genetically encoded aldehyde tag at the internal glycosylation site of the crystallizable fragment (Fc) of IgG1. We replaced the natural Fc N-glycosylation sequon with a five amino-acid sequence that was efficiently converted by recombinant formylglycine generating enzyme in vitro, thereby introducing aldehyde groups for subsequent chemical elaboration. Oxime-linked glycoconjugates were synthesized by conjugating aminooxy N-acetylglucosamine to the modified Fc followed by enzymatic transfer of complex N-glycans from corresponding glycan oxazolines by an EndoS-derived glycosynthase. In this manner we generated specific Fc glycoforms without relying on natural protein glycosylation machineries. PMID:24702330

  18. Quantitative Glycoproteomics Analysis Reveals Changes in N-Glycosylation Level Associated with Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in epithelial cancers, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However, little is known about the glycoproteome of the human pancreas or its alterations associated with pancreatic tumorigenesis. Using quantitative glycoproteomics approach, we investigated protein N-glycosylation in pancreatic tumor tissue in comparison with normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis tissue. The study lead to the discovery of a roster of glycoproteins with aberrant N-glycosylation level associated with pancreatic cancer, including mucin-5AC (MUC5AC), carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5), insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3), and galectin-3-binding protein (LGALS3BP). Pathway analysis of cancer-associated aberrant glycoproteins revealed an emerging phenomenon that increased activity of N-glycosylation was implicated in several pancreatic cancer pathways, including TGF-β, TNF, NF-kappa-B, and TFEB-related lysosomal changes. In addition, the study provided evidence that specific N-glycosylation sites within certain individual proteins can have significantly altered glycosylation occupancy in pancreatic cancer, reflecting the complexity of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer-associated glycosylation events. PMID:24471499

  19. Sequence characterization and glycosylation sites identification of donkey milk lactoferrin by multiple enzyme digestions and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Serafina; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Muccilli, Vera; Di Francesco, Antonella; Foti, Salvatore; Lorenzten, Andrea Maria; Roepstorff, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Lactoferrin, a protein showing an array of biochemical properties, including immuno-modulation, iron-binding ability, as well as antioxidant, antibacterial and antiviral activities, but which may also represent a potential milk allergen, was isolated from donkey milk by ion exchange chromatography. The characterization of its primary structure, by means of enzymatic digestions, SPITC derivatization of tryptic digest, reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography, electrospray and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, is reported. Our results allowed the almost complete characterization of donkey lactoferrin sequence, that, at least for the covered sequence, differs from the horse genomic deduced sequence (UniProtKB Acc. Nr. O77811) by five point substitutions located at positions 91 (Arg → His), 328 (Thr → Ile/Leu), 466 (Ala → Gly), 642 (Asn → Ser) and 668 (Ser → Ala). Analysis of the glycosylated protein showed that glycans in donkey lactoferrin are linked to the protein backbone via an amide bond to asparagine residues located at the positions 137, 281 and 476. PMID:27020775

  20. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhu; Lv, Mingyu; Shi, Ying; Yu, Jinghua; Niu, Junqi; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2016-01-01

    BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a “physical tethering” model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface. PMID:26938549

  1. Ultrasensitive Characterization of Site-Specific Glycosylation of Affinity Purified Haptoglobin from Lung Cancer Patient Plasma Using 10 μm i.d. Porous Layer Open Tubular (PLOT) LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry L.

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biochemical and clinical research efforts. Glycopeptide analysis using liquid chromatography - collision induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation - mass spectrometry (LC-CID/ETD-MS) allows simultaneous characterization of glycan structure and attached peptide site. However, due to the low ionization efficiency of glycopeptides during electrospray ionization (ESI), 200–500 fmol of sample per injection is needed for a single LC-MS run, which makes it challenging for the analysis of limited amounts of glycoprotein purified from biological matrices. To improve the sensitivity of LC-MS analysis for glycopeptides, an ultra-narrow porous layer open tubular (PLOT) LC column (2.5 m × 10 μm i.d.) was coupled to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ-CID/ETD-MS) to provide sensitive analysis of N-linked protein glycosylation heterogeneity. The potential of the developed method is demonstrated by the characterization of site-specific glycosylation using haptoglobin (Hpt) as a model protein. To limit the amount of haptoglobin to low pmole amounts of protein, we affinity purified it from 1 μL of pooled lung cancer patients plasma. A total of 26 glycoforms/glycan compositions on three Hpt tryptic glycopeptides were identified and quantified from 10 LC-MS runs with a consumption of 100 fmol Hpt digest (13 ng protein, 10 fmol per injection). Included in this analysis was the determination of the glycan occupancy level. At this sample consumption level, the high sensitivity of the PLOT LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS allowed glycopeptide identification and structure determination, along with relative quantitation of glycans presented on the same peptide backbone, even for low abundant glycopeptides at the ~100 attomole level. The PLOT LC-MS is shown to have sufficient sensitivity to allow characterization of site-specific protein glycosylation from trace levels of glycosylated proteins. PMID:21338062

  2. Calreticulin discriminates the proximal region at the N-glycosylation site of Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 ligand.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Makoto; Adachi, Yuka; Ito, Yukishige; Totani, Kiichiro

    2015-10-23

    Calreticulin (CRT) is well known as a lectin-like chaperone that recognizes Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 (G1M9)-glycoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, whether CRT can directly interact with the aglycone moiety (protein portion) of the glycoprotein remains controversial. To improve our understanding of CRT interactions, structure-defined G1M9-derivatives with different aglycones (-OH, -Gly-NH2, and -Gly-Glu-(t)Bu) were used as CRT ligands, and their interactions with recombinant CRT were analyzed using thermal shift analysis. The results showed that CRT binds strongly to a G1M9-ligand in the order -Gly-Glu-(t)Bu > -Gly-NH2 > -OH, which is the same as that of the reglucosylation of Man9GlcNAc2 (M9)-derivatives by the folding sensor enzyme UGGT (UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase). Our results indicate that, similar to UGGT, CRT discriminates the proximal region at the N-glycosylation site, suggesting a similar mechanism mediating the recognition of aglycone moieties in the ER glycoprotein quality control system. PMID:26362185

  3. Mapping N-linked Glycosylation Sites in the Secretome and Whole Cells of Aspergillus niger Using Hydrazide Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu; Aryal, Uma K.; Dai, Ziyu; Mason, Alisa C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Tian, Zhixin; Zhou, Jianying; Su, Dian; Weitz, Karl K.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Scott E.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is known to play an essential role in both cellular functions and the secretory pathways; however, little information is available on the dynamics of glycosylated N-linked glycosites of fungi. Herein we present the first extensive mapping of glycosylated N-linked glycosites in industrial strain Aspergillus niger by applying an optimized solid phase enrichment of glycopeptide protocol using hydrazide modified magnetic beads. The enrichment protocol was initially optimized using mouse plasma and A. niger secretome samples, which was then applied to profile N-linked glycosites from both the secretome and whole cell lysates of A. niger. A total of 847 unique N-linked glycosites and 330 N-linked glycoproteins were confidently identified by LC-MS/MS. Based on gene ontology analysis, the identified N-linked glycoproteins in the whole cell lysate were primarily localized in the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, golgi apparatus, lysosome, and storage vacuoles. The identified N-linked glycoproteins are involved in a wide range of biological processes including gene regulation and signal transduction, protein folding and assembly, protein modification and carbohydrate metabolism. The extensive coverage of glycosylated N-linked glycosites along with identification of partial N-linked glycosylation in those enzymes involving in different biochemical pathways provide useful information for functional studies of N-linked glycosylation and their biotechnological applications in A. niger.

  4. Proteolytic Cleavage Driven by Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Kötzler, Miriam P; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of human host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) to its mature form was recently shown, unexpectedly, to occur in a UDP-GlcNAc-dependent fashion within the transferase active site of O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) (Lazarus, M. B., Jiang, J., Kapuria, V., Bhuiyan, T., Janetzko, J., Zandberg, W. F., Vocadlo, D. J., Herr, W., and Walker, S. (2013) Science 342, 1235-1239). An interesting mechanism involving formation and then intramolecular rearrangement of a covalent glycosyl ester adduct of the HCF-1 polypeptide was proposed to account for this unprecedented proteolytic activity. However, the key intermediate remained hypothetical. Here, using a model enzyme system for which the formation of a glycosyl ester within the enzyme active site has been shown unequivocally, we show that ester formation can indeed lead to proteolysis of the adjacent peptide bond, thereby providing substantive support for the mechanism of HCF-1 processing proposed. PMID:26515062

  5. Sequence-based protein stabilization in the absence of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nikki Y; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Jamaluddin, M Fairuz; Mahmud, S Halimah Binte; Raman, Suresh C; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked N-glycosylation is a common modification of proteins that promotes productive protein folding and increases protein stability. Although N-glycosylation is important for glycoprotein folding, the precise sites of glycosylation are often not conserved between protein homologues. Here we show that, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proteins upregulated during sporulation under nutrient deprivation have few N-glycosylation sequons and in their place tend to contain clusters of like-charged amino-acid residues. Incorporation of such sequences complements loss of in vivo protein function in the absence of glycosylation. Targeted point mutation to create such sequence stretches at glycosylation sequons in model glycoproteins increases in vitro protein stability and activity. A dependence on glycosylation for protein stability or activity can therefore be rescued with a small number of local point mutations, providing evolutionary flexibility in the precise location of N-glycans, allowing protein expression under nutrient-limiting conditions, and improving recombinant protein production. PMID:24434425

  6. Review of Glycosylation Engineering of Biopharmaceuticals: Methods and Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The glycoform profile of a glycoprotein is non-templated, i.e., is not encoded within the genome or otherwise predetermined; however, it is estimated that ~50% of human genes having an open reading frame encode a –N-X-S/T- amino acid sequence, where X represents any amino acid other than proline, that comprises a potential site (sequon) for N-linked glycosylation of the translated protein. N-linked glycosylation is both a co- and post-translational modification. The complex oligosaccharide GlcNAc2Man9Glu3 may be added at a –N-X-S/T- sequon as the polypeptide chain emerges from the ribosome tunnel. Local secondary structure determines whether oligosaccharide is added and the extent of addition. Higher occupancy is observed for –N-X-T- sequons than at –N-X-S- sequons, and the efficiency of addition can be further influenced by adjacent amino acid residues.

  7. Towards alpha- or beta-D-C-glycosyl compounds by tin-catalyzed addition of glycosyl radicals to acrylonitrile and vinylphosphonate, and flexible reduction of tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl bromide with cyanoborohydride.

    PubMed

    Praly, Jean-Pierre; Ardakani, Azin Salek; Bruyère, Isabelle; Marie-Luce, Chrystelle; Bing Qin, Bing

    2002-10-01

    Photo-induced radical addition of acetylated alpha-D-glucopyranosyl bromide (1). to acrylonitrile or diethyl vinylphosphonate, in the presence of catalytic amounts of tri-n-butyltin chloride and sodium (or tetra-n-butylammonium) cyanoborohydride in excess, allowed efficient preparations of alpha-configurated nonononitrile and 2-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-ethylphosphonate (79, 70% yields, respectively). These conditions led to 2-(alpha-D-manno-, and galactopyranosyl)-ethylphosphonates in 68 and 76% yields. Similarly, radical addition of acetylated 1-bromo-beta-D-glucopyranosyl chloride (2). to acrylonitrile or diethyl vinylphosphonate afforded mainly intermediate chlorides which, upon radical reduction with excess tri-n-butyltin hydride, afforded the corresponding beta anomers (40 and 38%, respectively) by sequential C-C and C-H bond formation. Stereocontrol relies on the alpha-stereoselective quenching of D-glycopyranos-1-yl radicals. We found also that UV light irradiation of 1 with excess NaBH(3)CN in tert-butanol afforded either 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-2-deoxy-alpha-D-arabino-hexopyranose (65% after crystallization) or, when 10% mol thiophenol was added, 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol (79%). These are simple, tin-free, and easily controlled conditions, which compare well with known preparations of these reduced sugars. PMID:12423963

  8. An additional substrate binding site in a bacterial phenylalanine hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Ronau, Judith A.; Paul, Lake N.; Fuchs, Julian E.; Corn, Isaac R.; Wagner, Kyle T.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2014-01-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes phenylalanine oxidation to tyrosine, a reaction that must be kept under tight regulatory control. Mammalian PAH features a regulatory domain where binding of the substrate leads to allosteric activation of the enzyme. However, existence of PAH regulation in evolutionarily distant organisms, such as certain bacteria in which it occurs, has so far been underappreciated. In an attempt to crystallographically characterize substrate binding by PAH from Chromobacterium violaceum (cPAH), a single-domain monomeric enzyme, electron density for phenylalanine was observed at a distal site, 15.7Å from the active site. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed a dissociation constant of 24 ± 1.1 µM for phenylalanine. Under the same conditions, no detectable binding was observed in ITC for alanine, tyrosine, or isoleucine, indicating the distal site may be selective for phenylalanine. Point mutations of residues in the distal site that contact phenylalanine (F258A, Y155A, T254A) lead to impaired binding, consistent with the presence of distal site binding in solution. Kinetic analysis reveals that the distal site mutants suffer a discernible loss in their catalytic activity. However, x-ray structures of Y155A and F258A, two of the mutants showing more noticeable defect in their activity, show no discernible change in their active site structure, suggesting that the effect of distal binding may transpire through protein dynamics in solution. PMID:23860686

  9. Processing, fusogenicity, virion incorporation and CXCR4-binding activity of a feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein lacking the two conserved N-glycosylation sites at the C-terminus of the V3 domain.

    PubMed

    González, Silvia A; Affranchino, José L

    2016-07-01

    The process of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) entry into its target cells is initiated by the association of the surface (SU) subunit of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) with the cellular receptors CD134 and CXCR4. This event is followed by the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes, which is mediated by the transmembrane (TM) subunit of Env. We and others have previously demonstrated that the V3 domain of the SU subunit of Env is essential for CXCR4 binding. Of note, there are two contiguous and highly conserved potential N-glycosylation sites ((418)NST(420) and (422)NLT(424)) located at the C-terminal side of the V3 domain. We therefore decided to study the relevance for Env functions of these N-glycosylation motifs and found that disruption of both of them by introducing the N418Q/N422Q double amino acid substitution drastically impairs Env processing into the SU and TM subunits. Moreover, the simultaneous mutation of these N-glycosylation sites prevents Env incorporation into virions and Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Notably, a recombinant soluble version of the SU glycoprotein carrying the double amino acid replacement N418Q/N422Q at the V3 C-terminal side binds to CXCR4 with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type SU. PMID:27020572

  10. N-linked glycosylation of native and recombinant cauliflower xyloglucan endotransglycosylase 16A.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Hongbin; Denman, Stuart E; Campuzano, Iain D G; Ademark, Pia; Master, Emma R; Teeri, Tuula T; Brumer, Harry

    2003-01-01

    The gene encoding a XET (xyloglucan endotransglycosylase) from cauliflower ( Brassica oleracea var. botrytis ) florets has been cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis indicated a high degree of similarity to other XET enzymes belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 16 (GH16). In addition to the conserved GH16 catalytic sequence motif EIDFE, there exists one potential N-linked glycosylation site, which is also highly conserved in XET enzymes from this family. Purification of the corresponding protein from extracts of cauliflower florets allowed the fractionation of a single, pure glycoform, which was analysed by MS techniques. Accurate protein mass determination following the enzymic deglycosylation of this glycoform indicated the presence of a high-mannose-type glycan of the general structure GlcNAc2Man6. LC/MS and MS/MS (tandem MS) analysis provided supporting evidence for this structure and confirmed that the glycosylation site (underlined) was situated close to the predicted catalytic residues in the conserved sequence YLSSTNNEHDEIDFEFLGNRTGQPVILQTNVFTGGK. Heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris produced a range of protein glycoforms, which were, on average, more highly mannosylated than the purified native enzyme. This difference in glycosylation did not influence the apparent enzymic activity of the enzyme significantly. However, the removal of high-mannose glycosylation in recombinant cauliflower XET by endoglycosidase H, quantified by electrospray-ionization MS, caused a 40% decrease in the transglycosylation activity of the enzyme. No hydrolytic activity was detected in native or heterologously expressed BobXET16A, even when almost completely deglycosylated. PMID:12826015

  11. N-Glycosylation of Asparagine 8 Regulates Surface Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-related Protein A (MICA) Alleles Dependent on Threonine 24*

    PubMed Central

    Mellergaard, Maiken; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Schneider, Christine L.; Lauridsen, Felicia; Andresen, Lars; Jensen, Helle; Skov, Søren

    2014-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on several types of human lymphocytes. NKG2D ligands can be induced upon cell stress and are frequently targeted post-translationally in infected or transformed cells to avoid immune recognition. Virus infection and inflammation alter protein N-glycosylation, and we have previously shown that changes in cellular N-glycosylation are involved in regulation of NKG2D ligand surface expression. The specific mode of regulation through N-glycosylation is, however, unknown. Here we investigated whether direct N-glycosylation of the NKG2D ligand MICA itself is critical for cell surface expression and sought to identify the essential residues. We found that a single N-glycosylation site (Asn8) was important for MICA018 surface expression. The frequently expressed MICA allele 008, with an altered transmembrane and intracellular domain, was not affected by mutation of this N-glycosylation site. Mutational analysis revealed that a single amino acid (Thr24) in the extracellular domain of MICA018 was essential for the N-glycosylation dependence, whereas the intracellular domain was not involved. The HHV7 immunoevasin, U21, was found to inhibit MICA018 surface expression by affecting N-glycosylation, and the retention was rescued by T24A substitution. Our study reveals N-glycosylation as an allele-specific regulatory mechanism important for regulation of surface expression of MICA018, and we pinpoint the residues essential for this N-glycosylation dependence. In addition, we show that this regulatory mechanism of MICA surface expression is likely targeted during different pathological conditions. PMID:24872415

  12. Harnessing Glycosylation to Improve Cellulase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Beckham, G. T.; Dai, Z.; Matthews, J. F.; Momany, M.; Payne, C. M.; Adney, W. S.; Baker, S. E.; Himmel, M. E.

    2012-06-01

    Cellulases and hemicellulases are responsible for the turnover of plant cell wall polysaccharides in the biosphere, and thus form the foundation of enzyme engineering efforts in biofuels research. Many of these carbohydrate-active enzymes from filamentous fungi contain both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation, the extent and heterogeneity of which depends on growth conditions, expression host, and the presence of glycan trimming enzymes in the secretome, all of which in turn impact enzyme activity. As the roles of glycosylation in enzyme function have not been fully elucidated, here we discuss the potential roles of glycosylation on glycoside hydrolase enzyme structure and function after secretion. We posit that glycosylation, instead of hindering cellulase engineering, can be used as an additional tool to enhance enzyme activity, given deeper understanding of its molecular-level role in biomass deconstruction.

  13. Harnessing glycosylation to improve cellulase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Dai, Ziyu; Mattews, James F.; Momany, Michelle; Payne, Christina M.; Adney, William S.; Baker, Scott E.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2012-06-11

    Cellulases and hemicellulases are responsible for the turnover of plant cell wall polysaccharides in the biosphere, and thus form the foundation of enzyme engineering efforts in biofuels research. Many of these carbohydrate-active enzymes from filamentous fungi contain both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation, the extent and heterogeneity of which depends on growth conditions, expression host, and the presence of glycan trimming enzymes in the secretome, all of which in turn impacts enzyme activity. As the roles of glycosylation in enzyme function have not been fully elucidated, here we discuss the potential roles of glycosylation on glycoside hydrolase enzyme structure and function after secretion. We posit that glycosylation, instead of hindering cellulase engineering, can be used as an additional tool to enhance enzyme activity, given deeper understanding of its molecular-level role in biomass deconstruction.

  14. Removal of a N-linked Glycosylation Site on the Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia E(rns) Glycoprotein Affects Virulence in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) E(rns) glycoprotein is involved in several functions; including virus attachment and entry to target cells, production of antibodies, and virulence. Here, we describe the role of CSFV strain Brescia E(rns) glycosylation on virulence in swine. Amino acid residue N...

  15. From peptide to protein: comparative analysis of the substrate specificity of N-linked glycosylation in C. jejuni.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mark M; Glover, Kerney Jebrell; Imperiali, Barbara

    2007-05-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni was recently discovered to contain a general N-linked protein glycosylation pathway. Central to this pathway is PglB, a homologue of the Stt3p subunit of the eukaryotic oligosaccharyl transferase (OT), which is involved in the transfer of an oligosaccharide from a polyisoprenyl pyrophosphate carrier to the asparagine side chain of proteins within the conserved glycosylation sites D/E-X1-N-X2-S/T, where X1 and X2 can be any amino acids except proline. Using a library of peptide substrates and a quantitative radioactivity-based in vitro assay, we assessed the amino acids at each position of the consensus glycosylation sequence for their impact on glycosylation efficiency, whereby the sequence DQNAT was found to be the optimal acceptor substrate. In the context of a full-length folded protein, the differences between variations of the glycosylation sequences were found to be consistent with the trends observed from their peptidyl counterparts, though less dramatic because of additional influences. In addition to characterizing the acceptor preferences of PglB, we also assessed the selectivity toward the glycan donor. Interestingly, despite recent reports of relaxed selectivity toward the glycan donor, PglB was not found to be capable of utilizing glycosyl donors such as dolichyl-pyrophosphate-chitobiose, which is the minimum substrate for the eukaryotic OT process. PMID:17439157

  16. Structural Analysis of a Highly Glycosylated and Unliganded gp120-Based Antigen Using Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    L Wang; Y Qin; S Ilchenko; J Bohon; W Shi; M Cho; K Takamoto; M Chance

    2011-12-31

    Structural characterization of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 is very important for providing an understanding of the protein's immunogenicity and its binding to cell receptors. So far, the crystallographic structure of gp120 with an intact V3 loop (in the absence of a CD4 coreceptor or antibody) has not been determined. The third variable region (V3) of the gp120 is immunodominant and contains glycosylation signatures that are essential for coreceptor binding and entry of the virus into T-cells. In this study, we characterized the structure of the outer domain of gp120 with an intact V3 loop (gp120-OD8) purified from Drosophila S2 cells utilizing mass spectrometry-based approaches. We mapped the glycosylation sites and calculated the glycosylation occupancy of gp120-OD8; 11 sites from 15 glycosylation motifs were determined as having high-mannose or hybrid glycosylation structures. The specific glycan moieties of nine glycosylation sites from eight unique glycopeptides were determined by a combination of ECD and CID MS approaches. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting coupled with mass spectrometry analysis was employed to provide detailed information about protein structure of gp120-OD8 by directly identifying accessible and hydroxyl radical-reactive side chain residues. Comparison of gp120-OD8 experimental footprinting data with a homology model derived from the ligated CD4-gp120-OD8 crystal structure revealed a flexible V3 loop structure in which the V3 tip may provide contacts with the rest of the protein while residues in the V3 base remain solvent accessible. In addition, the data illustrate interactions between specific sugar moieties and amino acid side chains potentially important to the gp120-OD8 structure.

  17. Hypo-glycosylated Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (hFSH21/18) is much more active in vitro than Fully-glycosylated hFSH (hFSH24)

    PubMed Central

    Bousfield, George R.; Butnev, Vladimir Y.; Butnev, Viktor Y.; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Harvey, David J.; May, Jeffrey V.

    2014-01-01

    Hypo-glycosylated hFSH21/18 (possesses FSHβ21 and FSH18 bands) was isolated from hLH preparations by immunoaffinity chromatography followed by gel filtration. Fully-glycosylated hFSH24 was prepared by combining the fully-glycosylated FSHβ24 variant with hCGα and isolating the heterodimer. The hFSH21/18 glycoform preparation was significantly smaller than the hFSH24 preparation and possessed 60% oligomannose glycans, which is unusual for hFSH. Hypo-glycosylated hFSH21/18 was 9- to 26-fold more active than fully-glycosylated hFSH24 in FSH radioligand assays. Significantly greater binding of 125I-hFSH21/18 tracer than hFSH24 tracer was observed in all competitive binding assays. In addition, higher binding of hFSH21/18 was noted in association and saturation binding assays, in which twice as much hFSH21/18 was bound as hFSH24. This suggests that more ligand binding sites are available to hFSH21/18 in FSHR than to hFSH24. Hypo-glycosylated hFSH21/18 also bound rat FSHRs more rapidly, exhibiting almost no lag in binding, whereas hFSH24 specific binding proceeded very slowly for almost the first hour of incubation. PMID:24291635

  18. [The alterations of proteins glycosylation in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Chludzińska, Anna; Chrostek, Lech; Cylwik, Bogdan

    2012-08-01

    The alterations in glycosylation of serum glycoproteins were reported in several pathological conditions including rheumatic diseases. The many studies demonstrated the occurrence of some differentially glycosylated plasma immunoglobulins, especially IgG in rheumatoid arthritis. The most characteristic features are the decrease in galactose content, the presence of N-acetylglucosamine and the increase in fucose content. The structure of oligosaccharides attached to the antibody Fc region affect the pharmacokinetics and antibody effector functions of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The changes in immunoglobulin glycosylation was suggested to be important in the etiology of rheumatoid athritis and correlated with the disease severity. In addition to impaired glycosylation of imunoglubulins, in rheumatic diseases exist the disturbances in glycosylation of both acute-phase and non acute-phase response, such as alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin and alpha-2 macroglobulin. The alterations in glycosylation of these glycoproteins were also correlated with the disease activity. PMID:23009010

  19. Determination of the orientation of an integral membrane protein and sites of glycosylation by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis: influenza B virus NB glycoprotein lacks a cleavable signal sequence and has an extracellular NH2-terminal region.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, M A; Lamb, R A

    1986-01-01

    The membrane orientation of the NB protein of influenza B virus, a small (Mr, approximately 18,000) glycoprotein with a single internal hydrophobic domain, was investigated by biochemical and genetic means. Cell fractionation and protein solubility studies indicate NB is an integral membrane protein, and NB has been shown to be a dimer under nonreducing conditions. Treatment of infected-cell surfaces with proteinase K and endoglycosidase F and immunoprecipitation with a site-specific antibody suggests that the 18-amino-acid NH2-terminal region of NB is exposed at the cell surface. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to eliminate each of the four potential sites of N-linked glycosylation and expression of the mutant NB proteins in eucaryotic cells suggest that the two sites adjacent to the NH2 terminus are glycosylated. This provides further evidence that NB, which lacks a cleavable NH2-terminal signal sequence, has an exposed NH2 terminus at the cell surface. Images PMID:3025652

  20. Roles for major histocompatibility complex glycosylation in immune function

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Sean O.

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) glycoprotein family, also referred to as human leukocyte antigens, present endogenous and exogenous antigens to T lymphocytes for recognition and response. These molecules play a central role in enabling the immune system to distinguish self from non-self, which is the basis for protective immunity against pathogenic infections and disease while at the same time representing a serious obstacle for tissue transplantation. All known MHC family members, like the majority of secreted, cell surface, and other immune-related molecules, carry asparagine (N)-linked glycans. The immune system has evolved increasing complexity in higher-order organisms along with a more complex pattern of protein glycosylation, a relationship that may contribute to immune function beyond the early protein quality control events in the endoplasmic reticulum that are commonly known. The broad MHC family maintains peptide sequence motifs for glycosylation at sites that are highly conserved across evolution, suggesting importance, yet functional roles for these glycans remain largely elusive. In this review, we will summarize what is known about MHC glycosylation and provide new insight for additional functional roles for this glycoprotein modification in mediating immune responses. PMID:22461020

  1. Protein Glycosylation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic transformation results in a wide variety of cellular alterations that impact the growth, survival, and general behavior of affected tissue. Although genetic alterations underpin the development of neoplastic disease, epigenetic changes can exert an equally significant effect on neoplastic transformation. Among neoplasia-associated epigenetic alterations, changes in cellular glycosylation have recently received attention as a key component of neoplastic progression. Alterations in glycosylation appear to not only directly impact cell growth and survival but also facilitate tumor-induced immunomodulation and eventual metastasis. Many of these changes may support neoplastic progression, and unique alterations in tumor-associated glycosylation may also serve as a distinct feature of cancer cells and therefore provide novel diagnostic and even therapeutic targets. PMID:25621663

  2. Functional analysis of N-linked glycosylation mutants of the measles virus fusion protein synthesized by recombinant vaccinia virus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, G; Shen, S H; Briedis, D; Richardson, C; Massie, B; Weinberg, R; Smith, D; Taylor, J; Paoletti, E; Roder, J

    1994-01-01

    The role of N-linked glycosylation in the biological activity of the measles virus (MV) fusion (F) protein was analyzed by expressing glycosylation mutants with recombinant vaccinia virus vectors. There are three potential N-linked glycosylation sites located on the F2 subunit polypeptide of MV F, at asparagine residues 29, 61, and 67. Each of the three potential glycosylation sites was mutated separately as well as in combination with the other sites. Expression of mutant proteins in mammalian cells showed that all three sites are used for the addition of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cell surface expression of mutant proteins was reduced by 50% relative to the wild-type level when glycosylation at either Asn-29 or Asn-61 was abolished. Despite the similar levels of cell surface expression, the Asn-29 and Asn-61 mutant proteins had different biological activities. While the Asn-61 mutant was capable of inducing syncytium formation, the Asn-29 mutant protein did not exhibit any significant cell fusion activity. Inactivation of the Asn-67 glycosylation site also reduced cell surface transport of mutant protein but had little effect on its ability to cause cell fusion. However, when the Asn-67 mutation was combined with mutations at either of the other two sites, cleavage-dependent activation, cell surface expression, and cell fusion activity were completely abolished. Our data show that the loss of N-linked oligosaccharides markedly impaired the proteolytic cleavage, stability, and biological activity of the MV F protein. The oligosaccharide side chains in MV F are thus essential for optimum conformation of the extracellular F2 subunit that is presumed to bind cellular membranes. Images PMID:8107215

  3. Comprehensive analysis of protein glycosylation by solid-phase extraction of N-linked glycans and glycosite-containing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Eshghi, Shadi Toghi; Yang, Weiming; Trikannad, Namita; Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Aiyetan, Paul; Höti, Naseruddin; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of protein glycosylation is critical for understanding the structure and function of glycoproteins. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of glycoprotein conformations, current glycoprotein analyses focus mainly on either the de-glycosylated glycosylation site (glycosite)-containing peptides or the released glycans. Here, we describe a chemoenzymatic method called solid phase extraction of N-linked glycans and glycosite-containing peptides (NGAG) for the comprehensive characterization of glycoproteins that is able to determine glycan heterogeneity for individual glycosites in addition to providing information about the total N-linked glycan, glycosite-containing peptide and glycoprotein content of complex samples. The NGAG method can also be applied to quantitatively detect glycoprotein alterations in total and site-specific glycan occupancies. PMID:26571101

  4. Comprehensive analysis of protein glycosylation by solid-phase extraction of N-linked glycans and glycosite-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Eshghi, Shadi Toghi; Yang, Weiming; Trikannad, Namita; Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Aiyetan, Paul; Höti, Naseruddin; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of protein glycosylation is critical for understanding the structure and function of glycoproteins. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of glycoprotein conformations, current glycoprotein analyses focus mainly on either the de-glycosylated glycosylation site (glycosite)-containing peptides or the released glycans. Here, we describe a chemoenzymatic method called solid phase extraction of N-linked glycans and glycosite-containing peptides (NGAG) for the comprehensive characterization of glycoproteins that is able to determine glycan heterogeneity for individual glycosites in addition to providing information about the total N-linked glycan, glycosite-containing peptide and glycoprotein content of complex samples. The NGAG method can also be applied to quantitatively detect glycoprotein alterations in total and site-specific glycan occupancies. PMID:26571101

  5. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Studies on the Complexation of Antidiabetic Drugs with Glycosylated Serum Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seedher, N.; Kanojia, M.

    2013-11-01

    Glycosylation decreases the association constant values and hence the binding affinity of human serum albumin (HSA) for the antidiabetic drugs under study. The percentage of HAS-bound drug at physiological temperature was only about 21-38 % as compared to 46-74 % for non-glycosylated HSA. Thus the percentage of free drug available for an antihyperglycemic effect was about double (62-79 %) compared to the values for non-glycosylated HSA. Much higher free drug concentrations available for pharmacological effect can lead to the risk of hypoglycemia. Hydrophobic interactions were predominantly involved in the binding. In the binding of gliclazide, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions were involved. Site specificity for glycosylated HSA was the same as that for non-glycosylated HSA; gliclazide and repaglinide bind only at site II whereas glimepiride and glipizide bind at both sites I and II. Glycosylation, however, caused conformational changes in albumin, and the binding region within site II was different for glycosylated and non-glycosylated albumin. Stern-Volmer analysis also indicated the conformational changes in albumin as a result of glycosylation and showed that the dynamic quenching mechanism was valid for fluorescence of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated HSA.

  6. Detailed characterization of the O-linked glycosylation of the neuropilin-1 c/MAM-domain.

    PubMed

    Windwarder, Markus; Yelland, Tamas; Djordjevic, Snezana; Altmann, Friedrich

    2016-06-01

    Neuropilins are involved in angiogenesis and neuronal development. The membrane proximal domain of neuropilin-1, called c or MAM domain based on its sequence conservation, has been implicated in neuropilin oligomerization required for its function. The c/MAM domain of human neuropilin-1 has been recombinantly expressed to allow for investigation of its propensity to engage in molecular interactions with other protein or carbohydrate components on a cell surface. We found that the c/MAM domain was heavily O-glycosylated with up to 24 monosaccharide units in the form of disialylated core 1 and core 2 O-glycans. Attachment sites were identified on the chymotryptic c/MAM peptide ETGATEKPTVIDSTIQSEFPTY by electron-transfer dissociation mass spectrometry (ETD-MS/MS). For highly glycosylated species consisting of carbohydrate to about 50 %, useful results could only be obtained upon partial desialylation. ETD-MS/MS revealed a hierarchical order of the initial O-GalNAc addition to the four different glycosylation sites. These findings enable future functional studies about the contribution of the described glycosylations in neuropilin-1 oligomerization and the binding to partner proteins as VEGF or galectin-1.As a spin-off result the sialidase from Clostridium perfringens turned out to discriminate between galactose- and N-acetylgalactosamine-linked sialic acid. PMID:26059692

  7. Gram-Negative Flagella Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation had been considered as an eccentricity of a few bacteria. However, through advances in analytical methods and genome sequencing, it is now established that bacteria possess both N-linked and O-linked glycosylation pathways. Both glycosylation pathways can modify multiple proteins, flagellins from Archaea and Eubacteria being one of these. Flagella O-glycosylation has been demonstrated in many polar flagellins from Gram-negative bacteria and in only the Gram-positive genera Clostridium and Listeria. Furthermore, O-glycosylation has also been demonstrated in a limited number of lateral flagellins. In this work, we revised the current advances in flagellar glycosylation from Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the structural diversity of glycans, the O-linked pathway and the biological function of flagella glycosylation. PMID:24557579

  8. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-binding Module*

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Courtney B.; Talib, M. Faiz; McCabe, Clare; Bu, Lintao; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3–6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function. PMID:22147693

  9. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. B.; Talib, M. F.; McCabe, C.; Bu, L.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-27

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3-6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function.

  10. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  11. Glycosylation of conotoxins.

    PubMed

    Gerwig, Gerrit J; Hocking, Henry G; Stöcklin, Reto; Kamerling, Johannis P; Boelens, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Conotoxins are small peptides present in the venom of cone snails. The snail uses this venom to paralyze and capture prey. The constituent conopeptides display a high level of chemical diversity and are of particular interest for scientists as tools employed in neurological studies and for drug development, because they target with exquisite specificity membrane receptors, transporters, and various ion channels in the nervous system. However, these peptides are known to contain a high frequency and variability of post-translational modifications-including sometimes O-glycosylation-which are of importance for biological activity. The potential application of specific conotoxins as neuropharmalogical agents and chemical probes requires a full characterization of the relevant peptides, including the structure of the carbohydrate part. In this review, the currently existing knowledge of O-glycosylation of conotoxins is described. PMID:23455513

  12. N-linked glycosylation of GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus is critically important for virus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zuzhang; Lin, Tao; Sun, Lichang; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Xiaoming; Gao, Fei; Liu, Runxia; Chen, Chunyan; Tong, Guangzhi; Yuan, Shishan

    2012-09-01

    It has been proposed that the N-linked glycan addition at certain sites in GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is important for production of infectious viruses and viral infectivity. However, such specific N-linked glycosylation sites do not exist in some field PRRSV isolates. This implies that the existence of GP5-associated glycan per se is not vital to the virus life cycle. In this study, we found that mutation of individual glycosylation sites at N30, N35, N44, and N51 in GP5 did not affect virus infectivity in cultured cells. However, the mutants carrying multiple mutations at N-linked glycosylation sites in GP5 had significantly reduced virus yields compared with the wild-type (wt) virus. As a result, no viremia and antibody response were detected in piglets that were injected with a mutant without all N-linked glycans in GP5. These results suggest that the N-linked glycosylation of GP5 is critically important for virus replication in vivo. The study also showed that removal of N44-linked glycan from GP5 increased the sensitivity of mutant virus to convalescent-phase serum samples but did not elicit a high-level neutralizing antibody response to wt PRRSV. The results obtained from the present study have made significant contributions to better understanding the importance of glycosylation of GP5 in the biology of PRRSV. PMID:22761373

  13. Environmental projects, volume 11. Environmental assessment: Addition to operations building, Mars site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An Environmental Assessment was performed of the proposed addition to building G-86 at the Mars Site, which will provide space for new electronic equipment to consolidate the Deep Space Network (DSN) support facilities from other Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex (GDSCC) sites at the Mars Site, and will include a fifth telemetry and command group with its associated link monitor, control processor, and operator consoles. The addition of these facilities will increase the capability of the DSN to support future sophisticated NASA spacecraft missions such as the International Solar and Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. The planned construction of this building addition requires an Environmental Assessment (EA) document that records the existing environmental conditions at the Mars Site, that analyzes the environmental effects that possibly could be expected from the construction and use of the new building addition, and that recommends measures to be taken to mitigate any possible deleterious environmental effects.

  14. The role of HCV e2 protein glycosylation in functioning of virus envelope proteins in insect and Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Orlova, O V; Drutsa, V L; Spirin, P V; Prasolov, V S; Rubtsov, P M; Kochetkov, S N; Beljelarskaya, S N

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2, being virion components, are involved in the formation of infectious particles in infected cells. The detailed structure of the infectious particle of HCV remains poorly understood. Moreover, the virion assembly and release of virions by the cell are the least understood processes. It is believed that virion properties depend on glycosylation of the virus envelope proteins in a cell, while glycansat several glycosylation sites of these proteins play a pivotal role in protein functioning and the HCV life cycle. N-glycans of glycoproteins can influence viral particle formation, virus binding to cell surface, and HCV pathogenesis. We studied the effect of glycans on the folding ofthe E2 glycoprotein, formation of functional glycoprotein complexes and virus particles in insect and mammalian cells. In order to investigate these processes, point mutations of the N-glycosylation sites of HCV protein E2 (genotype 1b strain 274933RU) were generated and the mutant proteins were further analyzed in the baculovirus expression system. Elimination of the single glycosylation sites of the E2 glycoprotein, except for the N6 site, did not affect its synthesis efficiency in Sf9 insect cells, while the electrophoretic mobility of mutant proteins increased in proportion to the decrease in the number of glycosylation sites. The level of synthesis of HCV glycoprotein E2 in human HEK293T cells depended on the presence of glycans at the N1 and N8 glycosylation sites in contrast to Sf9 cells. At the same time, elimination of glycans at the N1, N2, and N10 sites led to the accumulation of unproductive E1E2 dimers as aggregates and productive assembly suppression of virus-like particles both in insect and mammalian cells. In addition, elimination of single glycosylation sites of HCV E2 had no impact on the RNA synthesis of structural proteins and formation of virus-like particles in insect and mammalian cells. PMID:25927005

  15. Glycosylation increases the thermostability of human aquaporin 10 protein.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Fredrik; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Fischer, Gerhard; Moberg, Andreas; Pedersen, Anders; Neutze, Richard; Hedfalk, Kristina

    2011-09-01

    Human aquaporin10 (hAQP10) is a transmembrane facilitator of both water and glycerol transport in the small intestine. This aquaglyceroporin is located in the apical membrane of enterocytes and is believed to contribute to the passage of water and glycerol through these intestinal absorptive cells. Here we overproduced hAQP10 in the yeast Pichia pastoris and observed that the protein is glycosylated at Asn-133 in the extracellular loop C. This finding confirms one of three predicted glycosylation sites for hAQP10, and its glycosylation is unique for the human aquaporins overproduced in this host. Nonglycosylated protein was isolated using both glycan affinity chromatography and through mutating asparagine 133 to a glutamine. All three forms of hAQP10 where found to facilitate the transport of water, glycerol, erythritol, and xylitol, and glycosylation had little effect on functionality. In contrast, glycosylated hAQP10 showed increased thermostability of 3-6 °C compared with the nonglycosylated protein, suggesting a stabilizing effect of the N-linked glycan. Because only one third of hAQP10 was glycosylated yet the thermostability titration was mono-modal, we suggest that the presence of at least one glycosylated protein within each tetramer is sufficient to convey an enhanced structural stability to the remaining hAQP10 protomers of the tetramer. PMID:21733844

  16. Detection of cytoplasmic glycosylation associated with hydroxyproline.

    PubMed

    West, Christopher M; van der Wel, Hanke; Blader, Ira J

    2006-01-01

    A special class of glycosylation occurs on a proline residue of the cytoplasmic/nuclear protein Skp1 in the social amoeba Dictyostelium. For this glycosylation to occur, the proline must first be hydroxylated by the action of a soluble prolyl 4-hydroxylase acting on the protein. Cytoplasmic prolyl 4-hydroxylases are dioxygen-dependent enzymes that have low affinity for their O2 substrate and, therefore, have been implicated in O2-sensing in Dictyostelium, as well as in vertebrates and invertebrates. The sugar-hydroxyproline linkage has low abundance, is resistant to alkali cleavage and known glycosidases, and does not bind known lectins. However, initial screens for this modification can be made by assessing changes in electrophoretic mobility of candidate proteins after treatment of cells with prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors, and/or by metabolic labeling with [3H]sugar precursors. In addition, cytoplasmic hydroxylation/glycosylation can be assessed by assaying for cytoplasmic glycosyltransferases. Here we describe these methods and examples of their use in analyzing Skp1 glycosylation in Dictyostelium and the apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis in humans. PMID:17132515

  17. Glycosylation modulates arenavirus glycoprotein expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, Cyrille J. Capul, Althea A. Lauron, Elvin J. Bederka, Lydia H. Knopp, Kristeene A. Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2011-01-20

    The glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) contains nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. We investigated the function of these N-glycosylations by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the available sites were occupied on GP1 and two of three on GP2. N-linked glycan mutations at positions 87 and 97 on GP1 resulted in reduction of expression and absence of cleavage and were necessary for downstream functions, as confirmed by the loss of GP-mediated fusion activity with T87A and S97A mutants. In contrast, T234A and E379N/A381T mutants impaired GP-mediated cell fusion without altered expression or processing. Infectivity via virus-like particles required glycans and a cleaved glycoprotein. Glycosylation at the first site within GP2, not normally utilized by LCMV, exhibited increased VLP infectivity. We also confirmed the role of the N-linked glycan at position 173 in the masking of the neutralizing epitope GP-1D. Taken together, our results indicated a strong relationship between fusion and infectivity.

  18. Initiation binding repressor, a factor that binds to the transcription initiation site of the histone h5 gene, is a glycosylated member of a family of cell growth regulators [corrected

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cuadrado, A; Martín, M; Noël, M; Ruiz-Carrillo, A

    1995-01-01

    Initiation binding repressor [corrected] (IBR) is a chicken erythrocyte factor (apparent molecular mass, 70 to 73 kDa) that binds to the sequences spanning the transcription initiation site of the histone h5 gene, repressing its transcription. A variety of other cells, including transformed erythroid precursors, do not have IBR but a factor referred to as IBF (68 to 70 kDa) that recognizes the same IBR sites. We have cloned the IBR cDNA and studied the relationship of IBR and IBF. IBR is a 503-amino-acid-long acidic protein which is 99.0% identical to the recently reported human NRF-1/alpha-Pal factor and highly related to the invertebrate transcription factors P3A2 and erected wing gene product (EWG). We present evidence that IBR and IBF are most likely identical proteins, differing in their degree of glycosylation. We have analyzed several molecular aspects of IBR/F and shown that the factor associates as stable homodimers and that the dimer is the relevant DNA-binding species. The evolutionarily conserved N-terminal half of IBR/F harbors the DNA-binding/dimerization domain (outer limits, 127 to 283), one or several casein kinase II sites (37 to 67), and a bipartite nuclear localization signal (89 to 106) which appears to be necessary for nuclear targeting. Binding site selection revealed that the alternating RCGCRYGCGY consensus constitutes high-affinity IBR/F binding sites and that the direct-repeat palindrome TGCGCATGCGCA is the optimal site. A survey of genes potentially regulated by this family of factors primarily revealed genes involved in growth-related metabolism. PMID:8524232

  19. Muscular dystrophies due to glycosylation defects.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Francesco; Torelli, Silvia; Brockington, Martin

    2008-10-01

    In the last few years, muscular dystrophies due to reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (ADG) have emerged as a common group of conditions, now referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Mutations in six genes (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, Fukutin, FKRP and LARGE) have so far been identified in patients with a dystroglycanopathy. Allelic mutations in each of these genes can result in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from severe congenital onset with associated structural brain malformations (Walker Warburg syndrome; muscle-eye-brain disease; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D) to a relatively milder congenital variant with no brain involvement (congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C), and to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2 variants with onset in childhood or adult life (LGMD2I, LGMD2L, and LGMD2N). ADG is a peripheral membrane protein that undergoes multiple and complex glycosylation steps to regulate its ability to effectively interact with extracellular matrix proteins, such as laminin, agrin, and perlecan. Although the precise composition of the glycans present on ADG are not known, it has been demonstrated that the forced overexpression of LARGE, or its paralog LARGE2, is capable of increasing the glycosylation of ADG in normal cells. In addition, its overexpression is capable of restoring dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding properties in primary cell cultures of patients affected by different genetically defined dystroglycanopathy variants. These observations suggest that there could be a role for therapeutic strategies to overcome the glycosylation defect in these conditions via the overexpression of LARGE. PMID:19019316

  20. Ultrasensitive characterization of site-specific glycosylation of affinity-purified haptoglobin from lung cancer patient plasma using 10 μm i.d. porous layer open tubular liquid chromatography-linear ion trap collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry L

    2011-03-15

    Site-specific analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biochemical and clinical research efforts. Glycopeptide analysis using liquid chromatography-collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry (LC-CID/ETD-MS) allows simultaneous characterization of the glycan structure and attached peptide site. However, due to the low ionization efficiency of glycopeptides during electrospray ionization, 200-500 fmol of sample per injection is needed for a single LC-MS run, which makes it challenging for the analysis of limited amounts of glycoprotein purified from biological matrixes. To improve the sensitivity of LC-MS analysis for glycopeptides, an ultranarrow porous layer open tubular (PLOT) LC column (2.5 m × 10 μm i.d.) was coupled to a linear ion trap (LTQ) collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometer to provide sensitive analysis of N-linked protein glycosylation heterogeneity. The potential of the developed method is demonstrated by the characterization of site-specific glycosylation using haptoglobin (Hpt) as a model protein. To limit the amount of haptoglobin to low picomole amounts of protein, we affinity purified it from 1 μL of pooled lung cancer patient plasma. A total of 26 glycoforms/glycan compositions on three Hpt tryptic glycopeptides were identified and quantified from 10 LC-MS runs with a consumption of 100 fmol of Hpt digest (13 ng of protein, 10 fmol per injection). Included in this analysis was the determination of the glycan occupancy level. At this sample consumption level, the high sensitivity of the PLOT LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS system allowed glycopeptide identification and structure determination, along with relative quantitation of glycans presented on the same peptide backbone, even for low abundant glycopeptides at the ∼100 amol level. The PLOT LC-MS system is shown to have sufficient sensitivity to allow characterization of site-specific protein glycosylation from trace

  1. On the site preferences of ternary additions to triple defect B2 intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, L.M.; Chen, S.L.; Chang, Y.A.

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge of the site preference of ternary solute additions is essential to developing an understanding of how these solutes affect the properties of B2 intermetallic compounds. A quasichemical model will be presented which is able to predict the site preferences of dilute solute additions to triple defect B2 compounds. The only parameters required are enthalpies of formation at the stoichiometric composition. General equations are developed which can be used to determine site occupations and defect concentrations for dilute as well as non-dilute solute additions. These equations use atom pair bond enthalpies as the parameters. It is found that the site preferences of dilute additions are not always in agreement with predictions based on the solubility lobes in ternary Gibbs isotherms, Predictions for dilute additions to NiAl and FeAl are compared to experimental results found in the literature. Satisfactory correlation is found between the model and the experimental results. In addition, the predictions from the model on vacancy concentrations in Fe doped NiAl are compared to recent experimental results by the authors.

  2. Prion propagation in cells expressing PrP glycosylation mutants.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Muhammad K; Dron, Michel; Chapuis, Jérôme; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2011-04-01

    Infection by prions involves conversion of a host-encoded cell surface protein (PrP(C)) to a disease-related isoform (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) carries two glycosylation sites variably occupied by complex N-glycans, which have been suggested by previous studies to influence the susceptibility to these diseases and to determine characteristics of prion strains. We used the Rov cell system, which is susceptible to sheep prions, to generate a series of PrP(C) glycosylation mutants with mutations at one or both attachment sites. We examined their subcellular trafficking and ability to convert into PrP(Sc) and to sustain stable prion propagation in the absence of wild-type PrP. The susceptibility to infection of mutants monoglycosylated at either site differed dramatically depending on the amino acid substitution. Aglycosylated double mutants showed overaccumulation in the Golgi compartment and failed to be infected. Introduction of an ectopic glycosylation site near the N terminus fully restored cell surface expression of PrP but not convertibility into PrP(Sc), while PrP(C) with three glycosylation sites conferred cell permissiveness to infection similarly to the wild type. In contrast, predominantly aglycosylated molecules with nonmutated N-glycosylation sequons, produced in cells expressing glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorless PrP(C), were able to form infectious PrP(Sc). Together our findings suggest that glycosylation is important for efficient trafficking of anchored PrP to the cell surface and sustained prion propagation. However, properly trafficked glycosylation mutants were not necessarily prone to conversion, thus making it difficult in such studies to discern whether the amino acid changes or glycan chain removal most influences the permissiveness to prion infection. PMID:21248032

  3. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser89 is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S89 was substituted with G89 (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  4. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser(89) is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S(89) was substituted with G(89) (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  5. Glycoengineering of yeasts from the perspective of glycosylation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Piirainen, Mari A; de Ruijter, Jorg C; Koskela, Essi V; Frey, Alexander D

    2014-12-25

    N-linked glycosylation of proteins is one of the most common posttranslational modifications. N-glycan structures and N-glycosylation efficiency are crucial parameters in the production of N-glycosylated proteins. Yeast cells can be seen as an attractive production host for therapeutic glycoproteins and pioneering work of glycoengineering was performed in Pichia pastoris, realizing yeast strains capable of producing defined, human-type N-glycans. Most strategies used for glycoengineering rely on the modification of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis for the generation of the substrate for Golgi-localized glycosyltransferases. However, modifications in the lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis often result in the accumulation of intermediate structures and cause hypoglycosylation of client proteins. In order to ensure complete N-glycosylation, the flow of lipid-linked oligosaccharide through the biosynthetic pathway and the transfer of the oligosaccharide from the donor lipid onto the protein have to be optimized. A promising tool to improve site occupancy is the expression of protozoan oligosaccharyltransferases, which possess altered specificities for the oligosaccharide and also for the protein acceptor site. Furthermore, flipping of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide into the ER lumen can be improved by overexpression of an artificial flippase. Improving the glycosylation efficiency ensures that not only homogeneous N-glycan structures are generated, but also client proteins are fully glycosylated. PMID:24632452

  6. The Metacaspase (Mca1p) Restricts O-glycosylation During Farnesol-induced Apoptosis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Camadro, Jean-Michel

    2016-07-01

    Protein glycolysation is an essential posttranslational modification in eukaryotic cells. In pathogenic yeasts, it is involved in a large number of biological processes, such as protein folding quality control, cell viability and host/pathogen relationships. A link between protein glycosylation and apoptosis was established by the analysis of the phenotypes of oligosaccharyltransferase mutants in budding yeast. However, little is known about the contribution of glycosylation modifications to the adaptive response to apoptosis inducers. The cysteine protease metacaspase Mca1p plays a key role in the apoptotic response in Candida albicans triggered by the quorum sensing molecule farnesol. We subjected wild-type and mca1-deletion strains to farnesol stress and then studied the early phase of apoptosis release in quantitative glycoproteomics and glycomics experiments on cell-free extracts essentially devoid of cell walls. We identified and characterized 62 new glycosylated peptides with their glycan composition: 17 N-glycosylated, 45 O-glycosylated, and 81 additional sites of N-glycosylation. They were found to be involved in the control of protein folding, cell wall integrity and cell cycle regulation. We showed a general increase in the O-glycosylation of proteins in the mca1 deletion strain after farnesol challenge. We identified 44 new putative protein substrates of the metacaspase in the glycoprotein fraction enriched on concanavalin A. Most of these substrates are involved in protein folding or protein resolubilization and in mitochondrial functions. We show here that key Mca1p substrates, such as Cdc48p or Ssb1p, involved in degrading misfolded glycoproteins and in the protein quality control system, are themselves differentially glycosylated. We found putative substrates, such as Bgl2p (validated by immunoblot), Srb1p or Ugp1p, that are involved in the biogenesis of glycans. Our findings highlight a new role of the metacaspase in amplifying cell death processes

  7. Glycosylation of Conotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Gerwig, Gerrit J.; Hocking, Henry G.; Stöcklin, Reto; Kamerling, Johannis P.; Boelens, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Conotoxins are small peptides present in the venom of cone snails. The snail uses this venom to paralyze and capture prey. The constituent conopeptides display a high level of chemical diversity and are of particular interest for scientists as tools employed in neurological studies and for drug development, because they target with exquisite specificity membrane receptors, transporters, and various ion channels in the nervous system. However, these peptides are known to contain a high frequency and variability of post-translational modifications—including sometimes O-glycosylation—which are of importance for biological activity. The potential application of specific conotoxins as neuropharmalogical agents and chemical probes requires a full characterization of the relevant peptides, including the structure of the carbohydrate part. In this review, the currently existing knowledge of O-glycosylation of conotoxins is described. PMID:23455513

  8. A Microarray-Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Approach for Site-specific Protein N-glycosylation Analysis, as Demonstrated for Human Serum Immunoglobulin M (IgM)*

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Martin; Küster, Simon Karl; Wahl, Fabian; Krismer, Jasmin; Dittrich, Petra S.; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for the site-specific identification and characterization of protein N-glycosylation. It is based on a nano-liquid chromatography microarray-matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-MS platform, which employs droplet microfluidics for on-plate nanoliter reactions. A chromatographic separation of a proteolytic digest is deposited at a high frequency on the microarray. In this way, a short separation run is archived into thousands of nanoliter reaction cavities, and chromatographic peaks are spread over multiple array spots. After fractionation, each other spot is treated with PNGaseF to generate two correlated traces within one run, one with treated spots where glycans are enzymatically released from the peptides, and one containing the intact glycopeptides. Mining for distinct glycosites is performed by searching for the predicted deglycosylated peptides in the treated trace. An identified peptide then leads directly to the position of the “intact” glycopeptide clusters, which are located in the adjacent spots. Furthermore, the deglycosylated peptide can be sequenced efficiently in a simple collision-induced dissociation-MS experiment. We applied the microarray approach to a detailed site-specific glycosylation analysis of human serum IgM. By scanning the treated spots with low-resolution matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-MS, we observed all five deglycosylated peptides, including the one originating from the secretory chain. A detailed glycopeptide characterization was then accomplished on the adjacent, untreated spots with high mass resolution and high mass accuracy using a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-Fourier transform-MS. We present the first detailed and comprehensive mass spectrometric analysis on the glycopeptide level for human polyclonal IgM with high mass accuracy. Besides complex type glycans on Asn 395, 332, 171, and on the J chain, we observed oligomannosidic glycans on Asn

  9. Identification of Glycosylation Sites Essential for Surface Expression of the CaVα2δ1 Subunit and Modulation of the Cardiac CaV1.2 Channel Activity.

    PubMed

    Tétreault, Marie-Philippe; Bourdin, Benoîte; Briot, Julie; Segura, Emilie; Lesage, Sylvie; Fiset, Céline; Parent, Lucie

    2016-02-26

    Alteration in the L-type current density is one aspect of the electrical remodeling observed in patients suffering from cardiac arrhythmias. Changes in channel function could result from variations in the protein biogenesis, stability, post-translational modification, and/or trafficking in any of the regulatory subunits forming cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channel complexes. CaVα2δ1 is potentially the most heavily N-glycosylated subunit in the cardiac L-type CaV1.2 channel complex. Here, we show that enzymatic removal of N-glycans produced a 50-kDa shift in the mobility of cardiac and recombinant CaVα2δ1 proteins. This change was also observed upon simultaneous mutation of the 16 Asn sites. Nonetheless, the mutation of only 6/16 sites was sufficient to significantly 1) reduce the steady-state cell surface fluorescence of CaVα2δ1 as characterized by two-color flow cytometry assays and confocal imaging; 2) decrease protein stability estimated from cycloheximide chase assays; and 3) prevent the CaVα2δ1-mediated increase in the peak current density and voltage-dependent gating of CaV1.2. Reversing the N348Q and N812Q mutations in the non-operational sextuplet Asn mutant protein partially restored CaVα2δ1 function. Single mutation N663Q and double mutations N348Q/N468Q, N348Q/N812Q, and N468Q/N812Q decreased protein stability/synthesis and nearly abolished steady-state cell surface density of CaVα2δ1 as well as the CaVα2δ1-induced up-regulation of L-type currents. These results demonstrate that Asn-663 and to a lesser extent Asn-348, Asn-468, and Asn-812 contribute to protein stability/synthesis of CaVα2δ1, and furthermore that N-glycosylation of CaVα2δ1 is essential to produce functional L-type Ca(2+) channels. PMID:26742847

  10. Impact of variable domain glycosylation on antibody clearance: an LC/MS characterization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihua; Biolsi, Susan; Bales, Kelly R; Kuchibhotla, Uma

    2006-02-15

    Variable (Fv) domain N-glycosylation sites are found in approximately 20% of human immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) in addition to the conserved N-glycosylation sites in the C(H)2 domains. The carbohydrate structures of the Fv glycans and their impact on in vivo half-life are not well characterized. Oligosaccharide structures in a humanized anti-Abeta IgG1 monoclonal antibody (Mab) with an N-glycosylation site in the complementary determining region (CDR2) of the heavy chain variable region were elucidated by LC/MS analysis following sequential exoglycosidase treatments of the endoproteinase Lys-C digest. Results showed that the major N-linked oligosaccharide structures in the Fv region have three characteristics (core-fucosylated biantennary oligosaccharides with one or two N-glycolylneuraminic acid [NeuGc] residues, zero or one alpha-linked Gal residue, and zero or one beta-linked GalNAc residue), whereas N-linked oligosaccharides in the Fc region contained typical Fc glycans (core-fucosylated, biantennary oligosaccharides with zero to two Gal residues). To elucidate the contribution of Fv glycans to the half-life of the antibody, a method that allows capture of the Mab and determination of its glycan structures at various time points after administration to mice was developed. Anti-Abeta antibody in mouse serum was immunocaptured by immobilized goat anti-human immunoglobulin Fc(gamma) antibody resin, and the captured material was treated with papain to generate Fab and Fc for LC/MS analysis. Different glycans in the Fc region showed the same clearance rate as demonstrated previously. In contrast to many other non-antibody glycosylated therapeutics, there is no strong correlation between oligosaccharide structures in the Fv region and their clearance rates in vivo. Our data indicated that biantennary oligosaccharides lacking galactosylation had slightly faster clearance rates than other structures in the Fv domain. PMID:16360109

  11. A theoretical estimate for nucleotide sugar demand towards Chinese Hamster Ovary cellular glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Ioscani Jimenez; Polizzi, Karen M.; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation greatly influences the safety and efficacy of many of the highest-selling recombinant therapeutic proteins (rTPs). In order to define optimal cell culture feeding strategies that control rTP glycosylation, it is necessary to know how nucleotide sugars (NSs) are consumed towards host cell and rTP glycosylation. Here, we present a theoretical framework that integrates the reported glycoproteome of CHO cells, the number of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosylation sites on individual host cell proteins (HCPs), and the carbohydrate content of CHO glycosphingolipids to estimate the demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation. We have identified the most abundant N-linked and O-GalNAc CHO glycoproteins, obtained the weighted frequency of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosites across the CHO cell proteome, and have derived stoichiometric coefficients for NS consumption towards CHO cell glycosylation. By combining the obtained stoichiometric coefficients with previously reported data for specific growth and productivity of CHO cells, we observe that the demand of NSs towards glycosylation is significant and, thus, is required to better understand the burden of glycosylation on cellular metabolism. The estimated demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation can be used to rationally design feeding strategies that ensure optimal and consistent rTP glycosylation. PMID:27345611

  12. A theoretical estimate for nucleotide sugar demand towards Chinese Hamster Ovary cellular glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Del Val, Ioscani Jimenez; Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation greatly influences the safety and efficacy of many of the highest-selling recombinant therapeutic proteins (rTPs). In order to define optimal cell culture feeding strategies that control rTP glycosylation, it is necessary to know how nucleotide sugars (NSs) are consumed towards host cell and rTP glycosylation. Here, we present a theoretical framework that integrates the reported glycoproteome of CHO cells, the number of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosylation sites on individual host cell proteins (HCPs), and the carbohydrate content of CHO glycosphingolipids to estimate the demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation. We have identified the most abundant N-linked and O-GalNAc CHO glycoproteins, obtained the weighted frequency of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosites across the CHO cell proteome, and have derived stoichiometric coefficients for NS consumption towards CHO cell glycosylation. By combining the obtained stoichiometric coefficients with previously reported data for specific growth and productivity of CHO cells, we observe that the demand of NSs towards glycosylation is significant and, thus, is required to better understand the burden of glycosylation on cellular metabolism. The estimated demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation can be used to rationally design feeding strategies that ensure optimal and consistent rTP glycosylation. PMID:27345611

  13. Diversity in Protein Glycosylation among Insect Species

    PubMed Central

    Vandenborre, Gianni; Smagghe, Guy; Ghesquière, Bart; Menschaert, Gerben; Nagender Rao, Rameshwaram; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Els J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background A very common protein modification in multicellular organisms is protein glycosylation or the addition of carbohydrate structures to the peptide backbone. Although the Class of the Insecta is the largest animal taxon on Earth, almost all information concerning glycosylation in insects is derived from studies with only one species, namely the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, the differences in glycoproteomes between insects belonging to several economically important insect orders were studied. Using GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) affinity chromatography, different sets of glycoproteins with mannosyl-containing glycan structures were purified from the flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum), the silkworm (Bombyx mori), the honeybee (Apis mellifera), the fruit fly (D. melanogaster) and the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). To identify and characterize the purified glycoproteins, LC-MS/MS analysis was performed. For all insect species, it was demonstrated that glycoproteins were related to a broad range of biological processes and molecular functions. Moreover, the majority of glycoproteins retained on the GNA column were unique to one particular insect species and only a few glycoproteins were present in the five different glycoprotein sets. Furthermore, these data support the hypothesis that insect glycoproteins can be decorated with mannosylated O-glycans. Conclusions/Significance The results presented here demonstrate that oligomannose N-glycosylation events are highly specific depending on the insect species. In addition, we also demonstrated that protein O-mannosylation in insect species may occur more frequently than currently believed. PMID:21373189

  14. AglQ Is a Novel Component of the Haloferax volcanii N-Glycosylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Arbiv, Adi; Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    N-glycosylation is a post-translational modification performed by members of all three domains of life. Studies on the halophile Haloferax volcanii have offered insight into the archaeal version of this universal protein-processing event. In the present study, AglQ was identified as a novel component of the pathway responsible for the assembly and addition of a pentasaccharide to select Asn residues of Hfx. volcanii glycoproteins, such as the S-layer glycoprotein. In cells deleted of aglQ, both dolichol phosphate, the lipid carrier used in Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation, and modified S-layer glycoprotein Asn residues only presented the first three pentasaccharide subunits, pointing to a role for AglQ in either preparing the third sugar for attachment of the fourth pentasaccharide subunit or processing the fourth sugar prior to its addition to the lipid-linked trisaccharide. To better define the precise role of AglQ, shown to be a soluble protein, bioinformatics tools were recruited to identify sequence or structural homologs of known function. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments guided by these predictions identified residues important for AglQ function. The results obtained point to AglQ acting as an isomerase in Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation. PMID:24236216

  15. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.   PMID:26982805

  16. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  . PMID:26982805

  17. Effects of glycosylation on antigenicity and immunogenicity of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) harbors three envelope glycoproteins (E(rns), E1 and E2). Previous studies have demonstrated that removal of specific glycosylation sites within these proteins yielded attenuated and immunogenic CSFV mutants. Here we analyzed the effects of lack of glycosylation of...

  18. The Calcium Goes Meow: Effects of Ions and Glycosylation on Fel d 1, the Major Cat Allergen.

    PubMed

    Ligabue-Braun, Rodrigo; Sachett, Liana Guimarães; Pol-Fachin, Laércio; Verli, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The major cat allergen, Fel d 1, is a structurally complex protein with two N-glycosylation sites that may be filled by different glycoforms. In addition, the protein contains three putative Ca2+ binding sites. Since the impact of these Fel d 1 structure modifications on the protein dynamics, physiology and pathology are not well established, the present work employed computational biology techniques to tackle these issues. While conformational effects brought upon by glycosylation were identified, potentially involved in cavity volume regulation, our results indicate that only the central Ca2+ ion remains coordinated to Fel d 1 in biological solutions, impairing its proposed role in modulating phospholipase A2 activity. As these results increase our understanding of Fel d 1 structural biology, they may offer new support for understanding its physiological role and impact into cat-promoted allergy. PMID:26134118

  19. The Calcium Goes Meow: Effects of Ions and Glycosylation on Fel d 1, the Major Cat Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Pol-Fachin, Laércio; Verli, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The major cat allergen, Fel d 1, is a structurally complex protein with two N-glycosylation sites that may be filled by different glycoforms. In addition, the protein contains three putative Ca2+ binding sites. Since the impact of these Fel d 1 structure modifications on the protein dynamics, physiology and pathology are not well established, the present work employed computational biology techniques to tackle these issues. While conformational effects brought upon by glycosylation were identified, potentially involved in cavity volume regulation, our results indicate that only the central Ca2+ ion remains coordinated to Fel d 1 in biological solutions, impairing its proposed role in modulating phospholipase A2 activity. As these results increase our understanding of Fel d 1 structural biology, they may offer new support for understanding its physiological role and impact into cat-promoted allergy. PMID:26134118

  20. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G; Larsen, Martin R; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  1. Glycosynthase Mutants of Endoglycosidase S2 Show Potent Transglycosylation Activity and Remarkably Relaxed Substrate Specificity for Antibody Glycosylation Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiezheng; Tong, Xin; Yang, Qiang; Giddens, John P; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-08-01

    Glycosylation can exert a profound impact on the structures and biological functions of antibodies. Glycosylation remodeling using the endoglycosidase-catalyzed deglycosylation and transglycosylation approach is emerging as a promising platform to produce homogeneous glycoforms of antibodies, but the broad application of this method will require the availability of highly efficient glycosynthase mutants. We describe in this paper a systematic site-directed mutagenesis of an endoglycosidase from Streptococcus pyogenes of serotype M49 (Endo-S2) and the evaluation of the resulting mutants for their hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities. We found that mutations at the Asp-184 residue gave mutants that demonstrated significantly different properties, some possessed potent transglycosylation activity with diminished hydrolysis activity but others did not, which would be otherwise difficult to predict without the comparative study. In contrast to the previously reported Endo-S mutants that are limited to action on complex type N-glycans, the Endo-S2 glycosynthases described here, including D184M and D184Q, were found to have remarkably relaxed substrate specificity and were capable of transferring three major types (complex, high-mannose, and hybrid type) of N-glycans for antibody glycosylation remodeling. In addition, the Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants were found to be much more active in general than the Endo-S mutants for transglycosylation. The usefulness of these Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants was exemplified by an efficient glycosylation remodeling of two therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and trastuzumab (Herceptin). PMID:27288408

  2. A novel mass spectrometric strategy “BEMAP” reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Duggin, Iain G.; Larsen, Martin R.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues mapping to 140 proteins in ETEC, including several known virulence factors, and 34 in E. coli K-12. The two strains had 32 glycoproteins in common. Remarkably, the majority of the ETEC glycoproteins were conserved in both strains but nevertheless were only glycosylated in the pathogen. Therefore, bacterial O-linked glycosylation is much more extensive than previously thought, and is especially important to the pathogen. PMID:27562176

  3. The glycosylation-dependent interaction of perlecan core protein with LDL: implications for atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ashline, David; Liu, Li; Tassa, Carlos; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Ravid, Katya; Layne, Matthew D.; Reinhold, Vernon; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2015-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan in the arterial wall. Previous studies have linked it to atherosclerosis. Perlecan contains a core protein and three HS side chains. Its core protein has five domains (DI–DV) with disparate structures and DII is highly homologous to the ligand-binding portion of LDL receptor (LDLR). The functional significance of this domain has been unknown. Here, we show that perlecan DII interacts with LDL. Importantly, the interaction largely relies on O-linked glycans that are only present in the secreted DII. Among the five repeat units of DII, most of the glycosylation sites are from the second unit, which is highly divergent and rich in serine and threonine, but has no cysteine residues. Interestingly, most of the glycans are capped by the negatively charged sialic acids, which are critical for LDL binding. We further demonstrate an additive effect of HS and DII on LDL binding. Unlike LDLR, which directs LDL uptake through endocytosis, this study uncovers a novel feature of the perlecan LDLR-like DII in receptor-mediated lipoprotein retention, which depends on its glycosylation. Thus, perlecan glycosylation may play a role in the early LDL retention during the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25528754

  4. Insights on N-glycosylation of human haptoglobin and its association with cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Shang, Shuxin; Li, Wei; Qin, Xue; Liu, Yinkun

    2016-07-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most significant post-translation modifications and plays a critical role in various biological functions. Haptoglobin (Hp) is one of the acute-phase response proteins secreted by liver. Its glycosylation could be analyzed by many analytical techniques qualitatively and quantitatively. The glycosylation alterations of Hp are reported to be associated with different kinds of diseases. The main glycosylation alterations of Hp in cancer appear to be the presence of aberrantly fucosylated and sialylated structures as well as increased branching. In this mini review, we provided a brief overview of Hp structure and biological function, discussed its glycosylation alterations in different cancers, and described the existing technologies for analyzing glycosylation site and glycan of Hp. Given the importance of Hp glycosylation, its unknown and unclear biological complexity and significances, Hp glycosylation has become a major target in cancer research. Development of sensitive and specific detection of Hp glycosylation including large-scale validation may be significant steps forward to its clinical application. PMID:26873173

  5. Engineering the Pattern of Protein Glycosylation Modulates the Thermostability of a GH11 Xylanase*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Maldonado, Raquel; Vieira, Davi Serradella; Alponti, Juliana Sanchez; Bonneil, Eric; Thibault, Pierre; Ward, Richard John

    2013-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is a common post-translational modification, the effect of which on protein conformational and stability is incompletely understood. Here we have investigated the effects of glycosylation on the thermostability of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A (XynA) expressed in Pichia pastoris. Intact mass analysis of the heterologous wild-type XynA revealed two, three, or four Hex8–16GlcNAc2 modifications involving asparagine residues at positions 20, 25, 141, and 181. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the XynA modified with various combinations of branched Hex9GlcNAc2 at these positions indicated a significant contribution from protein-glycan interactions to the overall energy of the glycoproteins. The effect of glycan content and glycosylation position on protein stability was evaluated by combinatorial mutagenesis of all six potential N-glycosylation sites. The majority of glycosylated enzymes expressed in P. pastoris presented increased thermostability in comparison with their unglycosylated counterparts expressed in Escherichia coli. Steric effects of multiple glycosylation events were apparent, and glycosylation position rather than the number of glycosylation events determined increases in thermostability. The MD simulations also indicated that clustered glycan chains tended to favor less stabilizing glycan-glycan interactions, whereas more dispersed glycosylation patterns favored stabilizing protein-glycan interactions. PMID:23846692

  6. Glycosylation of Erythrocyte Spectrin and Its Modification in Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Sajal; Dutta, Devawati; Ghoshal, Angana; Mukhopadhyay, Sumi; Saha, Bibhuti; Sundar, Shyam; Jarmalavicius, Saulius; Forgber, Michael; Mandal, Chhabinath; Walden, Peter; Mandal, Chitra

    2011-01-01

    Using a lectin, Achatinin-H, having preferential specificity for glycoproteins with terminal 9-O-acetyl sialic acid derivatives linked in α2-6 linkages to subterminal N-acetylgalactosamine, eight distinct disease-associated 9-O-acetylated sialoglycoproteins was purified from erythrocytes of visceral leishmaniaisis (VL) patients (RBCVL). Analyses of tryptic fragments by mass spectrometry led to the identification of two high-molecular weight 9-O-acetylated sialoglycoproteins as human erythrocytic α- and β-spectrin. Total spectrin purified from erythrocytes of VL patients (spectrinVL) was reactive with Achatinin-H. Interestingly, along with two high molecular weight bands corresponding to α- and β-spectrin another low molecular weight 60 kDa band was observed. Total spectrin was also purified from normal human erythrocytes (spectrinN) and insignificant binding with Achatinin-H was demonstrated. Additionally, this 60 kDa fragment was totally absent in spectrinN. Although the presence of both N- and O-glycosylations was found both in spectrinN and spectrinVL, enhanced sialylation was predominantly induced in spectrinVL. Sialic acids accounted for approximately 1.25 kDa mass of the 60 kDa polypeptide. The demonstration of a few identified sialylated tryptic fragments of α- and β-spectrinVL confirmed the presence of terminal sialic acids. Molecular modelling studies of spectrin suggest that a sugar moiety can fit into the potential glycosylation sites. Interestingly, highly sialylated spectrinVL showed decreased binding with spectrin-depleted inside-out membrane vesicles of normal erythrocytes compared to spectrinN suggesting functional abnormality. Taken together this is the first report of glycosylated eythrocytic spectrin in normal erythrocytes and its enhanced sialylation in RBCVL. The enhanced sialylation of this cytoskeleton protein is possibly related to the fragmentation of spectrinVL as evidenced by the presence of an additional 60 kDa fragment, absent in

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic and computer-stimulated structural analyses of a heptapeptide sequence found around the N-glycosylation site of a proline-rich glycoprotein from human parotid saliva.

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, R E; Bhandary, K K; Tseng, C C; Bergey, E J; Levine, M J

    1987-01-01

    The proline-rich glycoprotein from human parotid saliva has a common heptapeptide sequence around four of six N-glycosylation sites (Maeda, N., H. S. Kim, E. A. Azen, and O. J. Smithies, 1985, J. Biol. Chem., 20:11123-11130). A synthetic model of the heptamer protein sequence, NH2-Q(1)-G(2)-G(3)-N(4)-Q(5)-S(6)-Q(7)-CONH2, was examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and the ECEPP/2-VAO4A (Empirical Conformation Energy Program for Peptides) energy minimization computer algorithm (Scheraga, H. A., 1982, Quantum Chemistry Program Exchange, 454; Powell, M. J. D., 1964, Quantum Chemistry Program Exchange, 60). The NMR spectrum was almost completely assigned in dimethylsulfoxide-d6 (DMSO), and the amide chemical shift temperature dependence, phi dihedral angles, and chi 1 rotamer populations elucidated. These data indicated that a significant population of the heptamer could exist as a type I beta-turn [4----1 between Q(5) and G(2)] and/or a type II' beta-turn [4----1 between (Q)5 and G(2) and/or a gamma-turn [3----1 between Q(5) and G(3)] with the amino acid chi 1 torsion angles weighted toward the gauche- conformation. Starting from these three possible conformations, the ECEPP/2-VAO4A rigid geometry energy minimization program was used to find the localized predominant in vacuo structures of this heptapeptide sequence. The type II' beta-turn conformation best fits the data based on internuclear hydrogen-bonding distances, minimum potential energy considerations, and the NMR parameters. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:3828456

  8. Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Lynne A.; Krasnewich, Donna

    2013-01-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a rapidly growing group of inborn errors of metabolism that result from defects in the synthesis of glycans. Glycosylation is a major post-translational protein modification and an estimated 2% of the human genome encodes proteins for glycosylation. The molecular bases for the current 60…

  9. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites... NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  10. N-glycosylation in Haloferax volcanii: adjusting the sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Eichler, Jerry; Arbiv, Adi; Cohen-Rosenzweig, Chen; Kaminski, Lina; Kandiba, Lina; Konrad, Zvia

    2013-01-01

    Long believed to be restricted to Eukarya, it is now known that cells of all three domains of life perform N-glycosylation, the covalent attachment of glycans to select target protein asparagine residues. Still, it is only in the last decade that pathways of N-glycosylation in Archaea have been delineated. In the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation) proteins is responsible for the addition of an N-linked pentasaccharide to modified proteins, including the surface (S)-layer glycoprotein, the sole component of the surface layer surrounding the cell. The S-layer glycoprotein N-linked glycosylation profile changes, however, as a function of surrounding salinity. Upon growth at different salt concentrations, the S-layer glycoprotein is either decorated by the N-linked pentasaccharide introduced above or by both this pentasaccharide as well as a tetrasaccharide of distinct composition. Recent efforts have identified Agl5–Agl15 as components of a second Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway responsible for generating the tetrasaccharide attached to S-layer glycoprotein when growth occurs in 1.75 M but not 3.4 M NaCl-containing medium. PMID:24399998

  11. Impact of glycosylation on the unimpaired functions of the sperm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One of the key factors of early development is the specification of competence between the oocyte and the sperm, which occurs during gametogenesis. However, the starting point, growth, and maturation for acquiring competence during spermatogenesis and oogenesis in mammals are very different. Spermatogenesis includes spermiogenesis, but such a metamorphosis is not observed during oogenesis. Glycosylation, a ubiquitous modification, is a preliminary requisite for distribution of the structural and functional components of spermatids for metamorphosis. In addition, glycosylation using epididymal or female genital secretory glycans is an important process for the sperm maturation, the acquisition of the potential for fertilization, and the acceleration of early embryo development. However, nonemzymatic unexpected covalent bonding of a carbohydrate and malglycosylation can result in falling fertility rates as shown in the diabetic male. So far, glycosylation during spermatogenesis and the dynamics of the plasma membrane in the process of capacitation and fertilization have been evaluated, and a powerful role of glycosylation in spermatogenesis and early development is also suggested by structural bioinformatics, functional genomics, and functional proteomics. Further understanding of glycosylation is needed to provide a better understanding of fertilization and embryo development and for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools for infertility. PMID:26473106

  12. The effect of glycosylation on cytotoxicity of Ibaraki virus nonstructural protein NS3

    PubMed Central

    URATA, Maho; WATANABE, Rie; IWATA, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of Ibaraki virus nonstructural protein NS3 was confirmed, and the contribution of glycosylation to this activity was examined by using glycosylation mutants of NS3 generated by site-directed mutagenesis. The expression of NS3 resulted in leakage of lactate dehydrogenase to the culture supernatant, suggesting the cytotoxicity of this protein. The lack of glycosylation impaired the transport of NS3 to the plasma membrane and resulted in reduced cytotoxicity. Combined with the previous observation that NS3 glycosylation was specifically observed in mammalian cells (Urata et al., Virus Research 2014), it was suggested that the alteration of NS3 cytotoxicity through modulating glycosylation is one of the strategies to achieve host specific pathogenisity of Ibaraki virus between mammals and vector arthropods. PMID:26178820

  13. Site-specific glycoproteomics confirms that protein structure dictates formation of N-glycan type, core fucosylation and branching.

    PubMed

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H

    2012-11-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the individualized and highly reproducible N-glycan repertoires on each protein glycosylation site modulate function. Relationships between protein structures and the resulting N-glycoforms have previously been observed, but remain to be quantitatively confirmed and examined in detail to define the responsible mechanisms in the conserved mammalian glycosylation machinery. Here, we investigate this relationship by manually extracting and analyzing quantitative and qualitative site-specific glycoprofiling data from 117 research papers. Specifically, N-glycan structural motifs were correlated with the structure of the protein carriers, focusing on the solvent accessibility of the individual glycosylation sites and the physicochemical properties of the surrounding polypeptide chains. In total, 474 glycosylation sites from 169 mammalian N-glycoproteins originating from different tissues/body fluids were investigated. It was confirmed statistically that the N-glycan type, degree of core fucosylation and branching are strongly influenced by the glycosylation site accessibility. For these three N-glycan features, glycosylation sites carrying highly processed glycans were significantly more solvent-accessible than those carrying less processed counterparts. The glycosylation site accessibilities could be linked to molecular signatures at the primary and secondary protein levels, most notably to the glycoprotein size and the proportion of glycosylation sites located in accessible β-turns. In addition, the subcellular location of the glycoproteins influenced the formation of the N-glycan structures. These data confirm that protein structures dictate site-specific formation of several features of N-glycan structures by affecting the biosynthetic pathway. Mammals have, as such, evolved mechanisms enabling proteins to influence the N-glycans they present to the extracellular environment. PMID:22798492

  14. Polar Glycosylated and Lateral Non-Glycosylated Flagella from Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11).

    PubMed

    Fulton, Kelly M; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Twine, Susan M; Tomás, Juan M; Merino, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Polar and but not lateral flagellin proteins from Aeromonas hydrophila strain AH-1 (serotype O11) were found to be glycosylated. Top-down mass spectrometry studies of purified polar flagellins suggested the presence of a 403 Da glycan of mass. Bottom-up mass spectrometry studies showed the polar flagellin peptides to be modified with 403 Da glycans in O-linkage. The MS fragmentation pattern of this putative glycan was similar to that of pseudaminic acid derivative. Mutants lacking the biosynthesis of pseudaminic acid (pseB and pseI homologues) were unable to produce polar flagella but no changes were observed in lateral flagella by post-transcriptional regulation of the flagellin. Complementation was achieved by reintroduction of the wild-type pseB and pseI. We compared two pathogenic features (adhesion to eukaryotic cells and biofilm production) between the wild-type strain and two kinds of mutants: mutants lacking polar flagella glycosylation and lacking the O11-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but with unaltered polar flagella glycosylation. Results suggest that polar flagella glycosylation is extremely important for A. hydrophila AH-1 adhesion to Hep-2 cells and biofilm formation. In addition, we show the importance of the polar flagella glycosylation for immune stimulation of IL-8 production via toll-"like" receptor 5 (TLR5). PMID:26633358

  15. Polar Glycosylated and Lateral Non-Glycosylated Flagella from Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11)

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Kelly M.; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Twine, Susan M.; Tomás, Juan M.; Merino, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Polar and but not lateral flagellin proteins from Aeromonas hydrophila strain AH-1 (serotype O11) were found to be glycosylated. Top-down mass spectrometry studies of purified polar flagellins suggested the presence of a 403 Da glycan of mass. Bottom-up mass spectrometry studies showed the polar flagellin peptides to be modified with 403 Da glycans in O-linkage. The MS fragmentation pattern of this putative glycan was similar to that of pseudaminic acid derivative. Mutants lacking the biosynthesis of pseudaminic acid (pseB and pseI homologues) were unable to produce polar flagella but no changes were observed in lateral flagella by post-transcriptional regulation of the flagellin. Complementation was achieved by reintroduction of the wild-type pseB and pseI. We compared two pathogenic features (adhesion to eukaryotic cells and biofilm production) between the wild-type strain and two kinds of mutants: mutants lacking polar flagella glycosylation and lacking the O11-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but with unaltered polar flagella glycosylation. Results suggest that polar flagella glycosylation is extremely important for A. hydrophila AH-1 adhesion to Hep-2 cells and biofilm formation. In addition, we show the importance of the polar flagella glycosylation for immune stimulation of IL-8 production via toll-“like” receptor 5 (TLR5). PMID:26633358

  16. Phosphomannose Isomerase Inhibitors Improve N-Glycosylation in Selected Phosphomannomutase-deficient Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vandana; Ichikawa, Mie; He, Ping; Bravo, Yalda; Dahl, Russell; Ng, Bobby G.; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.; Freeze, Hudson H.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are rare genetic disorders due to impaired glycosylation. The patients with subtypes CDG-Ia and CDG-Ib have mutations in the genes encoding phosphomannomutase 2 (PMM2) and phosphomannose isomerase (MPI or PMI), respectively. PMM2 (mannose 6-phosphate → mannose 1-phosphate) and MPI (mannose 6-phosphate ⇔ fructose 6-phosphate) deficiencies reduce the metabolic flux of mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) into glycosylation, resulting in unoccupied N-glycosylation sites. Both PMM2 and MPI compete for the same substrate, Man-6-P. Daily mannose doses reverse most of the symptoms of MPI-deficient CDG-Ib patients. However, CDG-Ia patients do not benefit from mannose supplementation because >95% Man-6-P is catabolized by MPI. We hypothesized that inhibiting MPI enzymatic activity would provide more Man-6-P for glycosylation and possibly benefit CDG-Ia patients with residual PMM2 activity. Here we show that MLS0315771, a potent MPI inhibitor from the benzoisothiazolone series, diverts Man-6-P toward glycosylation in various cell lines including fibroblasts from CDG-Ia patients and improves N-glycosylation. Finally, we show that MLS0315771 increases mannose metabolic flux toward glycosylation in zebrafish embryos. PMID:21949237

  17. Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Pyeloplasty Using Additional 2 mm Instruments: A Comparison with Conventional Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung Ho; Lee, Dong-Gi; Lee, Jun Ho; Baek, Min Ki; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Despite a recent surge in the performance of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS), concerns remain about performing LESS pyeloplasty (LESS-P) because of the technical difficulty in suturing. We report our techniques and initial experiences with LESS-P using additional needlescopic instruments and compare the results with conventional laparoscopic pyeloplasty (CL-P). Materials and Methods Nine patients undergoing LESS-P were matched 2:1 with regard to age and side of surgery to a previous cohort of 18 patients who underwent CL-P. In both groups, the operating procedures were performed equally except for the number of access points. In the LESS-P group, we made a single 2 cm incision at the umbilicus and used a homemade port. We also used additional 2 mm needlescopic instruments at the subcostal area to facilitate suturing and the ureteral stenting. Results The preoperative characteristics were comparable in both groups. Postoperatively, no significant differences were noted between the LESS-P and CL-P cases in regard to length of stay, estimated blood loss, analgesics required, and complications. But, LESS-P was associated with a shorter operative time (252.2 vs. 309.7 minutes, p=0.044) and less pain on postoperative day one (numeric rating scale 3.7 vs. 5.6, p=0.024). The success rate was 94% with CL-P (median, 23 months) and 100% with LESS-P (median, 14 months). Conclusions Our initial experiences suggest that LESS-P is a feasible and safe procedure. The use of additional 2 mm instruments can help to overcome the difficulties associated with LESS surgery. PMID:22025957

  18. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  19. A non-glycosylated extracellular superoxide dismutase variant.

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, A; Edlund, T; Hjalmarsson, K; Marklund, S L; Sandström, J; Strömqvist, M; Tibell, L

    1992-01-01

    The secretory tetrameric extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is the only glycosylated SOD isoenzyme. The importance of the carbohydrate moiety for the properties of the enzyme is unknown. An expression vector defining nonglycosylated EC-SOD (ngEC-SOD) was constructed by mutagenesis of the codon for Asn-89 into a codon for Gln. The vector was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary DXB-11 cells and ngEC-SOD was isolated to 70% purity from the culture media of selected clones. The absence of glycosylation was established by the lack of affinity for various lectins, the absence of staining with the periodic acid-Schiff reagent, the change in mobility and composition of the tryptic peptide containing the mutated glycosylation site, and the reduction in apparent molecular mass upon SDS/PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography. The tetrameric state was retained. The heparin affinity, a fundamental and distinguishing property of EC-SOD, was found to be slightly increased. The enzymic activity was essentially retained. The major difference from native glycosylated enzyme in physical properties was a marked reduction in solubility. Like glycosylated EC-SOD, ngEC-SOD was, after intravenous injection into rabbits, rapidly sequestered by the vessel endothelium, and was promptly released into plasma after injection of heparin. The only difference from glycosylated EC-SOD in this behaviour, was a slightly more rapid elimination of the mutant enzyme from the vasculature. It is concluded that no specific biological role for the EC-SOD carbohydrate moiety could be revealed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1463450

  20. Golgi glycosylation and human inherited diseases.

    PubMed

    Freeze, Hudson H; Ng, Bobby G

    2011-09-01

    The Golgi factory receives custom glycosylates and dispatches its cargo to the correct cellular locations. The process requires importing donor substrates, moving the cargo, and recycling machinery. Correctly glycosylated cargo reflects the Golgi's quality and efficiency. Genetic disorders in the specific equipment (enzymes), donors (nucleotide sugar transporters), or equipment recycling/reorganization components (COG, SEC, golgins) can all affect glycosylation. Dozens of human glycosylation disorders fit these categories. Many other genes, with or without familiar names, well-annotated pedigrees, or likely homologies will join the ranks of glycosylation disorders. Their broad and unpredictable case-by-case phenotypes cross the traditional medical specialty boundaries. The gene functions in patients may be elusive, but their common feature may include altered glycosylation that provide clues to Golgi function. This article focuses on a group of human disorders that affect protein or lipid glycosylation. Readers may find it useful to generalize some of these patient-based, translational observations to their own research. PMID:21709180

  1. Golgi Glycosylation and Human Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Ng, Bobby G.

    2011-01-01

    The Golgi factory receives custom glycosylates and dispatches its cargo to the correct cellular locations. The process requires importing donor substrates, moving the cargo, and recycling machinery. Correctly glycosylated cargo reflects the Golgi's quality and efficiency. Genetic disorders in the specific equipment (enzymes), donors (nucleotide sugar transporters), or equipment recycling/reorganization components (COG, SEC, golgins) can all affect glycosylation. Dozens of human glycosylation disorders fit these categories. Many other genes, with or without familiar names, well-annotated pedigrees, or likely homologies will join the ranks of glycosylation disorders. Their broad and unpredictable case-by-case phenotypes cross the traditional medical specialty boundaries. The gene functions in patients may be elusive, but their common feature may include altered glycosylation that provide clues to Golgi function. This article focuses on a group of human disorders that affect protein or lipid glycosylation. Readers may find it useful to generalize some of these patient-based, translational observations to their own research. PMID:21709180

  2. A Novel Strategy for Thermostability Improvement of Trypsin Based on N-Glycosylation within the Ω-Loop Region.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chao; Liu, Ye; Yu, Haoran; Du, Kun; Gan, Yiru; Huang, He

    2016-07-28

    The Ω-loop is a nonregular and flexible structure that plays an important role in molecular recognition, protein folding, and thermostability. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulation was carried out to assess the molecular stability and flexibility profile of the porcine trypsin structures. Two Ω-Loops (fragment 57-67 and fragment 78-91) were confirmed to represent the flexible region. Subsequently, glycosylation site-directed mutations (A73S, N84S, and R104S) were introduced within the Ω-loop region and its wing chain based on its potential N-glycosylation sites (Asn-Xaa-Ser/Thr consensus sequences) and structure information to improve the thermostability of trypsin. The result demonstrated that the halflife of the N84S mutant at 50°C increased by 177.89 min when compared with that of the wildtype enzyme. Furthermore, the significant increase in the thermal stability of the N84S mutant has also been proven by an increase in the Tm values determined by circular dichroism. Additionally, the optimum temperatures of the wild-type enzyme and the N84S mutant were 75°C and 80°C, respectively. In conclusion, we obtained the thermostability-improved enzyme N84S mutant, and the strategy used to design this mutant based on its structural information and N-linked glycosylation modification could be applied to engineer other enzymes to meet the needs of the biotechnological industry. PMID:27012235

  3. Nontargeted Modification-Specific Metabolomics Investigation of Glycosylated Secondary Metabolites in Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) Based on Liquid Chromatography-High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weidong; Tan, Junfeng; Lu, Meiling; Xie, Dongchao; Li, Pengliang; Lv, Haipeng; Zhu, Yin; Guo, Li; Zhang, Yue; Peng, Qunhua; Lin, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Glycosylation on small molecular metabolites modulates a series of biological events in plants. However, a large number of glycosides have not been discovered and investigated using -omics approaches. Here, a general strategy named "nontargeted modification-specific metabolomics" was applied to map the glycosylation of metabolites. The key aspect of this method is to adopt in-source collision-induced dissociation to dissociate the glycosylated metabolite, causing a characteristic neutral loss pattern, which acts as an indicator for the glycosylation identification. In an exemplary application in green teas, 120 glucosylated/galactosylated, 38 rhamnosylated, 21 rutinosylated, and 23 primeverosylated metabolites were detected simultaneously. Among them, 61 glycosylated metabolites were putatively identified according to current tea metabolite databases. Thanks to the annotations of glycosyl moieties in advance, the method aids metabolite identifications. An additional 40 novel glycosylated metabolites were tentatively elucidated. This work provides a feasible strategy to discover and identify novel glycosylated metabolites in plants. PMID:27541009

  4. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2domains reveal that the (HhH)2domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  5. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  6. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Class A Repeats Are O-Glycosylated in Linker Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Wang, Shengjun; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Yang, Zhang; Halim, Adnan; Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Madsen, Thomas Daugbjerg; Seidah, Nabil G.; Bennett, Eric Paul; Levery, Steven B.; Clausen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) is crucial for cholesterol homeostasis and deficiency in LDLR functions cause hypercholesterolemia. LDLR is a type I transmembrane protein that requires O-glycosylation for stable expression at the cell surface. It has previously been suggested that LDLR O-glycosylation is found N-terminal to the juxtamembrane region. Recently we identified O-glycosylation sites in the linker regions between the characteristic LDLR class A repeats in several LDLR-related receptors using the “SimpleCell” O-glycoproteome shotgun strategy. Herein, we have systematically characterized O-glycosylation sites on recombinant LDLR shed from HEK293 SimpleCells and CHO wild-type cells. We find that the short linker regions between LDLR class A repeats contain an evolutionarily conserved O-glycosylation site at position −1 of the first cysteine residue of most repeats, which in wild-type CHO cells is glycosylated with the typical sialylated core 1 structure. The glycosites in linker regions of LDLR class A repeats are conserved in LDLR from man to Xenopus and found in other homologous receptors. O-Glycosylation is controlled by a large family of polypeptide GalNAc transferases. Probing into which isoform(s) contributed to glycosylation of the linker regions of the LDLR class A repeats by in vitro enzyme assays suggested a major role of GalNAc-T11. This was supported by expression of LDLR in HEK293 cells, where knock-out of the GalNAc-T11 isoform resulted in the loss of glycosylation of three of four linker regions. PMID:24798328

  7. Cotranslational and posttranslocational N-glycosylation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Shrimal, Shiteshu; Cherepanova, Natalia A.; Gilmore, Reid

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine linked glycosylation of proteins is an essential protein modification reaction in most eukaryotic organisms. N-linked oligosaccharides are important for protein folding and stability, biosynthetic quality control, intracellular traffic and the physiological function of many N-glycosylated proteins. In metazoan organisms, the oligosaccharyltransferase is composed of a catalytic subunit (STT3A or STT3B) and a set of accessory subunits. Duplication of the catalytic subunit gene allowed cells to evolve OST complexes that act sequentially to maximize the glycosylation efficiency of the large number of proteins that are glycosylated in metazoan organisms. We will summarize recent progress in understanding the mechanism of (a) cotranslational glycosylation by the translocation channel associated STT3A complex, (b) the role of the STT3B complex in mediating cotranslational or posttranslocational glycosylation of acceptor sites that have been skipped by the STT3A complex, and (c) the role of the oxidoreductase MagT1 in STT3B-dependent glycosylation of cysteine-proximal acceptor sites. PMID:25460543

  8. Development of a combined chemical and enzymatic approach for the mass spectrometric identification and quantification of aberrant N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Fangjun; Tan, Yexiong; Sun, Zhen; Song, Chunxia; Ye, Mingliang; Wang, Hongyang; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-02-16

    Direct mass spectrometric analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation is a challenge to the current analytical techniques. Except lectin affinity chromatography, no other glycosylation enrichment techniques are available for analysis of aberrant glycosylation. In this study, we developed a combined chemical and enzymatic strategy as an alternative for the mass spectrometric analysis of aberrant glycosylation. Sialylated glycopeptides were enriched with reverse glycoblotting, cleaved by endoglycosidase F3 and analyzed by mass spectrometry with both neutral loss triggered MS(3) in collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Interestingly, a great part of resulted glycopeptides were found with fucose attached to the N-acetylglucosamine (N-GlcNAc), which indicated that the aberrant glycosylation that is carrying both terminal sialylation and core fucosylation was identified. Totally, 69 aberrant N-glycosylation sites were identified in sera samples from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Following the identification, quantification of the level of this aberrant glycosylation was also carried out using stable isotope dimethyl labeling and pooled sera sample from liver cirrhosis and HCC was compared. Six glycosylation sites demonstrated elevated level of aberrancy, which demonstrated that our developed strategy was effective in both qualitative and quantitative studies of aberrant glycosylation. PMID:22202184

  9. Neurology of inherited glycosylation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, HH; Eklund, E A; Ng, BG; Patterson, M C

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation comprise most of the nearly 70 genetic disorders known to be caused by impaired synthesis of glycoconjugates. The effects are expressed in most organ systems, and most involve the nervous system. Typical manifestations include structural abnormalities, (eg, rapidly progressive cerebellar atrophy), myopathies (including congenital muscular dystrophies and limb-girdle dystrophies), strokes and stroke-like episodes, epileptic seizures, developmental delay, and demyelinating neuropathy. Patients can have neurological symptoms associated with coagulopathies, immune dysfunction with or without infections, and cardiac, renal, or hepatic failure, which are common features of glycosylation disorders. The diagnosis of congenital disorders of glycosylation should be considered for any patient with multisystem disease and in those with more specific phenotypic features. Measurement of concentrations of selected glycoconjugates can be used to screen for many of these disorders, and molecular diagnosis is becoming more widely available in clinical practice. Disease-modifying treatments are available for only a few disorders, but all affected individuals benefit from early diagnosis and aggressive management. PMID:22516080

  10. Taming the Reactivity of Glycosyl Iodides To Achieve Stereoselective Glycosidation.

    PubMed

    Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-19

    that even highly functionalized aglycon acceptors add. Following the coupling event, the TMS ethers are readily removed by methanolysis, and since all of the byproducts are volatile, multiple reactions can be performed in a single reaction vessel without isolation of intermediates. In this fashion, per-O-TMS monosaccharides can be converted to biologically relevant α-linked glycolipids in one pot. The stereochemical outcome of these reactions can also be switched to β-glycoside formation by addition of silver to chelate the iodide, thus favoring SN2 displacement of the α-iodide. While iodides derived from benzyl and silyl ether-protected oligosaccharides are susceptible to interglycosidic bond cleavage when treated with TMSI, the introduction of a single acetate protecting group prevents this unwanted side reaction. Partial acetylation of armed glycosyl iodides also attenuates HI elimination side reactions. Conversely, fully acetylated glycosyl iodides are deactivated and require metal catalysis in order for glycosidation to occur. Recent findings indicate that I2 activation of per-O-acetylated mono-, di-, and trisaccharides promotes glycosidation of cyclic ethers to give β-linked iodoalkyl glycoconjugates in one step. Products of these reactions have been converted into multivalent carbohydrate displays. With these synthetic pathways elucidated, chemical reactivity can be exquisitely controlled by the judicious selection of protecting groups to achieve high stereocontrol in step-economical processes. PMID:26524481

  11. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL...

  12. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL...

  13. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL...

  14. New Insights into the Glycosylation of the Surface Layer Protein SgsE from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a▿

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Kerstin; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Berkenkamp, Stefan; Messner, Paul; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Schäffer, Christina

    2006-01-01

    The surface of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a cells is covered by an oblique surface layer (S-layer) composed of glycoprotein subunits. To this S-layer glycoprotein, elongated glycan chains are attached that are composed of [→2)-α-l-Rhap-(1→3)-β-l-Rhap-(1→2)-α-L-Rhap-(1→] repeating units, with a 2-O-methyl modification of the terminal trisaccharide at the nonreducing end of the glycan chain and a core saccharide as linker to the S-layer protein. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, four bands appear, of which three represent glycosylated S-layer proteins. In the present study, nanoelectrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) and infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry were adapted for analysis of this high-molecular-mass and water-insoluble S-layer glycoprotein to refine insights into its glycosylation pattern. This is a prerequisite for artificial fine-tuning of S-layer glycans for nanobiotechnological applications. Optimized MS techniques allowed (i) determination of the average masses of three glycoprotein species to be 101.66 kDa, 108.68 kDa, and 115.73 kDa, (ii) assignment of nanoheterogeneity to the S-layer glycans, with the most prevalent variation between 12 and 18 trisaccharide repeating units, and the possibility of extension of the already-known →3)-α-l-Rhap-(1→3)-α-l-Rhap-(1→ core by one additional rhamnose residue, and (iii) identification of a third glycosylation site on the S-layer protein, at position threonine-590, in addition to the known sites threonine-620 and serine-794. The current interpretation of the S-layer glycoprotein banding pattern is that in the 101.66-kDa glycoprotein species only one glycosylation site is occupied, in the 108.68-kDa glycoprotein species two glycosylation sites are occupied, and in the 115.73-kDa glycoprotein species three glycosylation sites are occupied, while the 94.46-kDa band represents

  15. New insights into the glycosylation of the surface layer protein SgsE from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Kerstin; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Berkenkamp, Stefan; Messner, Paul; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Schäffer, Christina

    2006-11-01

    The surface of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a cells is covered by an oblique surface layer (S-layer) composed of glycoprotein subunits. To this S-layer glycoprotein, elongated glycan chains are attached that are composed of [-->2)-alpha-l-Rhap-(1-->3)-beta-l-Rhap-(1-->2)-alpha-L-Rhap-(1-->] repeating units, with a 2-O-methyl modification of the terminal trisaccharide at the nonreducing end of the glycan chain and a core saccharide as linker to the S-layer protein. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, four bands appear, of which three represent glycosylated S-layer proteins. In the present study, nanoelectrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) and infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry were adapted for analysis of this high-molecular-mass and water-insoluble S-layer glycoprotein to refine insights into its glycosylation pattern. This is a prerequisite for artificial fine-tuning of S-layer glycans for nanobiotechnological applications. Optimized MS techniques allowed (i) determination of the average masses of three glycoprotein species to be 101.66 kDa, 108.68 kDa, and 115.73 kDa, (ii) assignment of nanoheterogeneity to the S-layer glycans, with the most prevalent variation between 12 and 18 trisaccharide repeating units, and the possibility of extension of the already-known -->3)-alpha-l-Rhap-(1-->3)-alpha-l-Rhap-(1--> core by one additional rhamnose residue, and (iii) identification of a third glycosylation site on the S-layer protein, at position threonine-590, in addition to the known sites threonine-620 and serine-794. The current interpretation of the S-layer glycoprotein banding pattern is that in the 101.66-kDa glycoprotein species only one glycosylation site is occupied, in the 108.68-kDa glycoprotein species two glycosylation sites are occupied, and in the 115.73-kDa glycoprotein species three glycosylation sites are occupied, while the 94.46-kDa band

  16. Marked increase in rat red blood cell membrane protein glycosylation by one-month treatment with a cafeteria diet

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Laia; Baron, Cristian; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Remesar, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    than those of plasma, even when expressed in molal units, and were practically nil in cafeteria-diet fed rats compared with controls; there was no effect of sex. Conclusions. RBC membrane glycosylation is a sensitive indicator of developing metabolic syndrome-related hyperglycemia, more sensitive than the general measurement of plasma or RBC protein glycosylation. The extensive glycosylation of blood proteins does not seem to be markedly affected by sex; and could be hardly justified from an assumedly sustained plasma hyperglycemia. The low levels of glucose found within RBC, especially in rats under the cafeteria diet, could hardly justify the extensive glycosylation of hemoglobin and the lack of differences with controls, which contained sizeable levels of intracellular glucose. Additional studies are needed to study the dynamics of glucose in vivo in the RBC to understand how such extensive protein glycosylation could take place. PMID:26213657

  17. NEUROLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN GLYCOSYLATION DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Eklund, Erik A.; Ng, Bobby G.; Patterson, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    This review will present principles of glycosylation, describe the relevant glycosylation pathways and their related disorders, and highlight some of the neurological aspects and issues that continue to challenge researchers. Over 100 rare human genetic disorders that result from deficiencies in the different glycosylation pathways are known today. Most of these disorders impact the central and/or peripheral nervous systems. Patients typically have developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia, seizures, neuropathy, and metabolic abnormalities in multiple organ systems. Between these disorders there is great clinical diversity because all cell types differentially glycosylate proteins and lipids. The patients have hundreds of mis-glycosylated products afflicting a myriad of processes including cell signaling, cell-cell interaction and cell migration. This vast complexity in glycan composition and function, along with limited analytic tools has impeded the identification of key glycosylated molecules that cause pathologies, and to date few critical target proteins have been pinpointed. PMID:25840006

  18. Rapid Assays for Lectin Toxicity and Binding Changes that Reflect Altered Glycosylation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans, with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, and also missing those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also give rise to spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes

  19. Pulp fiction - The volunteer concept (or how not to site additional LLRW disposal capacity)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Experiences of compacts and of individual states throughout the nation indicate that low-level radioactive waste disposal siting processes, based from the beginning upon the volunteer concept are fraught with problems. Most apparent among these problems is that the volunteer concept does not lead to scientifically and technically based siting endeavors. Ten years have passed since the Amendments Act of 1985, and no compact or state has been - successful in providing for new LLRW disposal capacity. That failure can be traced in part to the reliance upon the volunteer concept in siting attempts. If success is to be achieved, the future direction for LLRW management must focus on three areas: first, a comprehensive evaluation of all LLRW management options, including reduction of waste generated and on-site storage; secondly, a comprehensive evaluation of the current as well as projected waste stream, to determine the amount of disposal capacity actually needed; and, finally, sound scientifically and technically based siting processes.

  20. Analysis of expression and glycosylation of avian metapneumovirus attachment glycoprotein from recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lizhong; Nishi, Krista; MacLeod, Erin; Sabara, Marta I; Li, Yan

    2010-11-01

    Recently, we reported the expression and glycosylation of avian metapneumovirus attachment glycoprotein (AMPV/C G protein) in eukaryotic cell lines by a transient-expression method. In the present study, we investigated the biosynthesis and O-linked glycosylation of the AMPV/C G protein in a baculovirus expression system. The results showed that the insect cell-produced G protein migrated more rapidly in SDS-PAGE as compared to LLC-MK2 cell-derived G proteins owing to glycosylation differences. The fully processed, mature form of G protein migrated between 78 and 86 kDa, which is smaller than the 110 kDa mature form of G expressed in LLC-MK2 cells. In addition, several immature G gene products migrating at 40-48 and 60-70 kDa were also detected by SDS-PAGE and represented glycosylated intermediates. The addition of the antibiotic tunicamycin, which blocks early steps of glycosylation, to insect cell culture resulted in the disappearance of two glycosylated forms of the G protein and identified a 38 kDa unglycosylated precursor. The maturation of the G protein was completely blocked by monensin, suggesting that the O-linked glycosylation of G initiated in the trans-Golgi compartment. The presence of O-linked sugars on the mature protein was further confirmed by lectin Arachis hypogaea binding assay. Furthermore, antigenic features of the G protein expressed in insect cells were evaluated by ELISA. PMID:20713098

  1. Expression of GPI anchored human recombinant erythropoietin in CHO cells is devoid of glycosylation heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Devasahayam, Mercy; Devi, Sobita

    2015-04-01

    Erythropoietin is a glycohormone involved in the regulation of the blood cell levels. It is a 166 amino acid protein having 3 N-glycosylation and one O-linked glycosylation sites, and is used to treat anaemia related illness. Though human recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO) is produced in CHO cells, the loss in quality control is 80% due to incomplete glycosylation of the rEPO with low levels of fully glycosylated active rEPO. Here, we describe the expression from CHO cells of fully glycosylated human rEPO when expressed as a GPI anchored molecule (rEPO-g). The results demonstrated the production of a homogenous completely glycosylated human rEPO-g as a 42 kD band without any low molecular weight glycoform variants as shown by affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE and anti-human EPO specific western blot. The western blot using specific monoclonal antibody is the available biochemical technique to prove the presence of homogeneity in the expressed recombinant protein. The GPI anchor can be removed during the purification process to yield a therapeutically relevant recombinant erythropoietin molecule cells with a higher in vivo biological activity due to its high molecular weight of 40 kD. This is possibly the first report on the production of a homogenous and completely glycosylated human rEPO from CHO cells for efficient therapy. PMID:26011979

  2. Molecular Analysis of an Alternative N-Glycosylation Machinery by Functional Transfer from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Naegeli, Andreas; Neupert, Christine; Fan, Yao-Yun; Lin, Chia-Wei; Poljak, Kristina; Papini, Anna Maria; Schwarz, Flavio; Aebi, Markus

    2014-01-01

    N-Linked protein glycosylation is a frequent post-translational modification that can be found in all three domains of life. In a canonical, highly conserved pathway, an oligosaccharide is transferred by a membrane-bound oligosaccharyltransferase from a lipid donor to asparagines in the sequon NX(S/T) of secreted polypeptides. The δ-proteobacterium Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae encodes an unusual pathway for N-linked protein glycosylation. This pathway takes place in the cytoplasm and is mediated by a soluble N-glycosyltransferase (NGT) that uses nucleotide-activated monosaccharides to glycosylate asparagine residues. To characterize the process of cytoplasmic N-glycosylation in more detail, we studied the glycosylation in A. pleuropneumoniae and functionally transferred the glycosylation system to Escherichia coli. N-Linked glucose specific human sera were used for the analysis of the glycosylation process. We identified autotransporter adhesins as the preferred protein substrate of NGT in vivo, and in depth analysis of the modified sites in E. coli revealed a surprisingly relaxed peptide substrate specificity. Although NX(S/T) is the preferred acceptor sequon, we detected glycosylation of alternative sequons, including modification of glutamine and serine residues. We also demonstrate the use of NGT to glycosylate heterologous proteins. Therefore, our study could provide the basis for a novel route for the engineering of N-glycoproteins in bacteria. PMID:24275653

  3. Enzymatic glycoprotein synthesis: Preparation of ribonuclease glycoforms via enzymatic glycopeptide condensation and glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, K.; Sears, P.; Martin, R.; Wong, C.H.

    1997-03-05

    In order to study the effects carbohydrates have on glycoprotein structure and funciton, it is imperative to be able to synthesize the appropriate natural and non-natural glycoprotein variants in a single form. Because the available in vivo techniques provide only heterogeneous mixtures of different glycoforms, enzymatic in vitro methodologies have been pursued. Using the N-glycoprotein RNase B as a model system, the oligosaccharide was removed leaving only the N-acetylglucosamine as a `tag` to the site of glycosylation. Glycosyltransferases were then used to build a unique carbohydrate moiety. A new RNase glycoform containing the branched oligosccharide, sialyl Lewis X or the Hg derivative, was synthesized enzymatically to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. In addition, the monoglycosylated protein was digested into several smaller pieces by subtilisin BPN`. These fragments were religated by subtilisin 8397 to the full length RNase by addition glycerol; this method points to a new chemical-enzymatic process for the synthesis of glycoproteins using synthetic peptides and glycopeptides as substrates for enzymatic ligation followed by further enzymatic glycosylations. 29 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Recent developments in the enzymatic O-glycosylation of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    The glycosylation of bioactive compounds, such as flavonoids, is of particular relevance, as it modulates many of their pharmacokinetic parameters. This article reviews the literature between 2010 and the end of 2015 that deals with the enzymatic O-glycosylation of this class of compounds. Enzymes of glycosyltransferase family 1 remain the biocatalysts of choice for glycodiversification of flavonoids, in spite of relatively low yields. Transfers of 14 different sugars, in addition to glucose, were reported. Several Escherichia coli strains were metabolically engineered to enable a (more efficient) synthesis of the required donor during in vivo glycosylations. For the transfer of glucose, enzymes of glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 70 were successfully assayed with several flavonoids. The number of acceptor substrates and of regiospecificities characterized so far is smaller than for glycosyltransferases. However, their glycosyl donors are much cheaper and yields are considerably higher. A few success stories of enzyme engineering were reported. These improved the catalytic efficiency as well as donor, acceptor, or product ranges. Currently, the development of appropriate high-throughput screening systems appears to be the major bottleneck for this powerful technology. PMID:27029191

  5. Molecular-Scale Features that Govern the Effects of O-Glycosylation on a Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guan, Xiaoyang; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Zeng, Chen; Greene, Eric R.; Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Chen, Claire; Groobman, Ari; Resch, Michael G.; Himmel, Michael E.; et al

    2015-09-21

    The protein glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in all kingdoms of life. Despite its importance in molecular and cellular biology, the molecular-level ramifications of O-glycosylation on biomolecular structure and function remain elusive. Here, we took a small model glycoprotein and changed the glycan structure and size, amino acid residues near the glycosylation site, and glycosidic linkage while monitoring any corresponding changes to physical stability and cellulose binding affinity. The results of this study reveal the collective importance of all the studied features in controlling the most pronounced effects of O-glycosylation in this system. This study suggests the possibility ofmore » designing proteins with multiple improved properties by simultaneously varying the structures of O-glycans and amino acids local to the glycosylation site.« less

  6. Molecular-Scale Features that Govern the Effects of O-Glycosylation on a Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyang; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Zeng, Chen; Greene, Eric R.; Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Chen, Claire; Groobman, Ari; Resch, Michael G.; Himmel, Michael E.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2015-09-21

    The protein glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in all kingdoms of life. Despite its importance in molecular and cellular biology, the molecular-level ramifications of O-glycosylation on biomolecular structure and function remain elusive. Here, we took a small model glycoprotein and changed the glycan structure and size, amino acid residues near the glycosylation site, and glycosidic linkage while monitoring any corresponding changes to physical stability and cellulose binding affinity. The results of this study reveal the collective importance of all the studied features in controlling the most pronounced effects of O-glycosylation in this system. This study suggests the possibility of designing proteins with multiple improved properties by simultaneously varying the structures of O-glycans and amino acids local to the glycosylation site.

  7. Breeding site selection by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to large wood additions and factors that influence reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason B.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.; Lightcap, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) with respect to breeding behavior can be partitioned into at least four fitness components: survival to reproduction, competition for breeding sites, success of egg incubation, and suitability of the local environment near breeding sites for early rearing of juveniles. We evaluated the relative influences of habitat features linked to these fitness components with respect to selection of breeding sites by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). We also evaluated associations between breeding site selection and additions of large wood, as the latter were introduced into the study system as a means of restoring habitat conditions to benefit coho salmon. We used a model selection approach to organize specific habitat features into groupings reflecting fitness components and influences of large wood. Results of this work suggest that female coho salmon likely select breeding sites based on a wide range of habitat features linked to all four hypothesized fitness components. More specifically, model parameter estimates indicated that breeding site selection was most strongly influenced by proximity to pool-tail crests and deeper water (mean and maximum depths). Linkages between large wood and breeding site selection were less clear. Overall, our findings suggest that breeding site selection by coho salmon is influenced by a suite of fitness components in addition to the egg incubation environment, which has been the emphasis of much work in the past.

  8. Glycosylation and epitope mapping of the 5T4 glycoprotein oncofoetal antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, David M; Woods, Andrew M; Myers, Kevin A; Westwater, Caroline; Rahi-Saund, Veena; Davies, Michael J; Renouf, David V; Hounsell, Elizabeth F; Stern, Peter L

    2002-01-01

    The human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen is a focus for development of several antibody-directed therapies on the basis of the murine monoclonal antibody against 5T4 (mAb5T4), which recognizes a conformational epitope. 5T4 molecules are highly N-glycosylated transmembrane glycoproteins whose extracellular domain contains two regions of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and associated flanking regions, separated by an intervening hydrophilic sequence. Using a series of deletion and mutated cDNA constructs as well as chimaeras with the murine homologue, we have mapped the mAb5T4 epitope to the more membrane-proximal LRR2 or its flanking region. Analysis of the glycosylation of the seven consensus Asp-Xaa-Ser/Thr sites was consistent with all of the sites being glycosylated. A combination of two high-mannose chains (predominantly octasaccharide) and five mostly sialylated bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary complex chains with minor quantities of core fucose were detected. The two glycosylation sites, which are the most likely to have predominantly high-mannose chains, are in the only two regions that show significant differences between the human and the 81% identical mouse sequence. A site-directed mutation, which abolished glycosylation at one of these sites (position 192), did not alter antigenicity. The other, which is nearest to the N-terminus in the human, has an Asn-Leu-Thr to Asn-Leu-Leu conversion in the mouse, so cannot be glycosylated in the latter species. The large complex glycosylation at the other sites is likely to influence the antigenicity and tertiary structure generating the 5T4 epitope. PMID:11903056

  9. Glycosylation and epitope mapping of the 5T4 glycoprotein oncofoetal antigen.

    PubMed

    Shaw, David M; Woods, Andrew M; Myers, Kevin A; Westwater, Caroline; Rahi-Saund, Veena; Davies, Michael J; Renouf, David V; Hounsell, Elizabeth F; Stern, Peter L

    2002-04-01

    The human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen is a focus for development of several antibody-directed therapies on the basis of the murine monoclonal antibody against 5T4 (mAb5T4), which recognizes a conformational epitope. 5T4 molecules are highly N-glycosylated transmembrane glycoproteins whose extracellular domain contains two regions of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and associated flanking regions, separated by an intervening hydrophilic sequence. Using a series of deletion and mutated cDNA constructs as well as chimaeras with the murine homologue, we have mapped the mAb5T4 epitope to the more membrane-proximal LRR2 or its flanking region. Analysis of the glycosylation of the seven consensus Asp-Xaa-Ser/Thr sites was consistent with all of the sites being glycosylated. A combination of two high-mannose chains (predominantly octasaccharide) and five mostly sialylated bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary complex chains with minor quantities of core fucose were detected. The two glycosylation sites, which are the most likely to have predominantly high-mannose chains, are in the only two regions that show significant differences between the human and the 81% identical mouse sequence. A site-directed mutation, which abolished glycosylation at one of these sites (position 192), did not alter antigenicity. The other, which is nearest to the N-terminus in the human, has an Asn-Leu-Thr to Asn-Leu-Leu conversion in the mouse, so cannot be glycosylated in the latter species. The large complex glycosylation at the other sites is likely to influence the antigenicity and tertiary structure generating the 5T4 epitope. PMID:11903056

  10. Synthesis of oligosaccharides using per-O-trimethylsilyl-glycosyl iodides as glycosyl donor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Cui, Yanli; Zou, Rong; Cheng, Zhaodong; Yao, Weirong; Mao, Yangyi; Zhang, Yongmin

    2016-06-01

    Trimethylsilyl (TMS) protecting group has been found to be very useful for the simultaneous protection of both the glycosyl donor- and the acceptor-substrates in oligosaccharide synthesis. Thus, while the per-O-trimethylsilylated glycosyl iodides served as the glycosyl donor, those bearing selectively exposed primary hydroxyl groups were found suitable as the glycosyl acceptor for the reaction. The cheap and commercially available trialkylamine, triethylamine was found to be an effective promoter for the glycosylation. Importantly, the reaction was α-stereospecific and gave the products in 58%-78% yields. PMID:27077820

  11. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal...

  12. Effect of a-site cation deficiency and YSZ additions on sintering and properties of doped lanthanum manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    The sintering behavior of Ca- and Sr-doped lanthanum manganite (the preferred SOFC cathode material) is highly dependent on the relative proportion of A and B site cations in the material. In general, A-site cation deficiency increases sintered density. The effect of additions of YSZ to lanthanum manganite (to expand the reactive region at the cathode/electrolyte interface and improve thermal expansion and sintering shrinkage matches) on sintering and other properties will also be reported.

  13. The effect of glycosylation on the transferrin structure: A molecular dynamic simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Z; Housaindokht, M R; Bozorgmehr, M R; Izadyar, M

    2016-09-01

    Transferrins have been defined by the highly cooperative binding of iron and a carbonate anion to form a Fe-CO3-Tf ternary complex. As such, the layout of the binding site residues affects transferrin function significantly; In contrast to N-lobe, C-lobe binding site of the transferrin structure has been less characterized and little research which surveyed the interaction of carbonate with transferrin in the C-lobe binding site has been found. In the present work, molecular dynamic simulation was employed to gain access into the molecular level understanding of carbonate binding site and their interactions in each lobe. Residues responsible for carbonate binding of transferrin structure were pointed out. In addition, native human transferrin is a glycoprotein that two N-linked complex glycan chains located in the C-lobe. Usually, in the molecular dynamic simulation for simplifying, glycan is removed from the protein structure. Here, we explore the effect of glycosylation on the transferrin structure. Glycosylation appears to have an effect on the layout of the binding site residue and transferrin structure. On the other hand, sometimes the entire transferrin formed by separated lobes that it allows the results to be interpreted in a straightforward manner rather than more parameters required for full length protein. But, it should be noted that there are differences between the separated lobe and full length transferrin, hence, a comparative analysis by the molecular dynamic simulation was performed to investigate such structural variations. Results revealed that separation in C-lobe caused a significant structural variation in comparison to N-lobe. Consequently, the separated lobes and the full length one are different, showing the importance of the interlobe communication and the impact of the lobes on each other in the transferrin structure. PMID:27235585

  14. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Human Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Adam E.; Rosenberg, Brandon N.; Edwards, Genea; Carreon, Teresia A.; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the difference in protein glycosylation and glycosylation enzyme levels between glaucomatous and control trabecular meshwork (TM). Experimental design Glaucomatous and normal donor (n=12 each) TM tissues, Lectin-fluorescence, fluorophore assisted carbohydrate analyses, and quantitative mass spectrometry were used to determine the glycosylation levels. Primary TM cells and glycosylation inhibitors were used to determine their effect on cell shape and motility. Results In contrast to elevated levels of glycoproteins determined by lectin-fluorescence, simultaneous hyper and hypo-glycosylation in glaucomatous trabecular meshwork was revealed by fluorophore assisted carbohydrate analyses. Analyses of enzymes showed elevation of Beta-glycosidase 1 and decrease in Galactosyltransferase family 6 domain containing protein 1 in the glaucomatous trabecular meshwork. Quantitative mass spectrometry identified select protein level changes between glaucomatous and normal trabecular meshwork. Primary trabecular meshwork cells were treated with inhibitors to elicit hypo-glycosylation, which affected cell shape, motility, and fluorescent tracer transport across a layer of trabecular meshwork cells. Conclusions and clinical relevance Global protein glycosylation is aberrant in glaucomatous trabecular meshwork compared to controls. The results presented here suggest that the alteration in global TM protein glycosylation encompassing cellular and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to glaucoma pathology likely mediated through changes in properties of TM cells. PMID:24458570

  15. Glycosylation enables aesculin to activate Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyun Ha; Park, Hyunsu; Park, Hee Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Sadikot, Ruxana T; Cha, Jaeho; Joo, Myungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Since aesculin, 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin-6-O-β-glucopyranoside, suppresses inflammation, we asked whether its anti-inflammatory activity is associated with the activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key anti-inflammatory factor. Our results, however, show that aesculin marginally activated Nrf2. Since glycosylation can enhance the function of a compound, we then asked whether adding a glucose makes aesculin activate Nrf2. Our results show that the glycosylated aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin, robustly activated Nrf2, inducing the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as heme oxygenase-1, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in macrophages. Mechanistically, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin suppressed ubiquitination of Nrf2, retarding degradation of Nrf2. Unlike aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly suppressed neutrophilic lung inflammation, a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI), in mice, which was not recapitulated in Nrf2 knockout mice, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory function of the compound largely acts through Nrf2. In a mouse model of sepsis, a major cause of ALI, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly enhanced the survival of mice, compared with aesculin. Together, these results show that glycosylation could confer the ability to activate Nrf2 on aesculin, enhancing the anti-inflammatory function of aesculin. These results suggest that glycosylation can be a way to improve or alter the function of aesculin. PMID:27417293

  16. Glycosylation enables aesculin to activate Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyun Ha; Park, Hyunsu; Park, Hee Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Sadikot, Ruxana T.; Cha, Jaeho; Joo, Myungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Since aesculin, 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin-6-O-β-glucopyranoside, suppresses inflammation, we asked whether its anti-inflammatory activity is associated with the activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key anti-inflammatory factor. Our results, however, show that aesculin marginally activated Nrf2. Since glycosylation can enhance the function of a compound, we then asked whether adding a glucose makes aesculin activate Nrf2. Our results show that the glycosylated aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin, robustly activated Nrf2, inducing the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as heme oxygenase-1, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in macrophages. Mechanistically, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin suppressed ubiquitination of Nrf2, retarding degradation of Nrf2. Unlike aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly suppressed neutrophilic lung inflammation, a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI), in mice, which was not recapitulated in Nrf2 knockout mice, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory function of the compound largely acts through Nrf2. In a mouse model of sepsis, a major cause of ALI, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly enhanced the survival of mice, compared with aesculin. Together, these results show that glycosylation could confer the ability to activate Nrf2 on aesculin, enhancing the anti-inflammatory function of aesculin. These results suggest that glycosylation can be a way to improve or alter the function of aesculin. PMID:27417293

  17. Site preference of ternary alloying additions to NiTi: Fe, Pt, Pd, Au, Al, Cu, Zr and Hf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Mosca, Hugo O.

    2004-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of the site substitution behavior of Pd in NiTi (J. Alloys and Comp. (2004), in press) has been extended to examine the behavior of several other alloying additions, namely, Fe, Pt, Au, Al, Cu, Zr and Hf in this important shape memory alloy. It was found that all elements, to a varying degree, displayed absolute preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice. How- ever, the energetics of the different substitutional schemes, coupled with large scale simulations indicate that the general trend in all cases is for the ternary addition to want to form stronger ordered structures with Ti.

  18. N-glycosylation of Colorectal Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Crina I. A.; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Fung, Wesley L. J.; Koeleman, Carolien A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Verhoeven, Aswin; Mesker, Wilma E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of ∼1 million cases and an annual mortality rate of ∼655,000 individuals. There is an urgent need for identifying novel targets to develop more sensitive, reliable, and specific tests for early stage detection of colon cancer. Post-translational modifications are known to play an important role in cancer progression and immune surveillance of tumors. In the present study, we compared the N-glycan profiles from 13 colorectal cancer tumor tissues and corresponding control colon tissues. The N-glycans were enzymatically released, purified, and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid. Aliquots were profiled by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) with fluorescence detection and by negative mode MALDI-TOF-MS. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis to investigate the N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer, an excellent separation and prediction ability were observed for both HILIC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS data. For structure elucidation, information from positive mode ESI-ion trap-MS/MS and negative mode MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was combined. Among the features with a high separation power, structures containing a bisecting GlcNAc were found to be decreased in the tumor, whereas sulfated glycans, paucimannosidic glycans, and glycans containing a sialylated Lewis type epitope were shown to be increased in tumor tissues. In addition, core-fucosylated high mannose N-glycans were detected in tumor samples. In conclusion, the combination of HILIC and MALDI-TOF-MS profiling of N-glycans with multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated its potential for identifying N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer tissues and provided new leads that might be used as candidate biomarkers. PMID:22573871

  19. Site-selective DNA hydrolysis by Ce(IV)-EDTA with the use of one oligonucleotide additive bearing two monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Komiyama, Makoto

    2005-10-01

    Two deoxyuridine derivatives each bearing a monophosphate group at the 5-position with a C3 linker, were incorporated into an oligonucleotide. By using this modified oligonucleotide, a bulge was formed at a predetermined position in a DNA substrate, and two monophosphate groups were placed at both junctions of the bulge. Upon treatment of the mixture with Ce(IV)-EDTA at pH 7.0, the phosphodiester linkages at the bulge site were selectively and efficiently hydrolyzed. The monophosphate groups introduced into the bulge site greatly accelerated site-selective DNA scission. Compared with the previously reported two-additive system, which combines two oligonucleotide additives each with a monophosphate at their termini, the present one-additive system is simpler and more convenient. Furthermore, site-selective DNA hydrolysis by using this one-additive system is successful even at high reaction temperatures (e.g., 55 degrees C). This reflects the thermodynamic stability of the duplexes formed between the substrate and the additive DNA. PMID:16196014

  20. The effects of C-glycosylation of luteolin on its antioxidant, anti-Alzheimer's disease, anti-diabetic, and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Sue; Islam, Md Nurul; Ali, Md Yousof; Kim, Young Myeong; Park, Hye Jin; Sohn, Hee Sook; Jung, Hyun Ah

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the effect of C-glycosylation at different positions of luteolin, the structure-activity relationships of luteolin and a pair of isomeric C-glycosylated derivatives orientin and isoorientin, were evaluated. We investigated the effects of C-glycosylation on the antioxidant, anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD), anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory effects of luteolin and its two C-glycosides via in vitro assays of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), total reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydraxyl (DPPH), aldose reductase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-site amyloid precursor cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), and cellular assays of NO production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/cyclooxygenase-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Of the three compounds, isoorientin showed the highest scavenging activity against DPPH, NO, and ONOO(-), while luteolin was the most potent inhibitor of ROS generation. In addition, luteolin showed the most potent anti-AD activity as determined by its inhibition of AChE, BChE, and BACE1. With respect to anti-diabetic effects, luteolin exerted the strongest inhibitory activity against PTP1B and rat lens aldose reductase. Luteolin also inhibited NO production and iNOS protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages, while orientin and isoorientin were inactive at the same concentrations. The effects of C-glycosylation at different positions of luteolin may be closely linked to the intensity and modulation of antioxidant, anti-AD, anti-diabetic, and anti-inflammatory effects of luteolin and its C-glycosylated derivatives. PMID:24988985

  1. Glycosylation of ribonuclease A catalysed by rabbit liver extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Khalkhall, Z; Marshall, R D

    1975-01-01

    Crude extracts of rabbit liver catalyse in vitro the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A. The enzymic activity is contained in rough endoplasmic reticulum. It has an absolute requirement for a bivalent metal ion: Co-2+ greater than Mn-2+ greater than Ni-2+. Mg-2+ is ineffective. There is enzymic activity in the absence of detergent, but increased activity is observed in the presence of Triton X-100. The site of glycosylation of ribonuclease A is asparagine-34, and glycosylation occurs only at this point. These findings agree with the hypothesis that the sequence Asn-X-Thr(Ser) (where X may be one of a number of types of amino acid) is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for N-acetylglucosaminylation of a protein-bound asparagine residue. PMID:1156375

  2. Glycosylation of Therapeutic Proteins: An Effective Strategy to Optimize Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Solá, Ricardo J.; Griebenow, Kai

    2009-01-01

    During their development and administration, protein-based drugs routinely display suboptimum therapeutic efficacies due to their poor physicochemical and pharmacological properties. These innate liabilities have driven the development of molecular level strategies to improve the therapeutic behavior of protein drugs. Among, the currently developed approaches, glycoengineering is one of the most promising due fact that it has been shown to simultaneously afford improvements over most of the parameters necessary for optimization of protein drug in vivo efficacy (e.g., in vitro and in vivo molecular stability, pharmacodynamic responses, and pharmacokinetic profiles) while allowing for targeting to the desired site of action. The intent of this article is to provide an account of the effects that glycosylation has on the therapeutic efficacy of protein drugs and to describe the current understanding of the mechanisms by which glycosylation leads to such effects. PMID:20055529

  3. Possible difference in glycosylation of the thyrotropin receptor among species.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, S; Akamizu, T; Mori, T

    1994-05-16

    Residue 113 of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) is a possible asparagine-linked glycosylation site in the human TSHR, but not in rat or dog TSHR. Russo et al. (Mol Endocrinol 5:29-33) reported that mutation of this residue in the human TSHR diminished TSH binding activity after transfection. To investigate the difference in the role of residue 113 of the TSHR among species, we created a mutant at residue 113 in the rat TSHR, transfected Cos-7 cells with the mutant DNA and measured TSH binding and TSH- and Graves' IgG-stimulated cAMP and phosphoinositide signals. No difference was found in the activities of the mutant transfectant from the wild type receptor transfectant. These results might suggest a real difference in glycosylation of the TSHR among species. PMID:8185569

  4. N-Glycosylation influences the structure and self-association abilities of recombinant nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Losfeld, Marie-Estelle; Leroy, Arnaud; Coddeville, Bernadette; Carpentier, Mathieu; Mazurier, Joël; Legrand, Dominique

    2011-07-01

    Nucleolin is a major nucleolar protein involved in fundamental processes of ribosome biogenesis, regulation of cell proliferation and growth. Nucleolin is known to shuttle between nucleus, cytoplasm and cell surface. We have previously found that nucleolin undergoes complex N- and O-glycosylations in extra-nuclear isoforms. We found that surface nucleolin is exclusively glycosylated and that N-glycosylation is required for its expression on the cells. Interestingly, the two N-glycans are located in the RNA-binding domains (RBDs) which participate in the self-association properties of nucleolin. We hypothesized that the occupancy of RBDs by N-glycans plays a role in these self-association properties. Here, owing to the inability to quantitatively produce full-size nucleolin, we expressed four N-glycosylation nucleolin variants lacking the N-terminal acidic domain in a baculovirus/insect cell system. As assessed by heptafluorobutyrate derivatization and mass spectrometry, this strategy allowed the production of proteins bearing or not paucimannosidic-type glycans on either one or two of the potential N-glycosylation sites. Their structure was investigated by circular dichroism and fluorimetry, and their ability to self-interact was analyzed by electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance. Our results demonstrate that all nucleolin-derived variants are able to self-interact and that N-glycosylation on both RBD1 and RBD3, or RBD3 alone, but not RBD1 alone, modifies the structure of the N-terminally truncated nucleolin and enhances its self-association properties. In contrast, N-glycosylation does not modify interaction with lactoferrin, a ligand of cell surface nucleolin. Our results suggest that the occupancy of the N-glycosylation sites may contribute to expression and functions of surface nucleolin. PMID:21575138

  5. Glycosylated and Nonglycosylated Complement Control Protein of the Lister Strain of Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Jordan; Atukorale, Vajini; Campbell, Joseph; Weir, Jerry P.

    2014-01-01

    The vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) is a secreted viral protein that binds the C3b and C4b complement components and inhibits the classic and alternative complement pathways. Previously, we reported that an attenuated smallpox vaccine, LC16m8, which was derived from the Lister strain of vaccinia virus (VV-Lister), expressed a glycosylated form of VCP, whereas published sequence data at that time indicated that the VV-Lister VCP has no motif for N-linked glycosylation. We were interested in determining whether the glycosylation of VCP impairs its biological activity, possibly contributing to the attenuation of LC16m8, and the likely origin of the glycosylated VCP. Expression analysis indicated that VV-Lister contains substrains expressing glycosylated VCP and substrains expressing nonglycosylated VCP. Other strains of smallpox vaccine, as well as laboratory strains of vaccinia virus, all expressed nonglycosylated VCP. Individual Lister virus clones expressing either the glycosylated VCP or the nonglycosylated species were isolated, and partially purified VCP from the isolates were found to be functional equivalents in binding human C3b and C4b complement proteins and inhibiting hemolysis and in immunogenicity. Recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing FLAG-tagged glycosylated VCP (FLAG-VCPg) and nonglycosylated VCP (FLAG-VCP) were constructed based on the Western Reserve strain. Purified FLAG-VCP and FLAG-VCPg bind human C3b and C4b and blocked complement-mediated hemolysis. Our data suggest that glycosylation did not affect the biological activity of VCP and thus may not have contributed to the attenuation of LC16m8. In addition, the LC16m8 virus likely originated from a substrain of VV-Lister that expresses glycosylated VCP. PMID:25030055

  6. Glycosylation Helps Cellulase Enzymes Bind to Plant Cell Walls (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    Computer simulations suggest a new strategy to design enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. Large-scale computer simulations predict that the addition of glycosylation on carbohydrate-binding modules can dramatically improve the binding affinity of these protein domains over amino acid mutations alone. These simulations suggest that glycosylation can be used as a protein engineering tool to enhance the activity of cellulase enzymes, which are a key component in the conversion of cellulose to soluble sugars in the production of biofuels. Glycosylation is the covalent attachment of carbohydrate molecules to protein side chains, and is present in many proteins across all kingdoms of life. Moreover, glycosylation is known to serve a wide variety of functions in biological recognition, cell signaling, and metabolism. Cellulase enzymes, which are responsible for deconstructing cellulose found in plant cell walls to glucose, contain glycosylation that when modified can affect enzymatic activity-often in an unpredictable manner. To gain insight into the role of glycosylation on cellulase activity, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used computer simulation to predict that adding glycosylation on the carbohydrate-binding module of a cellulase enzyme dramatically boosts the binding affinity to cellulose-more than standard protein engineering approaches in which amino acids are mutated. Because it is known that higher binding affinity in cellulases leads to higher activity, this work suggests a new route to designing enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. More generally, this work suggests that tuning glycosylation in cellulase enzymes is a key factor to consider when engineering biochemical conversion processes, and that more work is needed to understand how glycosylation affects cellulase activity at the molecular level.

  7. Chemical Synthesis of a Glycopeptide Derived from Skp1 for Probing Protein Specific Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Chinoy, Zoeisha S; Schafer, Christopher M; West, Christopher M; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2015-08-10

    Skp1 is a cytoplasmic and nuclear protein, best known as an adaptor of the SCF family of E3-ubiquitin ligases that label proteins for their degradation. Skp1 in Dictyostelium is posttranslationally modified on a specific hydroxyproline (Hyp) residue by a pentasaccharide, which consists of a Fucα1,2-Galβ-1,3-GlcNAcα core, decorated with two α-linked Gal residues. A glycopeptide derived form Skp1 was prepared to characterize the α-galactosyltransferase (AgtA) that mediates the addition of the α-Gal moieties, and to develop antibodies suitable for tracking the trisaccharide isoform of Skp1 in cells. A strategy was developed for the synthesis of the core trisaccharide-Hyp based on the use of 2-naphthylmethyl (Nap) ethers as permanent protecting groups to allow late stage installation of the Hyp moiety. Tuning of glycosyl donor and acceptor reactivities was critical for achieving high yields and anomeric selectivities of glycosylations. The trisaccharide-Hyp moiety was employed for the preparation of the glycopeptide using microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis. Enzyme kinetic studies revealed that trisaccharide-Hyp and trisaccharide-peptide are poorly recognized by AgtA, indicating the importance of context provided by the native Skp1 protein for engagement with the active site. The trisaccharide-peptide was a potent immunogen capable of generating a rabbit antiserum that was highly selective toward the trisaccharide isoform of full-length Skp1. PMID:26179871

  8. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  9. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  10. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  11. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  12. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  13. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  14. Tissue-specific factors additively increase the probability of the all-or-none formation of a hypersensitive site.

    PubMed Central

    Boyes, J; Felsenfeld, G

    1996-01-01

    DNase I-hypersensitive sites lack a canonical nucleosome and have binding sites for various transcription factors. To understand how the hypersensitivity is generated and maintained, we studied the chicken erythroid-specific beta(A)/epsilon globin gene enhancer, a region where both tissue-specific and ubiquitous transcription factors can bind. Constructions containing mutations of this enhancer were stably introduced into a chicken erythroid cell line. We found that the hypersensitivity was determined primarily by the erythroid factors and that their binding additively increased the accessibility. The fraction of accessible sites in clonal cell lines was quantitated using restriction endonucleases; these data implied that the formation of each hypersensitive site was an all-or-none phenomenon. Use of DNase I and micrococcal nuclease probes further indicated that the size of the hypersensitive site was influenced by the binding of transcription factors which then determined the length of the nucleosome-free gap. Our data are consistent with a model in which hypersensitive sites are generated stochastically: mutations that reduce the number of bound factors reduce the probability that these factors will prevail over a nucleosome; thus, the fraction of sites in the population that are accessible is also diminished. Images PMID:8665857

  15. The O-glycomap of Lubricin, a Novel Mucin Responsible for Joint Lubrication, Identified by Site-specific Glycopeptide Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Liaqat; Flowers, Sarah A.; Jin, Chunsheng; Bennet, Eric Paul; Ekwall, Anna-Karin H.; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2014-01-01

    The lubricative, heavily glycosylated mucin-like synovial glycoprotein lubricin has previously been observed to contain glycosylation changes related to rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Thus, a site-specific investigation of the glycosylation of lubricin was undertaken, in order to further understand the pathological mechanisms involved in these diseases. Lubricin contains an serine/threonine/proline (STP)-rich domain composed of imperfect tandem repeats (EPAPTTPK), the target for O-glycosylation. In this study, using a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry approach, employing both collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation fragmentation methods, we identified 185 O-glycopeptides within the STP-rich domain of human synovial lubricin. This showed that adjacent threonine residues within the central STP-rich region could be simultaneously and/or individually glycosylated. In addition to core 1 structures responsible for biolubrication, core 2 O-glycopeptides were also identified, indicating that lubricin glycosylation may have other roles. Investigation of the expression of polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase genes was carried out using cultured primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes, a cell type that expresses lubricin in vivo. This analysis showed high mRNA expression levels of the less understood polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 15 and 5 in addition to the ubiquitously expressed polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 and 2 genes. This suggests that there is a unique combination of transferase genes important for the O-glycosylation of lubricin. The site-specific glycopeptide analysis covered 82% of the protein sequence and showed that lubricin glycosylation displays both micro- and macroheterogeneity. The density of glycosylation was shown to be high: 168 sites of O-glycosylation, predominately sialylated, were identified. These glycosylation sites were focused in the central STP-rich region, giving the domain a

  16. The O-glycomap of lubricin, a novel mucin responsible for joint lubrication, identified by site-specific glycopeptide analysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Liaqat; Flowers, Sarah A; Jin, Chunsheng; Bennet, Eric Paul; Ekwall, Anna-Karin H; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2014-12-01

    The lubricative, heavily glycosylated mucin-like synovial glycoprotein lubricin has previously been observed to contain glycosylation changes related to rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Thus, a site-specific investigation of the glycosylation of lubricin was undertaken, in order to further understand the pathological mechanisms involved in these diseases. Lubricin contains an serine/threonine/proline (STP)-rich domain composed of imperfect tandem repeats (EPAPTTPK), the target for O-glycosylation. In this study, using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach, employing both collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation fragmentation methods, we identified 185 O-glycopeptides within the STP-rich domain of human synovial lubricin. This showed that adjacent threonine residues within the central STP-rich region could be simultaneously and/or individually glycosylated. In addition to core 1 structures responsible for biolubrication, core 2 O-glycopeptides were also identified, indicating that lubricin glycosylation may have other roles. Investigation of the expression of polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase genes was carried out using cultured primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes, a cell type that expresses lubricin in vivo. This analysis showed high mRNA expression levels of the less understood polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 15 and 5 in addition to the ubiquitously expressed polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 and 2 genes. This suggests that there is a unique combination of transferase genes important for the O-glycosylation of lubricin. The site-specific glycopeptide analysis covered 82% of the protein sequence and showed that lubricin glycosylation displays both micro- and macroheterogeneity. The density of glycosylation was shown to be high: 168 sites of O-glycosylation, predominately sialylated, were identified. These glycosylation sites were focused in the central STP-rich region, giving the domain a

  17. Addition of feruloyl esterase and xylanase produced on-site improves sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Braga, Cleiton Márcio Pinto; Delabona, Priscila da Silva; Lima, Deise Juliana da Silva; Paixão, Douglas Antônio Alvaredo; Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez

    2014-10-01

    Accessory enzymes that assist biomass degradation could be used to improve the recovery of fermentable sugar for use in biorefineries. In this study, different fungal strains isolated from the Amazon rainforest were evaluated in terms of their ability to produce feruloyl esterase (FAE) and xylanase enzymes, and an assessment was made of the contributions of the enzymes in the hydrolysis of pretreated sugarcane bagasse. In the selection step, screening using plate assays was followed by shake flask submerged cultivations. After carbon source selection and cultivation in a stirred-tank bioreactor, Aspergillusoryzae P21C3 proved to be a promising strain for production of the enzymes. Supplementation of a commercial enzyme preparation with 30% (v/v) crude enzymatic complex from A. oryzae P21C3 increased the conversion of cellulose derived from pretreated sugarcane bagasse by 36%. Supplementation with FAE and xylanase enzymes produced on-site can therefore be used to improve the hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse. PMID:25151076

  18. Functional significance of Asn-linked glycosylation of proteinase 3 for enzymatic activity, processing, targeting, and recognition by anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Specks, Ulrich; Fass, David N; Finkielman, Javier D; Hummel, Amber M; Viss, Margaret A; Litwiller, Robert D; McDonald, Cari J

    2007-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is a neutral serine protease stored in neutrophil granules. It has substantial sequence homology with elastase, cathepsin G and azurocidin. PR3 is the target antigen for autoantibodies (ANCA) in Wegener's granulomatosis, a necrotizing vasculitis syndrome. ANCA have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease. PR3 has two potential Asn-linked glycosylation sites. This study was designed to determine the occupancy of these glycosylation sites, and to evaluate their effect on enzymatic function, intracellular processing, targeting to granules and recognition by ANCA. We found that glycosylation occurs at both sites in native neutrophil PR3 and in wild type recombinant PR3 (rPR3) expressed in HMC-1 cells. Using glycosylation deficient rPR3 mutants we found that glycosylation at Asn-147, but not at Asn-102, is critical for thermal stability, and for optimal hydrolytic activity of PR3. Efficient amino-terminal proteolytic processing of rPR3 is dependent on glycosylation at Asn-102. Targeting to granules is not dependent on glycosylation, but unglycosylated rPR3 gets secreted preferentially into media supernatants. Finally, a capture ELISA for ANCA detection, using rPR3 glycosylation variants as target antigens, reveals that in about 20% of patients, epitope recognition by ANCA is affected by the glycosylation status of PR3. PMID:17158864

  19. Field evaluation of portable and central site PM samplers emphasizing additive and differential mass concentration estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fu-Lin; Vanderpool, Robert; Williams, Ronald; Dimmick, Fred; Grover, Brett D.; Long, Russell; Murdoch, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) and the accompanying Federal Reference Method (FRM) for PM 10 in 1987. The EPA revised the particle standards and FRM in 1997 to include PM 2.5. In 2005, EPA proposed revisions to this NAAQS to include PM 10-2.5 but only finalized revisions with a PM 2.5 FRM and the development of a national monitoring network in 2006. Presently, no EPA designated reference or equivalent method sampler has the ability to directly measure the mass concentrations of PM 10, PM 10-2.5, and PM 2.5 simultaneously. An additive approach has been used for samplers like the dichotomous monitors to calculate PM 10 mass concentrations from independent measures of PM 10-2.5 and PM 2.5 (i.e. PM 10 = PM 10-2.5 + PM 2.5). A differential approach has been used to calculate PM 10-2.5 from identical collocated PM 10 and PM 2.5 samplers (i.e. PM 10-2.5 = PM 10-PM 2.5). Since these two approaches have been used widely for PM measurements, it is informative to evaluate their precision and comparability. EPA performed collocated tests of five different particle samplers in the Research Triangle Park area of North Carolina to evaluate the comparability and to characterize the additive and differential approaches used to determine particle mass concentrations. The intra-sampler precision of MiniVol, Omni, and dichotomous samplers was less than 8.4%. The precision of PM 10 measurements using the additive approach with dichotomous samplers was less than 3.5%. The poorest precision of the various PM 10-2.5 differential approaches was less than 15.1%. No zero or negative PM 10-2.5 concentrations were calculated using the differential approach. A coefficient of determination of 0.81 or higher was obtained for all paired comparison of PM 10-2.5. The reported test results show that concentrations calculated from both the additive and differential approaches generally agree among the portable samplers, the more

  20. Control of thyrotropin glycosylation in normal rat pituitary cells in culture: effect of thyrotropin-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Ponsin, G.; Mornex, R.

    1983-08-01

    Regulation of glycosylation of TSH was studied in primary cultures of normal rat pituitary cells. (3H)Glucosamine or (3H)proline incorporation into immunoprecipitable TSH and trichloroacetic acid-precipitable proteins was measured after incubation periods ranging from 4-72 h. TSH release was assessed by RIA of TSH in the medium. TRH (30 nM) specifically increased the glycosylation of TSH despite the fact that it did not stimulate (3H)proline incorporation into the hormone even after 72 h of continuous labeling. The TRH-stimulated (3H)glucosamine-labeled TSH was completely recovered in the incubation medium. Effective concentrations of TRH were in the same range as those necessary for stimulation of TSH release (10(-10) - 10(-6) M). Somatostatin (50 nM) and T3 (10 microM) antagonized TRH effects on both TSH release and glycosylation. Stages of TSH glycosylation were discriminated by the addition to the culture medium of tunicamycin (10 micrograms/ml) or monensin (25 microM), which are known to inhibit core and terminal glycosylation of proteins, respectively. Medium (3H)glucosamine-labeled TSH was fully glycosylated, whereas a large part of the intracellular hormone was only core glycosylated. This suggests that terminal glycosylation of TSH could be related to hormone secretion. TRH stimulated essentially only terminal glycosylation of TSH. No alteration of core glycosylation of the hormone was observed after TRH treatment. The stimulating effect of TRH on terminal glycosylation of TSH is probably related to its ability to stimulate hormone release.

  1. Ethanol Addition for Enhancing Denitrification at the Uranium Mill Tailing Site in Monument Valley, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, A. K.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; McMillan, Andrew; Akyol, N. H.; Berkompas, J.; Miao, Z.; Jordan, F.; Tick, Geoff; Waugh, W. J.; Glenn, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium mining and processing near Monument Valley, Arizona resulted in the formation of a large nitrate plume in a shallow alluvial aquifer. The results of prior field characterization studies indicate that the nitrate plume is undergoing a slow rate of attenuation via denitrification, and the results of bench-scale studies suggest that denitrification rates can potentially be increased by an order of magnitude with the addition of ethanol as a carbon substrate. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential of ethanol amendment for enhancing the natural denitrification occurring in the alluvial aquifer. Pilot tests were conducted using the single well, push-pull method and a natural-gradient test. The results showed that the concentration of nitrate decreased, while the concentration of nitrous oxide (a product of denitrification) increased. In addition, changes in aqueous concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese indicate the ethanol amendment effected a change in prevailing redox conditions. The results of compound-specific stable isotope analysis for nitrogen indicated that the nitrate concentration reductions were biologically mediated. Continued monitoring after completion of the pilot tests has shown that nitrate concentrations in the injection zone have remained at levels three orders of magnitude lower than the initial values, indicating that the impacts of the pilot tests have been sustained for several months.

  2. Complementation of a pathogenic IFNGR2 misfolding mutation with modifiers of N-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Guillaume; Bustamante, Jacinta; Chapgier, Ariane; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Boisson Dupuis, Stephanie; Picard, Capucine; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Gineau, Laure; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Lamaze, Christophe; Puck, Jennifer M.; de Saint Basile, Geneviève; Khayat, Claudia Djambas; Mikhael, Raymond; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations may cause human disease by various mechanisms. Missense and other in-frame mutations may be deleterious because the mutant proteins are not correctly targeted, do not function correctly, or both. We studied a child with mycobacterial disease caused by homozygosity for a novel in-frame microinsertion in IFNGR2. In cells transfected with the mutant allele, most of the interferon γ receptor 2 (IFN-γR2) protein was retained within the cell, and that expressed on the cell surface had an abnormally high molecular weight (MW). The misfolding mutation was not gain-of-glycosylation, as it created no new N-glycosylation site. The mutant IFNGR2 allele was null, as the patient's cells did not respond to IFN-γ. Based on the well-established relationship between protein N-glycosylation and protein quality control processes, we tested 29 compounds affecting maturation by N-glycosylation in the secretory pathway. Remarkably, up to 13 of these compounds reduced the MW of surface-expressed mutant IFN-γR2 molecules and restored cellular responsiveness to IFN-γ. Modifiers of N-glycosylation may therefore complement human cells carrying in-frame and misfolding, but not necessarily gain-of-glycosylation, mutations in genes encoding proteins subject to trafficking via the secretory pathway. Some of these compounds are available for clinical use, paving the way for clinical trials of chemical complementation for various human genetic traits. PMID:18625743

  3. Structural Determinants Allowing Transferase Activity in SENSITIVE TO FREEZING 2, Classified as a Family I Glycosyl Hydrolase*

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Rebecca L.; Wang, Kun; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Benning, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    SENSITIVE TO FREEZING 2 (SFR2) is classified as a family I glycosyl hydrolase but has recently been shown to have galactosyltransferase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. Natural occurrences of apparent glycosyl hydrolases acting as transferases are interesting from a biocatalysis standpoint, and knowledge about the interconversion can assist in engineering SFR2 in crop plants to resist freezing. To understand how SFR2 evolved into a transferase, the relationship between its structure and function are investigated by activity assay, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis. SFR2 has no detectable hydrolase activity, although its catalytic site is highly conserved with that of family 1 glycosyl hydrolases. Three regions disparate from glycosyl hydrolases are identified as required for transferase activity as follows: a loop insertion, the C-terminal peptide, and a hydrophobic patch adjacent to the catalytic site. Rationales for the effects of these regions on the SFR2 mechanism are discussed. PMID:25100720

  4. N-Glycosylation is required for Na{sup +}-dependent vitamin C transporter functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Veedamali S. Marchant, Jonathan S.; Reidling, Jack C.; Said, Hamid M.

    2008-09-12

    The human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters (hSVCT1 and hSVCT2) mediate cellular uptake of ascorbic acid. Both these transporters contain potential sites for N-glycosylation in their extracellular domains (Asn-138, Asn-144 [hSVCT1]; Asn-188, Asn-196 [hSVCT2]), however the role of N-glycosylation in transporter function is unexplored. On the basis of the result that tunicamycin decreased {sup 14}C-ascorbic acid uptake in HepG2 cells, we systematically ablated all consensus N-glycosylation sites in hSVCT1 and hSVCT2 to resolve any effects on ascorbic acid uptake, transporter expression and targeting. We show that removal of individual N-glycosylation sites significantly impairs protein expression and consequently ascorbic acid uptake for hSVCT1 mutants (N138Q is retained intracellularly) and for hSVCT2 mutants (all of which reach the cell surface). N-Glycosylation is therefore essential for vitamin C transporter functionality.

  5. Oligosaccharyltransferase subunits bind polypeptide substrate to locally enhance N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, M Fairuz B; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2014-12-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferase is a multiprotein complex that catalyzes asparagine-linked glycosylation of diverse proteins. Using yeast genetics and glycoproteomics, we found that transient interactions between nascent polypeptide and Ost3p/Ost6p, homologous subunits of oligosaccharyltransferase, were able to modulate glycosylation efficiency in a site-specific manner in vivo. These interactions were driven by hydrophobic and electrostatic complementarity between amino acids in the peptide-binding groove of Ost3p/Ost6p and the sequestered stretch of substrate polypeptide. Based on this dependence, we used in vivo scanning mutagenesis and in vitro biochemistry to map the precise interactions that affect site-specific glycosylation efficiency. We conclude that transient binding of substrate polypeptide by Ost3p/Ost6p increases glycosylation efficiency at asparagines proximal and C-terminal to sequestered sequences. We detail a novel mode of interaction between translocating nascent polypeptide and oligosaccharyltransferase in which binding to Ost3p/Ost6p segregates a short flexible loop of glycosylation-competent polypeptide substrate that is delivered to the oligosaccharyltransferase active site for efficient modification. PMID:25118247

  6. Oligosaccharyltransferase Subunits Bind Polypeptide Substrate to Locally Enhance N-glycosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Jamaluddin, M. Fairuz B.; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Schulz, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferase is a multiprotein complex that catalyzes asparagine-linked glycosylation of diverse proteins. Using yeast genetics and glycoproteomics, we found that transient interactions between nascent polypeptide and Ost3p/Ost6p, homologous subunits of oligosaccharyltransferase, were able to modulate glycosylation efficiency in a site-specific manner in vivo. These interactions were driven by hydrophobic and electrostatic complementarity between amino acids in the peptide-binding groove of Ost3p/Ost6p and the sequestered stretch of substrate polypeptide. Based on this dependence, we used in vivo scanning mutagenesis and in vitro biochemistry to map the precise interactions that affect site-specific glycosylation efficiency. We conclude that transient binding of substrate polypeptide by Ost3p/Ost6p increases glycosylation efficiency at asparagines proximal and C-terminal to sequestered sequences. We detail a novel mode of interaction between translocating nascent polypeptide and oligosaccharyltransferase in which binding to Ost3p/Ost6p segregates a short flexible loop of glycosylation-competent polypeptide substrate that is delivered to the oligosaccharyltransferase active site for efficient modification. PMID:25118247

  7. Conformational implications of asparagine-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Imperiali, B; Rickert, K W

    1995-01-01

    The effects of cotranslational protein modification on the process of protein folding are poorly understood. Time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer has been used to assess the impact of glycosylation on the conformational dynamics of flexible oligopeptides. The peptide sequences examined are selected from glycoproteins of known three-dimensional structure. The energy transfer modulation associated with N-linked glycosylation is consistent with the glycopeptides sampling different conformational profiles in water. Results show that glycosylation causes the modified peptides to adopt a different ensemble of conformations, and for some peptides this change may lead to conformations that are more compact and better approximate the conformation of these peptides in the final folded protein. This result further implies that cotranslational glycosylation can trigger the timely formation of structural nucleation elements and thus assist in the complex process of protein folding. PMID:7816856

  8. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    PubMed

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. PMID:24139501

  9. Glycosylated haemoglobin: measurement and clinical use.

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, I

    1984-01-01

    The discovery, biochemistry, laboratory determination, and clinical application of glycosylated haemoglobins are reviewed. Sources of error are discussed in detail. No single assay method is suitable for all purposes, and in the foreseeable future generally acceptable standards and reference ranges are unlikely to be agreed. Each laboratory must establish its own. Nevertheless, the development of glycosylated haemoglobin assays is an important advance. They offer the best available means of assessing diabetic control. PMID:6381544

  10. Versatile characterization of glycosylation modification in CTLA4-Ig fusion proteins by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Guo, Qingcheng; Guo, Huaizu; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Yingxin; Gu, Peiming; Chen, Xi; Wang, Hao; Hou, Sheng; Guo, Yajun

    2014-01-01

    CTLA4-Ig is a highly glycosylated therapeutic fusion protein that contains multiple N- and O-glycosylation sites. Glycosylation plays a vital role in protein solubility, stability, serum half-life, activity, and immunogenicity. For a CTLA4-Ig biosimilar development program, comparative analytical data, especially the glycosylation data, can influence decisions about the type and amount of animal and clinical data needed to establish biosimilarity. Because of the limited clinical experience with biosimilars before approval, a comprehensive level of knowledge about the biosimilar candidates is needed to achieve subsequent development. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is a versatile technique for characterizing N- and O-glycosylation modification of recombinant therapeutic proteins, including 3 levels: intact protein analysis, peptide mapping analysis, and released glycans analysis. In this report, an in-depth characterization of glycosylation of a candidate biosimilar was carried out using a systematic approach: N- and O-linked glycans were identified and electron-transfer dissociation was then used to pinpoint the 4 occupied O-glycosylation sites for the first time. As the results show, the approach provides a set of routine tools that combine accurate intact mass measurement, peptide mapping, and released glycan profiling. This approach can be used to comprehensively research a candidate biosimilar Fc-fusion protein and provides a basis for future studies addressing the similarity of CTLA4-Ig biosimilars. PMID:25484062

  11. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Rajkumar S.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing & transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  12. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Rajkumar S. Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-02-27

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing and transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  13. Carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate modification is a common phenomenon in nature. Many carbohydrate modifications such as some epimerization, O-acetylation, O-sulfation, O-methylation, N-deacetylation, and N-sulfation, take place after the formation of oligosaccharide or polysaccharide backbones. These modifications can be categorized as carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications (PGMs). Carbohydrate PGMs further extend the complexity of the structures and the synthesis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. They also increase the capacity of the biological information that can be controlled by finely tuning the structures of carbohydrates. Developing efficient methods to obtain structurally defined naturally occurring oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates with carbohydrate PGMs is essential for understanding the biological significance of carbohydrate PGMs. Combine with high-throughput screening methods, synthetic carbohydrates with PGMs are invaluable probes in structure-activity relationship studies. We illustrate here several classes of carbohydrates with PGMs and their applications. Recent progress in chemical, enzymatic, and chemoenzymatic syntheses of these carbohydrates and their derivatives are also presented. PMID:17340000

  14. Flagellar Glycosylation in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew E.; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Titball, Richard W.; Essex-Lopresti, Angela E.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Prior, Joann L.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is known to impart novel physical properties and biological roles to proteins from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In this study, gel-based glycoproteomics were used to identify glycoproteins of the potential biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei and the closely related but nonpathogenic B. thailandensis. Top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) analyses identified that the flagellin proteins of both species were posttranslationally modified by novel glycans. Analysis of proteins from two strains of each species demonstrated that B. pseudomallei flagellin proteins were modified with a glycan with a mass of 291 Da, while B. thailandensis flagellin protein was modified with related glycans with a mass of 300 or 342 Da. Structural characterization of the B. thailandensis carbohydrate moiety suggests that it is an acetylated hexuronic acid. In addition, we have identified through mutagenesis a gene from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen biosynthetic cluster which is involved in flagellar glycosylation, and inactivation of this gene eliminates flagellar glycosylation and motility in B. pseudomallei. This is the first report to conclusively demonstrate the presence of a carbohydrate covalently linked to a protein in B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, and it suggests new avenues to explore in order to examine the marked differences in virulence between these two species. PMID:21602339

  15. The Association Between Glycosylation of Immunoglobulin G and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youxin; Klarić, Lucija; Yu, Xinwei; Thaqi, Kujtim; Dong, Jing; Novokmet, Mislav; Wilson, Jim; Polasek, Ozren; Liu, Youqin; Krištić, Jasminka; Ge, Siqi; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Wu, Lijuan; Zhou, Yong; Ugrina, Ivo; Song, Manshu; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Xiuhua; Zeng, Qiang; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Lauc, Gordan; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract More than half of all known proteins, and almost all membrane and extra-cellular proteins have oligosaccharide structures or glycans attached to them. Defects in glycosylation pathways are directly involved in at least 30 severe human diseases. A multiple center cross-sectional study (China, Croatia, and Scotland) was carried out to investigate the possible association between hypertension and IgG glycosylation. A hydrophilic interaction chromatography of fluorescently labeled glycans was used to analyze N-glycans attached to IgG in plasma samples from a total of 4757 individuals of Chinese Han, Croatian, and Scottish ethnicity. Five glycans (IgG with digalactosylated glycans) significantly differed in participants with prehypertension or hypertension compared to those with normal blood pressure, while additional 17 glycan traits were only significantly differed in participants with hypertension compared to those of normal blood pressure. These glycans were also significant correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) or diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The present study demonstrated for the 1st time an association between hypertension and IgG glycome composition. These findings suggest that the individual variation in N-glycosylation of IgG contributes to pathogenesis of hypertension, presumably via its effect on pro- and/or anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:27124023

  16. Additional disturbances as a beneficial tool for restoration of post-mining sites: a multi-taxa approach.

    PubMed

    Řehounková, Klára; Čížek, Lukáš; Řehounek, Jiří; Šebelíková, Lenka; Tropek, Robert; Lencová, Kamila; Bogusch, Petr; Marhoul, Pavel; Máca, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Open interior sands represent a highly threatened habitat in Europe. In recent times, their associated organisms have often found secondary refuges outside their natural habitats, mainly in sand pits. We investigated the effects of different restoration approaches, i.e. spontaneous succession without additional disturbances, spontaneous succession with additional disturbances caused by recreational activities, and forestry reclamation, on the diversity and conservation values of spiders, beetles, flies, bees and wasps, orthopterans and vascular plants in a large sand pit in the Czech Republic, Central Europe. Out of 406 species recorded in total, 112 were classified as open sand specialists and 71 as threatened. The sites restored through spontaneous succession with additional disturbances hosted the largest proportion of open sand specialists and threatened species. The forestry reclamations, in contrast, hosted few such species. The sites with spontaneous succession without disturbances represent a transition between these two approaches. While restoration through spontaneous succession favours biodiversity in contrast to forestry reclamation, additional disturbances are necessary to maintain early successional habitats essential for threatened species and open sand specialists. Therefore, recreational activities seem to be an economically efficient restoration tool that will also benefit biodiversity in sand pits. PMID:27053054

  17. Alteration of the N-linked Glycosylation Condition of E1 Glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Alters Virulence in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E1, along with Erns and E2 is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). Previously we showed that glycosylation status of virulent CSFV strain Brescia E2 or Erns affects virus virulence. Here, the three putative glycosylation sites of E1 were serially removed by ...

  18. Disulfide bonds and glycosylation in fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Limongi, P; Kjalke, M; Vind, J; Tams, J W; Johansson, T; Welinder, K G

    1995-01-15

    Four conserved disulfide bonds and N-linked and O-linked glycans of extracellular fungal peroxidases have been identified from studies of a lignin and a manganese peroxidase from Trametes versicolor, and from Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and recombinant C. cinereus peroxidase (rCIP) expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The eight cysteine residues are linked 1-3, 2-7, 4-5 and 6-8, and are located differently from the four conserved disulfide bridges present in the homologous plant peroxidases. CIP and rCIP were identical in their glycosylation pattern, although the extent of glycan chain heterogeneity depended on the fermentation batch. CIP and rCIP have one N-linked glycan composed only of GlcNAc and Man at residue Asn142, and two O-linked glycans near the C-terminus. The major glycoform consists of single Man residues at Thr331 and at Ser338. T. versicolor lignin isoperoxidase TvLP10 contains a single N-linked glycan composed of (GlcNAc)2Man5 bound to Asn103, whereas (GlcNAc)2Man3 was found in T. versicolor manganese isoperoxidase TvMP2 at the same position. In addition, mass spectrometry of the C-terminal peptide of TvMP2 indicated the presence of five Man residues in O-linked glycans. No phosphate was found in these fungal peroxidases. PMID:7851395

  19. Effect of the glycosylation of flavonoids on interaction with protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui; Wu, Donghui; Wang, Hongxian; Xu, Ming

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, two flavonoid aglycones (baicalein, quercetin) and their glycosides (baicalin, quercitrin) were studied for their ability to bind protein by quenching the protein intrinsic fluorescence. From the spectra obtained, the bimolecular quenching constants, the apparent static binding constants, and binding sites values were calculated. The glycosylation of flavonoids decreases the binding affinity with protein. For quercetin and quercitrin, the binding constants for BSA were 3.65 × 10 7 and 6.47 × 10 3 L mol -1, respectively. For baicalein and baicalin, the binding constants were 4.54 × 10 8 and 1.63 × 10 6 L mol -1, respectively.

  20. Iron(III) chloride as an efficient catalyst for stereoselective synthesis of glycosyl azides and a cocatalyst with Cu(0) for the subsequent click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Santosh B; Babu, N Seshu; Chen, Chien-Tien

    2011-10-01

    A highly efficient and mild method for azido glycosylation of glycosyl β-peracetates to 1,2-trans glycosyl azides was developed by using inexpensive FeCl(3) as the catalyst. In addition, we demonstrated, for the first time, that FeCl(3) in combination with copper powder can promote 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (click chemistry) of azido glycosides with terminal alkynes. Good to excellent yields were obtained with exclusive formation of a single isomer in both glycosyl azidation and subsequent cycloaddition processes. PMID:21842053

  1. Asymmetric Iridium-Catalyzed C-C Coupling of Chiral Diols via Site-Selective Redox-Triggered Carbonyl Addition.

    PubMed

    Shin, Inji; Krische, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cyclometalated π-allyliridium C,O-benzoate complexes modified by axially chiral chelating phosphine ligands display a pronounced kinetic preference for primary alcohol dehydrogenation, enabling highly site-selective redox-triggered carbonyl additions of chiral primary-secondary 1,3-diols with exceptional levels of catalyst-directed diastereoselectivity. Unlike conventional methods for carbonyl allylation, the present redox-triggered alcohol C-H functionalizations bypass the use of protecting groups, premetalated reagents, and discrete alcohol-to-aldehyde redox reactions. PMID:26187028

  2. Movement of tagged dredged sand at thalweg disposal sites in the Upper Mississippi River. Volume 3. Additional results at Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites

    SciTech Connect

    McCown, D.L.; Paddock, R.A.

    1985-04-01

    During routine channel maintenance, hydraulically dredged sand was tagged with sand coated with fluorescent dye before being deposited as a pile in the thalweg at three sites on the Upper Mississippi River. As discussed in the first two volumes of this report, bathymetry was measured and surface sediments were sampled to study changes in the topography of the disposal pile and the downstream movement of the tagged sand. At all three sites, topographic evidence of the pile disappeared after the first period of high river flow, which was followed by redevelopment of dunes in the disposal area. The tagged sand did not migrate into nearby border areas, backwaters, or sloughs, remaining in the main channel as it moved downstream. This volume presents the results of additional surveys at the Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites. At Gordon's Ferry, 25 bottom cores were taken to examine the three-dimensional distribution of tagged sand in the bottom sediments. The core analyses indicated that much of the tagged sand had been incorporated into the dune structure and that it resided primarily in the crests of the dunes.

  3. Molecular Determinants of Co- and Post-translational N-glycosylation of Type I Transmembrane Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Malaby, Heidi L. H.; Kobertz, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Type I transmembrane peptides acquire N-linked glycans during and after protein synthesis to facilitate anterograde trafficking through the secretory pathway. Mutations in N-glycosylation consensus sites (NXT and NXS, where X ≠ P) that alter the kinetics of the initial N-glycan attachment have been associated with cardiac arrhythmias; however, the molecular determinants that define co- and post-translational consensus sites in proteins are not known. Here, we identified co- and post-translational consensus sites in the KCNE family of K+ channel regulatory subunits to uncover three determinants that favor co-translational N-glycosylation kinetics of type I transmembrane peptides that lack a cleavable signal sequence: threonine containing-consensus sites (NXT), multiple N-terminal consensus sites, and long C-termini. The identification of these three molecular determinants now makes it possible to predict co- and post-translational consensus sites in type I transmembrane peptides. PMID:23718681

  4. A Computational Framework for the Automated Construction of Glycosylation Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is among the most common and complex post-translational modifications identified to date. It proceeds through the catalytic action of multiple enzyme families that include the glycosyltransferases that add monosaccharides to growing glycans, and glycosidases which remove sugar residues to trim glycans. The expression level and specificity of these enzymes, in part, regulate the glycan distribution or glycome of specific cell/tissue systems. Currently, there is no systematic method to describe the enzymes and cellular reaction networks that catalyze glycosylation. To address this limitation, we present a streamlined machine-readable definition for the glycosylating enzymes and additional methodologies to construct and analyze glycosylation reaction networks. In this computational framework, the enzyme class is systematically designed to store detailed specificity data such as enzymatic functional group, linkage and substrate specificity. The new classes and their associated functions enable both single-reaction inference and automated full network reconstruction, when given a list of reactants and/or products along with the enzymes present in the system. In addition, graph theory is used to support functions that map the connectivity between two or more species in a network, and that generate subset models to identify rate-limiting steps regulating glycan biosynthesis. Finally, this framework allows the synthesis of biochemical reaction networks using mass spectrometry (MS) data. The features described above are illustrated using three case studies that examine: i) O-linked glycan biosynthesis during the construction of functional selectin-ligands; ii) automated N-linked glycosylation pathway construction; and iii) the handling and analysis of glycomics based MS data. Overall, the new computational framework enables automated glycosylation network model construction and analysis by integrating knowledge of glycan structure and enzyme biochemistry. All

  5. A computational framework for the automated construction of glycosylation reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is among the most common and complex post-translational modifications identified to date. It proceeds through the catalytic action of multiple enzyme families that include the glycosyltransferases that add monosaccharides to growing glycans, and glycosidases which remove sugar residues to trim glycans. The expression level and specificity of these enzymes, in part, regulate the glycan distribution or glycome of specific cell/tissue systems. Currently, there is no systematic method to describe the enzymes and cellular reaction networks that catalyze glycosylation. To address this limitation, we present a streamlined machine-readable definition for the glycosylating enzymes and additional methodologies to construct and analyze glycosylation reaction networks. In this computational framework, the enzyme class is systematically designed to store detailed specificity data such as enzymatic functional group, linkage and substrate specificity. The new classes and their associated functions enable both single-reaction inference and automated full network reconstruction, when given a list of reactants and/or products along with the enzymes present in the system. In addition, graph theory is used to support functions that map the connectivity between two or more species in a network, and that generate subset models to identify rate-limiting steps regulating glycan biosynthesis. Finally, this framework allows the synthesis of biochemical reaction networks using mass spectrometry (MS) data. The features described above are illustrated using three case studies that examine: i) O-linked glycan biosynthesis during the construction of functional selectin-ligands; ii) automated N-linked glycosylation pathway construction; and iii) the handling and analysis of glycomics based MS data. Overall, the new computational framework enables automated glycosylation network model construction and analysis by integrating knowledge of glycan structure and enzyme biochemistry. All

  6. Glycosylation of the enhanced aromatic sequon is similarly stabilizing in three distinct reverse turn contexts.

    PubMed

    Price, Joshua L; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2011-08-23

    Cotranslational N-glycosylation can accelerate protein folding, slow protein unfolding, and increase protein stability, but the molecular basis for these energetic effects is incompletely understood. N-glycosylation of proteins at naïve sites could be a useful strategy for stabilizing proteins in therapeutic and research applications, but without engineering guidelines, often results in unpredictable changes to protein energetics. We recently introduced the enhanced aromatic sequon as a family of portable structural motifs that are stabilized upon glycosylation in specific reverse turn contexts: a five-residue type I β-turn harboring a G1 β-bulge (using a Phe-Yyy-Asn-Xxx-Thr sequon) and a type II β-turn within a six-residue loop (using a Phe-Yyy-Zzz-Asn-Xxx-Thr sequon) [Culyba EK, et al. (2011) Science 331:571-575]. Here we show that glycosylating a new enhanced aromatic sequon, Phe-Asn-Xxx-Thr, in a type I' β-turn stabilizes the Pin 1 WW domain. Comparing the energetic effects of glycosylating these three enhanced aromatic sequons in the same host WW domain revealed that the glycosylation-mediated stabilization is greatest for the enhanced aromatic sequon complementary to the type I β-turn with a G1 β-bulge. However, the portion of the stabilization from the tripartite interaction between Phe, Asn(GlcNAc), and Thr is similar for each enhanced aromatic sequon in its respective reverse turn context. Adding the Phe-Asn-Xxx-Thr motif (in a type I' β-turn) to the enhanced aromatic sequon family doubles the number of proteins that can be stabilized by glycosylation without having to alter the native reverse turn type. PMID:21825145

  7. N-/O-glycosylation analysis of human FVIIa produced in the milk of transgenic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chevreux, Guillaume; Faid, Valegh; Scohyers, Jean-Marc; Bihoreau, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Human coagulation factor VIIa is a glycoprotein that promotes haemostasis through activation of the coagulation cascade extrinsic pathway. Most haemophilia A/B patients with inhibitors are treated by injection of plasma-derived or recombinant FVIIa. The use of recombinant products raises questions about the ability of the host cell to produce efficiently post-translationally modified proteins. Glycosylation is especially critical considering that it can modulate protein safety and efficacy. The present paper reports the N-/O-glycosylation pattern of a new recombinant human factor VIIa expressed in the mammary glands of transgenic rabbits. Glycosylation was investigated by chromatography and advanced mass spectrometry techniques for glycan identification and quantitation. Mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analyses were performed to confirm the glycan structures as well as the position and branching of specific monosaccharides or substituents. The two N-glycosylation sites were found to be fully occupied mostly by mono- and bi-sialylated biantennary complex-type structures, the major form being A2G2S1. Some oligomannose/hybrid structures were retrieved in lower abundance, the major ones being GlcNAcα1,O-phosphorylated at the C6-position of a Man residue (Man-6-(GlcNAcα1,O-)phosphate motif) as commonly observed on lysosomal proteins. No immunogenic glycotopes such as Galili (Galα1,3Gal) and HD antigens (N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc)) were detected. Concerning O-glycosylation, the product exhibited O-fucose and O-glucose-(xylose)0, 1, 2 motifs as expected. The N-glycosylation consistency was also investigated by varying production parameters such as the period of lactation, the number of consecutive lactations and rabbit generations. Results show that the transgenesis technology is suitable for the long-term production of rhFVIIa with a reproducible glycosylation pattern. PMID:24092837

  8. Regulation of the glycosylations of collagen hydroxylysine in chick embryo tendon and cartilage cells.

    PubMed

    Anttinen, H; Hulkko, A

    1980-10-15

    The regulation of the glycosylations of hydroxylysine was studied in isolated chick-embryo cells by labelling with a [14C]lysine pulse. The course of the procollagen lysyl modifications was compared in tendon and cartilage cells, and the effect on the gycosylations of the degree of lysyl hydroxylation and the concentration of Mn2+ and Fe2+ were also studied, in tendon cells. Procollagen triple helix formation was inhibited in most experiments in order to eliminate the effect of this process on the continuation of the reactions. Both in the tendon and cartilage cells the intracellular lysyl modifications proceeded in a biphasic fashion. After an initial sharp linear increase, the reactions did not cease but were protracted at a slower but constant rate. Lysyl hydroxylation was followed by rapid galactosylation in both cell types and this was followed almost immediately by rapid glucosylation, suggesting a close association of the corresponding enzymes. The data further suggest that other factors must also exist, in addition to the differences in the timing of triple helix formation and the actual hydroxylysine content, which are responsible for the different amounts of galactose in the collagens synthesized by these cell types. The amount of glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysine nevertheless seemed to be determined by the available acceptor sites, i.e., the amount of galactosylhydroxylysine. In further experiments with tendon cells the oxygen participating in lysyl hydroxylation was displaced by nitrogen at various points in time. When the degree of lysyl hydroxylation was reduced to less than one-third of the original, the total amounts of glycosylated residues decreased correspondingly, but their proportion relative to total hydroxylysine remained unchanged. Extra Mn2+ increased the proportion of galactosylated hydroxylysine, suggesting that the activity of hydrosylysyl galactosyltransferase is not saturating in respect of the catalyzed reaction. Experiments on the

  9. Search for rare liver diseases: the case of glycosylation defects mimicking Wilson Disease.

    PubMed

    Socha, Piotr; Vajro, Pietro; Lefeber, Dirk; Adamowicz, Maciej; Tanner, Stuart

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric hepatology appears to be a very specific field of paediatrics which deals mainly with rare diseases although clinical features can be commonly found - like increased activity of transaminases. Some of these rare diseases like Wilson disease are commonly looked for and recently Wilsonian like phenotypes have been described which additionally presented with abnormal glycosylation of the plasma protein transferrin. In a subgroup of those patients with specific additional clinical symptoms (cleft uvula, low blood sugar, rhabdomyolysis and dilated cardiomyopathy) phosphoglucomutase 1 deficiency was identified. We recommend screening for abnormal glycosylation of the plasma protein transferrin in children with unexplained liver injury. PMID:24972800

  10. Estimation for Rock Mass Rating Distribution along Additional Excavating Tunnels in Gagok Mine as a Redeveloped Mining Site in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H.; Choi, Y.; Park, H.

    2012-12-01

    In case of expanding mine galleries on redeveloping mine to gain the remaining minerals, commencing stability assessment is required because the sites could be in an unstable state in rock mechanics by occurrence of stress relaxation due to long-unattended existing galleries and other facilities. The paper presents the case study, which consider cause of errors occurrence and correct estimation result, to conduct multi-criteria indicator kriging using drilling log and electro-resistivity data for stability assessment on redeveloping mine. The study area is Gagok mine, which is one of the recent redeveloped mining sites in Korea. For suitable analyzing to the site, two correction methods were proposed that supplemented the indicator kriging method. The FIEG method was used in order to reduce the error of the results from the electro-resistivity survey influenced by infrastructures and mine galleries. In addition, the CARI method was chosen as a technique to resolve the distortions in the results from the indirect data, which were used due to external factors and decreased accuracy in statistical techniques. As a result, 73 % of the data for verifying were showed correct RMR class by estimation results and 1 % of the result were overestimated. Sensitivity of the FIEG was 3.5 %, that of the linear-CARI was 56 to 60 % and that of the logarithm-CARI was 61 to 65 %. In conclusion, the presented methods showed considerably effect increasing the accuracy of the RMR estimation, and remarkably reducing the ratio for overestimation. This paper could be used for the stability analyzing at redeveloping mines not only with increasing accuracy, but also without any further survey data or additional costs.

  11. Glycosylation as a marker for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Simone; Unwin, Louise; Muniyappa, Mohankumar; Rudd, Pauline M

    2014-01-01

    Changes in serum protein glycosylation play an important role in inflammatory arthritis. Altered galactosylation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in rheumatoid arthritis attracts special attention due to the devastating nature of the disease. Studying glycosylation changes of serum proteins has been recognized as a potential strategy to provide added value regarding diagnostics, aetiopathology and therapy of inflammatory arthritic diseases. Key questions, which are approached in these fields of research, are whether or not glycosylation can be used as a complementary pre-clinical and clinical marker for disease differentiation, diagnosis, the prediction of disease course and severity as well as for the evaluation of disease therapies. These studies mainly focus on TNF antagonists, which present a new and promising way of treating inflammatory arthritis. The recent availability of new high-throughput glycoanalytical tools enables a more profound and efficient investigation in large patient cohorts and helps to gain new insights in the complex mechanism of the underlying disease pathways. PMID:24643039

  12. Glycoprotein Structural Genomics: Solving the Glycosylation Problem

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Veronica T.; Crispin, Max; Aricescu, A. Radu; Harvey, David J.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Fennelly, Janet A.; Yu, Chao; Boles, Kent S.; Evans, Edward J.; Stuart, David I.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Owens, Raymond J.; Davis, Simon J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Glycoproteins present special problems for structural genomic analysis because they often require glycosylation in order to fold correctly, whereas their chemical and conformational heterogeneity generally inhibits crystallization. We show that the “glycosylation problem” can be solved by expressing glycoproteins transiently in mammalian cells in the presence of the N-glycosylation processing inhibitors, kifunensine or swainsonine. This allows the correct folding of the glycoproteins, but leaves them sensitive to enzymes, such as endoglycosidase H, that reduce the N-glycans to single residues, enhancing crystallization. Since the scalability of transient mammalian expression is now comparable to that of bacterial systems, this approach should relieve one of the major bottlenecks in structural genomic analysis. PMID:17355862

  13. Large-Scale Organization of Glycosylation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    Glycosylation is a highly complex process to produce a diverse repertoire of cellular glycans that are frequently attached to proteins and lipids. Glycans participate in fundamental biological processes including molecular trafficking and clearance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, developmental biology, immune response, and pathogenesis. N-linked glycans found on proteins are formed by sequential attachments of monosaccharides with the help of a relatively small number of enzymes. Many of these enzymes can accept multiple N-linked glycans as substrates, thus generating a large number of glycan intermediates and their intermingled pathways. Motivated by the quantitative methods developed in complex network research, we investigate the large-scale organization of such N-glycosylation pathways in a mammalian cell. The uncovered results give the experimentally-testable predictions for glycosylation process, and can be applied to the engineering of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  14. Investigation of the effect of glycosylation on human prion protein by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Linghao; Xie, Jimin

    2009-04-01

    Prion protein conformational isomerization, PrP(C)-->PrP(Sc), has been attributed as the cause of TSE diseases such as mad-cow disease. The mechanism of such isomerization, however, is little known due the experimental difficulties in studying the scrapie form. Among factors that affect PrP isomerization, the role which glycosylation plays remains vague. The number of innumerous glycan species, together with their high flexibility, leads to ineffective structural characterization. In this research, we studied the effect of chitobiose glycosylation on human PrP, in both monomeric (huPrP(mono)) and dimeric (huPrP(dimer)) forms, by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results show that this glycosylation has minimal impact on the structure of huPrP(mono). However, it affects the secondary structure of dimeric protein. An additional beta-sheet strand is found while the glycosylation is absent in the huPrP(dimer). Comparatively, when the protein is glycosylated with chitobiose, such beta-sheet addition is not observed. PMID:19236103

  15. Recruitment of Glycosyl Hydrolase Proteins in a Cone Snail Venomous Arsenal: Further Insights into Biomolecular Features of Conus Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Violette, Aude; Leonardi, Adrijana; Piquemal, David; Terrat, Yves; Biass, Daniel; Dutertre, Sébastien; Noguier, Florian; Ducancel, Frédéric; Stöcklin, Reto; Križaj, Igor; Favreau, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Cone snail venoms are considered an untapped reservoir of extremely diverse peptides, named conopeptides, displaying a wide array of pharmacological activities. We report here for the first time, the presence of high molecular weight compounds that participate in the envenomation cocktail used by these marine snails. Using a combination of proteomic and transcriptomic approaches, we identified glycosyl hydrolase proteins, of the hyaluronidase type (Hyal), from the dissected and injectable venoms (“injectable venom” stands for the venom variety obtained by milking of the snails. This is in contrast to the “dissected venom”, which was obtained from dissected snails by extraction of the venom glands) of a fish-hunting cone snail, Conus consors (Pionoconus clade). The major Hyal isoform, Conohyal-Cn1, is expressed as a mixture of numerous glycosylated proteins in the 50 kDa molecular mass range, as observed in 2D gel and mass spectrometry analyses. Further proteomic analysis and venom duct mRNA sequencing allowed full sequence determination. Additionally, unambiguous segment location of at least three glycosylation sites could be determined, with glycans corresponding to multiple hexose (Hex) and N-acetylhexosamine (HexNAc) moieties. With respect to other known Hyals, Conohyal-Cn1 clearly belongs to the hydrolase-type of Hyals, with strictly conserved consensus catalytic donor and positioning residues. Potent biological activity of the native Conohyals could be confirmed in degrading hyaluronic acid. A similar Hyal sequence was also found in the venom duct transcriptome of C. adamsonii (Textilia clade), implying a possible widespread recruitment of this enzyme family in fish-hunting cone snail venoms. These results provide the first detailed Hyal sequence characterized from a cone snail venom, and to a larger extent in the Mollusca phylum, thus extending our knowledge on this protein family and its evolutionary selection in marine snail venoms. PMID:22412800

  16. Long-term Effects of Ethanol Addition on Denitrification At The Uranium Mill Tailing Site In Monument Valley, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, A. L.; Borden, A. K.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, K. C.; Akyol, N. H.; Berkompas, J. L.; Miao, Z.; Jordan, F.; Tick, G. R.; Waugh, J.; Glenn, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Due to mining and processing of uranium at a site near Monument Valley, AZ, an extensive nitrate plume was produced in a shallow alluvial aquifer. Two pilot tests were conducted to evaluate the addition of ethanol as a carbon substrate to enhance natural denitrification. Aqueous geochemistry was characterized based upon groundwater samples collected before and after the addition of ethanol. Compound specific stable isotope analysis was also conducted. The results of the field tests showed that the concentration of nitrate decreased, while the concentration of nitrous oxide (a product of denitrification) increased. In addition, changes in aqueous concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese indicated that the ethanol amendment caused a change in prevailing redox conditions. The results of compound-specific stable isotope analysis for nitrate-nitrogen indicated that the nitrate concentration reductions were biologically mediated. Denitrification rate coefficients estimated for the pilot tests were approximately 50 times larger than resident-condition (non-enhanced) values obtained from prior characterization studies conducted at the site. Using the time at which nitrate concentrations began to decline for downgradient monitoring wells, and the associated inter-well distances, rough estimates of approximately 0.1-0.17 m/day were obtained for the effective reactive-front velocity. These values are within the range of mean pore-water velocities expected for the measured hydraulic conductivities and gradient. The nitrate concentrations in the injection zone have remained at levels three orders of magnitude below the initial values for many months, indicating that the ethanol amendments had a long-term impact on the local subsurface environment.

  17. Unconventional N-Linked Glycosylation Promotes Trimeric Autotransporter Function in Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Katherine A.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Porsch, Eric A.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycosylation is a widespread mechanism employed by both eukaryotes and bacteria to increase the functional diversity of their proteomes. The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae glycosyltransferase HMW1C mediates unconventional N-linked glycosylation of the adhesive protein HMW1, which is encoded in a two-partner secretion system gene cluster that also encodes HMW1C. In this system, HMW1 is modified in the cytoplasm by sequential transfer of hexose residues. In the present study, we examined Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus homologues of HMW1C that are not encoded near a gene encoding an obvious acceptor protein. We found both homologues to be functional glycosyltransferases and identified their substrates as the K. kingae Knh and the A. aphrophilus EmaA trimeric autotransporter proteins. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed multiple sites of N-linked glycosylation on Knh and EmaA. Without glycosylation, Knh and EmaA failed to facilitate wild-type levels of bacterial autoaggregation or adherence to human epithelial cells, establishing that glycosylation is essential for proper protein function. PMID:26307167

  18. Role of envelope N-linked glycosylation in Ross River virus virulence and transmission.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michelle A; Herrero, Lara J; Jeffery, Jason A L; Hoehn, Marion; Rudd, Penny A; Supramaniam, Aroon; Kay, Brian H; Ryan, Peter A; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    With an expanding geographical range and no specific treatments, human arthritogenic alphaviral disease poses a significant problem worldwide. Previous in vitro work with Ross River virus (RRV) demonstrated that alphaviral N-linked glycosylation contributes to type I IFN (IFN-αβ) induction in myeloid dendritic cells. This study further evaluated the role of alphaviral N-linked glycans in vivo, assessing the effect of glycosylation on pathogenesis in a mouse model of RRV-induced disease and on viral infection and dissemination in a common mosquito vector, Aedes vigilax. A viral mutant lacking the E1-141 glycosylation site was attenuated for virus-induced disease, with reduced myositis and higher levels of IFN-γ induction at peak disease contributing to improved viral clearance, suggesting that glycosylation of the E1 glycoprotein plays a major role in the pathogenesis of RRV. Interestingly, RRV lacking E2-200 glycan had significantly reduced replication in the mosquito vector A. vigilax, whereas loss of either of the E1 or E2-262 glycans had little effect on the competence of the mosquito vector. Overall, these results indicate that glycosylation of the E1 and E2 glycoproteins of RRV provides important determinants of viral virulence and immunopathology in the mammalian host and replication in the mosquito vector. PMID:26813162

  19. Unexpected reactivity and mechanism of carboxamide activation in bacterial N-linked protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Lizak, Christian; Gerber, Sabina; Michaud, Gaëlle; Schubert, Mario; Fan, Yao-Yun; Bucher, Monika; Darbre, Tamis; Aebi, Markus; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Locher, Kaspar P

    2013-01-01

    The initial glycan transfer in asparagine-linked protein glycosylation is catalysed by the integral membrane enzyme oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). Here we study the mechanism of the bacterial PglB protein, a single-subunit OST, using chemically synthesized acceptor peptide analogues. We find that PglB can glycosylate not only asparagine but also glutamine, homoserine and the hydroxamate Asp(NHOH), although at much lower rates. In contrast, N-methylated asparagine or 2,4-diaminobutanoic acid (Dab) are not glycosylated. We find that of the various peptide analogues, only asparagine- or Dab-containing peptides bind tightly to PglB. Glycopeptide products are unable to bind, providing the driving force of product release. We find no suitably positioned residues near the active site of PglB that can activate the acceptor asparagine by deprotonation, making a general base mechanism unlikely and leaving carboxamide twisting as the most likely mechanistic proposal for asparagine activation. PMID:24149797

  20. Putative sperm fusion protein IZUMO and the role of N-glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Naokazu; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru

    2008-12-19

    IZUMO is the mouse sperm protein proven to be essential for fusion with eggs. It contains one immunoglobulin-like domain with a conserved glycosylation site within. In the present paper, we produced transgenic mouse lines expressing unglycosylated IZUMO (N204Q-IZUMO) in Izumo1 -/- background. The expression of N204Q-IZUMO rescued the infertile phenotype of IZUMO disrupted mice, indicating glycosylation is not essential for fusion-facilitating activity of IZUMO. The N204Q-IZUMO was produced in testis in comparable amounts to wild-type IZUMO, but the amount of N204Q-IZUMO on sperm was significantly decreased by the time sperm reached the cauda epididymis. These data suggest that glycosylation is not essential for the function of IZUMO, but has a role in protecting it from fragmentation in cauda epididymis.

  1. Exploring the Glycosylation of Serum CA125

    PubMed Central

    Saldova, Radka; Struwe, Weston B.; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Duffy, Michael J.; Rudd, Pauline M.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecologic cancer affecting women. The most widely used biomarker for ovarian cancer, CA125, lacks sensitivity and specificity. Here, we explored differences in glycosylation of CA125 between serum from patients with ovarian cancer and healthy controls. We found differences between CA125 N-glycans from patient sera compared to controls. These include increases in core-fucosylated bi-antennary monosialylated glycans, as well as decreases in mostly bisecting bi-antennary and non-fucosylated glycans in patients compared to controls. Measurement of the glycosylated state of CA125 may therefore provide a more specific biomarker for patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:23896595

  2. Clinical diagnostics and therapy monitoring in the congenital disorders of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Willems, Esther; Lefeber, Dirk J

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal protein glycosylation is observed in many common disorders like cancer, inflammation, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes. However, the actual use of this information in clinical diagnostics is still very limited. Information is usually derived from analysis of total serum N-glycan profiling methods, whereas the current use of glycoprotein biomarkers in the clinical setting is commonly based on protein levels. It can be envisioned that combining protein levels and their glycan isoforms would increase specificity for early diagnosis and therapy monitoring. To establish diagnostic assays, based on the mass spectrometric analysis of protein-specific glycosylation abnormalities, still many technical improvements have to be made. In addition, clinical validation is equally important as well as an understanding of the genetic and environmental factors that determine the protein-specific glycosylation abnormalities. Important lessons can be learned from the group of monogenic disorders in the glycosylation pathway, the Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG). Now that more and more genetic defects are being unraveled, we start to learn how genetic factors influence glycomics profiles of individual and total serum proteins. Although only in its initial stages, such studies suggest the importance to establish diagnostic assays for protein-specific glycosylation profiling, and the need to look beyond the single glycoprotein diagnostic test. Here, we review progress in and lessons from genetic disease, and review the increasing opportunities of mass spectrometry to analyze protein glycosylation in the clinical diagnostic setting. Furthermore, we will discuss the possibilities to expand current CDG diagnostics and how this can be used to approach glycoprotein biomarkers for more common diseases. PMID:26739145

  3. Resveratrol triggers ER stress-mediated apoptosis by disrupting N-linked glycosylation of proteins in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gwak, HyeRan; Kim, Soochi; Dhanasekaran, Danny N; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-02-28

    Malignant tumors have a high glucose demand and alter cellular metabolism to survive. Herein, focusing on the utility of glucose metabolism as a therapeutic target, we found that resveratrol induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis by interrupting protein glycosylation in a cancer-specific manner. Our results indicated that resveratrol suppressed the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway and interrupted protein glycosylation through GSK3β activation. Application of either biochemical intermediates of the hexosamine pathway or small molecular inhibitors of GSK3β reversed the effects of resveratrol on the disruption of protein glycosylation. Additionally, an ER UDPase, ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5), modulated protein glycosylation by Akt attenuation in response to resveratrol. By inhibition or overexpression of Akt functions, we confirmed that the glycosylation activities were dependent on ENTPD5 expression and regulated by the action of Akt in ovarian cancer cells. Resveratrol-mediated disruption of protein glycosylation induced cellular apoptosis as indicated by the up-regulation of GADD153, followed by the activation of ER-stress sensors (PERK and ATF6α). Thus, our results provide novel insight into cancer cell metabolism and protein glycosylation as a therapeutic target for cancers. PMID:26704305

  4. Bacterial Protein N-Glycosylation: New Perspectives and Applications*

    PubMed Central

    Nothaft, Harald; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is widespread throughout all three domains of life. Bacterial protein N-glycosylation and its application to engineering recombinant glycoproteins continue to be actively studied. Here, we focus on advances made in the last 2 years, including the characterization of novel bacterial N-glycosylation pathways, examination of pathway enzymes and evolution, biological roles of protein modification in the native host, and exploitation of the N-glycosylation pathways to create novel vaccines and diagnostics. PMID:23329827

  5. Interaction of locust apolipophorin III with lipoproteins and phospholipid vesicles: effect of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Weers, P M; Van Der Horst, D J; Ryan, R O

    2000-03-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) from Locusta migratoria is an exchangeable apolipoprotein that binds reversibly to lipoprotein surfaces. The native protein is glycosylated at Asn-18 and Asn-85. Variable attachment of five distinct oligosaccharide moieties at the two glycosylation sites results in molecular weight heterogeneity, as seen by mass spectrometry. The main mass peak of 20,488 Da decreases to 17,583 Da after removal of carbohydrate, indicating that apoLp-III carbohydrate mass is approximately 14% by weight. Deglycosylated apoLp-III induced clearance of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol vesicles at a faster rate than glycosylated apoLp-III. However, in lipoprotein binding assays, in which apoLp-III interacts with surface-localized diacylglycerol, only minor differences in binding were observed. The fluorescence properties of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate were unaffected by the glycosylation state of apoLp-III, indicating that no changes in the relative amount of exposed hydrophobic surface occurred as a result of carbohydrate removal. We propose that glycosyl moieties affect the ability of apoLp-III to transform phospholipid bilayer vesicles into disc-like complexes by steric hindrance. This is due to the requirement that apoLp-III penetrate the bilayer substrate prior to conformational opening of the helix bundle. On the other hand, the glycosyl moieties do not affect lipoprotein binding interactions as it does not involve deep protein penetration into the lipid milieu. Rather, lipoprotein binding is based on oriented protein contact with the lipid surface followed by opening of the helix bundle, which allows formation of a stable interaction with surface exposed hydrophobic sites. PMID:10706589

  6. Encoding Asymmetry of the N-Glycosylation Motif Facilitates Glycoprotein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan; Mohammad, Naveed; Ho, Chi Yip; Li, Carey F.; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Demetriou, Michael; Dennis, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is found in all domains of life and has a conserved role in glycoprotein folding and stability. In animals, glycoproteins transit through the Golgi where the N-glycans are trimmed and rebuilt with sequences that bind lectins, an innovation that greatly increases structural diversity and redundancy of glycoprotein-lectin interaction at the cell surface. Here we ask whether the natural tension between increasing diversity (glycan-protein interactions) and site multiplicity (backup and status quo) might be revealed by a phylogenic examination of glycoproteins and NXS/T(X≠P) N-glycosylation sites. Site loss is more likely by mutation at Asn encoded by two adenosine (A)-rich codons, while site gain is more probable by generating Ser or Thr downstream of an existing Asn. Thus mutations produce sites at novel positions more frequently than the reversal of recently lost sites, and therefore more paths though sequence space are made available to natural selection. An intra-species comparison of secretory and cytosolic proteins revealed a departure from equilibrium in sequences one-mutation-away from NXS/T and in (A) content, indicating strong selective pressures and exploration of N-glycosylation positions during vertebrate evolution. Furthermore, secretory proteins have evolved at rates proportional to N-glycosylation site number, indicating adaptive interactions between the N-glycans and underlying protein. Given the topology of the genetic code, mutation of (A) is more often nonsynonomous, and Lys, another target of many PTMs, is also encoded by two (A)-rich codons. An examination of acetyl-Lys sites in proteins indicated similar evolutionary dynamics, consistent with asymmetry of the target and recognition portions of modified sites. Our results suggest that encoding asymmetry is an ancient mechanism of evolvability that increases diversity and experimentation with PTM site positions. Strong selective pressures on PTMs may have contributed to

  7. Recombinant human heterodimeric IL-15 complex displays extensive and reproducible N- and O-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Thaysen-Andersen, M; Chertova, E; Bergamaschi, C; Moh, E S X; Chertov, O; Roser, J; Sowder, R; Bear, J; Lifson, J; Packer, N H; Felber, B K; Pavlakis, G N

    2016-06-01

    Human interleukin 15 (IL-15) circulates in blood as a stable molecular complex with the soluble IL-15 receptor alpha (sIL-15Rα). This heterodimeric IL-15:sIL-15Rα complex (hetIL-15) shows therapeutic potential by promoting the growth, mobilization and activation of lymphocytes and is currently evaluated in clinical trials. Favorable pharmacokinetic properties are associated with the heterodimeric formation and the glycosylation of hetIL-15, which, however, remains largely uncharacterized. We report the site-specific N- and O-glycosylation of two clinically relevant large-scale preparations of HEK293-derived recombinant human hetIL-15. Intact IL-15 and sIL-15Rα and derived glycans and glycopeptides were separately profiled using multiple LC-MS/MS strategies. IL-15 Asn79 and sIL-15Rα Asn107 carried the same repertoire of biosynthetically-related N-glycans covering mostly α1-6-core-fucosylated and β-GlcNAc-terminating complex-type structures. The two potential IL-15 N-glycosylation sites (Asn71 and Asn112) located at the IL-2 receptor interface were unoccupied. Mass analysis of intact IL-15 confirmed its N-glycosylation and suggested that Asn79-glycosylation partially prevents Asn77-deamidation. IL-15 contained no O-glycans, whereas sIL-15Rα was heavily O-glycosylated with partially sialylated core 1 and 2-type mono- to hexasaccharides on Thr2, Thr81, Thr86, Thr156, Ser158, and Ser160. The sialoglycans displayed α2-3- and α2-6-NeuAc-type sialylation. Non-human, potentially immunogenic glycoepitopes (e.g. N-glycolylneuraminic acid and α-galactosylation) were not displayed by hetIL-15. Highly reproducible glycosylation of IL-15 and sIL-15Rα of two batches of hetIL-15 demonstrated consistent manufacturing and purification. In conclusion, we document the heterogeneous and reproducible N- and O-glycosylation of large-scale preparations of the therapeutic candidate hetIL-15. Site-specific mapping of these molecular features is important to evaluate the consistent

  8. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, T A; Dias, A M; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, J M; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, C A; Pinho, S S

    2016-03-31

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell-cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  9. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, TA; Dias, AM; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, JM; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, CA; Pinho, SS

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell–cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  10. Diverse endonucleolytic cleavage sites in the mammalian transcriptome depend upon microRNAs, Drosha, and additional nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Karginov, Fedor V.; Cheloufi, Sihem; Chong, Mark M.W.; Stark, Alexander; Smith, Andrew D.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    The lifespan of a mammalian mRNA is determined, in part, by the binding of regulatory proteins and small RNA-guided complexes. The conserved endonuclease activity of Argonaute2 requires extensive complementarity between a small RNA and its target and is not used by animal microRNAs, which pair with their targets imperfectly. Here, we investigate the endonucleolytic function of Ago2 and other nucleases by transcriptome-wide profiling of mRNA cleavage products retaining 5′-phosphate groups in mouse ES. We detect a prominent signature of Ago2-dependent cleavage events and validate several such targets. Unexpectedly, a broader class of Ago2-independent cleavage sites is also observed, indicating participation of additional nucleases in site-specific mRNA cleavage. Within this class, we identify a cohort of Drosha-dependent mRNA cleavage events that functionally regulate mRNA levels in mES cells, including one in the Dgcr8 mRNA. Together, these results highlight the underappreciated role of endonucleolytic cleavage in controlling mRNA fates in mammals. PMID:20620951

  11. Diverse endonucleolytic cleavage sites in the mammalian transcriptome depend upon microRNAs, Drosha, and additional nucleases.

    PubMed

    Karginov, Fedor V; Cheloufi, Sihem; Chong, Mark M W; Stark, Alexander; Smith, Andrew D; Hannon, Gregory J

    2010-06-25

    The life span of a mammalian mRNA is determined, in part, by the binding of regulatory proteins and small RNA-guided complexes. The conserved endonuclease activity of Argonaute2 requires extensive complementarity between a small RNA and its target and is not used by animal microRNAs, which pair with their targets imperfectly. Here we investigate the endonucleolytic function of Ago2 and other nucleases by transcriptome-wide profiling of mRNA cleavage products retaining 5' phosphate groups in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We detect a prominent signature of Ago2-dependent cleavage events and validate several such targets. Unexpectedly, a broader class of Ago2-independent cleavage sites is also observed, indicating participation of additional nucleases in site-specific mRNA cleavage. Within this class, we identify a cohort of Drosha-dependent mRNA cleavage events that functionally regulate mRNA levels in mESCs, including one in the Dgcr8 mRNA. Together, these results highlight the underappreciated role of endonucleolytic cleavage in controlling mRNA fates in mammals. PMID:20620951

  12. From the Arctic to fetal life: physiological importance and structural basis of an 'additional' chloride-binding site in haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, M Cristina; Castagnola, Massimo; Bertonati, Claudia; Galtieri, Antonio; Giardina, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Haemoglobins from mammals of sub-Arctic and Arctic species, as well as fetal human Hb, are all characterized by a significantly lower Delta H of oxygenation compared with the majority of mammalian haemoglobins from temperate species (exceptions are represented by some cold-resistant species, such as cow, horse and pig). This has been interpreted as an adaptive mechanism of great importance from a physiological point of view. To date, the molecular basis of this thermodynamic characteristic is still not known. In the present study, we show that binding of extra chloride (with respect to adult human Hb) ions to Hb would significantly contribute to lowering the overall heat of oxygenation, thus providing a molecular basis for the low effect of temperature on the oxygenation-deoxygenation cycle. To this aim, the oxygen binding properties of bovine Hb, bear (Ursus arctos) Hb and horse Hb, which are representative of this series of haemoglobins, have been studied with special regard to the effect of heterotropic ligands, such as organic phosphates (namely 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and chloride. Functional results are consistent with a mechanism for ligand binding that involves an additional binding site for chloride ion. Analysis of computational chemistry results, obtained by the GRID program, further confirm the hypothesis that the reason for the lower Delta H of oxygenation is mainly due to an increase in the number of the oxygen-linked chloride-binding sites. PMID:14979874

  13. Addition of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Improves Bone Formation at an Ectopic Site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhifa; Li, Zhijin; Dai, Taiqiang; Zong, Chunlin; Liu, Yanpu; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) added to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheets on bone formation at an ectopic site. We isolated MSCs and ADSCs from the same rabbits. We then prepared MSC sheets for implantation with or without ADSCs subcutaneously in the backs of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. We assessed bone formation at eight weeks after implantation by micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. In osteogenic medium, MSCs grew to form multilayer sheets containing many calcium nodules. MSC sheets without ADSCs formed bone-like tissue; although neo-bone and cartilage-like tissues were sparse and unevenly distributed by eight weeks after implantation. In comparison, MSC sheets with ADSCs promoted better bone regeneration as evidenced by the greater density of bone, increased mineral deposition, obvious formation of blood vessels, large number of interconnected ossified trabeculae and woven bone structures, and greater bone volume/total volume within the composite constructs. Our results indicate that although sheets of only MSCs have the potential to form tissue engineered bone at an ectopic site, the addition of ADSCs can significantly increase the osteogenic potential of MSC sheets. Thus, the combination of MSC sheets with ADSCs may be regarded as a promising therapeutic strategy to stimulate bone regeneration. PMID:26848656

  14. Hypomorphic Glycosyltransferase Alleles and Recoding at Contingency Loci Influence Glycan Microheterogeneity in the Protein Glycosylation System of Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Camilla; Koomey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    As more bacterial protein glycosylation systems are identified and characterized, a central question that arises is, what governs the prevalence of particular glycans associated with them? In addition, accumulating evidence shows that bacterial protein glycans can be subject to the phenomenon of microheterogeneity, in which variant glycan structures are found at specific attachment sites of a given glycoprotein. Although factors underlying microheterogeneity in reconstituted expression systems have been identified and modeled, those impacting natural systems largely remain enigmatic. On the basis of a sensitive and specific glycan serotyping system, microheterogeneity has been reported for the broad-spectrum, O-linked protein glycosylation system in species within the genus Neisseria. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, a genetic approach was used to identify a hypomorphic allele of pglA (encoding the PglA galactosyltransferase) as a significant contributor to simultaneous expression of multiple glycoforms. Moreover, this phenotype was mapped to a single amino acid polymorphism in PglA. Further analyses revealed that many pglA phase-off variants (containing out-of-frame configurations in simple nucleotide repeats within the open reading frame) were associated with disproportionally high levels of the N,N′-diacetylbacillosamine–Gal disaccharide glycoform generated by PglA. This phenotype is emblematic of nonstandard decoding involving programmed ribosomal frameshifting and/or programmed transcriptional realignment. Together, these findings provide new information regarding the mechanisms of neisserial protein glycan microheterogeneity and the anticipatory nature of contingency loci. PMID:22797763

  15. The polar and lateral flagella from Plesiomonas shigelloides are glycosylated with legionaminic acid

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Aquilini, Eleonora; Fulton, Kelly M.; Twine, Susan M.; Tomás, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is the unique member of the Enterobacteriaceae family able to produce polar flagella when grow in liquid medium and lateral flagella when grown in solid or semisolid media. In this study on P. shigelloides 302-73 strain, we found two different gene clusters, one exclusively for the lateral flagella biosynthesis and the other one containing the biosynthetic polar flagella genes with additional putative glycosylation genes. P. shigelloides is the first Enterobacteriaceae were a complete lateral flagella cluster leading to a lateral flagella production is described. We also show that both flagella in P. shigelloides 302-73 strain are glycosylated by a derivative of legionaminic acid (Leg), which explains the presence of Leg pathway genes between the two polar flagella regions in their biosynthetic gene cluster. It is the first bacterium reported with O-glycosylated Leg in both polar and lateral flagella. The flagella O-glycosylation is essential for bacterial flagella formation, either polar or lateral, because gene mutants on the biosynthesis of Leg are non-flagellated. Furthermore, the presence of the lateral flagella cluster and Leg O-flagella glycosylation genes are widely spread features among the P. shigelloides strains tested. PMID:26167161

  16. The Autonomous Glycosylation of Large DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Piacente, Francesco; Gaglianone, Matteo; Laugieri, Maria Elena; Tonetti, Michela G

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of surface molecules is a key feature of several eukaryotic viruses, which use the host endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to add carbohydrates to their nascent glycoproteins. In recent years, a newly discovered group of eukaryotic viruses, belonging to the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus (NCLDV) group, was shown to have several features that are typical of cellular organisms, including the presence of components of the glycosylation machinery. Starting from initial observations with the chlorovirus PBCV-1, enzymes for glycan biosynthesis have been later identified in other viruses; in particular in members of the Mimiviridae family. They include both the glycosyltransferases and other carbohydrate-modifying enzymes and the pathways for the biosynthesis of the rare monosaccharides that are found in the viral glycan structures. These findings, together with genome analysis of the newly-identified giant DNA viruses, indicate that the presence of glycogenes is widespread in several NCLDV families. The identification of autonomous viral glycosylation machinery leads to many questions about the origin of these pathways, the mechanisms of glycan production, and eventually their function in the viral replication cycle. The scope of this review is to highlight some of the recent results that have been obtained on the glycosylation systems of the large DNA viruses, with a special focus on the enzymes involved in nucleotide-sugar production. PMID:26690138

  17. The Autonomous Glycosylation of Large DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Piacente, Francesco; Gaglianone, Matteo; Laugieri, Maria Elena; Tonetti, Michela G.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of surface molecules is a key feature of several eukaryotic viruses, which use the host endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to add carbohydrates to their nascent glycoproteins. In recent years, a newly discovered group of eukaryotic viruses, belonging to the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus (NCLDV) group, was shown to have several features that are typical of cellular organisms, including the presence of components of the glycosylation machinery. Starting from initial observations with the chlorovirus PBCV-1, enzymes for glycan biosynthesis have been later identified in other viruses; in particular in members of the Mimiviridae family. They include both the glycosyltransferases and other carbohydrate-modifying enzymes and the pathways for the biosynthesis of the rare monosaccharides that are found in the viral glycan structures. These findings, together with genome analysis of the newly-identified giant DNA viruses, indicate that the presence of glycogenes is widespread in several NCLDV families. The identification of autonomous viral glycosylation machinery leads to many questions about the origin of these pathways, the mechanisms of glycan production, and eventually their function in the viral replication cycle. The scope of this review is to highlight some of the recent results that have been obtained on the glycosylation systems of the large DNA viruses, with a special focus on the enzymes involved in nucleotide-sugar production. PMID:26690138

  18. Characterization of neutralization epitopes in the V2 region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120: role of glycosylation in the correct folding of the V1/V2 domain.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z; Kayman, S C; Honnen, W; Revesz, K; Chen, H; Vijh-Warrier, S; Tilley, S A; McKeating, J; Shotton, C; Pinter, A

    1995-01-01

    A number of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with various levels of neutralizing activity that recognize epitopes in the V1/V2 domain of LAI-related gp120s have been described. These include rodent antibodies directed against linear and conformational epitopes and a chimpanzee MAb, C108G, with extremely potent neutralizing activity directed against a glycan-dependent epitope. A fusion glycoprotein expression system that expressed the isolated V1/V2 domain of gp120 in native form was used to analyze the structural characteristics of these epitopes. A number of MAbs (C108G, G3-4, 684-238, SC258, 11/68b, 38/66a, 38/66c, 38/62c, and CRA3) that did not bind with high affinity to peptides immunoprecipitated a fusion glycoprotein expressing the V1/V2 domain of HXB2 gp120 in the absence of other human immunodeficiency virus sequences, establishing that their epitopes were fully specified within this region. Biochemical analyses indicated that in the majority of V1/V2 fusion molecules only five of the six glycosylation signals in the V1/V2 domain were utilized, and the glycoforms were found to be differentially recognized by particular MAbs. Both C108G and MAbs directed against conformational epitopes reacted with large fractions of the fully glycosylated molecules but with only small fractions of the incompletely glycosylated molecules. Mutational analysis of the V1 and V2 glycosylation signals indicated that in most cases the unutilized site was located either at position 156 or at position 160, suggesting the occurrence of competition for glycan addition at these neighboring positions. Mutation of glycosylation site 160 destroyed the C108G epitope but increased the fraction of the molecules that presented the conformational epitopes, while mutation of the highly conserved glycosylation site at position 156 greatly diminished the expression of the conformational epitopes and increased expression of the C108G epitope. Similar heterogeneity in glycosylation was also observed

  19. Mechanisms of disease: congenital muscular dystrophies-glycosylation takes center stage.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul T

    2006-04-01

    Recent studies have defined a group of muscular dystrophies, now termed the dystroglycanopathies, as novel disorders of glycosylation. These conditions include Walker-Warburg syndrome, muscle-eye-brain disease, Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy types 1C and 1D, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I. Although clinical findings can be highly variable, dystroglycanopathies are all characterized by cortical malformations and ocular defects at the more severe end of the clinical spectrum, in addition to muscular dystrophy. All of these disorders are defined by the underglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. Defective glycosylation of dystroglycan severs the link between this important cell adhesion molecule and the extracellular matrix, thereby contributing to cellular pathology. Recent experiments indicate that glycosylation might not only define forms of muscular dystrophy but also provide an avenue to the development of therapies for these disorders. PMID:16932553

  20. Remote Electronic Effects by Ether Protecting Groups Fine-Tune Glycosyl Donor Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Heuckendorff, Mads; Poulsen, Lulu Teressa; Jensen, Henrik H

    2016-06-17

    It was established that para-substituted benzyl ether protecting groups affect the reactivity of glycosyl donors of the thioglycoside type with the N-iodosuccinimide/triflic acid promoter system. Having electron donating p-methoxybenzyl ether (PMB) groups increased the reactivity of the donor in comparison to having electron withdrawing p-chloro (PClB) or p-cyanobenzyl ether (PCNB) protecting groups, which decreased the reactivity of the glycosyl donor relative to the parent benzyl ether (Bn) protected glycosyl donor. These findings were used to perform the first armed-disarmed coupling between two benzylated glucosyl donors by tuning their reactivity. In addition, the present work describes a highly efficient palladium catalyzed multiple cyanation and methoxylation of p-chlorobenzyl protected thioglycosides. The results of this paper regarding both the different electron withdrawing properties of various benzyl ethers and the efficient and multiple protecting group transformations are applicable in general organic chemistry and not restricted to carbohydrate chemistry. PMID:27224456

  1. The major secreted protein Msp1/p75 is O-glycosylated in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the occurrence, biosynthesis and possible functions of glycoproteins are increasingly documented for pathogens, glycoproteins are not yet widely described in probiotic bacteria. Nevertheless, knowledge of protein glycosylation holds important potential for better understanding specific glycan-mediated interactions of probiotics and for glycoengineering in food-grade microbes. Results Here, we provide evidence that the major secreted protein Msp1/p75 of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is glycosylated. Msp1 was shown to stain positive with periodic-acid Schiff staining, to be susceptible to chemical deglycosylation, and to bind with the mannose-specific Concanavalin A (ConA) lectin. Recombinant expression in Escherichia coli resulted in a significant reduction in molecular mass, loss of ConA reactivity and increased sensitivity towards pronase E and proteinase K. Mass spectrometry showed that Msp1 is O-glycosylated and identified a glycopeptide TVETPSSA (amino acids 101-108) bearing hexoses presumably linked to the serine residues. Interestingly, these serine residues are not present in the homologous protein of several Lactobacillus casei strains tested, which also did not bind to ConA. The role of the glycan substitutions in known functions of Msp1 was also investigated. Glycosylation did not seem to impact significantly on the peptidoglycan hydrolase activity of Msp1. In addition, the glycan chain appeared not to be required for the activation of Akt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells by Msp1. On the other hand, examination of different cell extracts showed that Msp1 is a glycosylated protein in the supernatant, but not in the cell wall and cytosol fraction, suggesting a link between glycosylation and secretion of this protein. Conclusions In this study we have provided the first evidence of protein O-glycosylation in the probiotic L rhamnosus GG. The major secreted protein Msp1 is glycosylated with ConA reactive sugars at the

  2. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Resch, Michael G.; Greene, Eric R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  3. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco anionic peroxidase: Effect of additional aromatic amino acids on stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Poloznikov, A A; Zakharova, G S; Chubar, T A; Hushpulian, D M; Tishkov, V I; Gazaryan, I G

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco anionic peroxidase (TOP) is known to effectively catalyze luminol oxidation without enhancers, in contrast to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). To pursue structure-activity relationship studies for TOP, two amino acids have been chosen for mutation, namely Thr151, close to the heme plane, and Phe140 at the entrance to the active site pocket. Three mutant forms TOP F140Y, T151W and F140Y/T151W have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and reactivated to yield active enzymes. Single-point mutations introducing additional aromatic amino acid residues at the surface of TOP exhibit a significant effect on the enzyme catalytic activity and stability as judged by the results of steady-state and transient kinetics studies. TOP T151W is up to 4-fold more active towards a number of aromatic substrates including luminol, whereas TOP F140Y is 2-fold more stable against thermal inactivation and 8-fold more stable in the reaction course. These steady-state observations have been rationalized with the help of transient kinetic studies on the enzyme reaction with hydrogen peroxide in a single turnover regime. The stopped-flow data reveal (a) an increased stability of F140Y Compound I towards hydrogen peroxide, and thus, a higher operational stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme, and (b) a lesser leakage of oxidative equivalents from TOP T151W Compound I resulting in the increased catalytic activity. The results obtained show that TOP unique properties can be further improved for practical applications by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:25957835

  5. The first representative of glycosylated three-fingered toxins. Cytotoxin from the Naja kaouthia cobra venom.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Alexey V; Astapova, Maria V; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2004-05-01

    There are different glycosylated proteins in snake venoms, but no glycosylated representatives of a large family of three-fingered toxins have previously been detected. A new glycoprotein was isolated from the venom of the Thai cobra Naja kaouthia. MALDI MS of the glycoprotein contained an array of peaks in the range from approximately 8900 to approximately 9400 Da indicating its microheterogeneity. Carbohydrate analysis showed the presence of mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and neuraminic acid. The N-terminal sequence of the glycoprotein was identical to that of cytotoxin 3 (CX3) from N. kaouthia, and CD spectra of the glycoprotein and CX3 were almost the same. Cleavage of a glycan moiety by N-glycosidase F gave a protein of molecular mass practically coinciding with that of CX3. MALDI MS of the tryptic digest of reduced glycoprotein S-pyridylethylated at cysteine residues, contained peaks corresponding to all tryptic fragments of CX3, with the exception of fragment 24-30. The peak corresponding to this peptide appeared in the mass-spectrum of similarly treated deglycosylated glycoprotein. These data show that the potential N-glycosylation site at Asn29 in CX3 is utilized for glycan attachment and that the glycoprotein is glycosylated CX3. In vivo toxicity of the glycoprotein to the cricket Gryllus assimilis was twofold lower than that of CX3. The cytotoxic activity of the glycoprotein towards HL60 cells was about two orders of magnitude lower than that of CX3, but could be made equal to the CX3 cytotoxicity by deglycosylation. Thus for the first time we have isolated a glycosylated three-fingered snake venom toxin wherein glycosylation appears to modulate its biological activity. PMID:15128311

  6. Solving Glycosylation Disorders: Fundamental Approaches Reveal Complicated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Chong, Jessica X.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Ng, Bobby G.

    2014-01-01

    Over 100 human genetic disorders result from mutations in glycosylation-related genes. In 2013, a new glycosylation disorder was reported every 17 days. This trend will probably continue given that at least 2% of the human genome encodes glycan-biosynthesis and -recognition proteins. Established biosynthetic pathways provide many candidate genes, but finding unanticipated mutated genes will offer new insights into glycosylation. Simple glycobiomarkers can be used in narrowing the candidates identified by exome and genome sequencing, and those can be validated by glycosylation analysis of serum or cells from affected individuals. Model organisms will expand the understanding of these mutations’ impact on glycosylation and pathology. Here, we highlight some recently discovered glycosylation disorders and the barriers, breakthroughs, and surprises they presented. We predict that some glycosylation disorders might occur with greater frequency than current estimates of their prevalence. Moreover, the prevalence of some disorders differs substantially between European and African Americans. PMID:24507773

  7. β1- and β3- voltage-gated sodium channel subunits modulate cell surface expression and glycosylation of Nav1.7 in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Laedermann, Cédric J.; Syam, Ninda; Pertin, Marie; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) are glycoproteins composed of a pore-forming α-subunit and associated β-subunits that regulate Nav α-subunit plasma membrane density and biophysical properties. Glycosylation of the Nav α-subunit also directly affects Navs gating. β-subunits and glycosylation thus comodulate Nav α-subunit gating. We hypothesized that β-subunits could directly influence α-subunit glycosylation. Whole-cell patch clamp of HEK293 cells revealed that both β1- and β3-subunits coexpression shifted V½ of steady-state activation and inactivation and increased Nav1.7-mediated INa density. Biotinylation of cell surface proteins, combined with the use of deglycosydases, confirmed that Nav1.7 α-subunits exist in multiple glycosylated states. The α-subunit intracellular fraction was found in a core-glycosylated state, migrating at ~250 kDa. At the plasma membrane, in addition to the core-glycosylated form, a fully glycosylated form of Nav1.7 (~280 kDa) was observed. This higher band shifted to an intermediate band (~260 kDa) when β1-subunits were coexpressed, suggesting that the β1-subunit promotes an alternative glycosylated form of Nav1.7. Furthermore, the β1-subunit increased the expression of this alternative glycosylated form and the β3-subunit increased the expression of the core-glycosylated form of Nav1.7. This study describes a novel role for β1- and β3-subunits in the modulation of Nav1.7 α-subunit glycosylation and cell surface expression. PMID:24009557

  8. Efficient synthesis of glycosylated phenazine natural products and analogs with DISAL (methyl 3,5-dinitrosalicylate) glycosyl donors.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Jane B; Petersen, Lars; Jensen, Knud J; Nielsen, John

    2003-09-21

    Inspired by the occurrence and function of phenazines in natural products, new glycosylated analogs were designed and synthesized. DISAL (methyl 3,5-dinitrosalicylate) glycosyl donors were used in an efficient and easily-handled glycosylation protocol compatible with combinatorial chemistry. Benzoylated D-glucose, D-galactose and L-quinovose DISAL glycosyl donors were synthesized in high yields and used under mild conditions to glycosylate methyl saphenate and 2-hydroxyphenazine. The glycosides were screened for biological activity and one compound showed inhibitory activity towards topoisomerase II. PMID:14527145

  9. Characterization of an Additional Splice Acceptor Site Introduced into CYP4B1 in Hominoidae during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Oliver T.; Roellecke, Katharina; Freund, Marcel; Gombert, Michael; Lottmann, Nadine; Steward, Charles A.; Kramm, Christof M.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Rettie, Allan E.; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    CYP4B1 belongs to the cytochrome P450 family 4, one of the oldest P450 families whose members have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The CYP4 monooxygenases typically oxidize fatty acids to both inactive and active lipid mediators, although the endogenous ligand(s) is largely unknown. During evolution, at the transition of great apes to humanoids, the CYP4B1 protein acquired a serine instead of a proline at the canonical position 427 in the meander region. Although this alteration impairs P450 function related to the processing of naturally occurring lung toxins, a study in transgenic mice suggested that an additional serine insertion at position 207 in human CYP4B1 can rescue the enzyme stability and activity. Here, we report that the genomic insertion of a CAG triplet at the intron 5–exon 6 boundary in human CYP4B1 introduced an additional splice acceptor site in frame. During evolution, this change occurred presumably at the stage of Hominoidae and leads to two major isoforms of the CYP4B1 enzymes of humans and great apes, either with or without a serine 207 insertion (insSer207). We further demonstrated that the CYP4B1 enzyme with insSer207 is the dominant isoform (76%) in humans. Importantly, this amino acid insertion did not affect the 4-ipomeanol metabolizing activities or stabilities of the native rabbit or human CYP4B1 enzymes, when introduced as transgenes in human primary cells and cell lines. In our 3D modeling, this functional neutrality of insSer207 is compatible with its predicted location on the exterior surface of CYP4B1 in a flexible side chain. Therefore, the Ser207 insertion does not rescue the P450 functional activity of human CYP4B1 that has been lost during evolution. PMID:26355749

  10. Functional Divergence in the Role of N-Linked Glycosylation in Smoothened Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Marada, Suresh; Navarro, Gemma; Truong, Ashley; Stewart, Daniel P.; Arensdorf, Angela M.; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Angelats, Edgar; Opferman, Joseph T.; Rohatgi, Rajat; McCormick, Peter J.; Ogden, Stacey K.

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Smoothened (Smo) is the requisite signal transducer of the evolutionarily conserved Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. Although aspects of Smo signaling are conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates, significant differences have evolved. These include changes in its active sub-cellular localization, and the ability of vertebrate Smo to induce distinct G protein-dependent and independent signals in response to ligand. Whereas the canonical Smo signal to Gli transcriptional effectors occurs in a G protein-independent manner, its non-canonical signal employs Gαi. Whether vertebrate Smo can selectively bias its signal between these routes is not yet known. N-linked glycosylation is a post-translational modification that can influence GPCR trafficking, ligand responsiveness and signal output. Smo proteins in Drosophila and vertebrate systems harbor N-linked glycans, but their role in Smo signaling has not been established. Herein, we present a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila and murine Smo glycosylation that supports a functional divergence in the contribution of N-linked glycans to signaling. Of the seven predicted glycan acceptor sites in Drosophila Smo, one is essential. Loss of N-glycosylation at this site disrupted Smo trafficking and attenuated its signaling capability. In stark contrast, we found that all four predicted N-glycosylation sites on murine Smo were dispensable for proper trafficking, agonist binding and canonical signal induction. However, the under-glycosylated protein was compromised in its ability to induce a non-canonical signal through Gαi, providing for the first time evidence that Smo can bias its signal and that a post-translational modification can impact this process. As such, we postulate a profound shift in N-glycan function from affecting Smo ER exit in flies to influencing its signal output in mice. PMID:26291458

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of urinary prostate protein glycosylation profiling in prostatitis diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Vermassen, Tijl; Van Praet, Charles; Poelaert, Filip; Lumen, Nicolaas; Decaestecker, Karel; Hoebeke, Piet; Van Belle, Simon; Rottey, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although prostatitis is a common male urinary tract infection, clinical diagnosis of prostatitis is difficult. The developmental mechanism of prostatitis is not yet unraveled which led to the elaboration of various biomarkers. As changes in asparagine-linked-(N-)-glycosylation were observed between healthy volunteers (HV), patients with benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer patients, a difference could exist in biochemical parameters and urinary N-glycosylation between HV and prostatitis patients. We therefore investigated if prostatic protein glycosylation could improve the diagnosis of prostatitis. Materials and methods Differences in serum and urine biochemical markers and in total urine N-glycosylation profile of prostatic proteins were determined between HV (N = 66) and prostatitis patients (N = 36). Additionally, diagnostic accuracy of significant biochemical markers and changes in N-glycosylation was assessed. Results Urinary white blood cell (WBC) count enabled discrimination of HV from prostatitis patients (P < 0.001). Urinary bacteria count allowed for discriminating prostatitis patients from HV (P < 0.001). Total amount of biantennary structures (urinary 2A/MA marker) was significantly lower in prostatitis patients compared to HV (P < 0.001). Combining the urinary 2A/MA marker and urinary WBC count resulted in an AUC of 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.70–0.89) which was significantly better than urinary WBC count (AUC = 0.70, 95% CI = [0.59–0.82], P = 0.042) as isolated test. Conclusions We have demonstrated the diagnostic value of urinary N-glycosylation profiling, which shows great potential as biomarker for prostatitis. Further research is required to unravel the developmental course of prostatic inflammation. PMID:26526330

  12. Optimal Synthetic Glycosylation of a Therapeutic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Thomas B.; Struwe, Weston B.; Gault, Joseph; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Taylor, Thomas A.; Raj, Ritu; Wals, Kim; Mohammed, Shabaz; Benesch, Justin L. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glycosylation patterns in antibodies critically determine biological and physical properties but their precise control is a significant challenge in biology and biotechnology. We describe herein the optimization of an endoglycosidase‐catalyzed glycosylation of the best‐selling biotherapeutic Herceptin, an anti‐HER2 antibody. Precise MS analysis of the intact four‐chain Ab heteromultimer reveals nonspecific, non‐enzymatic reactions (glycation), which are not detected under standard denaturing conditions. This competing reaction, which has hitherto been underestimated as a source of side products, can now be minimized. Optimization allowed access to the purest natural form of Herceptin to date (≥90 %). Moreover, through the use of a small library of sugars containing non‐natural functional groups, Ab variants containing defined numbers of selectively addressable chemical tags (reaction handles at Sia C1) in specific positions (for attachment of cargo molecules or “glycorandomization”) were readily generated.

  13. Optimal Synthetic Glycosylation of a Therapeutic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Thomas B.; Struwe, Weston B.; Gault, Joseph; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Taylor, Thomas A.; Raj, Ritu; Wals, Kim; Mohammed, Shabaz; Benesch, Justin L. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glycosylation patterns in antibodies critically determine biological and physical properties but their precise control is a significant challenge in biology and biotechnology. We describe herein the optimization of an endoglycosidase‐catalyzed glycosylation of the best‐selling biotherapeutic Herceptin, an anti‐HER2 antibody. Precise MS analysis of the intact four‐chain Ab heteromultimer reveals nonspecific, non‐enzymatic reactions (glycation), which are not detected under standard denaturing conditions. This competing reaction, which has hitherto been underestimated as a source of side products, can now be minimized. Optimization allowed access to the purest natural form of Herceptin to date (≥90 %). Moreover, through the use of a small library of sugars containing non‐natural functional groups, Ab variants containing defined numbers of selectively addressable chemical tags (reaction handles at Sia C1) in specific positions (for attachment of cargo molecules or “glycorandomization”) were readily generated. PMID:26756880

  14. Involvement of Aberrant Glycosylation in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Eiji; Ito, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common posttranslational modification reactions and nearly half of all known proteins in eukaryotes are glycosylated. In fact, changes in oligosaccharides structures are associated with many physiological and pathological events, including cell growth, migration and differentiation, and tumor invasion. Therefore, functional glycomics, which is a comprehensive study of the structures and functions of glycans, is attracting the increasing attention of scientists in various fields of life science. In cases of thyroid cancer, the biological characters and prognosis are completely different in each type of histopathology, and their oligosaccharide structures as well as the expression of glycosyltransferases are also different. In this review, we summarized our previous papers on oligosaccharides and thyroid cancers and discussed a possible function of oligosaccharides in the carcinogenesis in thyroid cancer. PMID:20652009

  15. Optimal Synthetic Glycosylation of a Therapeutic Antibody.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Thomas B; Struwe, Weston B; Gault, Joseph; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Taylor, Thomas A; Raj, Ritu; Wals, Kim; Mohammed, Shabaz; Robinson, Carol V; Benesch, Justin L P; Davis, Benjamin G

    2016-02-01

    Glycosylation patterns in antibodies critically determine biological and physical properties but their precise control is a significant challenge in biology and biotechnology. We describe herein the optimization of an endoglycosidase-catalyzed glycosylation of the best-selling biotherapeutic Herceptin, an anti-HER2 antibody. Precise MS analysis of the intact four-chain Ab heteromultimer reveals nonspecific, non-enzymatic reactions (glycation), which are not detected under standard denaturing conditions. This competing reaction, which has hitherto been underestimated as a source of side products, can now be minimized. Optimization allowed access to the purest natural form of Herceptin to date (≥90 %). Moreover, through the use of a small library of sugars containing non-natural functional groups, Ab variants containing defined numbers of selectively addressable chemical tags (reaction handles at Sia C1) in specific positions (for attachment of cargo molecules or "glycorandomization") were readily generated. PMID:26756880

  16. A new synthetic access to 2-N-(glycosyl)thiosemicarbazides from 3-N-(glycosyl)oxadiazolinethiones and the regioselectivity of the glycosylation of their oxadiazolinethione precursors

    PubMed Central

    El Tamany, El Sayed H; Fattah, Mohy El Din Abdel; Aly, Mohamed R E; Boraei, Ahmed T A; Duerkop, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycosylations of 5-(1H-indol-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazoline-2(3H)-thione delivered various degrees of S- and/or N-glycosides depending on the reaction conditions. S-Glycosides were obtained regiospecifically by grinding oxadiazolinethiones with acylated α-D-glycosyl halides in basic alumina, whereas 3-N-(glycosyl)oxadiazolinethiones were selectively obtained by reaction with HgCl2 followed by heating the resultant chloromercuric salt with α-D-glycosyl halides in toluene under reflux. On using Et3N or K2CO3 as a base, mixtures of S- (major degree) and N-glycosides (minor degree) were obtained. Pure 3-N-(glycosyl)oxadiazolinethiones can also be selectively obtained from glycosylsulfanyloxadiazoles by the thermal S→N migration of the glycosyl moiety, which is proposed to occur by a tight-ion-pair mechanism. Thermal S→N migration of the glycosyl moiety can be used for purification of mixtures of S- or N-glycosides to obtain the pure N-glycosides. The aminolysis of the respective S- or N-glycosides with ammonia in aqueous methanol served as further confirmation of their structures. While in S-glycosides the glycosyl moiety was cleaved off again, 3-N-(glycosyl)oxadiazolinethiones showed a ring opening of the oxadiazoline ring (without affecting the glycosyl moiety) to give N-(glycosyl)thiosemicarbazides. Herewith, a new synthetic access to one of the four classes of glycosylthiosemicarbazides was found. The ultimate confirmation of new structures was achieved by X-ray crystallography. Finally, action of ammonia on benzylated 3-N-(galactosyl)oxadiazolinethione unexpectedly yielded 3-N-(galactosyl)triazolinethione. This represents a new path to the conversion of glycosyloxadiazolinethiones to new glycosyltriazolinethione nucleosides, which was until now unknown. PMID:23400104

  17. N-glycosylation requirements in neuromuscular synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, William; Dear, Mary Lynn; Rushton, Emma; Broadie, Kendal

    2013-01-01

    Neural development requires N-glycosylation regulation of intercellular signaling, but the requirements in synaptogenesis have not been well tested. All complex and hybrid N-glycosylation requires MGAT1 (UDP-GlcNAc:α-3-D-mannoside-β1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyl-transferase I) function, and Mgat1 nulls are the most compromised N-glycosylation condition that survive long enough to permit synaptogenesis studies. At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), Mgat1 mutants display selective loss of lectin-defined carbohydrates in the extracellular synaptomatrix, and an accompanying accumulation of the secreted endogenous Mind the gap (MTG) lectin, a key synaptogenesis regulator. Null Mgat1 mutants exhibit strongly overelaborated synaptic structural development, consistent with inhibitory roles for complex/hybrid N-glycans in morphological synaptogenesis, and strengthened functional synapse differentiation, consistent with synaptogenic MTG functions. Synapse molecular composition is surprisingly selectively altered, with decreases in presynaptic active zone Bruchpilot (BRP) and postsynaptic Glutamate receptor subtype B (GLURIIB), but no detectable change in a wide range of other synaptic components. Synaptogenesis is driven by bidirectional trans-synaptic signals that traverse the glycan-rich synaptomatrix, and Mgat1 mutation disrupts both anterograde and retrograde signals, consistent with MTG regulation of trans-synaptic signaling. Downstream of intercellular signaling, pre- and postsynaptic scaffolds are recruited to drive synaptogenesis, and Mgat1 mutants exhibit loss of both classic Discs large 1 (DLG1) and newly defined Lethal (2) giant larvae [L(2)GL] scaffolds. We conclude that MGAT1-dependent N-glycosylation shapes the synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment and endogenous lectin localization within this domain, to modulate retention of trans-synaptic signaling ligands driving synaptic scaffold recruitment during synaptogenesis. PMID:24227656

  18. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of bovine myelin basic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hitz, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the CNS myelin sheath the nonenzymatic glycosylation reaction (at the early stage of the Amadori product) occurs only with the myelin basic protein and not with the other myelin proteins. This was observed in isolated bovine myelin by in vitro incubation with (/sup 14/C)-galactose and (/sup 14/C)-glucose. The respective in-vitro incorporation rates for purified bovine myelin basic protein with D-galactose, D-glucose and D-mannose were 7.2, 2.4 and 2.4 mmoles/mole myelin basic protein per day at 37/sup 0/C. A more rapid, HPLC method was devised and characterized to specifically analyze for the Amadori product. The HPLC method was correlated to the (/sup 14/C)-sugar incorporation method for myelin basic protein under a set of standard reaction conditions using (/sup 14/C)-glucose and (/sup 14/C)-mannose with HPLC values at 1/6 and 1/5 of the (/sup 14/C)-sugar incorporation method. A novel myelin basic protein purification step has been developed that yields a relativity proteolytic free preparation that is easy to work with, being totally soluble at a neutral pH. Nine new spots appear for a trypsinized glycosylated MBP in the paper peptide map of which eight correspond to positions of the (/sup 3/H)-labeled Amadori product in affinity isolated peptides. These studies provide a general characterization of and a structural basis for investigations on nonenzymatically glycosylated MBP as well as identifying MBP as the only nonenzymatically glycosylated protein in the CNS myelin sheath which may accumulate during aging, diabetes, and demyelinating diseases in general.

  19. Surface expression and function of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels are controlled by asparagine-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Black, Stefanie A G; Bladen, Chris; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2013-08-01

    Low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels play important roles in neuronal physiology where they control cellular excitability and synaptic transmission. Alteration in T-type channel expression has been linked to various pathophysiological conditions such as pain arising from diabetic neuropathy. In the present study, we looked at the role of asparagine (N)-linked glycosylation on human Cav3.2 T-type channel expression and function. Manipulation of N-glycans on cells expressing a recombinant Cav3.2 channel revealed that N-linked glycosylation is critical for proper functional expression of the channel. Using site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt the canonical N-linked glycosylation sites of Cav3.2 channel, we show that glycosylation at asparagine N192 is critical for channel expression at the surface, whereas glycosylation at asparagine N1466 controls channel activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that N-linked glycosylation of Cav3.2 not only controls surface expression and activity of the channel but also underlies glucose-dependent potentiation of T-type Ca(2+) current. Our data suggest that N-linked glycosylation of T-type channels may play an important role in aberrant upregulation of T-type channel activity in response to glucose elevations. PMID:23503728

  20. Functional roles of N-linked glycosylation of human matrix metalloproteinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Duellman, Tyler; Burnett, John; Yang, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a secreted endoproteinase with a critical role in the regulation of the extracellular matrix and proteolytic activation of signaling molecules. Human (h)MMP-9 has two well-defined N-glycosylation sites at residues N38 and N120, however, their role has remained mostly unexplored partly because expression of the N-glycosylation-deficient N38S has been difficult due to a recently discovered SNP-dependent miRNA-mediated inhibitory mechanism. hMMP-9 cDNA encoding amino acid substitutions at residues 38 (mS38) or 120 (N120S) were created in the background of a miRNA binding site disrupted template and expressed by transient transfection. hMMP-9 harboring a single mS38 replacement secreted well, whereas N120S, or a double mS38/ N120S hMMP-9 demonstrated much reduced secretion. Imaging indicated ER-retention of the non-secreted variants and co-IP confirmed an enhanced strong interaction between the non-secreted hMMP-9s and the ER-resident protein calreticulin. Removal of N-glycosylation at residue 38 revealed an amino acid-dependent strong interaction with calreticulin likely preventing unloading of the misfolded protein from the ER chaperone down the normal secretory pathway. As with other glycoproteins, N-glycosylation strongly regulates hMMP-9 secretion. This is mediated, however, through a novel mechanism of cloaking an N-glycosylation-independent strong interaction with the ER-resident calreticulin. PMID:26207422

  1. N-Glycosylation of Human R-Spondin 1 Is Required for Efficient Secretion and Stability but Not for Its Heparin Binding Ability

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-Fang; Hsu, Li-Sung; Weng, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chih-Kai; Wang, Shu-Ying; Chou, Yi-Hwa; Liu, Yan-Yu; Yuan, Zi-Xiu; Huang, Wen-Ying; Lin, Ho; Chen, Yau-Hung; Tsai, Jen-Ning

    2016-01-01

    R-spondin 1 (Rspo1) plays an essential role in stem cell biology by potentiating Wnt signaling activity. Despite the fact that Rspo1 holds therapeutic potential for a number of diseases, its biogenesis is not fully elucidated. All Rspo proteins feature two amino-terminal furin-like repeats, which are responsible for Wnt signal potentiation, and a thrombospondin type 1 (TSR1) domain that can provide affinity towards heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Using chemical inhibitors, deglycosylase and site-directed mutagenesis, we found that human Rspo1 and Rspo3 are both N-glycosylated at N137, a site near the C-terminus of the furin repeat 2 domain, and Rspo2 is N-glycosylated at N160, a position near the N-terminus of TSR1 domain. Elimination of N-glycosylation at these sites affects their accumulation in media but have no effect on the ability towards heparin. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site to Rspo2 mutant at the position homologous to N137 in Rspo1 restored full glycosylation and rescued the accumulation defect of nonglycosylated Rspo2 mutant in media. Similar effect can be observed in the N137 Rspo1 or Rspo3 mutant engineered with Rspo2 N-glycosylation site. The results highlight the importance of N-glycosylation at these two positions in efficient folding and secretion of Rspo family. Finally, we further showed that human Rspo1 is subjected to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control in N-glycan-dependent manner. While N-glycan of Rspo1 plays a role in its intracellular stability, it had little effect on secreted Rspo1. Our findings provide evidence for the critical role of N-glycosylation in the biogenesis of Rspo1. PMID:27314333

  2. N-Glycosylation of Human R-Spondin 1 Is Required for Efficient Secretion and Stability but Not for Its Heparin Binding Ability.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Fang; Hsu, Li-Sung; Weng, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chih-Kai; Wang, Shu-Ying; Chou, Yi-Hwa; Liu, Yan-Yu; Yuan, Zi-Xiu; Huang, Wen-Ying; Lin, Ho; Chen, Yau-Hung; Tsai, Jen-Ning

    2016-01-01

    R-spondin 1 (Rspo1) plays an essential role in stem cell biology by potentiating Wnt signaling activity. Despite the fact that Rspo1 holds therapeutic potential for a number of diseases, its biogenesis is not fully elucidated. All Rspo proteins feature two amino-terminal furin-like repeats, which are responsible for Wnt signal potentiation, and a thrombospondin type 1 (TSR1) domain that can provide affinity towards heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Using chemical inhibitors, deglycosylase and site-directed mutagenesis, we found that human Rspo1 and Rspo3 are both N-glycosylated at N137, a site near the C-terminus of the furin repeat 2 domain, and Rspo2 is N-glycosylated at N160, a position near the N-terminus of TSR1 domain. Elimination of N-glycosylation at these sites affects their accumulation in media but have no effect on the ability towards heparin. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site to Rspo2 mutant at the position homologous to N137 in Rspo1 restored full glycosylation and rescued the accumulation defect of nonglycosylated Rspo2 mutant in media. Similar effect can be observed in the N137 Rspo1 or Rspo3 mutant engineered with Rspo2 N-glycosylation site. The results highlight the importance of N-glycosylation at these two positions in efficient folding and secretion of Rspo family. Finally, we further showed that human Rspo1 is subjected to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control in N-glycan-dependent manner. While N-glycan of Rspo1 plays a role in its intracellular stability, it had little effect on secreted Rspo1. Our findings provide evidence for the critical role of N-glycosylation in the biogenesis of Rspo1. PMID:27314333

  3. Glycosylation in immune cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Markus; Gleissner, Christian A.; Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Leukocyte recruitment encompasses cell adhesion and activation steps that enable circulating leukocytes to roll, arrest, and firmly adhere on the endothelial surface before they extravasate into distinct tissue locations. This complex sequence of events relies on adhesive interactions between surface structures on leukocytes and endothelial cells and also on signals generated during the cell-cell contacts. Cell surface glycans play a crucial role in leukocyte recruitment. Several glycosyltransferases such as α1,3 fucosyltransferases, α2,3 sialyltransferases, core 2 N-acetylglucosaminlytransferases, β1,4 galactosyltransferases and polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases have been implicated in the generation of functional selectin ligands that mediate leukocyte rolling via binding to selectins. Recent evidence also suggests a role of α2,3 sialylated carbohydrate determinants in triggering chemokine-mediated leukocyte arrest and influencing β1 integrin function. Additional mechanisms by galectin- and siglec-dependent processes contribute to the growing number of reports emphasizing the significant role of glycans for the successful recruitment of leukocytes into tissues. Advancing the knowledge on glycan function into appropriate pathology models is likely to suggest interesting new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of immune- and inflammation-mediated diseases. PMID:19594631

  4. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... diabetes and to determine the proper insulin dosage for a patient. Elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin indicate uncontrolled diabetes in a patient. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  5. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... diabetes and to determine the proper insulin dosage for a patient. Elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin indicate uncontrolled diabetes in a patient. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  6. Genetic characterization of pilin glycosylation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Power, P M; Roddam, L F; Dieckelmann, M; Srikhanta, Y N; Tan, Y C; Berrington, A W; Jennings, M P

    2000-04-01

    Pili of Neisseria meningitidis are a key virulence factor, being the major adhesin of this capsulate organism and contributing to specificity for the human host. Pili are post-translationally modified by addition of an O-linked trisaccharide, Gal(beta1-4)Gal(alpha1-3)2,4-diacetimido-2,4,6-trideoxyhexose++ +. In a previous study the authors identified and characterized a gene, pglA, encoding a galactosyltransferase involved in pilin glycosylation. In this study a set of random genomic sequences from N. meningitidis strain MC58 was used to search for further genes involved in pilin glycosylation. Initially, an open reading frame was identified, and designated pglD (pilin glycosylation gene D), which was homologous to genes involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis. The region adjacent to this gene was cloned and nucleotide sequence analysis revealed two further genes, pglB and pglC, which were also homologous with genes involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis. Insertional mutations were constructed in pglB, pglC and pglD in N. meningitidis C311#3, a strain with well-defined LPS and pilin-linked glycan structures, to determine whether these genes had a role in the biosynthesis of either of these molecules. Analysis of these mutants revealed that there was no alteration in the phenotype of LPS in any of the mutant strains as judged by SDS-PAGE gel migration. In contrast, increased gel migration of the pilin subunit molecules of pglB, pglC and pglD mutants by Western analysis was observed. Pilin from each of the pglB, pglC and pglD mutants did not react with a terminal-galactose-specific stain, confirming that the gel migration differences were due to the alteration or absence of the pilin-linked trisaccharide structure in these mutants. In addition, antisera specific for the C311#3 trisaccharide failed to react with pilin from the pglB, pglC, pglD and galE mutants. Analysis of nucleotide sequence homologies has suggested specific roles for pglB, pglC and pglD in the

  7. A Propos of Glycosyl Cations and the Mechanism of Chemical Glycosylation; the Current State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Bohé, Luis

    2014-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in glycosylation with particular emphasis on mechanism is presented. The mounting evidence for both the existence of glycosyl oxocarbenium ions as fleeting intermediates in some reactions, and the crucial role of the associated in counter ion in others is discussed. The extremes of the SN1 and SN2 manifolds for the glycosylation reaction are bridged by a continuum of mechanisms in which it appears likely that most examples are located. PMID:25108484

  8. Metabolically engineered Escherichia coli for efficient production of glycosylated natural products

    PubMed Central

    Peirú, Salvador; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Menzella, Hugo G.; Carney, John R.; Gramajo, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    Summary Significant achievements in polyketide gene expression have made Escherichia coli one of the most promising hosts for the heterologous production of pharmacologically important polyketides. However, attempts to produce glycosylated polyketides, by the expression of heterologous sugar pathways, have been hampered until now by the low levels of glycosylated compounds produced by the recombinant hosts. By carrying out metabolic engineering of three endogenous pathways that lead to the synthesis of TDP sugars in E. coli, we have greatly improved the intracellular levels of the common deoxysugar intermediate TDP‐4‐keto‐6‐deoxyglucose resulting in increased production of the heterologous sugars TDP‐L‐mycarose and TDP‐d‐desosamine, both components of medically important polyketides. Bioconversion experiments carried out by feeding 6‐deoxyerythronolide B (6‐dEB) or 3‐α‐mycarosylerythronolide B (MEB) demonstrated that the genetically modified E. coli B strain was able to produce 60‐ and 25‐fold more erythromycin D (EryD) than the original strain K207‐3, respectively. Moreover, the additional knockout of the multidrug efflux pump AcrAB further improved the ability of the engineered strain to produce these glycosylated compounds. These results open the possibility of using E. coli as a generic host for the industrial scale production of glycosylated polyketides, and to combine the polyketide and deoxysugar combinatorial approaches with suitable glycosyltransferases to yield massive libraries of novel compounds with variations in both the aglycone and the tailoring sugars. PMID:21261868

  9. Lewisy Promotes Migration of Oral Cancer Cells by Glycosylation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation changes normal cellular functions and represents a specific hallmark of cancer. Lewisy (Ley) carbohydrate upregulation has been reported in a variety of cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). A high level of Ley expression is related to poor prognosis of patients with oral cancer. However, it is unclear how Ley mediates oral cancer progression. In this study, the role of Ley in OSCC was explored. Our data showed that Ley was upregulated in HSC-3 and OC-2 OSCC cell lines. Particularly, glycosylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with Ley was found in OC-2 cells, and this modification was absent upon inhibition of Ley synthesis. The absence of Ley glycosylation of EGFR weakened phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Additionally, EGF-triggered cell migration was reduced, but cell proliferation was not affected. Ley modification stabilized EGFR upon ligand activation. Conversely, absence of Ley glycosylation accelerated EGFR degradation. In summary, these results indicate that increased expression of Ley in OSCC cells is able to promote cell migration by modifying EGFR which in turn stabilizes EGFR expression and downstream signaling. Targeting Ley on EGFR could have a potential therapeutic effect on oral cancer. PMID:25799278

  10. N-Glycosylation of Antibodies Characterized by Mass Spectrometry: An Integrated Software Approach

    PubMed Central

    Asperger, A.; Resemann, A.; Suckau, D.; Schweiger-Hufnagel, U.

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies represent one of the most important classes of glycoproteins playing a central role in the immune response of living organisms. Furthermore, there is a growing interest in recombinant antibodies as potential biotherapeutic agents. The analysis of the N-glycosylation pattern present on antibodies is challenging due to its heterogeneous structure. The glycan profile is highly dependent on the process by which a recombinant glycoprotein is generated, such as host organism and growth conditions. Changes to the glycosylation pattern can significantly alter biological function. To characterize the N-glycosylation pattern of a recombinant antibody, a bottom-up approach was pursued. Tryptic digests of antibody samples were separated by nano-LC and analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry. An integrated software approach allowed a detailed characterization of the glycosylation pattern and visualization of the relevant mass spectra. LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis of the digested antibody provided, in addition to the nearly complete sequence coverage of the nonglycosylated peptides, a detail-rich picture of the highly complex pattern of N-linked glycans in form of the respective N-glycopeptides. Targeted analysis of potential glycopeptides significantly increased the information content. Integrated glycoprotein analysis software tools (ProteinScape 2.2) allowed identification of glycan modifications and interactive result validation. In this process software facilitated the initial characterization of the antibody as well as the subsequent quality control tasks.

  11. Functions of human bitter taste receptors depend on N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Reichling, Claudia; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Behrens, Maik

    2008-08-01

    Human bitter taste receptors of the TAS2R gene family play a crucial role as warning sensors against the ingestion of toxic food compounds. Moreover, the genetically highly polymorphic hTAS2Rs recognize an enormous number of structurally diverse toxic and non-toxic bitter substances, and hence, may substantially influence our individual eating habits. Heterologous expression in mammalian cells is a useful tool to investigate interactions between these receptors and their agonists. However, many bitter taste receptors are poorly expressed at the cell surface of heterologous cells requiring the addition of plasma membrane export promoting epitopes to the native receptor proteins. Currently, nothing is known about amino acid motifs or other receptor-intrinsic features of TAS2Rs affecting plasma membrane association. In the present study, we analyzed the Asn-linked glycosylation of hTAS2Rs at a consensus sequence in the second extracellular loop, which is conserved among all 25 hTAS2Rs. Non-glycosylated receptors exhibit substantially lower cell surface localization and reduced association with the cellular chaperone calnexin. As the auxiliary factors receptor transporting proteins 3 and 4 are able to restore the function of non-glycosylated hTAS2R16 partially, we conclude that glycosylation is important for receptor maturation but not for its function per se. PMID:18466324

  12. Glycosylation of Skp1 affects its conformation and promotes binding to a model f-box protein.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, M Osman; Schafer, Christopher M; Powell, John T; Rodgers, Karla K; Mooers, Blaine H M; West, Christopher M

    2014-03-18

    In the social amoeba Dictyostelium, Skp1 is hydroxylated on proline 143 and further modified by three cytosolic glycosyltransferases to yield an O-linked pentasaccharide that contributes to O2 regulation of development. Skp1 is an adapter in the Skp1/cullin1/F-box protein family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that targets specific proteins for polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. To investigate the biochemical consequences of glycosylation, untagged full-length Skp1 and several of its posttranslationally modified isoforms were expressed and purified to near homogeneity using recombinant and in vitro strategies. Interaction studies with the soluble mammalian F-box protein Fbs1/Fbg1/OCP1 revealed preferential binding to the glycosylated isoforms of Skp1. This difference correlated with the increased α-helical and decreased β-sheet content of glycosylated Skp1s based on circular dichroism and increased folding order based on small-angle X-ray scattering. A comparison of the molecular envelopes of fully glycosylated Skp1 and the apoprotein indicated that both isoforms exist as an antiparallel dimer that is more compact and extended in the glycosylated state. Analytical gel filtration and chemical cross-linking studies showed a growing tendency of less modified isoforms to dimerize. Considering that regions of free Skp1 are intrinsically disordered and Skp1 can adopt distinct folds when bound to F-box proteins, we propose that glycosylation, which occurs adjacent to the F-box binding site, influences the spectrum of energetically similar conformations that vary inversely in their propensity to dock with Fbs1 or another Skp1. Glycosylation may thus influence Skp1 function by modulating F-box protein binding in cells. PMID:24506136

  13. Glycosylation of Skp1 Affects Its Conformation and Promotes Binding to a Model F-Box Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the social amoeba Dictyostelium, Skp1 is hydroxylated on proline 143 and further modified by three cytosolic glycosyltransferases to yield an O-linked pentasaccharide that contributes to O2 regulation of development. Skp1 is an adapter in the Skp1/cullin1/F-box protein family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that targets specific proteins for polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. To investigate the biochemical consequences of glycosylation, untagged full-length Skp1 and several of its posttranslationally modified isoforms were expressed and purified to near homogeneity using recombinant and in vitro strategies. Interaction studies with the soluble mammalian F-box protein Fbs1/Fbg1/OCP1 revealed preferential binding to the glycosylated isoforms of Skp1. This difference correlated with the increased α-helical and decreased β-sheet content of glycosylated Skp1s based on circular dichroism and increased folding order based on small-angle X-ray scattering. A comparison of the molecular envelopes of fully glycosylated Skp1 and the apoprotein indicated that both isoforms exist as an antiparallel dimer that is more compact and extended in the glycosylated state. Analytical gel filtration and chemical cross-linking studies showed a growing tendency of less modified isoforms to dimerize. Considering that regions of free Skp1 are intrinsically disordered and Skp1 can adopt distinct folds when bound to F-box proteins, we propose that glycosylation, which occurs adjacent to the F-box binding site, influences the spectrum of energetically similar conformations that vary inversely in their propensity to dock with Fbs1 or another Skp1. Glycosylation may thus influence Skp1 function by modulating F-box protein binding in cells. PMID:24506136

  14. Neisseria meningitidis Type IV Pili Composed of Sequence Invariable Pilins Are Masked by Multisite Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Gault, Joseph; Ferber, Mathias; Machata, Silke; Imhaus, Anne-Flore; Malosse, Christian; Charles-Orszag, Arthur; Millien, Corinne; Bouvier, Guillaume; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Klinge, Kelly; Podglajen, Isabelle; Ploy, Marie Cécile; Seifert, H Steven; Nilges, Michael; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Duménil, Guillaume

    2015-09-01

    The ability of pathogens to cause disease depends on their aptitude to escape the immune system. Type IV pili are extracellular filamentous virulence factors composed of pilin monomers and frequently expressed by bacterial pathogens. As such they are major targets for the host immune system. In the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, strains expressing class I pilins contain a genetic recombination system that promotes variation of the pilin sequence and is thought to aid immune escape. However, numerous hypervirulent clinical isolates express class II pilins that lack this property. This raises the question of how they evade immunity targeting type IV pili. As glycosylation is a possible source of antigenic variation it was investigated using top-down mass spectrometry to provide the highest molecular precision on the modified proteins. Unlike class I pilins that carry a single glycan, we found that class II pilins display up to 5 glycosylation sites per monomer on the pilus surface. Swapping of pilin class and genetic background shows that the pilin primary structure determines multisite glycosylation while the genetic background determines the nature of the glycans. Absence of glycosylation in class II pilins affects pilus biogenesis or enhances pilus-dependent aggregation in a strain specific fashion highlighting the extensive functional impact of multisite glycosylation. Finally, molecular modeling shows that glycans cover the surface of class II pilins and strongly decrease antibody access to the polypeptide chain. This strongly supports a model where strains expressing class II pilins evade the immune system by changing their sugar structure rather than pilin primary structure. Overall these results show that sequence invariable class II pilins are cloaked in glycans with extensive functional and immunological consequences. PMID:26367394

  15. Neisseria meningitidis Type IV Pili Composed of Sequence Invariable Pilins Are Masked by Multisite Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Joseph; Ferber, Mathias; Machata, Silke; Imhaus, Anne-Flore; Malosse, Christian; Charles-Orszag, Arthur; Millien, Corinne; Bouvier, Guillaume; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Klinge, Kelly; Podglajen, Isabelle; Ploy, Marie Cécile; Seifert, H. Steven; Nilges, Michael; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Duménil, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    The ability of pathogens to cause disease depends on their aptitude to escape the immune system. Type IV pili are extracellular filamentous virulence factors composed of pilin monomers and frequently expressed by bacterial pathogens. As such they are major targets for the host immune system. In the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, strains expressing class I pilins contain a genetic recombination system that promotes variation of the pilin sequence and is thought to aid immune escape. However, numerous hypervirulent clinical isolates express class II pilins that lack this property. This raises the question of how they evade immunity targeting type IV pili. As glycosylation is a possible source of antigenic variation it was investigated using top-down mass spectrometry to provide the highest molecular precision on the modified proteins. Unlike class I pilins that carry a single glycan, we found that class II pilins display up to 5 glycosylation sites per monomer on the pilus surface. Swapping of pilin class and genetic background shows that the pilin primary structure determines multisite glycosylation while the genetic background determines the nature of the glycans. Absence of glycosylation in class II pilins affects pilus biogenesis or enhances pilus-dependent aggregation in a strain specific fashion highlighting the extensive functional impact of multisite glycosylation. Finally, molecular modeling shows that glycans cover the surface of class II pilins and strongly decrease antibody access to the polypeptide chain. This strongly supports a model where strains expressing class II pilins evade the immune system by changing their sugar structure rather than pilin primary structure. Overall these results show that sequence invariable class II pilins are cloaked in glycans with extensive functional and immunological consequences. PMID:26367394

  16. Glycosylation Effects on FSH-FSHR Interaction Dynamics: A Case Study of Different FSH Glycoforms by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Dixit, Anshuman; Bousfield, George R.; Lushington, Gerald H.

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotropin known as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) plays a key role in regulating reproductive processes. Physiologically active FSH is a glycoprotein that can accommodate glycans on up to four asparagine residues, including two sites in the FSHα subunit that are critical for biochemical function, plus two sites in the β subunit, whose differential glycosylation states appear to correspond to physiologically distinct functions. Some degree of FSHβ hypo-glycosylation seems to confer advantages toward reproductive fertility of child-bearing females. In order to identify possible mechanistic underpinnings for this physiological difference we have pursued computationally intensive molecular dynamics simulations on complexes between the high affinity site of the gonadal FSH receptor (FSHR) and several FSH glycoforms including fully-glycosylated (FSH24), hypo-glycosylated (e.g., FSH15), and completely deglycosylated FSH (dgFSH). These simulations suggest that deviations in FSH/FSHR binding profile as a function of glycosylation state are modest when FSH is adorned with only small glycans, such as single N-acetylglucosamine residues. However, substantial qualitative differences emerge between FSH15 and FSH24 when FSH is decorated with a much larger, tetra-antennary glycan. Specifically, the FSHR complex with hypo-glycosylated FSH15 is observed to undergo a significant conformational shift after 5–10 ns of simulation, indicating that FSH15 has greater conformational flexibility than FSH24 which may explain the more favorable FSH15 kinetic profile. FSH15 also exhibits a stronger binding free energy, due in large part to formation of closer and more persistent salt-bridges with FSHR. PMID:26402790

  17. Phase Structure and Site Preference Behavior of Ternary Alloying Additions to PdTi and PtTi Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    The phasc structure and concentration dependence of the lattice parameter and energy of formation of ternary Pd-'I-X and Pt-Ti-X alloys for a large number of ternary alloying additions X (X = Na, Mg, Al, Si, Sc. V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir) are investigated with an atomistic modeling approach. In addition, a detailed description of the site preference behavior of such additions showing that the elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice is provided.

  18. Generation of Broensted and Lewis acid sites on the surface of silica by addition of dopant cations

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, G.; Dumesic, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Pyridine adsorption was used to study the acidic properties of silica doped with the following cations: Sc/sup 3 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Fe/sup 2 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Al/sup 3 +/, and Ga/sup 3 +/. All samples were exposed to pyridine at 423 K and subsequently evacuated at successively higher temperatures to 723 K. Infrared spectra of the adsorbed pyridine indicated that all of these cations generated Lewis acid sites. This can be explained by the presence of coordinatively unsaturated dopant cations on the surface of silica, in accord with a model based on Pauling's electrostatic bond strength rules. The infrared frequency of the 19b band of pyridine adsorbed on these Lewis acid sites was found to increase with increasing electronegativity of the dopant cation. It is suggested that both of these quantities are related to the strength of the Lewis acid sites. Broensted acid sites were also observed by infrared spectroscopy for Sc/sup 3 +/, Al/sup 3 +/, and Ga/sup 3 +/ on silica. These dopant cations are believed to be bonded tetrahedrally on the surface of silica, generating bridging hydroxyl groups between the dopant cation and Si/sup 4 +/. As for zeolite catalysts, the proton associated with these groups and required for charge neutrality is the Broensted acid site. Finally, Broensted acid sites can also be generated on silica by highly electronegative anions, such as HPO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, which generate Broensted acidity in a different manner. 55 references.

  19. 76 FR 80377 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Additional On-Site Data Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  1. Natural human interferon-alpha 2 is O-glycosylated.

    PubMed Central

    Adolf, G R; Kalsner, I; Ahorn, H; Maurer-Fogy, I; Cantell, K

    1991-01-01

    Natural human interferon alpha 2 (IFN-alpha 2) was isolated from a preparation of partially purified human leucocyte IFN by monoclonal-antibody immunoaffinity chromatography. The purified protein had a specific activity of 1.5 x 10(8) i.u./mg; it was estimated to constitute 10-20% of the total antiviral activity of leucocyte IFN. N-Terminal amino-acid-sequence analysis identified the subspecies IFN-alpha 2b and/or IFN-alpha 2c, whereas IFN-alpha 2a was not detectable. The structure of natural IFN-alpha 2 was found to differ from that of its recombinant (Escherichia coli-derived) equivalent. First, reverse-phase h.p.l.c. showed that natural IFN-alpha 2 was significantly more hydrophilic then expected. Secondly, the apparent molecular mass of the natural protein determined by SDS/PAGE was higher than that of recombinant IFN-alpha 2; incubation under mild alkaline conditions known to eliminate O-linked carbohydrates resulted in a reduction of the apparent molecular mass to that of the recombinant protein. On sequence analysis of proteolytic peptides, Thr-106 was found to be modified. These results suggested that Thr-106 of natural IFN-alpha 2 carries O-linked carbohydrates. Reverse-phase h.p.l.c. as well as SDS/PAGE of natural IFN-alpha 2 showed that glycosylation is heterogeneous. For characterization of the carbohydrate moieties, the protein was treated with neuraminidase and/or O-glycanase and analysed by gel electrophoresis; in addition, glycopeptides obtained by proteinase digestion and separated by h.p.l.c. were characterized by sequence analysis and m.s. Further information on the composition of the glycans was obtained by monosaccharide analysis. The results indicate that natural IFN-alpha 2 contains the disaccharide galactosyl-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal-GalNAc) linked to Thr-106. In part of the molecules, this core carbohydrate carries (alpha-)N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas a disaccharide, probably N-acetyl-lactosamine, is bound to Gal-GalNAc in another

  2. The glycosylation and structure of human serum IgA1, Fab, and Fc regions and the role of N-glycosylation on Fcα receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Mattu, T S; Pleass, R J; Willis, A C; Kilian, M; Wormald, M R; Lellouch, A C; Rudd, P M; Woof, J M; Dwek, R A

    1998-01-23

    The human serum immunoglobulins IgG and IgA1 are produced in bone marrow and both interact with specific cellular receptors that mediate biological events. In contrast to IgA1, the glycosylation of IgG has been well characterized, and its interaction with various Fc receptors (Fc Rs) has been well studied. In this paper, we have analyzed the glycosylation of IgA1 and IgA1 Fab and Fc as well as three recombinant IgA1 molecules, including two N-glycosylation mutants. Amino acid sequencing data of the IgA1 Fc O-glycosylated hinge region indicated that O-glycans are located at Thr228, Ser230, and Ser232, while O-glycan sites at Thr225 and Thr236 are partially occupied. Over 90% of the N-glycans in IgA1 were sialylated, in contrast to IgG, where < 10% contain sialic acid. This paper contains the first report of Fab glycosylation in IgA1, and (in contrast to IgG Fab, which contains only N-linked glycans) both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were identified. Analysis of the N-glycans attached to recombinant IgA1 indicated that the Cα 2 N-glycosylation site contained mostly biantennary glycans, while the tailpiece site, absent in IgG, contained mostly triantennary structures. Further analysis of these data suggested that processing at one Fc N-glycosylation site affects the other. Neutrophil Fcα R binding studies, using recombinant IgA1, indicated that neither the tailpiece region nor the N-glycans in the C alpha 2 domain contribute to IgA1-neutrophil Fcα R binding. This contrasts with IgG, where removal of the Fc N-glycans reduces binding to the Fcγ R. The primary sequence and disulfide bond pattern of IgA1, together with the crystal structures of IgG1 Fc and mouse IgA Fab and the glycan sequencing data, were used to generate a molecular model of IgA1. As a consequence of both the primary sequence and S-S bond pattern, the N-glycans in IgA1 Fc are not confined within the inter-α-chain space. The accessibility of the Cα 2 N-glycans provides an explanation for the

  3. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism. PMID:26980729

  4. Comprehensive mapping of O‐glycosylation in flagellin from Campylobacter jejuni 11168: A multienzyme differential ion mobility mass spectrometry approach

    PubMed Central

    Ulasi, Gloria N.; Creese, Andrew J.; Hui, Sam Xin; Penn, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of flagellin is essential for the virulence of Campylobacter jejuni, a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. Here, we demonstrate comprehensive mapping of the O‐glycosylation of flagellin from Campylobacter jejuni 11168 by use of a bottom‐up proteomics approach that incorporates differential ion mobility spectrometry (also known as high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry or FAIMS) together with proteolysis with proteinase K. Proteinase K provides complementary sequence coverage to that achieved following trypsin proteolysis. The use of FAIMS increased the number of glycopeptides identified. Novel glycans for this strain were identified (pseudaminic acid and either acetamidino pseudaminic acid or legionaminic acid), as were novel glycosylation sites: Thr208, Ser343, Ser348, Ser349, Ser395, Ser398, Ser423, Ser433, Ser436, Ser445, Ser448, Ser451, Ser452, Ser454, Ser457 and Thr465. Multiply glycosylated peptides were observed, as well as variation at individual residues in the nature of the glycan and its presence or absence. Such extreme heterogeneity in the pattern of glycosylation has not been reported previously, and suggests a novel dimension in molecular variation within a bacterial population that may be significant in persistence of the organism in its natural environment. These results demonstrate the usefulness of differential ion mobility in proteomics investigations of PTMs. PMID:25884275

  5. Glycosylation at Asn211 Regulates the Activation State of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1)*

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hsueh-Liang; Valiathan, Rajeshwari R.; Payne, Leo; Kumarasiri, Malika; Mahasenan, Kiran V.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Huang, Paul; Fridman, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) belongs to a unique family of receptor tyrosine kinases that signal in response to collagens. DDR1 undergoes autophosphorylation in response to collagen binding with a slow and sustained kinetics that is unique among members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. DDR1 dimerization precedes receptor activation suggesting a structural inhibitory mechanism to prevent unwarranted phosphorylation. However, the mechanism(s) that maintains the autoinhibitory state of the DDR1 dimers is unknown. Here, we report that N-glycosylation at the Asn211 residue plays a unique role in the control of DDR1 dimerization and autophosphorylation. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that mutations that disrupt the conserved 211NDS N-glycosylation motif, but not other N-glycosylation sites (Asn260, Asn371, and Asn394), result in collagen I-independent constitutive phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry revealed that the N211Q mutant undergoes phosphorylation at Tyr484, Tyr520, Tyr792, and Tyr797. The N211Q traffics to the cell surface, and its ectodomain displays collagen I binding with an affinity similar to that of the wild-type DDR1 ectodomain. However, unlike the wild-type receptor, the N211Q mutant exhibits enhanced receptor dimerization and sustained activation upon ligand withdrawal. Taken together, these data suggest that N-glycosylation at the highly conserved 211NDS motif evolved to act as a negative repressor of DDR1 phosphorylation in the absence of ligand. The presence of glycan moieties at that site may help to lock the collagen-binding domain in the inactive state and prevent unwarranted signaling by receptor dimers. These studies provide a novel insight into the structural mechanisms that regulate DDR activation. PMID:24509848

  6. Structure of glycosylated NPC1 luminal domain C reveals insights into NPC2 and Ebola virus interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuguang; Ren, Jingshan; Harlos, Karl; Stuart, David I

    2016-03-01

    Niemann-pick type C1 (NPC1) is an endo/lysosomal membrane protein involved in intracellular cholesterol trafficking, and its luminal domain C is an essential endosomal receptor for Ebola and Marburg viruses. We have determined the crystal structure of glycosylated NPC1 luminal domain C and find all seven possible sites are glycosylated. Mapping the disease mutations onto the glycosylated structure reveals a potential binding face for NPC2. Knowledge-based docking of NPC1 onto Ebola viral glycoprotein and sequence analysis of filovirus susceptible and refractory species reveals four critical residues, H418, Q421, F502 and F504, some or all of which are likely responsible for the species-specific susceptibility to the virus infection. PMID:26846330

  7. Glycosylation of plant produced human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Steinkellner, Herta

    2015-12-23

    Human immunoglobulins circulate as highly heterogeneously glycosylated mixture of otherwise homogeneous protein backbones. A series of studies, mainly on IgG, have unequivocally proven that antibodies modulate their effector function through sugars present in the Fc domain. However, our limited technology in producing complex proteins such as antibodies, with defined glycan structures hamper in depths studies. This review introduces a plant based expression platform enabling engineering of antibody glycans. The procedure is based on the simultaneous delivery of appropriate constructs, carrying cDNAs of target proteins (e.g. heavy and light chain of antibodies) in combination with human glycosylation enzymes into plant leaves. Harvesting of recombinant proteins one week post construct delivery allows high speed and flexibility. Major achievements include the production of functional active slialylated pentameric IgMs in tobacco leaves. The system provides a viable approach to the generation of antibodies with defined glycoforms on demand, contributing to studies on antibody glycans and the development of novel antibody based drugs. PMID:27472861

  8. Glycosylation of Cellulases: Engineering Better Enzymes for Biofuels.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose in plant cell walls is the largest reservoir of renewable carbon on Earth. The saccharification of cellulose from plant biomass into soluble sugars can be achieved using fungal and bacterial cellulolytic enzymes, cellulases, and further converted into fuels and chemicals. Most fungal cellulases are both N- and O-glycosylated in their native form, yet the consequences of glycosylation on activity and structure are not fully understood. Studying protein glycosylation is challenging as glycans are extremely heterogeneous, stereochemically complex, and glycosylation is not under direct genetic control. Despite these limitations, many studies have begun to unveil the role of cellulase glycosylation, especially in the industrially relevant cellobiohydrolase from Trichoderma reesei, Cel7A. Glycosylation confers many beneficial properties to cellulases including enhanced activity, thermal and proteolytic stability, and structural stabilization. However, glycosylation must be controlled carefully as such positive effects can be dampened or reversed. Encouragingly, methods for the manipulation of glycan structures have been recently reported that employ genetic tuning of glycan-active enzymes expressed from homogeneous and heterologous fungal hosts. Taken together, these studies have enabled new strategies for the exploitation of protein glycosylation for the production of enhanced cellulases for biofuel production. PMID:26613815

  9. Insect Cell Glycosylation and Its Impact on the Functionality of a Recombinant Intracrystalline Nacre Protein, AP24.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eric P; Perovic, Iva; Rao, Ashit; Cölfen, Helmut; Evans, John Spencer

    2016-02-23

    The impacts of glycosylation on biomineralization protein function are largely unknown. This is certainly true for the mollusk shell, where glycosylated intracrystalline proteins such as AP24 (Haliotis rufescens) exist but their functions and the role of glycosylation remain elusive. To assess the effect of glycosylation on protein function, we expressed two recombinant variants of AP24: an unglycosylated bacteria-expressed version (rAP24N) and a glycosylated insect cell-expressed version (rAP24G). Our findings indicate that rAP24G is expressed as a single polypeptide containing variations in glycosylation that create microheterogeneity in rAP24G molecular masses. These post-translational modifications incorporate O- and N-glycans and anionic monosialylated and bisialylated, and monosulfated and bisulfated monosaccharides on the protein molecules. AFM and DLS experiments confirm that both rAP24N and rAP24G aggregate to form protein phases, with rAP24N exhibiting a higher degree of aggregation, compared to rAP24G. With regard to functionality, we observe that both recombinant proteins exhibit similar behavior within in vitro calcium carbonate mineralization assays and potentiometric titrations. However, rAP24G modifies crystal growth directions and is a stronger nucleation inhibitor, whereas rAP24N exhibits higher mineral phase stabilization and nanoparticle containment. We believe that the post-translational addition of anionic groups (via sialylation and sulfation), along with modifications to the protein surface topology, may explain the changes in glycosylated rAP24G aggregation and mineralization behavior, relative to rAP24N. PMID:26784838

  10. Astragalus membranaceus up-regulate Cosmc expression and reverse IgA dys-glycosylation in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Decreased Core I β3-Gal-T-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) expression induced IgA1 aberrant glycosylation is the main characteristic of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). This study tried to elucidate the effect of Astragalus membranaceus on Cosmc expression and IgA O-glycosylation of peripheral B lymphocytes in IgAN patients. Methods Peripheral B lymphocytes of 21 IgAN patients and 10 normal controls were isolated and cultured with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Astragalus membranaceus injection (AMI). Cosmc mRNA and protein expression levels were measured by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. IgA1 and glycosylation level were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and VV lectin-binding method. Results Cosmc mRNA expression and IgA1 O-glycosylation level in IgAN patients was significantly lower than normal controls at baseline. Treatment of LPS could obviously inhibit Cosmc expression and increase the IgA1 secretion in peripheral B lymphocytes of IgAN patients, which resulted in a significantly increase in IgA1 aberrant glycosylation level. Addition of AMI could remarkably up regulated Cosmc expression, decrease IgA1 secretion, and reverse glycosylation level in a dose related manner. Conclusion AMI can up-regulate Cosmc expression of peripheral B lymphocytes and reverse IgA1 aberrant O-glycosylation level, which might be the underlying mechanism of AMI therapy in treating IgAN. Trial registration TCTR20140515001 (Registration Date: 2014-05-15) PMID:24942185

  11. Orthoesters formation leading to mismatched Helferich glycosylations at O-3 of N-trichloroacetylated glucosamine residues.

    PubMed

    Forman, Adam; Auzanneau, France-Isabelle

    2016-04-29

    Using trisaccharide diol acceptors displaying two glucosamine residues free at O-3, we observed that α-l-fucosylation with α armed donor proceeded smoothly at the most accessible N-trichloroacetyl nonreducing end glucosamine residue. In contrast, glycosylations with peracetylated glycosyl bromide donors activated under Helferich conditions seemed to proceed preferentially or exclusively at the more sterically hindered N-acetylated reducing end unit. Thus, we concluded that disarmed donors were mismatched at O-3 of the N-trichloroacetylated glucosamine residue regardless of α or β configuration of the glycosidic bond formed and d or l configuration of the donor. Interestingly orthoester formation occurred in some cases at this position while they were not observed at the reducing end unit. Conversion of the nonreducing end trichloroacetamido to an acetamido allowed the Helferich catalyzed galactosylation to occur at both positions and revealed the impact of the N-trichloroacetamido on the mismatched glycosylations. Changing the activation conditions from the mild Lewis acid Hg(CN)2 to the stronger acid AgOTf revealed that in fact β-d-galactosylation at the less hindered N-trichloroacetylated residue was kinetically favored over that at the reducing end residue. Isolation of equal amounts of orthoester at this position suggested that it was formed first but that the strong AgOTf Lewis acid was able to promote rearrangement to the β-d-galactosidic bond. These results shed additional light on the apparent mismatch of disarmed glycosyl donors with hydroxyl groups deemed more accessible. Depending on electronic factors imposed by the acceptor and activation conditions, transient unstable orthoester formation may explain in some cases why these donors appear mismatched with the most accessible hydroxyl groups which are otherwise glycosylated by armed donors. PMID:27015141

  12. Polymorphisms in pilin glycosylation Locus of Neisseria meningitidis expressing class II pili.

    PubMed

    Kahler, C M; Martin, L E; Tzeng, Y L; Miller, Y K; Sharkey, K; Stephens, D S; Davies, J K

    2001-06-01

    We have located a locus, pgl, in Neisseria meningitidis strain NMB required for the glycosylation of class II pili. Between five and eight open reading frames (ORFs) (pglF, pglB, pglC, pglB2, orf2, orf3, orf8, and avtA) were present in the pgl clusters of different meningococcal isolates. The Class I pilus-expressing strains Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11 and N. meningitidis MC58 each contain a pgl cluster in which orf2 and orf3 have been deleted. Strain NMB and other meningococcal isolates which express class II type IV pili contained pgl clusters in which pglB had been replaced by pglB2 and an additional novel ORF, orf8, had been inserted between pglB2 and pglC. Insertional inactivation of the eight ORFs of the pgl cluster of strain NMB showed that pglF, pglB2, pglC, and pglD, but not orf2, orf3, orf8, and avtA, were necessary for pilin glycosylation. Pilin glycosylation was not essential for resistance to normal human serum, as pglF and pglD mutants retained wild-type levels of serum resistance. Although pglB2 and pglC mutants were significantly sensitive to normal human serum under the experimental conditions used, subsequent examination of the encapsulation phenotypes revealed that pglB2 and pglC mutants expressed almost 50% less capsule than wild-type NMB. A mutation in orf3, which did not affect pilin glycosylation, also resulted in a 10% reduction in capsule expression and a moderately serum sensitive phenotype. On the basis of these results we suggest that pilin glycosylation may proceed via a lipid-linked oligosaccharide intermediate and that blockages in this pathway may interfere with capsular transport or assembly. PMID:11349019

  13. The genetics of glycosylation in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Power, P M; Jennings, M P

    2003-01-28

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in reports of glycosylation of proteins in various Gram-negative systems including Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Campylobacter jejuni, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Caulobacter crescentus, Aeromonas caviae and Helicobacter pylori. Although this growing list contains many important pathogens (reviewed by Benz and Schmidt [Mol. Microbiol. 45 (2002) 267-276]) and the glycosylations are found on proteins important in pathogenesis such as pili, adhesins and flagella the precise role(s) of the glycosylation of these proteins remains to be determined. Furthermore, the details of the glycosylation biosynthetic process have not been determined in any of these systems. The definition of the precise role of glycosylation and the mechanism of biosynthesis will be facilitated by a detailed understanding of the genes involved. PMID:12586395

  14. A selective and mild glycosylation method of natural phenolic alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Poláková, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several bioactive natural p-hydroxyphenylalkyl β-D-glucopyranosides, such as vanillyl β-D-glucopyranoside, salidroside and isoconiferin, and their glycosyl analogues were prepared by a simple reaction sequence. The highly efficient synthetic approach was achieved by utilizing acetylated glycosyl bromides as well as aromatic moieties and mild glycosylation promoters. The aglycones, p-O-acetylated arylalkyl alcohols, were prepared by the reduction of the corresponding acetylated aldehydes or acids. Various stereoselective 1,2-trans-O-glycosylation methods were studied, including the DDQ–iodine or ZnO–ZnCl2 catalyst combination. Among them, ZnO–iodine has been identified as a new glycosylation promoter and successfully applied to the stereoselective glycoside synthesis. The final products were obtained by conventional Zemplén deacetylation. PMID:27340444

  15. New families in the classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Bairoch, A

    1993-01-01

    301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes corresponding to 39 EC entries of the I.U.B. classification system have been classified into 35 families on the basis of amino-acid-sequence similarities [Henrissat (1991) Biochem. J. 280, 309-316]. Approximately half of the families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number), whereas the other half were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). A > 60% increase in sequence data for glycosyl hydrolases (181 additional enzymes or enzyme domains sequences have since become available) allowed us to update the classification not only by the addition of more members to already identified families, but also by the finding of ten new families. On the basis of a comparison of 482 sequences corresponding to 52 EC entries, 45 families, out of which 22 are polyspecific, can now be defined. This classification has been implemented in the SWISS-PROT protein sequence data bank. PMID:8352747

  16. Glycosylation of matrix metalloproteases and tissue inhibitors: present state, challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Boon, Lise; Ugarte-Berzal, Estefania; Vandooren, Jennifer; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2016-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are crucial components of a complex and dynamic network of proteases. With a wide range of potential substrates, their production and activity are tightly controlled by a combination of signalling events, zymogen activation, post-translational modifications and extracellular inhibition. Slight imbalances may result in the initiation or progression of specific disease states, such as cancer and pathological inflammation. As glycosylation modifies the structures and functions of glycoproteins and many MMPs contain N- or O-linked oligosaccharides, we examine, compare and evaluate the evidence for whether glycosylation affects MMP catalytic activity and other functions. It is interesting that the catalytic sites of MMPs do not contain O-linked glycans, but instead possess a conserved N-linked glycosylation site. Both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides, attached to specific protein domains, endow these domains with novel functions such as the binding to lectins, cell-surface receptors and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs). Validated glycobiological data on N- and O-linked oligosaccharides of gelatinase B/MMP-9 and on O-linked structures of membrane-type 1 MMP/MMP-14 indicate that in-depth research of other MMPs may yield important insights, e.g. about subcellular localizations and functions within macromolecular complexes. PMID:27234584

  17. Glycosylation of matrix metalloproteases and tissue inhibitors: present state, challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Lise; Ugarte-Berzal, Estefania; Vandooren, Jennifer; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are crucial components of a complex and dynamic network of proteases. With a wide range of potential substrates, their production and activity are tightly controlled by a combination of signalling events, zymogen activation, post-translational modifications and extracellular inhibition. Slight imbalances may result in the initiation or progression of specific disease states, such as cancer and pathological inflammation. As glycosylation modifies the structures and functions of glycoproteins and many MMPs contain N- or O-linked oligosaccharides, we examine, compare and evaluate the evidence for whether glycosylation affects MMP catalytic activity and other functions. It is interesting that the catalytic sites of MMPs do not contain O-linked glycans, but instead possess a conserved N-linked glycosylation site. Both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides, attached to specific protein domains, endow these domains with novel functions such as the binding to lectins, cell-surface receptors and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs). Validated glycobiological data on N- and O-linked oligosaccharides of gelatinase B/MMP-9 and on O-linked structures of membrane-type 1 MMP/MMP-14 indicate that in-depth research of other MMPs may yield important insights, e.g. about subcellular localizations and functions within macromolecular complexes. PMID:27234584

  18. ArnT proteins that catalyze the glycosylation of lipopolysaccharide share common features with bacterial N-oligosaccharyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Tavares-Carreón, Faviola; Fathy Mohamed, Yasmine; Andrade, Angel; Valvano, Miguel A

    2016-03-01

    ArnT is a glycosyltransferase that catalyzes the addition of 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose (l-Ara4N) to the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide. This is a critical modification enabling bacteria to resist killing by antimicrobial peptides. ArnT is an integral inner membrane protein consisting of 13 predicted transmembrane helices and a large periplasmic C-terminal domain. We report here the identification of a functional motif with a canonical consensus sequence DEXRYAX(5)MX(3)GXWX(9)YFEKPX(4)W spanning the first periplasmic loop, which is highly conserved in all ArnT proteins examined. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the contribution of this motif in ArnT function, suggesting that these proteins have a common mechanism. We also demonstrate that the Burkholderia cenocepacia and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ArnT C-terminal domain is required for polymyxin B resistance in vivo. Deletion of the C-terminal domain in B. cenocepacia ArnT resulted in a protein with significantly reduced in vitro binding to a lipid A fluorescent substrate and unable to catalyze lipid A modification with l-Ara4N. An in silico predicted structural model of ArnT strongly resembled the tertiary structure of Campylobacter lari PglB, a bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase involved in protein N-glycosylation. Therefore, distantly related oligosaccharyltransferases from ArnT and PglB families operating on lipid and polypeptide substrates, respectively, share unexpected structural similarity that could not be predicted from direct amino acid sequence comparisons. We propose that lipid A and protein glycosylation enzymes share a conserved catalytic mechanism despite their evolutionary divergence. PMID:26515403

  19. [Detection and characterization of an additional site for binding of substrate and its analogs by inorganic pyrophosphatase].

    PubMed

    Bakuleva, N P; Kostenko, E B; Baĭkov, A A; Avaeva, S M

    1981-05-01

    Phosphate, pyrophosphate, imidodiphosphate, EDTA and tripolyphosphate increase the rate constant for dissociation of the inorganic pyrophosphatase-substrate intermediate formed after cessation of the reaction by fluoride. The effect is enhanced in the given order 19-fold, the dependence of this effect on ligand concentration being hyperbolic. The values of the dissociation constants of the enzyme-ligand complexes lie within the concentration range of 0.16-1.0 mM. At high concentrations of Na2+ added simultaneously with the ligands this effect is decreased. The value of tau 1/2 for Pi binding to the enzyme-substrate compound is 0.15 min. The data obtained suggest that pyrophosphatase contains an anion ligand binding site, differing from that of the active one. This site does not affect the hydrolytic function of pyrophosphatase, as can be evidenced from the fact that Pi (9.5 mM) does not change the rate of enzymatic cleavage of PPi. PMID:6117332

  20. Micropinocytic Ingestion of Glycosylated Albumin by Isolated Microvessels: Possible Role in Pathogenesis of Diabetic Microangiopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Stuart K.; Devenny, James J.; Bitensky, Mark W.

    1981-04-01

    Microvessels isolated from rat epididymal fat exhibit differential vesicular ingestion rates for unmodified and nonenzymatically glycosylated rat albumin. While unmodified rat albumin is excluded from ingestion by endothelial micropinocytic vesicles, glycosylated albumin is avidly taken up by endocytosis. Interaction of albumin and glycosylated albumin with endothelium was studied with a double-label fluorescence assay of micropinocytosis. When glycosylated albumin was present at a concentration of 6% with respect to total albumin (the level found in ``non diabetic'' serum), only glycosylated albumin was ingested. At higher concentrations of glycosylated albumin (those found in diabetic serum), both albumin and glycosylated albumin are ingested. Glycosylation of endothelial membrane components results in stimulated ingestion of glycosylated albumin, persistent exclusion of unmodified albumin, and unaltered micropinocytic ingestion of native ferritin. These results indicate that nonenzymatic glycosylation of serum albumin may result in rapid vesicle-mediated extravasation of albumin. Chronic microvascular leakage of glycosylated albumin could contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy.

  1. Structural and Functional Roles of Glycosylation in Fungal Laccase from Lentinus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Wen-Yih; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Hsu, Chih-An; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are multi-copper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of various organic and inorganic compounds by reducing O2 to water. Here we report the crystal structure at 1.8 Å resolution of a native laccase (designated nLcc4) isolated from a white-rot fungus Lentinus sp. nLcc4 is composed of three cupredoxin-like domains D1-D3 each folded into a Greek key β-barrel topology. T1 and T2/T3 copper binding sites and three N-glycosylated sites at Asn75, Asn238, and Asn458 were elucidated. Initial rate kinetic analysis revealed that the kcat, Km, and kcat/Km of nLcc4 with substrate ABTS were 3,382 s-1, 65.0 ± 6.5 μM, and 52 s-1μM-1, respectively; and the values with lignosulfonic acid determined using isothermal titration calorimetry were 0.234 s-1, 56.7 ± 3.2 μM, and 0.004 s-1μM-1, respectively. Endo H-deglycosylated nLcc4 (dLcc4), with only one GlcNAc residue remaining at each of the three N-glycosylation sites in the enzyme, exhibited similar kinetic efficiency and thermal stability to that of nLcc4. The isolated Lcc4 gene contains an open reading frame of 1563 bp with a deduced polypeptide of 521 amino acid residues including a predicted signaling peptide of 21 residues at the N-terminus. Recombinant wild-type Lcc4 and mutant enzymes N75D, N238D and N458D were expressed in Pichia pastoris cells to evaluate the effect on enzyme activity by single glycosylation site deficiency. The mutant enzymes secreted in the cultural media of P. pastoris cells were observed to maintain only 4-50% of the activity of the wild-type laccase. Molecular dynamics simulations analyses of various states of (de-)glycosylation in nLcc support the kinetic results and suggest that the local H-bond networks between the domain connecting loop D2-D3 and the glycan moieties play a crucial role in the laccase activity. This study provides new insights into the role of glycosylation in the structure and function of a Basidiomycete fungal laccase. PMID:25849464

  2. Structural and functional roles of glycosylation in fungal laccase from Lentinus sp.

    PubMed

    Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Liu, Wei-Chun; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Hsu, Chih-An; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Andrew H-J; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are multi-copper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of various organic and inorganic compounds by reducing O2 to water. Here we report the crystal structure at 1.8 Å resolution of a native laccase (designated nLcc4) isolated from a white-rot fungus Lentinus sp. nLcc4 is composed of three cupredoxin-like domains D1-D3 each folded into a Greek key β-barrel topology. T1 and T2/T3 copper binding sites and three N-glycosylated sites at Asn75, Asn238, and Asn458 were elucidated. Initial rate kinetic analysis revealed that the kcat, Km, and kcat/Km of nLcc4 with substrate ABTS were 3,382 s-1, 65.0 ± 6.5 μM, and 52 s-1μM-1, respectively; and the values with lignosulfonic acid determined using isothermal titration calorimetry were 0.234 s-1, 56.7 ± 3.2 μM, and 0.004 s-1μM-1, respectively. Endo H-deglycosylated nLcc4 (dLcc4), with only one GlcNAc residue remaining at each of the three N-glycosylation sites in the enzyme, exhibited similar kinetic efficiency and thermal stability to that of nLcc4. The isolated Lcc4 gene contains an open reading frame of 1563 bp with a deduced polypeptide of 521 amino acid residues including a predicted signaling peptide of 21 residues at the N-terminus. Recombinant wild-type Lcc4 and mutant enzymes N75D, N238D and N458D were expressed in Pichia pastoris cells to evaluate the effect on enzyme activity by single glycosylation site deficiency. The mutant enzymes secreted in the cultural media of P. pastoris cells were observed to maintain only 4-50% of the activity of the wild-type laccase. Molecular dynamics simulations analyses of various states of (de-)glycosylation in nLcc support the kinetic results and suggest that the local H-bond networks between the domain connecting loop D2-D3 and the glycan moieties play a crucial role in the laccase activity. This study provides new insights into the role of glycosylation in the structure and function of a Basidiomycete fungal laccase. PMID:25849464

  3. N-Glycosylation at the SynCAM (Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecule) Immunoglobulin Interface Modulates Synaptic Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    A Fogel; Y Li; Q Wang; T Lam; Y Modis; T Biederer

    2011-12-31

    Select adhesion molecules connect pre- and postsynaptic membranes and organize developing synapses. The regulation of these trans-synaptic interactions is an important neurobiological question. We have previously shown that the synaptic cell adhesion molecules (SynCAMs) 1 and 2 engage in homo- and heterophilic interactions and bridge the synaptic cleft to induce presynaptic terminals. Here, we demonstrate that site-specific N-glycosylation impacts the structure and function of adhesive SynCAM interactions. Through crystallographic analysis of SynCAM 2, we identified within the adhesive interface of its Ig1 domain an N-glycan on residue Asn(60). Structural modeling of the corresponding SynCAM 1 Ig1 domain indicates that its glycosylation sites Asn(70)/Asn(104) flank the binding interface of this domain. Mass spectrometric and mutational studies confirm and characterize the modification of these three sites. These site-specific N-glycans affect SynCAM adhesion yet act in a differential manner. Although glycosylation of SynCAM 2 at Asn(60) reduces adhesion, N-glycans at Asn(70)/Asn(104) of SynCAM 1 increase its interactions. The modification of SynCAM 1 with sialic acids contributes to the glycan-dependent strengthening of its binding. Functionally, N-glycosylation promotes the trans-synaptic interactions of SynCAM 1 and is required for synapse induction. These results demonstrate that N-glycosylation of SynCAM proteins differentially affects their binding interface and implicate post-translational modification as a mechanism to regulate trans-synaptic adhesion.

  4. Glycosylation, Hypogammaglobulinemia, and Resistance to Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Tae-Wook; Lusso, Paolo; Kaplan, Gerardo; Wolfe, Lynne; Memoli, Matthew J.; He, Miao; Vega, Hugo; Kim, Leo J.Y.; Huang, Yan; Hussein, Nadia; Nievas, Elma; Mitchell, Raquel; Garofalo, Mary; Louie, Aaron; Ireland, Derek C.; Grunes, Claire; Cimbro, Raffaello; Patel, Vyomesh; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Salahuddin, Daniel; Bristol, Tyler; Adams, David; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Hegde, Madhuri; Li, Yuxing; Calvo, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jennifer; Justement, J. Shawn; Jacques, Jerome; Priel, Debra A. Long; Murray, Danielle; Sun, Peter; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Chiorini, John A.; Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Verthelyi, Daniela; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Genetic defects in MOGS, the gene encoding mannosyl-oligosaccharide glucosidase (the first enzyme in the processing pathway of N-linked oligosaccharide), cause the rare congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIb (CDG-IIb), also known as MOGS-CDG. MOGS is expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in the trimming of N-glycans. We evaluated two siblings with CDG-IIb who presented with multiple neurologic complications and a paradoxical immunologic phenotype characterized by severe hypogammaglobulinemia but limited clinical evidence of an infectious diathesis. A shortened immunoglobulin half-life was determined to be the mechanism underlying the hypogammaglobulinemia. Impaired viral replication and cellular entry may explain a decreased susceptibility to infections. PMID:24716661

  5. ECM Proteins Glycosylation and Relation to Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernodet, Nadine; Bloomberg, Ayla; Sood, Vandana; Slutsky, Lenny; Ge, Shouren; Clark, Richard; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2004-03-01

    The chemical modification and crosslinking of proteins by sugar glycosylation contribute to the aging of tissue proteins, and acceleration of this reaction during hyperglycemia is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, such as disorder of the wound healing. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) formation and protein crosslinking are irreversible processes that alter the structural and functional properties of proteins, lipid components and nucleic acids. And the mechanism, by which it happens, is not clear. Fibrinogen and fibronectin are plasma proteins, which play a major role in human wound healing. Fibrinogen converts to an insoluble fibrin "gel" following a cut, which eventually forms a clot to prevent blood loss, to direct cell adhesion and migration for forming scars. Fibronectin is a critical protein for cell adhesion and migration in wound healing. The effects of glucose on the binding of these plasma proteins from the extra cellular matrix (ECM) were followed at different concentrations by atomic force microscopy and lateral force modulation to measure the mechanical response of the samples. Glucose solutions (1, 2, and 3mg/mL) were incubated with the protein (100 mg/ml) and silicon (Si) substrates spun with sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) 28% for five days. Data showed that not only the organization of the protein on the surface was affected but also its mechanical properties. At 3 mg/mL glucose, Fn fibers were observed to be harder than those of the control, in good agreement with our hypothesis that glycosylation hardens tissues by crosslinking of proteins in the ECM and might cause fibers to break more easily.

  6. N-glycosylation of the premembrane protein of Japanese encephalitis virus is critical for folding of the envelope protein and assembly of virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Zai, J; Mei, L; Wang, C; Cao, S; Fu, Z F; Chen, H; Song, Y

    2013-01-01

    Premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins, the major structural proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) each contain single potential N-glycosylation site. In this study, the role of N-glycosylation of these proteins on their folding and activity were investigated. Three mutant prM and/or E (prM-E) genes lacking N-glycosylation sites were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of the N-glycan on folding, secretion and cytotoxicity of mutant proteins were determined by comparison with their wild type (wt) counterparts. Removal of N-glycan from the prM protein resulted in a complete misfolding of the E protein and failure to form virus-like particles (VLPs). A similar removal of N-glycan from the E protein led to a low efficiency of its folding and VLPs formation. The secretion and cytotoxicity of the E protein was also markedly impaired in case the glycosylation sites in the prM or E or both proteins were removed. These results suggest that the N-glycosylation of the prM protein is critical to the folding of the E protein, which makes it pivotal in the cytotoxicity of JEV particles and their production. PMID:23530821

  7. Ceramide Glycosylation Catalyzed by Glucosylceramide Synthase and Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Yu; Li, Yu-Teh

    2014-01-01

    Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), converting ceramide to glucosylceramide, catalyzes the first reaction of ceramide glycosylation in sphingolipid metabolism. This glycosylation by GCS is a critical step regulating the modulation of cellular activities by controlling ceramide and glycosphingolipids (GSLs). An increase of ceramide in response to stresses, such as chemotherapy, drives cells to proliferation arrest and apoptosis or autophagy; however, ceramide glycosylation promptly eliminates ceramide and consequently, these induced processes, thus protecting cancer cells. Furthermore, persistently enhanced ceramide glycosylation can increase GSLs, participating in selecting cancer cells to drug resistance. GCS is overexpressed in diverse drug-resistant cancer cells and in tumors of breast, colon, and leukemia that display poor response to chemotherapy. As ceramide glycosylation by GCS is a rate-limiting step in GSL synthesis, inhibition of GCS sensitizes cancer cells to anticancer drugs and eradicates cancer stem cells. Mechanistic studies indicate that uncoupling ceramide glycosylation can modulate gene expression, decreasing MDR1 through the cSrc/β-catenin pathway and restoring p53 expression via RNA splicing. These studies not only expand our knowledge in understanding how ceramide glycosylation affects cancer cells, but also provide novel therapeutic approaches for targeting refractory tumors. PMID:23290777

  8. Secretion, interaction and assembly of two O-glycosylated cell wall antigens from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pavia, J; Aguado, C; Mormeneo, S; Sentandreu, R

    2001-07-01

    The mechanisms of incorporation of two antigens have been determined using a monoclonal antibody (3A10) raised against the material released from the mycelial cell wall by zymolyase digestion and retained on a concanavalin A column. One of the hybridomas secreted an IgG that reacted with two bands in Western blots. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that the antigens were located on the surfaces of mycelial cells, but within the cell walls of yeasts. These antigens were detected in a membrane preparation, in the SDS-soluble material and in the material released by a 1,3-beta-glucanase and chitinase from the cell walls of yeast and mycelial cells. In the latter three samples, an additional high-molecular-mass, highly polydispersed band was also detected. Beta-elimination of each fraction resulted in the disappearance of all antigen bands, suggesting that they are highly O-glycosylated. In addition, the electrophoretic mobility of the high-molecular-mass, highly polydispersed bands increased after digestion with endoglycosidase H, indicating that they are also N-glycosylated. New antigen bands were released when remnants of the cell walls extracted with 1,3-beta-glucanase or chitinase were digested with chitinase or 1,3-beta-glucanase. These results are consistent with the notion that, after secretion, parts of the O-glycosylated antigen molecules are transferred to an N-glycosylated protein(s). This molecular complex, as well as the remaining original 70 and 80 kDa antigen molecules, next bind to 1,3-beta-glucan or chitin, probably via 1,6-beta-glucan, and, in an additional step, to chitin or 1,3-beta-glucan. This process results in the final molecular product of each antigen, and their distribution in the cell walls. PMID:11429475

  9. [Roles of N-glycosylation in immunity of prME and NS1 gene of JEV].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Zhong; Wang, Xue; Zai, Jun-Jie; Sun, Le-Qiang; Song, Yun-Feng; Chen, Huan-Chun

    2012-05-01

    PrME and NS1 gene were the two main immuneprotect proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and they were also N-linked glycosylation proteins. To clear the effect of N-glycosylation on JEV immunity, the N-glycosylation site of prME and NS1 gene were eliminated by site-directed mutant PCR, subtituting the N to Q. And the the mutant genes were subcloned into eukaryotic expression plasmid. Four-weeks female mice were immuned with the wildtype and mutant gene by twice. The antibodies against prME were detected by ELISA and the neutralization antibodies were tested by viral neutralizing assay. The immunoprotection were determined by attack with JEV virulent strain. Compare with the wild-type gene immuned-groups, one N-glycan eliminated prME gene could induce a little higher ELISA antibody, neutralization antibody and immunoprotection, but the immunity of gene with both N-glycan absence was decreased. The similar status were observed in the wildtype and mutant NS1 groups. Thus these results show that the N-linked glycosylation in the prME and NS1 gene were correlated with the immunity, one glycan absent would enhance the immunity but both two loss would impair it. PMID:22764522

  10. Complement-mediated binding of naturally glycosylated and glycosylation-modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to human CR2 (CD21).

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, D C; Stewart, K; Ahearn, J M; Zhou, J; Zhou, J

    1993-01-01

    Particulate glycoproteins lacking sialic acid, such as desialylated enveloped viruses, readily activate complement through the alternative pathway. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contains two heavily glycosylated and partially sialylated envelope glycoproteins: a surface gp120 and a transmembrane gp41. The abilities of naturally glycosylated HIV-1 and glycosylation-modified HIV-1 to interact with the complement system were examined with a biological assay which measured the binding of whole virus particles to cells expressing CR2 (CD21), the complement receptor found naturally in abundance on follicular dendritic cells and immature B cells. HIV-1 IIIB was synthesized in the presence or absence of the mannosidase II inhibitor, swainsonine, to give rise to high-mannose-type, nonsialylated, nonfucosylated carbohydrate moieties. The virus also was treated with neuraminidase or endo-beta-galactosidase to remove terminal sialic acids. An enzyme immunoassay specific for HIV-1 p24 core protein was used to quantitate the amount of virus bound to cell surfaces. Virus particles incubated with 1:3-diluted, fresh HIV-1-negative human serum as a source of complement readily bound to MT-2 (CD4+ CR2+) and Raji-3 (CD4- CR2+) cells but not to CEM (CD4+ CR2-) cells, suggesting that the virus bound to CR2 independently of CD4. Compared with heat-inactivated or C3-deficient sera, fresh complement increased binding by as much as 62 times for naturally glycosylated virus, and 5 times more than this for glycosylation-modified virus. Similar observations were made with freshly isolated, non-mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Additional evidence that HIV-1 bound to CR2 independently of CD4 was provided by the fact that binding was blocked by monoclonal antibody OKB7 (anti-CR2) but not by OKT4a (anti-CD4). Also, the virus bound to transfected K562 cells (CD4-) which expressed recombinant human CR2 but did not bind to untransfected K562 cells. Results obtained

  11. In-Depth N-Glycosylation Reveals Species-Specific Modifications and Functions of the Royal Jelly Protein from Western (Apis mellifera) and Eastern Honeybees (Apis cerana).

    PubMed

    Feng, Mao; Fang, Yu; Han, Bin; Xu, Xiang; Fan, Pei; Hao, Yue; Qi, Yuping; Hu, Han; Huo, Xinmei; Meng, Lifeng; Wu, Bin; Li, Jianke

    2015-12-01

    Royal jelly (RJ), secreted by honeybee workers, plays diverse roles as nutrients and defense agents for honeybee biology and human health. Despite being reported to be glycoproteins, the glycosylation characterization and functionality of RJ proteins in different honeybee species are largely unknown. An in-depth N-glycoproteome analysis and functional assay of RJ produced by Apis mellifera lingustica (Aml) and Apis cerana cerana (Acc) were conducted. RJ produced by Aml yielded 80 nonredundant N-glycoproteins carrying 190 glycosites, of which 23 novel proteins harboring 35 glycosites were identified. For Acc, all 43 proteins glycosylated at 138 glycosites were reported for the first time. Proteins with distinct N-glycoproteomic characteristics in terms of glycoprotein species, number of N-glycosylated sites, glycosylation motif, abundance level of glycoproteins, and N-glycosites were observed in this two RJ samples. The fact that the low inhibitory efficiency of N-glycosylated major royal jelly protein 2 (MRJP2) against Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae) and the absence of antibacterial related glycosylated apidaecin, hymenoptaecin, and peritrophic matrix in the Aml RJ compared to Acc reveal the mechanism for why the Aml larvae are susceptible to P. larvae, the causative agent of a fatal brood disease (American foulbrood, AFB). The observed antihypertension activity of N-glycosylated MRJP1 in two RJ samples and a stronger activity found in Acc than in Aml reveal that specific RJ protein and modification are potentially useful for the treatment of hypertensive disease for humans. Our data gain novel understanding that the western and eastern bees have evolved species-specific strategies of glycosylation to fine-tune protein activity for optimizing molecular function as nutrients and immune agents for the good of honeybee and influence on the health promoting activity for human as well. This serves as a valuable resource for the targeted probing of the biological

  12. Identification of Novel O-Linked Glycosylated Toxoplasma Proteins by Vicia villosa Lectin Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kevin; Peng, Eric D.; Huang, Amy S.; Xia, Dong; Vermont, Sarah J.; Lentini, Gaelle; Lebrun, Maryse; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Bradley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii maintains its intracellular life cycle using an extraordinary arsenal of parasite-specific organelles including the inner membrane complex (IMC), rhoptries, micronemes, and dense granules. While these unique compartments play critical roles in pathogenesis, many of their protein constituents have yet to be identified. We exploited the Vicia villosa lectin (VVL) to identify new glycosylated proteins that are present in these organelles. Purification of VVL-binding proteins by lectin affinity chromatography yielded a number of novel proteins that were subjected to further study, resulting in the identification of proteins from the dense granules, micronemes, rhoptries and IMC. We then chose to focus on three proteins identified by this approach, the SAG1 repeat containing protein SRS44, the rhoptry neck protein RON11 as well as a novel IMC protein we named IMC25. To assess function, we disrupted their genes by homologous recombination or CRISPR/Cas9. The knockouts were all successful, demonstrating that these proteins are not essential for invasion or intracellular survival. We also show that IMC25 undergoes substantial proteolytic processing that separates the C-terminal domain from the predicted glycosylation site. Together, we have demonstrated that lectin affinity chromatography is an efficient method of identifying new glycosylated parasite-specific proteins. PMID:26950937

  13. Comparison of the Structure and Activity of Glycosylated and Aglycosylated Human Carboxylesterase 1

    PubMed Central

    Arena de Souza, Victoria; Scott, David J.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Rahman, Nahid; Charlton, Michael H.; Walsh, Martin A.; Owens, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Human Carboxylesterase 1 (hCES1) is the key liver microsomal enzyme responsible for detoxification and metabolism of a variety of clinical drugs. To analyse the role of the single N-linked glycan on the structure and activity of the enzyme, authentically glycosylated and aglycosylated hCES1, generated by mutating asparagine 79 to glutamine, were produced in human embryonic kidney cells. Purified enzymes were shown to be predominantly trimeric in solution by analytical ultracentrifugation. The purified aglycosylated enzyme was found to be more active than glycosylated hCES1 and analysis of enzyme kinetics revealed that both enzymes exhibit positive cooperativity. Crystal structures of hCES1 a catalytically inactive mutant (S221A) and the aglycosylated enzyme were determined in the absence of any ligand or substrate to high resolutions (1.86 Å, 1.48 Å and 2.01 Å, respectively). Superposition of all three structures showed only minor conformational differences with a root mean square deviations of around 0.5 Å over all Cα positions. Comparison of the active sites of these un-liganded enzymes with the structures of hCES1-ligand complexes showed that side-chains of the catalytic triad were pre-disposed for substrate binding. Overall the results indicate that preventing N-glycosylation of hCES1 does not significantly affect the structure or activity of the enzyme. PMID:26657071

  14. Identification of Novel O-Linked Glycosylated Toxoplasma Proteins by Vicia villosa Lectin Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kevin; Peng, Eric D; Huang, Amy S; Xia, Dong; Vermont, Sarah J; Lentini, Gaelle; Lebrun, Maryse; Wastling, Jonathan M; Bradley, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii maintains its intracellular life cycle using an extraordinary arsenal of parasite-specific organelles including the inner membrane complex (IMC), rhoptries, micronemes, and dense granules. While these unique compartments play critical roles in pathogenesis, many of their protein constituents have yet to be identified. We exploited the Vicia villosa lectin (VVL) to identify new glycosylated proteins that are present in these organelles. Purification of VVL-binding proteins by lectin affinity chromatography yielded a number of novel proteins that were subjected to further study, resulting in the identification of proteins from the dense granules, micronemes, rhoptries and IMC. We then chose to focus on three proteins identified by this approach, the SAG1 repeat containing protein SRS44, the rhoptry neck protein RON11 as well as a novel IMC protein we named IMC25. To assess function, we disrupted their genes by homologous recombination or CRISPR/Cas9. The knockouts were all successful, demonstrating that these proteins are not essential for invasion or intracellular survival. We also show that IMC25 undergoes substantial proteolytic processing that separates the C-terminal domain from the predicted glycosylation site. Together, we have demonstrated that lectin affinity chromatography is an efficient method of identifying new glycosylated parasite-specific proteins. PMID:26950937

  15. Structure of glycosylated Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase from Kluyveromyces yeast NBIMCC 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolashka-Angelova, Pavlina; Moshtanska, Vesela; Kujumdzieva, Anna; Atanasov, Boris; Petrova, Vencislava; Voelter, Wolfgang; Beeumen, Jozef Van

    2010-09-01

    The primary structure of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase from Kluyveromyces marxianus NBIMCC 1984 was elucidated by N-terminal sequence analysis of the intact protein and by determination of the amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides by MALDI-TOF-TOF tandem mass spectrometry. The molecular mass of one subunit of the homodimer SOD, containing 152 amino acid residues, was calculated to be 15858.3 Da while a value of 17096.63 Da was obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. This difference is explained by the presence of N-glycosylation of one linkage site, -Asn-Ile/Leu-Thr-, and a glycan chain with the structure Hex 5 GlcNAc 2. Glycosylation of K.marxianus superoxide dismutase is a post-translational modification. Recent developments in mass spectrometry have enabled detailed structural analyses of covalent modifications of proteins. Therefore, in this paper, we introduce a covalent modification of Cu/Zn-SOD from K. marxianus NBIMCC 1984, by analysis of the enzymatic liberated N-glycan from the enzyme using MALDI-TOF and tandem mass spectrometry on a Q-Trap mass spectrometer. This is the first report of the structure of the oligosaccharide of a naturally-glycosylated superoxide dismutase, determined by mass spectrometry.

  16. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  17. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two activemore » bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.« less

  18. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites. PMID:26382047

  19. O-glycosylation of protein subpopulations in alcohol-extracted rice proteins.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Michelle; Shah, Miti; Gerlach, Jared Q; Bhavanandan, Veer; Nagaraj, Vinay; Smith, Amy D; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Sommer, Ulf; Costello, Catherine E; Olszewski, Neil; Joshi, Lokesh

    2009-02-15

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation has been well characterized in mammalian systems but not in plants. In this study, the purified alcohol-soluble, non-reduced protein (prolamin) fraction from rice seed was investigated for the occurrence of O-linked oligosaccharides. As storage prolamins are unlikely to be O-glycosylated, any O-glycosylation found was likely to belong to co-extracted proteins, whether because of association with the protein body or solubility. SDS-PAGE and MS analyses revealed 14 and 16kDa protein families in fractions that bound to the lectins peanut agglutinin (PNA), Vicia villosa lectin (VVL) and Jacalin, indicative of the presence of O-linked saccharides. Enzymatic cleavage, fluorescent labeling and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis demonstrated a peak consistent with Gal-beta-(1-->3)-GalNAc, with similar MS/MS fragmentation. Additionally, upon chemical analysis, a GlcNAc-containing O-linked carbohydrate moiety was discovered. Protein blotting with anti-O-GlcNAc antibody (clone CTD110.6) was positive in a subpopulation of the 14kDa alcohol-soluble protein fraction, but a hot capping experiment was negative. Therefore, the GlcNAc residue in this case is unlikely to be terminal. Additionally, a positive reaction with CTD110.6mAb cannot be taken as absolute proof of O-GlcNAc modification and further confirmatory experiments should be employed. We hypothesize that O-glycosylation may contribute to protein functionality or regulation. Further investigation is required to identify the specific proteins with these modifications. This 'reverse' approach could lead to the identification of proteins involved in mRNA targeting, signaling, translation, anchoring or maintenance of translational quiescence and may be applied to germinating rice seed extracts for further elucidation of protein function and regulation. PMID:18639953

  20. In silico Investigation of the PglB Active Site Reveals Transient Catalytic States and Octahedral Metal Ion Coordination.

    PubMed

    Pedebos, Conrado; Arantes, Pablo Ricardo; Giesel, Guilherme Menegon; Verli, Hugo

    2015-11-01

    The last step of the bacterial N-glycosylation pathway involves PglB, an oligosaccharyltransferase, which is responsible for the en bloc transfer of a fully assembled oligosaccharide chain to a protein possessing the extended motif D/E-X-N-X-S/T. Recently, this molecule had its full structure elucidated, enabling the description of its domains and the proposition of a catalytic mechanism. By employing molecular dynamics simulations, we were able to evaluate structural aspects of PglB, suggesting prevalent motions that may bring insights into the mechanism of the glycosylated peptide detachment. Additionally, we identified transient states at the catalytic site, in which the previously described carboxamide twisting mechanism was observed. Aided by quantum mechanics calculations for each different conformational states of the catalytic site, we determined the presence of an octahedral metal coordination, along with the presence of one water molecule at the catalytic site. PMID:26220543

  1. Chemical glycosylation of cytochrome c improves physical and chemical protein stability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    detrimental effects by some stresses (i.e., elevated temperature and humidity) and from proteolytic degradation. In addition, non-modified Cyt c was more susceptible to denaturation by a water-organic solvent interface than its glycoconjugates, important for the formulation in polymers. Conclusion The results demonstrate that chemical glycosylation is a potentially valuable method to increase Cyt c stability during formulation and storage and potentially during its application after administration. PMID:25095792

  2. Specific N-linked and O-linked glycosylation modifications in the envelope V1 domain of simian immunodeficiency virus variants that evolve in the host alter recognition by neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Chackerian, B; Rudensey, L M; Overbaugh, J

    1997-01-01

    During progression to AIDS in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Mne-infected macaques, viral variants are selected that encode sequences with serine and threonine changes in variable region 1 (V1) of the surface component of the viral envelope protein (Env-SU). Because these serine and threonine amino acid changes are characteristic of sites for O-linked and N-linked glycosylation, we examined whether they were targets for modification by carbohydrates. For this purpose, we used several biochemical methods for analyzing the Env-SU protein encoded by chimeras of SIVMneCL8 and envelope sequences cloned from an SIVMneCL8-infected Macaca nemestrina during clinical latency and just after the onset of AIDS. The addition of an N-linked glycan was demonstrated by changes in the electrophoretic mobility of Env-SU, and this was verified by specific glycanase digestions and a detailed analysis of the molecular mass of partially purified Env-SU by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Molecular mass calculations by MALDI-TOF MS also demonstrated an increased mass, from 102.3 to 103.5 kDa, associated with serine and threonine residues predicted to be O-linked glycosylation sites. Together, these data provide the first direct evidence that the carbohydrate profile of Env-SU is distinct in SIV variants that evolve during infection of the host. Moreover, our studies show that these changes in glycosylation in V1 were directly associated with changes in antigenicity. Specifically, serine and threonine changes in V1 allowed the virus to escape neutralization by macaque sera that contained antibodies that could neutralize the parental virus, SIVMneCL8. The escape from antibody recognition appeared to be influenced by either O-linked or N-linked carbohydrate additions in V1. Moreover, when glycine residues were engineered at the positions where serine and threonine changes evolve in V1 of SIVMneCL8, there was no change in

  3. Glycation vs. glycosylation: a tale of two different chemistries and biology in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Motoko; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Kitazume, Shinobu; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Ookawara, Tomomi; Furuta, Akiko

    2016-08-01

    In our previous studies, we reported that the activity of an anti-oxidant enzyme, Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) became decreased as the result of glycation in vitro and in vivo. Glycated Cu,Zn-SOD produces hydroxyl radicals in the presence of transition metals due to the formation of a Schiff base adduct and a subsequent Amadori product. This results in the site-specific cleavage of the molecule, followed by random fragmentation. The glycation of other anti-oxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase results in a loss or decrease in enzyme activity under pathological conditions, resulting in oxidative stress. The inactivation of anti-oxidant enzymes induces oxidative stress in aging, diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders. It is well known that the levels of Amadori products and N(e)-(carboxylmethyl)lysine (CML) and other carbonyl compounds are increased in diabetes, a situation that will be discussed by the other authors in this special issue. We and others, reported that the glycation products accumulate in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients as well as in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), suggesting that glycation plays a pivotal role in the development of AD. We also showed that enzymatic glycosylation is implicated in the pathogenesis of AD and that oxidative stress is also important in this process. Specific types of glycosylation reactions were found to be up- or downregulated in AD patients, and key AD-related molecules including the amyloid-precursor protein (APP), tau, and APP-cleaving enzymes were shown to be functionally modified as the result of glycosylation. These results suggest that glycation as well as glycosylation are involved in oxidative stress that is associated with aging, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PMID:27325408

  4. POMGNT1 Is Glycosylated by Mucin-Type O-Glycans.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xin; Akasaka-Manya, Keiko; Manya, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Kuwahara, Naoyuki; Okada, Kazue; Tsumoto, Hiroki; Higashi, Nobuaki; Kato, Ryuichi; Shinohara, Yasuro; Irimura, Tatsuro; Endo, Tamao

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-linked mannose β1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (POMGNT1) is a Golgi glycosyltransferase that catalyzes the formation of the N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) β1→2Man linkage of O-mannosyl glycan. POMGNT1 is not modified by N-glycans because there are no potential N-glycosylation sites; however, it is not clear whether POMGNT1 is modified by O-glycans. To determine whether POMGNT1 is O-glycosylated, we prepared recombinant human POMGNT1 from HEK293T cells. The recombinant POMGNT1 was recognized by Sambucus sieboldiana lectin (SSA), and sialidase digestion of POMGNT1 decreased SSA reactivity and enhanced the reactivity of Arachis hypogaea lectin (PNA). These results suggest that POMGNT1 is modified by a sialylated core-1 O-glycan. Next, we analyzed the structures of the O-glycans on POMGNT1 by β-elimination and pyrazolone-labeling methods in combination with mass spectrometry. We identified several mucin-type O-glycans containing (NeuAc)1(Hex)1(HexNAc)1, (NeuAc)2(Hex)1(HexNAc)1, and (NeuAc)2(Hex)2(HexNAc)2. To examine whether the O-glycans affect the functions and properties of POMGNT1, we compared glycosylated and non-glycosylated forms of recombinant sPOMGNT1 for their activity and surface hydrophobicity using the hydrophobic probe 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS). POMGNT1 activity and surface hydrophobicity were not affected by the presence or absence of O-glycans. PMID:26328495

  5. Enhanced Aromatic Sequons Increase Oligosaccharyltransferase Glycosylation Efficiency and Glycan Homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Murray, Amber N; Chen, Wentao; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Hanson, Sarah R; Wiseman, R Luke; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2015-08-20

    N-Glycosylation plays an important role in protein folding and function. Previous studies demonstrate that a phenylalanine residue introduced at the n-2 position relative to an Asn-Xxx-Thr/Ser N-glycosylation sequon increases the glycan occupancy of the sequon in insect cells. Here, we show that any aromatic residue at n-2 increases glycan occupancy in human cells and that this effect is dependent upon oligosaccharyltransferase substrate preferences rather than differences in other cellular processing events such as degradation or trafficking. Moreover, aromatic residues at n-2 alter glycan processing in the Golgi, producing proteins with less complex N-glycan structures. These results demonstrate that manipulating the sequence space surrounding N-glycosylation sequons is useful both for controlling glycosylation efficiency, thus enhancing glycan occupancy, and for influencing the N-glycan structures produced. PMID:26190824

  6. Analytical detection and characterization of biopharmaceutical glycosylation by MS.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myung Jin; Hua, Serenus; Kim, Unyong; Kim, Hyun Joong; Lee, Jua; Kim, Jae-Han; An, Hyun Joo

    2016-04-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in ensuring the proper structure and function of most biotherapeutic proteins. Even small changes in glycan composition, structure, or location can have a drastic impact on drug safety and efficacy. Recently, glycosylation has become the subject of increased focus as biopharmaceutical companies rush to create not only biosimilars, but also biobetters based on existing biotherapeutic proteins. Against this backdrop of ongoing biopharmaceutical innovation, updated methods for accurate and detailed analysis of protein glycosylation are critical for biopharmaceutical companies and government regulatory agencies alike. This review summarizes current methods of characterizing biopharmaceutical glycosylation, including compositional mass profiling, isomer-specific profiling and structural elucidation by MS and hyphenated techniques. PMID:26964748

  7. Glycosyl dithiocarbamates: β-selective couplings without auxiliary groups.

    PubMed

    Padungros, Panuwat; Alberch, Laura; Wei, Alexander

    2014-03-21

    In this article, we evaluate glycosyl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) with unprotected C2 hydroxyls as donors in β-linked oligosaccharide synthesis. We report a mild, one-pot conversion of glycals into β-glycosyl DTCs via DMDO oxidation with subsequent ring opening by DTC salts, which can be generated in situ from secondary amines and CS2. Glycosyl DTCs are readily activated with Cu(I) or Cu(II) triflate at low temperatures and are amenable to reiterative synthesis strategies, as demonstrated by the efficient construction of a tri-β-1,6-linked tetrasaccharide. Glycosyl DTC couplings are highly β-selective despite the absence of a preexisting C2 auxiliary group. We provide evidence that the directing effect is mediated by the C2 hydroxyl itself via the putative formation of a cis-fused bicyclic intermediate. PMID:24548247

  8. Glycosyl Dithiocarbamates: β-Selective Couplings without Auxiliary Groups

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate glycosyl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) with unprotected C2 hydroxyls as donors in β-linked oligosaccharide synthesis. We report a mild, one-pot conversion of glycals into β-glycosyl DTCs via DMDO oxidation with subsequent ring opening by DTC salts, which can be generated in situ from secondary amines and CS2. Glycosyl DTCs are readily activated with Cu(I) or Cu(II) triflate at low temperatures and are amenable to reiterative synthesis strategies, as demonstrated by the efficient construction of a tri-β-1,6-linked tetrasaccharide. Glycosyl DTC couplings are highly β-selective despite the absence of a preexisting C2 auxiliary group. We provide evidence that the directing effect is mediated by the C2 hydroxyl itself via the putative formation of a cis-fused bicyclic intermediate. PMID:24548247

  9. Genetics Home Reference: ALG12-congenital disorder of glycosylation

    MedlinePlus

    ... particles and germs, marking them for destruction. A reduction in antibodies can make it difficult for affected ... called glycosylation. During this process, complex chains of sugar molecules (oligosaccharides) are added to proteins and fats ( ...

  10. O-glycosylation of serum IgA1 antibodies against mucosal and systemic antigens in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alice C; Molyneux, Karen; Feehally, John; Barratt, Jonathan

    2006-12-01

    In IgA nephropathy (IgAN), serum IgA1 with abnormal O-glycosylation deposits in the glomerular mesangium. The underlying mechanism of this IgA1 O-glycosylation abnormality is poorly understood, but recent evidence argues against a generic defect in B cell glycosyltransferases, suggesting that only a subpopulation of IgA1-committed B cells are affected. For investigation of whether the site of antigen encounter influences IgA1 O-glycosylation, the O-glycosylation of serum IgA1 antibodies against a systemic antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT), and a mucosal antigen, Helicobacter pylori (HP), was studied in patients with IgAN and control subjects. Serum IgA1 was purified from cohorts of patients with IgAN and control subjects with HP infection and after systemic TT immunization. The IgA1 samples were applied to HP- and TT-coated immunoplates to immobilize specific antibodies, and IgA1 O-glycosylation profiles were assessed by binding of the O-glycan-specific lectin Vicia villosa using a modified ELISA technique. Although total serum IgA1 had raised lectin binding in IgAN, the O-glycosylation of the specific IgA1 antibodies to TT and HP did not differ between patients and control subjects. In both groups, IgA1 anti-HP had higher lectin binding than IgA1 anti-TT. This study demonstrates that IgA1 O-glycosylation normally varies in different immune responses and that patients produce the full spectrum of IgA1 O-glycoforms. IgA1 with high lectin binding was produced in response to mucosal HP infection in all subjects. The raised circulating level of this type of IgA1 in IgAN is likely to be a consequence of abnormal systemic responses to mucosally encountered antigens rather than a fundamental defect in B cell O-glycosylation pathways. PMID:17093066

  11. Influence of Glycosylation Inhibition on the Binding of KIR3DL1 to HLA-B*57:01

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Haley; Gubbala, Supreetha; Simoneau, Camille; Gressens, Simon B.; Jost, Stephanie; Altfeld, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections can affect the glycosylation pattern of glycoproteins involved in antiviral immunity. Given the importance of protein glycosylation for immune function, we investigated the effect that modulation of the highly conserved HLA class I N-glycan has on KIR:HLA interactions and NK cell function. We focused on HLA-B*57:01 and its interaction with KIR3DL1, which has been shown to play a critical role in determining the progression of a number of human diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection. 721.221 cells stably expressing HLA-B*57:01 were treated with a panel of glycosylation enzyme inhibitors, and HLA class I expression and KIR3DL1 binding was quantified. In addition, the functional outcomes of HLA-B*57:01 N-glycan disruption/modulation on KIR3DL1ζ+ Jurkat reporter cells and primary human KIR3DL1+ NK cells was assessed. Different glycosylation enzyme inhibitors had varying effects on HLA-B*57:01 expression and KIR3DL1-Fc binding. The most remarkable effect was that of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of the first step of N-glycosylation, which resulted in significantly reduced KIR3DL1-Fc binding despite sustained expression of HLA-B*57:01 on 721.221 cells. This effect was paralleled by decreased activation of KIR3DL1ζ+ Jurkat reporter cells, as well as increased degranulation of primary human KIR3DL1+ NK cell clones when encountering HLA-B*57:01-expressing 721.221 cells that were pre-treated with tunicamycin. Overall, these results demonstrate that N-glycosylation of HLA class I is important for KIR:HLA binding and has an impact on NK cell function. PMID:26680341

  12. Hypoxic regulation of glycosylation via the N-acetylglucosamine cycle

    PubMed Central

    Shirato, Ken; Nakajima, Kazuki; Korekane, Hiroaki; Takamatsu, Shinji; Gao, Congxiao; Angata, Takashi; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is an energy substrate, as well as the primary source of nucleotide sugars, which are utilized as donor substrates in protein glycosylation. Appropriate glycosylation is necessary to maintain the stability of protein, and is also important in the localization and trafficking of proteins. The dysregulation of glycosylation results in the development of a variety of disorders, such as cancer, diabetes mellitus and emphysema. Glycosylation is kinetically regulated by dynamically changing the portfolio of glycosyltransferases, nucleotide sugars, and nucleotide sugar transporters, which together form a part of what is currently referred to as the ”Glycan cycle”. An excess or a deficiency in the expression of glycosyltransferases has been shown to alter the glycosylation pattern, which subsequently leads to the onset, progression and exacerbation of a number of diseases. Furthermore, alterations in intracellular nucleotide sugar levels can also modulate glycosylation patterns. It is observed that pathological hypoxic microenvironments frequently occur in solid cancers and inflammatory foci. Hypoxic conditions dramatically change gene expression profiles, by activating hypoxia-inducible factor-1, which mediates adaptive cellular responses. Hypoxia-induced glycosyltransferases and nucleotide sugar transporters have been shown to modulate glycosylation patterns that are part of the mechanism associated with cancer metastasis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 also induces the expression of glucose transporters and various types of glycolytic enzymes, leading to shifts in glucose metabolic patterns. This fact strongly suggests that hypoxic conditions are an important factor in modulating various nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathways. This review discusses some of the current thinking of how hypoxia alters glucose metabolic fluxes that can modulate cellular glycosylation patterns and consequently modify cellular functions, particularly from the standpoint of the N

  13. Eukaryotic Oligosaccharyltransferase Generates Free Oligosaccharides during N-Glycosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yoichiro; Buser, Reto; Ngwa, Elsy M.; Hirayama, Hiroto; Aebi, Markus; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Asparagine (N)-linked glycosylation regulates numerous cellular activities, such as glycoprotein quality control, intracellular trafficking, and cell-cell communications. In eukaryotes, the glycosylation reaction is catalyzed by oligosaccharyltransferase (OST), a multimembrane protein complex that is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During N-glycosylation in the ER, the protein-unbound form of oligosaccharides (free oligosaccharides; fOSs), which is structurally related to N-glycan, is released into the ER lumen. However, the enzyme responsible for this process remains unidentified. Here, we demonstrate that eukaryotic OST generates fOSs. Biochemical and genetic analyses using mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that the generation of fOSs is tightly correlated with the N-glycosylation activity of OST. Furthermore, we present evidence that the purified OST complex can generate fOSs by hydrolyzing dolichol-linked oligosaccharide, the glycan donor substrate for N-glycosylation. The heterologous expression of a single subunit of OST from the protozoan Leishmania major in S. cerevisiae demonstrated that this enzyme functions both in N-glycosylation and generation of fOSs. This study provides insight into the mechanism of PNGase-independent formation of fOSs. PMID:24062310

  14. Mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by short- and long-range glycopeptide substrate recognition that varies among members of the polypeptide GalNAc transferase family.

    PubMed

    Revoredo, Leslie; Wang, Shengjun; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik; Moremen, Kelley W; Jarvis, Donald L; Ten Hagen, Kelly G; Tabak, Lawrence A; Gerken, Thomas A

    2016-04-01

    A large family of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide GalNAc transferases (ppGalNAc-Ts) initiates and defines sites of mucin-type Ser/Thr-O-GalNAc glycosylation. Family members have been classified into peptide- and glycopeptide-preferring subfamilies, although both families possess variable activities against glycopeptide substrates. All but one isoform contains a C-terminal carbohydrate-binding lectin domain whose roles in modulating glycopeptide specificity is just being understood. We have previously shown for several peptide-preferring isoforms that the presence of a remote Thr-O-GalNAc, 6-17 residues from a Ser/Thr acceptor site, may enhance overall catalytic activity in an N- or C-terminal direction. This enhancement varies with isoform and is attributed to Thr-O-GalNAc interactions at the lectin domain. We now report on the glycopeptide substrate utilization of a series of glycopeptide (human-ppGalNAc-T4, T7, T10, T12 and fly PGANT7) and peptide-preferring transferases (T2, T3 and T5) by exploiting a series of random glycopeptide substrates designed to probe the functions of their catalytic and lectin domains. Glycosylation was observed at the -3, -1 and +1 residues relative to a neighboring Thr-O-GalNAc, depending on isoform, which we attribute to specific Thr-O-GalNAc binding at the catalytic domain. Additionally, these glycopeptide-preferring isoforms show remote lectin domain-assisted Thr-O-GalNAc enhancements that vary from modest to none. We conclude that the glycopeptide specificity of the glycopeptide-preferring isoforms predominantly resides in their catalytic domain but may be further modulated by remote lectin domain interactions. These studies further demonstrate that both domains of the ppGalNAc-Ts have specialized and unique functions that work in concert to control and order mucin-type O-glycosylation. PMID:26610890

  15. A multifunctional hybrid glycosyl hydrolase discovered in an uncultured microbial consortium from ruminant gut.

    PubMed

    Palackal, Nisha; Lyon, Christopher S; Zaidi, Seema; Luginbühl, Peter; Dupree, Paul; Goubet, Florence; Macomber, John L; Short, Jay M; Hazlewood, Geoffrey P; Robertson, Dan E; Steer, Brian A

    2007-02-01

    A unique multifunctional glycosyl hydrolase was discovered by screening an environmental DNA library prepared from a microbial consortium collected from cow rumen. The protein consists of two adjacent catalytic domains. Sequence analysis predicted that one domain conforms to glycosyl hydrolase family 5 and the other to family 26. The enzyme is active on several different beta-linked substrates and possesses mannanase, xylanase, and glucanase activities. Site-directed mutagenesis studies on the catalytic residues confirmed the presence of two functionally independent catalytic domains. Using site-specific mutations, it was shown that one catalytic site hydrolyzes beta-1,4-linked mannan substrates, while the second catalytic site hydrolyzes beta-1,4-linked xylan and beta-1,4-linked glucan substrates. Polysaccharide Analysis using Carbohydrate gel Electrophoresis (PACE) also confirmed that the enzyme has discrete domains for binding and hydrolysis of glucan- and mannan-linked polysaccharides. Such multifunctional enzymes have many potential industrial applications in plant processing, including biomass saccharification, animal feed nutritional enhancement, textile, and pulp and paper processing. PMID:17103163

  16. Effects of ammonia on CHO cell growth, erythropoietin production, and glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Butler, M

    2000-05-20

    The effect of ammonium chloride was determined on a culture of CHO cells transfected with the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene. Cell growth was inhibited above a culture concentration of 5 mM NH(4)Cl with an IC-50 determined to be 33 mM. The specific production of EPO increased with the addition of NH(4)Cl above 5 mM. At 10 mM NH(4)Cl, the final cell density after 4 days in culture was significantly lower but the final yield of EPO was significantly higher. This appeared to be due to continued protein production after cell growth had ceased. The metabolic effects of added NH(4)Cl included higher specific consumption rates of glucose and glutamine and an increased rate of production of alanine, glycine, and glutamate. The EPO analyzed from control cultures had a molecular weight range of 33-39 kDa and an isoelectric point range of 4.06-4.67. Seven distinct isoforms of the molecule were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis. This molecular heterogeneity was ascribed to variable glycosylation. Complete enzymatic de-glycosylation resulted in a single molecular form with a molecular mass of 18 kDa. Addition of NH(4)Cl to the cultures caused a significant increase in the heterogeneity of the glycoforms as shown by an increased molecular weight and pI range. Enzymatic de-sialylation of the EPO from the ammonia-treated and control cultures resulted in identical electrophoretic patterns. This indicated that the effect of ammonia was in the reduction of terminal sialylation of the glycan structures which accounted for the increased pI. Selective removal of the N-glycan structures by PNGase F resulted in two bands identified as the O-glycan linked structure (19 kDa) and the completely de-glycosylated structure (18 kDa). The proportion of the O-linked glycan structure was reduced, and its pI increased in cultures to which ammonia was added. Thus, the glycosylation pattern altered by the presence of ammonia included a reduction in terminal sialylation of all the glycans

  17. Production of glycosylated thermostable Providencia rettgeri penicillin G amidase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Sevo, Milica; Degrassi, Giuliano; Skoko, Natasa; Venturi, Vittorio; Ljubijankić, Goran

    2002-01-01

    Penicillin G amidase from Providencia rettgeri is a heterodimer of 92 kDa. We have previously expressed the Pr. rettgeri pac gene coding for this enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and now we report the expression and characterization in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The recombinant catalytically active enzyme (rPAC(Pr)) was secreted from shake flask-grown P. pastoris cells into the medium at a level of approximately 0.18 U ml(-1). This yield of rPAC(Pr) was higher, by two orders of magnitude, than that obtained using a single-copy expression plasmid in S. cerevisiae. In addition, the secreted recombinant enzyme was entirely N-glycosylated. The recombinant PAC(Pr) was further characterized in terms of specific activity, kinetic parameters and thermostability. Except the significantly higher thermostability of the glycosylated rPAC(Pr) produced in P. pastoris, the other parameters were very similar to those of the corresponding non-glycosylated enzymes produced in bacteria or in S. cerevisiae. The higher thermostability of this recombinant enzyme has a clear industrial advantage. PMID:12702330

  18. The Association Between Glycosylation of Immunoglobulin G and Hypertension: A Multiple Ethnic Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youxin; Klarić, Lucija; Yu, Xinwei; Thaqi, Kujtim; Dong, Jing; Novokmet, Mislav; Wilson, Jim; Polasek, Ozren; Liu, Youqin; Krištić, Jasminka; Ge, Siqi; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Wu, Lijuan; Zhou, Yong; Ugrina, Ivo; Song, Manshu; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Xiuhua; Zeng, Qiang; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Aulchenko, Yurii; Lauc, Gordan; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    More than half of all known proteins, and almost all membrane and extra-cellular proteins have oligosaccharide structures or glycans attached to them. Defects in glycosylation pathways are directly involved in at least 30 severe human diseases.A multiple center cross-sectional study (China, Croatia, and Scotland) was carried out to investigate the possible association between hypertension and IgG glycosylation. A hydrophilic interaction chromatography of fluorescently labeled glycans was used to analyze N-glycans attached to IgG in plasma samples from a total of 4757 individuals of Chinese Han, Croatian, and Scottish ethnicity.Five glycans (IgG with digalactosylated glycans) significantly differed in participants with prehypertension or hypertension compared to those with normal blood pressure, while additional 17 glycan traits were only significantly differed in participants with hypertension compared to those of normal blood pressure. These glycans were also significant correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) or diastolic blood pressure (DBP).The present study demonstrated for the 1st time an association between hypertension and IgG glycome composition. These findings suggest that the individual variation in N-glycosylation of IgG contributes to pathogenesis of hypertension, presumably via its effect on pro- and/or anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:27124023

  19. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycan by EptC protein-mediated addition of phosphoethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nichollas E; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V G; Labbate, Maurizio; Djordjevic, Steven P; Larsen, Martin R; Szymanski, Christine M; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2012-08-24

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni possesses an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate structures that decorate both protein and non-protein surface-exposed structures. An N-linked glycosylation system encoded by the pgl gene cluster mediates the synthesis of a rigidly conserved heptasaccharide that is attached to protein substrates or released as free oligosaccharide in the periplasm. Removal of N-glycosylation results in reduced virulence and impeded host cell attachment. Since the N-glycan is conserved, the N-glycosylation system is also an attractive option for glycoengineering recombinant vaccines in Escherichia coli. To determine whether non-canonical N-glycans are present in C. jejuni, we utilized high throughput glycoproteomics to characterize C. jejuni JHH1 and identified 93 glycosylation sites, including 34 not previously reported. Interrogation of these data allowed the identification of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN)-modified variant of the N-glycan that was attached to multiple proteins. The pEtN moiety was attached to the terminal GalNAc of the canonical N-glycan. Deletion of the pEtN transferase eptC removed all evidence of the pEtN-glycan but did not globally influence protein reactivity to patient sera, whereas deletion of the pglB oligosaccharyltransferase significantly reduced reactivity. Transfer of eptC and the pgl gene cluster to E. coli confirmed the addition of the pEtN-glycan to a target C. jejuni protein. Significantly reduced, yet above background levels of pEtN-glycan were also observed in E. coli not expressing eptC, suggesting that endogenous E. coli pEtN transferases can mediate the addition of pEtN to N-glycans. The addition of pEtN must be considered in the context of glycoengineering and may alter C. jejuni glycan-mediated structure-function interactions. PMID:22761430

  20. Hoxb-2 transcriptional activation in rhombomeres 3 and 5 requires an evolutionarily conserved cis-acting element in addition to the Krox-20 binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vesque, C; Maconochie, M; Nonchev, S; Ariza-McNaughton, L; Kuroiwa, A; Charnay, P; Krumlauf, R

    1996-01-01

    Segmentation is a key feature of the development of the vertebrate hindbrain where it involves the generation of repetitive morphological units termed rhombomeres (r). Hox genes are likely to play an essential role in the specification of segmental identity and we have been investigating their regulation. We show here that the mouse and chicken Hoxb-2 genes are dependent for their expression in r3 and r5 on homologous enhancer elements and on binding to this enhancer of the r3/r5-specific transcriptional activator Krox-20. Among the three Krox-20 binding sites of the mouse Hoxb-2 enhancer, only the high-affinity site is absolutely necessary for activity. In contrast, we have identified an additional cis-acting element, Box1, essential for r3/r5 enhancer activity. It is conserved both in sequence and in position respective to the high-affinity Krox-20 binding site within the mouse and chicken enhancers. Furthermore, a short 44 bp sequence spanning the Box1 and Krox-20 sites can act as an r3/r5 enhancer when oligomerized. Box1 may therefore constitute a recognition sequence for another factor cooperating with Krox-20. Taken together, these data demonstrate the conservation of Hox gene regulation and of Krox-20 function during vertebrate evolution. Images PMID:8895582

  1. Modification of emodin and aloe-emodin by glycosylation in engineered Escherihia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Gopal Prasad; Koirala, Niranjan; Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Jung, Hye Jin; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2015-04-01

    Glycosyltransferase from Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 (YjiC) was used for enzymatic modification of emodin and aloe-emodin in vitro and in vivo. In order to increase the availability of UDP-glucose, three genes involved in the production of precursors of NDP-sugar in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) viz. D-glucose phosphate isomerase (pgi), D-glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (zwf), and UDP-sugar hydrolase (ushA) were deleted and glucose-1-phosphate urididyltransferase (galU) gene was over expressed. To improve the yield of the products; substrate, time and media parameters were optimized, and the production was scaled up using a 3 L fermentor. The maximum yield of glycosylated products of emodin (emodin-O-β-D-glucoside) and aloe-emodin (aloe-emodin-O-β-D-glucoside) were approximately 144 µM (38 mg/L) and 168 µM (45 mg/L) respectively, representing almost 72 % and 84 % bioconversion of emodin and aloe-emodin when 200 µM of emodin and aloe-emodin were supplemented in the culture. Additionally, the emodin and aloe emodin major glycosylated products exhibited the highest stability at pH 8.0 and the stability of products was up to 70 °C and 60 °C respectively. Furthermore, the biological activities of emodin and its major glucoside (P1) were compared and their anti-cancer activities were assayed in several cancer cell lines. The results demonstrate that YjiC has the capacity to catalyze the glycosylation of these aromatic compounds and that glycosylation of anthraquinones enhances their aqueous solubility while retaining their biological activities. PMID:25663173

  2. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model

    PubMed Central

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Parkinson, William; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP–N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP–N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG), showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT) greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK) or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless) genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor and Wnt ligand

  3. Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Induces Aberrant Glycosylation through Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway Activation.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Miguel C; Carvalho-Cruz, Patricia; Donadio, Joana L; Oliveira, Isadora A; de Queiroz, Rafaela M; Marinho-Carvalho, Monica M; Sola-Penna, Mauro; de Paula, Iron F; Gondim, Katia C; McComb, Mark E; Costello, Catherine E; Whelan, Stephen A; Todeschini, Adriane R; Dias, Wagner B

    2016-06-17

    Deregulated cellular metabolism is a hallmark of tumors. Cancer cells increase glucose and glutamine flux to provide energy needs and macromolecular synthesis demands. Several studies have been focused on the importance of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway. However, a neglected but very important branch of glucose metabolism is the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP). The HBP is a branch of the glucose metabolic pathway that consumes ∼2-5% of the total glucose, generating UDP-GlcNAc as the end product. UDP-GlcNAc is the donor substrate used in multiple glycosylation reactions. Thus, HBP links the altered metabolism with aberrant glycosylation providing a mechanism for cancer cells to sense and respond to microenvironment changes. Here, we investigate the changes of glucose metabolism during epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the role of O-GlcNAcylation in this process. We show that A549 cells increase glucose uptake during EMT, but instead of increasing the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway, the glucose is shunted through the HBP. The activation of HBP induces an aberrant cell surface glycosylation and O-GlcNAcylation. The cell surface glycans display an increase of sialylation α2-6, poly-LacNAc, and fucosylation, all known epitopes found in different tumor models. In addition, modulation of O-GlcNAc levels was demonstrated to be important during the EMT process. Taken together, our results indicate that EMT is an applicable model to study metabolic and glycophenotype changes during carcinogenesis, suggesting that cell glycosylation senses metabolic changes and modulates cell plasticity. PMID:27129262

  4. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model.

    PubMed

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Parkinson, William; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-12-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG), showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT) greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK) or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless) genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor and Wnt ligand levels

  5. Quantification of the N-glycosylated Secretome by Super-SILAC During Breast Cancer Progression and in Human Blood Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Boersema, Paul J.; Geiger, Tamar; Wiśniewski, Jacek R.; Mann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cells secrete a large number of proteins to communicate with their surroundings. Furthermore, plasma membrane proteins and intracellular proteins can be released into the extracellular space by regulated or non-regulated processes. Here, we profiled the supernatant of 11 cell lines that are representative of different stages of breast cancer development by specifically capturing N-glycosylated peptides using the N-glyco FASP technology. For accurate quantification we developed a super-SILAC mix from several labeled breast cancer cell lines and used it as an internal standard for all samples. In total, 1398 unique N-glycosylation sites were identified and quantified. Enriching for N-glycosylated peptides focused the analysis on classically secreted and membrane proteins. N-glycosylated secretome profiles correctly clustered the different cell lines to their respective cancer stage, suggesting that biologically relevant differences were detected. Five different profiles of glycoprotein dynamics during cancer development were detected, and they contained several proteins with known roles in breast cancer. We then used the super-SILAC mix in plasma, which led to the quantification of a large number of the previously identified N-glycopeptides in this important body fluid. The combination of quantifying the secretome of cancer cell lines and of human plasma with a super-SILAC approach appears to be a promising new approach for finding markers of disease. PMID:23090970

  6. Glycosylation Modulates Melanoma Cell α2β1 and α3β1 Integrin Interactions with Type IV Collagen*

    PubMed Central

    Stawikowski, Maciej J.; Aukszi, Beatrix; Stawikowska, Roma; Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B.

    2014-01-01

    Although type IV collagen is heavily glycosylated, the influence of this post-translational modification on integrin binding has not been investigated. In the present study, galactosylated and nongalactosylated triple-helical peptides have been constructed containing the α1(IV)382–393 and α1(IV)531–543 sequences, which are binding sites for the α2β1 and α3β1 integrins, respectively. All peptides had triple-helical stabilities of 37 °C or greater. The galactosylation of Hyl393 in α1(IV)382–393 and Hyl540 and Hyl543 in α1(IV)531–543 had a dose-dependent influence on melanoma cell adhesion that was much more pronounced in the case of α3β1 integrin binding. Molecular modeling indicated that galactosylation occurred on the periphery of α2β1 integrin interaction with α1(IV)382–393 but right in the middle of α3β1 integrin interaction with α1(IV)531–543. The possibility of extracellular deglycosylation of type IV collagen was investigated, but no β-galactosidase-like activity capable of collagen modification was found. Thus, glycosylation of collagen can modulate integrin binding, and levels of glycosylation could be altered by reduction in expression of glycosylation enzymes but most likely not by extracellular deglycosylation activity. PMID:24958723

  7. Fibrotic response in fibroblasts from congenital disorders of glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Lecca, M Rita; Maag, Charlotte; Berger, Eric G; Hennet, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are characterized by a generalized underglycosylation of proteins. CDG is associated with multiple symptoms such as psychomotor retardation, hypotonia, hormonal disturbances, liver fibrosis and coagulopathies. The molecular basis of these symptoms is poorly understood considering the large extent of affected glycoproteins. To better understand the cellular responses to protein underglycosylation in CDG, we have investigated the differences in gene expression between healthy control and CDG fibroblasts by transcriptome comparison. This analysis revealed a strong induction of several genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix, such as collagens, COMP, IGFBP5 and biglycan. The extent of this response was confirmed at the protein level by showing increased production of collagen type-I for example. This fibrotic response of CDG fibroblasts was not paralleled by a differentiation to myofibroblasts and by increased TGF-β signalling. We could show that the addition of recombinant IGFBP5, one of the induced proteins in CDG, to healthy control fibroblasts increased the production of collagen type-I to levels similar to those found in CDG fibroblasts. The fibrotic response identified in CDG fibroblasts may account for the elevated tissue fibrosis, which is often encountered in CDG patients. PMID:21029365

  8. Glycosylation of arabinogalactan-proteins essential for development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Allan M; Basu, Debarati

    2016-01-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) are ubiquitous cell wall components present throughout the plant kingdom. They are extensively post translationally modified by conversion of proline to hydroxyproline (Hyp) and by addition of arabinogalactan (AG) polysaccharides to Hyp residues. Two small gene subfamilies within the CAZy GT31 family, referred to as Hyp-galactosyltransferases (Hyp-GALTs and HPGTs), encode enzymes that specifically add galactose to AGP protein backbones as revealed by heterologous expression of the genes coupled with an in vitro enzyme assay and by biochemical characterization of the genetic knock-out mutants. Biochemical analysis of galt2galt5 double and hpgt1hpgt2hpgt3 triple knockout mutants revealed significant reductions in both AGP-specific Hyp-GALT activity and β-Gal-Yariv precipitable AGPs. Further analysis of these mutants demonstrated both overlapping and distinct pleiotropic growth and development phenotypes, indicating the important contributions of the carbohydrate moieties toward AGP function. Current research indicates that all 8 Hyp-GALT/HPGT genes encode enzymes that catalyze the initial step for AGP glycosylation and that AGP glycans play essential roles in plant growth and development. PMID:27489583

  9. Glycosylation of arabinogalactan-proteins essential for development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Allan M.; Basu, Debarati

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) are ubiquitous cell wall components present throughout the plant kingdom. They are extensively post translationally modified by conversion of proline to hydroxyproline (Hyp) and by addition of arabinogalactan (AG) polysaccharides to Hyp residues. Two small gene subfamilies within the CAZy GT31 family, referred to as Hyp-galactosyltransferases (Hyp-GALTs and HPGTs), encode enzymes that specifically add galactose to AGP protein backbones as revealed by heterologous expression of the genes coupled with an in vitro enzyme assay and by biochemical characterization of the genetic knock-out mutants. Biochemical analysis of galt2galt5 double and hpgt1hpgt2hpgt3 triple knockout mutants revealed significant reductions in both AGP-specific Hyp-GALT activity and β-Gal-Yariv precipitable AGPs. Further analysis of these mutants demonstrated both overlapping and distinct pleiotropic growth and development phenotypes, indicating the important contributions of the carbohydrate moieties toward AGP function. Current research indicates that all 8 Hyp-GALT/HPGT genes encode enzymes that catalyze the initial step for AGP glycosylation and that AGP glycans play essential roles in plant growth and development. PMID:27489583

  10. Selective glycosylation of steroidal saponins by Arthrobacter nitroguajacolicus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-yuan; Lu, Li; Kang, Li-ping; Liu, Yi-xun; Zhao, Yang; Xiong, Cheng-qi; Zhang, Yu-qin; Yu, Li-yan; Ma, Bai-ping

    2015-01-30

    In this study seven strains of the genus Arthrobacter were screened by biotransformation to discover glycosylating patterns on steroid saponins. A strain of Arthrobacter nitroguajacolicus (CPCC 203516) was found to have the ability of fructosylation. Crude enzyme of the strain was extracted for the further study of conversion characteristics and patterns. Sucrose was used as a non-activated sugar donor, and fifteen steroidal saponins were involved. Nine furostan saponins of the substrates were converted, and ten products were isolated and identified. Based on the HR-ESI-MS, 1D, and 2D NMR spectral data, one fructosyl was added to furostan saponins at C6-OH of 26-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl by A. nitroguajacolicus for all nine products. One product was distinguished by an additional fructosyl at the position of C6-OH on the first added fructosyl. Spirostan saponins of the substrates could not be converted. Steroidal saponins embracing a fructosyl are quite rare according to other reports based on similar studies. This study successfully converted furostan saponins into new compounds. PMID:25497335

  11. The glycosylation of human synovial lubricin: implications for its role in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Ruby P; Whitelock, John M; Packer, Nicolle H; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2010-07-15

    Acidic proteins were isolated from synovial fluid from two osteoarthritic and two rheumatoid arthritic patients and identified by MS. It was found that the most abundant protein in all of the samples was the mucin-like protein lubricin. Further characterization of lubricin from the different patients by LC (liquid chromatography)-MS of released oligosaccharides showed that the core 1 O-linked oligosaccharides NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3GalNAc and NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3(NeuAc alpha2-6)GalNAc were the dominating structures on lubricin. The latter was found to be more prevalent in the rheumatoid arthritis samples, indicating that sialylation is up-regulated as part of the inflammatory response. In addition to these dominating structures, core 2 structures were also found in low amounts, where the largest was the disialylated hexasaccharide corresponding to the sequence NeuAc alpha2-3Ga lbeta1-3(NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3/4GlcNAc beta1-6)GalNAc. It was also found that a small proportion of the core 2 oligosaccharides carried sulfate. The ability of lubricin to present complex glycosylation reflecting the state of the joint tissue makes lubricin a candidate as a carrier of inflammatory oligosaccharide epitopes. In particular, it was shown that lubricin from inflamed arthritic tissue was recognized by the antibody MECA-79 and thus carried the sulfated epitope proposed to be part of the L-selectin ligand that is responsible for recruitment of leucocytes to inflammatory sites. PMID:20443780

  12. Determination of the glycosylation-pattern of the middle ear mucosa in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Engleder, Elisabeth; Demmerer, Elisabeth; Wang, Xueyan; Honeder, Clemens; Zhu, Chengjing; Studenik, Christian; Wirth, Michael; Arnoldner, Christoph; Gabor, Franz

    2015-01-01

    In the present study the glycosylation pattern of the middle ear mucosa (MEM) of guinea pigs, an approved model for middle ear research, was characterized with the purpose to identify bioadhesive ligands which might prolong the contact time of drug delivery systems with the middle ear mucosa (MEM). To assess the utility of five fluorescein labeled plant lectins with different carbohydrate specificities as bioadhesive ligands, viable MEM specimens were incubated at 4 °C and the lectin binding capacities were calculated from the MEM-associated relative fluorescence intensities. Among all lectins under investigation, fluorescein-labeled wheat germ agglutinin (F-WGA) emerged as the highest bioadhesive lectin. In general, the accessibility of carbohydrate moieties of the MEM followed the order: sialic acid and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (WGA) >> mannose and galactosamine (Lensculinaris agglutinin) > N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (Solanumtuberosum agglutinin) > fucose (Ulexeuropaeus isoagglutinin I) >> terminal mannose α-(1,3)-mannose (Galanthusnivalis agglutinin). Competitive inhibition studies with the corresponding carbohydrate revealed that F-WGA-binding was inhibited up to 90% confirming specificity of the F-WGA–MEM interaction. The cilia of the MEM were identified as F-WGA binding sites by fluorescence imaging as well as a z-stack of overlays of transmission, F-WGA- and nuclei-stained images of the MEM. Additionally, co-localisation experiments revealed that F-WGA bound to acidic mucopolysaccharides of the MEM. All in all, lectin-mediated bioadhesion to the MEM is proposed as a new concept for drug delivery to prolong the residence time of the drug in the tympanic cavity especially for successful therapy for difficult-to-treat diseases such as otitis media. PMID:25724132

  13. Effects of nutrient and lime additions in mine site rehabilitation strategies on the accumulation of antimony and arsenic by native Australian plants.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Susan C; Leech, Calvin D; Butler, Leo; Lisle, Leanne; Ashley, Paul M; Lockwood, Peter V

    2013-10-15

    The effects of nutrient and lime additions on antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) accumulation by native Australian and naturalised plants growing in two contaminated mine site soils (2,735 mg kg(-1) and 4,517 mg kg(-1) Sb; 826 mg kg(-1) and 1606 As mgkg(-1)) was investigated using a glasshouse pot experiment. The results indicated an increase in soil solution concentrations with nutrient addition in both soils and also with nutrient+lime addition for Sb in one soil. Metalloid concentrations in plant roots were significantly greater than concentrations in above ground plant parts. The metalloid transfer to above ground plant parts from the roots and from the soil was, however, low (ratio of leaf concentration/soil concentration≪1) for all species studied. Eucalyptus michaeliana was the most successful at colonisation with lowest metalloid transfer to above ground plant parts. Addition of nutrients and nutrients+lime to soils, in general, increased plant metalloid accumulation. Relative As accumulation was greater than that of Sb. All the plant species studied were suitable for consideration in the mine soil phytostabilisation strategies but lime additions should be limited and longer term trials also recommended. PMID:23433572

  14. Glycosylation profiles determine extravasation and disease-targeting properties of armed antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Venetz, Dario; Hess, Christian; Lin, Chia-wei; Aebi, Markus; Neri, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The ability of antibodies to extravasate out of blood vessels is critical for therapeutic activity, because molecular targets for most diseases are located outside of the endothelial lining. By performing detailed biodistribution studies with a novel IL9-armed cancer-specific antibody, we identified a clear correlation between N-linked glycan structures and tumor-targeting efficiencies. Site-specific glycan analysis provided a detailed view of the glycan microheterogeneity present on the IL9 portion of the recombinant protein. Nonsialylated glycan structures have a negative impact on disease-homing activity, highlighting the importance of glycosylation control and characterization during process development. PMID:25646460

  15. Global serum glycoform profiling for the investigation of dystroglycanopathies & Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Heywood, Wendy E.; Bliss, Emily; Mills, Philippa; Yuzugulen, Jale; Carreno, Gabriela; Clayton, Peter T.; Muntoni, Francesco; Worthington, Viki C.; Torelli, Silvia; Sebire, Neil J.; Mills, Kevin; Grunewald, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG) are an expanding group of genetic disorders which encompass a spectrum of glycosylation defects of protein and lipids, including N- & O-linked defects and among the latter are the muscular dystroglycanopathies (MD). Initial screening of CDG is usually based on the investigation of the glycoproteins transferrin, and/or apolipoprotein CIII. These biomarkers do not always detect complex or subtle defects present in older patients, therefore there is a need to investigate additional glycoproteins in some cases. We describe a sensitive 2D-Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) method that provides a global analysis of the serum glycoproteome. Patient samples from PMM2-CDG (n = 5), CDG-II (n = 7), MD and known complex N- & O-linked glycosylation defects (n = 3) were analysed by 2D DIGE. Using this technique we demonstrated characteristic changes in mass and charge in PMM2-CDG and in charge in CDG-II for α1-antitrypsin, α1-antichymotrypsin, α2-HS-glycoprotein, ceruloplasmin, and α1-acid glycoproteins 1&2. Analysis of the samples with known N- & O-linked defects identified a lower molecular weight glycoform of C1-esterase inhibitor that was not observed in the N-linked glycosylation disorders indicating the change is likely due to affected O-glycosylation. In addition, we could identify abnormal serum glycoproteins in LARGE and B3GALNT2-deficient muscular dystrophies. The results demonstrate that the glycoform pattern is varied for some CDG patients not all glycoproteins are consistently affected and analysis of more than one protein in complex cases is warranted. 2D DIGE is an ideal method to investigate the global glycoproteome and is a potentially powerful tool and secondary test for aiding the complex diagnosis and sub classification of CDG. The technique has further potential in monitoring patients for future treatment strategies. In an era of shifting emphasis from gel- to mass-spectral based proteomics

  16. Global serum glycoform profiling for the investigation of dystroglycanopathies & Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Wendy E; Bliss, Emily; Mills, Philippa; Yuzugulen, Jale; Carreno, Gabriela; Clayton, Peter T; Muntoni, Francesco; Worthington, Viki C; Torelli, Silvia; Sebire, Neil J; Mills, Kevin; Grunewald, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    The Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG) are an expanding group of genetic disorders which encompass a spectrum of glycosylation defects of protein and lipids, including N- & O-linked defects and among the latter are the muscular dystroglycanopathies (MD). Initial screening of CDG is usually based on the investigation of the glycoproteins transferrin, and/or apolipoprotein CIII. These biomarkers do not always detect complex or subtle defects present in older patients, therefore there is a need to investigate additional glycoproteins in some cases. We describe a sensitive 2D-Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) method that provides a global analysis of the serum glycoproteome. Patient samples from PMM2-CDG (n = 5), CDG-II (n = 7), MD and known complex N- & O-linked glycosylation defects (n = 3) were analysed by 2D DIGE. Using this technique we demonstrated characteristic changes in mass and charge in PMM2-CDG and in charge in CDG-II for α1-antitrypsin, α1-antichymotrypsin, α2-HS-glycoprotein, ceruloplasmin, and α1-acid glycoproteins 1&2. Analysis of the samples with known N- & O-linked defects identified a lower molecular weight glycoform of C1-esterase inhibitor that was not observed in the N-linked glycosylation disorders indicating the change is likely due to affected O-glycosylation. In addition, we could identify abnormal serum glycoproteins in LARGE and B3GALNT2-deficient muscular dystrophies. The results demonstrate that the glycoform pattern is varied for some CDG patients not all glycoproteins are consistently affected and analysis of more than one protein in complex cases is warranted. 2D DIGE is an ideal method to investigate the global glycoproteome and is a potentially powerful tool and secondary test for aiding the complex diagnosis and sub classification of CDG. The technique has further potential in monitoring patients for future treatment strategies. In an era of shifting emphasis from gel- to mass-spectral based proteomics

  17. Comparison of Viral Env Proteins from Acute and Chronic Infections with Subtype C Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Identifies Differences in Glycosylation and CCR5 Utilization and Suggests a New Strategy for Immunogen Design

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Li-Hua; Joseph, Sarah B.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Abrahams, Melissa-Rose; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Kincer, Laura P.; Treurnicht, Florette K.; Arney, Leslie; Ojeda, Suany; Zhang, Ming; Keys, Jessica; Potter, E. Lake; Chu, Haitao; Moore, Penny; Salazar, Maria G.; Iyer, Shilpa; Jabara, Cassandra; Kirchherr, Jennifer; Mapanje, Clement; Ngandu, Nobubelo; Seoighe, Cathal; Hoffman, Irving; Gao, Feng; Tang, Yuyang; Labranche, Celia; Lee, Benhur; Saville, Andrew; Vermeulen, Marion; Fiscus, Susan; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim Abdool; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Cohen, Myron S.; Montefiori, David; Williamson, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Understanding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission is central to developing effective prevention strategies, including a vaccine. We compared phenotypic and genetic variation in HIV-1 env genes from subjects in acute/early infection and subjects with chronic infections in the context of subtype C heterosexual transmission. We found that the transmitted viruses all used CCR5 and required high levels of CD4 to infect target cells, suggesting selection for replication in T cells and not macrophages after transmission. In addition, the transmitted viruses were more likely to use a maraviroc-sensitive conformation of CCR5, perhaps identifying a feature of the target T cell. We confirmed an earlier observation that the transmitted viruses were, on average, modestly underglycosylated relative to the viruses from chronically infected subjects. This difference was most pronounced in comparing the viruses in acutely infected men to those in chronically infected women. These features of the transmitted virus point to selective pressures during the transmission event. We did not observe a consistent difference either in heterologous neutralization sensitivity or in sensitivity to soluble CD4 between the two groups, suggesting similar conformations between viruses from acute and chronic infection. However, the presence or absence of glycosylation sites had differential effects on neutralization sensitivity for different antibodies. We suggest that the occasional absence of glycosylation sites encoded in the conserved regions of env, further reduced in transmitted viruses, could expose specific surface structures on the protein as antibody targets. PMID:23616655

  18. Protein Glycosylation in Helicobacter pylori: Beyond the Flagellins?

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Patrick S.; Ford, Rachel S.; Zebian, Najwa; Merkx-Jacques, Alexandra; Vijayakumar, Somalinga; Ratnayake, Dinath; Hayworth, Jacqueline; Creuzenet, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation of flagellins by pseudaminic acid is required for virulence in Helicobacter pylori. We demonstrate that, in H. pylori, glycosylation extends to proteins other than flagellins and to sugars other than pseudaminic acid. Several candidate glycoproteins distinct from the flagellins were detected via ProQ-emerald staining and DIG- or biotin- hydrazide labeling of the soluble and outer membrane fractions of wild-type H. pylori, suggesting that protein glycosylation is not limited to the flagellins. DIG-hydrazide labeling of proteins from pseudaminic acid biosynthesis pathway mutants showed that the glycosylation of some glycoproteins is not dependent on the pseudaminic acid glycosylation pathway, indicating the existence of a novel glycosylation pathway. Fractions enriched in glycoprotein candidates by ion exchange chromatography were used to extract the sugars by acid hydrolysis. High performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection revealed characteristic monosaccharide peaks in these extracts. The monosaccharides were then identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The spectra are consistent with sugars such as 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-nonulosonic acid (Pse5Ac7Ac) previously described on flagellins, 5-acetamidino-7-acetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-nonulosonic acid (Pse5Am7Ac), bacillosamine derivatives and a potential legionaminic acid derivative (Leg5AmNMe7Ac) which were not previously identified in H. pylori. These data open the way to the study of the mechanism and role of protein glycosylation on protein function and virulence in H. pylori. PMID:21984942

  19. [Non-enzymatic glycosylation of dietary protein in vitro].

    PubMed

    Bednykh, B S; Evdokimov, I A; Sokolov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins, based on discovered by Mayarn reaction of carbohydrate aldehyde group with a free amino group of a protein molecule, is well known to experts in biochemistry of food industry. Generated brown solid in some cases give the product marketable qualities--crackling bread--in others conversely, worsen the product. The biological effects of far-advanced products of non-enzymatic protein glycosylation reaction have not been studied enough, although it was reported previously that they are not split by digestive enzymes and couldn't be absorbed by animals. The objective of this work was to compare the depth of glycosylation of different food proteins of animal and vegetable origin. The objects of the study were proteins of animal (casein, lactoglobulin, albumin) and vegetable (soy isolate, proteins of rice flour, buckwheat, oatmeal) origin, glucose and fructose were selected as glycosylation agents, exposure 15 days at 37 degrees C. Lactoglobulin was glycosylated to a lesser extent among the proteins of animal origin while protein of oatmeal was glycosylated in the least degree among vegetable proteins. Conversely, such proteins as casein and soya isolate protein bound rather large amounts of carbohydrates. Fructose binding with protein was generally higher than the binding of glucose. The only exception was a protein of oatmeal. When of glucose and fructose simultaneously presented in the incubation medium, glucose binding usually increased while binding of fructose, in contrast, reduced. According to the total amount of carbohydrate (mcg), which is able to attach a protein (mg) the studied food proteins located in the following order: albumin (38) > soy protein isolate (23) > casein (15,) > whey protein rice flour protein (6) > protein from buckwheat flour (3) > globulin (2) > protein of oatmeal (0.3). The results obtained are to be used to select the optimal combination of proteins and carbohydrates, in which the glycosylation

  20. Glycosylated hemoglobin and hyperbaric oxygen coverage denials.

    PubMed

    Moffat, A D; Worth, E R; Weaver, L K

    2015-01-01

    Some Medicaid and Medicare fiscal intermediaries are denying hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients if the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 7.0%. We performed multiple PubMed searches for any diabetic wound healing clinical trial that documented HbA1c and had a wound healing endpoint. We scrutinized 30 peer-reviewed clinical trials, representing more than 4,400 patients. The average HbA1c from the intervention side of the studies was 8.6% (7.2% - 9.9%) and the control/sham side was 8.3% (6.0% - 10.6%). Twelve studies made a direct attempt to link HbA1c and wound healing. Four retrospective studies and one prospective cohort study assert that lower HbA1c favors wound healing, but review of the studies reveal design flaws that invalidate these conclusions. In total, 25 studies showed no direct correlation between HbA1c levels and wound healing. There was no randomized controlled trial (RCT) data demonstrating that HbA1c < 7.0% improves diabetic wound healing. In every study reviewed, wounds healed with high HbA1c levels that would be considered poorly controlled by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Frequently, patients lack optimal blood glucose control when they have a limb-threatening DFU. The evidence supports that denying hyperbaric oxygen to those with HbA1c > 7.0% is unfounded. PMID:26152104

  1. Glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles by emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Abeylath, Sampath C; Turos, Edward

    2007-08-01

    A selection of glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles has been prepared by radical-initiated emulsion polymerization in aqueous media. Using ethyl acrylate as a co-monomer, carbohydrate acrylates were incorporated into the poly(ethyl acrylate) framework to give stable emulsions of glyconanoparticles with an average particle size of around 40 nm. Using this technique a variety of glyconanoparticles were prepared from 3-O-acryloyl-1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-glucofuranose, 1-O-acryloyl-2,3:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-mannofuranose, 6-O-acryloyl-1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-galactopyranose, 2-N-acryloyl-1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine, 5-O-acryloyl-2,3-isopropylidene-1-methoxy-beta-D-ribofuranose and 4-N-acetyl-5'-O-acryloyl-2',3'-O-isopropylidene cytidine. Scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and proton NMR analysis of the emulsions indicated essentially 100% incorporation of the carbohydrate acrylate monomer into the polymer with the exception of O-benzyl- and O-benzoyl-protected carbohydrate acrylates, which gave incomplete incorporation. Formation of larger glyconanoparticles of ~80nm with (unprotected) 3-O-acryloyl-D-glucose and 5-O-acryloyl-1-methoxy-beta-D-ribofuranose revealed the influence of free hydroxyl groups in the monomer on the particle size during polymerization, a feature which is also apparently dependent on the amount of carbohydrate in the matrix. This methodology allows for a new, simple route to the synthesis of polymeric glyconanoparticles with potential applications in targeted drug delivery and materials development. PMID:18677404

  2. Glycosylated Nanoparticles as Efficient Antimicrobial Delivery Agents.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Ahmed M; Abdulkarim, Ali; Sharples, Gary J; Cameron, Neil R

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles that can be tailored through multivalent ligand display on the surface, while at the same time allowing encapsulation of desired bioactive molecules, are especially useful in providing a versatile and robust platform in the design of specific delivery vehicles for various purposes. Glycosylated nanoparticles (glyco-NPs) of a poly(n-butyl acrylate) (pBA) core and poly(N-2-(β-d-glucosyloxy)ethyl acrylamide) (p(NβGlcEAM)) or poly(N-2-(β-D-galactosyloxy)ethyl acrylamide) (p(NβGalEAM)) corona were prepared via nanoprecipitation in aqueous solutions of preformed amphiphilic glycopolymers. Well-defined block copolymers of (poly(pentafluorophenyl acrylate) (pPFPA) and pBA were first prepared by RAFT polymerization followed by postpolymerization functionalization with aminoethyl glycosides to yield p(NβGlcEAM-b-BA) and p(NβGalEAM-b-BA), which were then used to form glyco-NPs (glucosylated and galactosylated NPs, Glc-NPs and Gal-NPs, respectively). The glyco-NPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and TEM. Encapsulation and release of ampicillin, leading to nanoparticles that we have termed "glyconanobiotics", were studied. The ampicillin-loaded glyco-NPs were found to induce aggregation of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and resulted in antibacterial activity approaching that of ampicillin itself. This glyconanobiotics strategy represents a potential new approach for the delivery of antibiotics close to the surface of bacteria by promoting bacterial aggregation. Defined release in the proximity of the bacterial envelope may thus enhance antibacterial efficiency and potentially reduce the quantities of agent required for potency. PMID:27434596

  3. Altered glycosylation of complexed native IgG molecules is associated with disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sjöwall, C; Zapf, J; von Löhneysen, S; Magorivska, I; Biermann, M; Janko, C; Winkler, S; Bilyy, R; Schett, G; Herrmann, M; Muñoz, L E

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the redundancy of the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, glycans result in potential ligands for a plethora of lectin receptors found in immune effector cells. Here we analysed the exposure of glycans containing fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-type core by complexed native IgG in longitudinal serum samples of well-characterized patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Consecutive serum samples of a cohort of 15 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus during periods of increased disease activity and remission were analysed. All patients fulfilled the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. Sera of 15 sex- and age-matched normal healthy blood donors served as controls. The levels and type of glycosylation of complexed random IgG was measured with lectin enzyme-immunosorbent assays. After specifically gathering IgG complexes from sera, biotinylated lectins Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin were employed to detect IgG-associated fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-glycan core, respectively. In sandwich-ELISAs, IgG-associated IgM, IgA, C1q, C3c and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected as candidates for IgG immune complex constituents. We studied associations of the glycan of complexed IgG and disease activity according to the physician's global assessment of disease activity and the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 documented at the moment of blood taking. Our results showed significantly higher levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin binding sites exposed on IgG complexes of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus than on those of normal healthy blood donors. Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus correlated with higher exposure of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactive fucosyl residues by immobilized IgG complexes. Top levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactivity were found in samples taken during the

  4. O-glycosylation in cell wall proteins in Scedosporium prolificans is critical for phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokines production by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xisto, Mariana I D S; Bittencourt, Vera C B; Liporagi-Lopes, Livia Cristina; Haido, Rosa M T; Mendonça, Morena S A; Sassaki, Guilherme; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T; Romanos, Maria Teresa V; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the importance of O-linked oligosaccharides present in peptidorhamnomannan (PRM) from the cell wall of the fungus Scedosporium prolificans for recognition and phagocytosis of conidia by macrophages. Adding PRM led to a dose-dependent inhibition of conidia phagocytosis, whereas de-O-glycosylated PRM did not show any effect. PRM induced the release of macrophage-derived antimicrobial compounds. However, O-linked oligosaccharides do not appear to be required for such induction. The effect of PRM on conidia-induced macrophage killing was examined using latex beads coated with PRM or de-O-glycosylated PRM. A decrease in macrophage viability similar to that caused by conidia was detected. However, macrophage killing was unaffected when beads coated with de-O-glycosylated PRM were used, indicating the toxic effect of O-linked oligosaccharides on macrophages. In addition, PRM triggered TNF-α release by macrophages. Chemical removal of O-linked oligosaccharides from PRM abolished cytokine induction, suggesting that the O-linked oligosaccharidic chains are important moieties involved in inflammatory responses through the induction of TNF-α secretion. In summary, we show that O-glycosylation plays a role in the recognition and uptake of S. prolificans by macrophages, killing of macrophages and production of pro- inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25875427

  5. Scope and Limitations of 3‐Iodo‐Kdo Fluoride‐Based Glycosylation Chemistry using N‐Acetyl Glucosamine Acceptors†

    PubMed Central

    Pokorny, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ketosidic linkage of 3‐deoxy‐d‐manno‐octulosonic acid (Kdo) to lipid A constitutes a general structural feature of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide core. Glycosylation reactions of Kdo donors, however, are challenging due to the absence of a directing group at C‐3 and elimination reactions resulting in low yields and anomeric selectivities of the glycosides. While 3‐iodo‐Kdo fluoride donors showed excellent glycosyl donor properties for the assembly of Kdo oligomers, glycosylation of N‐acetyl‐glucosamine derivatives was not straightforward. Specifically, oxazoline formation of a β‐anomeric methyl glycoside, as well as iodonium ion transfer to an allylic aglycon was found. In addition, dehalogenation of the directing group by hydrogen atom transfer proved to be incompatible with free hydroxyl groups next to benzyl groups. In contrast, glycosylation of a suitably protected methyl 2‐acetamido‐2‐deoxy‐α‐d‐glucopyranoside derivative and subsequent deiodination proceeded in excellent yields and α‐specificity, and allowed for subsequent 4‐O‐phosphorylation. This way, the disaccharides α‐Kdo‐(2→6)‐α‐GlcNAcOMe and α‐Kdo‐(2→6)‐α‐GlcNAcOMe‐4‐phosphate were obtained in good overall yields. PMID:27308198

  6. Scope and Limitations of 3-Iodo-Kdo Fluoride-Based Glycosylation Chemistry using N-Acetyl Glucosamine Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Barbara; Kosma, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The ketosidic linkage of 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) to lipid A constitutes a general structural feature of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide core. Glycosylation reactions of Kdo donors, however, are challenging due to the absence of a directing group at C-3 and elimination reactions resulting in low yields and anomeric selectivities of the glycosides. While 3-iodo-Kdo fluoride donors showed excellent glycosyl donor properties for the assembly of Kdo oligomers, glycosylation of N-acetyl-glucosamine derivatives was not straightforward. Specifically, oxazoline formation of a β-anomeric methyl glycoside, as well as iodonium ion transfer to an allylic aglycon was found. In addition, dehalogenation of the directing group by hydrogen atom transfer proved to be incompatible with free hydroxyl groups next to benzyl groups. In contrast, glycosylation of a suitably protected methyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside derivative and subsequent deiodination proceeded in excellent yields and α-specificity, and allowed for subsequent 4-O-phosphorylation. This way, the disaccharides α-Kdo-(2→6)-α-GlcNAcOMe and α-Kdo-(2→6)-α-GlcNAcOMe-4-phosphate were obtained in good overall yields. PMID:27308198

  7. O-Glycosylation in Cell Wall Proteins in Scedosporium prolificans Is Critical for Phagocytosis and Inflammatory Cytokines Production by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Xisto, Mariana I. D. S.; Bittencourt, Vera C. B.; Liporagi-Lopes, Livia Cristina; Haido, Rosa M. T.; Mendonça, Morena S. A.; Sassaki, Guilherme; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Romanos, Maria Teresa V.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the importance of O-linked oligosaccharides present in peptidorhamnomannan (PRM) from the cell wall of the fungus Scedosporium prolificans for recognition and phagocytosis of conidia by macrophages. Adding PRM led to a dose-dependent inhibition of conidia phagocytosis, whereas de-O-glycosylated PRM did not show any effect. PRM induced the release of macrophage-derived antimicrobial compounds. However, O-linked oligosaccharides do not appear to be required for such induction. The effect of PRM on conidia-induced macrophage killing was examined using latex beads coated with PRM or de-O-glycosylated PRM. A decrease in macrophage viability similar to that caused by conidia was detected. However, macrophage killing was unaffected when beads coated with de-O-glycosylated PRM were used, indicating the toxic effect of O-linked oligosaccharides on macrophages. In addition, PRM triggered TNF-α release by macrophages. Chemical removal of O-linked oligosaccharides from PRM abolished cytokine induction, suggesting that the O-linked oligosaccharidic chains are important moieties involved in inflammatory responses through the induction of TNF-α secretion. In summary, we show that O-glycosylation plays a role in the recognition and uptake of S. prolificans by macrophages, killing of macrophages and production of pro- inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25875427

  8. Lipid advanced glycosylation: pathway for lipid oxidation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bucala, R; Makita, Z; Koschinsky, T; Cerami, A; Vlassara, H

    1993-01-01

    To address potential mechanisms for oxidative modification of lipids in vivo, we investigated the possibility that phospholipids react directly with glucose to form advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) that then initiate lipid oxidation. Phospholipid-linked AGEs formed readily in vitro, mimicking the absorbance, fluorescence, and immunochemical properties of AGEs that result from advanced glycosylation of proteins. Oxidation of unsaturated fatty acid residues, as assessed by reactive aldehyde formation, occurred at a rate that paralleled the rate of lipid advanced glycosylation. Aminoguanidine, an agent that prevents protein advanced glycosylation, inhibited both lipid advanced glycosylation and oxidative modification. Incubation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) with glucose produced AGE moieties that were attached to both the lipid and the apoprotein components. Oxidized LDL formed concomitantly with AGE-modified LDL. Of significance, AGE ELISA analysis of LDL specimens isolated from diabetic individuals revealed increased levels of both apoprotein- and lipid-linked AGEs when compared to specimens obtained from normal, nondiabetic controls. Circulating levels of oxidized LDL were elevated in diabetic patients and correlated significantly with lipid AGE levels. These data support the concept that AGE oxidation plays an important and perhaps primary role in initiating lipid oxidation in vivo. PMID:8341651

  9. Detection of Protein Glycosylation Using Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Cowcher, David P; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Brewster, Victoria L; Ashton, Lorna; Deckert, Volker; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-02-16

    The correct glycosylation of biopharmaceutical glycoproteins and their formulations is essential for them to have the desired therapeutic effect on the patient. It has recently been shown that Raman spectroscopy can be used to quantify the proportion of glycosylated protein from mixtures of native and glycosylated forms of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase). Here we show the first steps toward not only the detection of glycosylation status but the characterization of glycans themselves from just a few protein molecules at a time using tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). While this technique generates complex data that are very dependent on the protein orientation, with the careful development of combined data preprocessing, univariate and multivariate analysis techniques, we have shown that we can distinguish between the native and glycosylated forms of RNase. Many glycoproteins contain populations of subtly different glycoforms; therefore, with stricter orientation control, we believe this has the potential to lead to further glycan characterization using TERS, which would have use in biopharmaceutical synthesis and formulation research. PMID:26813024

  10. Studying N-linked glycosylation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Itkonen, Harri M; Mills, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations have been identified as a frequent event in cancer. This is often associated with increased flux through glycolysis, and also a secondary pathway to glycolysis, hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). HBP provides substrate for N-linked glycosylation, which occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. N-linked glycosylation supports protein folding and correct sorting of proteins to plasma membrane and secretion. This process generates complex glycoforms, which can be recognized by other proteins and glycosylation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) can also regulate their plasma-membrane retention time. Of special interest for experimental biologists, plants produce proteins, termed lectins, which bind with high specificity to glyco-conjugates. For the purposes of molecular biology, plant lectins can be conjugated to different moieties, such as agarose beads, which enable precipitation of specifically glycosylated proteins. In this chapter, we describe in detail how to perform pull-down experiments with commercially available lectins to identify changes in the glycosylation of RTKs. PMID:25319893

  11. Differential O-glycosylation in cortical and medullary thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Georgina; Lascurain, Ricardo; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Tetaert, Daniel; Degand, Pierre; Gorocica, Patricia; Espinosa, Blanca; Zenteno, Edgar; Chávez, Raúl

    2006-08-01

    Differentiation of T lymphocytes is characterized by variable expression of CD8/CD4 co-receptor molecules and changes in the glycosylation pattern. In this work, O-glycosylation was analyzed in microsomes from murine thymocytes purified with the PNA and Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL) lectins, specific for the T antigen (Gal beta1,3GalNAc1,0 Ser/Thr) in cortical and medullary thymocytes, respectively. Three peptides were used as acceptors for UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferase (GalNAc transferase); the peptide motif TTSAPTTS was the best glycosylated one. Cortical ALL-PNA+ thymocytes showed two-fold higher GalNAc transferase activity than ALL+PNA- thymocytes; however, capillary electrophoresis showed a higher proportion of di- versus mono-glycosylated peptides for ALL+PNA- than for ALL-PNA+. We compared the GalNAc transferase activity of thymocytes from dexamethasone-treated mice versus control mice. GalNAc transferase activity was six-fold higher in thymocytes from control mice than from dexamethasone-treated mice; the rate of di-glycosylated peptides for dexamethosone-resistant ALL+ was two-fold higher than for ALL- thymocytes. Our results confirm an upregulated biosynthesis of O-glycosidically linked glycans on T cell surface glycoproteins, and suggest that the modification of GalNAc transferase activity plays a relevant role during the maturation process of thymic cells. PMID:16762509

  12. Aberrant Glycosylation as Biomarker for Cancer: Focus on CD43

    PubMed Central

    de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Fiume, Giuseppe; Borrelli, Antonella; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Scala, Iris; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; Quinto, Ileana; Scala, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins playing a major role in cell signalling, immune recognition, and cell-cell interaction because of their glycan branches conferring structure variability and binding specificity to lectin ligands. Aberrant expression of glycan structures as well as occurrence of truncated structures, precursors, or novel structures of glycan may affect ligand-receptor interactions and thus interfere with regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Indeed, aberrant glycosylation represents a hallmark of cancer, reflecting cancer-specific changes in glycan biosynthesis pathways such as the altered expression of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Most studies have been carried out to identify changes in serum glycan structures. In most cancers, fucosylation and sialylation are significantly modified. Thus, aberrations in glycan structures can be used as targets to improve existing serum cancer biomarkers. The ability to distinguish differences in the glycosylation of proteins between cancer and control patients emphasizes glycobiology as a promising field for potential biomarker identification. In this review, we discuss the aberrant protein glycosylation associated with human cancer and the identification of protein glycoforms as cancer biomarkers. In particular, we will focus on the aberrant CD43 glycosylation as cancer biomarker and the potential to exploit the UN1 monoclonal antibody (UN1 mAb) to identify aberrant CD43 glycoforms. PMID:24689054

  13. Small Glycosylated Lignin Oligomers Are Stored in Arabidopsis Leaf Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Dima, Oana; Morreel, Kris; Vanholme, Bartel; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Boerjan, Wout

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is an aromatic polymer derived from the combinatorial coupling of monolignol radicals in the cell wall. Recently, various glycosylated lignin oligomers have been revealed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Given that monolignol oxidation and monolignol radical coupling are known to occur in the apoplast, and glycosylation in the cytoplasm, it raises questions about the subcellular localization of glycosylated lignin oligomer biosynthesis and their storage. By metabolite profiling of Arabidopsis leaf vacuoles, we show that the leaf vacuole stores a large number of these small glycosylated lignin oligomers. Their structural variety and the incorporation of alternative monomers, as observed in Arabidopsis mutants with altered monolignol biosynthesis, indicate that they are all formed by combinatorial radical coupling. In contrast to the common believe that combinatorial coupling is restricted to the apoplast, we hypothesized that the aglycones of these compounds are made within the cell. To investigate this, leaf protoplast cultures were cofed with 13C6-labeled coniferyl alcohol and a 13C4-labeled dimer of coniferyl alcohol. Metabolite profiling of the cofed protoplasts provided strong support for the occurrence of intracellular monolignol coupling. We therefore propose a metabolic pathway involving intracellular combinatorial coupling of monolignol radicals, followed by oligomer glycosylation and vacuolar import, which shares characteristics with both lignin and lignan biosynthesis. PMID:25700483

  14. Systematic screening of glycosylation- and trafficking-associated gene knockouts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies mutants with improved heterologous exocellulase activity and host secretion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As a strong fermentator, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the potential to be an excellent host for ethanol production by consolidated bioprocessing. For this purpose, it is necessary to transform cellulose genes into the yeast genome because it contains no cellulose genes. However, heterologous protein expression in S. cerevisiae often suffers from hyper-glycosylation and/or poor secretion. Thus, there is a need to genetically engineer the yeast to reduce its glycosylation strength and to increase its secretion ability. Results Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene-knockout strains were screened for improved extracellular activity of a recombinant exocellulase (PCX) from the cellulose digesting fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Knockout mutants of 47 glycosylation-related genes and 10 protein-trafficking-related genes were transformed with a PCX expression construct and screened for extracellular cellulase activity. Twelve of the screened mutants were found to have a more than 2-fold increase in extracellular PCX activity in comparison with the wild type. The extracellular PCX activities in the glycosylation-related mnn10 and pmt5 null mutants were, respectively, 6 and 4 times higher than that of the wild type; and the extracellular PCX activities in 9 protein-trafficking-related mutants, especially in the chc1, clc1 and vps21 null mutants, were at least 1.5 times higher than the parental strains. Site-directed mutagenesis studies further revealed that the degree of N-glycosylation also plays an important role in heterologous cellulase activity in S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Systematic screening of knockout mutants of glycosylation- and protein trafficking-associated genes in S. cerevisiae revealed that: (1) blocking Golgi-to-endosome transport may force S. cerevisiae to export cellulases; and (2) both over- and under-glycosylation may alter the enzyme activity of cellulases. This systematic gene-knockout screening approach may serve as a convenient means for

  15. Molecular Determinants of Species Specificity in the Coronavirus Receptor Aminopeptidase N (CD13): Influence of N-Linked Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wentworth, David E.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2001-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN), a 150-kDa metalloprotease also called CD13, serves as a receptor for serologically related coronaviruses of humans (human coronavirus 229E [HCoV-229E]), pigs, and cats. These virus-receptor interactions can be highly species specific; for example, the human coronavirus can use human APN (hAPN) but not porcine APN (pAPN) as its cellular receptor, and porcine coronaviruses can use pAPN but not hAPN. Substitution of pAPN amino acids 283 to 290 into hAPN for the corresponding amino acids 288 to 295 introduced an N-glycosylation sequon at amino acids 291 to 293 that blocked HCoV-229E receptor activity of hAPN. Substitution of two amino acids that inserted an N-glycosylation site at amino acid 291 also resulted in a mutant hAPN that lacked receptor activity because it failed to bind HCoV-229E. Single amino acid revertants that removed this sequon at amino acids 291 to 293 but had one or five pAPN amino acid substitution(s) in this region all regained HCoV-229E binding and receptor activities. To determine if other N-linked glycosylation differences between hAPN, feline APN (fAPN), and pAPN account for receptor specificity of pig and cat coronaviruses, a mutant hAPN protein that, like fAPN and pAPN, lacked a glycosylation sequon at 818 to 820 was studied. This sequon is within the region that determines receptor activity for porcine and feline coronaviruses. Mutant hAPN lacking the sequon at amino acids 818 to 820 maintained HCoV-229E receptor activity but did not gain receptor activity for porcine or feline coronaviruses. Thus, certain differences in glycosylation between coronavirus receptors from different species are critical determinants in the species specificity of infection. PMID:11559807

  16. Acute phase inflammation is characterized by rapid changes in plasma/peritoneal fluid N-glycosylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Yoann; Jónasdóttir, Hulda S; Hipgrave Ederveen, Agnes L; Reiding, Karli R; Jansen, Bas C; Freysdottir, Jona; Hardardottir, Ingibjörg; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Giera, Martin; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Murine zymosan-induced peritonitis is a widely used model for studying the molecular and cellular events responsible for the initiation, persistence and/or resolution of inflammation. Among these events, it is becoming increasingly evident that changes in glycosylation of proteins, especially in the plasma and at the site of inflammation, play an important role in the inflammatory response. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS)-based glycosylation profiling, we investigated the qualitative and quantitative effect of zymosan-induced peritonitis on N-glycosylation in mouse plasma and peritoneal fluid. Our results show that both N-glycomes exhibit highly similar glycosylation patterns, consisting mainly of diantennary and triantennary complex type N-glycans with high levels (>95 %) of galactosylation and sialylation (mostly NeuGc) and a medium degree of core fucosylation (30 %). Moreover, MS/MS structural analysis, assisted by linkage-specific derivatization of sialic acids, revealed the presence of O-acetylated sialic acids as well as disialylated antennae ("branching sialylation") characterized by the presence of α2-6-linked NeuGc on the GlcNAc of the NeuGcα2-3-Galβ1-3-GlcNAc terminal motif. A significant decrease of (core) fucosylation together with an increase of both α2-3-linked NeuGc and "branching sialylation" were observed in N-glycomes of mice challenged with zymosan, but not in control mice injected with PBS. Importantly, substantial changes in glycosylation were already observed 12 h after induction of peritonitis, thereby demonstrating an unexpected velocity of the biological mechanisms involved. PMID:26924641

  17. N-linked glycosylation of N48 is required for equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) function.

    PubMed

    Bicket, Alex; Coe, Imogen R

    2016-08-01

    Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) transports nucleosides and nucleoside analogue drugs across cellular membranes and is necessary for the uptake of many anti-cancer, anti-parasitic and anti-viral drugs. Previous work, and in silico prediction, suggest that hENT1 is glycosylated at Asn(48) in the first extracellular loop of the protein and that glycosylation plays a role in correct localization and function of hENT1. Site-directed mutagenesis of wild-type (wt) hENT1 removed potential glycosylation sites. Constructs (wt 3xFLAG-hENT1, N48Q-3xFLAG-hENT1 or N288Q-3xFLAG-hENT2) were transiently transfected into HEK293 cells and cell lysates were treated with or without peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F), followed by immunoblotting analysis. Substitution of N48 prevents hENT1 glycosylation, confirming a single N-linked glycosylation site. N48Q-hENT1 protein is found at the plasma membrane in HEK293 cells but at lower levels compared with wt hENT1 based on S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI) binding analysis (wt 3xFLAG-ENT1 Bmax, 41.5±2.9 pmol/mg protein; N48Q-3xFLAG-ENT1 Bmax, 13.5±0.45 pmol/mg protein) and immunofluorescence microscopy. Although present at the membrane, chloroadenosine transport assays suggest that N48Q-hENT1 is non-functional (wt 3xFLAG-ENT1, 170.80±44.01 pmol/mg protein; N48Q-3xFLAG-ENT1, 57.91±17.06 pmol/mg protein; mock-transfected 74.31±19.65 pmol/mg protein). Co-immunoprecipitation analyses suggest that N48Q ENT1 is unable to interact with self or with wt hENT1. Based on these data we propose that glycosylation at N48 is critical for the localization, function and oligomerization of hENT1. PMID:27480168

  18. N-linked glycosylation of N48 is required for equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) function

    PubMed Central

    Bicket, Alex; Coe, Imogen R.

    2016-01-01

    Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) transports nucleosides and nucleoside analogue drugs across cellular membranes and is necessary for the uptake of many anti-cancer, anti-parasitic and anti-viral drugs. Previous work, and in silico prediction, suggest that hENT1 is glycosylated at Asn48 in the first extracellular loop of the protein and that glycosylation plays a role in correct localization and function of hENT1. Site-directed mutagenesis of wild-type (wt) hENT1 removed potential glycosylation sites. Constructs (wt 3xFLAG-hENT1, N48Q-3xFLAG-hENT1 or N288Q-3xFLAG-hENT2) were transiently transfected into HEK293 cells and cell lysates were treated with or without peptide–N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F), followed by immunoblotting analysis. Substitution of N48 prevents hENT1 glycosylation, confirming a single N-linked glycosylation site. N48Q-hENT1 protein is found at the plasma membrane in HEK293 cells but at lower levels compared with wt hENT1 based on S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI) binding analysis (wt 3xFLAG-ENT1 Bmax, 41.5±2.9 pmol/mg protein; N48Q-3xFLAG-ENT1 Bmax, 13.5±0.45 pmol/mg protein) and immunofluorescence microscopy. Although present at the membrane, chloroadenosine transport assays suggest that N48Q-hENT1 is non-functional (wt 3xFLAG-ENT1, 170.80±44.01 pmol/mg protein; N48Q-3xFLAG-ENT1, 57.91±17.06 pmol/mg protein; mock-transfected 74.31±19.65 pmol/mg protein). Co-immunoprecipitation analyses suggest that N48Q ENT1 is unable to interact with self or with wt hENT1. Based on these data we propose that glycosylation at N48 is critical for the localization, function and oligomerization of hENT1. PMID:27480168

  19. Comparison of pectin-degrading fungal communities in temperate forests using glycosyl hydrolase family 28 pectinase primers targeting Ascomycete fungi.

    PubMed

    Gacura, Matthew D; Sprockett, Daniel D; Heidenreich, Bess; Blackwood, Christopher B

    2016-04-01

    Fungi have developed a wide assortment of enzymes to break down pectin, a prevalent polymer in plant cell walls that is important in plant defense and structure. One enzyme family used to degrade pectin is the glycosyl hydrolase family 28 (GH28). In this study we developed primers for the amplification of GH28 coding genes from a database of 293 GH28 sequences from 40 fungal genomes. The primers were used to successfully amplify GH28 pectinases from all Ascomycota cultures tested, but only three out of seven Basidiomycota cultures. In addition, we further tested the primers in PCRs on metagenomic DNA extracted from senesced tree leaves from different forest ecosystems, followed by cloning and sequencing. Taxonomic specificity for Ascomycota GH28 genes was tested by comparing GH28 composition in leaves to internal transcribed spacer (ITS) amplicon composition using pyrosequencing. All sequences obtained from GH28 primers were classified as Ascomycota; in contrast, ITS sequences indicated that fungal communities were up to 39% Basidiomycetes. Analysis of leaf samples indicated that both forest stand and ecosystem type were important in structuring fungal communities. However, site played the prominent role in explaining GH28 composition, whereas ecosystem type was more important for ITS composition, indicating possible genetic drift between populations of fungi. Overall, these primers will have utility in understanding relationships between fungal community composition and ecosystem processes, as well as detection of potentially pathogenic Ascomycetes. PMID:26899925

  20. Comparison of pectin-degrading fungal communities in temperate forests using glycosyl hydrolase family 28 pectinase primers targeting Ascomycete fungi

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gacura, Matthew D.; Sprockett, Daniel D.; Heidenreich, Bess; Blackwood, Christopher B.

    2016-02-17

    Here, fungi have developed a wide assortment of enzymes to break down pectin, a prevalent polymer in plant cell walls that is important in plant defense and structure. One enzyme family used to degrade pectin is the glycosyl hydrolase family 28 (GH28). In this studywe developed primers for the amplification of GH28 coding genes from a database of 293 GH28 sequences from40 fungal genomes. The primerswere used to successfully amplify GH28 pectinases from all Ascomycota cultures tested, but only three out of seven Basidiomycota cultures. In addition, we further tested the primers in PCRs on metagenomic DNA extracted from senescedmore » tree leaves from different forest ecosystems, followed by cloning and sequencing. Taxonomic specificity for Ascomycota GH28 genes was tested by comparing GH28 composition in leaves to internal transcribed spacer (ITS) amplicon composition using pyrosequencing. All sequences obtained from GH28 primers were classified as Ascomycota; in contrast, ITS sequences indicated that fungal communitieswere up to 39% Basidiomycetes. Analysis of leaf samples indicated that both forest stand and ecosystemtype were important in structuring fungal communities. However, site played the prominent role in explaining GH28 composition, whereas ecosystem type was more important for ITS composition, indicating possible genetic drift between populations of fungi. Overall, these primers will have utility in understanding relationships between fungal community composition and ecosystem processes, as well as detection of potentially pathogenic Ascomycetes.« less

  1. Structure and Mutagenesis of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Domains Evidence for Flexibility in the Placement of Polysialic Acid Attachment Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Deirdre A.; Swartzentruber, Kristin G.; Lavie, Arnon; Colley, Karen J.

    2010-11-09

    The addition of {alpha}2,8-polysialic acid to the N-glycans of the neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is critical for brain development and plays roles in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, neuronal regeneration, and the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. Our previous work indicates that the polysialylation of two N-glycans located on the fifth immunoglobulin domain (Ig5) of NCAM requires the presence of specific sequences in the adjacent fibronectin type III repeat (FN1). To understand the relationship of these two domains, we have solved the crystal structure of the NCAM Ig5-FN1 tandem. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals that the sites of Ig5 polysialylation are on the opposite face from the FN1 residues previously found to be critical for N-glycan polysialylation, suggesting that the Ig5-FN1 domain relationship may be flexible and/or that there is flexibility in the placement of Ig5 glycosylation sites for polysialylation. To test the latter possibility, new Ig5 glycosylation sites were engineered and their polysialylation tested. We observed some flexibility in glycosylation site location for polysialylation and demonstrate that the lack of polysialylation of a glycan attached to Asn-423 may be in part related to a lack of terminal processing. The data also suggest that, although the polysialyltransferases do not require the Ig5 domain for NCAM recognition, their ability to engage with this domain is necessary for polysialylation to occur on Ig5 N-glycans.

  2. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Henrique O; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Catarina; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients' response to therapy. PMID:27409642

  3. Reaction of phosphorylated and O-glycosylated peptides by chemically targeted identification at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Rusnak, Felicia; Zhou, Jie; Hathaway, Gary M

    2004-12-01

    Conditions for carrying out chemically targeted identification of peptides containing phosphorylated or glycosylated serine residues have been investigated. Ba(OH)2 was used at ambient temperature to catalyze the beta-elimination reaction at 25 degrees C. Nucleophilic addition of 2-aminoethanethiol was performed in both parallel and tandem experiments. The method was demonstrated by the reaction of beta-casein tryptic digest phosphopeptides and an O-glycosylated peptide. Contrary to an earlier report by others, the glycopeptide was found to react with essentially the same kinetics as phosphopeptides. Conversion of four phosphoserines in residues 15, 17, 18, and 19 from bovine beta-casein N-terminal tryptic phosphopeptides were followed by monitoring the time course of the addition reaction. The chemistry proceeded rapidly at room temperature with a half-reaction time of 15 min. No side-reaction products were observed; however, care was taken to minimize all counter ions that either precipitate barium or neutralize the base. Digestion of the converted peptides with lysine endopeptidase identified all five phosphoserines in the beta-casein tryptic digest. Alternatively, preincubation with base followed by nucleophilic addition of the thiol was found to work satisfactorily. The use of the water-soluble hydrochloride of 2-aminoethanethiol allowed beta-elimination, nucleophilic addition, and desalting to be carried out on a micro C18 reverse phase pipette tip. PMID:15585826

  4. N-glycosylation in Regulation of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Hilary; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein N-glycosylation can influence the nervous system in a variety of ways by affecting functions of glycoproteins involved in nervous system development and physiology. The importance of N-glycans for different aspects of neural development has been well documented. For example, some N-linked carbohydrate structures were found to play key roles in neural cell adhesion and axonal targeting during development. At the same time, the involvement of glycosylation in the regulation of neural physiology remains less understood. Recent studies have implicated N-glycosylation in the regulation of neural transmission, revealing novel roles of glycans in synaptic processes and the control of neural excitability. N-Glycans were found to markedly affect the function of several types of synaptic proteins involved in key steps of synaptic transmission, including neurotransmitter release, reception and uptake. Glycosylation also regulates a number of channel proteins, such as TRP channels that control responses to environmental stimuli and voltage-gated ion channels, the principal determinants of neuronal excitability. Sialylated carbohydrate structures play a particularly prominent part in the modulation of voltage gated ion channels. Sialic acids appear to affect channel functions via several mechanisms, including charge interactions, as well as other interactions that probably engage steric effects and interactions with other molecules. Experiments also indicated that some structural features of glycans can be particularly important for their function. Since glycan structures can vary significantly between different cell types and depends on the metabolic state of the cell, it is important to analyze glycan functions using in vivo approaches. While the complexity of the nervous system and intricacies of glycosylation pathways can create serious obstacles for in vivo experiments in vertebrates, recent studies have indicated that more simple and experimentally

  5. Characterization of N-linked protein glycosylation in Helicobacter pullorum.

    PubMed

    Jervis, Adrian J; Langdon, Rebecca; Hitchen, Paul; Lawson, Andrew J; Wood, Alison; Fothergill, Joanne L; Morris, Howard R; Dell, Anne; Wren, Brendan; Linton, Dennis

    2010-10-01

    The first bacterial N-linked glycosylation system was discovered in Campylobacter jejuni, and the key enzyme involved in the coupling of glycan to asparagine residues within the acceptor sequon of the glycoprotein is the oligosaccharyltransferase PglB. Emerging genome sequence data have revealed that pglB orthologues are present in a subset of species from the Deltaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, including three Helicobacter species: H. pullorum, H. canadensis, and H. winghamensis. In contrast to C. jejuni, in which a single pglB gene is located within a larger gene cluster encoding the enzymes required for the biosynthesis of the N-linked glycan, these Helicobacter species contain two unrelated pglB genes (pglB1 and pglB2), neither of which is located within a larger locus involved in protein glycosylation. In complementation experiments, the H. pullorum PglB1 protein, but not PglB2, was able to transfer C. jejuni N-linked glycan onto an acceptor protein in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the characterized C. jejuni N-glycosylation system with an in vitro oligosaccharyltransferase assay followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry demonstrated the utility of this approach, and when applied to H. pullorum, PglB1-dependent N glycosylation with a linear pentasaccharide was observed. This reaction required an acidic residue at the -2 position of the N-glycosylation sequon, as for C. jejuni. Attempted insertional knockout mutagenesis of the H. pullorum pglB2 gene was unsuccessful, suggesting that it is essential. These first data on N-linked glycosylation in a second bacterial species demonstrate the similarities to, and fundamental differences from, the well-studied C. jejuni system. PMID:20581208

  6. N-glycosylation of cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana: impacts on host stress response, production yield and vaccine potential.

    PubMed

    Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Kouokam, J Calvin; Jurkiewicz, Jessica M; Nelson, Bailey; Moore, Lauren J; Husk, Adam S; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based transient overexpression systems enable rapid and scalable production of subunit vaccines. Previously, we have shown that cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), an oral cholera vaccine antigen, is N-glycosylated upon expression in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana. Here, we found that overexpression of aglycosylated CTB by agroinfiltration of a tobamoviral vector causes massive tissue necrosis and poor accumulation unless retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the re-introduction of N-glycosylation to its original or an alternative site significantly relieved the necrosis and provided a high CTB yield without ER retention. Quantitative gene expression analysis of PDI, BiP, bZIP60, SKP1, 26Sα proteasome and PR1a, and the detection of ubiquitinated CTB polypeptides revealed that N-glycosylation significantly relieved ER stress and hypersensitive response, and facilitated the folding/assembly of CTB. The glycosylated CTB (gCTB) was characterized for potential vaccine use. Glycan profiling revealed that gCTB contained approximately 38% plant-specific glycans. gCTB retained nanomolar affinity to GM1-ganglioside with only marginal reduction of physicochemical stability and induced an anti-cholera holotoxin antibody response comparable to native CTB in a mouse oral immunization study. These findings demonstrated gCTB's potential as an oral immunogen and point to a potential role of N-glycosylation in increasing recombinant protein yields in plants. PMID:25614217

  7. N-Glycosylation of cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana: impacts on host stress response, production yield and vaccine potential

    PubMed Central

    Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Kouokam, J. Calvin; Jurkiewicz, Jessica M.; Nelson, Bailey; Moore, Lauren J.; Husk, Adam S.; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based transient overexpression systems enable rapid and scalable production of subunit vaccines. Previously, we have shown that cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), an oral cholera vaccine antigen, is N-glycosylated upon expression in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana. Here, we found that overexpression of aglycosylated CTB by agroinfiltration of a tobamoviral vector causes massive tissue necrosis and poor accumulation unless retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the re-introduction of N-glycosylation to its original or an alternative site significantly relieved the necrosis and provided a high CTB yield without ER retention. Quantitative gene expression analysis of PDI, BiP, bZIP60, SKP1, 26Sα proteasome and PR1a, and the detection of ubiquitinated CTB polypeptides revealed that N-glycosylation significantly relieved ER stress and hypersensitive response, and facilitated the folding/assembly of CTB. The glycosylated CTB (gCTB) was characterized for potential vaccine use. Glycan profiling revealed that gCTB contained approximately 38% plant-specific glycans. gCTB retained nanomolar affinity to GM1-ganglioside with only marginal reduction of physicochemical stability and induced an anti-cholera holotoxin antibody response comparable to native CTB in a mouse oral immunization study. These findings demonstrated gCTB's potential as an oral immunogen and point to a potential role of N-glycosylation in increasing recombinant protein yields in plants. PMID:25614217

  8. Purification of the extracellular domain of the membrane protein GlialCAM expressed in HEK and CHO cells and comparison of the glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Jean-Philippe; Arod, Christian; Sauvage, Christophe; Busso, Stephane; Dupraz, Philippe; Pankiewicz, Renata; Antonsson, Bruno

    2008-03-01

    Adhesion molecules are essential for a wide range of biological and physiological functions, including cell-cell interactions, cell interactions with the extracellular matrix, cell migration, proliferation and survival. Defects in cell adhesion have been associated with pathological conditions such as neoplasia, and neurodegenerative diseases. We have identified a new adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin family, GlialCAM. The same protein was recently published under the name hepaCAM and was suggested to be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we have expressed and purified the extracellular domain of this molecule in two mammalian expression systems, HEK and CHO cells. A three step purification protocol gave an over 95% pure protein. The extracellular domain of GlialCAM possesses several potential N- and O-glycosylation sites. Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications of secreted proteins and of the extracellular domains of membrane bound proteins. It can influence both the activity and the stability of the protein. The glycosylation pattern has been shown to depend on the cell type where the protein is expressed. We examined if differences in the glycosylation of this protein could be detected when it was expressed in the two commonly used mammalian expression systems, HEK and CHO. Differences in the glycosylation were detected. PMID:18082421

  9. Two-Dimensional Gel Based Approaches for the Assessment of N-Linked and O-GlcNAc Glycosylation in Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David R. M.; Mitsak, Megan J.; Elliott, Steven T.; Chen, Dawn; Whelan, Steven A.; Hart, Gerald W.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2009-01-01

    The glycosylation state of envelope glycoproteins in Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV/SIV) is critical to viral infectivity and tropism, viral protein processing, and in virus evasion of the immune system. Using a rapid fluorescent two-dimensional gel based method coupled with enzymatic pre-treatment of virus with PNGase F (Peptide: N-Glycosidase F) and fluorescent 2D gels or 2D gel Western blotting, we show significant differences in the glycosylation patterns of two SIV strains widely used in animal models of HIV disease and vaccine studies. We also demonstrate the modification of a host protein important in HIV biology (HLA-DR) by O-GlcNAc. Further, this experimental pipeline allows for the identification of the modified protein and the site of N-linked glycosylation by fluorescent two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) and the qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of viral glycosylation. The method is fully compatible with downstream glycomics analysis. This approach will permit correlation of virus glycosylation status with pathological severity and may serve as a rapid screen of viruses from physiological samples for further study by more advanced MS methodology. PMID:19072736

  10. The Structural Biology of Enzymes Involved in Natural Product Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shanteri; Phillips, George N.

    2012-01-01

    The glycosylation of microbial natural products often dramatically influences the biological and/or pharmacological activities of the parental metabolite. Over the past decade, crystal structures of several enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and attachment of novel sugars found appended to natural products have emerged. In many cases, these studies have paved the way to a better understanding of the corresponding enzyme mechanism of action and have served as a starting point for engineering variant enzymes to facilitate to production of differentially-glycosylated natural products. This review specifically summarizes the structural studies of bacterial enzymes involved in biosynthesis of novel sugar nucleotides. PMID:22688446

  11. Assembly of naturally occurring glycosides, evolved tactics, and glycosylation methods.

    PubMed

    Yu, Biao; Sun, Jiansong; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2012-08-21

    Glycosylation of proteins and lipids is critical to many life processes. Secondary metabolites (or natural products), such as flavonoids, steroids, triterpenes, and antibiotics, are also frequently modified with saccharides. The resulting glycosides include diverse structures and functions, and some of them have pharmacological significance. The saccharide portions of the glycosides often have specific structural characteristics that depend on the aglycones. These molecules also form heterogeneous "glycoform" mixtures where molecules have similar glycosidic linkages but the saccharides vary in the length and type of monosaccharide unit. Thus, it is difficult to purify homogeneous glycosides in appreciable amounts from natural sources. Chemical synthesis provides a feasible access to the homogeneous glycosides and their congeners. Synthesis of a glycoside involves the synthesis of the aglycone, the saccharide, the connection of these two parts, and the overall manipulation of protecting groups. However, most synthetic efforts to date have focused on the aglycones, treating the attachment of saccharides onto the aglycones as a dispensable topic. The synthesis of the aglycone and the synthesis of the saccharide belong to two independent categories of chemistry, and different types of the aglycones and saccharides pose as specific synthetic subjects in their own disciplines. The only reaction that integrates the broad chemistry of glycoside synthesis is the glycosidic bond formation between the saccharide and the aglycone. Focusing on this glycosylation reaction in this Account, we string together our experience with the synthesis of the naturally occurring glycosides. We briefly describe the synthesis of 18 glycosides, including glycolipids, phenolic glycosides, steroid glycosides, and triterpene glycosides. Each molecule represents a prototypical structure of a family of the natural glycosides with interesting biological activities, and we emphasize the general

  12. Human Milk Bacterial and Glycosylation Patterns Differ by Delivery Mode.

    PubMed

    Hoashi, Marina; Meche, Lawrence; Mahal, Lara K; Bakacs, Elizabeth; Nardella, Deanna; Naftolin, Frederick; Bar-Yam, Naomi; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2016-07-01

    Mammals have evolved to nourish their offspring exclusively with maternal milk for around half of the lactation period, a crucial developmental window. In view of oral-breast contact during lactation and the differences in oral microbiota between cesarean section (C-section) and vaginally delivered infants, we expected differences in milk composition by delivery mode. We performed a cross-sectional study of banked human milk and found changes related to time since delivery in bacterial abundance and glycosylation patterns only in milk from women who delivered vaginally. The results warrant further research into the effects of delivery mode on milk microbes, milk glycosylation, and postpartum infant development. PMID:26711314

  13. Residual laminin-binding activity and enhanced dystroglycan glycosylation by LARGE in novel model mice to dystroglycanopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kanagawa, Motoi; Nishimoto, Akemi; Chiyonobu, Tomohiro; Takeda, Satoshi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Wang, Fan; Fujikake, Nobuhiro; Taniguchi, Mariko; Lu, Zhongpeng; Tachikawa, Masaji; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Tajima, Youichi; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Endo, Tamao; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Campbell, Kevin P.; Toda, Tatsushi

    2009-01-01

    Hypoglycosylation and reduced laminin-binding activity of α-dystroglycan are common characteristics of dystroglycanopathy, which is a group of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), caused by a mutation in the fukutin gene, is a severe form of dystroglycanopathy. A retrotransposal insertion in fukutin is seen in almost all cases of FCMD. To better understand the molecular pathogenesis of dystroglycanopathies and to explore therapeutic strategies, we generated knock-in mice carrying the retrotransposal insertion in the mouse fukutin ortholog. Knock-in mice exhibited hypoglycosylated α-dystroglycan; however, no signs of muscular dystrophy were observed. More sensitive methods detected minor levels of intact α-dystroglycan, and solid-phase assays determined laminin binding levels to be ∼50% of normal. In contrast, intact α-dystroglycan is undetectable in the dystrophic Largemyd mouse, and laminin-binding activity is markedly reduced. These data indicate that a small amount of intact α-dystroglycan is sufficient to maintain muscle cell integrity in knock-in mice, suggesting that the treatment of dystroglycanopathies might not require the full recovery of glycosylation. To examine whether glycosylation defects can be restored in vivo, we performed mouse gene transfer experiments. Transfer of fukutin into knock-in mice restored glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. In addition, transfer of LARGE produced laminin-binding forms of α-dystroglycan in both knock-in mice and the POMGnT1 mutant mouse, which is another model of dystroglycanopathy. Overall, these data suggest that even partial restoration of α-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin-binding activity by replacing or augmenting glycosylation-related genes might effectively deter dystroglycanopathy progression and thus provide therapeutic benefits. PMID:19017726

  14. Detailed functional characterization of glycosylated and nonglycosylated variants of malaria vaccine candidate PfAMA1 produced in Nicotiana benthamiana and analysis of growth inhibitory responses in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Boes, Alexander; Spiegel, Holger; Edgue, Gueven; Kapelski, Stephanie; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Fendel, Rolf; Remarque, Edmond; Altmann, Friedrich; Maresch, Daniel; Reimann, Andreas; Pradel, Gabriele; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-02-01

    One of the most promising malaria vaccine candidate antigens is the Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1). Several studies have shown that this blood-stage antigen can induce strong parasite growth inhibitory antibody responses. PfAMA1 contains up to six recognition sites for N-linked glycosylation, a post-translational modification that is absent in P. falciparum. To prevent any potential negative impact of N-glycosylation, the recognition sites have been knocked out in most PfAMA1 variants expressed in eukaryotic hosts. However, N-linked glycosylation may increase efficacy by improving immunogenicity and/or focusing the response towards relevant epitopes by glycan masking. We describe the production of glycosylated and nonglycosylated PfAMA1 in Nicotiana benthamiana and its detailed characterization in terms of yield, integrity and protective efficacy. Both PfAMA1 variants accumulated to high levels (>510 μg/g fresh leaf weight) after transient expression, and high-mannose-type N-glycans were confirmed for the glycosylated variant. No significant differences between the N. benthamiana and Pichia pastoris PfAMA1 variants were detected in conformation-sensitive ligand-binding studies. Specific titres of >2 × 10(6) were induced in rabbits, and strong reactivity with P. falciparum schizonts was observed in immunofluorescence assays, as well as up to 100% parasite growth inhibition for both variants, with IC₅₀ values of ~35 μg/mL. Competition assays indicated that a number of epitopes were shielded from immune recognition by N-glycans, warranting further studies to determine how glycosylation can be used for the directed targeting of immune responses. These results highlight the potential of plant transient expression systems as a production platform for vaccine candidates. PMID:25236489

  15. Changes in Saliva Rheological Properties and Mucin Glycosylation in Dry Mouth.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, N M A; Shirlaw, P; Pramanik, R; Carpenter, G H; Proctor, G B

    2015-12-01

    Saliva is vital for the maintenance of normal oral physiology and mucosal health. The loss of salivary function can have far-reaching consequences, as observed with dry mouth, which is associated with increased orodental disease, speech impairment, dysphagia, and a significant negative effect on quality of life. The timely diagnosis of oral dryness is vital for the management of orodental disease and any associated often-undiagnosed systemic disease (e.g., Sjögren syndrome). Our aim was to investigate differences in mucin glycoproteins and saliva rheological properties between sufferers and nonsufferers of dry mouth in order to understand the relationship between saliva composition, rheological properties, and dryness perception and provide additional potential diagnostic markers. All patients exhibited objective and subjective oral dryness, irrespective of etiology. Over half of the patients (n = 20, 58.8%) had a saliva secretion rate above the gland dysfunction cutoff of 0.1 mL/min. Mucin (MUC5B and MUC7) concentrations were generally similar or higher in patients. Despite the abundance of these moisture-retaining proteins, patients exhibited reduced mucosal hydration (wetness) and significantly lower saliva spinnbarkeit (stringiness), suggesting a loss of the lubricating and retention/adhesion properties of saliva, which, at least partially, are associated with mucin glycoproteins. Over 90% of patients with dry mouth (DMPs) consistently had unstimulated whole mouth saliva (UWMS) spinnbarkeit below the proposed normal cutoff (10 mm). Further analysis of mucins revealed the reduced glycosylation of mucins in DMPs compared to healthy controls. Our data indicate that UWMS mucin concentrations are not reduced in dry mouth but that the mucin structure (glycosylation) is altered. UWMS from DMPs had reduced spinnbarkeit, the assessment of which, in conjunction with sialometry, could improve sensitivity for the diagnosis of dry mouth. Additionally, it may be useful to

  16. Glycosylation is essential for translocation of carp retinol-binding protein across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Gaetani, Sancia; Apreda, Marianna; Bellovino, Diana . E-mail: bellovino@inran.it

    2005-07-01

    Retinoid transport is well characterized in many vertebrates, while it is still largely unexplored in fish. To study the transport and utilization of vitamin A in these organisms, we have isolated from a carp liver cDNA library retinol-binding protein, its plasma carrier. The primary structure of carp retinol-binding protein is very conserved, but presents unique features compared to those of the correspondent proteins isolated and characterized so far in other species: it has an uncleavable signal peptide and two N-glycosylation sites in the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the protein that are glycosylated in vivo. In this paper, we have investigated the function of the carbohydrate chains, by constructing three mutants deprived of the first, the second or both carbohydrates. The results of transient transfection of wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein in Cos cells followed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis have shown that the absence of both carbohydrate moieties blocks secretion, while the presence of one carbohydrate group leads to an inefficient secretion. Experiments of carp RBP mRNA in vitro translation in a reticulocyte cell-free system in the presence of microsomes have demonstrated that N-glycosylation is necessary for efficient translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Moreover, when Cos cells were transiently transfected with wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein (aa 1-67)-green fluorescent protein fusion constructs and semi-permeabilized with streptolysin O, immunofluorescence analysis with anti-green fluorescent protein antibody revealed that the double mutant is exposed to the cytosol, thus confirming the importance of glycan moieties in the translocation process.

  17. Macro- and Micro-heterogeneity in Pituitary and Urinary Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Bousfield, George R.; Butnev, Vladimir Y.; Rueda-Santos, Monica A.; Brown, Alan; Hall, Aaron Smalter; Harvey, David J.

    2015-01-01

    FSH glycosylation macroheterogeneity in pituitary and urinary hFSH samples was evaluated by Western blotting. Microheterogeneity in two highly purified urinary and pituitary hFSH preparations was evaluated by nano-electrospray mass spectrometry of peptide-N-glycanase-released oligosaccharides. An age-related loss of hypo-glycosylated hFSH in individual female pituitaries was indicated by progressively reduced abundance of hFSH21 relative to hFSH24. Urinary hFSH was evaluated as a potentially non-invasive indicator of glycoform abundance, as the only way for pituitary FSH to reach the urine is through the blood. Both highly purified and crude postmenopausal urinary hFSH preparations possessed the same amount of hFSH21 as postmenopausal pituitary gland FSH. Considerable microheterogeneity was encountered in both pituitary and urinary hFSH glycan populations, as 84 pituitary hFSH glycan ions were observed as compared with 68 urinary hFSH glycans. The biggest quantitative differences between the two populations were reduced abundance of bisecting GlcNAc-containing and fucosylated glycans, along with s