Science.gov

Sample records for additional hazardous materials

  1. Hazardous materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... for words like: Acid Alkali Carcinogenic Caution Corrosive Danger Explosive Flammable Irritant Radioactive Unstable Warning A label ... leak occurs What to do if there is danger from the material mixing with other substances How ...

  2. Hazardous materials dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Parallel growth of the chemical industry of emergency response capabilities in the public and private sectors has created a new need for improved communications. A new vocabulary of important terms is emerging in each of the industries that transport, store and handle hazardous materials. This dictionary, representing a compilation of words and phrases from many relevant sources, will help document and standardize the nomenclature of hazardous materials. The authors have screened the technical discourse of the chemical, transportation, petroleum and medical fields, both governmental and private, to determine the most current expressions and their uses. The lexicographic goal has been to identify key terms, ambiguous and multiple meaning words, acronyms, symbols and even slang referring to hazardous materials reactions, storing and handling procedures.

  3. Hazardous-Materials Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Henry W.; Edmonds, Gary O.

    1995-01-01

    Remotely controlled mobile robot used to locate, characterize, identify, and eventually mitigate incidents involving hazardous-materials spills/releases. Possesses number of innovative features, allowing it to perform mission-critical functions such as opening and unlocking doors and sensing for hazardous materials. Provides safe means for locating and identifying spills and eliminates risks of injury associated with use of manned entry teams. Current version of vehicle, called HAZBOT III, also features unique mechanical and electrical design enabling vehicle to operate safely within combustible atmosphere.

  4. Managing Academe's Hazardous Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Fay

    1991-01-01

    Those responsible for planning and management of colleges and universities must plan comprehensively for hazardous waste disposal. Federal and state regulations are increasing, landfill area is becoming scarce, and incineration costs are rising fast. High-level institutional commitment to a sound campus environment policy is essential. (MSE)

  5. 78 FR 42998 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials, Safety Administration (PHMSA... participate in a public meeting addressing the transportation of hazardous materials by rail. FRA and......

  6. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being

  7. Hazardous materials package performance regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N. A.; Glass, R. E.; McClure, J. D.; Finley, N. C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a hazardous materials Hazmat Packaging Performance Evaluation (HPPE) project being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Transportation Research Special Programs Administration (DOT-RSPA) to look at the subset of bulk packagings that are larger than 2000 gallons. The objectives of this project are to evaluate current hazmat specification packagings and develop supporting documentation for determining performance requirements for packagings in excess of 2000 gallons that transport hazardous materials that have been classified as extremely toxic by inhalation (METBI).

  8. Transportation of Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-02-28

    This report documents the Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment (EPHA) for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (THM) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). This hazards assessment is intended to identify and analyze those transportation hazards significant enough to warrant consideration in the SRS Emergency Management Program.

  9. Hazardous Material Packaging and Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Hypes, Philip A.

    2016-02-04

    This is a student training course. Some course objectives are to: recognize and use standard international and US customary units to describe activities and exposure rates associated with radioactive material; determine whether a quantity of a single radionuclide meets the definition of a class 7 (radioactive) material; determine, for a given single radionuclide, the shipping quantity activity limits per 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 173.435; determine the appropriate radioactive material hazard class proper shipping name for a given material; determine when a single radionuclide meets the DOT definition of a hazardous substance; determine the appropriate packaging required for a given radioactive material; identify the markings to be placed on a package of radioactive material; determine the label(s) to apply to a given radioactive material package; identify the entry requirements for radioactive material labels; determine the proper placement for radioactive material label(s); identify the shipping paper entry requirements for radioactive material; select the appropriate placards for a given radioactive material shipment or vehicle load; and identify allowable transport limits and unacceptable transport conditions for radioactive material.

  10. Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

  11. 76 FR 65779 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... Center, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of...

  12. 76 FR 2950 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, ] additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... Center, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of...

  13. Robots Working with Hazardous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amai, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.

    1999-01-06

    While many research and development activities take place at Sandia National Laboratories' Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC), where the "rubber meets the road" is in the ISRC'S delivered systems. The ISRC has delivered several systems over the last few years that handle hazardous materials on a daily basis, and allow human workers to move to a safer, supervisory role than the "hands-on" operations that they used to perform. The ISRC at Sandia performs a large range of research and development activities, including development and delivery of one-of-a-kind robotic systems for use with hazardous materials. Our mission is to create systems for operations where people can't or don't want to perform the operations by hand, and the systems described in this article are several of our first-of-a-kind deliveries to achieve that mission.

  14. Navy Shipboard Hazardous Material Minimization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberich, M.J.; Robinson, P.; Chastain, B.

    1994-12-31

    The use of hazardous (and potentially hazardous) materials in shipboard cleaning applications has proliferated as new systems and equipments have entered the fleet to reside alongside existing equipments. With the growing environmental awareness (and additional, more restrictive regulations) at all levels/echelon commands of the DoD, the Navy has initiated a proactive program to undertake the minimization/elimination of these hazardous materials in order to eliminate HMs at the source. This paper will focus on the current Shipboard Hazardous Materials Minimization Program initiatives including the identification of authorized HM currently used onboard, identification of potential substitute materials for HM replacement, identification of new cleaning technologies and processes/procedures, and identification of technical documents which will require revision to eliminate the procurement of HMs into the federal supply system. Also discussed will be the anticipated path required to implement the changes into the fleet and automated decision processes (substitution algorithm) currently employed. The paper will also present the most recent technologies identified for approval or additional testing and analysis including: supercritical CO{sub 2} cleaning, high pressure blasting (H{sub 2}O + baking soda), aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning materials and processes, solvent replacements and dedicated parts washing systems with internal filtering capabilities, automated software for solvent/cleaning process substitute selection. Along with these technological advances, data availability (from on-line databases and CDROM Database libraries) will be identified and discussed.

  15. NASA LaRC Hazardous Material Pharmacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esquenet, Remy

    1995-01-01

    In 1993-1994 the Office of Environmental Engineering contracted SAIC to develop NASA Langley's Pollution Prevention (P2) Program. One of the priority projects identified in this contract was the development of a hazardous waste minimization (HAZMIN)/hazardous materials reutilization (HAZMART) program in the form of a Hazardous Materials Pharmacy. A hazardous materials pharmacy is designed to reduce hazardous material procurement costs and hazardous waste disposal costs. This is accomplished through the collection and reissue of excess hazardous material. Currently, a rarely used hazardous material may be stored in a shop area, unused, until it passes its expiration date. The material is then usually disposed of as a hazardous waste, often at a greater expense than the original cost of the material. While this material was on the shelf expiring, other shop areas may have ordered new supplies of the same material. The hazardous material pharmacy would act as a clearinghouse for such materials. Material that is not going to be used would be turned in to the pharmacy. Other users could then be issued this material free of charge, thereby reducing procurement costs. The use of this material by another shop prevents it from expiring, thereby reducing hazardous waste disposal costs.

  16. Hazardous material replacement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Guttridge, A.H.

    1993-09-01

    Methyl dianiline (MDA) is one of the components used in potting of electronic assemblies at Allied Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). MDA is a liver toxin and a suspected carcinogen. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of hazardous materials as much as technically feasible. This project was initiated to find alternatives to the MDA foam system. The project plan was to verify that the new materials developed by expert groups within the DOE nuclear weapons complex, such as the Organic Materials Group, would meet the unique requirements of the assemblies fabricated in the Electronic Products Manufacturing Building (EPMB) at KCD. The work was discontinued when associates assigned to the project were transferred to higher priority projects.

  17. 78 FR 69310 - Hazardous Materials Table, Special Provisions, Hazardous Materials Communications, Emergency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 Hazardous Materials Table, Special Provisions, Hazardous Materials Communications, Emergency Response Information, Training Requirements, and... of October 1, 2012, on page 242, in Sec. 172.101, in the Hazardous Materials Table, in the entry...

  18. 77 FR 21714 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, and 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... A. Leary, Standards and Rulemaking Division, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  19. 78 FR 1119 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, and 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) on the transportation of lithium cells and batteries,...

  20. 78 FR 24309 - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration List of Special Permit Applications Delayed AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: List of Applications Delayed... of Hazardous Materials Special Permits and Approvals, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  1. 76 FR 45332 - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is...

  2. 78 FR 34156 - Hazardous Materials: Emergency Recall Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Hazardous Materials: Emergency Recall Order AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Emergency Recall Order... on May 24, 2013 to The Lite Cylinder Company, Inc. The Office of Hazardous Materials Safety...

  3. 78 FR 18419 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Delayed Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Delayed Applications AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: List of... Paquet, Director, Office of Hazardous Materials Special Permits and Approvals, Pipeline and...

  4. Hazard index for underground toxic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. F.; Cohen, J. J.; McKone, T. E.

    1980-06-01

    Work in the area of hazard indices was reviewed. A geotoxicity hazard index for use in characterizing the hazard of toxic material buried underground is presented. Factors included in this index are: an intrinsic toxicity factor, formulated as the volume of water required for dilution to public drinking water levels; a persistence factor to chracterize the longevity of the material, ranging from unity for stable materials to smaller values for shorter lived materials; an availability factor that relates the transport potential for the particular material to a reference value for its naturally occurring analog; and a correction factor to accommodate the buildup of decay progeny, resulting in increased toxicity.

  5. 76 FR 4276 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 174 Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of Transportation... in this aspect of FRA's hazardous materials program. DATES: The public meeting will be held...

  6. 75 FR 60333 - Hazardous Material; Miscellaneous Packaging Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Hazardous Material; Miscellaneous Packaging Amendments AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... materials packages may be considered a bulk packaging. The September 1, 2006 NPRM definition for ``bulk... erroneously stated Large Packagings would contain hazardous materials without an intermediate packaging,...

  7. 49 CFR 383.121 - Requirements for hazardous materials endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hazardous materials accidents; and (10) Tunnels and railroad crossings. (b) Hazardous materials handling... materials; (3) Emergency procedures; and (4) Existence of special requirements for transporting Class...

  8. 49 CFR 383.121 - Requirements for hazardous materials endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hazardous materials accidents; and (10) Tunnels and railroad crossings. (b) Hazardous materials handling... materials; (3) Emergency procedures; and (4) Existence of special requirements for transporting Class A...

  9. Hazard index for underground toxic material

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.; McKone, T.E.

    1980-06-01

    To adequately define the problem of waste management, quantitative measures of hazard must be used. This study reviews past work in the area of hazard indices and proposes a geotoxicity hazard index for use in characterizing the hazard of toxic material buried underground. Factors included in this index are: an intrinsic toxicity factor, formulated as the volume of water required for dilution to public drinking-water levels; a persistence factor to characterize the longevity of the material, ranging from unity for stable materials to smaller values for shorter-lived materials; an availability factor that relates the transport potential for the particular material to a reference value for its naturally occurring analog; and a correction factor to accommodate the buildup of decay progeny, resulting in increased toxicity.

  10. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-04-05

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  11. Detection device for hazardous material

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chemical with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  12. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-01-01

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  13. NRT-1: Hazardous Materials Planning Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NRT issued Hazardous Materials Emergency Planning Guide (NRT1) in 1987, as required by EPCRA, to provide planning guidance for state and local governments in the development of local emergency response plans.

  14. Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

  15. Hazardous Materials Management Program Report- 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2005-06-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Hazardous Materials Management Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  16. 75 FR 4441 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is...

  17. Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Rofer, Cheryl K.; Buelow, Steven J.; Dyer, Richard B.; Wander, Joseph D.

    1992-01-01

    A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

  18. 49 CFR 174.3 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transportation or transport by rail any shipment of hazardous material that is not in conformance with the... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  19. 77 FR 36607 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... additional hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are... rigid outer packaging capable of passing the Flame Penetration and Resistance Test and the...

  20. Control of Materials Flammability Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Dennis E.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on selecting, using, and configuring spacecraft materials in such a way as to minimize the ability of fire to spread onboard a spacecraft. The presentation gives an overview of the flammability requirements of NASA-STD-6001, listing specific tests and evaluation criteria it requires. The presentation then gives flammability reduction methods for specific spacecraft items and materials.

  1. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  2. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous material. 151.03-30 Section 151.03-30 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part hazardous material means a liquid material or substance that is— (a) Flammable or combustible;...

  3. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hazardous material. 151.03-30 Section 151.03-30 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part hazardous material means a liquid material or substance that is— (a) Flammable or combustible;...

  4. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hazardous material. 151.03-30 Section 151.03-30 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part hazardous material means a liquid material or substance that is— (a) Flammable or combustible;...

  5. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Osterman, Robert A.; Cox, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

  6. 76 FR 37283 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to the List of Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 RIN 2137-AE74 Hazardous... materials under the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101-5128). PHMSA carries out... Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.), which authorizes the......

  7. Environmental Protection for Hazardous Materials Incidents. Volume 1. Hazardous Materials Incident Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    227 9. Cloves ............................................ 2’h 10. Footwear .......................................... 231...Occupational Safety and Health Xvi NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NSN National Stock Number OHM-TADS Oil and Hazardous Materials...8217rechnical Assistance Data Systems OHSPC Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency "ORM Other Regulated Material ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  8. 75 FR 9147 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) in coordination with the Federal...

  9. Nuclear and hazardous material perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, Gary M.; Kunze, Jay F.; Rogers, Vern C.

    2007-07-01

    The reemerging nuclear enterprise in the 21. century empowering the power industry and nuclear technology is still viewed with fear and concern by many of the public and many political leaders. Nuclear phobia is also exhibited by many nuclear professionals. The fears and concerns of these groups are complex and varied, but focus primarily on (1) management and disposal of radioactive waste [especially spent nuclear fuel and low level radioactive waste], (2) radiation exposures at any level, and (3) the threat nuclear terrorism. The root cause of all these concerns is the exaggerated risk perceived to human health from radiation exposure. These risks from radiation exposure are compounded by the universal threat of nuclear weapons and the disastrous consequences if these weapons or materials become available to terrorists or rogue nations. This paper addresses the bases and rationality for these fears and considers methods and options for mitigating these fears. Scientific evidence and actual data are provided. Radiation risks are compared to similar risks from common chemicals and familiar human activities that are routinely accepted. (authors)

  10. 76 FR 43509 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...PHMSA is amending the Hazardous Materials Regulations to make miscellaneous amendments to update and clarify certain regulatory requirements. These amendments are intended to: promote safer transportation practices; eliminate unnecessary regulatory requirements; finalize outstanding petitions for rulemaking; facilitate international commerce; and simplify the regulations. PHMSA anticipates......

  11. 75 FR 60017 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ...PHMSA proposes to make miscellaneous amendments to the Hazardous Materials Regulations to update and clarify certain regulatory requirements. Among other provisions, PHMSA is proposing to add a labeling exception for ``consolidation bins'' to facilitate use of bins as a method of consolidating packages for ease of handling when transported by motor vehicle and to clarify that the definition of......

  12. Hazardous material transportation risks in the Puget Sound Region

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.; Rhoads, R.E.; Franklin, A.L.; Cole, B.M.; Rau, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of a study performed for the Transportation Systems Center (TSC) of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), to determine public safety risks of transporting hazardous material (HM) in the Central Puget Sound Region (CPSR) of Washington State. Results of this study were used in a regional assessment of hazardous material transportation conducted for the Materials Transportation Bureau (MTB) of DOT by the Puget Sound Council of Governments (PSCOG) and the DOT Transportation Systems Center (TSC). Additional hazardous material studies have also been conducted by the DOT in New Orleans, Louisiana, San Francisco, California, Niagara County, New York, Indianapolis, Indiana, Memphis, Tennessee, and the State of Massachusetts. 15 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Transportation of... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous...

  14. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Poisonous hazardous materials. 172.313 Section 172.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS...

  15. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Poisonous hazardous materials. 172.313 Section 172.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS...

  16. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Poisonous hazardous materials. 172.313 Section 172.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS...

  17. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Poisonous hazardous materials. 172.313 Section 172.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS...

  18. 78 FR 60726 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Penalty Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...; Offeror Requirements for specific hazardous materials: Cigarette lighters, Explosives, Radioactive Materials, Compressed Gases in cylinders; Packaging Manufacturers, Drum Manufacturers and Reconditioners..., Hazardous materials transportation, Packaging and containers, Penalties, Reporting and...

  19. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...'s Federal Supply Service (4FQ) maintains an automated data base, accessible via modem and computer... on the terminal screen, the system allows for the addition of the MSDS to the user's local data base... personnel who handle, store, ship, use or dispose of hazardous materials. Each record in the data base...

  20. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...'s Federal Supply Service (4FQ) maintains an automated data base, accessible via modem and computer... on the terminal screen, the system allows for the addition of the MSDS to the user's local data base... personnel who handle, store, ship, use or dispose of hazardous materials. Each record in the data base...

  1. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...'s Federal Supply Service (4FQ) maintains an automated data base, accessible via modem and computer... on the terminal screen, the system allows for the addition of the MSDS to the user's local data base... personnel who handle, store, ship, use or dispose of hazardous materials. Each record in the data base...

  2. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...'s Federal Supply Service (4FQ) maintains an automated data base, accessible via modem and computer... on the terminal screen, the system allows for the addition of the MSDS to the user's local data base... personnel who handle, store, ship, use or dispose of hazardous materials. Each record in the data base...

  3. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that manufacturers identify and document potential hazards on material safety data sheets (MSDSs) as...'s Federal Supply Service (4FQ) maintains an automated data base, accessible via modem and computer... on the terminal screen, the system allows for the addition of the MSDS to the user's local data...

  4. 76 FR 15046 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in..., IN. 180.205. permit to authorize a change in mating sealing surface configuration design....

  5. Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, J.

    1994-12-31

    There are thousands of dangerous situations happening daily in developing countries around the world involving untrained workers and hazardous materials. There are very few if any agencies in developing countries that are charged with ensuring safe and healthful working conditions. In addition to the problem of regulation and enforcement, there are potential training problems due to the level of literacy and degree of scientific background of these workers. Many of these workers are refugees from poorly developed countries who are willing to work no matter what the conditions. Training methods (standards) accepted as state of the art in the United States and other developed countries may not work well under the conditions found in developing countries. Because these methods may not be appropriate, new and novel ways to train workers quickly, precisely and economically in hazardous materials management should be developed. One approach is to develop training programs that use easily recognizable graphics with minimal verbal instruction, programs similar to the type used to teach universal international driving regulations and safety. The program as outlined in this paper could be tailored to any sized plant and any hazardous material handling or exposure situation. The situation in many developing countries is critical, development of simplified training methods for workers exposed to hazardous materials hold valuable market potential and are an opportunity for many underdeveloped countries to develop indigenous expertise in hazardous materials management.

  6. Hazardous materials sensing: An electrical metamaterial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Vaishali; Kitture, Rohini; Kumari, Dimple; Rajesh, Harsh; Banerjee, Shaibal; Kale, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    Metamaterials are recently emerging materials exhibiting amazing properties such as extremely miniaturized antennas, waveguides, optical couplers, multiplexers and filters. Such structures also respond to the variation in their ambient conditions when exposed to toxic and hazardous materials, which are especially hazardous to human health. Through this manuscript, we document our studies on three different high energy materials; namely 2- bromo-2nitropropane-1,3-diol (BNP), bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) malonate (AM) and bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) glutarate (AG). A Complementary Split Ring Resonator has been fabricated at resonant frequency of 4.48 GHz using copper on FR4 substrate. The energetic materials were exposed to the sensor and results were monitored using Vector Network Analyzer. The volume of liquids was varied from 0.5 μL to 3 μL. Prominent and explicit shifts in the transmission resonant frequency and amplitude was seen as a signature of each energetic material. The signatures were not only sensitive to the specific toxic group in the material but also to the volume of the liquid subjected to this sensor. The results are correlated with the simulation results, basic chemistry of the materials and permittivity measurements. The ultra-fast reversibility and repeatability, with good sensitivity and specificity of these devices project their applications in sensitive locations, particularly to combat for human security and health issues.

  7. Coordinated Navy Hazardous Material Substitution Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    the Commerce Business Daily ( CBD ) and unofficial. channels such as the media should be used to the maximum extent possible to get the message to current...01lice ot Mandgement and Budget. Paperwork Aeduction Project (0 104-0188), Washington, DC 2o . . . uianK) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES...COVERED lAugust 1993 Interim Draft 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS C: F33615-89-D-4003 Coordinated Navy Hazardous Material Substitution Order Nr

  8. 41 CFR 101-42.203 - Reassignment of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials. 101-42.203 Section 101-42.203 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.203 Reassignment of hazardous materials....

  9. 41 CFR 101-42.208 - Custody of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials. 101-42.208 Section 101-42.208 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.208 Custody of hazardous materials. Custody...

  10. 41 CFR 101-42.203 - Reassignment of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials. 101-42.203 Section 101-42.203 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.203 Reassignment of hazardous materials....

  11. 41 CFR 101-42.208 - Custody of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials. 101-42.208 Section 101-42.208 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.208 Custody of hazardous materials. Custody...

  12. 77 FR 52636 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to Fireworks Regulations (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    .... Background The requirements for the classification and packaging of Class 1 explosive materials are specified... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 107, 172, and 173 RIN 2137-AE70 Hazardous Materials: Revision to Fireworks Regulations (RRR) AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  13. 49 CFR 383.121 - Requirements for hazardous materials endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... 383.121 Section 383.121 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... REGULATIONS COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE STANDARDS; REQUIREMENTS AND PENALTIES Required Knowledge and Skills...) Hazardous materials regulations including: (1) Hazardous materials table; (2) Shipping paper...

  14. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hazardous materials. 101-42.405 Section 101-42.405 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation...

  15. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hazardous materials. 101-42.405 Section 101-42.405 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation...

  16. 49 CFR 175.3 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. 175.3 Section 175.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations...

  17. 49 CFR 176.3 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. 176.3 Section 176.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General § 176.3 Unacceptable...

  18. 49 CFR 174.3 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. 174.3 Section 174.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY RAIL General Requirements § 174.3...

  19. 77 FR 24885 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ...)(1) permits that the shipping paper for a packaging containing the residue of a hazardous material... the hazardous material last contained in the packaging. Further, the shipping papers for tank cars... paper for a packaging containing the residue of a hazardous material to include the words...

  20. 78 FR 17874 - Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Petitions for Rulemaking (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, 176, 178 RIN 2137-AE79 Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Petitions for Rulemaking (RRR) Correction In rule document 2013-04197.... 172.101 0 On page 14713, the Table titled ``Sec. 172.101 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE'' is corrected...

  1. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  2. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  3. 14 CFR 135.505 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 135.505 Section 135.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.505 Hazardous materials training required. (a)...

  4. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  5. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  6. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  7. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  8. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  9. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  10. 14 CFR 135.505 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 135.505 Section 135.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.505 Hazardous materials training required. (a)...

  11. 14 CFR 135.505 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 135.505 Section 135.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.505 Hazardous materials training required. (a)...

  12. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  13. 14 CFR 135.505 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 135.505 Section 135.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.505 Hazardous materials training required. (a)...

  14. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  15. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... materials in commerce, as the Secretary considers appropriate. The Secretary is authorized to apply these regulations to persons who transport hazardous materials in commerce. In addition, the law authorizes the Secretary to apply these regulations to persons who cause hazardous materials to be transported in...

  16. Risk methodologies for offsite hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C.A.; Eichler, T.V.; Wiedermann, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    A number of suggestions have been advanced in recent years concerning the risks posed to nuclear power plants by offsite hazardous materials relative to (1) the regulatory approach including considerations of minimum and safe standoff distances, exclusion distances, site acceptance ceilings and floors, screening distances and screening probabilities, plant design, etc., and (2) the analysis and evaluation procedures such as material screening criteria, plant vulnerability, standarized physical models, etc. An evaluation of current analyses and approaches indicates that this complex problem, variety of approaches, and safety concerns may be better accommodated by developing criteria and treatments along the lines of a so-called conditional risk approach. Specifically, the probability (P) of some ultimate consequence (C) occurring from an accident (A) involving hazardous materials is given as P(C) = P(C/A) x P(A). Assuming that the plant to accident site standoff distance is the fundamental independent variable of the risk methodology, certain conditional risk designations and conditions can be made and are presented.

  17. The Hazardous Materials Information System. Users Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    only on hazardous materials used by the Government. Keep in mind that the HMIS is a growing system. Just because an item is not listed in the system does...NoO-0729 W. R. GRACE & CO POLYCEL I (CIC) A-A-1543 8520-00-270-0065 CONTINENTAL CHEM CORP BORAX A-A-S 7930-00-281-4731 PAUL CO PRODUCTS INC...As was written earlier, the HMIS is a growing database. Some items in the supply system have not yet been entered into HMIS. Therefore, to be sure

  18. 49 CFR 177.801 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HIGHWAY General Information and Regulations § 177.801 Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. No person may accept for transportation or transport by motor vehicle a forbidden material...

  19. 49 CFR 177.801 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HIGHWAY General Information and Regulations § 177.801 Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. No person may accept for transportation or transport by motor vehicle a forbidden material...

  20. 49 CFR 177.801 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HIGHWAY General Information and Regulations § 177.801 Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. No person may accept for transportation or transport by motor vehicle a forbidden material...

  1. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  2. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  3. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  4. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  5. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS... combination. 4 For pesticides only, where a material has the hazards of Class 3, Packing Group III,...

  6. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... material lading would have a dangerous reaction with the hazardous material. (2) A cargo tank may not be... tanks equipped with a 1 psig normal vent, the sum of the tank static head plus 1 psig. In addition,...

  7. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... material lading would have a dangerous reaction with the hazardous material. (2) A cargo tank may not be... tanks equipped with a 1 psig normal vent, the sum of the tank static head plus 1 psig. In addition,...

  8. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... material lading would have a dangerous reaction with the hazardous material. (2) A cargo tank may not be... tanks equipped with a 1 psig normal vent, the sum of the tank static head plus 1 psig. In addition,...

  9. 30 CFR 56.16004 - Containers for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Containers for hazardous materials. 56.16004 Section 56.16004 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16004 Containers for hazardous materials. Containers holding hazardous...

  10. 30 CFR 57.16004 - Containers for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Containers for hazardous materials. 57.16004 Section 57.16004 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16004 Containers for hazardous materials. Containers holding hazardous...

  11. 49 CFR 212.229 - Apprentice hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... basic knowledge of the chemical hazards associated with hazardous materials that are transported by... manufacturing and maintenance of packagings associated with these shipments. [57 FR 28116, June 24, 1992]...

  12. 77 FR 76604 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... modification of special permits (e.g. to provide for additional hazardous materials, packaging design changes... authorize an Services, Inc., additional packaging. Norwell, MA. 14848-M Corning 49 CFR 172.301, To...

  13. 78 FR 43271 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... drawing 348711 which is part of weldment design 447235, the addition of two new weldment designs,...

  14. 49 CFR 173.243 - Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate hazard. 173.243 Section 173.243 Transportation Other... hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate hazard. When § 172.101 of this...

  15. 49 CFR 173.243 - Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate hazard. 173.243 Section 173.243 Transportation Other... hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate hazard. When § 172.101 of this...

  16. Reduce accidental releases of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, D.

    1996-09-01

    With final publication of the Risk Management Program (RMP), operating companies must take action to lessen the likelihood of accidental hazardous chemical releases. Now, companies must extensively investigate how raw materials and products are managed within the process and storage facilities. Protection at high costs is not profitable. At the same time, not enough protection is also costly should a release invoke substantial property damage or loss of life. Modern ways to confine regulated compounds include inherently safer technologies (ISTs) and active mitigation technologies. These new designs and added options can improve protection against more likely release scenarios. Using the guidelines, HPI operators manage both compliance and cost of compliance when developing safety programs for RMP.

  17. Hazardous materials incidents in military aircraft.

    PubMed

    Voge, V M; Tolan, G

    1993-07-01

    We evaluated 10 years of reported hazardous cargo incident information from the U.S. Air Force and Naval Safety Centers. In this first of two papers describing the hazardous cargo problems reported by the two services, we describe types of aircraft and types of hazardous cargo involved in incidents not causing aircraft mishaps. Normally, hazardous cargo must be manifested as such and no passengers are allowed on such flights. Unauthorized hazardous cargo was found on military aircraft carrying passengers. The most common problem was fuel spills or fumes. The most frequent cause of a hazardous cargo incident was improper manifest of same. Improvements are recommended for the incompatible or inconsistent hazardous cargo incident reporting systems, in order to improve prevention of hazardous cargo incidents.

  18. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... regulations to persons who transport hazardous materials in commerce. In addition, the law authorizes the Secretary to apply these regulations to persons who cause hazardous materials to be transported in commerce... transported in commerce is present in a package or transport conveyance when it is not, and to anyone...

  19. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... regulations to persons who transport hazardous materials in commerce. In addition, the law authorizes the Secretary to apply these regulations to persons who cause hazardous materials to be transported in commerce... transported in commerce is present in a package or transport conveyance when it is not, and to anyone...

  20. 75 FR 4618 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Special Permit AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR Part 107, Subpart B), notice is hereby given that...

  1. 75 FR 10973 - Hazardous Materials: Risk-Based Adjustment of Transportation Security Plan Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 Hazardous Materials: Risk... security plan requirements applicable to the commercial transportation of hazardous materials by air, rail... Requirements The federal hazardous materials transportation law (federal hazmat law, 49......

  2. 75 FR 70069 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications For Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications For Modification of Special Permit AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is...

  3. Design for containment of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C. ); McDonald, J.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Department of Energy, (DOE), facilities across the United States, use wind and tornado design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. In addition, other programs such as Advanced Light Water Reactors, New Production Reactors, and Individual Plant Examinations for External Events for commercial nuclear power plants utilize design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. The use of probabilistic performance goals is a departure from design practice for commercial nuclear power plants which have traditionally been designed utilizing a conservative specification of wind and tornado loading combined with deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits. Approaches which utilize probabilistic wind and tornado hazard curves for specification of loading and deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits are discussed in this paper. Through the use of such design/evaluation approaches, it may be demonstrated that there is high likelihood that probabilistic performance goals can be achieved. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  4. 75 FR 53593 - Hazardous Materials: Minor Editorial Corrections and Clarifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... transportation, Packaging and containers, Radioactive materials, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements... section specifies general requirements for packaging hazardous materials for transportation by aircraft... contamination on motor vehicles used to transport Class 7 radioactive materials under exclusive use...

  5. 49 CFR 173.155 - Exceptions for Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... the material meets the definition of a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, marine pollutant, or...

  6. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the national...

  7. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... product code required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if...

  8. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the national...

  9. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... product code required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if...

  10. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the national...

  11. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric pressure) measured in the IBC at 55 °C... capacity. (ii) The absolute pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131 °F). This absolute pressure must......

  12. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section. (i) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 50 °C (122 °F). This absolute pressure must not... pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131......

  13. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section. (i) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 50 °C (122 °F). This absolute pressure must not... pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131......

  14. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric pressure) measured in the IBC at 55 °C... capacity. (ii) The absolute pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131 °F). This absolute pressure must......

  15. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section. (i) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 50 °C (122 °F). This absolute pressure must not... pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131......

  16. 49 CFR 176.142 - Hazardous materials of extreme flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous materials of extreme flammability. 176... of extreme flammability. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, certain hazardous materials of extreme flammability may not be transported in a vessel carrying Class 1 (explosive)...

  17. Oligopyrrole Macrocycles: Receptors and Chemosensors for Potentially Hazardous Materials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Oligopyrroles represent a diverse class of molecular receptors that have been utilized in a growing number of applications. Recently, these systems have attracted interest as receptors and chemosensors for hazardous materials, including harmful anionic species, high-valent actinide cations, and nitroaromatic explosives. These versatile molecular receptors have been used to develop rudimentary colorimetric and fluorimetric assays for hazardous materials. PMID:21465591

  18. 78 FR 8431 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 RIN 2137-AE87 Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR) Correction In rule document 2012-31243 appearing on pages...

  19. 41 CFR 109-43.307-2 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-43.307-2 Section 109-43.307-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... 43-UTILIZATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 43.3-Utilization of Excess § 109-43.307-2 Hazardous materials....

  20. 41 CFR 109-43.307-2 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-43.307-2 Section 109-43.307-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... 43-UTILIZATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 43.3-Utilization of Excess § 109-43.307-2 Hazardous materials....

  1. 41 CFR 109-43.307-2 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-43.307-2 Section 109-43.307-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... 43-UTILIZATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 43.3-Utilization of Excess § 109-43.307-2 Hazardous materials....

  2. 14 CFR 121.1005 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 121.1005 Section 121.1005 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  3. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials recognition training. 91.1085 Section 91.1085 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No...

  4. 14 CFR 121.1005 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 121.1005 Section 121.1005 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  5. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials recognition training. 91.1085 Section 91.1085 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No...

  6. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  7. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  8. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  9. 14 CFR 121.1005 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 121.1005 Section 121.1005 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  10. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  11. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  12. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials recognition training. 91.1085 Section 91.1085 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No...

  13. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  14. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  15. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials recognition training. 91.1085 Section 91.1085 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No...

  16. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  17. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  18. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  19. 14 CFR 121.1005 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 121.1005 Section 121.1005 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  20. 75 FR 80892 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... Isotopes Inc. permit to authorize and Idaho Falls, ID. increase in the number of times the packaging can...

  1. 76 FR 37403 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in..., DC. Division 2.1 and 2.2 gases in alterative packaging when transported by motor vehicle....

  2. Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center strategic plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This strategic Plan was developed in keeping with the Department of Energy`s mission for partnership with its customers to contribute to our Nation`s welfare by providing the technical information and the scientific and educational foundation for the technology, policy and institutional leadership necessary to achieve efficiency in energy use, diversity in energy sources, a more productive and competitive economy, improved environmental quality, and a secure national defense. The Plan provides the concepts for realigning the Departments`s Hazardous Materials Spill Center (HSC) in achieving its vision of becoming the global leader in meeting the diverse HAZMAT needs in the areas of testing, training, and technology. Each of these areas encompass many facets and a multitude of functional and operational requirements at the Federal, state, tribal, and local government levels, as well as those of foreign governments and the private sector. The evolution of the limited dimensional Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility into a multifaceted HAZMAT Spill Center will require us to totally redefine our way of thinking as related to our business approach, both within and outside of the Department. We need to establish and maintain a viable and vibrant outreach program through all aspects of the public (via government agencies) and private sectors, to include foreign partnerships. The HAZMAT Spill Center goals and objectives provide the direction for meeting our vision. This direction takes into consideration the trends and happenings identified in the {open_quotes}Strategic Outlook{close_quotes}, which includes valuable input from our stakeholders and our present and future customers. It is our worldwide customers that provide the essence of the strategic outlook for the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  3. Hazardous materials response project: program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The overall purpose of this Program described is to provide timely and effective deployment of scientific resources during an emergency oil or hazardous substance release to minimize environmental and socioeconomic impact.

  4. Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

  5. 77 FR 36607 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... radioactive material packagings after October 1, 2008. (mode 1) BILLING CODE 4909-60-M ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA),...

  6. Activities for Teaching about Hazardous Materials in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Robert W.; And Others

    Materials containing hazardous substances present serious problems to human health and to the health of the environment. There are many potential problems related to the site of a house or apartment, the construction materials used in the house or the apartment, products and materials used in and around the home, and disposal of materials.…

  7. Hazardous Materials Chemistry for the Non-Chemist. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Thomas K.; Enholm, Eric J.

    This book provides a basic introduction for the student to hazardous materials chemistry. Coverage of chemistry, rather than non-chemical hazards, is particularly stressed on a level which the layman can understand. Basic terminology is emphasized at all levels, as are simple chemistry symbols, in order to provide the student with an introductory…

  8. Household Hazardous Materials and Their Labels: A Reference for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Lillian F.

    Household hazardous materials are products or wastes which are toxic, corrosive, reactive, and/or ignitable. Although common products such as pesticides, oils, gasoline, solvents, cleaners, and polishes are hazardous, students and adults are not always aware of potential dangers. This sourcebook contains definitions and examples of household…

  9. 14 CFR 145.165 - Hazardous materials training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training. 145.165 Section 145.165 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Personnel § 145.165 Hazardous...

  10. 14 CFR 145.165 - Hazardous materials training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training. 145.165 Section 145.165 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Personnel § 145.165 Hazardous...

  11. SOUTH ELEVATION. THE DWELLING, FLAG TOWER, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION. THE DWELLING, FLAG TOWER, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED ARE VISIBLE IN THE BACKGROUND. - U.S. Coast Guard Lake Worth Inlet Station, Boathouse, Peanut Island, Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  12. Organizing to cope with hazardous-material spills

    SciTech Connect

    Rychman, D.W.; Ryckman, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method is given for handling hazardous-material spills that threaten drinking-water supplies. The method is applied to three case histories involving a phenol/alcohol/solvents spill, a gasoline spill, and a weekend oil spill.

  13. Materials as additives for advanced lubrication

    DOEpatents

    Pol, Vilas G.; Thackeray, Michael M.; Mistry, Kuldeep; Erdemir, Ali

    2016-09-13

    This invention relates to carbon-based materials as anti-friction and anti-wear additives for advanced lubrication purposes. The materials comprise carbon nanotubes suspended in a liquid hydrocarbon carrier. Optionally, the compositions further comprise a surfactant (e.g., to aid in dispersion of the carbon particles). Specifically, the novel lubricants have the ability to significantly lower friction and wear, which translates into improved fuel economies and longer durability of mechanical devices and engines.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  15. Hazardous Materials Technician. Technical Committee on Occupational Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Montana Coll., Havre. Montana Center for Vocational Education, Research, Curriculum and Personnel Development.

    This document describes Montana's postsecondary curriculum to prepare hazardous materials technicians. Basic general education requirements are described. The technical skills and the knowledge associated with each are listed in the following categories: (1) site assessment; (2) sampling materials; (3) handling materials; (4) recording data; (5)…

  16. 77 FR 39662 - Hazardous Materials; Reverse Logistics (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Materials; Reverse Logistics (RRR) AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA... materials in the ``reverse logistics'' supply chain. Reverse logistics is the process that is initiated when... will propose to simplify the regulations for reverse logistics shipments and provide avenue means...

  17. 75 FR 52392 - Office Of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-21017] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline And Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office Of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: List of applications for...

  18. Regulatory Exclusions and Alternative Standards for the Recycling of Materials, Solid Wastes and Hazardous Wastes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Determining the Level of Regulation for Hazardous Waste Recycling, Recycled Materials that are not Subject to RCRA Hazardous Waste Regulation, Materials Subject to Alternative Regulatory Controls, Materials Subject to Full Hazardous Waste Regulations.

  19. 75 FR 43906 - Hazardous Materials: Requirements for the Storage of Explosives During Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Materials: Requirements for the Storage of Explosives During Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous... Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE... Explosives Stored During Transportation A. Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR), 49 CFR Parts...

  20. 76 FR 32867 - Hazardous Materials: Requirements for Storage of Explosives During Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... Materials: Requirements for Storage of Explosives During Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous...-8553, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200... Requirements Applicable to Explosives Stored During Transportation A. Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR;...

  1. 78 FR 60755 - Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures-Resumption of Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures--Resumption of Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... identified in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Improvement Act of 2012 related to the Department... hazardous material transportation matters identified by Congress. This final rule is required to...

  2. Radioprotective materials with tungsten nanopowder additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrish, V.; Baranov, G.; Chayka, T.; Derbasova, N.

    2017-01-01

    There’s been studied influence of submicron powder additives obtained by processing hardmetal waste TTK (TiC-WC-TaC-Co), on strength properties of cement. This modified cement is used as a structural material for containers at transportation and storage of radioactive waste.

  3. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  4. Additive manufacturing of materials: Opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Love, Lonnie J.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Peter, William H.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) is considered a disruptive technology for producing components with topologically optimized complex geometries as well as functionalities that are not achievable by traditional methods. The realization of the full potential of 3D printing is stifled by a lack of computational design tools, generic material feedstocks, techniques for monitoring thermomechanical processes under in situ conditions, and especially methods for minimizing anisotropic static and dynamic properties brought about by microstructural heterogeneity. In this paper, we discuss the role of interdisciplinary research involving robotics and automation, process control, multiscale characterization of microstructure and properties, and high-performance computational tools to address each of these challenges. In addition, emerging pathways to scale up additive manufacturing of structural materials to large sizes (>1 m) and higher productivities (5–20 kg/h) while maintaining mechanical performance and geometrical flexibility are also discussed.

  5. Additive manufacturing of materials: Opportunities and challenges

    DOE PAGES

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Love, Lonnie J.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; ...

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) is considered a disruptive technology for producing components with topologically optimized complex geometries as well as functionalities that are not achievable by traditional methods. The realization of the full potential of 3D printing is stifled by a lack of computational design tools, generic material feedstocks, techniques for monitoring thermomechanical processes under in situ conditions, and especially methods for minimizing anisotropic static and dynamic properties brought about by microstructural heterogeneity. In this paper, we discuss the role of interdisciplinary research involving robotics and automation, process control, multiscale characterization of microstructure and properties, and high-performancemore » computational tools to address each of these challenges. In addition, emerging pathways to scale up additive manufacturing of structural materials to large sizes (>1 m) and higher productivities (5–20 kg/h) while maintaining mechanical performance and geometrical flexibility are also discussed.« less

  6. Additive manufacturing of biologically-inspired materials.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2016-01-21

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies offer an attractive pathway towards the fabrication of functional materials featuring complex heterogeneous architectures inspired by biological systems. In this paper, recent research on the use of AM approaches to program the local chemical composition, structure and properties of biologically-inspired materials is reviewed. A variety of structural motifs found in biological composites have been successfully emulated in synthetic systems using inkjet-based, direct-writing, stereolithography and slip casting technologies. The replication in synthetic systems of design principles underlying such structural motifs has enabled the fabrication of lightweight cellular materials, strong and tough composites, soft robots and autonomously shaping structures with unprecedented properties and functionalities. Pushing the current limits of AM technologies in future research should bring us closer to the manufacturing capabilities of living organisms, opening the way for the digital fabrication of advanced materials with superior performance, lower environmental impact and new functionalities.

  7. Computed tomography characterisation of additive manufacturing materials.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Richard; Thompson, Darren; Winder, John

    2011-06-01

    Additive manufacturing, covering processes frequently referred to as rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing, provides new opportunities in the manufacture of highly complex and custom-fitting medical devices and products. Whilst many medical applications of AM have been explored and physical properties of the resulting parts have been studied, the characterisation of AM materials in computed tomography has not been explored. The aim of this study was to determine the CT number of commonly used AM materials. There are many potential applications of the information resulting from this study in the design and manufacture of wearable medical devices, implants, prostheses and medical imaging test phantoms. A selection of 19 AM material samples were CT scanned and the resultant images analysed to ascertain the materials' CT number and appearance in the images. It was found that some AM materials have CT numbers very similar to human tissues, FDM, SLA and SLS produce samples that appear uniform on CT images and that 3D printed materials show a variation in internal structure.

  8. Material instability hazards in mine-processing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Fredland, J.W.; Wu, K.K.; Kirkwood, D.W.

    1993-10-01

    Many accidents occur in the mining industry as a result of the instability of material during handling and processing operation. Accidents due to dump point instability at stockpiles, and at spoil or waste piles, for example, occur with alarming frequency. Miners must be trained to be better aware of these hazards. Information on safe working procedures at stockpiles and surge piles is provided. Mine operators must review their training and operating procedures regularly to ensure that hazardous conditions are avoided.

  9. Environmental Projects. Volume 9: Construction of hazardous materials storage facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Activities at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) are carried out in support of seven parabolic dish antennas. These activities may give rise to environmental hazards. This report is one in a series of reports describing environmental projects at GDSCC. The construction of two hazardous materials and wastes storage facilities and an acid-wash facility is described. An overview of the Goldstone complex is also presented along with a description of the environmental aspects of the GDSCC site.

  10. 49 CFR 173.36 - Hazardous materials in Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and thickness of the outer packaging must be such that friction during transportation is not likely to... weakened in the event of leakage. (5) Metallic devices. Nails, staples and other metallic devices must not... materials may not contain other hazardous materials, except dry ice. (i) When a Large Packaging is used...

  11. 49 CFR 173.36 - Hazardous materials in Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and thickness of the outer packaging must be such that friction during transportation is not likely to... weakened in the event of leakage. (5) Metallic devices. Nails, staples and other metallic devices must not... materials may not contain other hazardous materials, except dry ice. (i) When a Large Packaging is used...

  12. 41 CFR 109-44.702-3 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-44.702-3 Section 109-44.702-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... materials. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and heads of field organizations shall...

  13. 41 CFR 109-44.702-3 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-44.702-3 Section 109-44.702-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... materials. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and heads of field organizations shall...

  14. 41 CFR 109-44.702-3 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-44.702-3 Section 109-44.702-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... materials. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and heads of field organizations shall...

  15. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  16. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  17. 75 FR 5258 - Hazardous Materials Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... for transportation, certain categories and quantities of hazardous materials. PHMSA's proposal would... of the registration program are to gather information about the transportation of hazardous...

  18. Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials - Selection of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Weltens, R.; Vanermen, G.; Tirez, K.; Robbens, J.; Deprez, K.; Michiels, L.

    2012-12-15

    In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or - if not all compounds are identified - from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of

  19. Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials--selection of methods.

    PubMed

    Weltens, R; Vanermen, G; Tirez, K; Robbens, J; Deprez, K; Michiels, L

    2012-12-01

    In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or--if not all compounds are identified--from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of

  20. Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Todd, Terry A.; Burchfield, Larry A.; Anshits, Alexander G.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Sapozhnikova, Natalia V.

    2006-10-03

    Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

  1. Microstructural Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Brice, D. A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H. L.

    2016-07-01

    In additively manufactured (AM) metallic materials, the fundamental interrelationships that exist between composition, processing, and microstructure govern these materials’ properties and potential improvements or reductions in performance. For example, by using AM, it is possible to achieve highly desirable microstructural features (e.g., highly refined precipitates) that could not otherwise be achieved by using conventional approaches. Simultaneously, opportunities exist to manage macro-level microstructural characteristics such as residual stress, porosity, and texture, the last of which might be desirable. To predictably realize optimal microstructures, it is necessary to establish a framework that integrates processing variables, alloy composition, and the resulting microstructure. Although such a framework is largely lacking for AM metallic materials, the basic scientific components of the framework exist in literature. This review considers these key components and presents them in a manner that highlights key interdependencies that would form an integrated framework to engineer microstructures using AM.

  2. 78 FR 43270 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT... Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR Part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby given that the Office...

  3. 76 FR 66777 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... Pipeline And Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT... Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR Part 107, Subpart B), notice is hereby given that the Office...

  4. 76 FR 22447 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT... Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby given that the Office...

  5. 75 FR 34523 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT... Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby given that the Office...

  6. 49 CFR 172.101 - Purpose and use of hazardous materials table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Purpose and use of hazardous materials table. 172.101 Section 172.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL...

  7. 49 CFR 172.101 - Purpose and use of hazardous materials table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Purpose and use of hazardous materials table. 172.101 Section 172.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL...

  8. 49 CFR 172.101 - Purpose and use of hazardous materials table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Purpose and use of hazardous materials table. 172.101 Section 172.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL...

  9. 49 CFR 172.101 - Purpose and use of hazardous materials table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purpose and use of hazardous materials table. 172.101 Section 172.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL...

  10. 76 FR 2951 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Hazardous Materials Safety has received the application described herein. Each mode of transportation for... published in accordance with part 107 of the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5117... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice...

  11. 76 FR 10771 - Hazardous Materials: Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices by Highway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ..., Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey... of Hazardous Materials Safety is the Federal safety authority for the transportation of hazardous materials by air, rail, highway, and water. Under the Federal hazardous materials transportation...

  12. Sustainable Materials Management: Non-Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Hierarchy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA developed the non-hazardous materials and waste management hierarchy in recognition that no single waste management approach is suitable for managing all materials and waste streams in all circumstances.

  13. 76 FR 81396 - Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Amendments; Response to Appeals; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... CFR Part 173 Hazardous materials transportation, Incorporation by reference, Packaging and containers, Radioactive materials, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Uranium. 49 CFR Part 174 Hazardous materials transportation, Radioactive materials, Rail carriers, Railroad safety, Reporting and recordkeeping...

  14. 40 CFR 260.42 - Notification requirement for hazardous secondary materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.42... according to the exclusion (reported as the EPA hazardous waste numbers that would apply if the hazardous secondary materials were managed as hazardous wastes); (8) For each hazardous secondary material,...

  15. Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

    1980-07-01

    Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

  16. Laser Additive Manufacturing of Magnetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikler, C. V.; Chaudhary, V.; Borkar, T.; Soni, V.; Jaeger, D.; Chen, X.; Contieri, R.; Ramanujan, R. V.; Banerjee, R.

    2017-03-01

    While laser additive manufacturing is becoming increasingly important in the context of next-generation manufacturing technologies, most current research efforts focus on optimizing process parameters for the processing of mature alloys for structural applications (primarily stainless steels, titanium base, and nickel base alloys) from pre-alloyed powder feedstocks to achieve properties superior to conventionally processed counterparts. However, laser additive manufacturing or processing can also be applied to functional materials. This article focuses on the use of directed energy deposition-based additive manufacturing technologies, such as the laser engineered net shaping (LENS™) process, to deposit magnetic alloys. Three case studies are presented: Fe-30 at.%Ni, permalloys of the type Ni-Fe-V and Ni-Fe-Mo, and Fe-Si-B-Cu-Nb (derived from Finemet) alloys. All these alloys have been processed from a blend of elemental powders used as the feedstock, and their resultant microstructures, phase formation, and magnetic properties are discussed in this paper. Although these alloys were produced from a blend of elemental powders, they exhibited relatively uniform microstructures and comparable magnetic properties to those of their conventionally processed counterparts.

  17. 76 FR 5370 - Potential Addition of Vapor Intrusion Component to the Hazard Ranking System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Potential Addition of Vapor Intrusion Component to the Hazard Ranking System AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Opportunity for Public Input. SUMMARY: The...

  18. 76 FR 11569 - Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Authority Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... Parcel Service (UPS) suggests a change in the definition as follows: ``A material of any kind, including...-service order. DGAC suggests that the definition of ``Emergency order'' include the term ``written'' to be... out-of-service orders) to address unsafe conditions or practices posing an imminent hazard;...

  19. 78 FR 15303 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ...PHMSA is amending the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to make miscellaneous amendments to update and clarify certain regulatory requirements. These amendments promote safer transportation practices, eliminate unnecessary regulatory requirements, address a petition for rulemaking, incorporate a special permit into the HMR, facilitate international commerce, and simplify the regulations.......

  20. 76 FR 75950 - Hazardous Materials: Emergency Restriction/Prohibition Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ..., including Rainbow of Hope. This Emergency Order was issued by the Office of Hazardous Materials Safety... Department of Transportation. This Order is issued to Rainbow of Hope, Strategic Sciences, Inc., Realm... occurred at a Rainbow of Hope facility at 12349 Gladstone Avenue, Sylmar, CA. Two people were...

  1. NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE FAR RIGHT. DOCKSIDE STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. LAKE WORTH INLET AND THE TOWN OF PALM BEACH ARE IN THE BACKGROUND. - U.S. Coast Guard Lake Worth Inlet Station, Boathouse, Peanut Island, Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  2. Information Resources in Pesticides, Environmental Health and Hazardous Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Winfred F.

    This directory of information centers, selected abstracting and indexing publications, and a discussion of journal capabilities and limitations has been prepared by the Hazardous Materials Advisory Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency. For selected information resources, each of the 20 entries includes name and location of the…

  3. 78 FR 23503 - Hazardous Materials; Temporary Reduction of Registration Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...; Temporary Reduction of Registration Fees AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... DOT to adjust the amount of the annual registration fee to account for any unexpended balance in the... the Fund, PHMSA is lowering the registration fees for registration year 2013-2014 for all persons,...

  4. Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Training: The Colorado Training Institute. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Leslie

    The Colorado Training Institute (CTI), established in 1980, is a non-profit, instructional program devoted to promoting hazardous materials safety through education. It has trained over 3,000 emergency response personnel and industry officials and is a unique example of the private and public sectors working together to protect the public from…

  5. Hazardous Materials in Marine Transportation: A Practical Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Thomas J.; Kichner, Jerzy J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a course offered at the United States Coast Guard Academy that deals with the marine transportation of hazardous materials. Outlines the major topics covered in the course, including marine transportation regulations. Discusses the use of lectures, laboratory demonstrations, and "hands-on" activities in the instructional…

  6. 75 FR 1302 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ...PHMSA, in consultation with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), is proposing to amend requirements in the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) on the transportation of lithium cells and batteries, including lithium cells and batteries packed with or contained in equipment. The proposed changes are intended to enhance safety by ensuring that all lithium batteries are designed to......

  7. 14 CFR 145.206 - Notification of hazardous materials authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notification of hazardous materials authorizations. 145.206 Section 145.206 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules §...

  8. Additively manufactured metallic pentamode meta-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayati, R.; Leeflang, A. M.; Zadpoor, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual mechanical properties that originate from their topological design. Pentamode metamaterials are particularly interesting because they could be designed to possess any thermodynamically admissible elasticity tensor. In this study, we additively manufacture the metallic pentamode metamaterials from a biocompatible and mechanically strong titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) using an energy distribution method developed for the powder bed fusion techniques. The mechanical properties of the developed materials were a few orders of magnitude higher than those of the similar topologies fabricated previously from polymers. Moreover, the elastic modulus and yield stress of the presented pentamode metamaterials were decoupled from their relative density, meaning that the metallic meta-biomaterials with independently tailored elastic and mass transport (permeability) properties could be designed for tissue regeneration purposes.

  9. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS... passengers in locations where the aircraft operator issues tickets, checks baggage, and maintains...

  10. Description and Implementation of the Hazardous Materials Tracking System (TRACKER).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    all the LSNs that indicate a fed particular units can also be identified. Some exam- supply class which contains hazardous matel 4 pies from previous...preservative and sealing compounds • 8040 adhesives 65 Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Equipment and Supplies 81 Containers Packaging, and Packing...9330 plastic fabricated materials The information is required for effective manage- 4 9340 glass fabricated materials ment of two environmental

  11. 77 FR 17394 - Hazardous Materials: Approval and Communication Requirements for the Safe Transportation of Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... transportation of hazardous materials by highway, rail, vessel, and air. The scope of the HMR includes hazardous.... Congress expressly authorized DOT to issue variances in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act of 1975... include: The safety record for hazardous materials transported; transportation operations......

  12. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  13. SB 1082 -- Unified hazardous materials/waste program: Local implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.

    1995-12-31

    California Senate Bill 1082 was signed into law in the fall of 1993 because business and industry believed there were too many hazardous materials inspectors asking the same questions, looking at the same items and requiring similar information on several variations of the same form. Industry was not happy with the large diversity of programs, each with its own inspectors, permits and fees, essentially doing what industry believed was the same inspection. SB 1082 will allow local city and county agencies to apply to the California Environmental Protection Agency to become a Certified Unified Program Agency (CUPA) or work with a CUPA as a Participating Agency (PA) to manage specific program elements. The CUPA will unify six regulatory programs including hazardous waste/tiered permitting, aboveground storage tanks, underground storage tanks, business and area plans/inventory or disclosure, acutely hazardous materials/risk management prevention and Uniform Fire Code programs related to hazardous materials inventory/plan requirements. The bill requires the CUPA to (1) implement a permit consolidation program; (2) implement a single fee system with a state surcharge; (3) consolidate, coordinate and make consistent any local or regional requirements or guidance documents; and (4) implement a single unified inspection and enforcement program.

  14. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  17. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  18. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  19. Analysis of hazardous material releases due to natural hazards in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Hatice; Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Cruz, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    Natural hazards were the cause of approximately 16,600 hazardous material (hazmat) releases reported to the National Response Center (NRC) between 1990 and 2008-three per cent of all reported hazmat releases. Rain-induced releases were most numerous (26 per cent of the total), followed by those associated with hurricanes (20 per cent), many of which resulted from major episodes in 2005 and 2008. Winds, storms or other weather-related phenomena were responsible for another 25 per cent of hazmat releases. Large releases were most frequently due to major natural disasters. For instance, hurricane-induced releases of petroleum from storage tanks account for a large fraction of the total volume of petroleum released during 'natechs' (understood here as a natural hazard and the hazardous materials release that results). Among the most commonly released chemicals were nitrogen oxides, benzene, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Three deaths, 52 injuries, and the evacuation of at least 5,000 persons were recorded as a consequence of natech events. Overall, results suggest that the number of natechs increased over the study period (1990-2008) with potential for serious human and environmental impacts.

  20. Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material

    DOEpatents

    Murray, Jr., Holt

    1995-01-01

    A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal.

  1. Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material

    DOEpatents

    Murray, H. Jr.

    1995-02-21

    A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal. 40 figs.

  2. 75 FR 45195 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... compressed oxygen without rigid outer packaging when no other means of transportation exist. 14860-M Alaska... authorizing the transportation in commerce of compressed oxygen without rigid outer packaging when no...

  3. 75 FR 30099 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... No. Docket No. Applicant affected permit thereof Modification Special Permits 10407-M Thermo Process... addition of Boron Grantee: Thermo trifluoride. Measure Tech), Sugar Land, TX 10646-M Schlumberger 49 CFR..., TX 2.1 and 2.3 hazardous materials. 10785-M Thermo Process 49 CFR To modify the special...

  4. 76 FR 13313 - Hazardous Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Hazardous Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations AGENCY: Pipeline and... or unload cargo tank motor vehicles (CTMVs). In addition, PHMSA is proposing to require each employee... reduce the risk associated with the loading and unloading of cargo tank motor vehicles that...

  5. Analysis of error-prone survival data under additive hazards models: measurement error effects and adjustments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Yi, Grace Y

    2016-07-01

    Covariate measurement error occurs commonly in survival analysis. Under the proportional hazards model, measurement error effects have been well studied, and various inference methods have been developed to correct for error effects under such a model. In contrast, error-contaminated survival data under the additive hazards model have received relatively less attention. In this paper, we investigate this problem by exploring measurement error effects on parameter estimation and the change of the hazard function. New insights of measurement error effects are revealed, as opposed to well-documented results for the Cox proportional hazards model. We propose a class of bias correction estimators that embraces certain existing estimators as special cases. In addition, we exploit the regression calibration method to reduce measurement error effects. Theoretical results for the developed methods are established, and numerical assessments are conducted to illustrate the finite sample performance of our methods.

  6. Routing Hazardous Materials around the District of Columbia Area

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Peterson, B E; Han, Lee; Chin, Charles

    2009-12-01

    ABSTRACT The recent hazardous material (hazmat) shipment ban in Washington, DC has led to debates, legal challenges, and considerations by other major cities to pursue similar actions. This paper presents a methodology for evaluating hazmat shipment routing options on railroad networks under situations such as the shipment ban. A case study involves three alternatives is presented. Population and other vulnerable people within a 0.8 km (or 0.5 mile) radius buffer zone along the rail line are used to evaluate the potential risk associated with ultra hazardous material shipments. Based on this study, it is concluded that moderate increases in ton-km, subsequently time in-transit, will be resulted from the rerouting. On the other hand, the overall population-at-risk will see a reduction. The population-atrisk burden, however, is simply shifted from one location to other locations. This paper also identifies areas for potential follow-up efforts.

  7. HAZBOT - A hazardous materials emergency response mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, H. W.; Edmonds, G.

    The authors describe the progress that has been made towards the development of a mobile robot that can be used by hazardous materials emergency response teams to perform a variety of tasks including incident localization and characterization, hazardous material identification/classification, site surveillance and monitoring, and ultimately incident mitigation. In September of 1991, the HAZBOT II vehicle performed its first end-to-end demonstration involving a scenario in which the vehicle: navigated to the incident location from a distant (150-200 ft.) deployment site; entered a building through a door with thumb latch style handle and door closer; located and navigated to the suspected incident location (a chemical storeroom); unlocked and opened the storeroom's door; climbed over the storeroom's 12 in. high threshold to enter the storeroom; and located and identified a broken container of benzene.

  8. Performance-oriented packagings for hazardous materials: Resource guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This document provides recommendations to US Department of Energy (DOE) shippers regarding packaging that meet performance-oriented packaging requirements implemented by US Department of Transportation (DOT) in rulemaking HM-181 (December 21, 1990) and subsequent actions. The packaging described in this document are certified by their vendor to comply with requirements for Packing Group I, II, or III hazardous materials packaging. The intent of this document is to share information between DOE and contractors and at all DOE facilities.

  9. Oil and Hazardous Materials Spill Response Technology Development, Strategic Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    intermediate fuel oil and marine diesel from the dry bulk carrier SELENDANG AYU. (U.S. Coat Guard Pollution Incidents In and Around U.S. Waters A...similar analysis of prevention efforts should be carried out in the future. 17. Key Words oil , hazardous material, oil spill, pollution ...the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 introduced major changes in tanker design and significantly increased the liability for spillers. At the same time

  10. Hazardous Materials Management System. A Guide for Local Emergency Managers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Office of Emergency Management 12240 N.E. Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97230 81 9 21 043 whom- son MCOEM 0779 July, 1981 Final Report HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...Emergency Management 12210 N. E. Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97230 FEMA REVIEW NOTICE "This report has been reviewed in the Federal Emergency Management Agency...Management Agency." SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ’.IS PAGE (When. Dot* f’Aor i . lb M INSTRUCTIONS REPORT DOCUENTATION PAGE BEOR COMPLETIORM I. REPORT NUMBER

  11. 75 FR 13333 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT... Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, Subpart B), notice is hereby given that the Office of...

  12. 76 FR 77589 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Energy Washington, 173.417(a)(l)(i). transportation in DC. commerce of radioactive materials without... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA),...

  13. Mission: Possible. Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, W.T.; Prather-Stroud, W.

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management (CEHMM) was established in May 2004 as a nonprofit research organization. Its purpose is to develop a sustainable technical/scientific community located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, that interacts worldwide to find solutions to hazardous materials management issues. An important part of the mission is to achieve improved protection of worker safety, human health, and the environment. Carlsbad has a large technical community due to the presence of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and its many contractors and support organizations. These groups include the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, Washington Group International, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. These organizations form the basis of a unique knowledge community with strengths in many areas, such as geosciences, actinide chemistry, environmental monitoring, and waste transportation. CEHMM works cooperatively with these organizations and others to develop projects that will maintain this knowledge community beyond the projected closure date of WIPP. At present, there is an emphasis in bio-monitoring, air monitoring, hazardous materials educational programs, and endangered species remediation. CEHMM is also currently working with a group from the American Nuclear Society to help facilitate their conference scheduled for April 2006 in Carlsbad. CEHMM is growing rapidly and is looking forward to a diverse array of new projects. (authors)

  14. Environmental risk analysis of hazardous material rail transportation.

    PubMed

    Saat, Mohd Rapik; Werth, Charles J; Schaeffer, David; Yoon, Hongkyu; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2014-01-15

    An important aspect of railroad environmental risk management involves tank car transportation of hazardous materials. This paper describes a quantitative, environmental risk analysis of rail transportation of a group of light, non-aqueous-phase liquid (LNAPL) chemicals commonly transported by rail in North America. The Hazardous Materials Transportation Environmental Consequence Model (HMTECM) was used in conjunction with a geographic information system (GIS) analysis of environmental characteristics to develop probabilistic estimates of exposure to different spill scenarios along the North American rail network. The risk analysis incorporated the estimated clean-up cost developed using the HMTECM, route-specific probability distributions of soil type and depth to groundwater, annual traffic volume, railcar accident rate, and tank car safety features, to estimate the nationwide annual risk of transporting each product. The annual risk per car-mile (car-km) and per ton-mile (ton-km) was also calculated to enable comparison between chemicals and to provide information on the risk cost associated with shipments of these products. The analysis and the methodology provide a quantitative approach that will enable more effective management of the environmental risk of transporting hazardous materials.

  15. Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-03-01

    This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Munemoto, Takashi; Sakai, Minoru; Yagi, Shintaro

    2011-12-01

    The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO3·H2O), as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO4 and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO4 in solution (>30 μM) can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO4 than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO4 uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC is significantly higher than simple adsorption

  17. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Munemoto, Takashi; Sakai, Minoru; Yagi, Shintaro

    2011-12-01

    The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO3·H2O), as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO4 and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO4 in solution (>30 μM) can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO4 than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO4 uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC is significantly higher than simple adsorption

  18. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings. 172.312 Section 172.312 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  19. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings. 172.312 Section 172.312 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  20. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings. 172.312 Section 172.312 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  1. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings. 172.312 Section 172.312 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  2. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles... Transportation § 173.33 Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles. (a) General requirements. (1) No person may offer or accept a hazardous material for transportation in a cargo tank motor vehicle except...

  3. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal Acquisition... and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. As prescribed in 223.7103(a), use the following clause: Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR 1993) (a) Definitions. As used...

  4. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal Acquisition... and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. As prescribed in 223.7103(a), use the following clause: Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR 2012) (a) Definitions. As used...

  5. 41 CFR 101-42.304 - Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... donation of certain hazardous materials. 101-42.304 Section 101-42.304 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.304...

  6. 41 CFR 101-42.304 - Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... donation of certain hazardous materials. 101-42.304 Section 101-42.304 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.304...

  7. 41 CFR 101-42.303 - Hazardous materials distributed to donees by State agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Hazardous materials... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.303...

  8. 41 CFR 101-42.401 - Sales responsibilities for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for hazardous materials. 101-42.401 Section 101-42.401 Public Contracts and Property Management... DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property §...

  9. 41 CFR 101-42.302 - Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... donation of hazardous materials. 101-42.302 Section 101-42.302 Public Contracts and Property Management... DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.302 Responsibilities...

  10. 41 CFR 101-42.401 - Sales responsibilities for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for hazardous materials. 101-42.401 Section 101-42.401 Public Contracts and Property Management... DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property §...

  11. 41 CFR 101-42.404 - Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the sale of hazardous materials. 101-42.404 Section 101-42.404 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42... Property § 101-42.404 Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials. Special sales...

  12. 41 CFR 101-42.303 - Hazardous materials distributed to donees by State agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Hazardous materials... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.303...

  13. 41 CFR 101-42.302 - Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... donation of hazardous materials. 101-42.302 Section 101-42.302 Public Contracts and Property Management... DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.302 Responsibilities...

  14. 41 CFR 101-42.404 - Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the sale of hazardous materials. 101-42.404 Section 101-42.404 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42... Property § 101-42.404 Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials. Special sales...

  15. 76 FR 5107 - Regulation of Oil-Bearing Hazardous Secondary Materials From the Petroleum Refining Industry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 260 and 261 RIN-2050-AE78 Regulation of Oil-Bearing Hazardous Secondary Materials..., ``Regulation of Oil-Bearing ] Hazardous Secondary Materials from the Petroleum Refining Industry Processed in a... reconsider the final rule, ``Regulation of Oil-Bearing Hazardous Secondary Materials from the...

  16. 41 CFR 102-42.75 - How are gifts containing hazardous materials handled?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hazardous materials handled? 102-42.75 Section 102-42.75 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... § 102-42.75 How are gifts containing hazardous materials handled? Gifts containing hazardous materials are handled in accordance with the requirements and provisions of this part and part 101-42 of...

  17. 49 CFR 176.72 - Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials. 176.72... VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.72 Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials. (a) A metal bale hook may not be used for handling any package of hazardous materials. (b) The use of equipment...

  18. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.312 Liquid hazardous materials in non... packagings containing liquid hazardous materials, single packaging fitted with vents, or open...

  19. 41 CFR 101-42.304 - Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... donation of certain hazardous materials. 101-42.304 Section 101-42.304 Public Contracts and Property....3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.304 Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials. Special donation requirements for specific...

  20. 41 CFR 101-42.302 - Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... donation of hazardous materials. 101-42.302 Section 101-42.302 Public Contracts and Property Management...-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.302 Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials. (a) Holding agencies. Holding agencies shall be responsible for...

  1. 76 FR 44496 - Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures; Response to Appeals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ...) identifier; an estimated quantity of the hazardous material planned for transportation; an estimate of the... CEO be aware of the hazardous materials transportation functions executed by that company, and... transportation of hazardous materials under the guidelines of a special permit. For clarification, applicants...

  2. 76 FR 4847 - Hazardous Materials: Safety Requirements for External Product Piping on Cargo Tanks Transporting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    .... SUMMARY: PHMSA is proposing to amend the Hazardous Materials Regulations to prohibit the transportation of... This rulemaking is issued under the authority of the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49... regulations for the safe transportation, including security, of hazardous materials in intrastate,...

  3. 78 FR 30258 - Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures-Resumption of Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures--Resumption of Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... proposing to address certain matters identified in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Act of 2012... 21st Century Act, or the MAP-21, which included the Hazardous Materials Transportation...

  4. 78 FR 66326 - Hazardous Materials: Rail Petitions and Recommendations To Improve the Safety of Railroad Tank...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Transportation (RRR) AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Advance... requirements to enhance the safe transportation of Packing Group I and II hazardous materials; (3) afford DOT... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 173, 174, 178, 179, and 180 RIN...

  5. 75 FR 15613 - Hazardous Materials Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... registration program are to gather information about the transportation of hazardous materials, and to fund the... transportation system each day. It is impossible to predict when and where a hazardous materials incident......

  6. 75 FR 59197 - Hazardous Materials: Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices by Highway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... of transportation incidents involving hazardous materials when CMV drivers are distracted by... transportation of hazardous materials as defined in this section. In a final rule published today addressing the... of Hazardous Materials Safety is the Federal safety authority for the transportation of...

  7. 78 FR 22798 - Hazardous Materials: Revision of Maximum and Minimum Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... reflect the changes to Section 5123 of the Federal hazardous material transportation law. In 49 CFR 107... rule is published under the authority of the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C... hazardous material transportation law or a regulation, order, special permit, or approval issued under...

  8. 49 CFR 176.99 - Permit requirements for certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit requirements for certain hazardous materials. 176.99 Section 176.99 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Special Requirements...

  9. 49 CFR 176.146 - Segregation from non-hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation from non-hazardous materials. 176.146 Section 176.146 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 1...

  10. 49 CFR 176.98 - Stowage of hazardous materials on board barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of hazardous materials on board barges. 176.98 Section 176.98 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Special Requirements for Barges...

  11. 49 CFR 173.204 - Non-bulk, non-specification packagings for certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-bulk, non-specification packagings for certain hazardous materials. 173.204 Section 173.204 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  12. 49 CFR 175.88 - Inspection, orientation and securing packages of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inspection, orientation and securing packages of hazardous materials. 175.88 Section 175.88 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT...

  13. 49 CFR 176.140 - Segregation from other classes of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation from other classes of hazardous materials. 176.140 Section 176.140 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements...

  14. 75 FR 27205 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporation of Special Permits Into Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ...The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration is amending the Hazardous Materials Regulations to incorporate provisions contained in certain widely used or longstanding special permits that have an established safety record. Special permits allow a company or individual to package or ship a hazardous material in a manner that varies from the regulations so long as an equivalent......

  15. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles... Transportation § 173.33 Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles. (a) General requirements. (1) No person may offer or accept a hazardous material for transportation in a cargo tank motor vehicle except...

  16. Integrating Hazardous Materials Characterization and Assessment Tools to Guide Pollution Prevention in Electronic Products and Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Carl

    Due to technology proliferation, the environmental burden attributed to the production, use, and disposal of hazardous materials in electronics have become a worldwide concern. The major theme of this dissertation is to develop and apply hazardous materials assessment tools to systematically guide pollution prevention opportunities in the context of electronic product design, manufacturing and end-of-life waste management. To this extent, a comprehensive review is first provided on describing hazard traits and current assessment methods to evaluate hazardous materials. As a case study at the manufacturing level, life cycle impact assessment (LCIA)-based and risk-based screening methods are used to quantify chemical and geographic environmental impacts in the U.S. printed wiring board (PWB) industry. Results from this industrial assessment clarify priority waste streams and States to most effectively mitigate impact. With further knowledge of PWB manufacturing processes, select alternative chemical processes (e.g., spent copper etchant recovery) and material options (e.g., lead-free etch resist) are discussed. In addition, an investigation on technology transition effects for computers and televisions in the U.S. market is performed by linking dynamic materials flow and environmental assessment models. The analysis forecasts quantities of waste units generated and maps shifts in environmental impact potentials associated with metal composition changes due to product substitutions. This insight is important to understand the timing and waste quantities expected and the emerging toxic elements needed to be addressed as a consequence of technology transition. At the product level, electronic utility meter devices are evaluated to eliminate hazardous materials within product components. Development and application of a component Toxic Potential Indicator (TPI) assessment methodology highlights priority components requiring material alternatives. Alternative

  17. EPA Seeks Public Comments on Addition of Subsurface Intrusion Component to the Superfund Hazard Ranking System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking public comment on the proposed addition of a subsurface intrusion (SsI) component to the Superfund Hazard Ranking System (HRS). The HRS is a scoring system EPA uses to identify

  18. Hazardous materials transportation: a risk-analysis-based routing methodology.

    PubMed

    Leonelli, P; Bonvicini, S; Spadoni, G

    2000-01-07

    This paper introduces a new methodology based on risk analysis for the selection of the best route for the transport of a hazardous substance. In order to perform this optimisation, the network is considered as a graph composed by nodes and arcs; each arc is assigned a cost per unit vehicle travelling on it and a vehicle capacity. After short discussion about risk measures suitable for linear risk sources, the arc capacities are introduced by comparison between the societal and individual risk measures of each arc with hazardous materials transportation risk criteria; then arc costs are defined in order to take into account both transportation out-of-pocket expenses and risk-related costs. The optimisation problem can thus be formulated as a 'minimum cost flow problem', which consists of determining for a specific hazardous substance the cheapest flow distribution, honouring the arc capacities, from the origin nodes to the destination nodes. The main features of the optimisation procedure, implemented on the computer code OPTIPATH, are presented. Test results about shipments of ammonia are discussed and finally further research developments are proposed.

  19. Evaluation of methods to compare consequences from hazardous materials transportation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, R.E.; Franklin, A.L.; Lavender, J.C.

    1986-10-01

    This report presents the results of a project to develop a framework for making meaningful comparisons of the consequences from transportation accidents involving hazardous materials. The project was conducted in two phases. In Phase I, methods that could potentially be used to develop the consequence comparisons for hazardous material transportation accidents were identified and reviewed. Potential improvements were identified and an evaluation of the improved methods was performed. Based on this evaluation, several methods were selected for detailed evaluation in Phase II of the project. The methods selected were location-dependent scenarios, figure of merit and risk assessment. This evaluation included application of the methods to a sample problem which compares the consequences of four representative hazardous materials - chlorine, propane, spent nuclear fuel and class A explosives. These materials were selected because they represented a broad class of hazardous material properties and consequence mechanisms. The sample case aplication relied extensively on consequence calculations performed in previous transportation risk assessment studies. A consultant was employed to assist in developing consequence models for explosives. The results of the detailed evaluation of the three consequence comparison methods indicates that methods are available to perform technically defensible comparisons of the consequences from a wide variety of hazardous materials. Location-dependent scenario and risk assessment methods are available now and the figure of merit method could be developed with additional effort. All of the methods require substantial effort to implement. Methods that would require substantially less effort were identified in the preliminary evaluation, but questions of technical accuracy preclude their application on a scale. These methods may have application to specific cases, however.

  20. Dielectric breakdown of additively manufactured polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Monzel, W. Jacob; Hoff, Brad W.; Maestas, Sabrina S.; French, David M.; Hayden, Steven C.

    2016-01-11

    Dielectric strength testing of selected Polyjet-printed polymer plastics was performed in accordance with ASTM D149. This dielectric strength data is compared to manufacturer-provided dielectric strength data for selected plastics printed using the stereolithography (SLA), fused deposition modeling (FDM), and selective laser sintering (SLS) methods. Tested Polyjet samples demonstrated dielectric strengths as high as 47.5 kV/mm for a 0.5 mm thick sample and 32.1 kV/mm for a 1.0 mm sample. As a result, the dielectric strength of the additively manufactured plastics evaluated as part of this study was lower than the majority of non-printed plastics by at least 15% (with the exception of polycarbonate).

  1. Dielectric breakdown of additively manufactured polymeric materials

    DOE PAGES

    Monzel, W. Jacob; Hoff, Brad W.; Maestas, Sabrina S.; ...

    2016-01-11

    Dielectric strength testing of selected Polyjet-printed polymer plastics was performed in accordance with ASTM D149. This dielectric strength data is compared to manufacturer-provided dielectric strength data for selected plastics printed using the stereolithography (SLA), fused deposition modeling (FDM), and selective laser sintering (SLS) methods. Tested Polyjet samples demonstrated dielectric strengths as high as 47.5 kV/mm for a 0.5 mm thick sample and 32.1 kV/mm for a 1.0 mm sample. As a result, the dielectric strength of the additively manufactured plastics evaluated as part of this study was lower than the majority of non-printed plastics by at least 15% (with themore » exception of polycarbonate).« less

  2. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, Vitaly T.; Ivanov, Alexander V.; Filippov, Eugene A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

  3. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

  4. Double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for versatile hazardous materials detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) system capable of detecting a variety of hazardous materials at tens of meters. The use of a double-pulse laser improves the sensitivity and selectivity of ST-LIBS, especially for the detection of energetic materials. In addition to various metallic and plastic materials, the system has been used to detect bulk explosives RDX and Composition-B, explosive residues, biological species such as the anthrax surrogate Bacillus subtilis, and chemical warfare simulants at 20 m. We have also demonstrated the discrimination of explosive residues from various interferents on an aluminum substrate.

  5. Additive hazards regression and partial likelihood estimation for ecological monitoring data across space.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Chang; Zhu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    We develop continuous-time models for the analysis of environmental or ecological monitoring data such that subjects are observed at multiple monitoring time points across space. Of particular interest are additive hazards regression models where the baseline hazard function can take on flexible forms. We consider time-varying covariates and take into account spatial dependence via autoregression in space and time. We develop statistical inference for the regression coefficients via partial likelihood. Asymptotic properties, including consistency and asymptotic normality, are established for parameter estimates under suitable regularity conditions. Feasible algorithms utilizing existing statistical software packages are developed for computation. We also consider a simpler additive hazards model with homogeneous baseline hazard and develop hypothesis testing for homogeneity. A simulation study demonstrates that the statistical inference using partial likelihood has sound finite-sample properties and offers a viable alternative to maximum likelihood estimation. For illustration, we analyze data from an ecological study that monitors bark beetle colonization of red pines in a plantation of Wisconsin.

  6. 49 CFR 1.97 - Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous... ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.97 Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator. The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  7. 49 CFR 1.97 - Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous... ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.97 Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator. The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  8. 49 CFR 1.97 - Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous... ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.97 Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator. The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  9. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Classification of a material having more than one... having more than one hazard. (a) Classification of a material having more than one hazard. Except as... meets the definition of more than one hazard class or division as defined in this part, shall be...

  10. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Classification of a material having more than one... having more than one hazard. (a) Classification of a material having more than one hazard. Except as... meets the definition of more than one hazard class or division as defined in this part, shall be...

  11. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory--health protection.

    PubMed

    Ketchen, E; Porter, W

    1981-12-01

    Maintaining reasonable control of all hazardous materials used in a large research laboratory can be a formidable task. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a Hazardous Material Coordinator for Health Protection (HMC-Hlth) and a Hazardous Material Coordinator for Environmental Protection (HMC-Env) control hazardous materials from acquisition to disposal. The HMC-Hlth, a member of the Industrial Hygiene Department, is responsible for control of the purchase and use of hazardous materials. If the material has not had a hazard evaluation, the user is required to contact the HMC-Hlth to find out if the material is hazardous before ordering it. If the material is hazardous, the user must get permission from his divisional representative to purchase it. The user is required to fill out Part 2 of a Hazardous Material Control Card (HMCC), describing the proposed use and location of the material and to return HMCC to the HMC-Hlth. This allows the Industrial Hygiene Department to evaluate the use of the materials and to take air samples as needed. Part 1 of the HMCC also contains computer printed information on the hazards.

  12. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Storage of hazardous...

  13. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage of hazardous...

  14. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Storage of hazardous...

  15. 40 CFR 260.40 - Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis. 260.40 Section 260.40 Protection of... SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.40 Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste...

  16. 40 CFR 260.40 - Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis. 260.40 Section 260.40 Protection of... SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.40 Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste...

  17. 40 CFR 260.40 - Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis. 260.40 Section 260.40 Protection of... SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.40 Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste...

  18. 40 CFR 260.40 - Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis. 260.40 Section 260.40 Protection of... SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.40 Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste...

  19. 40 CFR 260.40 - Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste recycling activities on a case-by-case basis. 260.40 Section 260.40 Protection of... SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.40 Additional regulation of certain hazardous waste...

  20. Immobilization of low level hazardous organics using recycled materials

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.R.; Smith, F.G.

    1996-12-31

    Rust Remedial Services, Inc. (RRS) recently conducted a major study on the effectiveness of additives, both virgin and recycled, in the immobilization of low-level organics in soils. Using a clean soil spiked with a mixture of hazardous organic chemicals, twelve different stabilization formulations were comparatively tested using leaching (TCLP) and total analysis (TCA) methods. TCLP reduction levels illustrated the effectiveness of the stabilization treatment on a wide variety of low level organics in contaminated soil, with the proper selection of stabilization admixtures. A specially prepared, comminuted, rubber particulate was especially effective in reducing the apparent presence of certain semi-volatile organic compounds in soil, as measured by TCA methods. Most semi-volatile organic compounds were so strongly held by the rubber particles that they were not recovered in the analytical procedure.

  1. Regulation of the transportation of hazardous materials: a critique and a proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    This article is a description and analysis of the system of regulation of hazardous-materials transportation and a proposal for reform. It has four parts. Part I surveys the present scheme of federal, state, and local safety regulation of hazardous-materials transportation. Part II describes the failures of the present regulatory system and presents a framework for analyzing alternative approaches to preventing hazardous-materials-transportation accidents. Part III compares the present system with one such alternative, a system of strict liability. Part IV is a proposal for reforming hazardous-materials-transportation regulation by deregulating materials that are not extremely hazardous, and imposing strict liability on all transporters of hazardous materials.

  2. Hazardous materials flows by rail. Final report, January 1986-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, F.; Hussey, L.; Zebe, P.

    1990-03-01

    The report presents a quantitative overview of the movement of hazardous materials by rail in the United States. The data used is a hazardous materials rail waybill sample developed at TSC from the 1983 Rail Waybill Sample. The report examines (1) the Rail Waybill Sample, (2) the characteristics of hazardous materials rail transport, (3) non-interchange versus interchange hazardous materials traffic, (4) the origins and destinations of hazardous materials traffic, and (5) specific information on the rail flows of STCC 289--Misc. Chemical Products, STCC 287--Agricultural Chemicals, STCC 291--Products of Petroleum Refining, and STCC 281--Industrial Organic Chemicals. The basic purpose of the report is to provide analysts and policymakers with information on the movement of hazardous materials by rail that can be used in the decision-making process.

  3. 41 CFR 101-42.207 - Transfer of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.207 Section 101-42.207 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.207 Transfer...

  4. 41 CFR 101-42.207 - Transfer of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.207 Section 101-42.207 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.207 Transfer...

  5. 41 CFR 101-42.402 - Reporting hazardous materials for sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials for sale. 101-42.402 Section 101-42.402 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.402 Reporting...

  6. 41 CFR 101-42.402 - Reporting hazardous materials for sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials for sale. 101-42.402 Section 101-42.402 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.402 Reporting...

  7. 41 CFR 101-42.207 - Transfer of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.207 Section 101-42.207 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.207 Transfer...

  8. 41 CFR 101-42.207 - Transfer of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.207 Section 101-42.207 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.207 Transfer...

  9. 41 CFR 101-42.207 - Transfer of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.207 Section 101-42.207 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.207 Transfer...

  10. The Element of Surprise: Preparing for the Possibility of Hazardous Materials within Archival Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    Unprocessed archival collections can contain unknown and potentially hazardous materials that can be harmful to other collections and staff. Archival literature largely focuses on collection and personnel dangers posed by environmental hazards such as mold and insect infestation but not on pharmaceutical and chemical hazards. In this article, the…

  11. Rapid test for the detection of hazardous microbiological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordmueller, Mario; Bohling, Christian; John, Andreas; Schade, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    After attacks with anthrax pathogens have been committed since 2001 all over the world the fast detection and determination of biological samples has attracted interest. A very promising method for a rapid test is Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is an optical method which uses time-resolved or time-integrated spectral analysis of optical plasma emission after pulsed laser excitation. Even though LIBS is well established for the determination of metals and other inorganic materials the analysis of microbiological organisms is difficult due to their very similar stoichiometric composition. To analyze similar LIBS-spectra computer assisted chemometrics is a very useful approach. In this paper we report on first results of developing a compact and fully automated rapid test for the detection of hazardous microbiological material. Experiments have been carried out with two setups: A bulky one which is composed of standard laboratory components and a compact one consisting of miniaturized industrial components. Both setups work at an excitation wavelength of λ=1064nm (Nd:YAG). Data analysis is done by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with an adjacent neural network for fully automated sample identification.

  12. Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal-insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlemiller, J.

    1981-08-01

    The smoldering combustion hazards of cellulosic loose fill insulation materials fall into three categories: smolder initiation, smolder propagation, and transition from smoldering into flaming. Previous findings on the initiation problem are summarized briefly. They serve as the basis for recommendations on an improved smolder ignition test method which is designed to give ignition temperatures comparable to those in practice. The proposed test method requires checking against full-scale mock-up results before it can be considered for implementation. Smolder propagation, driven by buoyant convection, through a thick (18 cm) layer of cellulosic insulation has been extensively examined. A heavy (25% add-on) loading of boric acid (a widely used smolder retardant) cuts the propagation rate in half (from approx. 0.3 to 0.15 cm/min) but does not come close to stopping this process. Analysis of experimental profiles for temperature, oxygen level, and remaining organic fraction strongly indicates that the smolder wave is oxygen-supply controlled and that it involves both first and second stages of oxidative heat release from the insulation material. The balance of involvement of the two stages varies with depth in the layer. It appears that efforts to develop improved means of suppressing smolder propagation must be directed at the entire oxidation process. However, since boric acid is fairly effective at slowing the second stage of oxidation, most new efforts should be aimed at the first stage of oxidation (which also is responsible for smolder initiation).

  13. 76 FR 73011 - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... modify the Cylinders, 173.304(a)(2); special permit to Chilton, WI. 178.50. authorize additional Division 2.2 materials. 14157-M......... Worthington 49 CFR 173.302a To modify the Cylinders of special permit to Canada, change the test Tilbury, criteria for Hot- Ontario. Dip Galvanized cylinders from...

  14. 76 FR 27300 - Hazardous Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous... impacting interested parties affected by the cargo tank motor vehicle proposals in this notice, we...

  15. Predicting the Survival Time for Bladder Cancer Using an Additive Hazards Model in Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    TAPAK, Leili; MAHJUB, Hossein; SADEGHIFAR, Majid; SAIDIJAM, Massoud; POOROLAJAL, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: One substantial part of microarray studies is to predict patients’ survival based on their gene expression profile. Variable selection techniques are powerful tools to handle high dimensionality in analysis of microarray data. However, these techniques have not been investigated in competing risks setting. This study aimed to investigate the performance of four sparse variable selection methods in estimating the survival time. Methods: The data included 1381 gene expression measurements and clinical information from 301 patients with bladder cancer operated in the years 1987 to 2000 in hospitals in Denmark, Sweden, Spain, France, and England. Four methods of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, smoothly clipped absolute deviation, the smooth integration of counting and absolute deviation and elastic net were utilized for simultaneous variable selection and estimation under an additive hazards model. The criteria of area under ROC curve, Brier score and c-index were used to compare the methods. Results: The median follow-up time for all patients was 47 months. The elastic net approach was indicated to outperform other methods. The elastic net had the lowest integrated Brier score (0.137±0.07) and the greatest median of the over-time AUC and C-index (0.803±0.06 and 0.779±0.13, respectively). Five out of 19 selected genes by the elastic net were significant (P<0.05) under an additive hazards model. It was indicated that the expression of RTN4, SON, IGF1R and CDC20 decrease the survival time, while the expression of SMARCAD1 increase it. Conclusion: The elastic net had higher capability than the other methods for the prediction of survival time in patients with bladder cancer in the presence of competing risks base on additive hazards model. PMID:27114989

  16. Marginal regression approach for additive hazards models with clustered current status data.

    PubMed

    Su, Pei-Fang; Chi, Yunchan

    2014-01-15

    Current status data arise naturally from tumorigenicity experiments, epidemiology studies, biomedicine, econometrics and demographic and sociology studies. Moreover, clustered current status data may occur with animals from the same litter in tumorigenicity experiments or with subjects from the same family in epidemiology studies. Because the only information extracted from current status data is whether the survival times are before or after the monitoring or censoring times, the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator of survival function converges at a rate of n(1/3) to a complicated limiting distribution. Hence, semiparametric regression models such as the additive hazards model have been extended for independent current status data to derive the test statistics, whose distributions converge at a rate of n(1/2) , for testing the regression parameters. However, a straightforward application of these statistical methods to clustered current status data is not appropriate because intracluster correlation needs to be taken into account. Therefore, this paper proposes two estimating functions for estimating the parameters in the additive hazards model for clustered current status data. The comparative results from simulation studies are presented, and the application of the proposed estimating functions to one real data set is illustrated.

  17. Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP) for hazardous and mixed waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-07-01

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for (1) nickel plating line (F006) sludges and (2) incinerator wastes. Vitrification of these wastes using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), has been determined to greatly enhance the dissolution and retention of hazardous, mixed, and heavy metal species in glass. RASP lowers melt temperatures (typically 1050-- 1150{degrees}C), thereby minimizing volatility concerns during vitrification. RASP maximizes waste loading (typically 50--75 wt% on a dry oxide basis) by taking advantage of the glass forming potential of the waste. RASP vitrification thereby minimizes waste disposal volume (typically 86--97 vol. %), and maximizes cost savings. Solidification of the F006 plating line sludges containing depleted uranium has been achieved in both soda-lime-silica (SLS) and borosilicate glasses at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 75 wt%. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and bottom kiln ash have been achieved in SLS glass at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 50% using RASP. These waste loadings correspond to volume reductions of 86 and 94 volume %, respectively, with large associated savings in storage costs.

  18. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Hazardous Materials Transportation and Packaging Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Calihan, T.W. III; Votaw, E.F.

    1995-05-01

    This QAPP covers only the implementation accomplished through Level I and II manuals. It covers the quality affecting activities identified in USDOE orders (both HQ and Richland Operations Office), US DOT, US EPA, and NRC regulations, IAEA guidelines, and the WHC manuals. It covers activities related to hazardous materials transportation performed on and off the Hanford site under the jurisdictional authority of WHC. (Hazardous materials include radioactive, hazardous waste, and mixed waste.)

  19. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how

  20. Additives in Bituminous Materials and Fuel-Resistant Sealers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    AD-A285 748 D)OT/FAAICT-94/78 DOT/FAAtRD-93/30 Additives in Bituminous FA Tehnia Cer Materials and Fuel-Resistant Atlantic City International Airport...Subtitle Ro Dat August 1394 Additives in Bituminous Materials and Fuel-Resistant S •O..M0aMtioiCOd5 Sealers I Amdirw S Polwo ovwm ’n New, No Gary L...bituminous materials and fuel-resistant sealers. Included in this report is a brief hisLory of these types of additives, the results of an airport

  1. 41 CFR 101-42.1101 - Federal supply classification (FSC) groups and classes which contain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....001 subject to DOT Hazardous Materials Regulations. 6510 Surgical dressing materials Items containing... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN...

  2. Hazardous Materials Technology: A Community College's Response to a Critical Employment Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Janice N.; And Others

    Studies conducted by the Eastern Iowa Community College District in 1986 revealed a lack of credit programs and curricula for training individuals in the technical aspects of hazardous materials management and need for hazardous materials technicians by local industry. In response, an associate of applied science (AAS) degree program in Hazardous…

  3. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  4. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  5. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  6. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  7. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  8. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  9. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  10. 49 CFR 176.74 - On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and proper lashing by use of wire rope, strapping or other means, including shoring and bracing, or... these must be free and clear of all cargo. (e) Crew and passenger spaces and areas set aside for the crew's use may not be used to stow any hazardous material. (f) A hazardous material may not be...

  11. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unwanted material that is not solid or... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Alternative... Eligible Academic Entities § 262.215 Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste. (a) If...

  12. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unwanted material that is not solid or... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Alternative... Eligible Academic Entities § 262.215 Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste. (a) If...

  13. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. 173.240 Section 173.240 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When §...

  14. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Transportation § 170.905 How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? (a) Tribes cannot use IRR Program funds to train personnel to handle radioactive and hazardous material. (b) Tribes can seek... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling...

  15. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  16. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  17. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  18. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  19. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  20. Comparative Investigation of Source Term Estimation Algorithms for Hazardous Material Atmospheric Transport and Dispersion Prediction Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    model was a simple, normally distributed measurement error model . DSTL’s Urban Dispersion Model ...field trial data or code-on-code comparisons. V&V of Urban Dispersion Modeling . Complex Urban dispersion modeling is an active area where T&D...Validation Analysis of Hazardous Material Assessment Model , Support for DTRA in the Validation Analysis of Hazardous Material Transport and Dispersion

  1. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions. 175.25 Section 175.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions. Each person who engages in for-hire...

  2. 49 CFR 1.96 - The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.96 The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. Is responsible for: (a) Pipelines. (1) Administering a national program of safety in natural...

  3. 49 CFR 1.96 - The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.96 The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. Is responsible for: (a) Pipelines. (1) Administering a national program of safety in natural...

  4. 49 CFR 1.96 - The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.96 The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. Is responsible for: (a) Pipelines. (1) Administering a national program of safety in natural...

  5. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (HMR) to persons and functions. 171.1 Section 171.1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... and functions. Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) directs the... transportation of hazardous materials in commerce and to pre-transportation and transportation functions....

  6. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  7. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  8. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  9. 33 CFR 155.310 - Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges. 155.310 Section 155.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION...

  10. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically...

  11. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically...

  12. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically...

  13. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically...

  14. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and non-DOT Specification portable tanks suitable for transport of liquids are authorized. For transportation by vessel, also see §...

  15. 41 CFR 102-80.35 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the monitoring of hazardous materials and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... local requirements. In addition to those operating in GSA space pursuant to a delegation of authority, tenants in GSA space must comply with these requirements. (b) In leased space, include in all agreements with the lessor requirements that hazardous materials stored in leased space are kept and...

  16. 41 CFR 102-80.35 - What are Federal agencies' responsibilities concerning the monitoring of hazardous materials and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... local requirements. In addition to those operating in GSA space pursuant to a delegation of authority, tenants in GSA space must comply with these requirements. (b) In leased space, include in all agreements with the lessor requirements that hazardous materials stored in leased space are kept and...

  17. 49 CFR 385.415 - What operational requirements apply to the transportation of a hazardous material for which a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...), 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001; and the National Archives and Records...) Additional requirements. A motor carrier transporting hazardous materials requiring a permit under this part... delivery of each permitted load. Contact may be by telephone, radio or via an electronic tracking...

  18. 49 CFR 385.415 - What operational requirements apply to the transportation of a hazardous material for which a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...), 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001; and the National Archives and Records...) Additional requirements. A motor carrier transporting hazardous materials requiring a permit under this part... delivery of each permitted load. Contact may be by telephone, radio or via an electronic tracking...

  19. 49 CFR 385.415 - What operational requirements apply to the transportation of a hazardous material for which a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...), 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001; and the National Archives and Records...) Additional requirements. A motor carrier transporting hazardous materials requiring a permit under this part... delivery of each permitted load. Contact may be by telephone, radio or via an electronic tracking...

  20. Additive Technology: Update on Current Materials and Applications in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Barazanchi, Abdullah; Li, Kai Chun; Al-Amleh, Basil; Lyons, Karl; Waddell, J Neil

    2017-02-01

    Additive manufacturing or 3D printing is becoming an alternative to subtractive manufacturing or milling in the area of computer-aided manufacturing. Research on material for use in additive manufacturing is ongoing, and a wide variety of materials are being used or developed for use in dentistry. Some materials, however, such as cobalt chromium, still lack sufficient research to allow definite conclusions about the suitability of their use in clinical dental practice. Despite this, due to the wide variety of machines that use additive manufacturing, there is much more flexibility in the build material and geometry when building structures compared with subtractive manufacturing. Overall additive manufacturing produces little material waste and is energy efficient when compared to subtractive manufacturing, due to passivity and the additive layering nature of the build process. Such features make the technique suitable to be used with fabricating structures out of hard to handle materials such as cobalt chromium. The main limitations of this technology include the appearance of steps due to layering of material and difficulty in fabricating certain material generally used in dentistry for use in 3D printing such as ceramics. The current pace of technological development, however, promises exciting possibilities.

  1. Determination of the fire hazards of mine materials using a radiant panel

    PubMed Central

    Harteis, S.P.; Litton, C.D.; Thomas, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a laboratory-scale method to rank the ignition and fire hazards of commonly used underground mine materials and to eliminate the need for the expensive large-scale tests that are currently being used. A radiant-panel apparatus was used to determine the materials’ relevant thermal characteristics: time to ignition, critical heat flux for ignition, heat of gasification, and mass-loss rate. Three thermal parameters, TRP, TP1 and TP4, were derived from the data, then developed and subsequently used to rank the combined ignition and fire hazards of the combustible materials from low hazard to high hazard. The results compared favorably with the thermal and ignition hazards of similar materials reported in the literature and support this approach as a simpler one for quantifying these combustible hazards. PMID:26877552

  2. Truck transportation of hazardous materials: a national overview. Final report, October 1983-October 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Maio, D.J.; Liu, T.K.

    1987-12-01

    The primary objective of the effort has been to provide government regulators and policymakers with (a) an estimate of the aggregate national volume of hazardous chemical and petroleum products transportation in trucks, (b) a profile of the truck fleet involved in hazardous-materials transport, and (c) the geographical distribution of the transport activity. After defining data sources and methods, hazardous chemical and petroleum products transport is quantified in terms of total tons, ton-miles, and haul distances. Truck-transport categories include domestic production from U.S. plants, imports from ports of entry, and distribution from regional storage facilities. Next, the report characterizes the truck fleet involved in hazardous-materials transport in terms of truck size, type, and placarded operations. Geographical distribution of truck transport of hazardous materials is then presented graphically, with traffic patterns mapped in terms of major highway corridors. Finally, trends in truck transport of hazardous chemical and petroleum products since 1977 are analyzed.

  3. Preparedness of hazardous materials emergencies in railyards: Guidance for railroads and adjacent communities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Railroads are a key part of the distribution system for hazardous materials and, thus, much hazardous material passes through railyards en route to intermediate or final consumers. While the vast majority of these materials are shipped without incident, both the number of shipments and the nature of the materials themselves dictate that railyards and surrounding communities be prepared to respond quickly and effectively to emergencies. This report contains information on 11 emergency preparedness functions and 150 guidance recommendations.

  4. Electrostatic Levitation for Studies of Additive Manufactured Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Tramel, Terri

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is a unique facility for investigators studying high temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified. Electrostatic levitation minimizes gravitational effects and allows materials to be studied without contact with a container or instrumentation. The lab also has a high temperature emissivity measurement system, which provides normal spectral and normal total emissivity measurements at use temperature. The ESL lab has been instrumental in many pioneering materials investigations of thermophysical properties, e.g., creep measurements, solidification, triggered nucleation, and emissivity at high temperatures. Research in the ESL lab has already led to the development of advanced high temperature materials for aerospace applications, coatings for rocket nozzles, improved medical and industrial optics, metallic glasses, ablatives for reentry vehicles, and materials with memory. Modeling of additive manufacturing materials processing is necessary for the study of their resulting materials properties. In addition, the modeling of the selective laser melting processes and its materials property predictions are also underway. Unfortunately, there is very little data for the properties of these materials, especially of the materials in the liquid state. Some method to measure thermophysical properties of additive manufacturing materials is necessary. The ESL lab is ideal for these studies. The lab can provide surface tension and viscosity of molten materials, density measurements, emissivity measurements, and even creep strength measurements. The ESL lab can also determine melting temperature, surface temperatures, and phase transition temperatures of additive manufactured materials. This presentation will provide background on the ESL lab and its capabilities, provide an approach to using the ESL

  5. Polymeric materials combustion: Toxicity hazards and legal aspects. January 1973-December 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1973-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning toxicity hazards and legal aspects of polymeric materials combustion in building, electrical and electronic applications. Flammability assessment, flame retardant additives, and toxicity standards of polymeric materials are discussed. Regulations and legislation on polymer flammability are presented. Health hazards caused by toxic gases from polymeric materials combustion are considered. (This updated bibliography contains 238 citations, 28 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  6. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-11-09

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

  7. Prospective study of hepatic, renal, and haematological surveillance in hazardous materials firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Kales, S; Polyhronopoulos, G; Aldrich, J; Mendoza, P; Suh, J; Christiani, D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate possible health effects related to work with hazardous materials as measured by end organ effect markers in a large cohort over about 2 years, and in a subcohort over 5 years.
METHODS—Hepatic, renal, and haematological variables were analysed from 1996-98 in hazardous materials firefighters including 288 hazardous materials technicians (81%) and 68 support workers (19%). The same end organ effect markers in a subcohort of the technicians were also analysed (n=35) from 1993-98. Support workers were considered as controls because they are also firefighters, but had a low potential exposure to hazardous materials.
RESULTS—During the study period, no serious injuries or exposures were reported. For the end organ effect markers studied, no significant differences were found between technicians and support workers at either year 1 or year 3. After adjustment for a change in laboratory, no significant longitudinal changes were found within groups for any of the markers except for creatinine which decreased for both technicians (p<0.001) and controls (p<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—Health effects related to work are infrequent among hazardous materials technicians. Haematological, hepatic, and renal testing is not required on an annual basis and has limited use in detecting health effects in hazardous materials technicians.


Keywords: hazardous materials; firefighters; medical surveillance PMID:11160986

  8. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  9. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  10. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  11. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  12. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  13. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory - environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhower, B.M.; Oakes, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    In the Federal Register of May 19, 1980, the US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated final hazardous waste regulations according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. The major substantive portions of these regulations went into effect on November 19, 1980, and established a federal program to provide comprehensive regulation of hazardous waste from its generation to its disposal. In an effort to comply with these regulations, a Hazardous Materials Management and Control Program was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program is administered by two Hazardous Materials Coordinators, who together with various support groups, ensure that all hazardous materials and wastes are handled in such a manner that all personnel, the general public, and the environment are adequately protected.

  14. Thermodynamically consistent microstructure prediction of additively manufactured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing has risen to the top of research interest in advanced manufacturing in recent years due to process flexibility, achievability of geometric complexity, and the ability to locally modify and optimize materials. The present work is focused on providing an approach for incorporating thermodynamically consistent properties and microstructure evolution for non-equilibrium supercooling, as observed in additive manufacturing processes, into finite element analysis. There are two primary benefits of this work: (1) the resulting prediction is based on the material composition and (2) the nonlinear behavior caused by the thermodynamic properties of the material during the non-equilibrium solution is accounted for with extremely high resolution. The predicted temperature response and microstructure evolution for additively manufactured stainless steel 316L using standard handbook-obtained thermodynamic properties are compared with the thermodynamic properties calculated using the CALculation of PHAse Diagrams (CALPHAD) approach. Data transfer from the CALPHAD approach to finite element analysis is discussed.

  15. An analysis of candidates for addition to the Clean Air Act list of hazardous air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Lunder, Sonya; Woodruff, Tracey J; Axelrad, Daniel A

    2004-02-01

    There are 188 air toxics listed as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in the Clean Air Act (CAA), based on their potential to adversely impact public health. This paper presents several analyses performed to screen potential candidates for addition to the HAPs list. We analyzed 1086 HAPs and potential HAPs, including chemicals regulated by the state of California or with emissions reported to the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI). HAPs and potential HAPs were ranked by their emissions to air, and by toxicity-weighted (tox-wtd) emissions for cancer and noncancer, using emissions information from the TRI and toxicity information from state and federal agencies. Separate consideration was given for persistent, bioaccumulative toxins (PBTs), reproductive or developmental toxins, and chemicals under evaluation for regulation as toxic air contaminants in California. Forty-four pollutants were identified as candidate HAPs based on three ranking analyses and whether they were a PBT or a reproductive or developmental toxin. Of these, nine qualified in two or three different rankings (ammonia [NH3], copper [Cu], Cu compounds, nitric acid [HNO3], N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, sulfuric acid [H2SO4], vanadium [V] compounds, zinc [Zn], and Zn compounds). This analysis suggests further evaluation of several pollutants for possible addition to the CAA list of HAPs.

  16. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events.

  17. 40 CFR 241.3 - Standards and procedures for identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... unit, and are produced from the processing of discarded non-hazardous secondary materials and that meet... industrial process. (iv) The non-hazardous secondary material must result in products that...

  18. Using choice experiments to assess people's preferences for railway transports of hazardous materials.

    PubMed

    Winslott Hiselius, Lena

    2005-10-01

    This article investigates whether the choice experiment approach can be used to assess people's preferences and the determinants of these preferences in order to estimate the costs and benefits of different configurations of the transport of hazardous materials by rail. Changes in the exposure to hazardous materials that people are subjected to are used rather than changes in accident risk. To the best knowledge of the author, this has not been done before in a study of people's preferences toward hazardous materials. A mail survey, carried out in two cities in Sweden, is used to obtain tentative estimates of the willingness to pay for a reduction in exposure as well as the willingness to accept an increase in exposure. Special attention is given to viability, since the complexity of the activity studied, transport of hazardous materials, and the method used pose particular challenges. The response rate and tests of validity and consistency indicate that this method can be applied. Moreover, the results suggest that studies of this kind may provide guidance on changes in the transport of hazardous materials, especially because policymakers may influence the attributes presented here. Referring to the exposure of hazardous materials highlights the importance of providing the respondents with adequate information regarding hazardous transports. An important finding is that the amount of background information may have some effect on the stated preferences.

  19. Teaching about Hazardous Materials. ERIC/SMEAC Environmental Education Digest No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disinger, John F.

    Problems related to the handling of hazardous substances and toxic wastes have escalated making this environmental dilemma a national concern. This digest provides an update of key legislative and management efforts associated with hazardous wastes and reviews current instructional materials in the area. Major topics addressed include: (1) waste…

  20. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When § 172... portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and sift-proof...

  1. Transport and Reactivity of Decontaminants to Provide Hazard Mitigation of Chemical Warfare Agents from Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    A combined approach was developed that integrated two types of testing—dilute liquid-phase reactor results to determine 18 chemical reactivity...TRANSPORT AND REACTIVITY OF DECONTAMINANTS TO PROVIDE HAZARD MITIGATION OF CHEMICAL ...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Transport and Reactivity of Decontaminants to Provide Hazard Mitigation of Chemical Warfare Agents from Materials 5a

  2. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  3. 49 CFR 173.155 - Exceptions for Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... the material meets the definition of a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, marine pollutant, or is offered for transportation and transported by aircraft or vessel, and is eligible for the...

  4. 49 CFR 173.155 - Exceptions for Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... the material meets the definition of a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, marine pollutant, or is offered for transportation and transported by aircraft or vessel, and is eligible for the...

  5. 49 CFR 173.155 - Exceptions for Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... the material meets the definition of a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, marine pollutant, or is offered for transportation and transported by aircraft or vessel, and is eligible for the...

  6. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  7. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  8. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  9. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  10. Methods for the additive manufacturing of semiconductor and crystal materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Speight, Douglas

    2016-11-22

    A method for the additive manufacturing of inorganic crystalline materials, including: physically combining a plurality of starting materials that are used to form an inorganic crystalline compound to be used as one or more of a semiconductor, scintillator, laser crystal, and optical filter; heating or melting successive regions of the combined starting materials using a directed heat source having a predetermined energy characteristic, thereby facilitating the reaction of the combined starting materials; and allowing each region of the combined starting materials to cool in a controlled manner, such that the desired inorganic crystalline compound results. The method also includes, prior to heating or melting the successive regions of the combined starting materials using the directed heat source, heating the combined starting materials to facilitate initial reaction of the combined starting materials. The method further includes translating the combined starting materials and/or the directed heat source between successive locations. The method still further includes controlling the mechanical, electrical, photonic, and/or optical properties of the inorganic crystalline compound.

  11. 49 CFR 173.243 - Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Class 8, Packing Group I and II) by a closure activated at a temperature not over 121 °C (250 °F); MC... requirements in § 178.337-11 of this subchapter. (c) Portable tanks. DOT Specification 51 and 60 portable tanks... liquid hazardous material that is a Class 3, PG I or II, or PG III with a flash point of less than 38...

  12. 49 CFR 173.227 - Materials poisonous by inhalation, Division 6.1, Packing Group I, Hazard Zone B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials poisonous by inhalation, Division 6.1, Packing Group I, Hazard Zone B. 173.227 Section 173.227 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  13. 41 CFR 101-42.209 - Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.209 Section 101-42.209 Public... OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.209 Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. The...

  14. 41 CFR 101-42.406 - Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.406 Section 101-42.406... CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.406 Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials...

  15. 41 CFR 101-42.209 - Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.209 Section 101-42.209 Public... OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.209 Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. The...

  16. 41 CFR 101-42.406 - Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.406 Section 101-42.406... CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.406 Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials...

  17. 41 CFR 101-42.209 - Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.209 Section 101-42.209 Public... OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.209 Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. The...

  18. 41 CFR 101-42.406 - Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.406 Section 101-42.406... CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.406 Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials...

  19. 41 CFR 101-42.406 - Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.406 Section 101-42.406... CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.406 Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials...

  20. 41 CFR 101-42.209 - Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.209 Section 101-42.209 Public... OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.209 Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. The...

  1. 41 CFR 101-42.209 - Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. The special handling requirements associated with many hazardous materials often increase the cost of core and handling... associated with hazardous materials. Only the cost of transportation and handling incurred incident to...

  2. 49 CFR 176.77 - Stowage of barges containing hazardous materials on board barge-carrying vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of barges containing hazardous materials on board barge-carrying vessels. 176.77 Section 176.77 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  3. 75 FR 80893 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... the application for, and the processing of, special permits from the Department of Transportations... Hazardous Materials Safety has received the application described herein. Each mode of transportation...

  4. 33 CFR 155.310 - Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS...) For a tankship, as defined in 46 CFR 30.10-67, the coaming or other barrier required in 46 CFR...

  5. 49 CFR 176.74 - On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... water damage must be protected so that it will not be exposed to the weather or to sea water. (c) Not... (except Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous material). (d) Fireplugs, hoses, sounding pipes, and access...

  6. 75 FR 9634 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... published in accordance with Part 107 of the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5 117.... Boyle 49 CFR 173.835(g).. To modify the special Transportation, permit to authorize an Inc....

  7. 77 FR 5305 - Hazardous Materials: Special Permit and Approval Applicant Fitness Determinations; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... Applicant Fitness Determinations; Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... persons that PHMSA will conduct a public meeting to discuss Special Permit and Approval applicant fitness... criteria used when determining an applicant's minimum level of fitness. DATES: Public Meeting:...

  8. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory--environmental protection.

    PubMed

    Eisenhower, B M; Oakes, T W; Braunstein, H M

    1984-04-01

    At a large research laboratory facility the management and control of hazardous materials, and their subsequent wastes can be an unmanageable task. Environmental regulations, mandated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, established a Federal program to provide comprehensive regulation of hazardous solid waste materials from their generation time to their disposal. In an effort to comply with these regulations, a Hazardous Materials Management and Control Program was created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program provides personnel with specific guidelines for the procurement, use, storage, transportation and disposal of hazardous materials/wastes, and ensures that they are managed in a manner which adequately protects all personnel, the general public, and the environment.

  9. Report: EPA Provided Quality and Timely Information on Hurricane Katrina Hazardous Material Releases and Debris Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2006-P-00023, May 2, 2006. After Hurricane Katrina, EPA was the agency with lead responsibility to prevent, minimize, or mitigate threats to public health and the environment caused by hazardous materials and oil spills in inland zones.

  10. Statistical inference for the additive hazards model under outcome-dependent sampling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jichang; Liu, Yanyan; Sandler, Dale P; Zhou, Haibo

    2015-09-01

    Cost-effective study design and proper inference procedures for data from such designs are always of particular interests to study investigators. In this article, we propose a biased sampling scheme, an outcome-dependent sampling (ODS) design for survival data with right censoring under the additive hazards model. We develop a weighted pseudo-score estimator for the regression parameters for the proposed design and derive the asymptotic properties of the proposed estimator. We also provide some suggestions for using the proposed method by evaluating the relative efficiency of the proposed method against simple random sampling design and derive the optimal allocation of the subsamples for the proposed design. Simulation studies show that the proposed ODS design is more powerful than other existing designs and the proposed estimator is more efficient than other estimators. We apply our method to analyze a cancer study conducted at NIEHS, the Cancer Incidence and Mortality of Uranium Miners Study, to study the risk of radon exposure to cancer.

  11. Statistical inference for the additive hazards model under outcome-dependent sampling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jichang; Liu, Yanyan; Sandler, Dale P.; Zhou, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective study design and proper inference procedures for data from such designs are always of particular interests to study investigators. In this article, we propose a biased sampling scheme, an outcome-dependent sampling (ODS) design for survival data with right censoring under the additive hazards model. We develop a weighted pseudo-score estimator for the regression parameters for the proposed design and derive the asymptotic properties of the proposed estimator. We also provide some suggestions for using the proposed method by evaluating the relative efficiency of the proposed method against simple random sampling design and derive the optimal allocation of the subsamples for the proposed design. Simulation studies show that the proposed ODS design is more powerful than other existing designs and the proposed estimator is more efficient than other estimators. We apply our method to analyze a cancer study conducted at NIEHS, the Cancer Incidence and Mortality of Uranium Miners Study, to study the risk of radon exposure to cancer. PMID:26379363

  12. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  13. Materials Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRC's Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  14. Material Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRCs Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  15. Overview of Materials Qualification Needs for Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Mohsen; Salem, Ayman; Beuth, Jack; Harrysson, Ola; Lewandowski, John J.

    2016-03-01

    This overview highlights some of the key aspects regarding materials qualification needs across the additive manufacturing (AM) spectrum. AM technology has experienced considerable publicity and growth in the past few years with many successful insertions for non-mission-critical applications. However, to meet the full potential that AM has to offer, especially for flight-critical components (e.g., rotating parts, fracture-critical parts, etc.), qualification and certification efforts are necessary. While development of qualification standards will address some of these needs, this overview outlines some of the other key areas that will need to be considered in the qualification path, including various process-, microstructure-, and fracture-modeling activities in addition to integrating these with lifing activities targeting specific components. Ongoing work in the Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center at Case Western Reserve University is focusing on fracture and fatigue testing to rapidly assess critical mechanical properties of some titanium alloys before and after post-processing, in addition to conducting nondestructive testing/evaluation using micro-computerized tomography at General Electric. Process mapping studies are being conducted at Carnegie Mellon University while large area microstructure characterization and informatics (EBSD and BSE) analyses are being conducted at Materials Resources LLC to enable future integration of these efforts via an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering approach to AM. Possible future pathways for materials qualification are provided.

  16. AN AZERBAIDZHAN SSR. INSTITUTE OF ADDITIVE CHEMISTRY ADDITIVES TO LUBRICATING OILS. PROBLEMS OF SYNTHESIS, INVESTIGATION AND USE OF OIL ADDITIVES; FUELS AND POLYMER MATERIALS (SELECTED ARTICLES),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An Azerbaidzhan SSR. Institute of additive chemistry additives to lubricating oils . Problems of synthesis, investigation and use of oil additives; fuels and polymer materials (Selected articles)--Translation.

  17. 49 CFR 177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 173.12(e) of this subchapter, cyanides, cyanide mixtures or solutions may not be stored, loaded and transported with acids if a mixture of the materials would generate hydrogen cyanide; Division 4.2 materials... materials together when it is known that the mixture of contents would not cause a fire or a...

  18. Dioxin emissions from industrial boilers burning hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Castaldini, C.; Olexsey, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory analyses for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDF) were performed on waste fuels and stack gas emission samples from five industrial boiler test sites cofiring liquid hazardous wastes. Analytical results indicate that, apart from creosote sludge, chlorinated wastes were void of PCDD and PCDF compounds at detection limits in the range of 0.045 to 4.17 ppb. Creosote sludge cofired with wood waste in a stoker boiler was found to contain 7.4 ppm of total dioxins, primarily hepta and octa homologs.

  19. EPA Adds Five Hazardous Waste Sites to Superfunds National Priorities List and Proposes an Additional Seven

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON -- Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is adding five hazardous waste sites that pose risks to human health and the environment to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL). A separate action includes a proposal to ad

  20. Flows of selected hazardous materials by rail. Final report for Sep 87-Apr 91

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, F.; Church, R.; Zebe, P.; Frev, J.

    1991-05-01

    The report is a review of hazardous materials rail traffic in the continental United States. It focuses on the year 1986, a relatively typical recent year in which an estimated total of 1,477 million net tons of freight was moved by rail. Of this, 63 million net tons, or four percent of the total, were hazardous materials. The report is designed to characterize the flow of selected hazardous materials and show their geographical distribution. It focusses on materials that (1) have large tonnages moving by rail, such as Products of Refining, (2) are regarded as especially dangerous, such as Products That May Be Toxic by Inhalation, or (3) have been recently designated as hazardous materials, such as molten or liquid sulphur. Its scope includes national, state and Business Economic Areas (BEAs) rail traffic. The purpose of the report is to help those in government and industry who are interested in the flows of hazardous materials see how these materials are geographically distributed by rail.

  1. Complex metallic alloys as new materials for additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Kenzari, Samuel; Bonina, David; Marie Dubois, Jean; Fournée, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing processes allow freeform fabrication of the physical representation of a three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) data model. This area has been expanding rapidly over the last 20 years. It includes several techniques such as selective laser sintering and stereolithography. The range of materials used today is quite restricted while there is a real demand for manufacturing lighter functional parts or parts with improved functional properties. In this article, we summarize recent work performed in this field, introducing new composite materials containing complex metallic alloys. These are mainly Al-based quasicrystalline alloys whose properties differ from those of conventional alloys. The use of these materials allows us to produce light-weight parts consisting of either metal–matrix composites or of polymer–matrix composites with improved properties. Functional parts using these alloys are now commercialized. PMID:27877661

  2. Complex metallic alloys as new materials for additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kenzari, Samuel; Bonina, David; Marie Dubois, Jean; Fournée, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Additive manufacturing processes allow freeform fabrication of the physical representation of a three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) data model. This area has been expanding rapidly over the last 20 years. It includes several techniques such as selective laser sintering and stereolithography. The range of materials used today is quite restricted while there is a real demand for manufacturing lighter functional parts or parts with improved functional properties. In this article, we summarize recent work performed in this field, introducing new composite materials containing complex metallic alloys. These are mainly Al-based quasicrystalline alloys whose properties differ from those of conventional alloys. The use of these materials allows us to produce light-weight parts consisting of either metal-matrix composites or of polymer-matrix composites with improved properties. Functional parts using these alloys are now commercialized.

  3. Complex metallic alloys as new materials for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenzari, Samuel; Bonina, David; Dubois, Jean Marie; Fournée, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Additive manufacturing processes allow freeform fabrication of the physical representation of a three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) data model. This area has been expanding rapidly over the last 20 years. It includes several techniques such as selective laser sintering and stereolithography. The range of materials used today is quite restricted while there is a real demand for manufacturing lighter functional parts or parts with improved functional properties. In this article, we summarize recent work performed in this field, introducing new composite materials containing complex metallic alloys. These are mainly Al-based quasicrystalline alloys whose properties differ from those of conventional alloys. The use of these materials allows us to produce light-weight parts consisting of either metal-matrix composites or of polymer-matrix composites with improved properties. Functional parts using these alloys are now commercialized.

  4. Analyses of Hazardous Substances in Biological Materials: Volume 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angerer, Jürgen; Schaller, Karl-Heinz

    1996-10-01

    Biological monitoring has proved extremely valuable in assessing the health risk of persons exposed to hazardous chemical substances in the environment or at the workplace. The chemical compounds are generally determined in body fluids. They are present in trace or ultratrace concentrations. Specific and extremely sensitive methods of chemical analysis are necessary to separate these substances from the biological matrix and to determine them precisely. This volume contains 12 standardized analytical methods. All methods are suitable for routine use. They meet exceptionally high standards of reliability and reproducibility and are in accordance with 'Good Laboratory Practice'. Considerable emphasis is placed on sample collection methods and on analytical quality control. One gereral chapter introduces biological monitoring using ICP-spectroscopy.

  5. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Toxic or Hazardous Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Treatment, and Disposal of Toxic or Hazardous Materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal..., Treatment, and Disposal of Toxic or Hazardous Materials. As prescribed in 223.7106, use the basic clause or..., TREATMENT, AND DISPOSAL OF TOXIC OR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS—BASIC (SEP 2014) (a) Definitions. As used in...

  6. Proposal of the confinement strategy of radioactive and hazardous materials for the European DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X. Z.; Carloni, D.; Stieglitz, R.; Ciattaglia, S.; Johnston, J.; Taylor, N.

    2017-04-01

    Confinement of radioactive and hazardous materials is one of the fundamental safety functions in a nuclear fusion facility, which has to limit the mobilisation and dispersion of sources and hazards during normal, abnormal and accidental situations. In a first step energy sources and radioactive source have been assessed for a conceptual DEMO configuration. The confinement study for the European DEMO has been investigated for the main systems at the plant breakdown structure (PBS) level 1 taking a bottom-up approach. Based on the identification of the systems possessing a confinement function, a confinement strategy has been proposed, in which DEMO confinement systems and barriers have been defined. In addition, confinement for the maintenance has been issued as well. The assignment of confinement barriers to the identified sources under abnormal and accidental conditions has been performed, and the DEMO main safety systems have been proposed as well. Finally, confinement related open issues have been pointed out, which need to be resolved in parallel with DEMO development.

  7. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  8. 49 CFR 173.2 - Hazardous materials classes and index to hazard class definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-flammable compressed gas 173.115 2 2.3 Poisonous gas 173.115 3 Flammable and combustible liquid 173.120 4 4.1 Flammable solid 173.124 4 4.2 Spontaneously combustible material 173.124 4 4.3 Dangerous when...

  9. 49 CFR 177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... § 173.12(e) of this subchapter, cyanides, cyanide mixtures or solutions may not be stored, loaded and... materials together when it is known that the mixture of contents would not cause a fire or a...

  10. 77 FR 31815 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Combustible Liquids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... states that the most widely-used commercial explosive product in the U.S. is ammonium nitrate/fuel oil... nitrate/fuel oil materials (``ANFO''), of blends of the two directly into boreholes, which are equipped...

  11. ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

    2003-02-27

    The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  13. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains a minimum of 132 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains a minimum of 137 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Navy Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS). Hazardous Materials Control Module. Users’ Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-16

    Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS) 6 Hazardous Materials Control Module (HMC) User’s Manual 7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization...Materials Control (HMC) module of the Naval Medical Command’s (NAVMED) Navy Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS). After presenting

  17. 14 CFR 139.321 - Handling and storing of hazardous substances and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... substances and materials. (a) Each certificate holder who acts as a cargo handling agent must establish and...: (1) Designated personnel to receive and handle hazardous substances and materials. (2) Assurance from... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Handling and storing of...

  18. Mechanical characterisation of additively manufactured material having lattice microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuan-Urquizo, E.; Yang, S.; Bhaskar, A.

    2015-02-01

    Many natural and engineered structures possess cellular and porous architecture. This paper is focused on the mechanical characterisation of additively manufactured lattice structures. The lattice consists of a stack of polylactic acid (PLA) filaments in a woodpile arrangement fabricated using a fused deposition modelling 3D printer. Some of the most promising applications of this 3D lattice material of this type include scaffolds for tissue engineering and the core for sandwich panels. While there is a significant body of work concerning the manufacture of such lattice materials, attempts to understand their mechanical properties are very limited. This paper brings together manufacturing with the need to understand the structure-property relationship for this class of materials. In order to understand the elastic response of the PLA-based lattice structures obtained from the fused deposition modelling process, single filaments manufactured using the same process were experimentally characterised first. The single PLA filaments were manufactured under different temperatures. These filaments were then characterised by using tensile testing. The stress-strain curves are presented. The variability of the measured results is discussed. The measured properties are then taken as input to a finite element model of the lattice material. This model uses simple one-dimensional elements in conjunction with a novel method achieving computational economy which precludes the use of fine meshes. Using this novel model, the apparent elastic modulus of lattice along the filaments has been obtained and is presented in this paper.

  19. Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

    2000-03-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

  20. Rapid Solidification and Phase Transformations in Additive Manufactured Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2016-01-14

    Within the past few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a promising manufacturing technique to enable the production of complex engineering structures with high efficiency and accuracy. Among the important factors establishing AM as a sustainable manufacturing process is the ability to control the microstructures and properties of AM products. In most AM processes, such as laser sintering (LS), laser melting (LM), and laser metal deposition (LMD), rapid solidification and high-temperature phase transformations play primary roles in determining nano- and microstructures, and consequently the mechanical and other properties of AM products. This topic of JOM is dedicated to summarizingmore » the current research efforts in the area of rapid solidification and phase transformations in additively manufactured materials. Finally, a brief summary follows below of 10 journal articles in this topic.« less

  1. Rapid Solidification and Phase Transformations in Additive Manufactured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2016-01-14

    Within the past few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a promising manufacturing technique to enable the production of complex engineering structures with high efficiency and accuracy. Among the important factors establishing AM as a sustainable manufacturing process is the ability to control the microstructures and properties of AM products. In most AM processes, such as laser sintering (LS), laser melting (LM), and laser metal deposition (LMD), rapid solidification and high-temperature phase transformations play primary roles in determining nano- and microstructures, and consequently the mechanical and other properties of AM products. This topic of JOM is dedicated to summarizing the current research efforts in the area of rapid solidification and phase transformations in additively manufactured materials. Finally, a brief summary follows below of 10 journal articles in this topic.

  2. 75 FR 17111 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Combustible Liquids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... defined as liquids, or mixtures of liquids, or liquids containing solids in solution or suspension (for... (Poisonous gas) materials, as defined in Sec. 173.115; mixtures that are not offered for transportation at or... flash point greater than 35 C (95 F) which is in a water-miscible solution with a water content of...

  3. DoD Hazardous Materials Information System Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    points to obtain a ILA assigned code. Since water is the most commonly used solvent and since it is not assigned a NIOSH code the following locally...cf* various materials, with its length greater than its other dimensions, e.g., solder. Not applicable to items such as soap, beeswax , buffing

  4. Electrolytic decontamination of conductive materials for hazardous waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolytic removal of plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium surfaces has been demonstrated. Preliminary experiments were performed on the electrochemically based decontamination of type 304L stainless steel in sodium nitrate solutions to better understand the metal removal effects of varying cur-rent density, pH, and nitrate concentration parameters. Material removal rates and changes in surface morphology under these varying conditions are reported. Experimental results indicate that an electropolishing step before contamination removes surface roughness, thereby simplifying later electrolytic decontamination. Sodium nitrate based electrolytic decontamination produced the most uniform stripping of material at low to intermediate pH and at sodium nitrate concentrations of 200 g L{sup -1} and higher. Stirring was also observed to increase the uniformity of the stripping process.

  5. Dredging and dewatering sediment containing hazardous and toxic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Askin, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Dredging is a common method of remediating ponds containing contaminated wastes. However, dewatering of the dredged solids is usually not well integrated with the dredging phase. As a result, overall project efficiency can be poor. Specifically, since dredges deliver material in a widely varying slurry form and since dewatering presses require the delivered material to be uniform, union of the two systems often results in inconsistent operation of the overall process. In an effort to enhance overall dredging and dewatering process production rates as well as minimize the return of suspended solids in the decant water, a new process was developed to provide a consistent dredged sludge for delivery to the press. This paper discusses modifications made to a conventional dredging and dewatering process to improve production rates and dewatering capabilities. These modifications are applicable to any project where efficient solids dewatering is required and where returning decant water must be visually free of suspended solids. 4 figs.

  6. Intra-aortic filtration is effective in collecting hazardous materials.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Carlos-A; Bernabeu, Eduardo; Fernández, Claudio; Colli, Andrea; Josa, Miguel

    2007-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac operations are mostly due to particle embolization. This case illustrates the embolic potential of any material. A 77-year-old lady underwent re-operation for homograft aortic regurgitation and mitral valve replacement. Intra-aortic filtration was used. After cardiopulmonary bypass the filter was found to have captured a pledget from a suture used to secure the mitral replacement device.

  7. Time-correlations in the dynamics of hazardous material pipelines incidents.

    PubMed

    Sosa, E; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2009-06-15

    This paper addresses the following question: Are the hazardous materials pipeline incidents non-randomly time distributed? Our analysis suggests that they are correlated, which means that a hazardous materials pipeline incident is not independent from the time elapsed since the previous event. That is, our statistical tests suggest that previous accident counts correlate with future counts. But, if we consider incidents with a large severity index (spills and property damage), the phenomenon is unpredictable, since it approaches a Poissonian process (random, independent and uncorrelated).

  8. Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility.

  9. Hazardous material minimization for radar assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendment, enacted in November 1990, empowered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to completely eliminate the production and usage of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by January 2000. A reduction schedule for methyl chloroform beginning in 1993 with complete elimination by January 2002 was also mandated. In order to meet the mandates, the processes, equipment, and materials used to solder and clean electronic assemblies were investigated. A vapor-containing cleaning system was developed. The system can be used with trichloroethylene or d-Limonene. The solvent can be collected for recycling if desired. Fluxless and no-clean soldering were investigated, and the variables for a laser soldering process were identified.

  10. Materials for Shielding Astronauts from the Hazards of Space Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Miller, J.; Shinn, J. L.; Thibeault, S. A.; Singleterry, R. C.; Simonsen, L. C.; Kim, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effects of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human spaceflight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar energetic particle (SEP) events was of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since the missions are of long duration and the accumulated exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to rather large thickness of aluminum shielding according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to GCR like ions, the shield requirements for a Mars mission are prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Preliminary studies indicate that materials with high hydrogen content and low atomic number constituents are most efficient in protecting the astronauts. This occurs for two reasons: the hydrogen is efficient in breaking up the heavy GCR ions into smaller less damaging fragments and the light constituents produce few secondary radiations (especially few biologically damaging neutrons). An overview of the materials related issues and their impact on human space exploration will be given.

  11. Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling of Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Frank; Newkirk, Joseph; Fan, Zhiqiang; Sparks, Todd; Chen, Xueyang; Fletcher, Kenneth; Zhang, Jingwei; Zhang, Yunlu; Kumar, Kannan Suresh; Karnati, Sreekar

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this proposed project is to research and develop a prediction tool for advanced additive manufacturing (AAM) processes for advanced materials and develop experimental methods to provide fundamental properties and establish validation data. Aircraft structures and engines demand materials that are stronger, useable at much higher temperatures, provide less acoustic transmission, and enable more aeroelastic tailoring than those currently used. Significant improvements in properties can only be achieved by processing the materials under nonequilibrium conditions, such as AAM processes. AAM processes encompass a class of processes that use a focused heat source to create a melt pool on a substrate. Examples include Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Direct Metal Deposition. These types of additive processes enable fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. To achieve the desired material properties and geometries of the final structure, assessing the impact of process parameters and predicting optimized conditions with numerical modeling as an effective prediction tool is necessary. The targets for the processing are multiple and at different spatial scales, and the physical phenomena associated occur in multiphysics and multiscale. In this project, the research work has been developed to model AAM processes in a multiscale and multiphysics approach. A macroscale model was developed to investigate the residual stresses and distortion in AAM processes. A sequentially coupled, thermomechanical, finite element model was developed and validated experimentally. The results showed the temperature distribution, residual stress, and deformation within the formed deposits and substrates. A mesoscale model was developed to include heat transfer, phase change with mushy zone, incompressible free surface flow, solute redistribution, and surface tension. Because of excessive computing time needed, a parallel computing approach was also tested. In addition

  12. ANALYSIS OF MPC ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR ADDITION OF FILLER MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    W. Wallin

    1996-09-03

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) in response to a request received via a QAP-3-12 Design Input Data Request (Ref. 5.1) from WAST Design (formerly MRSMPC Design). The request is to provide: Specific MPC access requirements for the addition of filler materials at the MGDS (i.e., location and size of access required). The objective of this analysis is to provide a response to the foregoing request. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a documented record of the basis for the response. The response is stated in Section 8 herein. The response is based upon requirements from an MGDS perspective.

  13. 49 CFR 173.226 - Materials poisonous by inhalation, Division 6.1, Packing Group I, Hazard Zone A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials poisonous by inhalation, Division 6.1... Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Packaging...

  14. 40 CFR 262.210 - Making the hazardous waste determination in the laboratory before the unwanted material is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)(3) for acute hazardous waste, or § 261.5(g)(3) for hazardous waste. (e) An unwanted material that is... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Making the hazardous waste....210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES...

  15. 40 CFR 262.210 - Making the hazardous waste determination in the laboratory before the unwanted material is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)(3) for acute hazardous waste, or § 261.5(g)(3) for hazardous waste. (e) An unwanted material that is... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Making the hazardous waste....210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES...

  16. 40 CFR 262.210 - Making the hazardous waste determination in the laboratory before the unwanted material is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)(3) for acute hazardous waste, or § 261.5(g)(3) for hazardous waste. (e) An unwanted material that is... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Making the hazardous waste....210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES...

  17. Graphene-based materials for the electrochemical determination of hazardous ions.

    PubMed

    Molina, J; Cases, F; Moretto, L M

    2016-11-23

    The use of graphene in the field of electrochemical sensors is increasing due to two main properties that make graphene and derivatives appealing for this purpose: their conductivity and high surface area. In addition, graphene materials can be easily functionalized with nanoparticles (Au, Pt, etc.) or organic molecules (DNA, polymers, etc.) producing synergies that allow higher sensitivity, lower limit of detection as well as increased selectivity. The present review focuses on the most important works published related to graphene-based electrochemical sensors for the determination of hazardous ions (such as As(III), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Hg(2+), Cr(VI), Cu(2+), Ag(+), etc.). The review presents examples of the use of graphene-based electrodes for this purpose as well as important parameters of the sensors such as: limit of detection, linear range, sensitivity, main interferences, stability, and reproducibility. The application of these graphene-based electrodes in real samples (water or food matrices) is indicated, as well. There is room for improvement of these type of sensors and more effort should be devoted to the use of doped graphene (doped for instance with N, B, S, Se, etc.) since electrochemically active sites originated by doping facilitate charge transfer, adsorption and activation of analytes, and fixation of functional moieties/molecules. This will allow the sensitivity and the selectivity of the electrodes to be increased when combined with other materials (nanoparticles/organic molecules).

  18. Disposal of hazardous materials from TxDOT activities. Final report, September 1992-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, M.; Corapcioglu, M.Y.; Beavers, T.; Beck, B.; Mehevec, A.

    1994-11-01

    The process of purchasing, storing, handling and disposal of hazardous waste is demanding. The Texas Department of Transportation deals with many such compounds every day in performing its duty of maintaining over 70,000 miles of Texas roadway. With the new demands being placed on all users of hazardous materials by the new EPA guidelines, procedures must be enacted to ensure TxDOT`s compliance with these ever-changing regulations. The placement of full-time safety and hazardous materials coordinators in each district office will help to ensure that employees follow reporting procedures and use disposal guidelines. The report will discuss these actions and others that might help TxDOT in this task.

  19. Hazardous'' terminology

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of terms (e.g., hazardous chemicals,'' hazardous materials,'' hazardous waste,'' and similar nomenclature) refer to substances that are subject to regulation under one or more federal environmental laws. State laws and regulations also provide additional, similar, or identical terminology that may be confused with the federally defined terms. Many of these terms appear synonymous, and it easy to use them interchangeably. However, in a regulatory context, inappropriate use of narrowly defined terms can lead to confusion about the substances referred to, the statutory provisions that apply, and the regulatory requirements for compliance under the applicable federal statutes. This information Brief provides regulatory definitions, a brief discussion of compliance requirements, and references for the precise terminology that should be used when referring to hazardous'' substances regulated under federal environmental laws. A companion CERCLA Information Brief (EH-231-004/0191) addresses toxic'' nomenclature.

  20. Filter-based chemical sensors for hazardous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Kevin J.; Ewing, Kenneth J.; Poutous, Menelaos K.; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.

    2014-05-01

    The development of new techniques for the detection of homemade explosive devices is an area of intense research for the defense community. Such sensors must exhibit high selectivity to detect explosives and/or explosives related materials in a complex environment. Spectroscopic techniques such as FTIR are capable of discriminating between the volatile components of explosives; however, there is a need for less expensive systems for wide-range use in the field. To tackle this challenge we are investigating the use of multiple, overlapping, broad-band infrared (IR) filters to enable discrimination of volatile chemicals associated with an explosive device from potential background interferants with similar chemical signatures. We present an optical approach for the detection of fuel oil (the volatile component in ammonium nitrate-fuel oil explosives) that relies on IR absorption spectroscopy in a laboratory environment. Our proposed system utilizes a three filter set to separate the IR signals from fuel oil and various background interferants in the sample headspace. Filter responses for the chemical spectra are calculated using a Gaussian filter set. We demonstrate that using a specifically chosen filter set enables discrimination of pure fuel oil, hexanes, and acetone, as well as various mixtures of these components. We examine the effects of varying carrier gasses and humidity on the collected spectra and corresponding filter response. We study the filter response on these mixtures over time as well as present a variety of methods for observing the filter response functions to determine the response of this approach to detecting fuel oil in various environments.

  1. Radioactivity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials and end products.

    PubMed

    Viruthagiri, G; Rajamannan, B; Suresh Jawahar, K

    2013-12-01

    Studies have been planned to obtain activity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials (quartz, feldspar, clay, zircon, kaolin, grog, alumina bauxite, baddeleyite, masse, dolomite and red mud) and end products (ceramic brick, glazed ceramic wall and floor tiles) as the activity concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium vary from material to material. The primordial radionuclides in ceramic raw materials and end products are one of the sources of radiation hazard in dwellings made of these materials. By the determination of the activity level in these materials, the indoor radiological hazard to human health can be assessed. This is an important precautionary measure whenever the dose rate is found to be above the recommended limits. The aim of this work was to measure the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in ceramic raw materials and end products. The activity of these materials has been measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry, which contains an NaI(Tl) detector connected to multichannel analyser (MCA). Radium equivalent activity, alpha-gamma indices and radiation hazard indices associated with the natural radionuclides are calculated to assess the radiological aspects of the use of the ceramic end products as decorative or covering materials in construction sector. Results obtained were examined in the light of the relevant international legislation and guidance and compared with the results of similar studies reported in different countries. The results suggest that the use of ceramic end product samples examined in the construction of dwellings, workplace and industrial buildings is unlikely to give rise to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants.

  2. 49 CFR 176.76 - Transport vehicles, freight containers, and portable tanks containing hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.76 Transport... in which any flammable liquid or gas is stowed. Any heating or air conditioning equipment having a... Class DOT-113 or AAR-204W tank cars. (h) A fumigated cargo transport unit may only be transported...

  3. 49 CFR 176.76 - Transport vehicles, freight containers, and portable tanks containing hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.76 Transport... any flammable liquid or gas is stowed. Any heating or air conditioning equipment having a fuel tank... cars. (h) A fumigated cargo transport unit may only be transported on board a vessel subject to...

  4. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What standards govern transportation of radioactive and... Transportation § 170.901 What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials? DOT, the... Protection Agency have established standards and regulations for the shipment of radioactive and...

  5. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What standards govern transportation of radioactive and... Transportation § 170.901 What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials? DOT, the... Protection Agency have established standards and regulations for the shipment of radioactive and...

  6. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What standards govern transportation of radioactive and... Transportation § 170.901 What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials? DOT, the... Protection Agency have established standards and regulations for the shipment of radioactive and...

  7. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What standards govern transportation of radioactive and... Transportation § 170.901 What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials? DOT, the... Protection Agency have established standards and regulations for the shipment of radioactive and...

  8. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What standards govern transportation of radioactive and... Transportation § 170.901 What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials? DOT, the... Protection Agency have established standards and regulations for the shipment of radioactive and...

  9. 49 CFR 176.76 - Transport vehicles, freight containers, and portable tanks containing hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hazardous materials may be carried only on board a trailership, trainship, ferry vessel or car float. (c) (d... any flammable liquid or gas is stowed. Any heating or air conditioning equipment having a fuel tank containing a flammable liquid or gas may be stowed only “on deck”. Equipment electrically powered...

  10. Integrated risk reduction framework to improve railway hazardous materials transportation safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Saat, M Rapik; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2013-09-15

    Rail transportation plays a critical role to safely and efficiently transport hazardous materials. A number of strategies have been implemented or are being developed to reduce the risk of hazardous materials release from train accidents. Each of these risk reduction strategies has its safety benefit and corresponding implementation cost. However, the cost effectiveness of the integration of different risk reduction strategies is not well understood. Meanwhile, there has been growing interest in the U.S. rail industry and government to best allocate resources for improving hazardous materials transportation safety. This paper presents an optimization model that considers the combination of two types of risk reduction strategies, broken rail prevention and tank car safety design enhancement. A Pareto-optimality technique is used to maximize risk reduction at a given level of investment. The framework presented in this paper can be adapted to address a broader set of risk reduction strategies and is intended to assist decision makers for local, regional and system-wide risk management of rail hazardous materials transportation.

  11. Probability analysis of multiple-tank-car release incidents in railway hazardous materials transportation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Saat, Mohd Rapik; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2014-07-15

    Railroads play a key role in the transportation of hazardous materials in North America. Rail transport differs from highway transport in several aspects, an important one being that rail transport involves trains in which many railcars carrying hazardous materials travel together. By contrast to truck accidents, it is possible that a train accident may involve multiple hazardous materials cars derailing and releasing contents with consequently greater potential impact on human health, property and the environment. In this paper, a probabilistic model is developed to estimate the probability distribution of the number of tank cars releasing contents in a train derailment. Principal operational characteristics considered include train length, derailment speed, accident cause, position of the first car derailed, number and placement of tank cars in a train and tank car safety design. The effect of train speed, tank car safety design and tank car positions in a train were evaluated regarding the number of cars that release their contents in a derailment. This research provides insights regarding the circumstances affecting multiple-tank-car release incidents and potential strategies to reduce their occurrences. The model can be incorporated into a larger risk management framework to enable better local, regional and national safety management of hazardous materials transportation by rail.

  12. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... table. (a) Rail cars: Class DOT 103, 104, 105, 109, 111, 112, 114, 115, or 120 tank car tanks; Class 106... solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  13. 76 FR 8658 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Rule; information... carriage of solid hazardous materials in bulk to allow use of the IMSBC Code as an equivalent form of... 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On January 1, 2011, compliance with the IMSBC Code...

  14. 77 FR 69925 - Assessment of Hazardous Materials Incident Data Collection, Analysis, Reporting, and Use

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... for an assessment to improve the collection, analysis, reporting, and use of data related to accidents... to accidents and incidents involving the transportation of hazardous materials. Section 33006(b... improving the collection, analysis, reporting, and use of data related to accidents and incidents...

  15. 75 FR 44841 - Hazardous Materials: Special Permits and Approvals-Minimum Level of Fitness Determinations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ...--Minimum Level of Fitness Determinations; Public Meeting AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... persons that PHMSA will conduct a public meeting to discuss Special Permit and Approval applicant fitness... used when determining an applicant's minimum level of fitness. DATES: Public Meeting: August 19,...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... providing shipper and forwarding agent with U.S. requirements. Cannot be based on inference 4,000. Import shipments—Failure to certify by shipper or forwarding agent 2,000. 171.15 Failure to provide immediate... package does not contain a hazardous material 2,000. 172.304 Obscured marking 2,000. 172.313...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... forwarding agent with U.S. requirements. Cannot be based on inference 4,000. Import shipments—Failure to certify by shipper or forwarding agent 2,000. 171.15 Failure to provide immediate notice of certain... hazardous material 2,000. 172.304 Obscured marking 2,000. 172.313 “Inhalation Hazard” not marked 2,500....

  18. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... forwarding agent with U.S. requirements. Cannot be based on inference 4,000. Import shipments—Failure to certify by shipper or forwarding agent 2,000. 171.15 Failure to provide immediate notice of certain... hazardous material 2,000. 172.304 Obscured marking 2,000. 172.313 “Inhalation Hazard” not marked 2,500....

  19. 76 FR 5483 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporation of Certain Cargo Tank Special Permits Into Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... continue to be used in anhydrous ammonia service under specified conditions. The decision to consider the... anhydrous ammonia fertilizers. The HMR authorize the use of nurse tanks operated by private motor carriers... ability to track transporters of anhydrous ammonia and other hazardous materials without such...

  20. Hospital preparedness for hazardous materials incidents and treatment of contaminated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, J L; Blackmon, G M; Brodkin, C A; Robertson, W O

    1997-01-01

    Hospital-based facilities providing emergency care in the state of Washington were surveyed to determine their level of preparedness for hazardous materials incidents including the treatment of contaminated patients. Responses to a faxed questionnaire were received from 95 (94%) of the 101 emergency care facilities in Washington State. Only 42 (44%) of the facilities reported the ability to receive any chemically exposed patient. Of the 95 responding emergency care facilities, 39 (41%) had no designated decontamination facilities; 67 (70%) had protocols for handling chemical contamination and possible evacuation from hazardous materials spills, and 52 (55%) had protocols for handling medical facility contamination and possible evacuation from treating chemically contaminated patients. Twelve (13%) facilities had evacuated their emergency department or other part of the hospital for contamination incidents in the past 5 years. Despite the frequent occurrence of hazardous materials incidents, most emergency care facilities in Washington State are not fully prepared to handle contaminated patients and chemical spills. This may have important implications for the care of persons with exposure to hazardous materials and for implementing Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations standards and federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations. PMID:9426476