Science.gov

Sample records for additional heat sink

  1. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bonde, Wayne L.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watetight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures.

  2. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bonde, W.L.; Contolini, R.J.

    1992-03-24

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watertight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures. 13 figs.

  3. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  4. Heat sinking for printed circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, S.K.; Richardson, G.; Pinkerton, A.L.

    1984-09-11

    A flat pak or other solid-state device mounted on a printed circuit board directly over a hole extends therethrough so that the bottom of the pak or device extends beyond the bottom of the circuit board. A heat sink disposed beneath the circuit board contacts the bottom of the pak or device and provides direct heat sinking thereto. Pressure may be applied to the top of the pak or device to assure good mechanical and thermal contact with the heat sink.

  5. Heat sink effects in VPPA welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steranka, Paul O., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a model for prediction of heat sink effects associated with the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process is discussed. The long term goal of this modeling is to provide means for assessing potential heat sink effects and, eventually, to provide indications as to changes in the welding process that could be used to compensate for these effects and maintain the desired weld quality. In addition to the development of a theoretical model, a brief experimental investigation was conducted to demonstrate heat sink effects and to provide an indication of the accuracy of the model.

  6. Honeycomb-Fin Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1989-01-01

    Improved finned heat sink for electronic components more lightweight, inexpensive, and efficient. Designed for use with forced air, easily scaled up to dissipate power up to few hundred watts. Fins are internal walls of aluminum honeycomb structure. Cell structure gives strength to thin aluminum foil. Length of channels chosen for thermodynamic efficency; columns of cells combined in any reasonable number because flowing air distributed to all. Heat sink cools nearly as effectively at ends as near its center, no matter how many columns of cells combined.

  7. Multi-lead heat sink

    DOEpatents

    Roose, L.D.

    1982-08-25

    The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again.

  8. Multi-lead heat sink

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again.

  9. Multi-lead heat sink

    DOEpatents

    Roose, L.D.

    1984-07-03

    The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again. 4 figs.

  10. Representative shuttle evaporative heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a representative shuttle evaporative heat sink (RSEHS) system which vaporizes an expendable fluid to provide cooling for the shuttle heat transport fluid loop is reported. The optimized RSEHS minimum weight design meets or exceeds the shuttle flash evaporator system requirements. A cold trap which cryo-pumps flash evaporator exhaust water from the CSD vacuum chamber test facility to prevent water contamination of the chamber pumping equipment is also described.

  11. Heat pipe cooling system with sensible heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1988-01-01

    A heat pipe cooling system which employs a sensible heat sink is discussed. With this type of system, incident aerodynamic heat is transported via a heat pipe from the stagnation region to the heat sink and absorbed by raising the temperature of the heat sink material. The use of a sensible heat sink can be advantageous for situations where the total mission heat load is limited, as it is during re-entry, and a suitable radiation sink is not available.

  12. Fusible heat sink for EVA thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary design and analysis of a heat sink system utilizing a phase change slurry material to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions is described. During normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable fusible heat sink. Recharge is accomplished by disconnecting the heat sink from the liquid cooling garment and placing it in an on board freezer for simultaneous slurry refreeze and power supply electrical rechange.

  13. Electrical assembly having heat sink protrusions

    DOEpatents

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2009-04-21

    An electrical assembly, comprising a heat producing semiconductor device supported on a first major surface of a direct bond metal substrate that has a set of heat sink protrusions supported by its second major surface. In one preferred embodiment the heat sink protrusions are made of the same metal as is used in the direct bond copper.

  14. Forced air heat sink apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A high efficiency forced air heat sink assembly employs a split feed transverse flow configuration to minimize the length of the air flow path through at least two separated fin structures. Different embodiments use different fin structure material configurations including honeycomb, corrugated and serpentine. Each such embodiment uses a thermally conductive plate having opposed exterior surfaces; one for receiving a component to be cooled and one for receiving the fin structures. The serpentine structured fin embodiment employs a plurality of fin supports extending from the plate and forming a plurality of channels for receiving the fin structures. A high thermal conductivity bondant, such as metal-filled epoxy, may be used to bond the fin structures to either the plate or the fin supports. Dip brazing and soldering may also be employed depending upon the materials selected.

  15. Electronic modules easily separated from heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Metal heat sink and electronic modules bonded to a thermal bridge can be easily cleaved for removal of the modules for replacement or repair. A thin film of grease between a fluorocarbon polymer film on the metal heat sink and an adhesive film on the modules acts as the cleavage plane.

  16. Multilead, Vaporization-Cooled Soldering Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, John

    1995-01-01

    Vaporization-cooled heat sink proposed for use during soldering of multiple electrical leads of packaged electronic devices to circuit boards. Heat sink includes compliant wicks held in grooves on edges of metal fixture. Wicks saturated with water. Prevents excessive increases in temperature at entrances of leads into package.

  17. Mounting for diodes provides efficient heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Efficient heat sink is provided by soldering diodes to metal support bars which are brazed to a ceramic base. Electrical connections between diodes on adjacent bars are made flexible by metal strips which aid in heat dissipation.

  18. Copper foil provides uniform heat sink path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, I. E., Jr.; Schreihans, F. A.

    1966-01-01

    Thermal path prevents voids and discontinuities which make heat sinks in electronic equipment inefficient. The thermal path combines the high thermal conductivity of copper with the resiliency of silicone rubber.

  19. Design Considerations for Fusible Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, Thomas J.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Sheth, Rubik B.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally radiator designs are based off a passive or flow through design depending on vehicle requirements. For cyclical heat loads, a novel idea of combining a full flow through radiator to a phase change material is currently being investigated. The flow through radiator can be designed for an average heat load while the phase change material can be used as a source of supplemental heat rejections when vehicle heat loads go above the average load. Furthermore, by using water as the phase change material, harmful radiation protection can be provided to the crew. This paper discusses numerous trades conducted to understand the most optimal fusible heat sink design for a particular heat load. Trades include configuration concepts, amount of phase change needed for supplemental heat rejection, and the form of interstitial material needed for optimal performance. These trades were used to culminate to a fusible heat sink design. The paper will discuss design parameters taken into account to develop an engineering development unit.

  20. Direct-Interface, Fusible Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    Nonventing, regenerable, and self-contained heat sink absorbs heat in melting of ice by direct contact with forced flow of warm water. Elastic bladder contains water and ice. Connectors designed to prevent leaks easily connectable and disconnectable. Female portions embedded in wall of heat sink. After water frozen, male portions inserted and flow of warm water initiated. Water melts ice in and around female connectors, then flow passes between ice and bladder from inlet to outlet. Component of low-power portable refrigerator to operate for short time in picnic or camp setting.

  1. Water/Ice Heat Sink With Quick-Connect Couplings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Report presents additional detailed information on apparatus described in "Direct-Interface, Fusible Heat Sink" (ARC-11920). Describes entire apparatus, with special emphasis on features of quick-disconnect couplings governing flow of water under various operating conditions and plumbing configuration.

  2. Heat sink effects on weld bead: VPPA process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steranka, Paul O., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation into the heat sink effects due to weldment irregularities and fixtures used in the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) process was conducted. A basic two-dimensional model was created to represent the net heat sink effect of surplus material using Duhamel's theorem to superpose the effects of an infinite number of line heat sinks of variable strength. Parameters were identified that influence the importance of heat sink effects. A characteristic length, proportional to the thermal diffusivity of the weldment material divided by the weld torch travel rate, correlated with heat sinking observations. Four tests were performed on 2219-T87 aluminum plates to which blocks of excess material were mounted in order to demonstrate heat sink effects. Although the basic model overpredicted these effects, it correctly indicated the trends shown in the experimental study and is judged worth further refinement.

  3. Heat sink effects on weld bead: VPPA process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steranka, Paul O., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation into the heat sink effects due to weldment irregularities and fixtures used in the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) process was conducted. A basic two-dimensional model was created to represent the net heat sink effect of surplus material using Duhamel's theorem to superpose the effects of an infinite number of line heat sinks of variable strength. Parameters were identified that influence the importance of heat sink effects. A characteristic length, proportional to the thermal diffusivity of the weldment material divided by the weld torch travel rate, correlated with heat sinking observations. Four tests were performed on 2219-T87 aluminum plates to which blocks of excess material were mounted in order to demonstrate heat sink effects. Although the basic model overpredicted these effects, it correctly indicated the trends shown in the experimental study and is judged worth further refinement.

  4. Mounting improves heat-sink contact with beryllia washer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    To conduct heat away from electrical components that must be electrically insulated from a metal heat sink, a metal washer and a coil spring are placed between one end of the electrical component and the beryllia washer mounted on the heat sink. The thermal paths are formed by the component lead and base, the metal and beryllia washers, and the compressed spring.

  5. Thermal Transport Model for Heat Sink Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Brown, Ari D.; Smith, Stephen J.; Kilbourne, Caroline a.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the development of a finite element model for describing thermal transport through microcalorimeter arrays in order to assist in heat-sinking design. A fabricated multi-absorber transition edge sensor (PoST) was designed in order to reduce device wiring density by a factor of four. The finite element model consists of breaking the microcalorimeter array into separate elements, including the transition edge sensor (TES) and the silicon substrate on which the sensor is deposited. Each element is then broken up into subelements, whose surface area subtends 10 10 microns. The heat capacity per unit temperature, thermal conductance, and thermal diffusivity of each subelement are the model inputs, as are the temperatures of each subelement. Numerical integration using the Finite in Time Centered in Space algorithm of the thermal diffusion equation is then performed in order to obtain a temporal evolution of the subelement temperature. Thermal transport across interfaces is modeled using a thermal boundary resistance obtained using the acoustic mismatch model. The document concludes with a discussion of the PoST fabrication. PoSTs are novel because they enable incident x-ray position sensitivity with good energy resolution and low wiring density.

  6. Visual investigation on the heat dissipation process of a heat sink by using digital holographic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bingjing; Zhao, Jianlin Wang, Jun; Di, Jianglei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Junjiang

    2013-11-21

    We present a method for visually and quantitatively investigating the heat dissipation process of plate-fin heat sinks by using digital holographic interferometry. A series of phase change maps reflecting the temperature distribution and variation trend of the air field surrounding heat sink during the heat dissipation process are numerically reconstructed based on double-exposure holographic interferometry. According to the phase unwrapping algorithm and the derived relationship between temperature and phase change of the detection beam, the full-field temperature distributions are quantitatively obtained with a reasonably high measurement accuracy. And then the impact of heat sink's channel width on the heat dissipation performance in the case of natural convection is analyzed. In addition, a comparison between simulation and experiment results is given to verify the reliability of this method. The experiment results certify the feasibility and validity of the presented method in full-field, dynamical, and quantitative measurement of the air field temperature distribution, which provides a basis for analyzing the heat dissipation performance of plate-fin heat sinks.

  7. The planetary distribution of heat sources and sinks during FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Wei, M. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Heating distributions from analysis of the National Meteorological Center and European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts data sets; methods used and problems involved in the inference of diabatic heating; the relationship between differential heating and energy transport; and recommendations on the inference of heat soruces and heat sinks for the planetary show are discussed.

  8. 11. View from heat sink, south oblique of missile site ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View from heat sink, south oblique of missile site control building - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  9. 7. View from heat sink (south to north), west oblique ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View from heat sink (south to north), west oblique of missile site control building, emphasizing southwest face - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  10. 6. View from heat sink (south to north), west oblique ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View from heat sink (south to north), west oblique of missile site control building - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  11. Ice pack heat sink subsystem - phase 1, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, and test of a functional laboratory model ice pack heat sink subsystem are discussed. Operating instructions to include mechanical and electrical schematics, maintenance instructions, and equipment specifications are presented.

  12. Friction pull plug welding: chamfered heat sink pull plug design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coletta, Edmond R. (Inventor); Cantrell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW) is a solid state repair process for defects up to one inch in length, only requiring single sided tooling (OSL) for usage on flight hardware. Experimental data has shown that the mass of plug heat sink remaining above the top of the plate surface after a weld is completed (the plug heat sink) affects the bonding at the plug top. A minimized heat sink ensures complete bonding of the plug to the plate at the plug top. However, with a minimal heat sink three major problems can arise, the entire plug could be pulled through the plate hole, the central portion of the plug could be separated along grain boundaries, or the plug top hat can be separated from the body. The Chamfered Heat Sink Pull Plug Design allows for complete bonding along the ISL interface through an outside diameter minimal mass heat sink, while maintaining enough central mass in the plug to prevent plug pull through, central separation, and plug top hat separation.

  13. An aluminum heat sink and radiator for electrophoresis capillaries.

    PubMed

    Rapp, T L; Morris, M D

    1996-12-15

    An aluminum heat sink and radiator are used with forced air cooling of an electrophoresis capillary. Theoretical analyses of the operating limits and heat dissipation characteristics are presented. A system designed for power dissipation as high as 5 W is shown to dissipate heat efficiently and to operate without arcing at voltages higher than 30 kV.

  14. Ice pack heat sink subsystem - Phase 1, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and test at one-g of a functional laboratory model (non-flight) ice pack heat sink subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions are discussed. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick connect/disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  15. Numerical Modeling and Optimization of Warm-water Heat Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Yaser; Chiarot, Paul

    2015-11-01

    For cooling in large data-centers and supercomputers, water is increasingly replacing air as the working fluid in heat sinks. Utilizing water provides unique capabilities; for example: higher heat capacity, Prandtl number, and convection heat transfer coefficient. The use of warm, rather than chilled, water has the potential to provide increased energy efficiency. The geometric and operating parameters of the heat sink govern its performance. Numerical modeling is used to examine the influence of geometry and operating conditions on key metrics such as thermal and flow resistance. This model also facilitates studies on cooling of electronic chip hot spots and failure scenarios. We report on the optimal parameters for a warm-water heat sink to achieve maximum cooling performance.

  16. Heat sink effects in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank is fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process. In VPPA welding, a noble gas, usually argon, is directed through an arc to emerge from the torch as a hot plasma jet. This jet is surrounded by a shielding gas, usually helium, to protect the weld from contamination with air. The high velocity, hot plasma jet completely penetrates the workpiece (resembling a line heat source) when operated in the 'keyhole' mode. The metal melts on touching the side of the jet, as the torch travels in the perpendicular direction to the direction of the jet, and melted metal moves around the plasma jet in the keyhole forming a puddle which solidifies behind the jet. Heat sink effects are observed when there are irregularities in the workpiece configuration, especially, if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, i.e., in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of this research is to study the effect of irregularities in workpiece configuration and fixture differences (heat sink effects) on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld. Experiments were performed on different workpiece geometries and compared to approximate models.

  17. TEM Pump With External Heat Source And Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesmith, Bill J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed thermoelectric/electromagnetic (TEM) pump driven by external source of heat and by two or more heat pipe radiator heat sink(s). Thermoelectrics generate electrical current to circulate liquid metal in secondary loop of two-fluid-loop system. Intended for use with space and terrestrial dual loop liquid metal nuclear reactors. Applications include spacecraft on long missions or terrestrial beacons or scientific instruments having to operate in remote areas for long times. Design modified to include multiple radiators, converters, and ducts, as dictated by particular application.

  18. Enhancement of heat exchange by on-chip engineered heat sink structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Yonuk; Dresselhaus, Paul D.; Benz, Samuel P.

    2007-03-01

    We report a method for improving heat exchange between cryo- cooled high power consuming devices and coolant. We fabricated a micro-machined monolithic heat sink structure on a high integration density superconducting Josephson device, and studied the effect of the heat sink on cooling of the device in detail. The monolithic heat sink structure showed a significant enhancement of cooling efficiency, which markedly improved the chip operation. The detailed mechanism of the enhancement still needs further modeling and study in order to optimize the design of the heat sink structure.

  19. Rugged microelectronic module package supports circuitry on heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. L.

    1966-01-01

    Rugged module package for thin film hybrid microcircuits incorporated a rigid, thermally conductive support structure, which serves as a heat sink, and a lead wire block in which T-shaped electrical connectors are potted. It protects the circuitry from shock and vibration loads, dissipates internal heat, and simplifies electrical connections between adjacent modules.

  20. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  1. Enhanced heat sink with geometry induced wall-jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Mahamudul; Tikadar, Amitav; Bari, Fazlul; Morshed, A. K. M. M.

    2016-07-01

    Mini-channels embedded in solid matrix have already proven to be a very efficient way of electronic cooling. Traditional mini-channel heat sinks consist of single layer of parallel channels. Although mini-channel heat sink can achieve very high heat flux, its pumping requirement for circulating liquid through the channel increase very sharply as the flow velocity increases. The pumping requirements of the heat sink can be reduced by increasing its performance. In this paper a novel approach to increase the thermal performance of the mini-channel heat sink is proposed through geometry induced wall jet which is a passive technique. Geometric irregularities along the channel length causes abrupt pressure change between the channels which causes cross flow through the interconnections thus one channel faces suction and other channel jet action. This suction and jet action disrupts boundary layer causing enhanced heat transfer performance. A CFD model has been developed using commercially available software package FLUENT to evaluate the technique. A parametric study of the velocities and the effect of the position of the wall-jets have been performed. Significant reduction in thermal resistance has been observed for wall-jets, it is also observed that this reduction in thermal resistance is dependent on the position and shape of the wall jet.

  2. Effects Of Heat Sinks On VPPA Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C.; Steranka, Paul O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes theoretical and experimental study of absorption of heat by metal blocks in contact with metal plate while plate subjected to variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding. Purpose of study to contribute to development of comprehensive mathematical model of temperature in weld region. Also relevant to welding of thin sheets of metal to thick blocks of metal, heat treatment of metals, and hotspots in engines.

  3. Reparable, high-density microelectronic module provides effective heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, K. J.; Maytone, F. F.

    1967-01-01

    Reparable modular system is used for packaging microelectronic flat packs and miniature discrete components. This three-dimensional compartmented structure incorporates etched phosphor bronze sheets and frames with etched wire conductors. It provides an effective heat sink for electric power dissipation in the absence of convective cooling means.

  4. Assembly of opto-electronic module with improved heat sink

    DOEpatents

    Chan, Benson; Fortier, Paul Francis; Freitag, Ladd William; Galli, Gary T.; Guindon, Francois; Johnson, Glen Walden; Letourneau, Martial; Sherman, John H.; Tetreault, Real

    2004-11-23

    A heat sink for a transceiver optoelectronic module including dual direct heat paths and a structure which encloses a number of chips having a central web which electrically isolates transmitter and receiver chips from each other. A retainer for an optical coupler having a port into which epoxy is poured. An overmolded base for an optoelectronic module having epoxy flow controller members built thereon. Assembly methods for an optoelectronic module including gap setting and variation of a TAB bonding process.

  5. Graphite Fluoride Fiber Composites For Heat Sinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Long, Martin; Stahl, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Graphite fluoride fiber/polymer composite materials consist of graphite fluoride fibers in epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene, or polyimide resin. Combines high electrical resistivity with high thermal conductivity and solves heat-transfer problems of many electrical systems. Commercially available in powder form, for use as dry lubricant or cathode material in lithium batteries. Produced by direct fluorination of graphite powder at temperature of 400 to 650 degree C. Applications include printed-circuit boards for high-density power electronics, insulators for magnetic-field cores like those found in alternators and transformers, substrates for thin-film resistors, and electrical-protection layers in aircraft de-icers.

  6. Ultimate Heat Sink Cooling Pond and Spray Pond Analysis Models.

    1999-05-02

    Version 00 Three programs model performance of an ultimate heat sink cooling pond. National Weather Service data is read and analyzed to predict periods of lowest cooling performance and highest evaporative loss. The data is compared to local site data for significant differences. Then the maximum pond temperature is predicted. Five programs model performance of an ultimate heat sink spray pond. The cooling performance, evaporative water loss, and drift water loss as a function ofmore » windspeed are estimated for a spray field. These estimates are used in conjunction with National Weather Service data to predict periods of lowest cooling performance and highest evaporative loss. This data is compared to local site data for significant differences. Then the maximum pond temperature is predicted.« less

  7. Latent heat sink in soil heat flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  8. Heat transfer performance of a novel double-layer mini-channel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Rui; Bai, Pengfei; Fu, Ting; Lu, Longsheng; Zhou, Guofu

    2016-07-01

    High pressure drop and significant non-uniformity in temperature distribution along the streamwise direction are still challenges to the design of mini-channel heat sink. High density mini-channel arrays with high liquid-wall contact area are usually pursued in a conventional single-layer design of heat sink, which also inevitably brings high pressure drop. A novel double-layer structured heat sink is proposed in this paper. Four heat sinks with various designs in mini-channel density and flow direction were fabricated and studied experimentally on the heat transfer performance. The single factor of heat load does not show obvious effect on the overall thermal resistance of the heat sinks. On the other hand, slight decrease in thermal resistance was found with the increase in heat load at high flow rates. Moreover, a computational fluid dynamics modeling work was conducted. The results indicate that the parallel cross-flow field regulated by the double-layer structure enhances the heat exchange in both horizontal and vertical directions and consequently gives an uniform temperature distribution and high heat transfer efficiency.

  9. The use of segregated heat sink structures to achieve enhanced passive cooling for outdoor wireless devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, K.; Punch, J.

    2014-07-01

    Environmental standards which govern outdoor wireless equipment can stipulate stringent conditions: high solar loads (up to 1 kW/m2), ambient temperatures as high as 55°C and negligible wind speeds (0 m/s). These challenges result in restrictions on power dissipation within a given envelope, due to the limited heat transfer rates achievable with passive cooling. This paper addresses an outdoor wireless device which features two segregated heat sink structures arranged vertically within a shielded chimney structure: a primary sink to cool temperature-sensitive components; and a secondary sink for high power devices. Enhanced convective cooling of the primary sink is achieved due to the increased mass flow within the chimney generated by the secondary sink. An unshielded heat sink was examined numerically, theoretically and experimentally, to verify the applicability of the methods employed. Nusselt numbers were compared for three cases: an unshielded heat sink; a sink located at the inlet of a shield; and a primary heat sink in a segregated structure. The heat sink, when placed at the inlet of a shield three times the length of the sink, augmented the Nusselt number by an average of 64% compared to the unshielded case. The Nusselt number of the primary was found to increase proportionally with the temperature of the secondary sink, and the optimum vertical spacing between the primary and secondary sinks was found to be close to zero, provided that conductive transfer between the sinks was suppressed.

  10. Temperature Histories in Ceramic-Insulated Heat-Sink Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciepluch, Carl C.

    1960-01-01

    Temperature histories were calculated for a composite nozzle wall by a simplified numerical integration calculation procedure. These calculations indicated that there is a unique ratio of insulation and metal heat-sink thickness that will minimize total wall thickness for a given operating condition and required running time. The optimum insulation and metal thickness will vary throughout the nozzle as a result of the variation in heat-transfer rate. The use of low chamber pressure results in a significant increase in the maximum running time of a given weight nozzle. Experimentally measured wall temperatures were lower than those calculated. This was due in part to the assumption of one-dimensional or slab heat flow in the calculation procedure.

  11. A direct-interface fusible heat sink for astronaut cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, B. W.

    1990-01-01

    Astronaut cooling during extravehicular activity is a critical design issue in developing a portable life support system that meets the requirements of a space station mission. Some the requirements are that the cooling device can be easily regenerable and nonventing during operation. In response to this, a direct-interface, fusible heat sink prototpye with freezable quick-disconnects was developed. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and tested that consists of an elastic container filled with normal tap water and having two quick-disconnects embedded in a wall. These quick-disconnects are designed so that they may be frozen with the ice and yet still be joined to the cooling system, allowing an immediate flow path. The inherent difficulties in a direct-interface heat sink have been overcome, i.e., (1) establishing an initial flow path; (2) avoiding low-flow freeze-up; and (3) achieving adequate heat-transfer rates at the end of the melting process. The requirements, design, fabrication, and testing are discussed.

  12. A direct-interface, fusible heat sink for astronaut cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis; Webbon, B. W.

    1990-01-01

    Astronaut cooling during extravehicular activity is a critical design issue in developing a portable life support system that meets the requirements of a space station mission. Some of the requirements are that the cooling device can be easily regenerable and nonventing during operation. In response to this, a direct-interface, fusible heat sink prototype with freezable quick-disconnects was developed. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and tested that consists of an elastic container filled with normal tap water and having two quick-disconnects embedded in a wall. These quick-disconnects are designed so that they may be frozen with the ice and yet still be joined to the cooling system, allowing an immediate flow path. The inherent difficulties in a direct-interface heat sink have been overcome, i.e., (1) establishing an initial flow path; (2) avoiding low-flow freeze-up; and (3) achieving adequate heat-transfer rates at the end of the melting process. The requirements, design, fabrication, and testing are discussed.

  13. Heat sink structural design concepts for a hypersonic research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    Hypersonic research aircraft design requires careful consideration of thermal stresses. This paper relates some of the problems in a heat sink structural design that can be avoided by appropriate selection of design options including material selection, design concepts, and load paths. Data on several thermal loading conditions are presented on various conventional designs including bulkheads, longerons, fittings, and frames. Results indicate that conventional designs are inadequate and that acceptable designs are possible by incorporating innovative design practices. These include nonintegral pressure compartments, ball-jointed links to distribute applied loads without restraining the thermal expansion, and material selections based on thermal compatibility.

  14. Heat-load simulator for heat sink design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunleavy, A. M.; Vaughn, T. J.

    1968-01-01

    Heat-load simulator is fabricated from 1/4-inch aluminum plate with a contact surface equal in dimensions and configuration to those of the electronic installation. The method controls thermal output to simulate actual electronic component thermal output.

  15. New Configurations of Micro Plate-Fin Heat Sink to Reduce Coolant Pumping Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The thermal resistance of heat exchangers has a strong influence on the electric power produced by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). In this work, a real TEG device is applied to three configurations of micro plate-fin heat sink. The distance between certain microchannels is varied to find the optimum heat sink configuration. The particular focus of this study is to reduce the coolant mass flow rate by considering the thermal resistances of the heat sinks and, thereby, to reduce the coolant pumping power in the system. The three-dimensional governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat transfer are solved using the finite-volume method for a wide range of pressure drop laminar flows along the heat sink. The temperature and the mass flow rate distribution in the heat sink are discussed. The results, which are in good agreement with previous computational studies, show that using suggested heat sink configurations reduces the coolant pumping power in the system.

  16. A fusible heat sink concept for extravehicular activity /EVA/ thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary design and analysis of a heat sink system, utilizing a phase change slurry material, to be used for astronaut and equipment cooling during manned space missions. During normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a regenerable fusible heat sink. Recharge is accomplished by disconnecting the heat sink from the liquid cooling garment and placing it in an onboard freezer for simultaneous slurry refreeze and power supply recharge.

  17. FEM simulation for cold press forging forming of the round-fin heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kesheng; Han, Yu; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Lihan

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the finite element method is used to investigate the forming process of cold press forging for the round-fin heat sink in the automotive lighting. A series of simulations on the round-fin heat sink forming using the program DEFORM were carried out. The blank thickness and friction coefficient on the formation of round-fin were studied, and the tooling structure with counterpressure on the heat sink formation was also investigated. The results show that the blank thickness is very good for the round-fin formation, and the thicker the blank is, the better the round-fin can be formed; and also When both the punch-blank interface and the die-blank interface have the same value of friction factor, the larger value of friction factor is in favor of round-fin forming, the further investigation reveals that the friction at the punch-blank interface has more significant effect on preventing the initiation of flow-through compared with the friction at the die-blank interface, which implies that the punch-blank interface has more significant effect on the material flow in the formation of round-fin. Meanwhile, The tooling structure with counterpressure is helpful to the formation of round-fin heat sink, which not only ensures the height of each round-fin on the heat sink is uniform but also retards the initiation of flow-through on the reverse side of round-fin. In addition, the experiments of press forging process were conducted to validate the finite element analysis, and the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Climate. Varying planetary heat sink led to global-warming slowdown and acceleration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianyao; Tung, Ka-Kit

    2014-08-22

    A vacillating global heat sink at intermediate ocean depths is associated with different climate regimes of surface warming under anthropogenic forcing: The latter part of the 20th century saw rapid global warming as more heat stayed near the surface. In the 21st century, surface warming slowed as more heat moved into deeper oceans. In situ and reanalyzed data are used to trace the pathways of ocean heat uptake. In addition to the shallow La Niña-like patterns in the Pacific that were the previous focus, we found that the slowdown is mainly caused by heat transported to deeper layers in the Atlantic and the Southern oceans, initiated by a recurrent salinity anomaly in the subpolar North Atlantic. Cooling periods associated with the latter deeper heat-sequestration mechanism historically lasted 20 to 35 years.

  19. Characterization of Single Phase and Two Phase Heat and Momentum Transport in a Spiraling Radial Inow Microchannel Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Maritza

    Thermal management of systems under high heat fluxes on the order of hundreds of W/cm2 is important for the safety, performance and lifetime of devices, with innovative cooling technologies leading to improved performance of electronics or concentrating solar photovoltaics. A novel, spiraling radial inflow microchannel heat sink for high flux cooling applications, using a single phase or vaporizing coolant, has demonstrated enhanced heat transfer capabilities. The design of the heat sink provides an inward swirl flow between parallel, coaxial disks that form a microchannel of 1 cm radius and 300 micron channel height with a single inlet and a single outlet. The channel is heated on one side through a conducting copper surface, and is essentially adiabatic on the opposite side to simulate a heat sink scenario for electronics or concentrated photovoltaics cooling. Experimental results on the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics in the heat sink, using single phase water as a working fluid, revealed heat transfer enhancements due to flow acceleration and induced secondary flows when compared to unidirectional laminar fully developed flow between parallel plates. Additionally, thermal gradients on the surface are small relative to the bulk fluid temperature gain, a beneficial feature for high heat flux cooling applications. Heat flux levels of 113 W/cm2 at a surface temperature of 77 deg C were reached with a ratio of pumping power to heat rate of 0.03%. Analytical models on single phase flow are used to explore the parametric trends of the flow rate and passage geometry on the streamlines and pressure drop through the device. Flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics were obtained for this heat sink using water at near atmospheric pressure as the working fluid for inlet subcooling levels ranging from 20 to 80 deg C and mean mass flux levels ranging from 184-716 kg/m. 2s. Flow enhancements similar to singlephase flow were expected, as well

  20. Heat Sinks for Miniature Thermoelectric Coolers: Selection and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenyuk, V.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of heat sink (HS) thermal resistance on the performance of a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) has been studied. A method of HS characterization is proposed for the typical case of substantial mismatch in the dimensions of these components. This dimension mismatch causes significant heat spreading resistance in the HS base plate which is highly dependent on the lack of conformity of the components. In this study we investigated modern a HS whose thermal resistance R d was determined experimentally by use of a dummy heater of fixed dimensions. An analytical method is proposed for predicting HS thermal resistance for arbitrary heater dimensions using the certified R d value as sole reference point. The method is based on an HS thermal model with three-dimensional heat spread in its base plate. This theoretical approach was used for characterization of HS from Alpha Company, a manufacturer of HS for microelectronics. HS with low pressure drop were considered under conditions of natural and forced convection. It is shown that their thermal resistance, which depends on TEC dimensions, can differ substantially from the certified value.

  1. A Distributed Method for Modeling Effective Cryogenic Flat Cable Heat Sinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobrist, N. R.; Daal, M.; Sadoulet, B.; Golwala, S.

    2014-09-01

    A common challenge in low temperature instrumentation is adequately heat sinking signal wires between room temperature and devices at base temperature. Using cryostat space for adequate heat sinking typically comes at the cost of complexity or experimental space. As such, it is useful to know how much heat sinking is adequate given the materials, heat sources and cooling capacities involved. We present a differential equation for modeling the heat flowing out of a flat cable along an interval over which it is adhered to an insulating interface which is bound to a metallic heat sinking surface and numerical results for realistic heat sinks in the Kelvin range. We also present a computational method for solving this differential equation.

  2. A heat-sinking self-referencing fiber optic emission probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeu, Nicholas; Shimoji, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    A novel heat-sinking, self-referencing fiber optic emission probe having a sapphire fiber probe head is described. The laser heating effect in a GaAs wafer (on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) platform) has been measured with the probe in both the noncontact proximity mode and the contact mode. The GaAs/PTFE composite was selected to simulate the thermal conductivity of animal tissues. It was found that for the same laser power delivered to the wafer, the temperature rise in the contact mode was only 42% of that in the proximity mode. Additionally, a demonstration of the self-referencing capability of the probe is also presented.

  3. Aluminum heat sink enables power transistors to be mounted integrally with printed circuit board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaward, R. C.

    1967-01-01

    Power transistor is provided with an integral flat plate aluminum heat sink which mounts directly on a printed circuit board containing associated circuitry. Standoff spacers are used to attach the heat sink to the printed circuit board containing the remainder of the circuitry.

  4. Heat Transfer and Flow Structure Evaluation of a Synthetic Jet Emanating from a Planar Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-07-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  5. Ice pack heat sink subsystem, phase 2. [astronaut life support cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Kellner, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The report describes the design, development, fabrication, and test at one gravity of a prototype ice pack heat sink subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions; the investigation of thermal storage material with the objective of uncovering materials with heats of fusion and/or solution in the range of 300 Btu/lb (700 kilojoules/kilogram); and the planned procedure for implementing an ice pack heat sink subsystem flight experiment. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  6. Structural Design and Analysis of a Light-Weight Laminated Composite Heat Sink for Spaceflight PWBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Mark S.; Niemeyer, W. Lee

    1997-01-01

    In order to reduce the overall weight in spaceborne electronic systems, a conventional metallic heat sink typically used for double-sided printed wiring boards was suggested to be replaced by light-weight and high-strength laminated composite materials. Through technology validation assurance (TVA) approach, it has been successfully demonstrated that using laminated composite heat sink can not only reduce the weight of the heat sink by nearly 50%, but also significantly lower the internal thermally-induced stresses that are largely responsible for potential delamination under cyclic temperature variations. With composite heat sink, both thermal and dynamic performance of the double-sided printed wiring board (PWB) exceeds that of its counterpart with metallic heat sink. Also included in this work is the original contribution to the understanding of creep behavior of the worst-case leadless chip carrier (LCC) surface mount solder joint. This was identified as the interconnection most susceptible to thermal fatigue damage in the PWB assembly.

  7. Heat Transfer Capacity of Lotus-Type Porous Copper Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Hiroshi; Ogushi, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Hideo; Ikeda, Teruyuki

    Lotus-type porous copper is a form of copper that includes many straight pores, which are produced by the precipitation of supersaturated gas dissolved in the molten metal during solidification. The lotus-type porous copper is attractive as a heat sink because a higher heat transfer capacity is obtained as the pore diameter decreases. We investigate a fin model for predicting the heat transfer capacity of the lotus-type porous copper. Its heat transfer capacity is verified to be predictable via the straight fin model, in which heat conduction in the porous metal and the heat transfer to the fluid in the pores are taken into consideration by comparison with a numerical analysis. We both experimentally and analytically determine the heat transfer capacities of three types of heat sink: with conventional groove fins, with groove fins that have a smaller fin gap (micro-channels) and with lotus-type porous copper fins. The conventional groove fins have a fin gap of 3mm and a fin thickness of 1mm, the micro-channels have a fin gap of 0.5mm and a fin thickness of 0.5mm, and the lotus-type porous copper fins have pores with a diameter of 0.3mm and a porosity of 0.39. The lotus-type porous copper fins were found to have a heat transfer capacity 4 times greater than the conventional groove fins and 1.3 times greater than the micro-channel heat sink under the same pumping power.

  8. Thermal performance analysis of optimized hexagonal finned heat sinks in impinging air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, Kenan; Yeşildal, Faruk; Karabey, Altuǧ; Yakut, Rıdvan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, thermal performance analysis of hexagonal finned heat sinks which optimized according to the experimental design and optimization method of Taguchi were investigated. Experiments of air jet impingement on heated hexagonal finned heat sinks were carried out adhering to the L18(21*36) orthogonal array test plan. Optimum geometries were determined and named OH-1, OH-2. Enhancement efficiency with the first law of thermodynamics was analyzed for optimized heat sinks with 100, 150, 200 mm heights of hexagonal fin. Nusselt correlations were found out and variations of enhancement efficiency with Reynolds number presented in η-Re graphics.

  9. Experimental Optimisation of the Thermal Performance of Impinging Synthetic Jet Heat Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marron, Craig; Persoons, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Zero-net-mass flow synthetic jet devices offer a potential solution for energy- efficient cooling of medium power density electronic components. There remains an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these flows with extended surfaces, which prevents the wider implementation of these devices in the field. This study examines the effect of the main operating parameters on the heat transfer rate and electrical power consumption for a synthetic jet cooled heat sink. Three different heat sink geometries are tested. The results find that a modified sink with a 14 × 14 pin array with the central 6 × 6 pins removed provides superior cooling to either a fully pinned sink or flat plate. Furthermore each heat sink is found to have its own optimum jet orifice-to-sink spacing for heat transfer independent of flow conditions. The optimum heat transfer for the modified sink is H = 34 jet diameters. The effect of frequency on heat transfer is also studied. It is shown that heat transfer increases superlinearly with frequency at higher stroke lengths. The orientation of the impingement surface with respect to gravity has no effect on the heat transfer capabilities of the tested device. These tests are the starting point for further investigation into enhanced synthetic jet impingement surfaces. The equivalent axial fan cooled pinned heat sink (Malico Inc. MFP40- 18) has a thermal resistance of 1.93K/W at a fan power consumption of 0.12W. With the modified pinned heat sink, a synthetic jet at Re = 911, L0/D = 10, H/D = 30 provides a thermal resistance of 2.5K/W at the same power consumption.

  10. Mathematical model and computation of heat distribution for LED heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Sun, L. X.

    2016-05-01

    The light-emitting diode (LED) has many advantages over conventional lighting including lower energy consumption, longer lifetime, improved physical robustness, smaller size, and faster switching. It is noted, however, that its efficiency and lifetime will be degraded severely when it is operated at high temperature. Both previous simulations and experimental results have already indicated that the heat transfer in vertical direction of the LED lamp by conduction is the critical component. In this paper, a simplified mathematical model of the heat source and the conduction distribution for the LED heat sink is developed to estimate the heat distribution in the spherical coordinate system, which can be used for the shape optimization design. Furthermore, the model of the heat conduction equation is solved numerically with the explicit finite-difference method (EFDM). Several numerical simulations show that the model performs well when considering the real situation, so our method is feasible and effective.

  11. Heat Sink Welding for Preventing Hot Cracking in Alloy 2195 Intersection Welds: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Pingsha; Rogers, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Two concepts, stationary cooling and trailing cooling, were proposed to prevent weld intersection cracking. Finite element analysis was used to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of those two concepts. Both stationary and trailing heat sink setups were proposed for preventing intersection cracking. The cooling media could be liquid nitrogen, or pressured air knife. Welding experiments on the small test panel with the localized heat sink confirmed the feasibility of using such a stationary cooling technique. The required cooling was achieved in this test panel. Systematic welding experiments should be conducted in the future to validate and refine the heat sink technique for preventing intersection cracking.

  12. Evaluating Thermoelectric Power Generation Device Performance Using a Rectangular Microchannel Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, a microchannel heat sink is applied to a thermoelectric power generation (TEG) device and compared with a traditional heat sink. The advantages and disadvantages of using each heat sink in a TEG device are evaluated. The microchannel hydraulic diameter is 5.33 × 10-4 m and that of the macrochannel is 2.13 × 10-3 m. Pressure drops and heat removed in the micro heat sink configuration are obtained for six different mass flow rates for the laminar and turbulent fluid flow regimes. By computationally applying a constant temperature difference between the hot and cold sides of the TEG, the fluid and thermal parameters are considered for both laminar and turbulent regimes in the channels. Furthermore, using the temperature difference through each TEG, the system efficiency is calculated. The results show that the microchannel heat sink gives a higher pressure drop, but the heat flow across the TEG device and the mass flow rate needed to provide the same generated power are less than for the macrochannel heat sink.

  13. Heat transfer performance of Al2O3/water nanofluids in a mini channel heat sink.

    PubMed

    Dominic, A; Sarangan, J; Suresh, S; Sai, Monica

    2014-03-01

    The high density heat removal in electronic packaging is a challenging task of modern days. Finding compact, energy efficient and cost effective methods of heat removal is being the interest of researchers. In the present work, mini channel with forced convective heat transfer in simultaneously developing regime is investigated as the heat transfer coefficient is inversely proportional to hydraulic diameter. Mini channel heat sink is made from the aluminium plate of 30 mm square with 8 mm thickness. It has 15 mini channel of 0.9 mm width, 1.3 mm height and 0.9 mm of pitch. DI water and water based 0.1% and 0.2% volume fractions of Al2O3/water nanofluids are used as coolant. The flow rates of the coolants are maintained in such a way that it is simultaneously developing. Reynolds number is varied from 400 to 1600 and heat input is varied from 40 W to 70 W. The results showed that heat transfer coefficient is more than the heat transfer coefficient of fully developed flow. Also the heat transfer is more for nanofluids compared to DI water.

  14. Optimization of an ammonia-cooled rectangular microchannel heat sink using multi-objective non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adham, Ahmed Mohammed; Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Ahmad, Robiah

    2012-10-01

    The ever decreasing size of modern electronic packaging has induced researchers to search for an effective and efficient heat removal system to handle the continuously increasing power density. Investigations have involved different geometry, material and coolant to address the thermal management issues. This paper reports the potential improvement in the overall performance of a rectangular microchannel heat sink using a new gaseous coolant namely ammonia gas. Using a multi-objective general optimization scheme with the thermal resistance model as an analysis method in combination with a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm as an optimization technique, it was found that significant reduction in the total thermal resistance up to 34 % for ammonia-cooled compared to air-cooled microchannel heat sink under the same operating conditions is achievable. In addition, a considerable decrease in the microchannel heat sink's mass up to 30 % was achieved due to the different heat sink's material used.

  15. Ice Pack Heat Sink Subsystem - Phase I. [astronaut liquid cooling garment design and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes the design and test at one-g of a functional laboratory model (non-flight) Ice Pack Heat Sink Subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick connect/disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  16. Numerical investigation of entropy generation in microchannels heat sink with different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaryjat, A. A.; Stanciu, D.; Dobrovicescu, A.; Badescu, V.; Aldhaidhawi, M.

    2016-08-01

    Entropy generation of 3D cross sections circular, square, and hexagon shapes microchannel heat sinks (MCHS) were numerically performed. The governing equations (continuity, momentum and energy) along with the boundary conditions and the study state conjugate heat transfer problem were solved using the finite volume method (FVM). The Reynolds number in the range of 100 to 1600 and heat flux of 125, 150, 175 and 200 kW/m2 were covered in this study. The overall entropy generation rate and entropy generation number are obtained by integrating the volumetric rate components over the entire heat sink. The results indicated that entropy generation decreases with increases of the Reynolds number. Decreasing the heat flux led to decreasing entropy generation. The square microchannel heat sink has the lowest entropy generation and entropy generation number

  17. Numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer from perforated plate-fin heat sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Md. Farhad; Hasan, Muhammad Noman; Ali, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    Excessive heat from microelectronic components is essential to remove to increase the reliability of the system. In this paper, various types of perforations in the form of small channels such as square, circular, triangular and hexagonal cross sections are introduced and thermal performances are compared to improve the cooling performance of heat sink. The governing equations are solved by adopting a control volume based finite element method with an unstructured non-uniform grid system. Flow and heat transfer characteristics are presented for Reynolds numbers from 2 × 104 to 4 × 104 based on the fin length and Prandtl number is taken as Pr = 0.71. RANS based k-ɛ turbulence model is used to predict the turbulent flow parameters. The predicted results are validated by the previously published experimental data and in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Results show that fins having circular perforations have better thermal and fluid dynamic performances than the other types of fins considered here.

  18. Numerical prediction of micro-channel LD heat sink operated with antifreeze based on CFD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Gang; Tang, Xiaojun

    2014-12-01

    To theoretically study the feasibility of antifreeze coolants applied as cooling fluids for high power LD heat sink, detailed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of liquid cooled micro-channels heat sinks is presented. The performance operated with antifreeze coolant (ethylene glycol aqueous solution) compared with pure water are numerical calculated for the heat sinks with the same micro-channels structures. The maximum thermal resistance, total pressure loss (flow resistance), thermal resistance vs. flow-rate, and pressure loss vs. flow-rate etc. characteristics are numerical calculated. The results indicate that the type and temperature of coolants plays an important role on the performance of heat sinks. The whole thermal resistance and pressure loss of heat sinks increase significantly with antifreeze coolants compared with pure water mainly due to its relatively lower thermal conductivity and higher fluid viscosity. The thermal resistance and pressure loss are functions of the flow rate and operation temperature. Increasing of the coolant flow rate can reduce the thermal resistance of heat sinks; meanwhile increase the pressure loss significantly. The thermal resistance tends to a limit with increasing flow rate, while the pressure loss tends to increase exponentially with increasing flow rate. Low operation temperature chiefly increases the pressure loss rather than thermal resistance due to the remarkable increasing of fluid viscosity. The actual working point of the cooling circulation system can be determined on the basis of the pressure drop vs. flow rate curve for the micro-channel heat sink and that for the circulation system. In the same system, if the type or/and temperature of the coolant is changed, the working point is accordingly influenced, that is, working flow rate and pressure is changed simultaneously, due to which the heat sink performance is influenced. According to the numerical simulation results, if ethylene glycol aqueous

  19. Theoretical determination of design parameters for an arrayed heat sink with vertical plate fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiang-Jiun; Chen, Yi-Jin

    2016-05-01

    This paper employs theoretical approach to determine the adequate design parameters of an arrayed plate-fins heat sink based on maximizing heat flow. According to analyzed results, increasing the dimensions of configurative parameters does not always yield the significant increase in the heat flow. As the fin length and fin space increases until a critical value, the heat flow will significantly reduce the increment or decay, respectively.

  20. Demonstration of Super Cooled Ice as a Phase Change Material Heat Sink for Portable Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    A phase change material (PCM) heat sink using super cooled ice as a nontoxic, nonflammable PCM is being developed. The latent heat of fusion for water is approximately 70% larger than most paraffin waxes, which can provide significant mass savings. Further mass reduction is accomplished by super cooling the ice significantly below its freezing temperature for additional sensible heat storage. Expansion and contraction of the water as it freezes and melts is accommodated with the use of flexible bag and foam materials. A demonstrator unit has been designed, built, and tested to demonstrate proof of concept. Both testing and modeling results are presented along with recommendations for further development of this technology.

  1. Statistical optimization of microchannel heat sink (MCHS) geometry cooled by different nanofluids using RSM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Gorji, M.; Pourmehran, O.; Hatami, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, an analytical investigation of the heat transfer for the microchannel heat sink (MCHS) cooled by different nanofluids (Cu, Al2O3, Ag, TiO2 in water and ethylene glycol as base fluids) is studied by the porous media approach and the Galerkin method and results are compared with numerical procedure. Response surface methodology (RSM) is applied to obtain the desirability of the optimum design of the channel geometry. The effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of the nanofluid are calculated by the Patel et al. and Khanafer et al. model, respectively, and MCHS is considered as a porous medium, as proposed by Kim and Kim. In addition, to deal with nanofluid heat transfer, a model based on the Brownian motion of nanoparticles is used. The effects of the nanoparticles volume fraction, nanoparticle type and size, base fluid type, etc., on the temperature distribution, velocity and Nusselt number are considered. Results show that, by increasing the nanoparticles volume fraction, the Brownian movement of the particles, which carries the heat and distributes it to the surroundings, increases and, consequently, the difference between coolant and wall temperature becomes less.

  2. Vegetation feedbacks of nutrient addition lead to a weaker carbon sink in an ombrotrophic bog.

    PubMed

    Larmola, Tuula; Bubier, Jill L; Kobyljanec, Christine; Basiliko, Nathan; Juutinen, Sari; Humphreys, Elyn; Preston, Michael; Moore, Tim R

    2013-12-01

    To study vegetation feedbacks of nutrient addition on carbon sequestration capacity, we investigated vegetation and ecosystem CO2 exchange at Mer Bleue Bog, Canada in plots that had been fertilized with nitrogen (N) or with N plus phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) for 7-12 years. Gross photosynthesis, ecosystem respiration, and net CO2 exchange were measured weekly during May-September 2011 using climate-controlled chambers. A substrate-induced respiration technique was used to determine the functional ability of the microbial community. The highest N and NPK additions were associated with 40% less net CO2 uptake than the control. In the NPK additions, a diminished C sink potential was due to a 20-30% increase in ecosystem respiration, while gross photosynthesis rates did not change as greater vascular plant biomass compensated for the decrease in Sphagnum mosses. In the highest N-only treatment, small reductions in gross photosynthesis and no change in ecosystem respiration led to the reduced C sink. Substrate-induced microbial respiration was significantly higher in all levels of NPK additions compared with control. The temperature sensitivity of respiration in the plots was lower with increasing cumulative N load, suggesting more labile sources of respired CO2 . The weaker C sink potential could be explained by changes in nutrient availability, higher woody : foliar ratio, moss loss, and enhanced decomposition. Stronger responses to NPK fertilization than to N-only fertilization for both shrub biomass production and decomposition suggest that the bog ecosystem is N-P/K colimited rather than N-limited. Negative effects of further N-only deposition were indicated by delayed spring CO2 uptake. In contrast to forests, increased wood formation and surface litter accumulation in bogs seem to reduce the C sink potential owing to the loss of peat-forming Sphagnum.

  3. Enhancing ultra-high CPV passive cooling using least-material finned heat sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, Leonardo; Fernandez, Eduardo F.; Almonacid, Florencia; Reddy, K. S.; Mallick, Tapas K.

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-high concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems aim to increase the cost-competiveness of CPV by increasing the concentrations over 2000 suns. In this work, the design of a heat sink for ultra-high concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) applications is presented. For the first time, the least-material approach, widely used in electronics to maximize the thermal dissipation while minimizing the weight of the heat sink, has been applied in CPV. This method has the potential to further decrease the cost of this technology and to keep the multijunction cell within the operative temperature range. The designing procedure is described in the paper and the results of a thermal simulation are shown to prove the reliability of the solution. A prediction of the costs is also reported: a cost of 0.151/Wp is expected for a passive least-material heat sink developed for 4000x applications.

  4. Enhancing ultra-high CPV passive cooling using least-material finned heat sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Micheli, Leonardo Mallick, Tapas K.; Fernandez, Eduardo F.; Almonacid, Florencia; Reddy, K. S.

    2015-09-28

    Ultra-high concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems aim to increase the cost-competiveness of CPV by increasing the concentrations over 2000 suns. In this work, the design of a heat sink for ultra-high concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) applications is presented. For the first time, the least-material approach, widely used in electronics to maximize the thermal dissipation while minimizing the weight of the heat sink, has been applied in CPV. This method has the potential to further decrease the cost of this technology and to keep the multijunction cell within the operative temperature range. The designing procedure is described in the paper and the results of a thermal simulation are shown to prove the reliability of the solution. A prediction of the costs is also reported: a cost of 0.151$/W{sub p} is expected for a passive least-material heat sink developed for 4000x applications.

  5. Study of heat sink thermal protection systems for hypersonic research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahl, W. A.; Edwards, C. L. W.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of using a single metallic heat sink thermal protection system (TPS) over a projected flight test program for a hypersonic research vehicle was studied using transient thermal analyses and mission performance calculations. Four materials, aluminum, titanium, Lockalloy, and beryllium, as well as several combinations, were evaluated. Influence of trajectory parameters were considered on TPS and mission performance for both the clean vehicle configuration as well as with an experimental scramjet mounted. From this study it was concluded that a metallic heat sink TPS can be effectively employed for a hypersonic research airplane flight envelope which includes dash missions in excess of Mach 8 and 60 seconds of cruise at Mach numbers greater than 6. For best heat sink TPS match over the flight envelope, Lockalloy and titanium appear to be the most promising candidates

  6. Light weight Heat-Sink, Based on Phase-Change-Material for a High powered - Time limited application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibovitz, Johnathan

    2002-01-01

    When designing components for an aerospace application, whether it is an aircraft, satellite, space station or a launcher - a major considered parameter is its weight . For a combat aircraft, an addition of such a lightweight Heat sink to a high power component, can extend significantly avionics performance at very high altitude - when cooling means are poor. When dealing with a satellite launcher, each pound saved from the launcher in favor of the satellite - may contribute, for instance, several months of satellite life. The solution presented in this paper deals with an electronic device producing high power, for limited time and requires relatively low temperature base plate. The requirements demand that a base plate temperature should not exceed 70°c while exposed to a heat- flux of about 1.5W/cm^2 from an electronic device, during approximately 14 minutes. The classical solution for this transient process requires an Aluminum block heat sink of about 1100 grams . The PCM based heat-sink gives the solution for this case with about 400 grams only with a compact package. It also includes an option for cooling the system by forced convection (and in principle by radiation), when those means of heat dissipation - are available. The work includes a thermal analysis for the Aluminum - PCM heat sink and a series of validation tests of a model. The paper presents results of the analysis and results of the tests, including comparison to the classical robust solution. A parametric performance envelope for customizing to other potential applications is presented as well.

  7. Pitch-based carbon foam heat sink with phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    2004-08-24

    A process for producing a carbon foam heat sink is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications. The foam is encased and filled with a phase change material to provide a very efficient heat sink device.

  8. Pitch-based carbon foam heat sink with phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    2000-01-01

    A process for producing a carbon foam heat sink is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications. The foam is encased and filled with a phase change material to provide a very efficient heat sink device.

  9. Pitch-based carbon foam heat sink with phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    2002-01-01

    A process for producing a carbon foam heat sink is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications. The foam is encased and filled with a phase change material to provide a very efficient heat sink device.

  10. Pitch-based carbon foam heat sink with phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    2007-01-02

    A process for producing a carbon foam heat sink is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications. The foam is encased and filled with a phase change material to provide a very efficient heat sink device.

  11. Pitch-based carbon foam heat sink with phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    2007-01-23

    A process for producing a carbon foam heat sink is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications. The foam is encased and filled with a phase change material to provide a very efficient heat sink device.

  12. Pitch-based carbon foam heat sink with phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    2006-03-21

    A process for producing a carbon foam heat sink is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications. The foam is encased and filled with a phase change material to provide a very efficient heat sink device.

  13. Preliminary Trade Study of Phase Change Heat Sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Molly; Leimkeuhler, Thomas; Quinn, Gregory; Golliher, Eric

    2006-01-01

    For short durations, phase change based heat rejection systems are a very effective way of removing heat from spacecraft. Future NASA vehicles, such as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), will require non-radiative heat rejection systems during at least a portion of the planned mission, just as their predecessors have. While existing technologies are available to modify, such as Apollo era sublimators, or the Space Shuttle Flash Evaporator System (FES), several new technologies are under development or investigation to progress beyond these existing heat rejection systems. Examples include the Multi-Fluid Evaporator developed by Hamilton Sundstrand, improvements upon the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator originally developed for the X-38 program, and a Compact Flash Evaporator System (CFES). Other possibilities evaluate new ways of operating existing designs. The new developments are targeted at increasing operating life, expanding the environments in which the system can operate, improving the mass and volume characteristics, or some combination of these or other improvements. This paper captures the process and results of a preliminary trade study performed at Johnson Space Center to compare the various existing and proposed phase change based heat rejection systems for the CEV. Because the new systems are still in development, and the information on existing systems is extrapolation, this trade study is not meant to suggest a final decision for future vehicles. The results of this early trade study are targeted to aid the development efforts for the new technologies by identifying issues that could reduce the chances of selection for the CEV.

  14. Thermal conductivity from hierarchical heat sinks using carbon nanotubes and graphene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lee, Cheng-En; Chen, Yu-Fu; Chang, Jeng-Kuei; Teng, Hsi-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    The in-plane (kip) and through-plane (ktp) thermal conductivities of heat sinks using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene nanosheets (GNs), and CNT/GN composites are extracted from two experimental setups within the 323-373 K temperature range. Hierarchical three-dimensional CNT/GN frameworks display higher kip and ktp values, as compared to the CNT- and GN-based heat sinks. The kip and ktp values of the CNT/GN-based heat sink reach as high as 1991 and 76 W m-1 K-1 at 323 K, respectively. This improved thermal conductivity is attributed to the fact that the hierarchical heat sink offers a stereo thermal conductive network that combines point, line, and plane contact, leading to better heat transport. Furthermore, the compression treatment provided an efficient route to increase both kip and ktp values. This result reveals that the hierarchical carbon structures become denser, inducing more thermal conductive area and less thermal resistivity, i.e., a reduced possibility of phonon-boundary scattering. The correlation between thermal and electrical conductivity (ε) can be well described by two empirical equations: kip = 567 ln(ε) + 1120 and ktp = 20.6 ln(ε) + 36.1. The experimental results are obtained within the temperature range of 323-373 K, suitably complementing the thermal management of chips for consumer electronics.

  15. Thermal conductivity from hierarchical heat sinks using carbon nanotubes and graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lee, Cheng-En; Chen, Yu-Fu; Chang, Jeng-Kuei; Teng, Hsi-sheng

    2015-11-28

    The in-plane (kip) and through-plane (ktp) thermal conductivities of heat sinks using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene nanosheets (GNs), and CNT/GN composites are extracted from two experimental setups within the 323-373 K temperature range. Hierarchical three-dimensional CNT/GN frameworks display higher kip and ktp values, as compared to the CNT- and GN-based heat sinks. The kip and ktp values of the CNT/GN-based heat sink reach as high as 1991 and 76 W m(-1) K(-1) at 323 K, respectively. This improved thermal conductivity is attributed to the fact that the hierarchical heat sink offers a stereo thermal conductive network that combines point, line, and plane contact, leading to better heat transport. Furthermore, the compression treatment provided an efficient route to increase both kip and ktp values. This result reveals that the hierarchical carbon structures become denser, inducing more thermal conductive area and less thermal resistivity, i.e., a reduced possibility of phonon-boundary scattering. The correlation between thermal and electrical conductivity (ε) can be well described by two empirical equations: kip = 567 ln(ε) + 1120 and ktp = 20.6 ln(ε) + 36.1. The experimental results are obtained within the temperature range of 323-373 K, suitably complementing the thermal management of chips for consumer electronics. PMID:26498343

  16. Heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microfluidic heat sink with variously-shaped ribs for chip cooling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Lian; Yang, Da-Wei; Wang, Yan; Niu, Di; Zhao, Xiao-Lin; Ding, Gui-Fu

    2015-04-22

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigated the heat transfer and friction characteristics of microfluidic heat sinks with variously-shaped micro-ribs, i.e., rectangular, triangular and semicircular ribs. The micro-ribs were fabricated on the sidewalls of microfluidic channels by a surface-micromachining micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process and used as turbulators to improve the heat transfer rate of the microfluidic heat sink. The results indicate that the utilizing of micro-ribs provides a better heat transfer rate, but also increases the pressure drop penalty for microchannels. Furthermore, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microchannels are strongly affected by the rib shape. In comparison, the triangular ribbed microchannel possesses the highest Nusselt number and friction factor among the three rib types.

  17. Intensification of heat transfer in high-power laser diode bars by means of porous metal heat-sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Derzhavin, S. I.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Mashkovskiy, D. A.; Timoshkin, V. N.; Philonenko, V.

    1999-01-01

    To intensify a heat transfer in high-power emitters based on laser diode bars we propose the use of a heat sink from a porous permeable material cooled by a fluid flow [1-3]. The main advantage of this class of materials is the possibility of removing significant heat flows with compact heat sink. An analysis of the characteristic values of the thermal loads and their relations with the material and liquid parameters drawn from an one-dimensional model of stationary one-sided heat exchange shows the possibility of heat flow removal of more than 1.5 kW/cm 2 at room temperature in a liquid. Methods for improving the effectiveness of the strategy are considered.

  18. Heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microfluidic heat sink with variously-shaped ribs for chip cooling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Lian; Yang, Da-Wei; Wang, Yan; Niu, Di; Zhao, Xiao-Lin; Ding, Gui-Fu

    2015-01-01

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigated the heat transfer and friction characteristics of microfluidic heat sinks with variously-shaped micro-ribs, i.e., rectangular, triangular and semicircular ribs. The micro-ribs were fabricated on the sidewalls of microfluidic channels by a surface-micromachining micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process and used as turbulators to improve the heat transfer rate of the microfluidic heat sink. The results indicate that the utilizing of micro-ribs provides a better heat transfer rate, but also increases the pressure drop penalty for microchannels. Furthermore, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microchannels are strongly affected by the rib shape. In comparison, the triangular ribbed microchannel possesses the highest Nusselt number and friction factor among the three rib types. PMID:25912351

  19. Heat Transfer and Friction Characteristics of the Microfluidic Heat Sink with Variously-Shaped Ribs for Chip Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Lian; Yang, Da-Wei; Wang, Yan; Niu, Di; Zhao, Xiao-Lin; Ding, Gui-Fu

    2015-01-01

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigated the heat transfer and friction characteristics of microfluidic heat sinks with variously-shaped micro-ribs, i.e., rectangular, triangular and semicircular ribs. The micro-ribs were fabricated on the sidewalls of microfluidic channels by a surface-micromachining micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process and used as turbulators to improve the heat transfer rate of the microfluidic heat sink. The results indicate that the utilizing of micro-ribs provides a better heat transfer rate, but also increases the pressure drop penalty for microchannels. Furthermore, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microchannels are strongly affected by the rib shape. In comparison, the triangular ribbed microchannel possesses the highest Nusselt number and friction factor among the three rib types. PMID:25912351

  20. Open-Cell Aluminum Foams Filled With Phase Change Materials as Compact Heat Sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Herling, Darrell R.

    2006-11-01

    In many engineering applications, thermal management of electrical devices under cyclic temperature variations can be important for proper operation of the devices and for thermal safety. Open-cell aluminum foams filled with phase change materials (PCM) can be used as effective heat sinks through the use of the thermal conductivity of the foams and the latent heat of the PCM. The effects of geometric parameters of open-cell aluminum foams on the performance of aluminum foam-PCM heat sinks are investigated by experiments. Three types of open-cell aluminum 6061 foams with similar relative densities and different cell sizes are used as specimens. Paraffin is selected as the PCM due to its excellent thermal stability and ease of handling. During the experiment, a copper block, which simulates an electrical device under thermal load, is attached to the bottom surface of the specimen and heated by a hot plate until the temperature of the copper block reaches 100 C. Then the whole experimental set-up is removed from the hot plate and cooled. The temperature history of the copper block is measured as a function of time. The experimental results show that the aluminum foam-PCM heat sinks increase both the heating and cooling times of the copper block. Also, as the surface area per unit volume of the aluminum foam increases, both the heating and cooling times increase due to better utilization of the latent heat of the PCM. Finally, the experimental results indicate that the effect of the surface area per unit volume is more pronounced on the cooling time than on the heating time. The results of this investigation suggest that the surface area per unit volume of aluminum foams can be a major parameter in the design of aluminum foam-PCM heat sinks made of open-cell aluminum foams with similar relative densities.

  1. Effects of heat sink compounds on contact resistance of porous media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High and low-conductivity heat sink compounds were applied in succession on a thermal probe, which was then used to determine the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of some porous media at room temperature. The experiment was conducted separately under different packing densities and water...

  2. Evaluation of heat sink materials for thermal management of lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimpault-Darcy, E. C.; Miller, K.

    1988-01-01

    Aluminum, neopentyl glycol (NPG), and resins FT and KT are evaluated theoretically and experimentally as heat sink materials for lithium battery packs. The thermal performances of the two resins are compared in a thermal vacuum experiment. As solutions to the sublimation property were not immediately apparent, a theoretical comparison of the thermal performance of NPG versus KT, Al, and no material, is presented.

  3. 78 FR 55117 - Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft Regulatory Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... COMMISSION Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Nuclear Power Plants.'' This regulatory guide (RG) describes methods and procedures acceptable to the NRC staff that nuclear power plant facility licensees and applicants may use to implement general...

  4. Experimental study on thermal performance of heat sinks: the effect of hydraulic diameter and geometric shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzougui, M.; Hammami, M.; Maad, R. Ben

    2016-10-01

    The main purpose of this study is focused on experimental investigation of cooling performance of various minichannel designs. The hydraulic dimension of one of the heat sink is 3 mm while that of the other is 2 mm. Deionised water was used as the coolant for studies conducted in both the heat sinks. Tests were done for a wide range of flow rates (0.7 l-9 l h-1) and heat inputs (5-40 kW/m2). Irrespective of the hydraulic diameter and the geometric configuration, profits and boundaries of each channel shape are analyzed and discussed in the clarity of experimental data. The total thermal resistance and the average heat transfer coefficient are compared for the various channels inspected.

  5. Friction pull plug welding: chamfered heat sink pull plug design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coletta, Edmond R. (Inventor); Cantrell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The average strength of a pull plug weld is increased and weak bonding eliminated by providing a dual included angle at the top one third of the pull plug. Plugs using the included angle of the present invention had consistent high strength, no weak bonds and were substantially defect free. The dual angle of the pull plug body increases the heat and pressure of the weld in the region of the top one third of the plug. This allows the plug to form a tight high quality solid state bond. The dual angle was found to be successful in elimination of defects on both small and large plugs.

  6. Model Development and Experimental Validation of the Fusible Heat Sink Design for Exploration Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, Thomas J.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Le,Hung

    2012-01-01

    The Fusible Heat Sink is a novel vehicle heat rejection technology which combines a flow through radiator with a phase change material. The combined technologies create a multi-function device able to shield crew members against Solar Particle Events (SPE), reduce radiator extent by permitting sizing to the average vehicle heat load rather than to the peak vehicle heat load, and to substantially absorb heat load excursions from the average while constantly maintaining thermal control system setpoints. This multi-function technology provides great flexibility for mission planning, making it possible to operate a vehicle in hot or cold environments and under high or low heat load conditions for extended periods of time. This paper describes the model development and experimental validation of the Fusible Heat Sink technology. The model developed was intended to meet the radiation and heat rejection requirements of a nominal MMSEV mission. Development parameters and results, including sizing and model performance will be discussed. From this flight-sized model, a scaled test-article design was modeled, designed, and fabricated for experimental validation of the technology at Johnson Space Center thermal vacuum chamber facilities. Testing showed performance comparable to the model at nominal loads and the capability to maintain heat loads substantially greater than nominal for extended periods of time.

  7. Model Development and Experimental Validation of the Fusible Heat Sink Design for Exploration Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, Thomas J.; Leimkuehler, Thomas; Sheth, Rubik; Le, Hung

    2013-01-01

    The Fusible Heat Sink is a novel vehicle heat rejection technology which combines a flow through radiator with a phase change material. The combined technologies create a multi-function device able to shield crew members against Solar Particle Events (SPE), reduce radiator extent by permitting sizing to the average vehicle heat load rather than to the peak vehicle heat load, and to substantially absorb heat load excursions from the average while constantly maintaining thermal control system setpoints. This multi-function technology provides great flexibility for mission planning, making it possible to operate a vehicle in hot or cold environments and under high or low heat load conditions for extended periods of time. This paper describes the modeling and experimental validation of the Fusible Heat Sink technology. The model developed was intended to meet the radiation and heat rejection requirements of a nominal MMSEV mission. Development parameters and results, including sizing and model performance will be discussed. From this flight-sized model, a scaled test-article design was modeled, designed, and fabricated for experimental validation of the technology at Johnson Space Center thermal vacuum chamber facilities. Testing showed performance comparable to the model at nominal loads and the capability to maintain heat loads substantially greater than nominal for extended periods of time.

  8. A novel trapezoid fin pattern applicable for air-cooled heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Hung; Wang, Chi-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    The present study proposed a novel step or trapezoid surface design applicable to air-cooled heat sink under cross flow condition. A total of five heat sinks were made and tested, and the corresponding fin patterns are (a) plate fin; (b) step fin (step 1/3, 3 steps); (c) 2-step fin (step 1/2, 2 steps); (d) trapezoid fin (trap 1/3, cutting 1/3 length from the rear end) and (e) trapezoid fin (trap 1/2, cutting 1/2 length from the rear end). The design is based on the heat transfer augmentation via (1) longer perimeter of entrance region and (2) larger effective temperature difference at the rear part of the heat sink. From the test results, it is found that either step or trapezoid design can provide a higher heat transfer conductance and a lower pressure drop at a specified frontal velocity. The effective conductance of trap 1/3 design exceeds that of plate surface by approximately 38 % at a frontal velocity of 5 m s-1 while retains a lower pressure drop of 20 % with its surface area being reduced by 20.6 %. For comparisons exploiting the overall thermal resistance versus pumping power, the resultant thermal resistance of the proposed trapezoid design 1/3, still reveals a 10 % lower thermal resistance than the plate fin surface at a specified pumping power.

  9. Thermal performance of ethylene glycol based nanofluids in an electronic heat sink.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, P; Suresh, S

    2014-03-01

    Heat transfer in electronic devices such as micro processors and power converters is much essential to keep these devices cool for the better functioning of the systems. Air cooled heat sinks are not able to remove the high heat flux produced by the today's electronic components. Liquids work better than air in removing heat. Thermal conductivity which is the most essential property of any heat transfer fluid can be enhanced by adding nano scale solid particles which possess higher thermal conductivity than the liquids. In this work the convective heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the water/ethylene glycol mixture based nanofluids consisting of Al2O3, CuO nanoparticles with a volume concentration of 0.1% are studied experimentally in a rectangular channel heat sink. The nano particles are characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope and the nannofluids are prepared by using an ultrasonic vibrator and Sodium Lauryl Salt surfactant. The experimental results showed that nanofluids of 0.1% volume concentration give higher convective heat transfer coefficient values than the plain water/ethylene glycol mixture which is prepared in the volume ratio of 70:30. There is no much penalty in the pressure drop values due to the inclusion of nano particles in the water/ethylene glycol mixture. PMID:24745228

  10. 12 Years of NPK Addition Diminishes Carbon Sink Potential of a Nutrient Limited Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmola, T.; Bubier, J. L.; Juutinen, S.; Moore, T. R.

    2011-12-01

    Peatlands store about a third of global soil carbon. Our aim was to study whether the vegetation feedbacks of nitrogen (N) deposition lead to stronger carbon sink or source in a nutrient limited peatland ecosystem. We investigated vegetation structure and ecosystem CO2 exchange at Mer Bleue Bog, Canada, that has been fertilized for 7-12 years. We have applied 5 and 20 times ambient annual wet N deposition (0.8 g N m-2) with or without phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Gross photosynthesis, ecosystem respiration and net CO2 exchange (NEE) were measured weekly during the growing season using chamber technique. Under the highest N(PK) treatments, the light saturated photosynthesis (PSmax) was reduced by 20-30% compared to the control treatment, whereas under moderate N and PK additions PSmax slightly increased or was similar to the control. The ecosystem respiration showed similar trends among the treatments, but changes in the rates were less pronounced. High nutrient additions led to up to 65% lower net CO2 uptake than that in the control: In the NPK plots with cumulative N additions of 70, 19, and 0 g N m-2, the daytime NEE in May-July 2011 averaged 0.8 (se. 0.3), 2.0 (se. 0.4), and 2.4 (se. 0.3) μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. In the N only plots with cumulative N additions of 45, 19, and 0 g N m-2, the daytime NEE in May-July 2011 averaged 0.8 (se. 0.2), 2.6 (se. 0.4), and 1.8 (se. 0.3) μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The reduced plant photosynthetic capacity and diminished carbon sink potential in the highest nutrient treatments correlated with the loss of peat mosses and were not compensated for by the increased vascular plant biomass that has mainly been allocated to woody shrub stems.

  11. Improving the efficiency of high-power diode lasers using diamond heat sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Parashchuk, Valentin V; Baranov, V V; Telesh, E V; Mien, Vu Doan; Luc, Vu Van; Truong, Pham Van; Belyaeva, A K

    2010-06-23

    Using multifunctional ion beam and magnetron sputtering systems, we have developed chemical and vacuum techniques for producing metallic coatings firmly adherent to various surfaces, with application to copper and diamond heat sinks for diode lasers. Conditions have been optimised for mounting diode lasers and bars using the proposed metallisation processes, and significant improvements in the output parameters of the devices have been achieved. The power output of cw laser diodes on diamond heat sinks increases by up to a factor of 2, the linear (working) portion of their power-current characteristic becomes markedly broader, and their slope efficiency increases by a factor of 1.5 - 2 relative to that of lasers on copper heat spreaders. The use of diamond heat sinks extends the drive current range of pulsed diode bars by a factor of 2 - 3 and enables them to operate at more than one order of magnitude longer pump pulse durations (up to milliseconds) when the pulse repetition rate is at least 10 Hz. (lasers)

  12. Proton Heating by Cyclotron Waves in the Presence of a Finite Source and a Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Yoon, P. H.; Choe, G.

    2012-12-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the study of solar wind is the acceleration of protons and heavy ions. The preferential heating of these ions in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field is interpreted as the resonant heating by cyclotron waves. The present paper investigates the resonant cyclotron heating of the solar wind ions by quasilinear theoretical formalism. The major focus is on the role of source and sink terms associated with the Alfven-cyclotron waves. If one considers low-frequency Alfvenic waves as the wave source, then the resulting cyclotron heating is extremely small [Yoon & Fang 2009, Rha et al., 2011, Moya et al., 2011]. However, with a finite source term an appreciable heating can result [Yoon & Fang 2009]. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the problem of Alfvenic turbulent heating by cyclotron resonance with a continuous source of Alfvenic turbulence as well as a sink term. We also discuss the role of nonlinear mode coupling as well as the effects of spatial inhomogeneity.

  13. Local convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of CuO/water nanofluid in a microchannel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabi, A. R.; Zarrinabadi, S.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Hashemabadi, S. H.; Salimi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Forced convective heat transfer in a microchannel heat sink (MCHS) using CuO/water nanofluids with 0.1 and 0.2 vol% as coolant was investigated. The experiments were focused on the heat transfer enhancement in the channel entrance region at Re < 1800. Hydraulic performance of the MCHS was also estimated by measuring friction factor and pressure drop. Results showed that higher convective heat transfer coefficient was obtained at the microchannel entrance. Maximum enhancement of the average heat transfer coefficient compared with deionized water was about 40 % for 0.2 vol% nanofluid at Re = 1150. Enhancement of the convective heat transfer coefficient of nanofluid decreased with further increasing of Reynolds number.

  14. Innovative hybrid heat sink materials with high thermal conductivities and tailored CTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzmantel, M.; Neubauer, E.

    2015-02-01

    This paper talks about high performance heat sinks and heat spreaders made by hybrid structures based on metaldiamond composites. Thermal conductivities can be tuned between 450 and 650 W/mK while maintaining customizable thermal expansion of 6-10 ppm/K (@30°C). Using different hybrid structures in combination with the metal-diamond core significant changes in thermal properties can be identified. Applications targeted are LED, disc laser and laser diode heatsinks with these high performance inserts without the need of CTE matched submounts.

  15. Charcoal addition to soils in NE England: a carbon sink with environmental co-benefits?

    PubMed

    Bell, M J; Worrall, F

    2011-04-01

    Interest in the application of biochar (charcoal produced during the pyrolysis of biomass) to agricultural land is increasing across the world, recognised as a potential way to capture and store atmospheric carbon. Its interest is heightened by its potential co-benefits for soil quality and fertility. The majority of research has however been undertaken in tropical rather than temperate regions. This study assessed the potential for lump-wood charcoal addition (as a substitute for biochar) to soil types which are typically under arable and forest land-use in North East England. The study was undertaken over a 28 week period and found: i) No significant difference in net ecosystem respiration (NER) between soils containing charcoal and those without, other than in week 1 of the trial. ii) A significantly higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC) flux from soils containing large amounts of charcoal than from those untreated, when planted with ryegrass. iii) That when increased respiration or DOC loss did occur, neither was sufficiently large to alter the carbon sink benefits of charcoal application. iv) That charcoal incorporation resulted in a significantly lower nitrate flux in soil leachate from mineral soils. v) That charcoal incorporation caused significant increases in soil pH, from 6.98 to 7.22 on bare arable soils when 87,500 kg charcoal/ha was applied. Consideration of both the carbon sink and environmental benefits observed here suggests that charcoal application to temperate soils typical of North East England should be considered as a method of carbon sequestration. Before large scale land application is encouraged, further large scale trials should be undertaken to confirm the positive results of this research.

  16. Design, development, and fabrication of a prototype ice pack heat sink subsystem. Flight experiment physical phenomena experiment chest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Dean, W. C., II

    1975-01-01

    The concept of a flight experiment physical phenomena experiment chest, to be used eventually for investigating and demonstrating ice pack heat sink subsystem physical phenomena during a zero gravity flight experiment, is described.

  17. Saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel heat sink fed by a split flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, A.W.; Toto, D.; Thome, J.R.; Vanoli, G.P.

    2010-01-15

    An extensive experimental campaign has been carried out for the measurement of saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel copper heat sink. The heat sink was formed by 29 parallel channels that were 199 {mu}m wide and 756 {mu}m deep. In order to increase the critical heat flux and reduce the two-phase pressure drop, a split flow system was implemented with one central inlet at the middle of the channels and two outlets at either end. The base critical heat flux was measured using three HFC Refrigerants (R134a, R236fa and R245fa) for mass fluxes ranging from 250 to 1500 kg/m{sup 2} s, inlet subcoolings from -25 to -5 K and saturation temperatures from 20 to 50 C. The parametric effects of mass velocity, saturation temperature and inlet subcooling were investigated. The analysis showed that significantly higher CHF was obtainable with the split flow system (one inlet-two outlets) compared to the single inlet-single outlet system, providing also a much lower pressure drop. Notably several existing predictive methods matched the experimental data quite well and quantitatively predicted the benefit of higher CHF of the split flow. (author)

  18. Hot spot mitigation in microprocessors by application of single phase microchannel heat sink and microprocessor floor planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anjali

    Poor thermal management in high frequency microprocessors results in thermal and mechanical stresses in the chip due to leakage losses, occurrence of hot spots and large temperature gradients. A micro-fluidics based cooling scheme of single phase microchannel heat sinks is found to be most promising cooling solution. Microchannel heat sinks have high cooling capability because of its high surface area to volume ratio and high heat transfer coefficient. Besides the fluid flow, heat transfer mechanism in microchannel heat sinks is affected by its installation on the microprocessor chip. Since microchannel heat sinks are capable of reducing only the average temperature rise of the microprocessor chip, technique of microprocessor floor planning can be applied to reduce hot spot temperature, mitigate multiple hot spots and reduce large temperature gradients on the surface of microprocessor chip. In this study, adequate installation of the microchannel heat sink on the processor chip has been proposed to extract maximum heat from the device. Microprocessor floor planning has also been explored to obtain an optimum chip floor plan on grounds of low performance penalty, low hot spot temperature and minimum number hot spots. The dependence of maximum hot spot temperature of the chip on pressure gradient across the microchannels has also been discussed.

  19. Investigation of different nanoparticles for magnetophoretically enabled nanofin heat sinks in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Pyshar; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Campbell, Jos L; Coughlan, Phillip; Ghorbani, Kamran; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-05-01

    Assembled nanofin heat sinks, nanostructures which are formed via external forces in a cooling microfluidic to remove heat from hot spots, are a new concept that has recently been introduced. In this work, we investigate nanofin structures formed by CrO2 and Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticles and compare their performance. Thermal imaging is used for comparison of three cases including: (i) DI water as the coolant liquid, (ii) suspension of magnetic particles in DI water, and (iii) suspension of magnetic particles in DI water in the presence of a magnetic field. For each case, the experiments are conducted at three different flow rates of 10, 40 and 120 μl min(-1). Our results suggest that the high thermal conductivity of the nanofins composed of CrO2 significantly enhances the heat exchange across the microchannel. The proof-of-concept magnetophoretic system can offer a practical solution for the cooling of future compact electronics. PMID:24647620

  20. Development and Processing of Novel Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Materials for Heat Sink Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. J. B.; Corbin, S. F.; Hexemer, R. L.; Donaldson, I. W.; Bishop, Donald Paul

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this research was to design aluminum powder metallurgy (PM) alloys and processing strategies that yielded sintered products with thermal properties that rivaled those of the cast and wrought aluminum alloys traditionally employed in heat sink manufacturing. Research has emphasized PM alloys within the Al-Mg-Sn system. In one sub-theme of research, the general processing response of each PM alloy was investigated through a combination of sintering trials, sintered density measurements, and microstructural assessments. In the second, the thermal properties of sintered products were studied in detail. Thermal conductivity was first determined using a calculated approach through discrete measurements of specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and density and subsequently verified using a transient plane source technique on larger specimens. Experimental PM alloys achieved >99 pct theoretical density and exhibited thermal conductivity that ranged from 179 to 225 W/m K. Thermal performance was largely dominated by the amount of magnesium present within the aluminum grains and, in turn, bulk alloy chemistry. Data confirmed that the novel PM alloys were highly competitive with even the most advanced heat sink materials such as wrought 6063 and 6061.

  1. Optimal performance of heat engines with a finite source or sink and inequalities between means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johal, Ramandeep S.

    2016-07-01

    Given a system with a finite heat capacity and a heat reservoir, and two values of initial temperatures, T+ and T-(sink at T-, or, when the reservoir is an infinite sink at T- and the system acts as a source at T+? It is found that in order to compare the total extracted work, and the corresponding efficiency in the two cases, we need to consider three regimes as suggested by an inequality, the so-called arithmetic mean-geometric mean inequality, involving the arithmetic and the geometric means of the two temperature values T+ and T-. In each of these regimes, the efficiency at total work obeys certain universal bounds, given only in terms of the ratio of initial temperatures. The general theoretical results are exemplified for thermodynamic systems for which internal energy and temperature are power laws of the entropy. The conclusions may serve as benchmarks in the design of heat engines, where we can choose the nature of the finite system, so as to tune the total extractable work and/or the corresponding efficiency.

  2. Optimal performance of heat engines with a finite source or sink and inequalities between means.

    PubMed

    Johal, Ramandeep S

    2016-07-01

    Given a system with a finite heat capacity and a heat reservoir, and two values of initial temperatures, T_{+} and T_{-}(sink at T_{-}, or, when the reservoir is an infinite sink at T_{-} and the system acts as a source at T_{+}? It is found that in order to compare the total extracted work, and the corresponding efficiency in the two cases, we need to consider three regimes as suggested by an inequality, the so-called arithmetic mean-geometric mean inequality, involving the arithmetic and the geometric means of the two temperature values T_{+} and T_{-}. In each of these regimes, the efficiency at total work obeys certain universal bounds, given only in terms of the ratio of initial temperatures. The general theoretical results are exemplified for thermodynamic systems for which internal energy and temperature are power laws of the entropy. The conclusions may serve as benchmarks in the design of heat engines, where we can choose the nature of the finite system, so as to tune the total extractable work and/or the corresponding efficiency.

  3. Optimal performance of heat engines with a finite source or sink and inequalities between means.

    PubMed

    Johal, Ramandeep S

    2016-07-01

    Given a system with a finite heat capacity and a heat reservoir, and two values of initial temperatures, T_{+} and T_{-}(sink at T_{-}, or, when the reservoir is an infinite sink at T_{-} and the system acts as a source at T_{+}? It is found that in order to compare the total extracted work, and the corresponding efficiency in the two cases, we need to consider three regimes as suggested by an inequality, the so-called arithmetic mean-geometric mean inequality, involving the arithmetic and the geometric means of the two temperature values T_{+} and T_{-}. In each of these regimes, the efficiency at total work obeys certain universal bounds, given only in terms of the ratio of initial temperatures. The general theoretical results are exemplified for thermodynamic systems for which internal energy and temperature are power laws of the entropy. The conclusions may serve as benchmarks in the design of heat engines, where we can choose the nature of the finite system, so as to tune the total extractable work and/or the corresponding efficiency. PMID:27575093

  4. Study of structural active cooling and heat sink systems for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This technology investigation was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a number of thermal protection systems (TPS) concepts which are alternate candidates to the space shuttle baseline TPS. Four independent tasks were performed. Task 1 consisted of an in-depth evaluation of active structural cooling of the space shuttle orbiter. In Task 2, heat sink concepts for the booster were studied to identify and postulate solutions for design problems unique to heat sink TPS. Task 3 consisted of a feasibility demonstration test of a phase change material (PCM) incorporated into a reusable surface insulation (RSI) thermal protection system for the shuttle orbiter. In Task 4 the feasibility of heat pipes for stagnation region cooling was studied for the booster and the orbiter. Designs were developed for the orbiter leading edge and used in trade studies of leading edge concepts. At the time this program was initiated, a 2-stage fully reusable shuttle system was envisioned; therefore, the majority of the tasks were focused on the fully reusable system environments. Subsequently, a number of alternate shuttle system approaches, with potential for reduced shuttle system development funding requirements, were proposed. Where practicable, appropriate shifts in emphasis and task scoping were made to reflect these changes.

  5. Analysis of a passive heat sink for temperature stabilization of high-power LED bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvís, Eduardo; Bendaña, Ricardo; Michinel, Humberto; Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro; Paredes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a numerical analysis and experimental measurements of the temperature stabilization of high-power LED chips that we have obtained by employing an aluminum passive heat sink, designed to be used in a compact light bulb configuration. We demonstrate that our system keeps the temperature of the LED chip well-below 70° C yielding long-term operation of the device. Our simulations have been performed for a low-cost device ready to install in public streetlights. The experimental measurements performed in different configurations show a nice agreement with the numerical calculations.

  6. Fluid-cooled heat sink with improved fin areas and efficiencies for use in cooling various devices

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Bennion, Kevin; Kelly, Kenneth; Narumanchi, Sreekant

    2015-04-21

    The disclosure provides a fluid-cooled heat sink having a heat transfer base and a plurality of heat transfer fins in thermal communication with the heat transfer base, where the heat transfer base and the heat transfer fins form a central fluid channel through which a forced or free cooling fluid may flow. The heat transfer pins are arranged around the central fluid channel with a flow space provided between adjacent pins, allowing for some portion of the central fluid channel flow to divert through the flow space. The arrangement reduces the pressure drop of the flow through the fins, optimizes average heat transfer coefficients, reduces contact and fin-pin resistances, and reduces the physical footprint of the heat sink in an operating environment.

  7. A Compact, Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator with High Heat Sink Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P. J.; Canavan, E. R.; DiPirro, M. J.; Jackson, M.; Tuttle, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    In the continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR), the existence of a constant temperature stage attached to the load breaks the link between the requirements of the load (usually a detector array) and the operation of the ADR. This allows the ADR to be cycled much faster, which yields more than an order of magnitude improvement in cooling power density over single-shot ADRs. Recent effort has focused on developing compact, efficient higher temperature stages. An important part of this work has been the development of passive gas-gap heat switches that transition (from conductive to insulating) at temperatures around 1 K and 4 K without the use of an actively heated getter. We have found that by carefully adjusting available surface area and the number of He-3 monolayers, gas-gap switches can be made to operate passively. Passive operation greatly reduces switching time and eliminates an important parasitic heat load. The current four stage ADR provides 6 micro W of cooling at 50 mK (21 micro W at 100 mK) and weighs less than 8 kg. It operates from a 4.2 K heat sink, which can be provided by an unpumped He bath or many commercially available mechanical cryocoolers. Reduction in critical current with temperature in our fourth stage NbTi magnet presently limits the maximum temperature of our system to approx. 5 K. We are developing compact, low-current Nb3Sn magnets that will raise the maximum heat sink temperature to over 10 K.

  8. Experimental Evaluation of the Heat Sink Effect in Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Kristina I.; Lutat, Carolin; Rieder, Christian; Schenk, Andrea; Wacker, Frank; Raatschen, Hans-Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate and quantify the heat sink effect in hepatic microwave ablation (MWA) in a standardized ex vivo model, and to analyze the influence of vessel distance and blood flow on lesion volume and shape. Materials and Methods 108 ex vivo MWA procedures were performed in freshly harvested pig livers. Antennas were inserted parallel to non-perfused and perfused (700,1400 ml/min) glass tubes (diameter 5mm) at different distances (10, 15, 20mm). Ablation zones (radius, area) were analyzed and compared (Kruskal-Wallis Test, Dunn’s multiple comparison Test). Temperature changes adjacent to the tubes were measured throughout the ablation cycle. Results Maximum temperature decreased significantly with increasing flow and distance (p<0.05). Compared to non-perfused tubes, ablation zones were significantly deformed by perfused tubes within 15mm distance to the antenna (p<0.05). At a flow rate of 700ml/min ablation zone radius was reduced to 37.2% and 80.1% at 10 and 15mm tube distance, respectively; ablation zone area was reduced to 50.5% and 89.7%, respectively. Conclusion Significant changes of ablation zones were demonstrated in a pig liver model. Considerable heat sink effect was observed within a diameter of 15mm around simulated vessels, dependent on flow rate. This has to be taken into account when ablating liver lesions close to vessels. PMID:26222431

  9. Ultimate Heat Sink Thermal Performance and Water Utilization: Measurements on Cooling and Spray Ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Athey, G. F.; Hadlock, R. K.; Abbey, O. B.

    1982-02-01

    A data acquisition research program, entitled "Ultimate Heat Sink Performance Field Experiments," has been brought to completion. The primary objective is to obtain the requisite data to characterize thermal performance and water utilization for cooling ponds and spray ponds at elevated temperature. Such data are useful for modeling purposes, but the work reported here does not contain modeling efforts within its scope. The water bodies which have been studied are indicative of nuclear reactor ultimate heat sinks, components of emergency core cooling systems. The data reflect thermal performance and water utilization for meteorological and solar influences which are representative of worst-case combinations of conditions. Constructed water retention ponds, provided with absolute seals against seepage, have been chosen as facilities for the measurement programs; the first pond was located at Raft River, Idaho, and the second at East Mesa, California. The data illustrate and describe, for both cooling ponds and spray ponds, thermal performance and water utilization as the ponds cool from an initially elevated temperature. To obtain the initial elevated temperature, it has been convenient to conduct the measurements at geothermal sites having large supplies and delivery rates of hot geothermal fluid. The data are described and discussed in the text, and presented in the form of data volumes as appendices.

  10. Mixed convection flow with non-uniform heat source/sink in a doubly stratified magnetonanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Hussain, S.; Sagheer, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we explore the unsteady flow of viscous nanofluid driven by an inclined stretching sheet. The novelty of the present study is to account for the effect of a non-uniform heat source/sink in a thermally and solutally stratified magnetonanofluid. Governing system of nonlinear partial differential equations is converted into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Solution of the transformed system is obtained using RK4 method with shooting technique. It is observed that increase in the values of thermal and mass stratification parameter reduce the velocity profile and increase in the values of variable thermal conductivity parameter and non-uniform heat source/sink parameters enhance the temperature distribution. Moreover, skin friction coefficient, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are discussed. Obtained results are displayed both graphically and in tabular form to illustrate the effect of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. Numerical results are compared with previous published results and found to be in good agreement for special cases of the emerging parameters.

  11. Laser thinning for monolayer graphene formation: heat sink and interference effect.

    PubMed

    Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Seung Jin; Kim, Eun Sung; Güneş, Fethullah; Lee, Il Ha; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Si Young; Lim, Seong Chu; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Young Hee

    2011-01-25

    Despite the availability of large-area graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the control of a uniform monolayer graphene remained challenging. Here, we report a method of acquiring monolayer graphene by laser irradiation. The accumulation of heat on graphene by absorbing light, followed by oxidative burning of upper graphene layers, which strongly relies on the wavelength of light and optical parameters of the substrate, was in situ measured by the G-band shift in Raman spectroscopy. The substrate plays a crucial role as a heat sink for the bottom monolayer graphene, resulting in no burning or etching. Oscillatory thinning behavior dependent on the substrate oxide thickness was evaluated by adopting a simple Fresnel's equation. This paves the way for future research in utilizing monolayer graphene for high-speed electronic devices.

  12. Design and simulation of a novel high-efficiency cooling heat-sink structure using fluid-thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongqi, Jing; Li, Zhong; Yuxi, Ni; Junjie, Zhang; Suping, Liu; Xiaoyu, Ma

    2015-10-01

    A novel high-efficiency cooling mini-channel heat-sink structure has been designed to meet the package technology demands of high power density laser diode array stacks. Thermal and water flowing characteristics have been simulated using the Ansys-Fluent software. Owing to the increased effective cooling area, this mini-channel heat-sink structure has a better cooling effect when compared with the traditional macro-channel heat-sinks. Owing to the lower flow velocity in this novel high efficient cooling structure, the chillers' water-pressure requirement is reduced. Meanwhile, the machining process of this high-efficiency cooling mini-channel heat-sink structure is simple and the cost is relatively low, it also has advantages in terms of high durability and long lifetime. This heat-sink is an ideal choice for the package of high power density laser diode array stacks. Project supported by the Defense Industrial Technology Development Program (No. B1320133033).

  13. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  14. Fusible heat sink materials - Evaluation of alternate candidates. [for PLSS cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.; Lomax, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Fusible heat sinks are a possible source for thermal regulation of space suited astronauts. Materials with greater thermal storage capability than water could enable both an extension of time between recharging and/or a reduction in size and/or mass. An extensive literature search identified 1,215 candidates with a solid-liquid transformation within the temperature range of -13 C to 5 C. Based on data available in the literature, several candidates with a cooling capacity significantly greater than water were identified. Measurements of the transformation temperature and enthalpy of transformation were then undertaken with a differential scanning calorimeter in order to confirm the accuracy of the literature. Laboratory measurements have thus far not been able to corroborate the extremely high values found from the literature. This paper presents the approach for materials selection utilized in this study, the experimental procedure, and the results of the measurements thus far undertaken.

  15. Reexamination of METMAN, Recommendations on Enhancement of LCVG, and Development of New Concepts for EMU Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Amir

    1990-01-01

    METMAN is a 41-node transient metabolic computer code developed in 1970 and revised in 1989 by Lockheed Engineering and Sciences, Inc. This program relies on a mathematical model to predict the transient temperature distribution in a body influenced by metabolic heat generation and thermal interaction with the environment. A more complex 315-node model is also available that not only simulates the thermal response of a body exposed to a warm environment, but is also capable of describing the thermal response resulting from exposure to a cold environment. It is important to compare the two models for the prediction of the body's thermal response to metabolic heat generation and exposure to various environmental conditions. Discrepancies between the twi models may warrant an investigation of METMAN to ensure its validity for describing the body's thermal response in space environment. The Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment is a subsystem of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). This garment, worn under the pressure suit, contains the liquid cooling tubing and gas ventilation manifolds; its purpose is to alleviate or reduce thermal stress resulting from metabolic heat generation. There is renewed interest in modifying this garment through identification of the locus of maximum heat transfer at body-liquid cooled tubing interface. The sublimator is a vital component of the Primary Life Support System (PLSS) in the EMU. It acts as a heat sink to remove heat and humidity from the gas ventilating circuit and the liquid cooling loop of the LCVG. The deficiency of the sublimator is that the ice, used as the heat sink, sublimates into space. There is an effort to minimize water losses in the feedwater circuit of the EMU. This requires developing new concepts to design an alternative heat sink system. Efforts are directed to review and verify the heat transfer formulation of the analytical model employed by METMAN. A conceptual investigation of regenerative non

  16. Heat Exchange, Additive Manufacturing, and Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick

    2015-02-23

    Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured undistorted snapshots of refrigerants flowing through small heat exchangers, helping them to better understand heat transfer in heating, cooling and ventilation systems.

  17. Numerical and Experimental Studies of Ultra Low Profile Three-dimensional Heat Sinks (3DHS) Made using a Novel Manufacturing Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna Kota; Diana Sobers; Paul Kolodner; Nikhil Bajaj; Jen-Hau Cheng; Elina Simon; Todd Salamon

    2012-04-01

    The continued increase in electronic device packaging densities is placing ever more challenging performance requirements on air-cooled heat sinks. In cases where the state-of-the-art heat sink technology is unable of to meet these requirements, this often results in either a relaxation of design specifications, or the exploration of other thermal management technologies better able to handle high heat density applications, such as liquid cooling. Both of these approaches provide challenges to equipment designers, as relaxing requirements does not allow for a scale-able path to increased device densities and their associated functionality, while incorporating new thermal management technologies often requires major hardware redesigns, which has significant cost implications. In this work, we explore the use of air-cooled heat sinks incorporating three-dimensional features, so-called three-dimensional heat sinks (3DHS), that enhance heat transfer through a number of different physical mechanisms, as an approach to further extending the limits of air cooling. An ultra low profile (5.7 mm) heat sink application is targeted due to the significant thermal challenges associated with restrictions on heat sink height. We also present details on a novel manufacturing method that has significant cost advantages over other fabrication methods such as investment casting and direct metal printing. Experiments on 3DHS and conventional heat sink are conducted in a wind tunnel test apparatus as a function of inlet air mass flow rate and flow bypass above the heat sinks. The experimental results show a strong correlation between heat sink permeability and thermal performance, as measured by heat sink thermal resistance versus ideal pumping power. The results also illustrate the important effects of flow bypass on heat sink performance. The best performing 3DHS design is observed to have up to a 19% improvement in thermal performance relative to a conventional parallel fin heat sink

  18. Nanoscale characterization of the thermal interface resistance of a heat-sink composite material by in situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Kakefuda, Yohei; Mori, Takao; Hirose, Kenji; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-20

    We developed an original method of in situ nanoscale characterization of thermal resistance utilizing a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The focused electron beam of the HRTEM was used as a contact-free heat source and a piezo-movable nanothermocouple was developed as a thermal detector. This method has a high flexibility of supplying thermal-flux directions for nano/microscale thermal conductivity analysis, and is a powerful way to probe the thermal properties of complex or composite materials. Using this method we performed reproducible measurements of electron beam-induced temperature changes in pre-selected sections of a heat-sink α-Al(2)O(3)/epoxy-based resin composite. Observed linear behavior of the temperature change in a filler reveals that Fourier's law holds even at such a mesoscopic scale. In addition, we successfully determined the thermal resistance of the nanoscale interfaces between neighboring α-Al(2)O(3) fillers to be 1.16 × 10(-8) m(2)K W(-1), which is 35 times larger than that of the fillers themselves. This method that we have discovered enables evaluation of thermal resistivity of composites on the nanoscale, combined with the ultimate spatial localization and resolution sample analysis capabilities that TEM entails.

  19. Nanoscale characterization of the thermal interface resistance of a heat-sink composite material by in situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Kakefuda, Yohei; Mori, Takao; Hirose, Kenji; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    We developed an original method of in situ nanoscale characterization of thermal resistance utilizing a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The focused electron beam of the HRTEM was used as a contact-free heat source and a piezo-movable nanothermocouple was developed as a thermal detector. This method has a high flexibility of supplying thermal-flux directions for nano/microscale thermal conductivity analysis, and is a powerful way to probe the thermal properties of complex or composite materials. Using this method we performed reproducible measurements of electron beam-induced temperature changes in pre-selected sections of a heat-sink α-Al2O3/epoxy-based resin composite. Observed linear behavior of the temperature change in a filler reveals that Fourier’s law holds even at such a mesoscopic scale. In addition, we successfully determined the thermal resistance of the nanoscale interfaces between neighboring α-Al2O3 fillers to be 1.16 × 10-8 m2K W-1, which is 35 times larger than that of the fillers themselves. This method that we have discovered enables evaluation of thermal resistivity of composites on the nanoscale, combined with the ultimate spatial localization and resolution sample analysis capabilities that TEM entails.

  20. Effect of magnetic field on the forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of a magnetic nanofluid in a miniature heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashjaee, Mehdi; Goharkhah, Mohammad; Khadem, Leila Azizi; Ahmadi, Reza

    2014-12-01

    The effect of an external magnetic field on the forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of water based Fe3O4 nanofluid (ferrofluid) in a miniature heat sink is studied experimentally. The heat sink with the dimensions of 40 mm (L) × 40 mm (W) × 10 mm (H) consists of an array of five circular channels with diameter and length of 4 and 40 mm, respectively. It is heated from the bottom surface with a constant heat flux while the other surfaces are insulated. The heat sink is also influenced by an external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet. The local convective coefficients are measured at various flow rates (200 < Re < 900), magnetic field intensities (B < 1,400 G), and particle volume fractions (φ = 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 %). Results show that using ferrofluid results in a maximum of 14 % improvement in heat transfer compared to the pure water, in the absence of magnetic field. This value grows up to 38 % when a magnetic field with the strength of 1,200 G is applied to the ferrofluid. On the other hand, it is observed that the significant heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is always accompanied by a pressure drop penalty. The optimum operating condition is obtained based on the maximum heat transfer enhancement per pressure loss.

  1. Braze Development of Graphite Fiber for Use in Phase Change Material Heat Sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Gleason, Brian; Beringer, Woody; Stephen, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand (HS), together with NASA Johnson Space Center, developed methods to metallurgically join graphite fiber to aluminum. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate improved thermal conductance, tensile strength and manufacturability compared to existing epoxy bonded techniques. These improvements have the potential to increase the performance and robustness of phase change material heat sinks that use graphite fibers as an interstitial material. Initial work focused on evaluating joining techniques from 4 suppliers, each consisting of a metallization step followed by brazing or soldering of one inch square blocks of Fibercore graphite fiber material to aluminum end sheets. Results matched the strength and thermal conductance of the epoxy bonded control samples, so two suppliers were down-selected for a second round of braze development. The second round of braze samples had up to a 300% increase in strength and up to a 132% increase in thermal conductance over the bonded samples. However, scalability and repeatability proved to be significant hurdles with the metallization approach. An alternative approach was pursued which used nickel and active braze allows to prepare the carbon fibers for joining with aluminum. This approach was repeatable and scalable with improved strength and thermal conductance when compared with epoxy bonding.

  2. Braze Development of Graphite Fiber for Use in Phase Change Material Heat Sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Beringer, Woody; Gleason, Brian; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand (HS), together with NASA Johnson Space Center, developed methods to metallurgically join graphite fiber to aluminum. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate improved thermal conductance, tensile strength and manufacturability compared to existing epoxy bonded techniques. These improvements have the potential to increase the performance and robustness of phase change material heat sinks that use graphite fibers as an interstitial material. Initial work focused on evaluating joining techniques from four suppliers, each consisting of a metallization step followed by brazing or soldering of one inch square blocks of Fibercore graphite fiber material to aluminum end sheets. Results matched the strength and thermal conductance of the epoxy bonded control samples, so two suppliers were down-selected for a second round of braze development. The second round of braze samples had up to a 300% increase in strength and up to a 132% increase in thermal conductance over the bonded samples. However, scalability and repeatability proved to be significant hurdles with the metallization approach. An alternative approach was pursued which used a nickel braze allow to prepare the carbon fibers for joining with aluminum. Initial results on sample blocks indicate that this approach should be repeatable and scalable with good strength and thermal conductance when compared with epoxy bonding.

  3. Lunar South Pole ice as heat sink for Lunar cryofuel production system

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A.; Stanley, M.; Modro, S.M.; Whitman, P.

    1995-03-01

    Recent Clementine bistatic radar data suggest that water ice may be present in a {open_quotes}forever shaded{close_quotes} depression or crater at the South Pole of the Moon. The ice is a feedstock for the electrolysis production of cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen rocket fuels for a transportation system on the moon and for leaving and descending on to the moon. The ice also provides a convective heat sink critical to the practical implementation of high throughput electric power generators and refrigerators that liquefy and cool the oxygen and hydrogen into cryogenic rocket fuel. This brief analysis shows that about a hundred tonnes of hardware delivered to the lunar surface can produce tens of thousands of tonnes of rocket fuel per year, on the moon. And it makes the point that if convective cooling is used instead of radiative cooling, then power and processing systems can be used that exist and have been tested already. This shortens the time by an order of magnitude to develop lunar operations. Quick deployment of a chemical cryofuel energy source is a key factor in the economics of lunar development.

  4. Numerical investigation of thermal performance of a water-cooled mini-channel heat sink for different chip arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikadar, Amitav; Hossain, Md. Mahamudul; Morshed, A. K. M. M.

    2016-07-01

    Heat transfer from electronic chip is always challenging and very crucial for electronic industry. Electronic chips are assembled in various manners according to the design conditions and limitationsand thus the influence of chip assembly on the overall thermal performance needs to be understand for the efficient design of electronic cooling system. Due to shrinkage of the dimension of channel and continuous increment of thermal load, conventional heat extraction techniques sometimes become inadequate. Due to high surface area to volume ratio, mini-channel have the natural advantage to enhance convective heat transfer and thus to play a vital role in the advanced heat transfer devices with limited surface area and high heat flux. In this paper, a water cooled mini-channel heat sink was considered for electronic chip cooling and five different chip arrangements were designed and studied, namely: the diagonal arrangement, parallel arrangement, stacked arrangement, longitudinal arrangement and sandwiched arrangement. Temperature distribution on the chip surfaces was presented and the thermal performance of the heat sink in terms of overall thermal resistance was also compared. It is found that the sandwiched arrangement of chip provides better thermal performance compared to conventional in line chip arrangement.

  5. Fusible heat sink materials - An identification of alternate candidates. [for astronaut thermoregulation in EVA portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna; Lomax, Curtis

    1991-01-01

    Fusible heat sinks are a possible source for thermal regulation of space suited astronauts. An extensive database search was undertaken to identify candidate materials with liquid solid transformations over the temperature range of -18 C to 5 C; and 1215 candidates were identified. Based on available data, 59 candidate materials with thermal storage capability, DeltaH values higher than that of water were identified. This paper presents the methodology utilized in the study, including the decision process used for materials selection.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of heat transfer for two-layered microchannel heat sink with non-uniform heat flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanglong; Yang, Lili; Li, Yue; Wu, Yihao; Hu, Xinglong

    2016-09-01

    To meet the cooling demand of electronic devices with multiple heat sources, we design two novel two-layer mini-channel heat sinks (3-port structure and 5-port structure) to improve the uniformity of surface temperature distribution. The temperature distribution and fluid flow in the two channel networks with single and two layer structures are investigated. The 5-port mini-channel network is verified to have a lower pressure drop and a better thermal performance compared with the 3-port one in terms of total thermal resistance and surface temperature distribution. For the 5-port 2-layer structure, the local thermal resistance ranges from 0.2 to 0.08 K/W at the flow rate of 400-900 ml/min while the pressure drop is lower than 2.5 kPa.

  7. Design, development, and fabrication of a prototype ice pack heat sink subsystem. Potassium bifluoride/water solution investigations. [for portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Kellner, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    A series of investigations was conducted to characterize the physical properties of potassium bifluoride and water solutions for use as the fusible heat sink material in a regenerable portable life support system.

  8. 3-Dimensional numerical study of cooling performance of a heat sink with air-water flow through mini-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sambit; Majumder, Abhik; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-07-01

    The present microelectronics market demands devices with high power dissipation capabilities having enhanced cooling per unit area. The drive for miniaturizing the devices to even micro level dimensions is shooting up the applied heat flux on such devices, resulting in complexity in heat transfer and cooling management. In this paper, a method of CPU processor cooling is introduced where active and passive cooling techniques are incorporated simultaneously. A heat sink consisting of fins is designed, where water flows internally through the mini-channel fins and air flows externally. Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed for large set of Reynolds number in laminar region using finite volume method for both developing flows. The dimensions of mini-channel fins are varied for several aspect ratios such as 1, 1.33, 2 and 4. Constant temperature (T) boundary condition is applied at heat sink base. Channel fluid temperature, pressure drop are analyzed to obtain best cooling option in the present study. It has been observed that as the aspect ratio of the channel decreases Nusselt number decreases while pressure drop increases. However, Nusselt number increases with increase in Reynolds number.

  9. Thermophoresis on boundary layer heat and mass transfer flow of Walters-B fluid past a radiate plate with heat sink/source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasu, B.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy; Murthy, P. V. S. N.

    2016-09-01

    The Walters-B liquid model is employed to simulate medical creams and other rheological liquids encountered in biotechnology and chemical engineering. This rheological model introduces supplementary terms into the momentum conservation equation. The combined effects of thermal radiation and heat sink/source on transient free convective, laminar flow and mass transfer in a viscoelastic fluid past a vertical plate are presented by taking thermophoresis effect into account. The transformed conservation equations are solved using a stable, robust finite difference method. A parametric study illustrating the influence of viscoelasticity parameter (Γ), thermophoretic parameter (τ), thermal radiation parameter (F), heat sink/source (ϕ), Prandtl number (Pr), Schmidt number (Sc), thermal Grashof number (Gr), solutal Grashof number (Gm), temperature and concentration profiles as well as local skin-friction, Nusselt and Sherwood number is conducted. The results of this parametric study are shown graphically and inform of table. The study has applications in polymer materials processing.

  10. Heat Source/Sink in a Magneto-Hydrodynamic Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in a Porous Medium: Dual Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Awais, Muhammad; Imtiaz, Amna

    2016-01-01

    This communication deals with the properties of heat source/sink in a magneto-hydrodynamic flow of a non-Newtonian fluid immersed in a porous medium. Shrinking phenomenon along with the permeability of the wall is considered. Mathematical modelling is performed to convert the considered physical process into set of coupled nonlinear mathematical equations. Suitable transformations are invoked to convert the set of partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are tackled numerically for the solution computations. It is noted that dual solutions for various physical parameters exist which are analyzed in detail. PMID:27598314

  11. Heat Source/Sink in a Magneto-Hydrodynamic Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in a Porous Medium: Dual Solutions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Awais, Muhammad; Imtiaz, Amna

    2016-01-01

    This communication deals with the properties of heat source/sink in a magneto-hydrodynamic flow of a non-Newtonian fluid immersed in a porous medium. Shrinking phenomenon along with the permeability of the wall is considered. Mathematical modelling is performed to convert the considered physical process into set of coupled nonlinear mathematical equations. Suitable transformations are invoked to convert the set of partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are tackled numerically for the solution computations. It is noted that dual solutions for various physical parameters exist which are analyzed in detail. PMID:27598314

  12. Temperature control at DBS electrodes using a heat sink: experimentally validated FEM model of DBS lead architecture.

    PubMed

    Elwassif, Maged M; Datta, Abhishek; Rahman, Asif; Bikson, Marom

    2012-08-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of medically refractory movement disorders and other neurological and psychiatric conditions. The extent of temperature increases around DBS electrodes during normal operation (joule heating and increased metabolic activity) or coupling with an external source (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging) remains poorly understood and methods to mitigate temperature increases are being actively investigated. We developed a heat transfer finite element method (FEM) simulation of DBS incorporating the realistic architecture of Medtronic 3389 leads. The temperature changes were analyzed considering different electrode configurations, stimulation protocols and tissue properties. The heat-transfer model results were then validated using micro-thermocouple measurements during DBS lead stimulation in a saline bath. FEM results indicate that lead design (materials and geometry) may have a central role in controlling temperature rise by conducting heat. We show how modifying lead design can effectively control temperature increases. The robustness of this heat-sink approach over complimentary heat-mitigation technologies follows from several features: (1) it is insensitive to the mechanisms of heating (e.g. nature of magnetic coupling); (2) it does not interfere with device efficacy; and (3) can be practically implemented in a broad range of implanted devices without modifying the normal device operations or the implant procedure.

  13. Temperature control at DBS electrodes using a heat sink: experimentally validated FEM model of DBS lead architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwassif, Maged M.; Datta, Abhishek; Rahman, Asif; Bikson, Marom

    2012-08-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of medically refractory movement disorders and other neurological and psychiatric conditions. The extent of temperature increases around DBS electrodes during normal operation (joule heating and increased metabolic activity) or coupling with an external source (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging) remains poorly understood and methods to mitigate temperature increases are being actively investigated. We developed a heat transfer finite element method (FEM) simulation of DBS incorporating the realistic architecture of Medtronic 3389 leads. The temperature changes were analyzed considering different electrode configurations, stimulation protocols and tissue properties. The heat-transfer model results were then validated using micro-thermocouple measurements during DBS lead stimulation in a saline bath. FEM results indicate that lead design (materials and geometry) may have a central role in controlling temperature rise by conducting heat. We show how modifying lead design can effectively control temperature increases. The robustness of this heat-sink approach over complimentary heat-mitigation technologies follows from several features: (1) it is insensitive to the mechanisms of heating (e.g. nature of magnetic coupling); (2) it does not interfere with device efficacy; and (3) can be practically implemented in a broad range of implanted devices without modifying the normal device operations or the implant procedure.

  14. Encapsulated nano-heat-sinks for thermal management of heterogeneous chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minghui; Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Hu, Jianjun; Fan, Yunxiao; Voevodin, Andrey A; Su, Ming

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a new way to control temperatures of heterogeneous exothermic reactions such as heterogeneous catalytic reaction and polymerization by using encapsulated nanoparticles of phase change materials as thermally functional additives. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and silica encapsulated paraffin nanoparticles are used to absorb heat released in catalytic reaction and to mitigate gel effect of polymerization, respectively. The local hot spots that are induced by non-homogenous catalyst packing, reactant concentration fluctuation, and abrupt change of polymerization rate lead to solid to liquid phase change of nanoparticle cores so as to avoid thermal runaway by converting energies from exothermic reactions to latent heat of fusion. By quenching local hot spots at initial stage, reaction rates do not rise significantly because the thermal energy produced in reaction is isothermally removed. Nanoparticles of phase change materials will open a new dimension for thermal management of exothermic reactions to quench local hot spots, prevent thermal runaway of reaction, and change product distribution. PMID:20967399

  15. Impact of Improved Heat Sinking of an X-Ray Calorimeter Array on Crosstalk, Noise, and Background Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Adams, J. S.; Brekosky, R. P.; Chervenak, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Porter, F. S.

    2011-01-01

    The x-ray calorimeter array of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) of the Astro-H satellite will incorporate a silicon thermistor array produced during the development of the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) of the Suzaku satellite. On XRS, inadequate heat sinking of the array led to several non-ideal effects. The thermal crosstalk, while too small to be confused with x-ray signals, nonetheless contributed a noise term that could be seen as a degradation in energy resolution at high flux. When energy was deposited in the silicon frame around the active elements of the array, such as by a cosmic ray, the resulting pulse in the temperature of the frame resulted in coincident signal pulses on most of the pixels. In orbit, the resolution was found to depend on the particle background rate. In order to minimize these effects on SXS, heat-sinking gold was applied to areas on the front and back of the array die, which was thermally anchored to the gold of its fanout board via gold wire bonds. The thermal conductance from the silicon chip to the fanout board was improved over that of XRS by an order of magnitude. This change was sufficient for essentially eliminating frame events and allowing high-resolution to be attained at much higher counting rates. We will present the improved performance, the measured crosstalk, and the results of the thermal characterization of such arrays.

  16. Unsteady Flow of Third Grade Fluid over an Oscillatory Stretching Sheet with Thermal Radiation and Heat Source/Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Khan, Sami Ullah; Abbas, Zaheer

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the unsteady boundary layer flow and heat transfer analysis in a third grade fluid over an oscillatory stretching sheet under the influences of thermal radiation and heat source/sink. The convective boundary condition at the sheet is imposed to determine the temperature distribution. Homotopy analysis method (HAM) is used to solve dimensionless nonlinear partial differential equations. The effects of involved parameters on both velocity and temperature fields are illustrated in detail through various plots. It is found that the amplitude of velocity decreases by increasing the ratio of the oscillation frequency of the sheet to its stretching rate and Hartmann number while it increases by increasing the third grade fluid parameter. On contrary, the temperature field is found to be a decreasing function of the third grade fluid parameter.

  17. Sustainable Retrofit of Residential Roofs Using Metal Roofing Panels, Thin-Film Photovoltaic Laminates, and PCM Heat Sink Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Miller, William A; Childs, Phillip W; Biswas, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    During September-October 2009, research teams representing Metal Construction Association (the largest North American trade association representing metal building manufacturers, builders, and material suppliers), CertainTeed (one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of thermal insulation and building envelope materials), Unisolar (largest U.S. producer of amorphous silicone photo-voltaic (PV) laminates), Phase Change Energy (manufacturer of bio-based PCM), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) installed three experimental attics utilizing different roof retrofit strategies in the ORNL campus. The main goal of this project was experimental evaluation of a newly-developed sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing amorphous silicone PV laminates integrated with metal roof and PCM heat sink. The experimental attic with PV laminate was expected to work during the winter time as a passive solar collector with PCM storing solar heat, absorbed during the day, and increasing overall attic air temperature during the night.

  18. Microsegregation during Solidification of Graphitic Fiber-Reinforced Aluminum Alloys under External Heat Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, H. G.; Lopez, H. F.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    2007-01-01

    Squeeze casting and melt infiltration were employed in processing continuous graphitic fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites. The fiber reinforcements were (1) uncoated carbon fiber (UNC-CF), (2) Ni-coated carbon fiber (NiC-CF), and (3) bare graphite fibers (GRFs), and they were externally cooled to enhance the local solidification of the matrix alloy. The solidified microstructures and their composition profiles were examined using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray, and electron probe microanalysis wavelengh-dispersive X-ray. The resultant microstructures in the UNC-CF and NiC-CF reinforced composites exhibited significant differences from those found in the GRF-reinforced composite, in terms of solidified morphologies and compositions. It was found that coarse columnar dendrites developed in the fiber-free matrix, fine equiaxed dendrites in the chilled matrix, and columnar-like arms in the fiber-reinforced matrices. In contrast, in bare GRF-reinforced composites, two distinct regions were clearly distinguished: (1) a region consisting of coarse equiaxed dendrites in the fiber-free matrix and (2) a featureless morphology within the fiber reinforcement regions. These distinct microstructures were attributed to preferential heat extraction through the GRFs, which possess a relatively high thermal conductivity. Apparently, heat extraction through the GRFs led to the formation of single α-Al envelopes on the fiber surfaces. In addition, the extent of solute segregation found in the GRF-reinforced alloy composite was relatively small when compared with the CF-reinforced alloy composites.

  19. Inter-Ocean Exchanges and Regional Sinks of Heat during the Warming Hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. K.; Park, W.; Baringer, M. O.; Gordon, A. L.; Huber, B. A.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Global mean surface warming has stalled since the end of the twentieth century, but the net radiation imbalance at the top of the atmosphere continues to suggest an increasingly warming planet. This apparent contradiction has been reconciled by an anomalous heat flux into the ocean, induced by a shift towards a La Niña-like state with cold sea surface temperatures in the eastern tropical Pacific over the past decade or so. A significant portion of the heat missing from the atmosphere is therefore expected to be stored in the Pacific Ocean. However, in situ hydrographic records indicate that Pacific Ocean heat content has been decreasing. We analyze observations along with simulations from a global ocean-sea ice model to track the pathway of heat. We find that the enhanced heat uptake by the Pacific Ocean has been compensated by an increased heat transport from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean, carried by the Indonesian throughflow. As a result, Indian Ocean heat content has increased abruptly, which accounts for more than 70% of the global ocean heat gain in the upper 700 m during the past decade.

  20. Heat sink effect on tumor ablation characteristics as observed in monopolar radiofrequency, bipolar radiofrequency, and microwave, using ex vivo calf liver model.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C; Shehata, Mena; Alzahrani, Nayef; Al-Alem, Issan; Morris, David L

    2015-03-01

    Thermal ablation of liver tumors near large blood vessels is affected by the cooling effect of blood flow, leading to incomplete ablation. Hence, we conducted a comparative investigation of heat sink effect in monopolar (MP) and bipolar (BP) radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and microwave (MW) ablation devices.With a perfused calf liver, the ablative performances (volume, mass, density, dimensions), with and without heat sink, were measured. Heat sink was present when the ablative tip of the probes were 8.0 mm close to a major hepatic vein and absent when >30 mm away. Temperatures (T1 and T2) on either side of the hepatic vein near the tip of the probes, heating probe temperature (T3), outlet perfusate temperature (T4), and ablation time were monitored.With or without heat sink, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass, compared with MP RFA or MW ablation, with latter device producing the highest density of tissue ablated. MW ablation produced an ellipsoidal shape while radiofrequency devices produced spheres.Percentage heat sink effect in Bipolar radiofrequency : Mono-polar radiofrequency : Microwave was (Volume) 33:41:22; (mass) 23:56:34; (density) 9.0:26:18; and (relative elipscity) 5.8:12.9:1.3, indicating that BP and MW devices were less affected.Percentage heat sink effect on time (minutes) to reach maximum temperature (W) = 13.28:9.2:29.8; time at maximum temperature (X) is 87:66:16.66; temperature difference (Y) between the thermal probes (T3) and the temperature (T1 + T2)/2 on either side of the hepatic vessel was 100:87:20; and temperature difference between the (T1 + T2)/2 and temperature of outlet circulating solution (T4), Z was 20.33:30.23:37.5.MW and BP radiofrequencies were less affected by heat sink while MP RFA was the most affected. With a single ablation, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass regardless of heat sink.

  1. Hydrogen-isotope transport in an ELBRODUR G CuCrZr alloy for nuclear applications in heat sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, S. J.; Byeon, W. J.; Shin, H. W.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, Jaeyong; Lee, S. K.; Kim, Jaewoo

    2016-05-01

    We present the first complete data set of the transport parameters (permeability, diffusivity, and solubility) of hydrogen and deuterium in an ELBRODUR G precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy experimentally measured by using the time-dependent gas-phase technique in an elevated temperature range of 300-600 °C for nuclear applications in heat sinks. Using the measured values for hydrogen and deuterium and a quantum mechanical model based on a harmonic approximation, an extrapolation for tritium is also presented. The isotope effect ratios for the transport parameters were also estimated. Furthermore, our hydrogen results for ELBRODUR G were compared with the results for other copper alloys previously reported by other authors.

  2. Experimental study on thermal performance of micro pin fin heat sinks with various shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Junye; Li, Gui; Zhao, Xiaobao; Li, Qihe

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a visualization experimental study on the heat transfer characteristics of various shapes of micro pin fins, including the circular, ellipse, diamond, square and triangle shape micro pin fin arrays with various equivalent diameters and pin fin density. The influences study of different sizes and shapes of pin fin on Nusselt number and heat transfer coefficient have been conducted. The results show that with the increase of the flow rate, the temperature of the bottom of the experimental section decreases. And the Nusselt number of different shapes of micro pin fins increases with the increase of Re. In which, the heat transfer performance of the ellipse shape pin fin appears better among the other shapes of pin fins. However, the higher pin fin of the ellipse shape density leads to a weaker flow performance. Besides, the micro-scale heat transfer correlation between the Nusselt number and the Reynolds number is fitted based on the experimental data.

  3. Thermal and mechanical properties of infiltrated W/CuCrZr composite materials for functionally graded heat sink application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, J.-H.; Brendel, A.; Nawka, S.; Schubert, T.; Kieback, B.

    2013-07-01

    Functionally graded tungsten/copper composite materials are considered as interlayer material for the water-cooled divertor target of fusion reactors consisting of a tungsten base armor and a copper alloy heat sink. The W/Cu composite interlayer is supposed to reduce the thermal expansion mismatch and to strengthen the heat sink. A critical drawback of this composite is loss of strength at elevated temperatures owing to the softening of the copper matrix. To solve this problem, we developed a novel tungsten/copper composite using precipitation-hardened Cu1CrZr alloy instead of pure copper. To this end, a fabrication route based on melt infiltration into a tungsten skeleton was established. Comprehensive characterizations and tests were performed on the specimens of three compositions (30, 50 and 70 vol.% of tungsten) at temperatures of 20, 300 and 550 °C. In this paper, extensive data of thermal and mechanical properties are presented. It turned out that the composites possess a strongly enhanced strength compared to the W/Cu composites and unreinforced alloy. The tensile behavior exhibits a significant hardening effect even for small W content while the rupture strain is decreased as well. Nevertheless, the composites show a still acceptable ductility for W content up to 50 vol.%. The composite of higher W content becomes fully brittle. Graded composites were also produced. Metallographic analysis confirms a good bonding between the layers. The thermal conductivity and thermal expansion data exhibit a typical rule-of-mixture behavior indicating a high quality of the materials.

  4. Geothermal as a heat sink application for raising air conditioning efficency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hesham Safwat Osman Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Objective: Geothermal applications in heating, ventilation, air-conditioning is a US technology for more than 30 years old ,which saves more than 30% average energy cost than the traditional air-conditioning systems systems. Applying this technology in Middle East and African countries would be very feasible specially in Egypt specially as it suffers Electric crisis --The temperature of the condensers and the heat rejecting equipment is much higher than the Egyptian land at different depth which is a great advantages, and must be measured, recorded, and studied accurately -The Far goal of the proposal is to construct from soil analysis a temperature gradient map for Egypt and , African countries on different depth till 100 m which is still unclear nowadays and must be measured and recorded in databases through researches - The main model of the research is to study the heat transfer gradient through the ground earth borehole,grout,high density polyethylene pipes , and water inlet temperature which affect the electric efficiency of the ground source heat pump air conditioning unit Impact on the Region: Such research result will contribute widely in Energy saving sector specially the air conditioning sector in Egypt and the African countries which consumes more than 30% of the electric consumption of the total consumption . and encouraging Green systems such Geothermal to be applied

  5. Optimization of microchannel heat sink using genetic algorithm and Taguchi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhanu Pratap; Garg, Harry; Lall, Arun K.

    2016-04-01

    Active cooling using microchannel is a challenging area. The optimization and miniaturization of the devices is increasing the heat loads and affecting the operating performance of the system. The microchannel based cooling systems are widely used and overcomes most of the limitations of the existing solutions. Microchannels help in reducing dimensions and therefore finding many important applications in the microfluidics domain. The microchannel performance is related to the geometry, material and flow conditions. Optimized selection of controllable parameters is a key issue while designing the microchannel based cooling system. The proposed work presents a simulation based study according to Taguchi design of experiment with Reynolds number, aspect ratio and plenum length as input parameters to determine SN ratio. The objective of this study is to maximize the heat transfer. Mathematical models based on these parameters were developed which helps in global optimization using Genetic Algorithm. Genetic algorithm further employed to optimize the input parameters and generates global solution points for the proposed work. It was concluded that the optimized value for heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number was 2620.888 W/m2K and 3.4708 as compare to values obtained through SN ratio based parametric study i.e. 2601.3687 W/m2K and 3.447 respectively. Hence an error of 0.744% and 0.68% was detected in heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number respectively.

  6. Thermal management optimization of an air-cooled Li-ion battery module using pin-fin heat sinks for hybrid electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadian, Shahabeddin K.; Zhang, Yuwen

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional transient thermal analysis of an air-cooled module that contains prismatic Li-ion cells next to a special kind of aluminum pin fin heat sink whose heights of pin fins increase linearly through the width of the channel in air flow direction was studied for thermal management of Lithium-ion battery pack. The effects of pin fins arrangements, discharge rates, inlet air flow velocities, and inlet air temperatures on the battery were investigated. The results showed that despite of heat sinks with uniform pin fin heights that increase the standard deviation of the temperature field, using this kind of pin fin heat sink compare to the heat sink without pin fins not only decreases the bulk temperature inside the battery, but also decreases the standard deviation of the temperature field inside the battery as well. Increasing the inlet air temperature leads to decreasing the standard deviation of the temperature field while increases the maximum temperature of the battery. Furthermore, increasing the inlet air velocity first increases the standard deviation of the temperature field till reaches to the maximum point, and after that decreases. Also, increasing the inlet air velocity leads to decrease in the maximum temperature of the battery.

  7. A Passive EMI Filter with Access to the Ungrounded Motor Neutral Line-Its Effect on Eliminating Leakage Current from the Inverter Heat Sink-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumoto, Takafumi; Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper deals with a leakage current flowing out of the heat sink of a voltage-source PWM inverter. The heat-sink leakage current is caused by a steep change in the common-mode voltage produced by the inverter. It flows through parasitic capacitors between the heat sink and power semiconductor devices when no EMI filter is connected. Experimental results reveal that the heat-sink leakage current flows not into the supply side, but into the motor side. These understandings succeed in describing an equivalent common-mode circuit taking the parasitic capacitors into account. The authors have proposed a passive EMI filter that is unique in access to the ungrounded motor neutral line. It is discussed from this equivalent circuit that the passive EMI filter is effective in preventing the leakage current from flowing. Moreover, installation of another small-sized common-mode inductor at the ac side of the diode rectifier prevents the leakage current from flowing into the supply side. Experimental results obtained from a 200-V, 3.7-kW laboratory system confirm the effectiveness and viability of the EMI filter.

  8. High Density Die Casting (HDDC): new frontiers in the manufacturing of heat sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sce, Andrea; Caporale, Lorenzo

    2014-07-01

    Finding a good solution for thermal management problems is every day more complex. due to the power density and the required performances. When a solution suitable for high volumes is needed. die-casting and extrusion are the most convenient technologies. However designers have to face the well-known limitations for those processes. High Density Die Casting (HDDC) is a process under advanced development. in order to overcome the extrusion and traditional die casting limits by working with alloys having much better thermal performances than the traditional die-casting process. while keeping the advantages of a flexible 3D design and a low cost for high volumes. HDDC offers the opportunity to design combining different materials (aluminium and copper. aluminium and stainless steel) obtaining a structure with zero porosity and overcoming some of die-casting limits. as shown in this paper. A dedicated process involving embedded heat pipes is currently under development in order to offer the possibility to dramatically improve the heat spreading.

  9. A study of high-temperature heat pipes with multiple heat sources and sinks. I - Experimental methodology and frozen startup profiles. II - Analysis of continuum transient and steady-state experimental data with numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, A.; Cao, Y.; Buchko, M.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental profiles for heat pipe startup from the frozen state were obtained, using a high-temperature sodium/stainless steel pipe with multiple heat sources and sinks to investigate the startup behavior of the heat pipe for various heat loads and input locations, with both low and high heat rejection rates at the condensor. The experimental results of the performance characteristics for the continuum transient and steady-state operation of the heat pipe were analyzed, and the performance limits for operation with varying heat fluxes and location are determined.

  10. Solid-State Additive Manufacturing for Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norfolk, Mark; Johnson, Hilary

    2015-03-01

    Energy densities in devices are increasing across many industries including power generation, high power electronics, manufacturing, and automotive. Increasingly, there is a need for very high efficiency thermal management devices that can pull heat out of a small area at higher and higher rates. Metal additive manufacturing (AM) technologies have the promise of creating parts with complex internal geometries required for integral thermal management. However, this goal has not been met due to constraints in fusion-based metal 3D printers. This work presents a new strategy for metal AM of heat exchangers using an ultrasonic sheet lamination approach.

  11. Experimental study of moisture uptake of polyurethane foam subjected to a heat sink below 30 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Chen, J. Y.; Gan, Z. H.; Qiu, L. M.; Zhang, K. H.; Yang, R. P.; Ma, X. J.; Liu, Z. H.

    2014-01-01

    Rigid closed-cell foam is widely used to thermally insulate liquid hydrogen and oxygen tanks of space launch vehicles due to its lightweight, mechanical strength and thermal-insulating performance. Up to now, little information is available on the intrusion of moisture into the foam that subjects one side to liquid hydrogen temperatures and the other side to room temperatures and high relative humidity. A novel cryogenic moisture uptake apparatus has been designed and fabricated to measure the moisture uptake into the polyurethane foam. For safety and convenience, two identical single-stage pulse tube cryocoolers instead of liquid hydrogen are used to cool one side of the foam specimen to the lowest temperature of 26 K. Total of eight specimens in three groups, according to whether there is a butt-joint or weathering period, are tested respectively for both 5 h and 9 h. The additional weight due to moisture uptake of the foam for the 26 K cases is compared to previous measurements at 79 K. The results are instructive for the applications of foam to the insulation of liquid hydrogen tanks in space launch vehicles.

  12. Non-additive model for specific heat of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Silva, R.; Mello, V. D.

    2016-10-01

    By using non-additive Tsallis entropy we demonstrate numerically that one-dimensional quasicrystals, whose energy spectra are multifractal Cantor sets, are characterized by an entropic parameter, and calculate the electronic specific heat, where we consider a non-additive entropy Sq. In our method we consider an energy spectra calculated using the one-dimensional tight binding Schrödinger equation, and their bands (or levels) are scaled onto the [ 0 , 1 ] interval. The Tsallis' formalism is applied to the energy spectra of Fibonacci and double-period one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We analytically obtain an expression for the specific heat that we consider to be more appropriate to calculate this quantity in those quasiperiodic structures.

  13. Three-dimensional MHD boundary layer flow due to an axisymmetric shrinking sheet with radiation, viscous dissipation and heat source/sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, M.; Balaswamy, B.; Kishan, N.

    2016-05-01

    An analysis is made to study a three dimensional MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer due to a porous axisymmetric shrinking sheet. The governing partial differential equations of momentum and energy are transformed into self similar non-linear ordinary differential equations by using the suitable similarity transformations. These equations are, then solved by using the variational finite element method. The flow phenomena is characterised by the magnetic parameter M, suction parameter S, porosity parameter Kp, heat source/sink parameter Q, Prandtl number Pr, Eckert number Ec and radiation parameter Rd. The numerical results of the velocity and temperature profiles are obtained and displayed graphically.

  14. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Gonzalez, Rosalinda; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Tang, Jianwu; Chao, Wei Chun; Crusius, John; Bratton, John; Green, Adrian; Shelton, James

    2011-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N2O, CH4, and CO2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N2O, CH4 and respiratory CO2fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m−2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N2O and CH4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N2O in July 2009 averaged −33 μmol N2O m−2 day−1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 μmol N2O m−2 day−1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N2O and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N2O and CH4 fluxes observed, exceeded half

  15. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Gonzalez, R.; Kroeger, K.D.; Tang, J.; Chao, W.C.; Crusius, J.; Bratton, J.; Green, A.; Shelton, J.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N2O, CH4, and CO2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N2O, CH4 and respiratory CO2 fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m-2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N2O and CH4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N2O in July 2009 averaged -33 ??mol N2O m-2 day-1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 ??mol N2O m-2 day-1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N2O and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N2O and CH4 fluxes observed, exceeded half the magnitude of typical

  16. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Gonzalez, Rosalinda; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Tang, Jianwu; Chao, Wei Chun; Crusius, John; Bratton, John; Green, Adrian; Shelton, James

    2011-08-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N 2O, CH 4, and CO 2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N 2O, CH 4 and respiratory CO 2 fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO 3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m -2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N 2O and CH 4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N 2O in July 2009 averaged -33 μmol N 2O m -2 day -1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N 2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH 4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N 2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 μmol N 2O m -2 day -1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N 2O and CH 4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N 2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N 2O and CH 4 fluxes observed, exceeded half

  17. Flow and Thermal Performance of a Water-Cooled Periodic Transversal Elliptical Microchannel Heat Sink for Chip Cooling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yang, Mo; Wang, Zhiyun; Xu, Hongtao; Zhang, Yuwen

    2015-04-01

    Flow and thermal performance of transversal elliptical microchannels were investigated as a passive scheme to enhance the heat transfer performance of laminar fluid flow. The periodic transversal elliptical micro-channel is designed and its pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics in laminar flow are numerically investigated. Based on the comparison with a conventional straight micro- channel having rectangular cross section, it is found that periodic transversal elliptical microchannel not only has great potential to reduce pressure drop but also dramatically enhances heat transfer performance. In addition, when the Reynolds number equals to 192, the pressure drop of the transversal elliptical channel is 36.5% lower than that of the straight channel, while the average Nusselt number is 72.8% higher; this indicates that the overall thermal performance of the periodic transversal elliptical microchannel is superior to the conventional straight microchannel. It is suggested that such transversal elliptical microchannel are attractive candidates for cooling future electronic chips effectively with much lower pressure drop. PMID:26353536

  18. Melting Phenomenon in MHD Stagnation Point Flow of Dusty Fluid over a Stretching Sheet in the Presence of Thermal Radiation and Non-Uniform Heat Source/Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasannakumara, B. C.; Gireesha, B. J.; Manjunatha, P. T.

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive numerical study is conducted to investigate the effect of melting on flow and heat transfer of incompressible viscous dusty fluid near two-dimensional stagnation-point flow over a stretching surface, in the presence of thermal radiation, non-uniform heat source/sink and applied magnetic field. Using suitable transformations, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations and then they are solved numerically. The influence of the various interesting parameters on the flow and heat transfer is analyzed and discussed in detail through plotted graphs. Comparison of the present results with existing results is shown and a good agreement is observed. We found that the velocity and temperature fields increase with an increase in the melting process of the stretching sheet.

  19. Sinking methane.

    PubMed

    Reay, David S

    2003-02-01

    Concentrations of the powerful greenhouse gas, methane, in our atmosphere have doubled since the beginning of the industrial age. Reducing these levels is a vital part of global efforts to combat global warming. Could we make use of the Earth's own methane sinks?

  20. Two-Dimensional, Supersonic, Linearized Flow with Heat Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Harvard

    1959-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the forces on a thin supersonic wing underneath which the air is heated. The analysis is limited principally to linearized theory but nonlinear effects are considered. It is shown that significant advantages to external heating would exist if the heat were added well below and ahead of the wing.

  1. Interfacial optimization of tungsten fibre-reinforced copper for high-temperature heat sink material for fusion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, A.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Bolt, H.

    2009-04-01

    W fibre-reinforced Cu shows great promise to improve the mechanical performance at high-temperatures compared to conventional Cu-based alloys. Focus was placed on the optimization of the interface to achieve an enhanced adhesion between W fibre and Cu matrix. The interfacial properties were investigated through pull-out measurements of single matrix-coated fibres for different interfacial concepts. The interfacial adhesion of W and Cu is determined solely through mechanical interlocking. Interdiffusion and segregations experiment showed that there are no interface reactions between W and Cu at elevated temperatures. From the investigated interfacial concepts, a stepwise graded transition interface with additional heat treatment was found to achieve the highest interfacial shear strength. The thermal stability of the MMC in thermal cycling tests can be assured by depositing a stepwise graded transition between W fibre and Cu matrix.

  2. Radiation Effects on the Flow of Powell-Eyring Fluid Past an Unsteady Inclined Stretching Sheet with Non-Uniform Heat Source/Sink

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Asad, Sadia; Mustafa, Meraj; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the unsteady flow of Powell-Eyring fluid past an inclined stretching sheet. Unsteadiness in the flow is due to the time-dependence of the stretching velocity and wall temperature. Mathematical analysis is performed in the presence of thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink. The relevant boundary layer equations are reduced into self-similar forms by suitable transformations. The analytic solutions are constructed in a series form by homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence interval of the auxiliary parameter is obtained. Graphical results displaying the influence of interesting parameters are given. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed. PMID:25072515

  3. Missing sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. Catherine

    Preliminary results at a Duke University research forest exposed to high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide suggest plants might transfer excess CO2 into groundwater, where it could remain stored away for thousands of years. The finding, if bolstered by further research, might lower predicted impacts of global warming due to CO2 emissions from industry and vehicles as well as help solve a mystery: why there is 29% less CO2 in the atmosphere than current emissions inventories suggest there should be. “While it wouldn't explain all of that “missing sink,” if you push the calculations, it may explain maybe one-fifth of it,” said Duke botanist William Schlesinger.

  4. Similarity solution to three dimensional boundary layer flow of second grade nanofluid past a stretching surface with thermal radiation and heat source/sink

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, T.; Muhammad, Taseer; Shehzad, S. A.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-01-15

    Development of human society greatly depends upon solar energy. Heat, electricity and water from nature can be obtained through solar power. Sustainable energy generation at present is a critical issue in human society development. Solar energy is regarded one of the best sources of renewable energy. Hence the purpose of present study is to construct a model for radiative effects in three-dimensional of nanofluid. Flow of second grade fluid by an exponentially stretching surface is considered. Thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects are taken into account in presence of heat source/sink and chemical reaction. Results are derived for the dimensionless velocities, temperature and concentration. Graphs are plotted to examine the impacts of physical parameters on the temperature and concentration. Numerical computations are presented to examine the values of skin-friction coefficients, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. It is observed that the values of skin-friction coefficients are more for larger values of second grade parameter. Moreover the radiative effects on the temperature and concentration are quite reverse.

  5. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  6. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  7. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  8. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  9. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional requirements to provide heat... requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of a Hg Budget unit that monitors and reports Hg... monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  10. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  11. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional requirements to provide heat... requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of a Hg Budget unit that monitors and reports Hg... monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  12. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  13. Elevated temperature properties of SiC-fibre reinforced CuCr1Zr, a candidate heat sink material for application in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, P. W. M.; Hemptenmacher, J.; Muchilo, D.

    2007-03-01

    In experimental fusion reactors the copper alloy CuCr1Zr is a widely used alloy for heat sinks. The thermal conductivity at room temperature of this alloy measures 370 W m-1K-1. Its room temperature mechanical properties with a tensile strength of 400-470 MPa and a yield stress of 280-380 MPa are based on a dispersion hardening and an aging treatment. The long-term temperature capability is however limited due to an overaging effect taking place in the temperature range of roughly 350 °C up to an aging temperature of 480 °C. A possibile way to improve the properties at elevated temperatures is by embedding stiff, strong fibres, e.g. SiC-fibres. In the present study, the mechanical behaviour of SiC-fibre reinforced CuCr1Zr is determined at 550 °C and compared with the room temperature properties. The thermal conductivity is considerably reduced by embedding SiC-fibres. From measured values of the thermal conductivity of the composite material the axial thermal conductivity of the SiC-fibre can be roughly estimated to be 16 W m-1K-1.

  14. Acidization of a Direct Heat Hydrothermal Well and its Potential in Developing Additional Direct Heat Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Strawn, J. A.; Prestwich, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A matrix acid treatment on a limestone formation in a low temperature hydrothermal production well in South Dakota has resulted in a 40% increase in heat (BTU) available for use in space heating a hospital. The results of this experimental treatment on the Madison Limestone suggest a significant potential may exist for similar applications, particularly throughout the western United States. This paper presents the results of the acid treatment, suggests other possible areas for similar application, and analyzes the economics for successful treatments.

  15. Dynamics and controls of urban heat sink and island phenomena in a desert city: Development of a local climate zone scheme using remotely-sensed inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Ahmed K.; Blackburn, G. Alan; Whyatt, J. Duncan

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to determine the dynamics and controls of Surface Urban Heat Sinks (SUHS) and Surface Urban Heat Islands (SUHI) in desert cities, using Dubai as a case study. A Local Climate Zone (LCZ) schema was developed to subdivide the city into different zones based on similarities in land cover and urban geometry. Proximity to the Gulf Coast was also determined for each LCZ. The LCZs were then used to sample seasonal and daily imagery from the MODIS thermal sensor to determine Land Surface Temperature (LST) variations relative to desert sand. Canonical correlation techniques were then applied to determine which factors explained the variability between urban and desert LST. Our results indicate that the daytime SUHS effect is greatest during the summer months (typically ∼3.0 °C) with the strongest cooling effects in open high-rise zones of the city. In contrast, the night-time SUHI effect is greatest during the winter months (typically ∼3.5 °C) with the strongest warming effects in compact mid-rise zones of the city. Proximity to the Arabian Gulf had the largest influence on both SUHS and SUHI phenomena, promoting daytime cooling in the summer months and night-time warming in the winter months. However, other parameters associated with the urban environment such as building height had an influence on daytime cooling, with larger buildings promoting shade and variations in airflow. Likewise, other parameters such as sky view factor contributed to night-time warming, with higher temperatures associated with limited views of the sky.

  16. Nutrient Addition Leads to a Weaker CO2 Sink and Higher CH4 Emissions through Vegetation-Microclimate Feedbacks at Mer Bleue Bog, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubier, J. L.; Arnkil, S.; Humphreys, E.; Juutinen, S.; Larmola, T.; Moore, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has led to nutrient enrichment in wetlands globally, affecting plant community composition, carbon (C) cycling, and microbial dynamics. Nutrient-limited boreal bogs are long-term sinks of carbon dioxide (CO2), but sources of methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas. We fertilized Mer Bleue Bog, a Sphagnum moss and evergreen shrub-dominated ombrotrophic bog near Ottawa, Ontario, for 10-15 years with N as NO3 and NH4 at 5, 10 and 20 times ambient N deposition (0.6-0.8 g N m-2 y-1), with and without phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Treatments were applied to triplicate plots (3 x 3 m) from May - August 2000-2015 and control plots received distilled water. We measured net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration, and CH4 flux with climate-controlled chambers; leaf-level CO2 exchange and biochemistry; substrate-induced respiration, CH4 production and consumption potentials with laboratory incubations; plant species composition and abundance; and microclimate (peat temperature, moisture, light interception). After 15 years, we have found that NEE has decreased, and CH4 emissions have increased, in the highest nutrient treatments owing to changes in vegetation, microtopography, and peat characteristics. Vegetation changes include a loss of Sphagnum moss and introduction of new deciduous species. Simulated atmospheric N deposition has not benefitted the photosynthetic apparatus of the dominant evergreen shrubs, but resulted in higher foliar respiration, contributing to a weaker ecosystem CO2 sink. Loss of moss has led to wetter near-surface substrate, higher rates of decomposition and CH4 emission, and a shift in microbial communities. Thus, elevated atmospheric deposition of nutrients may endanger C storage in peatlands through a complex suite of feedbacks and interactions among vegetation, microclimate, and microbial communities.

  17. Comment on "Heat transfer in MHD viscoelastic boundary layer flow over a stretching sheet with thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroberardino, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that previously reported analytical solutions for the temperature field given in terms of Kummer's function by Nandeppanavar et al. (2011) [1], are incorrect. We then provide valid solutions of the governing ordinary differential equations for the fluid flow and temperature field using the homotopy analysis method (HAM) for two general types of non-isothermal boundary conditions, namely, prescribed surface temperature and prescribed heat flux. Our analysis is supported by a graphical and tabular demonstration of convergence of the HAM solutions.

  18. Tubular sublimatory evaporator heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, B. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An evaporative refrigerator or cooler comprising a bundle of spaced, porous walled tubes closed at one of their ends and vented to a vacuum at the other end is disclosed. The tube bundle is surrounded by a water jacket having a hot water inlet distribution manifold and a cooled water outlet through a plenum chamber. Hot water is pumped into the jacket to circulate around the tubes, and when this water meets the vacuum existing inside the tubes, it evaporates thereby cooling the water in the jacket. If cooling proceeds to the point where water penetrating or surrounding all or part of the tubes freezes, operation continues with local sublimation of the ice on the tubes while the circulating water attempts to melt the ice. Both sublimation and evaporation may take place simultaneously in different regions of the device.

  19. Heat acclimation improves intermittent sprinting in the heat but additional pre-cooling offers no further ergogenic effect.

    PubMed

    Castle, Paul; Mackenzie, Richard W; Maxwell, Neil; Webborn, Anthony D J; Watt, Peter W

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 10 days of heat acclimation with and without pre-cooling on intermittent sprint exercise performance in the heat. Eight males completed three intermittent cycling sprint protocols before and after 10 days of heat acclimation. Before acclimation, one sprint protocol was conducted in control conditions (21.8 ± 2.2°C, 42.8 ± 6.7% relative humidity) and two sprint protocols in hot, humid conditions (33.3 ± 0.6°C, 52.2 ± 6.8% relative humidity) in a randomized order. One hot, humid condition was preceded by 20 min of thigh pre-cooling with ice packs (-16.2 ± 4.5°C). After heat acclimation, the two hot, humid sprint protocols were repeated. Before heat acclimation, peak power output declined in the heat (P < 0.05) but pre-cooling prevented this. Ten days of heat acclimation reduced resting rectal temperature from 37.8 ± 0.3°C to 37.4 ± 0.3°C (P < 0.01). When acclimated, peak power output increased by ∼2% (P < 0.05, main effect) and no reductions in individual sprint peak power output were observed. Additional pre-cooling offered no further ergogenic effect. Unacclimated athletes competing in the heat should pre-cool to prevent reductions in peak power output, but heat acclimate for an increased peak power output. PMID:21777052

  20. Heat transfer characteristics for some coolant additives used for water cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ziyan, H.Z.; Helali, A.H.B.

    1996-12-31

    Engine coolants contain certain additives to prevent engine overheating or coolant freezing in cold environments. Coolants, also, contain corrosion and rust inhibitors, among other additives. As most engines are using engine cooling solutions, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of engine coolants on the boiling heat transfer coefficient. This has its direct impact on radiator size and environment. This paper describes the apparatus and the measurement techniques. Also, it presents the obtained boiling heat transfer results at different parameters. Three types of engine coolants and their mixtures in distilled water are evaluated, under sub-cooled and saturated boiling conditions. A profound effect of the presence of additives in the coolant, on heat transfer, was clear since changes of heat transfer for different coolants were likely to occur. The results showed that up to 180% improvement of boiling heat transfer coefficient is experienced with some types of coolants. However, at certain concentrations other coolants provide deterioration or not enhancement in the boiling heat transfer characteristics. This investigation proved that there are limitations, which are to be taken into consideration, for the composition of engine coolants in different environments. In warm climates, ethylene glycol should be kept at the minimum concentration required for dissolving other components, whereas borax is beneficial to the enhancement of the heat transfer characteristics.

  1. HEAT: High accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry. III. Additional improvements and overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, M. E.; Vazquez, J.; Ruscic, B.; Wilson, A. K.; Gauss, J.; Stanton, J. F.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. t Mainz; The Univ. of Texas; Univ. of North Texas

    2008-01-01

    Effects of increased basis-set size as well as a correlated treatment of the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer approximation are studied within the context of the high-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry (HEAT) theoretical model chemistry. It is found that the addition of these ostensible improvements does little to increase the overall accuracy of HEAT for the determination of molecular atomization energies. Fortuitous cancellation of high-level effects is shown to give the overall HEAT strategy an accuracy that is, in fact, higher than most of its individual components. In addition, the issue of core-valence electron correlation separation is explored; it is found that approximate additive treatments of the two effects have limitations that are significant in the realm of <1 kJ mol{sup -1} theoretical thermochemistry.

  2. Proper use of sludge-control additives in residential heating oil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tatnall, R.E.

    1995-04-01

    Discussed are various aspects of heating oil `sludge`: How it forms, typical problems it causes, how sludge-control additives work, what should be expected of them, and what happens in a contaminated system when such additives are used. Test results from laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that performance of commercially available additives varies greatly. The concept of `end-of-the-line` treatment is described and compared with bulk fuel treatment. A procedure is described whereby a retailer can test additives himself, and thus determine just what those additives will or will not do for his business. Finally, the economics of an effective treatment program are outlined.

  3. Sink Inserts for Flood Prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Bodnar, Daniel J.; Hardesty, David L.

    2004-09-01

    A simple, inexpensive insert is described for preventing flooding in lab sinks. The insert is essentially a tube with slots cut into the side that fits snugly into the drain outlet, preventing water buildup and providing additional drainage sites to avoid constriction by small lab items and paper towels.

  4. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  5. Overview of Heat Addition and Efficiency Predictions for an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Reid, Terry V.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. Microporous bulk insulation is used in the ground support test hardware to minimize the loss of thermal energy from the electric heat source to the environment. The insulation package is characterized before operation to predict how much heat will be absorbed by the convertor and how much will be lost to the environment during operation. In an effort to validate these predictions, numerous tasks have been performed, which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs. This test and modeling effort included: (a) making thermophysical property measurements of test setup materials to provide inputs to the numerical models, (b) acquiring additional test data that was collected during convertor tests to provide numerical models with temperature profiles of the test setup via thermocouple and infrared measurements, (c) using multidimensional numerical models (computational fluid dynamics code) to predict net heat input of an operating convertor, and (d) using validation test hardware to provide direct comparison of numerical results and validate the multidimensional numerical models used to predict convertor net heat input. This effort produced high fidelity ASC net heat input predictions, which were successfully validated using

  6. Competitive interaction between two different spherical sinks.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Nyrée; Strieder, William

    2004-10-22

    Competitive interactions within diverse mixed populations of chemically active sites are prevalent throughout nature, science, and engineering. Their effects are readily seen in the distribution of dead and surviving aerobic cells within a thick biofilm and particle shape changes during the growth and coarsening of crystals. Even in the most dilute case, competition for a reactant requires at least two spheres/cells, and the solution of the two-spherical sink problem is of interest for several reasons. The solution accurately describes lower cell concentration behavior (10(8) cells/l), and like the Smoluchowski diffusion-reaction treatment for a single sphere, the analysis is extremely helpful in understanding the fundamental phenomena of the effect on the first spherical sink of the presence of a second different spherical sink. In addition these exact solutions are required for the systematic extension to higher density behavior by rigorous expansions in the spherical sink densities. The method of the twin spherical expansion is used with a formal matrix elimination scheme to generate an exact solution for two distinct spherical sinks of differing sizes and kinetics. The two sinks exist in a medium, which supplies a reactant to the sinks via Fickian diffusion. The two sinks compete for the same reactant with different first-order reactions occurring at the surface of each sink. Earlier work focused on two spherical sinks of the same size with identical surface reaction kinetics. This work has been advanced to allow for diversity in the theory of cellular or reactive sink competition. A number of interesting higher order interactive phenomena are observed in this paper when the different reactive sinks are in close proximity. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Evidence for an Additional Heat Source in the Warm Ionized Medium of Galaxies.

    PubMed

    Reynolds; Haffner; Tufte

    1999-11-01

    Spatial variations of the [S ii]/Halpha and [N ii]/Halpha line intensity ratios observed in the gaseous halo of the Milky Way and other galaxies are inconsistent with pure photoionization models. They appear to require a supplemental heating mechanism that increases the electron temperature at low densities, ne. This would imply that in addition to photoionization, which has a heating rate per unit volume proportional to n2e, there is another source of heat with a rate per unit volume proportional to a lower power of ne. One possible mechanism is the dissipation of interstellar plasma turbulence, which, according to Minter & Spangler, heats the ionized interstellar medium in the Milky Way at a rate of approximately 1x10-25ne ergs cm-3 s-1. If such a source were present, it would dominate over photoionization heating in regions where ne less, similar0.1 cm-3, producing the observed increases in the [S ii]/Halpha and [N ii]/Halpha intensity ratios at large distances from the galactic midplane as well as accounting for the constancy of [S ii]/[N ii], which is not explained by pure photoionization. Other supplemental heating sources, such as magnetic reconnection, cosmic rays, or photoelectric emission from small grains, could also account for these observations, provided they supply approximately 10-5 ergs s-1 per square centimeter of the Galactic disk to the warm ionized medium.

  8. Heat conduction in double-walled carbon nanotubes with intertube additional carbon atoms.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liu; Feng, Yanhui; Tan, Peng; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-07-01

    Heat conduction of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with intertube additional carbon atoms was investigated for the first time using a molecular dynamics method. By analyzing the phonon vibrational density of states (VDOS), we revealed that the intertube additional atoms weak the heat conduction along the tube axis. Moreover, the phonon participation ratio (PR) demonstrates that the heat transfer in DWCNTs is dominated by low frequency modes. The added atoms cause the mode weight factor (MWF) of the outer tube to decrease and that of the inner tube to increase, which implies a lower thermal conductivity. The effects of temperature, tube length, and the number and distribution of added atoms were studied. Furthermore, an orthogonal array testing strategy was designed to identify the most important structural factor. It is indicated that the tendencies of thermal conductivity of DWCNTs with added atoms change with temperature and length are similar to bare ones. In addition, thermal conductivity decreases with the increasing number of added atoms, more evidently for atom addition concentrated at some cross-sections rather than uniform addition along the tube length. Simultaneously, the number of added atoms at each cross-section has a considerably more remarkable impact, compared to the tube length and the density of chosen cross-sections to add atoms.

  9. Simulation of MLI concerning the influence of an additional heat load on intermediate layers

    SciTech Connect

    Funke, Thomas; Golle, Steffen; Haberstroh, Christoph

    2014-01-29

    Multilayer insulation (MLI) is commonly used in most cryogenic devices such as LHe cryostats or storage vessels. Numerical and experimental studies of such insulation systems are known from literature. The temperature distribution of intermediate layers has been investigated as well. Experiments using temperature sensors, for example thermocouples, to determine the temperature of intermediate layers had been described. Naturally such wiring causes additional heat load on the respective layer and influences the equilibrium temperature. A mathematical model of heat transfer through MLI has been developed to investigate the temperature distribution across the MLI layers. The model comprises a combination of radiation, residual gas conduction and conductive heat flux. An analysis for variable cold and warm boundary temperatures and various residual gases and pressures is carried out. In addition to the model an experimental test rig will be built for the verification of the model. The paper presents the influence of an additional heat load on an intermediate layer on the temperature distribution and on the overall thermal performance of MLI.

  10. Effect of ionic additive on pool boiling critical heat flux of titania/water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jung-Yeul; Kim, Hyungdae; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    TiO2/water nanofluids were prepared and tested to investigate the effects of an ionic additive (i.e., nitric acid in this study) on the critical heat flux (CHF) behavior in pool boiling. Experimental results showed that the ionic additive improved the dispersion stability but reduced the CHF increase in the nanofluid. The additive affected the self-assembled nanoparticle structures formed on the heater surfaces by creating a more uniform and smoother structure, thus diminishing the CHF enhancement in nanofluids.

  11. Influence of Alumina Addition to Aluminum Fins for Compact Heat Exchangers Produced by Cold Spray Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farjam, Aslan; Cormier, Yannick; Dupuis, Philippe; Jodoin, Bertrand; Corbeil, Antoine

    2015-10-01

    In this work, aluminum and aluminum-alumina powder mixtures were used to produce pyramidal fin arrays on aluminum substrates using cold spray as an additive manufacturing process. Using aluminum-alumina mixtures instead of pure aluminum powder could be seen as a cost-effective measure, preventing nozzle clogging or the need to use expensive polymer nozzles that wear out rapidly during cold spray. The fin geometries that were produced were observed using a 3D digital microscope to determine the flow passages width and fins' geometric details. Heat transfer and pressure drop tests were carried out using different ranges of appropriate Reynolds numbers for the sought commercial application to compare each fin array and determine the effect of alumina content. It was found that the presence of alumina reduces the fins' performance when compared to pure aluminum fins but that they were still outperforming traditional fins. Numerical simulations were performed to model the fin arrays and were used to predict the pressure loss in the fin array and compare these results with experimental values. The numerical model opens up new avenues in predicting different applicable operating conditions and other possible fin shapes using the same fin composition, instead of performing costly and time-consuming experiments.

  12. What's Up with Sinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blintz, William

    2005-01-01

    In Hamlet, Shakespeare invites readers to ponder a famous philosophical question: To be or not to be? That is the question. In this issue, two trade books invite students to explore the question: To sink or not to sink? That is the experiment. Though both books are targeted for younger children, teachers can use these books with elementary…

  13. Sinking with the Titanic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2015-03-01

    In the Titanic movie, when the rear part of the ship is about to sink, Jack Dawson (Leonardo DiCaprio) says to Rose DeWitt Bukater (Kate Winslet) to get ready to swim, because the sinking body will suck them into the abysses. Is this sucking phenomenon really happening? And, if so, why?

  14. Additive Manufacturing for Cost Efficient Production of Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, Holly; Ross, Nicole

    2015-10-30

    An additive manufacture technique known as laminated object manufacturing (LOM) was used to fabricate compact ceramic heat exchanger prototypes. LOM uses precision CO2 laser cutting of ceramic green tapes, which are then precision stacked to build a 3D object with fine internal features. Modeling was used to develop prototype designs and predict the thermal response, stress, and efficiency in the ceramic heat exchangers. Build testing and materials analyses were used to provide feedback for the design selection. During this development process, laminated object manufacturing protocols were established. This included laser optimization, strategies for fine feature integrity, lamination fluid control, green handling, and firing profile. Three full size prototypes were fabricated using two different designs. One prototype was selected for performance testing. During testing, cross talk leakage prevented the application of a high pressure differential, however, the prototype was successful at withstanding the high temperature operating conditions (1300 °F). In addition, analysis showed that the bulk of the part did not have cracks or leakage issues. This led to the development of a module method for next generation LOM heat exchangers. A scale-up cost analysis showed that given a purpose built LOM system, these ceramic heat exchangers would be affordable for the applications.

  15. Modeled heating and surface erosion comparing motile (gas borne) and stationary (surface coating) inert particle additives

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1982-09-27

    The unsteady, non-similar, chemically reactive, turbulent boundary layer equations are modified for gas plus dispersed solid particle mixtures, for gas phase turbulent combustion reactions and for heterogeneous gas-solid surface erosive reactions. The exterior (ballistic core) edge boundary conditions for the solutions are modified to include dispersed particle influences on core propellant combustion-generated turbulence levels, combustion reactants and products, and reaction-induced, non-isentropic mixture states. The wall surface (in this study it is always steel) is considered either bare or coated with a fixed particle coating which is conceptually non-reactive, insulative, and non-ablative. Two families of solutions are compared. These correspond to: (1) consideration of gas-borne, free-slip, almost spontaneously mobile (motile) solid particle additives which influence the turbulent heat transfer at the uncoated steel surface and, in contrast, (2) consideration of particle-free, gas phase turbulent heat transfer to the insulated surface coated by stationary particles. Significant differences in erosive heat transfer are found in comparing the two families of solutions over a substantial range of interior ballistic flow conditions. The most effective influences on reducing erosive heat transfer appear to favor mobile, gas-borne particle additives.

  16. Model Scramjet Inlet Unstart Induced by Mass Addition and Heat Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Seong-Kyun; Baccarella, Damiano; McGann, Brendan; Liu, Qili; Wermer, Lydiy; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-11-01

    The inlet unstart phenomena in a model scramjet are investigated at an arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. The unstart induced by nitrogen or ethylene jets at low or high enthalpy Mach 4.5 freestream flow conditions are compared. The jet injection pressurizes the downstream flow by mass addition and flow blockage. In case of the ethylene jet injection, heat release from combustion increases the backpressure further. Time-resolved schlieren imaging is performed at the jet and the lip of the model inlet to visualize the flow features during unstart. High frequency pressure measurements are used to provide information on pressure fluctuation at the scramjet wall. In both of the mass and heat release driven unstart cases, it is observed that there are similar flow transient and quasi-steady behaviors of unstart shockwave system during the unstart processes. Combustion driven unstart induces severe oscillatory flow motions of the jet and the unstart shock at the lip of the scramjet inlet after the completion of the unstart process, while the unstarted flow induced by solely mass addition remains relatively steady. The discrepancies between the processes of mass and heat release driven unstart are explained by flow choking mechanism.

  17. A review on augmentation of heat transfer in boiling using surfactants/additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Anil; Pise, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    Studies of heat transfer enhancement in boiling under various conditions and configurations have given different results. Understanding the boiling behaviour from these studies, literature is reviewed in terms of surface texture, heater geometry and orientation, experimental and numerical studies in presence of surfactant/additives. After understanding different behaviour in boiling, the effect of environment friendly surfactant is studied through literature review. Benchmarking of experimental procedure is done by experimenting and comparing some surfactants studied in literature.

  18. Experimental study of enhanced heat transfer by addition of CuO nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesumathy, Stella; Udayakumar, M.; Suresh, S.

    2012-06-01

    An energy storage system has been designed to study the thermal characteristics of paraffin wax with an embedded nano size copper oxide (CuO) particle. This paper presents studies conducted on phase transition times, heat fraction as well as heat transfer characteristics of paraffin wax as phase change material (PCM) embedded with CuO nanoparticles. 40 nm mean size CuO particles of 2, 5 and 10% by weight were dispersed in PCM for this study. Experiments were performed on a heat exchanger with 1.5-10 l/min of heat transfer fluid (HTF) flow. Time-based variations of the temperature distributions are revealed from the results of observations of melting and solidification curves. The results strongly suggested that the thermal conductivity enhances 6, 6.7 and 7.8% in liquid state and in dynamic viscosity it enhances by 5, 14 and 30% with increasing mass fraction of the CNEPs. The thermal conductivity ratio of the composites can be augmented by a factor up to 1.3. The heat transfer coefficient during solidification increased about 78% for the maximum flow rate. The analysis of experimental results reveals that the addition of copper oxide nanoparticles to the paraffin wax enhances both the conduction and natural convection very effectively in composites and in paraffin wax. The paraffin wax-based composites have great potential for energy storage applications like industrial waste heat recovery, solar thermal applications and solar based dynamic space power generation with optimal fraction of copper oxide nanoparticles.

  19. Drag reducing effects of polymer additives in a plate heat exchanger for the OTEC system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, N.; Yoon, S.; Kim, C.; Seo, T.

    1999-07-01

    Experiments were undertaken for a 15kW Alfa-Laval plate heat exchanger utilizing polyethylene oxide as a polymer additive. Concentrations of polymer additives were 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 100, 200 and 400 wppm at 25 C and mass flow rates were 0.6kg/s, 0.7kg/s, 0.8kg/s and 0.9kg/s in normal operating ranges of the plate heat exchanger. The maximum effects of drag reductions were found at 20 wppm polymer concentration and at approximately 0.7kg/s of mass flow rate. The results show that there exist optimum polymer concentration and at approximately 0.7kg/s of mass flow rate. The results show that there exist optimum polymer concentration and mass flow rate for the plate heat exchanger for maximum drag reduction effects. In most cases, drag reduction of approximately 20% has been obtained. It means considerable savings in pumping power for a large size OTEC plant.

  20. Heat transfer and material flow during laser assisted multi-layer additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2014-09-28

    A three-dimensional, transient, heat transfer, and fluid flow model is developed for the laser assisted multilayer additive manufacturing process with coaxially fed austenitic stainless steel powder. Heat transfer between the laser beam and the powder particles is considered both during their flight between the nozzle and the growth surface and after they deposit on the surface. The geometry of the build layer obtained from independent experiments is compared with that obtained from the model. The spatial variation of melt geometry, cooling rate, and peak temperatures is examined in various layers. The computed cooling rates and solidification parameters are used to estimate the cell spacings and hardness in various layers of the structure. Good agreement is achieved between the computed geometry, cell spacings, and hardness with the corresponding independent experimental results.

  1. Sinking coastal cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, G.; Bucx, T.; Dam, R.; de Lange, G.; Lambert, J.

    2015-11-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. A major cause for severe land subsidence is excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs for (infra)structure. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. As subsidence is often spatially variable and can be caused by multiple processes, an assessment of subsidence in delta cities needs to answer questions such as: what are the main causes? What is the current subsidence rate and what are future scenarios (and interaction with other major environmental issues)? Where are the vulnerable areas? What are the impacts and risks? How can adverse impacts be mitigated or compensated for? Who is involved and responsible to act? In this study a quick-assessment of subsidence is performed on the following mega-cities: Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok. Results of these case studies will be presented and compared, and a (generic) approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas is provided.

  2. Thermal radiation and Hall effects on boundary layer flow past a non-isothermal stretching surface embedded in porous medium with non-uniform heat source/sink and fluid-particle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gireesha, B. J.; Mahanthesh, B.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy; Manjunatha, P. T.

    2016-04-01

    Theoretical study on hydromagnetic heat transfer in dusty viscous fluid on continuously stretching non-isothermal surface, with linear variation of surface temperature or heat flux has been carried out. Effects of Hall current, Darcy porous medium, thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink are taken into the account. The sheet is considered to be permeable to allow fluid suction or blowing, and stretching with a surface velocity varied according to a linear. Two cases of the temperature boundary conditions were considered at the surface namely, PST and PHF cases. The governing partial differential equations are transferred to a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations by employing suitable similarity transformations and then they are solved numerically. Effects of various pertinent parameters on flow and heat transfer for both phases is analyzed and discussed through graphs in detail. The values of skin friction and Nusselt number for different governing parameters are also tabulated. Comparison of the present results with known numerical results is presented and an excellent agreement is found.

  3. Evaluation of heat-cured resin bases following the addition of denture teeth using a second heat cure.

    PubMed

    Polukoshko, K M; Brudvik, J S; Nicholls, J I; Smith, D E

    1992-04-01

    This study compared heat-cured acrylic resin denture baseplate distortions following a second heat cure used to add the denture teeth. The second heat cure was done with three different water-bath curing temperatures. The distortions were evaluated in three planes by use of a measuring microscope. Recorded distortions were not clinically significant.

  4. Planktonic foraminifera: factors controlling sinking speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kozo; Be, Allan W. H.

    1984-12-01

    Sinking speeds of 330 specimens belonging to 10 extant species of planktonic foraminifera were determined in a sinking column device filled with 3°C seawater. The sinking speed is governed primarily by shell weight and presence/absence of spines. For example, preserved planktonic specimens of Orbulina universa, whose shell weight ranged from 2 to 21 μg, sank 122 to 583 m day -1, with a correlation coefficient of 0.92 on log-log scale. Progressive shell thickening during foraminiferal growth accounts for some of the higher sinking speeds. In addition, shells from sediment on the average sink about three times faster than shells (of equivalent size and species) of planktonic foraminifera collected in near-surface waters. These high values are in part due to the shells often being encrusted with clay and nannoplankton remains. In contrast, the sinking speeds of the spinose species are approximately 3-fold slower than those of the non-spinose species. Based on data from plankton tows, most planktonic foraminifera > 150 μm reach the mean ocean depth of 3800 m in 3 to 12 days depending upon shell weight and presence or absence of spines. Estimated Reynolds numbers range from 0.05 to 24.85 and most exceed a value of 0.5 which is an upper for limit Stokes' Law range, suggesting that foraminifera are out of Stokes' sinking range. The Reynolds number and drag coefficients are negatively well correlated, indicating that drag is one of the important controlling factors in the sinking regime. The presence of spines is significant in increasing drag, decreasing the Reynolds number, and hence reducing the sinking speed.

  5. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of animals in sinks can compromise persistence. Conversely, sinks can bolster population sizes, improving viability. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional persistence, we simulated the removal of sink hab...

  6. Precipitation of sword bean proteins by heating and addition of magnesium chloride in a crude extract.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Kaho; Masuda, Tetsuya; Takenaka, Yasuyuki; Masui, Hironori; Tani, Fumito; Arii, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Sword bean (Canavalia gladiata) seeds are a traditional food in Asian countries. In this study, we aimed to determine the optimal methods for the precipitation of sword bean proteins useful for the food development. The soaking time for sword beans was determined by comparing it with that for soybeans. Sword bean proteins were extracted from dried seeds in distilled water using novel methods. We found that most proteins could be precipitated by heating the extract at more than 90 °C. Interestingly, adding magnesium chloride to the extract at lower temperatures induced specific precipitation of a single protein with a molecular weight of approximately 48 kDa. The molecular weight and N-terminal sequence of the precipitated protein was identical to that of canavalin. These data suggested that canavalin was precipitated by the addition of magnesium chloride to the extract. Our results provide important insights into the production of processed foods from sword bean.

  7. Nonlinear feedback in a six-dimensional Lorenz model: impact of an additional heating term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.-W.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a six-dimensional Lorenz model (6DLM) is derived, based on a recent study using a five-dimensional (5-D) Lorenz model (LM), in order to examine the impact of an additional mode and its accompanying heating term on solution stability. The new mode added to improve the representation of the streamfunction is referred to as a secondary streamfunction mode, while the two additional modes, which appear in both the 6DLM and 5DLM but not in the original LM, are referred to as secondary temperature modes. Two energy conservation relationships of the 6DLM are first derived in the dissipationless limit. The impact of three additional modes on solution stability is examined by comparing numerical solutions and ensemble Lyapunov exponents of the 6DLM and 5DLM as well as the original LM. For the onset of chaos, the critical value of the normalized Rayleigh number (rc) is determined to be 41.1. The critical value is larger than that in the 3DLM (rc ~ 24.74), but slightly smaller than the one in the 5DLM (rc ~ 42.9). A stability analysis and numerical experiments obtained using generalized LMs, with or without simplifications, suggest the following: (1) negative nonlinear feedback in association with the secondary temperature modes, as first identified using the 5DLM, plays a dominant role in providing feedback for improving the solution's stability of the 6DLM, (2) the additional heating term in association with the secondary streamfunction mode may destabilize the solution, and (3) overall feedback due to the secondary streamfunction mode is much smaller than the feedback due to the secondary temperature modes; therefore, the critical Rayleigh number of the 6DLM is comparable to that of the 5DLM. The 5DLM and 6DLM collectively suggest different roles for small-scale processes (i.e., stabilization vs. destabilization), consistent with the following statement by Lorenz (1972): "If the flap of a butterfly's wings can be instrumental in generating a tornado, it can

  8. Nonlinear feedback in a six-dimensional Lorenz Model: impact of an additional heating term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.-W.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a six-dimensional Lorenz model (6DLM) is derived, based on a recent study using a five-dimensional (5-D) Lorenz model (LM), in order to examine the impact of an additional mode and its accompanying heating term on solution stability. The new mode added to improve the representation of the steamfunction is referred to as a secondary streamfunction mode, while the two additional modes, that appear in both the 6DLM and 5DLM but not in the original LM, are referred to as secondary temperature modes. Two energy conservation relationships of the 6DLM are first derived in the dissipationless limit. The impact of three additional modes on solution stability is examined by comparing numerical solutions and ensemble Lyapunov exponents of the 6DLM and 5DLM as well as the original LM. For the onset of chaos, the critical value of the normalized Rayleigh number (rc) is determined to be 41.1. The critical value is larger than that in the 3DLM (rc ~ 24.74), but slightly smaller than the one in the 5DLM (rc ~ 42.9). A stability analysis and numerical experiments obtained using generalized LMs, with or without simplifications, suggest the following: (1) negative nonlinear feedback in association with the secondary temperature modes, as first identified using the 5DLM, plays a dominant role in providing feedback for improving the solution's stability of the 6DLM, (2) the additional heating term in association with the secondary streamfunction mode may destabilize the solution, and (3) overall feedback due to the secondary streamfunction mode is much smaller than the feedback due to the secondary temperature modes; therefore, the critical Rayleigh number of the 6DLM is comparable to that of the 5DLM. The 5DLM and 6DLM collectively suggest different roles for small-scale processes (i.e., stabilization vs. destabilization), consistent with the following statement by Lorenz (1972): If the flap of a butterfly's wings can be instrumental in generating a tornado, it can

  9. Sinking coastal cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, Gilles; Bucx, Tom; Dam, Rien; De Lange, Ger; Lambert, John

    2014-05-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs. This effects roads and transportation networks, hydraulic infrastructure - such as river embankments, sluice gates, flood barriers and pumping stations -, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. Excessive groundwater extraction after rapid urbanization and population growth is the main cause of severe land subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. Because of ongoing urbanization and population growth in delta areas, in particular in coastal megacities, there is, and will be, more economic development in subsidence-prone areas. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by extreme weather events (short term) and rising sea levels (long term).Consequently, detrimental impacts will increase in the near future, making it necessary to address subsidence related problems now. Subsidence is an issue that involves many policy fields, complex technical aspects and governance embedment. There is a need for an integrated approach in order to manage subsidence and to develop appropriate strategies and measures that are effective and efficient on both the short and long term. Urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies are just examples of the options available. A major rethink is needed to deal with the 'hidden' but urgent

  10. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  11. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  12. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  13. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  14. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  15. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  16. Corrosion and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Water Dispersed with Carboxylate Additives and Multi Walled Carbon Nano Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, Chellapilla V. K. N. S. N.; Srinivas, Vadapalli

    2016-02-01

    This paper summarizes a recent work on anti-corrosive properties and enhanced heat transfer properties of carboxylated water based nanofluids. Water mixed with sebacic acid as carboxylate additive found to be resistant to corrosion and suitable for automotive environment. The carboxylated water is dispersed with very low mass concentration of carbon nano tubes at 0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 %. The stability of nanofluids in terms of zeta potential is found to be good with carboxylated water compared to normal water. The heat transfer performance of nanofluids is carried out on an air cooled heat exchanger similar to an automotive radiator with incoming air velocities across radiator at 5, 10 and 15 m/s. The flow Reynolds number of water is in the range of 2500-6000 indicating developing flow regime. The corrosion resistance of nanofluids is found to be good indicating its suitability to automotive environment. There is a slight increase in viscosity and marginal decrease in the specific heat of nanofluids with addition of carboxylate as well as CNTs. Significant improvement is observed in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids dispersed with CNTs. During heat transfer experimentation, the inside heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient has also improved markedly. It is also found that the velocity of air and flow rate of coolant plays an important role in enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient.

  17. Additive impacts on particle emissions from heating low emitting cooking oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouei Torkmahalleh, M.; Zhao, Y.; Hopke, P. K.; Rossner, A.; Ferro, A. R.

    2013-08-01

    The effect of five additives, including table salt, sea salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and turmeric, on the emission of PM2.5 and ultrafine particles (UFP) from heated cooking oil (200 °C) were studied. One hundred milligrams of the additives were added individually to either canola or soybean oil without stirring. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt reduced the PM2.5 emission of canola oil by 86% (p < 0.001), 88% (p < 0.001), and 91% (p < 0.001), respectively. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt also decreased the total particle number emissions of canola oil by 45% (p = 0.003), 52% (p = 0.001), and 53% (p < 0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder showed no changes in the PM2.5 and total number emissions of canola oil. Table salt and sea salt, decreased the level of PM2.5 emissions from soybean oil by 47% (p < 0.001) and 77% (p < 0.001), respectively. No differences in the PM2.5 emissions were observed when other additives were added to soybean oil. Black pepper, sea salt, and table salt reduced the total particle number emissions from the soybean oil by 51%, 61% and 68% (p < 0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder had no effect on soybean oil with respect to total particle number emissions. Our results indicate that table salt, sea salt, and black pepper can be used to reduce the particle total number and PM2.5 emissions when cooking with oil.

  18. Sinking Coastal Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, G.; Stuurman, R.; De Lange, G.; Bucx, T.; Lambert, J.

    2014-12-01

    In many coastal cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will continue to sink, even below sea level. The ever increasing industrial and domestic demand for water in these cities results in excessive groundwater extraction, causing severe subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by climate-induced sea level rise. Land subsidence results in two types damage: foremost it increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. Secondly, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs of roads and transportation networks, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. To survey the extent of groundwater associated subsidence, we conducted a quick-assessment of subsidence in a series of mega-cities (Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Dhaka, New Orleans and Bangkok). For each city research questions included: what are the main causes, how much is the current subsidence rate and what are predictions, where are the vulnerable areas, what are the impacts and risks, how can adverse impacts can be mitigated or compensated for, and what governmental bodies are involved and responsible to act? Using the assessment, this paper discusses subsidence modelling and measurement results from the selected cities. The focus is on the importance of delayed settlement after increases in hydraulic heads, the role of the subsurface composition for subsidence rates and best practice solutions for subsiding cities. For the latter, urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management

  19. Experimental investigation of forced convective heat transfer performance in nanofluids of Al2O3/water and CuO/water in a serpentine shaped micro channel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, A.; Alagumurthi, N.; Senthilvelan, T.

    2016-07-01

    The microchannels are device used to remove high heat fluxes from smaller area. In this experimental research work the heat transfer performance of nanofluids of Al2O3/water and CuO/water were compared. The important character of such fluids is the enhanced thermal conductivity, in comparison with base fluid without considerable alteration in physical and chemical properties. The effect of forced convective heat transfer coefficient was calculated using serpentine shaped microchannel heat exchanger. Furthermore we calculated the forced convective heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluids using theoretical correlations in order to compare the results with the experimental data. The heat transfer coefficient for different particle concentration and temperature were analysed using forced convection heat transfer using nanofluids. The findings indicate considerable enhancement in convective heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluids as compared to the basefluid. The results also shows that CuO/water nanofluid has increased heat transfer coefficient compared with Al2O3/water and base fluids. Moreover the experimental results indicate there is increased forced convective heat transfer coefficient with the increase in nano particle concentration.

  20. Overview of Heat Addition and Efficiency Predictions for an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Reid, Terry; Schifer, Nicholas; Briggs, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    Past methods of predicting net heat input needed to be validated. Validation effort pursued with several paths including improving model inputs, using test hardware to provide validation data, and validating high fidelity models. Validation test hardware provided direct measurement of net heat input for comparison to predicted values. Predicted value of net heat input was 1.7 percent less than measured value and initial calculations of measurement uncertainty were 2.1 percent (under review). Lessons learned during validation effort were incorporated into convertor modeling approach which improved predictions of convertor efficiency.

  1. Direct heating surface combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Shire, L. I.; Mroz, T. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The combustor utilizes a non-adiabatic flame to provide low-emission combustion for gas turbines. A fuel-air mixture is directed through a porous wall, the other side of which serves as a combustion surface. A radiant heat sink disposed adjacent to and spaced from the combustion surface controls the combustor flame temperature in order to prevent the formation of oxides of nitrogen. A secondary air flow cools the heat sink. Additionally, up to 100% of secondary air flow is mixed with the combustion products at the direct heating surface combustor to dilute such products thereby reducing exit temperature. However, if less than 100% secondary air is mixed to the combustor, the remainder may be added to the combustion products further downstream.

  2. Regulation of assimilate import into sink organs: update on molecular drivers of sink strength

    PubMed Central

    Bihmidine, Saadia; Hunter, Charles T.; Johns, Christine E.; Koch, Karen E.; Braun, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments have altered our view of molecular mechanisms that determine sink strength, defined here as the capacity of non-photosynthetic structures to compete for import of photoassimilates. We review new findings from diverse systems, including stems, seeds, flowers, and fruits. An important advance has been the identification of new transporters and facilitators with major roles in the accumulation and equilibration of sugars at a cellular level. Exactly where each exerts its effect varies among systems. Sugarcane and sweet sorghum stems, for example, both accumulate high levels of sucrose, but may do so via different paths. The distinction is central to strategies for targeted manipulation of sink strength using transporter genes, and shows the importance of system-specific analyses. Another major advance has been the identification of deep hypoxia as a feature of normal grain development. This means that molecular drivers of sink strength in endosperm operate in very low oxygen levels, and under metabolic conditions quite different than previously assumed. Successful enhancement of sink strength has nonetheless been achieved in grains by up-regulating genes for starch biosynthesis. Additionally, our understanding of sink strength is enhanced by awareness of the dual roles played by invertases (INVs), not only in sucrose metabolism, but also in production of the hexose sugar signals that regulate cell cycle and cell division programs. These contributions of INV to cell expansion and division prove to be vital for establishment of young sinks ranging from flowers to fruit. Since INV genes are themselves sugar-responsive “feast genes,” they can mediate a feed-forward enhancement of sink strength when assimilates are abundant. Greater overall productivity and yield have thus been attained in key instances, indicating that even broader enhancements may be achievable as we discover the detailed molecular mechanisms that drive sink strength in diverse

  3. Regulation of assimilate import into sink organs: update on molecular drivers of sink strength.

    PubMed

    Bihmidine, Saadia; Hunter, Charles T; Johns, Christine E; Koch, Karen E; Braun, David M

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments have altered our view of molecular mechanisms that determine sink strength, defined here as the capacity of non-photosynthetic structures to compete for import of photoassimilates. We review new findings from diverse systems, including stems, seeds, flowers, and fruits. An important advance has been the identification of new transporters and facilitators with major roles in the accumulation and equilibration of sugars at a cellular level. Exactly where each exerts its effect varies among systems. Sugarcane and sweet sorghum stems, for example, both accumulate high levels of sucrose, but may do so via different paths. The distinction is central to strategies for targeted manipulation of sink strength using transporter genes, and shows the importance of system-specific analyses. Another major advance has been the identification of deep hypoxia as a feature of normal grain development. This means that molecular drivers of sink strength in endosperm operate in very low oxygen levels, and under metabolic conditions quite different than previously assumed. Successful enhancement of sink strength has nonetheless been achieved in grains by up-regulating genes for starch biosynthesis. Additionally, our understanding of sink strength is enhanced by awareness of the dual roles played by invertases (INVs), not only in sucrose metabolism, but also in production of the hexose sugar signals that regulate cell cycle and cell division programs. These contributions of INV to cell expansion and division prove to be vital for establishment of young sinks ranging from flowers to fruit. Since INV genes are themselves sugar-responsive "feast genes," they can mediate a feed-forward enhancement of sink strength when assimilates are abundant. Greater overall productivity and yield have thus been attained in key instances, indicating that even broader enhancements may be achievable as we discover the detailed molecular mechanisms that drive sink strength in diverse

  4. Forests as carbon sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, R.A.; Woodwell, R.M.

    1995-11-01

    When the nations of the world signed and later ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), they accepted the difficult challenge of stabilizing the composition of the atmosphere with respect to the greenhouse gases (GHGs). Success will require a reduction in both use of fossil fuels and rates of deforestation. Forests have a large enough influence on the atmosphere that one of the options for stabilizing the concentrations of GHGs in the atmosphere includes the use of forests as a carbon sink through reforestation of large areas. We identify in this paper the potential and the limitations of such projects. We discuss the implications of four approaches in management of forests globally: (i) continued deforestation, (ii) halting deforestation, (iii) net reforestation including agroforestry, and (iv) substituting the use of wood fuels for fossil fuels.

  5. Laser heat treatment of aerosol-jet additive manufactured graphene patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabari, Elahe; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2015-09-01

    In this article, a laser processing protocol for heat treatment of micro-scale printed graphene patterns is developed, and the results are compared with the counterpart results obtained by the conventional heat treatment process carried out in a furnace. A continuous-wave Erbium fiber laser is used to enhance electrical properties of the aerosol-jet printed graphene patterns through removing solvents and a stabilizer polymer. The laser power and the process speed are optimized to effectively treat the printed patterns without compromising the quality of the graphene flakes. Furthermore, a heat transfer model is developed and its results are utilized to optimize the laser treatment process. It is found that the laser heat treatment process with a laser speed of 0.03 mm s-1, a laser beam diameter ~50 μm, and a laser power of 10 W results in pure graphene patterns with no excessive components. The ratio of D to G bands ({{I}\\text{D}}/{{I}\\text{G}}) in Raman graph of the laser treated pure graphene, which is an indicator of the level of the active defects in graphene structures, is 0.52. The laser treated pure graphene structures also have a C/O ratio and an electrical resistivity of ~4.5 and 0.022 Ω cm, respectively. These values are fairly comparable with the results of samples treated in a furnace. The results suggest that the laser processing has the capability of removing stabilizer polymers and solvents through a localized moving heat source, which is preferable for flexible electronics with low working temperature substrates.

  6. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  7. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium.

  8. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. PMID

  9. High-Absorptance Radiative Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cafferty, T.

    1983-01-01

    Absorptance of black-painted open-cell aluminum honeycomb improved by cutting honeycomb at angle or bias rather than straight across. This ensures honeycomb cavities escapes. At each reflection radiation attenuated by absorption. Applications include space-background simulators, space radiators, solar absorbers, and passive coolers for terrestrial use.

  10. Does It Sink or Float?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith Richards

    2012-01-01

    This activity is designed to teach prekindergarten to second grade students about the concept of sink or float through an inquiry activity. Students will use familiar objects to predict and test the properties of sink and float. Background information is offered to teachers to assist them with this activity. This lesson begins with an engaging…

  11. Preliminary design package for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Summarized preliminary design information on activities associated with the development, delivery and support of solar heating and cooling systems is given. These systems are for single family dwellings and commercial applications. The heating/cooling system use a reversible vapor compression heat pump that is driven in the cooling mode by a Rankine power loop, and in the heating mode by a variable speed electric motor. The heating/cooling systems differ from the heating-only systems in the arrangement of the heat pump subsystem and the addition of a cooling tower to provide the heat sink for cooling mode operation.

  12. Heat tolerant fungi and applied research: Addition to the previously treated group of strictly thermotolerant species.

    PubMed

    Mouchacca, Jean

    2007-12-01

    Heat tolerant fungi are organisms that may perform bioconversion processes and produce industrially important metabolites. They may either be obligate thermophiles or simple thermotolerants. The present document is the continuation of a critical note on thermotolerant fungi erroneously reported in the literature as possessing thermophilic attributes. Fifty strictly thermotolerant taxa are here considered. Some of their binomials have only recently been introduced in the scientific literature. The reported thermotolerant species are grouped according to broad taxonomic categories. The nomenclature of zygomycetous taxa and anamorphic fungi is straightforward, as usually only one binomial is available or only one state is produced in culture respectively. For Ascomycetes regularly producing in culture a conidial state, the name of the sexual state (teleomorph) should be used to designate the organism even when a binomial is available for the anamorph; this prevents the practice of interchangeably using the name of either states of the same fungus. When ascomycetous taxa produce the anamorph regularly and the teleomorph only under specific cultural conditions, the name of the anamorph could be preferentially selected. The goal is to introduce uniformity in name citations of fungi, particularly in the literature of applied research. Each species is reported under its taxonomically correct name, either the original binomial or the latest combined binomial after generic transfer(s). Known synonyms are also specified. Maximum efforts were undertaken to trace updated information on the taxonomic position of these fifty strict thermotolerant species. For each, information on the type material, morphological features distinguishing it from related members of the genus (and when necessary a generic taxonomic assessment) and, finally, salient ecological features including heat tolerance levels are given. For some information on their biotechnological use is also provided

  13. Source Distribution Method for Unsteady One-Dimensional Flows With Small Mass, Momentum, and Heat Addition and Small Area Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold

    1959-01-01

    A source distribution method is presented for obtaining flow perturbations due to small unsteady area variations, mass, momentum, and heat additions in a basic uniform (or piecewise uniform) one-dimensional flow. First, the perturbations due to an elemental area variation, mass, momentum, and heat addition are found. The general solution is then represented by a spatial and temporal distribution of these elemental (source) solutions. Emphasis is placed on discussing the physical nature of the flow phenomena. The method is illustrated by several examples. These include the determination of perturbations in basic flows consisting of (1) a shock propagating through a nonuniform tube, (2) a constant-velocity piston driving a shock, (3) ideal shock-tube flows, and (4) deflagrations initiated at a closed end. The method is particularly applicable for finding the perturbations due to relatively thin wall boundary layers.

  14. On the effect of BUM generation enhancement revealed using the scheme of additional heating of ionospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Erukhimov, L. M.; Komrakov, G. P.; Sergeev, E. N.; Thidé, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Wagner, L. S.; Goldstein, J. A.; Selcher, G.

    1997-05-01

    We present measured characteristics of the artificial ionospheric radio emission (AIRE), which were obtained experimentally using additional heating of the ionospheric F-region by O-polarized waves. It is shown that the observed enhancement of intensity of the broad upshifted maximum (BUM) of the AIRE can result from the influence of electrons accelerated in the plasma: esonance region on its generation. An empirical model of the phenomenon observed is developed. It is concluded from experimental results that the BUM has a complex structure and only one of its components produces the above emission enhancement. We show the possibility of using the AIRE in additional heating of ionospheric plasma for diagnostics of artificial ionospheric turbulence and investigation of the features of perturbation propagation along the geomagnetic field lines.

  15. Extremely strong thermohaline sources/sinks generated by diagnostic initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Peter C.; Lan, Jian

    2003-03-01

    One difficulty for ocean modeling is the lack of velocity data for specifying the initial condition. Diagnostic initialization is widely used; it integrates the model from known temperature (Tc) and salinity (Sc) and zero velocity fields while holding (Tc, Sc) unchanged. After a period (around 30 days) of the diagnostic run, the velocity field (Vc) is established, and (Tc, Sc, Vc) fields are then treated as the initial conditions for the prognostic numerical modeling. During the diagnostic initialization period, the heat and salt `source/sink' terms are generated at each time step. Maximum time rates of absolute change of the monthly mean T, S (0.1°/day, 0.1 ppt/day) are taken as the standard measures to identify the strength of the thermohaline `sources/sinks'. Twenty four times of the standard measures (0.1°/hr, 0.1 ppt/hr) represent strong `sources/sinks'. Ten times of the strong `sources/sinks' (1°/hr, 1 ppt/hr) represent extremely strong `sources/sinks'. The Princeton Ocean Model implemented for the Japan/East Sea is used to demonstrate the existence of extremely strong thermohaline sources and sinks generated by the diagnostic initialization with the annual mean Tc, Sc from the Navy's Global Digital Environmental Model. The effects of extremely strong and spatially nonuniform initial heating/cooling (salting/freshening) rates on thermohaline and velocity fields need to be further investigated.

  16. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Devices Using Additive-Subtractive Manufacturing Techniques: Application to Waste-Heat Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are well suited for waste-heat energy harvesting applications as opposed to primary energy generation. Commercially available thermoelectric modules are flat, inflexible and have limited sizes available. State-of-art manufacturing of TEG devices relies on assembling prefabricated parts with soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping. Furthermore, efforts to incorporate them onto curved surfaces such as exhaust pipes, pump housings, steam lines, mixing containers, reaction chambers, etc. require custom-built heat exchangers. This is costly and labor-intensive, in addition to presenting challenges in terms of space, thermal coupling, added weight and long-term reliability. Additive manufacturing technologies are beginning to address many of these issues by reducing part count in complex designs and the elimination of sub-assembly requirements. This work investigates the feasibility of utilizing such novel manufacturing routes for improving the manufacturing process of thermoelectric devices. Much of the research in thermoelectricity is primarily focused on improving thermoelectric material properties by developing of novel materials or finding ways to improve existing ones. Secondary to material development is improving the manufacturing process of TEGs to provide significant cost benefits. To improve the device fabrication process, this work explores additive manufacturing technologies to provide an integrated and scalable approach for TE device manufacturing directly onto engineering component surfaces. Additive manufacturing techniques like thermal spray and ink-dispenser printing are developed with the aim of improving the manufacturing process of TEGs. Subtractive manufacturing techniques like laser micromachining are also studied in detail. This includes the laser processing parameters for cutting the thermal spray materials efficiently by

  18. DNA Persistence in a Sink Drain Environment

    DOE PAGES

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm. The sink drain apparatus was sampled before and for several days after the addition of themore » sterilized B. anthracis culture to detect the presence of B. anthracis DNA. Multiple PCR primer pairs were used to screen for chromosomal and plasmid DNA with primers targeting shorter sequences showing greater amplification efficiency and success. PCR amplification and detection of target sequences indicate persistence of chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA in the biofilm for 5 or more and 14 or more days, respectively.« less

  19. DNA Persistence in a Sink Drain Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-07-31

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm. The sink drain apparatus was sampled before and for several days after the addition of the sterilized B. anthracis culture to detect the presence of B. anthracis DNA. Multiple PCR primer pairs were used to screen for chromosomal and plasmid DNA with primers targeting shorter sequences showing greater amplification efficiency and success. PCR amplification and detection of target sequences indicate persistence of chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA in the biofilm for 5 or more and 14 or more days, respectively.

  20. DNA Persistence in a Sink Drain Environment

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Eric M.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are organized structures composed mainly of cells and extracellular polymeric substances produced by the constituent microorganisms. Ubiquitous in nature, biofilms have an innate ability to capture and retain passing material and may therefore act as natural collectors of contaminants or signatures of upstream activities. To determine the persistence and detectability of DNA passing through a sink drain environment, Bacillus anthracis strain Ames35 was cultured (6.35 x 107 CFU/mL), sterilized, and disposed of by addition to a sink drain apparatus with an established biofilm. The sink drain apparatus was sampled before and for several days after the addition of the sterilized B. anthracis culture to detect the presence of B. anthracis DNA. Multiple PCR primer pairs were used to screen for chromosomal and plasmid DNA with primers targeting shorter sequences showing greater amplification efficiency and success. PCR amplification and detection of target sequences indicate persistence of chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA in the biofilm for 5 or more and 14 or more days, respectively. PMID:26230525

  1. Heat Pipe Blocks Return Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-foil reed valve in conventional slab-wick heat pipe limits heat flow to one direction only. With sink warmer than source, reed is forced closed and fluid returns to source side through annular transfer wick. When this occurs, wick slab on sink side of valve dries out and heat pipe ceases to conduct heat.

  2. On modeling weak sinks in MODPATH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams, Daniel B.; Haitjema, Henk; Kauffman, Leon J.

    2012-01-01

    Regional groundwater flow systems often contain both strong sinks and weak sinks. A strong sink extracts water from the entire aquifer depth, while a weak sink lets some water pass underneath or over the actual sink. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW may allow a sink cell to act as a strong or weak sink, hence extracting all water that enters the cell or allowing some of that water to pass. A physical strong sink can be modeled by either a strong sink cell or a weak sink cell, with the latter generally occurring in low resolution models. Likewise, a physical weak sink may also be represented by either type of sink cell. The representation of weak sinks in the particle tracing code MODPATH is more equivocal than in MODFLOW. With the appropriate parameterization of MODPATH, particle traces and their associated travel times to weak sink streams can be modeled with adequate accuracy, even in single layer models. Weak sink well cells, on the other hand, require special measures as proposed in the literature to generate correct particle traces and individual travel times and hence capture zones. We found that the transit time distributions for well water generally do not require special measures provided aquifer properties are locally homogeneous and the well draws water from the entire aquifer depth, an important observation for determining the response of a well to non-point contaminant inputs.

  3. Effects of Heat and Momentum Addition Inside and Outside the Compound Sonic Point of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Webb, G. M.; McKenzie, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the effect of heat and momentum addition to the solar wind for a model including the effects of Alfven waves and plasma pressure (proton plus electron pressure). The mass flux per unit area in 1D flow maximizes when the flow speed equals the compound sound speed, including the effects of the Alfven wave pressure. We discuss the analogue of the Laval nozzle for the solar wind flow, and the dependence of the effective nozzle area as a function of radial distance, and the relationship of the nozzle area to the momentum equation and the Mach number of the flow. An analysis is carried out of the effects of heat and momentum addition to the wind, using a thin slice approximation, which leads to Rankine Hugoniot relations for weak deflagrations and detonations (i.e. the combustion Hugoniot). The linearized Hugoniot is used to analyze the effects of small momentum and energy addition to the wind in the thin slice approximation. We obtain the fully nonlinear Rankine Hugoniot equation solutions. The analysis also holds in the presence of Alfven waves, in which the wave energy exchange equation yields the wave action flux conservation law when their contribution to the compound sound speed is taken into account. The effective polytropic index γgamma and flow speed relative to the compound flow speed ahead of the slice play crucial roles in determining whether local acceleration or deceleration results. Some results are at first sight unexpected since γgamma for Alfven waves ranges from -1/2 (in sub-Alfvenic flow) to 3/2 in super-Alfvenic flow.

  4. Carbapenemase-bearing Klebsiella spp. in sink drains: investigation into the potential advantage of copper pipes.

    PubMed

    Soothill, J S

    2016-06-01

    Sink drains have long been known to harbour pathogenic bacteria and efforts such as heated sink traps have been made to control them. Sink outlet pipes have been implicated in outbreaks of infection by multi-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. To investigate whether a change to copper pipes might prevent cross-infection, sections of standard sink outlet pipe were left in containers of water to which multi-resistant human strains of K. pneumoniae had been added. Bacterial counts from the water of containers to which copper pipe had been added were lower than those from containers to which PVC (polyvinyl chloride) pipe had been added. PMID:27112043

  5. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2016-03-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  6. Flinking: Neither Floating nor Sinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger B.

    1993-01-01

    Describes an activity that challenges students to make an object that, when released under water, does not float up or sink down. The main concept this activity investigates is the density of ordinary objects in comparison to the density of water. (PR)

  7. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    PubMed

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators.

  8. A study of hear sink performance in air and soil for use in a thermoelectric energy harvesting device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J.; Lawrence, E. E.

    2002-01-01

    A suggested application of a thermoelectric generator is to exploit the natural temperature difference between the air and the soil to generate small amounts of electrical energy. Since the conversion efficiency of even the best thermoelectric generators available is very low, the performance of the heat sinks providing the heat flow is critical. By providing a constant heat input to various heat sinks, field tests of their thermal conductances in soil and in air were performed. Aprototype device without a thermoelectric generator was constructed, buried, and monitored to experimentally measure the heat flow achievable in such a system. Theoretical considerations for design and selection of improved heat sinks are also presented. In particular, the method of shape factoranalysis is used to give rough estimates and upper bounds for the thermal conductance of a passive heat sink buried in soil.

  9. Hyperlipidemia sink for anesthetic agents.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Thomas J; Porhomayon, Jahan; Nader, Nader D; Eldesouki, Enas; Smith, Kelly; Hobika, Geoffrey G

    2016-11-01

    We present a case that involves anesthetic resistance during anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy. Despite adequate dosing of both intravenous and inhalation anesthetics, our patient was resistant to induction of the state of general anesthesia. Subsequently, we noticed extreme hyperlipidemia. We hypothesized that the patient's extreme hyperlipidemia served as an anesthetic "sink" and prevented the full dose of intravenous agents from quickly reaching their intended site of action.

  10. Effect of additional heat treatment of 2024-T3 on the growth of fatigue crack in air and in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louwaard, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of ductility on the fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum alloys, fatigue tests were carried out on central notched specimens of 2024-T3 and 2024-T8 sheet material. The 2024-T8 material was obtained by an additional heat treatment applied on 2024-T3 (18 hours at 192 C), which increased the static yield strength from 43.6 to 48.9 kgf/sq mm. A change in the ultimate strength was not observed. Fatigue tests were carried out on both materials in humid air and in high vacuum. According to a new crack propagation model, crack extension is supported to be caused by a slip-related process and debonding triggered by the environment. This model predicts an effect of the ductility on the crack growth rate which should be smaller in vacuum than in humid air; however, this was not confirmed. In humid air the crack-growth rate in 2024-T8 was about 2 times faster than in 2024-T3, while in vacuum the ratio was about 2.5. Crack closure measurements gave no indications that crack closure played a significant role in both materials. Some speculative explanations are briefly discussed.

  11. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Julie A; Lawler, Joshua J; Schumaker, Nathan H; Wilsey, Chad B; Bender, Darren J

    2015-12-01

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of individuals in sinks can compromise persistence; but conversely, sinks can improve viability by improving connectivity and facilitating the recolonization of vacant sources. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional population persistence of declining populations, we simulated source-sink dynamics for 3 very different endangered species: Black-capped Vireos (Vireo atricapilla) at Fort Hood, Texas, Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) in Alberta, and Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in the northwestern United States. We used empirical data from these case studies to parameterize spatially explicit individual-based models. We then used the models to quantify population abundance and persistence with and without long-term sinks. The contributions of sink habitats varied widely. Sinks were detrimental, particularly when they functioned as strong sinks with few emigrants in declining populations (e.g., Alberta's Ord's kangaroo rat) and benign in robust populations (e.g., Black-capped Vireos) when Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism was controlled. Sinks, including ecological traps, were also crucial in delaying declines when there were few sources (e.g., in Black-capped Vireo populations with no Cowbird control). Sink contributions were also nuanced. For example, sinks that supported large, variable populations were subject to greater extinction risk (e.g., Northern Spotted Owls). In each of our case studies, new context-dependent sinks emerged, underscoring the dynamic nature of sources and sinks and the need for frequent re-assessment. Our results imply that management actions based on assumptions that sink habitats are generally harmful or helpful risk undermining conservation efforts for declining populations.

  12. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Julie A; Lawler, Joshua J; Schumaker, Nathan H; Wilsey, Chad B; Bender, Darren J

    2015-12-01

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of individuals in sinks can compromise persistence; but conversely, sinks can improve viability by improving connectivity and facilitating the recolonization of vacant sources. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional population persistence of declining populations, we simulated source-sink dynamics for 3 very different endangered species: Black-capped Vireos (Vireo atricapilla) at Fort Hood, Texas, Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) in Alberta, and Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in the northwestern United States. We used empirical data from these case studies to parameterize spatially explicit individual-based models. We then used the models to quantify population abundance and persistence with and without long-term sinks. The contributions of sink habitats varied widely. Sinks were detrimental, particularly when they functioned as strong sinks with few emigrants in declining populations (e.g., Alberta's Ord's kangaroo rat) and benign in robust populations (e.g., Black-capped Vireos) when Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism was controlled. Sinks, including ecological traps, were also crucial in delaying declines when there were few sources (e.g., in Black-capped Vireo populations with no Cowbird control). Sink contributions were also nuanced. For example, sinks that supported large, variable populations were subject to greater extinction risk (e.g., Northern Spotted Owls). In each of our case studies, new context-dependent sinks emerged, underscoring the dynamic nature of sources and sinks and the need for frequent re-assessment. Our results imply that management actions based on assumptions that sink habitats are generally harmful or helpful risk undermining conservation efforts for declining populations. PMID:26032147

  13. Additive effect of heat on the UVB-induced tyrosinase activation and melanogenesis via ERK/p38/MITF pathway in human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei-Jie; Ma, Hui-Jun; Zhao, Guang; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Wen; Ma, Li-Juan; Lei, Xiao-Bing

    2014-08-01

    Heat is known as an environmental factor that causes significant skin pigmentation, but its effects on melanogenesis have been poorly studied. It has been shown that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is involved in ultraviolet B (UVB) and stress-induced melanogenesis in melanocytes. In this study, we investigated the effects of heat and UVB, on melanocyte melanogenesis, differentiation, and MAPK phosphorylation. The results showed that heat (1 h at 40 °C for 5 days) increased cell dendrites, enlarged cell bodies, and induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)/p38/MITF activation but did not influence melanogenesis of human epidermal melanocytes from skin phototype III. UVB irradiation (20 mJ/cm(2) for 5 days) induced melanogenesis and c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK)/p38/MITF/tyrosinase activation in melanocytes from skin phototype III. UVB combined with heat resulted in much more significant tyrosinase activation and melanogenesis as compared with UVB alone in melanocytes from skin phototype III. Furthermore, heat treatment and UVB irradiation induced JNK, ERK, and p38 activation but not melanogenic and morphological changes in melanocytes from skin phototype I. These findings suggested that heat promoted melanocyte differentiation, probably via heat-induced ERK/p38/MITF/activation. Furthermore, heat had an additive effect on the UVB-induced tyrosinase activation and melanogenesis. These results provide a new clue for dermatologists for the treatment of hypopigmented skin disease with heat combined with UVB irradiation.

  14. The heat dissipation model and desensitizing mechanism of the HMX/additive interfaces: a theoretical investigation based on linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) is a high-energy explosive with high sensitivity. The heat dissipation of the HMX/additive interface is a key issue in understanding the hot spot formation and desensitizing mechanism of mixture explosive. In this work, we derive new formulae to calculate the heat dissipation rate for a set of HMX/additive interfaces, and build a physical model to describe the energy dissipation time and distance in mixture explosive. Four kinds of additives are considered: 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, graphite, paraffin and fluoropolymers. At low strength loading, we prove that the heat dissipation rate is proportional to the square of frequency, and suggest a way to decrease the sensitivity of the explosive. At medium strength loading, the viscosity coefficient and friction coefficient of interface are calculated. The desensitizing abilities of additives to HMX are discussed systematically.

  15. The Effect of Sink Temperature on a Capillary Pumped Loop Employing a Flat Evaporator and Shell and Tube Condenser

    SciTech Connect

    M. Cerza; R.C. Herron; J.J. Harper

    2002-06-24

    An experimental facility for conducting research on capillary pumped loop (CPL) systems was developed. In order to simulate shipboard cooling water encountered at various locations of the ocean, the heat sink temperature of the facility could be varied. A flat plate, CPL evaporator was designed and tested under various heat sink temperatures. The sink temperature ranged from 274.3 to 305.2 K and the heat input varied from 250 to 800 W which corresponds to heat fluxes up to 1.8 W/cm{sup 2}. The CPL flat plate evaporator performed very well under this range of heat input and sink temperatures. The main result obtained showed that a large degree of subcooling developed between the evaporator vapor outlet line and liquid return line. This condensate depression increased with increasing heat input.

  16. Trends and regional distributions of land and ocean carbon sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, J. L.; Gloor, M.; Gruber, N.; Beaulieu, C.; Jacobson, A. R.; Mikaloff Fletcher, S. E.; Pacala, S.; Rodgers, K.

    2010-08-01

    We show here an updated estimate of the net land carbon sink (NLS) as a function of time from 1960 to 2007 calculated from the difference between fossil fuel emissions, the observed atmospheric growth rate, and the ocean uptake obtained by recent ocean model simulations forced with reanalysis wind stress and heat and water fluxes. Except for interannual variability, the net land carbon sink appears to have been relatively constant at a mean value of -0.27 Pg C yr-1 between 1960 and 1988, at which time it increased abruptly by -0.88 (-0.77 to -1.04) Pg C yr-1 to a new relatively constant mean of -1.15 Pg C yr-1 between 1989 and 2003/7 (the sign convention is negative out of the atmosphere). This result is detectable at the 99% level using a t-test. The land use source (LU) is relatively constant over this entire time interval. While the LU estimate is highly uncertain, this does imply that most of the change in the net land carbon sink must be due to an abrupt increase in the land sink, LS = NLS - LU, in response to some as yet unknown combination of biogeochemical and climate forcing. A regional synthesis and assessment of the land carbon sources and sinks over the post 1988/1989 period reveals broad agreement that the Northern Hemisphere land is a major sink of atmospheric CO2, but there remain major discrepancies with regard to the sign and magnitude of the net flux to and from tropical land.

  17. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence (journal article)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of individuals in sinks can compromise persistence; but conversely, sinks can improve viability by improving connectivity and facilitating the recolonization of vacant sources. To assess the contribution of sinks t...

  18. Additional cooling and heating load improvements in seasonal performance modeling of room and central air conditioners and heat pumps. Topical report, Subtask 3. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-09

    The study focuses on improving the load modeling technique of Seasonal Performance Model (SPM) in order to estimate a more realistic load for seasonal analysis calculations on an hourly basis. A computer simulation program, Seasonal Performance Model Load (SPMLD), was used to calculate the cooling and heating loads for a typical residence in Caribou, Maine; Columbia, Missouri; and Fort Worth, Texas. The derivation of the SPMLD is described and changes made to improve cooling and heating load estimates are identified. (MCW)

  19. Rangelands: a closing carbon sink?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Two thirds of the world's agricultural land is suitable for grazing only. Much of this land has experienced severe erosion due to mismanagement, massive redistribution of soil and sediment, and significant degradation of vegetation. As a consequence, geochemical cycles have changed. Unlike croplands, the impact of degradation on nutrient fluxes is hardly compensated on rangelands, potentially disturbing the carbon cycle because of the declining biomass production and the subsequent conversion of litter into soil organic matter. Over time, the degradation leads to a decline in soil C stocks and, if associated with soil erosion, also to a decline in carbon transfer from soil into sediment sinks. A priory reasoning suggests that during the degradation process, with soil productivity not yet massively affected, the Carbon transfer initially increases because soil erosion rates are also greater than in the non-disturbed system. With most soil degradation in rangelands occurring during the past 200 years, this mechanism on a large part of the global land area could have generated an unintentional terrestrial carbon sink during a time period with increasing industrial CO2 emissions. Using global data on soil degradation, soil erosion, soil carbon stocks and dynamics to simulate their interaction and potential role for rangeland carbon cycles supports the assumption that rangelands may have functioned as a carbon sink, but reveals major uncertainties with regards to the size. This highlights the need to improve our knowledge and understanding of rangeland erosion, landscape change and soil formation, both with regards to the recent past, but also the impacts of their future use and climate.

  20. A heat flow calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Reaction mechanism for nickel-cadmium cell is not known well enough to allow calculation of heat effects. Calorimeter can measure heat absorbed or evolved in cell, by determining amount of external heat that must be supplied to calorimeter to maintain constant flow isothermal heat sink.

  1. Parameterization of Aerosol Sinks in Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The modelers point of view is that the aerosol problem is one of sources, evolution, and sinks. Relative to evolution and sink processes, enormous attention is given to the problem of aerosols sources, whether inventory based (e.g., fossil fuel emissions) or dynamic (e.g., dust, sea salt, biomass burning). On the other hand, aerosol losses in models are a major factor in controlling the aerosol distribution and lifetime. Here we shine some light on how aerosol sinks are treated in modern chemical transport models. We discuss the mechanisms of dry and wet loss processes and the parameterizations for those processes in a single model (GEOS-5). We survey the literature of other modeling studies. We additionally compare the budgets of aerosol losses in several of the ICAP models.

  2. The Arctic Ocean carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGilchrist, G. A.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.; Tsubouchi, T.; Bacon, S.; Torres-Valdés, S.; Azetsu-Scott, K.

    2014-04-01

    We present observation based estimates of the transport of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) across the four main Arctic Ocean gateways (Davis Strait, Fram Strait, Barents Sea Opening and Bering Strait). Combining a recently derived velocity field at these boundaries with measurements of DIC, we calculated a net summertime pan-Arctic export of 231±49 Tg C yr-1. On an annual basis, we estimate that at least 166±60 Tg C yr-1 of this is due to uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere, although time-dependent changes in carbon storage are not quantified. To further understand the region's role as a carbon sink, we calculated the volume-conserved net DIC transport from beneath a prescribed mixed layer depth of 50 m, referred to as ‘interior transport', revealing an export of 61±23 Tg C yr-1. Applying a carbon framework to infer the sources of interior transport implied that this export is primarily due to the sinking and remineralisation of organic matter, highlighting the importance of the biological pump. Furthermore, we qualitatively show that the present day Arctic Ocean is accumulating anthropogenic carbon beneath the mixed layer, imported in Atlantic Water.

  3. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, S.; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100-180 K. The apparatus is cooled by a two-stage GM cooler and the temperature is controlled with a heater and a braided copper wire connection. A thermal guard is mounted on the hot side of the device to confine the heat flow axially through the sample. A gas handling system allows testing the device with different gas pressures in the heat switch. Experiments are performed at various heat sink temperatures, by varying gas pressure in the gas-gap and with helium, hydrogen and nitrogen gas. The measured off-conductance with a heat sink temperature of 115 K and the hot plate at 120 K is 0.134 W/K, the on-conductance with helium and hydrogen gases at the same temperatures is 4.80 W/K and 4.71 W/K, respectively. This results in an on/off conductance ratio of 37 ± 7 and 35 ± 6 for helium and hydrogen respectively. The experimental results matches fairly well with the predicted heat conductance at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Tracking sinks of atmospheric methane using small world networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Sheng; Su, Pei-Jen

    2014-12-01

    The present study uses small world network to highlight the key hubs for CH4 atmospheric pathways without considering rate constant of each reaction and concentrations of each species. The atmospheric methane sources and sinks were formulated into a well-organized network of 49 nodes and 302 links. In the network, reactions (including substrates and products) are considered as nodes and their pathways as links. Using a small world model, we analyzed the weighted and directed network of methane sources and sinks. By analyzing the characteristic path length, clustering coefficient, and degree distribution, we obtained insights into the methane network. The results indicate that only a few key nodes serve as hubs or limiting reactions, such as CH4 + OH → CH3 + H2O; HO2 + NO → NO2 + OH; CH3O2H → CH3O + OH; and CH4 + Cl → CH3 + HCl. The network is highly efficient; when key hub reactions experience interruptions, pathways to other nodes can be accessed to complete the methane degradation process. Additionally, our directed network keeps sources and sinks independent of each other such that changes in the number or type of methane sources does not affect the findings related to sinks. Tracking the structure of methane sources and sinks not only provides valuable, and perhaps universal, information about the network structure, but also can lead to a better understanding of the dynamic processes that generate the network. Finally, this is the first attempt of the network model in analyzing environmental issues and may represent a common blueprint for the interconnected reactions (sources and sinks) of other greenhouse gases.

  5. Effect of heat treatment, pH, sugar concentration, and metal addition on green color retention in homogenized puree of Thompson seedless grape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homogenized puree of Thompson seedless (Vitis vinifera ‘Thompson Seedless’) grape was treated under different conditions, including heating time (5-30 min), temperature (20-80°C) and pH (2-10). Treatments with separate additions of glucose, fructose, and sucrose at concentrations of 100-600 g/L and ...

  6. Effect of cerium addition on casting/chill interfacial heat flux and casting surface profile during solidification of Al-14%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, Al-14 wt. % Si alloy was solidified against copper, brass and cast iron chills, to study the effect of Ce melt treatment on casting/chill interfacial heat flux transients and casting surface profile. The heat flux across the casting/chill interface was estimated using inverse modelling technique. On addition of 1.5% Ce, the peak heat flux increased by about 38%, 42% and 43% for copper, brass and cast iron chills respectively. The effect of Ce addition on casting surface texture was analyzed using a surface profilometer. The surface profile of the casting and the chill surfaces clearly indicated the formation of an air gap at the periphery of the casting. The arithmetic average value of the profile departure from the mean line (Ra) and arithmetical mean of the absolute departures of the waviness profile from the centre line (Wa) were found to decrease on Ce addition. The interfacial gap width formed for the unmodified and Ce treated casting surfaces at the periphery were found to be about 35µm and 13µm respectively. The enhancement in heat transfer on addition of Ce addition was attributed to the lowering of the surface tension of the liquid melt. The gap width at the interface was used to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) across the chill surface after the formation of stable solid shell. It was found that the HTC decreased along the radial direction for copper and brass chills and increased along radial direction for cast iron chills.

  7. Additional heat treatment of non-porous coatings obtained on medium carbon steel substrates by electron beam cladding of a Ti-Mo-C powder composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mul, D. O.; Drobyaz, E. A.; Zimoglyadova, T. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Lazurenko, D. V.; Shevtsova, L. I.

    2016-04-01

    The structure and microhardness of surface layers, obtained by non-vacuum electron beam cladding of Ti-Mo-C powder mixture on a steel substrate after different types of heat treatment, were investigated. After cladding samples were heat treated in a furnace at 200...500 °C, as well as quenched at 860 ° C and then underwent high-temperature tempering. Heat treatment of cladded coatings induced tempering of martensite and precipitation of cementite particles (Fe3C). Transmission electron microscopy of the samples after heating and holding at 300 ° C revealed precipitation of nanosized cubical TiC particles. The formation of hard nanosized particles led to the surface layer microhardness growth. The highest level of microhardness (which was 1.2...1.5-fold higher in comparison with coating microhardness after heat treatment) was achieved after heating of the claded material at 300 °C and 400 °C Additional quenching of samples at 860 °C did not increase the microhardness level.

  8. N-Sink: A Tool to Identify Nitrogen Sources and Sinks within aWatershed Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    N-Sink is a customized ArcMap© program that provides maps of N sourcesand sinks within a watershed, and estimates the delivery efficiency of N movement from sources to the watershed outlet. The primary objective of N-Sink is to assist land use planners, watershed managers, and la...

  9. Experimental Breeder Reactor II inherent shutdown and heat removal tests - test results and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Planchon, H.P.; Singer, R.M.; Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Chang, L.K.; Betten, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    A test program is being conducted to demonstrate that a power producing Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) can passively remove shutdown heat by natural convection; passively reduce power in response to a loss of reactor flow and passively reduce power in response to a loss of the balance of plant heat sink. Measurements and pretest predictions confirm that natural convection is a reliable, predictable method of shutdown heat removal and suggest that safety-related pumps or pony motors are not necessary for safe, shutdown heat removal in a LMR. Measurements from tests in which reactor flow and heat rejection to the balance of plant were perturbed show that reactivity feedbacks can passively control power and temperature. This data is a basis for additional tests including a complete loss-of-flow without scram and a complete loss of heat sink without scram.

  10. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A.

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences.more » For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.« less

  11. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A.

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences. For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.

  12. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences. For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.

  13. [Effects of technological additives and heating range on some chemical and physical changes in canned meat. 2. Changes in redox potentials and selected quality characteristics].

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, J; Pikul, J; Janitz, W

    1976-01-01

    The influence of technological additives and the range of heating on the redox potential, as well as on some quality features of canned meat was examined. The experiments showed, that the time of storage and the degree of heating of model preserves of meat influence on the redox potential. The technological additions as polyphosphates, ascorbic acid, gelatine and mixtures of these substances influence less on the redox potential. The analysis of each experimental factor showed, that on the secretion of meat juice occurring during can pasteurization or sterilization influence all experimental factors, as the kind of heating, the time of storage as well as the kind and the quantity of technological additives. The highest secretion of meat juice was found in cans with addition of ascorbic acid. Cans with addition of gelatine had the smallest content of jelly and consequently the lowest secretion of meat juice. It was also found a certain relation between the level of redox potential and the tested quality features of the model meat preserves.

  14. Measured effects of retrofits -- a refrigerant oil additive and a condenser spray device -- on the cooling performance of a heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Sand, J.R.; Baxter, V.D.; Linkous, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    A 15-year old, 3-ton single package air-to-air heat pump was tested in laboratory environmental chambers simulating indoor and outdoor conditions. After documenting initial performance, the unit was retrofitted with a prototype condenser water-spray device and retested. Results at standard ARI cooling rating conditions (95 F outdoor dry bulb and 80/67 F indoor dry bulb/wet bulb temperatures) showed the capacity increased by about 7%, and the electric power demand dropped by about 8%, resulting in a steady-state EER increase of 17%. Suction and discharge pressures were reduced by 7 and 37 psi, respectively. A refrigerant oil additive formulated to enhance refrigerant-side heat transfer was added at a dose of one ounce per ton of rated capacity, and the unit was tested for several days at the same 95 F outdoor conditions and showed essentially no increase in capacity, and a slight 3% increase in steady-state EER. Adding more additive lowered the EER slightly. Suction and discharge pressures were essentially unchanged. The short-term testing showed that the condenser-spray device was effective in increasing the cooling capacity and lowering the electrical demand on an old and relatively inefficient heat pump, but the refrigerant additive had little effect on the cooling performance of the unit. Sprayer issues to be resolved include the effect of a sprayer on a new, high-efficiency air conditioner/heat pump, reliable long-term operation, and economics.

  15. Improving high temperature creep resistance of reduced activation steels by addition of nitrogen and intermediate heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. B.; Zhang, C.; Xia, Z. X.; Yang, Z. G.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we report an enhanced high-temperature creep resistance in reduced activation ferrite/martensite (RAFM) steels, by introducing nitrogen (0.035 wt%, M3 steel) and employing a novel intermediate heat treatment I-Q-T (intermediate treatment, quenching and tempering). In comparison with all the control groups, the uniaxial tests of the I-Q-T treated M3 steel showed significant increase in rupture time and decrease in elongation. The microstructures of the samples were further characterized to elucidate the origin of the enhanced creep resistance. It is found that, by introducing nitrogen, the primary TaC particles were refined; by employing the I-Q-T heat treatment, the dispersed fine secondary MX precipitates, as well as the lath subgrains containing high-density dislocations, were increased: all are responsible for the improved creep resistance.

  16. Causes of sinks near Tucson, Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffmann, J.P.; Pool, D.R.; Konieczki, A.D.; Carpenter, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    Land subsidence in the form of sinks has occurred on and near farmlands near Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, USA. The sinks occur in alluvial deposits along the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River, and have made farmlands dangerous and unsuitable for farming. More than 1700 sinks are confined to the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River and are grouped along two north-northwestward-trending bands that are approximately parallel to the river and other flood-plain drainages. An estimated 17,000 m3 of sediment have been removed in the formation of the sinks. Thirteen trenches were dug to depths of 4-6 m to characterize near-surface sediments in sink and nonsink areas. Sediments below about 2 m included a large percentage of dispersive clays in sink areas. Sediments in nonsink areas contain a large component of medium- to coarse-grained, moderately to well sorted sand that probably fills a paleochannel. Electromagnetic surveys support the association of silts and clays in sink areas that are highly electrically conductive relative to sand in nonsink areas. Sinks probably are caused by the near-surface process of subsurface erosion of dispersive sediments along pre-existing cracks in predominantly silt and clay sediments. The pre-existing cracks probably result from desiccation or tension that developed during periods of water-table decline and channel incision during the past 100 years or in earlier periods.

  17. SOURCES AND SINKS OF NEUTRALS AND PLASMA IN THE SATURNIAN MAGNETOSPHERE (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    This talk will review current knowledge on the source and sinks of plasm and energy in Saturn's magnetosphere. Enceladus dominates the water group source, with most of the material escaping from the plume near the southern pole. The relatively low corotation energy in this region results in less energy being available to heat electrons. The electrons are too cold to ionize the neutrals and the inner magnetosphere is dominated by neutrals. In addition, Saturn's atmosphere is a large source of neutral H, the rings contribute O2, and Titan is a source whose magnitude is controversial. In the inner magnetosphere most particles and energy are removed as fast neutrals; transport is more important further out and may be dominated by fingers of inflow and outflow as at Jupiter.

  18. Simultaneous measurements of the specific heat and thermal conductivity of suspended thin samples by transient electrothermal method.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Ma, Weigang; Li, Zhixin; Zhang, Xing

    2009-06-01

    The electrothermal technique is developed to simultaneously measure the specific heat and thermal conductivity of individual thin samples suspended across two heat sinks, resorting to pulsed direct currents with or without a dc offset. The temperature evolution due to Joule self-heating is recorded and compared with the numerical solutions of transient heat conduction equations using the finite volume method. The thermal conductivity is determined by the steady temperature level and the specific heat by the transient temperature rise or relaxation. This technique is applied to a 10 microm thick platinum wire and the thermal conductivity and specific heat are in good agreement with the literature values. In addition, the influences of thermal radiation and thermal boundary resistance between the sample and heat sinks on the experimental results are discussed. PMID:19566218

  19. Inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella senftenberg in liquid whole egg using generally recognized as safe additives, ionizing radiation, and heat.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ignacio; Niemira, Brendan A; Fan, Xuetong; Sommers, Christopher H

    2007-06-01

    The effect of combining irradiation and heat (i.e., irradiation followed by heat [IR-H]) on Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Senftenberg inoculated into liquid whole egg (LWE) with added nisin, EDTA, sorbic acid, carvacrol, or combinations of these GRAS (generally recognized as safe) additives was investigated. Synergistic reductions of Salmonella populations were observed when LWE samples containing GRAS additives were treated by gamma radiation (0.3 and 1.0 kGy), heat (57 and 60 degrees C), or IR-H. The presence of additives reduced the initial radiation Dgamma -values (radiation doses required to eliminate 90% of the viable cells) by 1.2- to 1.5-fold, the thermal decimal reduction times (D,-values) by up to 3.5- and 1.8-fold at 57 and 60 degrees C, respectively, and the thermal D,-values after irradiation treatments by up to 3.4- and 1.5-fold at 57 and 60 degrees C, respectively, for both Salmonella serovars. Of all the additives investigated, nisin at a concentration of 100 IU/ml was the most effective at reducing the heat treatment times needed to obtain a 5-log reduction of Salmonella. Thus, while treatments of 21.6 min at 57 degrees C or of 5 min at 60 degrees C should be applied to achieve a 5-log reduction for Salmonella in LWE, only 5.5 min at 57 degrees C or 2.3 min at 60 degrees C after a 0.3-kGy radiation pretreatment was required when nisin at a concentration of 100 IU/ml was used. The synergistic reduction of Salmonella viability by IR-H treatments in the presence of GRAS additives could enable LWE producers to reduce the temperature or processing time of thermal treatments (current standards are 60'C for 3.5 min in the United States) or to increase the level of Salmonella inactivation.

  20. Mechanism of coercivity enhancement by Ag addition in FePt-C granular films for heat assisted magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Varaprasad, B. S. D. Ch. S.; Takahashi, Y. K. Wang, J.; Hono, K.; Ina, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ueno, W.; Nitta, K.; Uruga, T.

    2014-06-02

    We investigated the Ag distribution in a FePtAg-C granular film that is under consideration for a heat assisted magnetic recording medium by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure. Ag is rejected from the core of FePt grains during the deposition, forming Ag-enriched shell surrounding L1{sub 0}-ordered FePt grains. Since Ag has no solubility in both Fe and Pt, the rejection of Ag induces atomic diffusions thereby enhancing the kinetics of the L1{sub 0}-order in the FePt grains.

  1. Conducting the Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Heat conduction plays an important role in the efficiency and life span of electronic components. To keep electronic components running efficiently and at a proper temperature, thermal management systems transfer heat generated from the components to thermal surfaces such as heat sinks, heat pipes, radiators, or heat spreaders. Thermal surfaces absorb the heat from the electrical components and dissipate it into the environment, preventing overheating. To ensure the best contact between electrical components and thermal surfaces, thermal interface materials are applied. In addition to having high conductivity, ideal thermal interface materials should be compliant to conform to the components, increasing the surface contact. While many different types of interface materials exist for varying purposes, Energy Science Laboratories, Inc. (ESLI), of San Diego, California, proposed using carbon velvets as thermal interface materials for general aerospace and electronics applications. NASA s Johnson Space Center granted ESLI a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to develop thermal interface materials that are lightweight and compliant, and demonstrate high thermal conductance even for nonflat surfaces. Through Phase II SBIR work, ESLI created Vel-Therm for the commercial market. Vel-Therm is a soft, carbon fiber velvet consisting of numerous high thermal conductivity carbon fibers anchored in a thin layer of adhesive. The velvets are fabricated by precision cutting continuous carbon fiber tows and electrostatically flocking the fibers into uncured adhesive, using proprietary techniques.

  2. Non-additive response of blends of rice and potato starch during heating at intermediate water contents: A differential scanning calorimetry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Geertrui M; Pareyt, Bram; Delcour, Jan A

    2016-02-01

    The impact of different hydration levels, on gelatinization of potato starch (PS), rice starch (RS) and a 1:1 blend thereof, was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and related to nuclear magnetic resonance proton distributions of hydrated samples, before and after heating. At 20% or 30% hydration, the visual appearance of all samples was that of a wet powder, and limited, if any, gelatinization occurred upon heating. At 30% hydration, changes in proton distributions were observed and related to plasticization of amorphous regions in the granules. At 50% hydration, the PS-RS blend appeared more liquid-like than other hydrated samples and showed more pronounced gelatinization than expected based on additive behavior of pure starches. This was due to an additional mobile water fraction in the unheated PS-RS blend, originating from differences in water distribution due to altered stacking of granules and/or altered hydration of PS due to presence of cations in RS.

  3. Additive Manufacturing/Diagnostics via the High Frequency Induction Heating of Metal Powders: The Determination of the Power Transfer Factor for Fine Metallic Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Caravias, George; Holcomb, Matthew

    2015-03-11

    Grid Logic Inc. is developing a method for sintering and melting fine metallic powders for additive manufacturing using spatially-compact, high-frequency magnetic fields called Micro-Induction Sintering (MIS). One of the challenges in advancing MIS technology for additive manufacturing is in understanding the power transfer to the particles in a powder bed. This knowledge is important to achieving efficient power transfer, control, and selective particle heating during the MIS process needed for commercialization of the technology. The project s work provided a rigorous physics-based model for induction heating of fine spherical particles as a function of frequency and particle size. This simulation improved upon Grid Logic s earlier models and provides guidance that will make the MIS technology more effective. The project model will be incorporated into Grid Logic s power control circuit of the MIS 3D printer product and its diagnostics technology to optimize the sintering process for part quality and energy efficiency.

  4. Chemical TOPAZ: Modifications to the heat transfer code TOPAZ: The addition of chemical reaction kinetics and chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A.L. III.

    1990-06-07

    This is a report describing the modifications which have been made to the heat flow code TOPAZ to allow the inclusion of thermally controlled chemical kinetics. This report is broken into parts. The first part is an introduction to the general assumptions and theoretical underpinning that were used to develop the model. The second section describes the changes that have been implemented into the code. The third section is the users manual for the input for the code. The fourth section is a compilation of hints, common errors, and things to be aware of while you are getting started. The fifth section gives a sample problem using the new code. This manual addenda is written with the presumption that most readers are not fluent with chemical concepts. Therefore, we shall in this section endeavor to describe the requirements that must be met before chemistry can occur and how we have modeled the chemistry in the code.

  5. Sources and sinks for atmospheric N2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, M. B.; Elkins, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Yung, Y. L.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the temporal and spatial distribution of N2O in solution are not yet sufficient to permit quantitative assessment of the role of the ocean in the budget of atmospheric N2O. Consideration of the global nitrogen cycle suggests that the land should be the primary source of N2O. The gas is removed in the atmosphere by photolysis and by reaction with O(1D), and there may be additional sinks in the ocean.

  6. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  7. Optimization of microwave heating in an existing cubicle cavity by incorporating additional wave guide and control components

    SciTech Connect

    Erle, R.R.; Eschen, V.G.; Sprenger, G.S.

    1995-04-01

    The use of microwave energy to thermally treat Low Level (LLW), Transuranic (TRU), and mixed waste has been under development at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) since 1986. During that time, the technology has progressed from bench-scale tests, through pilot-scale tests, and finally to a full-scale demonstration unit. Experimental operations have been conducted on a variety of non-radioactive surrogates and actual radioactive waste forms. Through these studies and development efforts, the Microwave Vitrification Engineering Team (MVET) at Rocky Flats has successfully proven the application of microwave energy for waste treatment operations. In the microwave solidification process, microwave energy is used to heat a mixture of waste and glass frit to produce a vitrified product that meets all the current acceptance criteria at the final disposal sites. All of the development to date has utilized a multi-mode microwave system to provide the energy to treat the materials. Currently, evaluations are underway on modifications to the full-scale demonstration system that provide a single-mode operation as a possible method to optimize the system. This poster presentation describes the modifications made to allow the single-mode operation.

  8. Offshore structure and method of sinking same

    SciTech Connect

    Fern, D. T.

    1985-02-05

    An offshore structure and a method of skinking it to the sea bed. In accordance with one aspect of this invention, the structure is sunk asymmetrically by first sinking a first end portion thereof and then sinking the other end portion. The first end portion is sunk by ballasting it while the other end portion is closed to ballast. The structure is provided with sufficient water plane area while sinking each end portion to maintain stability during the sinking process. In accordance with another aspect of this invention, at least two spaced-apart piles are provided at the end corresponding to the first end portion to absorb the force of impact with the sea bed and to maintain a skirt on the structure out of contact with the sea bed until both ends of the structure have been sunk to the sea bed.

  9. Influence of additives on the increase of the heating value of Bayah's coal with upgrading brown coal (UBC) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heriyanto, Heri; Widya Ernayati, K.; Umam, Chairul; Margareta, Nita

    2015-12-01

    UBC (upgrading brown coal) is a method of improving the quality of coal by using oil as an additive. Through processing in the oil media, not just the calories that increase, but there is also water repellent properties and a decrease in the tendency of spontaneous combustion of coal products produced. The results showed a decrease in the water levels of natural coal bayah reached 69%, increase in calorific value reached 21.2%. Increased caloric value and reduced water content caused by the water molecules on replacing seal the pores of coal by oil and atoms C on the oil that is bound to increase the percentage of coal carbon. As a result of this experiment is, the produced coal has better calorific value, the increasing of this new calorific value up to 23.8% with the additive waste lubricant, and the moisture content reduced up to 69.45%.

  10. Marine submicron aerosol gradients, sources and sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceburnis, Darius; Rinaldi, Matteo; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Martucci, Giovanni; Giulianelli, Lara; O'Dowd, Colin D.

    2016-10-01

    Aerosol principal sources and sinks over eastern North Atlantic waters were studied through the deployment of an aerosol chemistry gradient sampling system. The chemical gradients of primary and secondary aerosol components - specifically, sea salt (SS), water-insoluble organic matter (WIOM), water-soluble organic matter (WSOM), nitrate, ammonium, oxalate, amines, methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) - were examined in great detail. Sea salt fluxes were estimated by the boundary layer box model and ranged from 0.3 to 3.5 ng m-2 s-1 over the wind speed range of 5-12 m s-1 and compared well with the derived fluxes from existing sea salt source parameterisations. The observed seasonal pattern of sea salt gradients was mainly driven by wind stress in addition to the yet unquantified effect of marine OM modifying fractional contributions of SS and OM in sea spray. WIOM gradients were a complex combination of rising and waning biological activity, especially in the flux footprint area, and wind-driven primary sea spray production supporting the coupling of recently developed sea spray and marine OM parameterisations.

  11. On the one-dimensional theory of steady compressible fluid flow in ducts with friction and heat addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Bruce L; Montgomery, Donald; Wasserman, Robert H

    1947-01-01

    Steady, diabatic (nonadiabatic), frictional, variable-area flow of a compressible fluid is treated in differential form on the basis of the one-dimensional approximation. The basic equations are first stated in terms of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity of the fluid. Considerable simplification and unification of the equations are then achieved by choosing the square of the local Mach number as one of the variables to describe the flow. The transformed system of equations thus obtained is first examined with regard to the existence of a solution. It is shown that, in general, a solution exists whose calculation requires knowledge only of the variation with position of any three of the dependent variables of the system. The direction of change of the flow variables can be obtained directly from the transformed equations without integration. As examples of this application of the equations, the direction of change of the flow variables is determined for two special flows. In the particular case when the local Mach number m = 1, a special condition must be satisfied by the flow if a solution is to exist. This condition restricts the joint rate of variation of heating, friction, and area at m = 1. Further analysis indicates that when a solution exists at this point it is not necessarily unique. Finally it is shown that the physical phenomenon of choking, which is known to occur in certain simple flow situations, is related to restrictions imposed on the variables by the form of the transformed equations. The phenomenon of choking is thus given a more general significance in that the transformed equations apply to a more general type of flow than has hitherto been treated. (author)

  12. Additional ECR heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma via the absorption of satellite harmonics of the surface flute modes in a rippled magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, V. O.; Girka, I. O.

    2006-12-15

    A theoretical study is made of the possibility of additional heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma in confinement systems with a rippled magnetic field via the absorption of satellite harmonics of the surface flute modes with frequencies below the electron gyrofrequency in the local resonance region, {epsilon}{sub 1} (r{sub 1}) = [2{pi}c/({omega}L)]{sup 2}, where {epsilon}{sub 1} is the diagonal element of the plasma dielectric tensor in the hydrodynamic approximation, L is the period of a constant external rippled magnetic field, and the radical coordinate r{sub 1} determines the position of the local resonance. It is found that the high-frequency power absorbed near the local resonance is proportional to the square of the ripple amplitude of the external magnetic field. The mechanism proposed is shown to ensure the absorption of the energy of surface flute modes and, thereby, the heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma.

  13. Heat treatment and the use of additives to improve the stability of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in shellfish tissue reference materials for internal quality control and proficiency testing.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Stephen; Clion, Valentin; Auroy, Virginie; Foley, Barry; Turner, Andrew D

    2015-06-01

    The need for homogenous reference materials stable for paralytic shellfish toxins is vital for the monitoring and quality assurance of these potent neurotoxins in shellfish. Two stabilisation techniques were investigated, heat treatment through autoclaving and the addition of preserving additives into the tissue matrix. Short and long-term stability experiments as well as homogeneity determination were conducted on materials prepared by both techniques in comparison with an untreated control using two LC-FLD methods. Both techniques improved the stability of the matrix and the PSP toxins present compared to the controls. A material was prepared using the combined techniques of heat treatment followed by spiking with additives and data is presented from this optimised reference material as used over a two year period in the Irish national monitoring program and in a development exercise as part of a proficiency testing scheme operated by QUASIMEME (Quality Assurance of Information for Marine Environmental Monitoring in Europe) since 2011. The results were indicative of the long-term stability of the material as evidenced through consistent assigned values in the case of the proficiency testing scheme and a low relative standard deviation of 10.5% for total toxicity data generated over 24 months.

  14. 18. DETAIL OF COMBINATION HANDWASH SINK/KNIFE STERILIZER ON SPLITTERS' PLATFORM; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL OF COMBINATION HANDWASH SINK/KNIFE STERILIZER ON SPLITTERS' PLATFORM; KNIVES AND CLEAVERS WERE CLEANED FREQUENTLY BY DIPPING THEM INTO STEAM-HEATED WATER IN THE RECTANGULAR TANK; NOTE FOOT-OPERATED FAUCETS - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  15. Green technology effect of injection pressure, timing and compression ratio in constant pressure heat addition cycle by an eco-friendly material.

    PubMed

    Karthikayan, S; Sankaranarayanan, G; Karthikeyan, R

    2015-11-01

    Present energy strategies focus on environmental issues, especially environmental pollution prevention and control by eco-friendly green technologies. This includes, increase in the energy supplies, encouraging cleaner and more efficient energy management, addressing air pollution, greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change. Biofuels provide the panorama of new fiscal opportunities for people in rural area for meeting their need and also the demand of the local market. Biofuels concern protection of the environment and job creation. Renewable energy sources are self-reliance resources, have the potential in energy management with less emissions of air pollutants. Biofuels are expected to reduce dependability on imported crude oil with connected economic susceptibility, reduce greenhouse gases, other pollutants and invigorate the economy by increasing demand and prices for agricultural products. The use of neat paradise tree oil and induction of eco-friendly material Hydrogen through inlet manifold in a constant pressure heat addition cycle engine (diesel engine) with optimized engine operating parameters such as injection timing, injection pressure and compression ratio. The results shows the heat utilization efficiency for neat vegetable oil is 29% and neat oil with 15% Hydrogen as 33%. The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) for 15% of H2 share as 450°C at full load and the heat release of 80J/deg. crank angle for 15% Hydrogen energy share.

  16. Green technology effect of injection pressure, timing and compression ratio in constant pressure heat addition cycle by an eco-friendly material.

    PubMed

    Karthikayan, S; Sankaranarayanan, G; Karthikeyan, R

    2015-11-01

    Present energy strategies focus on environmental issues, especially environmental pollution prevention and control by eco-friendly green technologies. This includes, increase in the energy supplies, encouraging cleaner and more efficient energy management, addressing air pollution, greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change. Biofuels provide the panorama of new fiscal opportunities for people in rural area for meeting their need and also the demand of the local market. Biofuels concern protection of the environment and job creation. Renewable energy sources are self-reliance resources, have the potential in energy management with less emissions of air pollutants. Biofuels are expected to reduce dependability on imported crude oil with connected economic susceptibility, reduce greenhouse gases, other pollutants and invigorate the economy by increasing demand and prices for agricultural products. The use of neat paradise tree oil and induction of eco-friendly material Hydrogen through inlet manifold in a constant pressure heat addition cycle engine (diesel engine) with optimized engine operating parameters such as injection timing, injection pressure and compression ratio. The results shows the heat utilization efficiency for neat vegetable oil is 29% and neat oil with 15% Hydrogen as 33%. The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) for 15% of H2 share as 450°C at full load and the heat release of 80J/deg. crank angle for 15% Hydrogen energy share. PMID:26025643

  17. Effectiveness: N(sub TU) relationships for the design and performance evaluation of additional shell-and-tube heat exchanger geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-11-01

    This Data Item 88021, an addition to the Sub-series on Heat Transfer, complements ESDU 86018 by extending the range of configurations covered there and in particular considering the effect of using small numbers of baffles for E- and J-shells and the use of J-shells in series. It also explores the limitations of the assumptions associated with the effectiveness - N(sub TU) method and shows where those assumptions break down. The curves presented for each exchanger geometry show the locus of designs for which a temperature cross may occur and the locus of 95 percent heat transfer effectiveness which indicates the region of uneconomic design. The method assumes a linear temperature/enthalpy relationship (constant specific heat capacity) for both streams. It applies to boiling or condensing flow of a single component with no temperature change, or boiling and condensing flow of a mixture that is always two-phase. It excludes conditions in which transition from single- to two-phase flow occurs. However, by use of average property values, it is possible to extend the method to apply to cases where there is some variation of physical and thermodynamic properties with temperature.

  18. [Carbon storage and carbon sink of mangrove wetland: research progress].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Guo, Zhi-hua; Li, Zhi-yong

    2013-04-01

    Mangrove forest is a special wetland forest growing in the inter-tidal zone of tropical and subtropical regions, playing important roles in windbreak, promoting silt sedimentation, resisting extreme events such as cyclones and tsunamis, and protecting coastline, etc. The total area of global mangrove forests is about 152000 km2, only accounting for 0. 4% of all forest area. There are about 230 km2 mangrove forests in China. The mangrove forests in the tropics have an average carbon storage as high as 1023 Mg hm-2, and the global mangrove forests can sequestrate about 0. 18-0. 228 Pg C a-1. In addition to plant species composition, a variety of factors such as air temperature, seawater temperature and salinity, soil physical and chemical properties, atmospheric CO2 concentration, and human activities have significant effects on the carbon storage and sink ability of mangrove forests. Many approaches based onfield measurements, including allometric equations, remote sensing, and model simulation, are applied to quantify the carbon storage and sink ability of mangrove forest wetland. To study the carbon storage and sink ability of mangrove wetland can promote the further understanding of the carbon cycle of mangrove wetland and related controlling mechanisms, being of significance for the protection and rational utilization of mangrove wetland.

  19. [Carbon storage and carbon sink of mangrove wetland: research progress].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Guo, Zhi-hua; Li, Zhi-yong

    2013-04-01

    Mangrove forest is a special wetland forest growing in the inter-tidal zone of tropical and subtropical regions, playing important roles in windbreak, promoting silt sedimentation, resisting extreme events such as cyclones and tsunamis, and protecting coastline, etc. The total area of global mangrove forests is about 152000 km2, only accounting for 0. 4% of all forest area. There are about 230 km2 mangrove forests in China. The mangrove forests in the tropics have an average carbon storage as high as 1023 Mg hm-2, and the global mangrove forests can sequestrate about 0. 18-0. 228 Pg C a-1. In addition to plant species composition, a variety of factors such as air temperature, seawater temperature and salinity, soil physical and chemical properties, atmospheric CO2 concentration, and human activities have significant effects on the carbon storage and sink ability of mangrove forests. Many approaches based onfield measurements, including allometric equations, remote sensing, and model simulation, are applied to quantify the carbon storage and sink ability of mangrove forest wetland. To study the carbon storage and sink ability of mangrove wetland can promote the further understanding of the carbon cycle of mangrove wetland and related controlling mechanisms, being of significance for the protection and rational utilization of mangrove wetland. PMID:23898678

  20. Preparation of a biphasic porous bioceramic by heating bovine cancellous bone with Na4P2O7.10H2O addition.

    PubMed

    Lin, F H; Liao, C J; Chen, K S; Sun, J S

    1999-03-01

    Sintered bovine cancellous bone exhibited excellent biocompatiblity, high porosity and have an interconnecting porous structure allowing for bone ingrowth. However, the main mineral constitution of sintered bovine bone-hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP) seems to be too stable in vivo. For improving its bioactivity, the calcined bovine bone removing the organic substance by burning process-with different quantities of sodium pyrophosphate (Na4P2O7.10H2O, NP) addition was heated to a high temperature to transform its crystalline phase constitution from HAP into TCP/HAP biphasic or other multiphasic structures. Results revealed that the calcined bovine bone without NP addition, exhibited a pure form of HAP characterized pattern during heating. Its thermal behavior was similar to stoichiometric HAP, it gradually lost its OH- ions and transformed into oxyhydroxyapatite at high temperature. After being doped into calcined bovine bone, NP would react with HAP to form betaBTCP and NaCaPO4 around 600 degrees C. At 900 degrees C, doped NP would completely react with HAP and the NaCaPO4 would further react with HAP to form more betaBTCP in the system. With NP increasing in the calcined bovine bone, HAP would gradually convert into different crystalline phase compositions of TCP/HAP, TCP/HAP/NaCaPO4 or TCP/NaCaPO4 at high temperature. By heating calcined bovine cancellouse bone with different quantities of NP we could obtain different crystalline phase compositions of natural porous bioceramic in this study.

  1. The atmospheric partial lifetime of carbon tetrachloride with respect to the global soil sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, Robert C.; Happell, James D.

    2016-03-01

    The magnitude of the terrestrial soil sink for atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) remains poorly constrained, with the estimated uncertainty range of CCl4 partial lifetimes between ~110 and 910 years. Field observations are sparse, and there are uncertainties in extrapolating these results to the global scale. Here we add to the published CCl4 fluxes with additional field measurements, and we employ a land cover classification scheme based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer measurements that align more closely with the measurement sites to reevaluate the global CCl4 soil sink. We calculate an updated partial lifetime of CCl4 with respect to the soil sink to be 375 (288-536) years, which is 50 to 90% longer than the most recently published best estimates of the soil sink partial lifetime (195 and 245 years). This translates into a longer overall atmospheric lifetime estimate, which is more consistent with the observed atmospheric concentration trend and interhemispheric gradient.

  2. The Oceanic Sink for Anthropogenic CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine, Chris; Feely, R. A.; Gruber, N.; Key, Robert; Lee, K.; Bullister, J.L.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wong, C. S.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Tilbrook, B.; Millero, F. J.; Peng, T.-H.; Kozyr, Alexander; Ono, Tsueno

    2004-01-01

    Using inorganic carbon measurements from an international survey effort in the 1990s and a tracer-based separation technique, we estimate a global oceanic anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink for the period from 1800 to 1994 of 118 19 petagrams of carbon. The oceanic sink accounts for ~48% of the total fossil-fuel and cement-manufacturing emissions, implying that the terrestrial biosphere was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of about 39 28 petagrams of carbon for this period. The current fraction of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions stored in the ocean appears to be about one-third of the long-term potential.

  3. Late-stage sinking of plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glazner, A.F.; Miller, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Many granodiorite to diorite plutons in the Great Basin of western North America are surrounded by rim monoclines or anticlines that suggest relative downward movement of the plutons while wall rocks were hot and ductile. We propose that such plutons rise to a level of approximately neutral buoyancy and then founder as their densities increase ??? 40% during crystallization. Late-stage sinking of intermediate to mafic plutons should be common when wall rocks are rich in weak, low-density minerals such as quartz and calcite. Structures related to sinking will overprint those related to initial pluton emplacement and may be mistaken for regional tectonic structures.

  4. The oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2.

    PubMed

    Sabine, Christopher L; Feely, Richard A; Gruber, Nicolas; Key, Robert M; Lee, Kitack; Bullister, John L; Wanninkhof, Rik; Wong, C S; Wallace, Douglas W R; Tilbrook, Bronte; Millero, Frank J; Peng, Tsung-Hung; Kozyr, Alexander; Ono, Tsueno; Rios, Aida F

    2004-07-16

    Using inorganic carbon measurements from an international survey effort in the 1990s and a tracer-based separation technique, we estimate a global oceanic anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink for the period from 1800 to 1994 of 118 +/- 19 petagrams of carbon. The oceanic sink accounts for approximately 48% of the total fossil-fuel and cement-manufacturing emissions, implying that the terrestrial biosphere was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of about 39 +/- 28 petagrams of carbon for this period. The current fraction of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions stored in the ocean appears to be about one-third of the long-term potential.

  5. Vapors-liquid phase separator. [infrared telescope heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Brown, G. S.; Chuang, C.; Kamioka, Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Lee, J. M.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1980-01-01

    The use of porous plugs, mostly with in the form of passive devices with constant area were considered as vapor-liquid phase separators for helium 2 storage vessels under reduced gravity. The incorporation of components with variable cross sectional area as a method of flow rate modification was also investigated. A particular device which uses a shutter-type system for area variation was designed and constructed. This system successfully permitted flor rate changes of up to plus or minus 60% from its mean value.

  6. Diffusion and reaction for a spherical source and sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Nyrée; Strieder, William

    2003-03-01

    Two chemically active spheres in an infinite medium, one a zeroth-order reactant source and the other a first-order sink, are considered for various sphere size ratios, center-to-center distances, and sink strengths from chemical to diffusion controlled conditions. This source-sink model simulates some aspects of biological mutualism interactions between different cells. Infinite series expansions in a single index n are obtained for the sink reaction rate and reactant concentration profiles using the bispherical expansion. Each of the coefficients, generated exactly by a matrix elimination method, is expressed in terms of nested, continued fractions easily evaluated for the given n. At intermediate and larger sink-source separation distances the sink reaction rate decays harmonically. For smaller sink-source separations with a highly reactive small sink, a local maximum in the sink reaction rate is found.

  7. Capillary-Condenser-Pumped Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1989-01-01

    Heat being transferred supplies operating power. Capillary-condenser-pumped heat-transfer loop similar to heat pipe and to capillary-evaporator-pumped heat-transfer loop in that heat-transfer fluid pumped by evaporation and condensation of fluid at heat source and sink, respectively. Capillary condenser pump combined with capillary evaporator pump to form heat exchanger circulating heat-transfer fluids in both loops. Transport of heat more nearly isothermal. Thermal stress in loop reduced, and less external surface area needed in condenser section for rejection of heat to heat sink.

  8. Gypsum Wallboard as a sink for formaldehyde

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) has been of special concern as an indoor air pollutant because of its presence in a wide range of consumer products and its adverse health effects. Materials acting as HCHO sinks, such as painted gypsum wallboard, can become emission sources. However, adsorpti...

  9. Effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and properties of dense AlN sintered with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.; Dutta, G.; Dutta, I.

    1995-09-01

    The secondary phase constitution in two sintered AlN ceramics (1.8% and 4.2% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions) was studied as a function of heat treatment temperatures between 1,750 and 1,900 C under pure nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of the phase constitution on the physical properties, such ad density, thermal conductivity (K), and lattice constants, and on the mechanical properties in three-point bending, was also investigated. Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} was found to getter dissolved oxygen from the AlN lattice below 1,850 C, but evaporated at 1,850 C and above. Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} appeared to sublimate below 1,850 C in the atmosphere used in this study. Depending on the secondary phase constitution, heat treatment affected thermal conductivity favorably or adversely. Occasionally, samples with similar lattice oxygen contents were found to have different thermal conductivities, suggesting that factors besides dissolved oxygen can also influence K. Lattice parameter measurements indicated that, within the small range of lattice oxygen concentrations in the AlN samples studied, the c-axis was more sensitive than the a-axis to oxygen content.

  10. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) andmore » also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.« less

  11. Sinking karst river Dobra hydrology (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, O.; Andrić, I.

    2009-04-01

    A case of special hydrological characteristics of sinking karst river Dobra is analysed. Its catchment is located in the central part of the Dinaric karst region of Croatia. The Dobra River has three parts. First one calls Upper or Ogulinska Dobra. Its length from the spring to the Djula sink is 51.2 km. The second part flows through karst underground from the Djula sink to the karst spring zone near village Gojak. In order to reappear at the karst springs zone of the Lower or Gojačka Dobra River it flows through cave system 16,396 km long. The shortest aerial distance between Djula sink and the Lower Dobra River karst spring zone is 4.6 km. The longitude of this third part of the Dobra River is 52.1 km. Along the some sections of the open watercourse of the Upper Dobra there are huge water losses through small karst sinks located on the bottom of its channel. The hydrological as well as hydrogeological regime of the Dobra River is strongly influenced by the construction of HEPP Gojak built in 1959. Water from the neighbouring Zagorska Mrežnica River is provided by tunnel to the hydroelectric power plant (HEPP) Gojak situated immediately downstream from the Gojak karst spring zone. By this way mean annual discharge of the Lower Dobra has increased doubly, from about 13.6 to 28 m3/s. At the end of July 1999, the town of Ogulin was flooded. This flood was caused by insufficient swallow capacity of the Djula spring. New changes of hydrological, hydrogeological and ecological characteristics of the Lower Dobra River should be expected in the near future. The HEPP Lešće on the Lower Dobra is currently under construction.

  12. Reduction of acrylamide and its kinetics by addition of antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) and extract of green tea (EGT) in asparagine-glucose microwave heating system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ying, Tiejin; Zhang, Ying

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) and extract of green tea (EGT) on the formation and kinetics of acrylamide in an equimolar asparagine-glucose model system. The substrates spiked with AOB and EGT were microwave-heated at 180 degrees C and the acrylamide content in final reaction products was quantified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The results showed that both AOB and EGT could effectively reduce the formation of acrylamide in an asparagine-glucose microwave heating model system and achieved a maximum reduction rate when the addition levels of AOB and EGT were both 10(-6) mg/mL reaction solution. To describe the kinetic behavior of acrylamide, a simplified kinetic model was optimized and relative kinetic rate constants were evaluated under isothermal conditions. The results indicated that the reduction effect of AOB and EGT on the acrylamide formation may partly be ascribed to the decrease of the formation rate constant (k(F)) in both AOB and EGT-spiked systems (43.4% and 32.3% of decrease, respectively, P < 0.05). The kinetic parameter k(E), which represents the elimination rate of acrylamide in both AOB and EGT-spiked systems, was not significantly different (6.9% of increase and 10.9% of decrease, respectively, P > 0.05). The results of the kinetic study indicated that addition of AOB and EGT could significantly reduce the formation rate constant (k(F)) of acrylamide, but could not significantly affect the elimination rate constant (k(E)) of acrylamide.

  13. Detecting black bear source-sink dynamics using individual-based genetic graphs.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Hope M; Moore, Jennifer A; Etter, Dwayne; Winterstein, Scott R; Scribner, Kim T

    2016-07-27

    Source-sink dynamics affects population connectivity, spatial genetic structure and population viability for many species. We introduce a novel approach that uses individual-based genetic graphs to identify source-sink areas within a continuously distributed population of black bears (Ursus americanus) in the northern lower peninsula (NLP) of Michigan, USA. Black bear harvest samples (n = 569, from 2002, 2006 and 2010) were genotyped at 12 microsatellite loci and locations were compared across years to identify areas of consistent occupancy over time. We compared graph metrics estimated for a genetic model with metrics from 10 ecological models to identify ecological factors that were associated with sources and sinks. We identified 62 source nodes, 16 of which represent important source areas (net flux > 0.7) and 79 sink nodes. Source strength was significantly correlated with bear local harvest density (a proxy for bear density) and habitat suitability. Additionally, resampling simulations showed our approach is robust to potential sampling bias from uneven sample dispersion. Findings demonstrate black bears in the NLP exhibit asymmetric gene flow, and individual-based genetic graphs can characterize source-sink dynamics in continuously distributed species in the absence of discrete habitat patches. Our findings warrant consideration of undetected source-sink dynamics and their implications on harvest management of game species. PMID:27440668

  14. Method of Generating Transient Equivalent Sink and Test Target Temperatures for Swift BAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Swift mission has a 600-km altitude and a 22 degrees maximum inclination. The sun angle varies from 45 degrees to 180 degrees in normal operation. As a result, environmental heat fluxes absorbed by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) radiator and loop heat pipe (LHP) compensation chambers (CCs) vary transiently. Therefore the equivalent sink temperatures for the radiator and CCs varies transiently. In thermal performance verification testing in vacuum, the radiator and CCs radiated heat to sink targets. This paper presents an analytical technique for generating orbit transient equivalent sink temperatures and a technique for generating transient sink target temperatures for the radiator and LHP CCs. Using these techniques, transient target temperatures for the radiator and LHP CCs were generated for three thermal environmental cases: worst hot case, worst cold case, and cooldown and warmup between worst hot case in sunlight and worst cold case in the eclipse, and three different heat transport values: 128 W, 255 W, and 382 W. The 128 W case assumed that the two LHPs transport 255 W equally to the radiator. The 255 W case assumed that one LHP fails so that the remaining LHP transports all the waste heat from the detector array to the radiator. The 382 W case assumed that one LHP fails so that the remaining LHP transports all the waste heat from the detector array to the radiator, and has a 50% design margin. All these transient target temperatures were successfully implemented in the engineering test unit (ETU) LHP and flight LHP thermal performance verification tests in vacuum.

  15. Numerical investigation of the mechanical properties of the additive manufactured bone scaffolds fabricated by FDM: The effect of layer penetration and post-heating.

    PubMed

    Naghieh, S; Karamooz Ravari, M R; Badrossamay, M; Foroozmehr, E; Kadkhodaei, M

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, thanks to additive manufacturing technology, researchers have gone towards the optimization of bone scaffolds for the bone reconstruction. Bone scaffolds should have appropriate biological as well as mechanical properties in order to play a decisive role in bone healing. Since the fabrication of scaffolds is time consuming and expensive, numerical methods are often utilized to simulate their mechanical properties in order to find a nearly optimum one. Finite element analysis is one of the most common numerical methods that is used in this regard. In this paper, a parametric finite element model is developed to assess the effects of layers penetration׳s effect on inter-layer adhesion, which is reflected on the mechanical properties of bone scaffolds. To be able to validate this model, some compression test specimens as well as bone scaffolds are fabricated with biocompatible and biodegradable poly lactic acid using fused deposition modeling. All these specimens are tested in compression and their elastic modulus is obtained. Using the material parameters of the compression test specimens, the finite element analysis of the bone scaffold is performed. The obtained elastic modulus is compared with experiment indicating a good agreement. Accordingly, the proposed finite element model is able to predict the mechanical behavior of fabricated bone scaffolds accurately. In addition, the effect of post-heating of bone scaffolds on their elastic modulus is investigated. The results demonstrate that the numerically predicted elastic modulus of scaffold is closer to experimental outcomes in comparison with as-built samples.

  16. Numerical investigation of the mechanical properties of the additive manufactured bone scaffolds fabricated by FDM: The effect of layer penetration and post-heating.

    PubMed

    Naghieh, S; Karamooz Ravari, M R; Badrossamay, M; Foroozmehr, E; Kadkhodaei, M

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, thanks to additive manufacturing technology, researchers have gone towards the optimization of bone scaffolds for the bone reconstruction. Bone scaffolds should have appropriate biological as well as mechanical properties in order to play a decisive role in bone healing. Since the fabrication of scaffolds is time consuming and expensive, numerical methods are often utilized to simulate their mechanical properties in order to find a nearly optimum one. Finite element analysis is one of the most common numerical methods that is used in this regard. In this paper, a parametric finite element model is developed to assess the effects of layers penetration׳s effect on inter-layer adhesion, which is reflected on the mechanical properties of bone scaffolds. To be able to validate this model, some compression test specimens as well as bone scaffolds are fabricated with biocompatible and biodegradable poly lactic acid using fused deposition modeling. All these specimens are tested in compression and their elastic modulus is obtained. Using the material parameters of the compression test specimens, the finite element analysis of the bone scaffold is performed. The obtained elastic modulus is compared with experiment indicating a good agreement. Accordingly, the proposed finite element model is able to predict the mechanical behavior of fabricated bone scaffolds accurately. In addition, the effect of post-heating of bone scaffolds on their elastic modulus is investigated. The results demonstrate that the numerically predicted elastic modulus of scaffold is closer to experimental outcomes in comparison with as-built samples. PMID:26874065

  17. Orifice Blocks Heat Pipe in Reverse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    High forward-mode conductance is combined with rapid reverse-mode shutoff in a heat pipe originally developed to cool spacecraft payloads. A narrow orifice within the pipe "chokes off" the evaporator if heat sink becomes warmer than source. During normal operation, with source warmer than sink, orifice has little effect. Design is simpler and more compact than other thermal-diode heat pipes and requires no special materials, forgings, or unusual construction techniques.

  18. Cryostat including heater to heat a target

    DOEpatents

    Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

    1990-09-11

    A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

  19. Cryostat including heater to heat a target

    DOEpatents

    Pehl, Richard H.; Madden, Norman W.; Malone, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vesssel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism.

  20. 17. INTERIOR OF KITCHEN SHOWING UPDATED CABINETS, SINK, AND FAUCET, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR OF KITCHEN SHOWING UPDATED CABINETS, SINK, AND FAUCET, AND ORIGINAL WOOD-FRAMED SLIDING GLASS WINDOWS ON SOUTH WALL OVER SINK. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  1. When Do Bubbles Cause a Floating Body To Sink?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denardo, Bruce; Pringle, Leonard; DeGrace, Carl; McGuire, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Describes qualitative lecture demonstrations that show that bubbles can indeed sink a body, including the case of ice in water. Presents a quantitative experiment to determine the density of bubbly water required to sink a spherical body. (Author/YDS)

  2. Sinking skin flap syndrome in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Shroff, Sheetal; Tatsui, Claudio E; Tremont-Lukats, Ivo W; Gilbert, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Sinking skin flap syndrome (SSFS) is a rare neurological complication in patients with traumatic haemorrhage, stroke or cerebral oedema who undergo decompressive craniectomy to relieve increased intracranial pressure. Hallmark of SSFS is the sinking of the scalp to a plane lower than the edges of the skull defect in the setting of neurological deterioration. Our objective is to report that SSFS can present after small craniotomy without cerebral cortex compression and to share our diagnostic/therapeutic approach. A 62-year-old woman with a glioblastoma developed SSFS after a small craniectomy and tumour resection without cerebral cortex compression but a decrease in the surgical cavity volume. Brain MRI showed decreased size of the surgical cavity. Interestingly, the patient also developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). This case highlights an atypical presentation of SSFS and the possible association with PRES. It also illustrates how an early cranioplasty can successfully reverse SSFS. PMID:25398923

  3. Sources, Propagators, and Sinks of Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Space Weather is a complex web of sources, propagators, and sinks of energy, mass, and momentum. A complete understanding of Space Weather requires specifying, and an ability to predict, each link in this web. One important problem in Space Weather is ranking the importance of a particular measurement or model in a research program. One way to do this ranking is to examine the simplest linked diagram of the sources, propagators, and sinks and produce. By analyzing only those components that contribute to a particular area the individual contributions can be better appreciated. Several such diagrams will be shown and used to discuss how long-term effects of Space Weather can be separated from the impulsive effects.

  4. Opportunities and Challenges for Geographically Expanding N-Sink

    EPA Science Inventory

    The N-Sink tool was created to provide a useful and accessible means for local land use managers to explore the relationship of land use in their towns and counties to nitrogen pollution of their waters. N-Sink focuses on three types of landscape N sinks: wetlands, lakes/ponds/re...

  5. Abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ziming; Yang, Weifeng; Chen, Min; Zheng, Minfang; Hu, Wangjiang

    2016-07-01

    The abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon (PBC) were examined for the first time in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans. In the central Arctic Ocean, high PBC concentrations with a mean of 0.021 ± 0.016 μmol L‑1 were observed in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). A number of parameters, including temperature, salinity and 234Th/238U ratios, indicated that both the rapid release of atmospherically deposited PBC on sea ice and a slow sinking rate were responsible for the comparable PBC concentrations between the MIZ and mid-latitudinal Pacific Ocean (ML). On the Chukchi and Bering Shelves (CBS), PBC concentrations were also comparable to those obtained in the ML. Further, significant deficits of 234Th revealed the rapid sinking of PBC on the CBS. These results implied additional source terms for PBC in addition to atmospheric deposition and fluvial discharge on the western Arctic shelves. Based on 234Th/238U disequilibria, the net sinking rate of PBC out of the surface water was ‑0.8 ± 2.5 μmol m‑3 d‑1 (mean ± s.d.) in the MIZ. In contrast, on the shelves, the average sinking rate of PBC was 6.1 ± 4.6 μmol m‑3 d‑1. Thus, the western Arctic Shelf was probably an effective location for burying PBC.

  6. Abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ziming; Yang, Weifeng; Chen, Min; Zheng, Minfang; Hu, Wangjiang

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon (PBC) were examined for the first time in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans. In the central Arctic Ocean, high PBC concentrations with a mean of 0.021 ± 0.016 μmol L(-1) were observed in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). A number of parameters, including temperature, salinity and (234)Th/(238)U ratios, indicated that both the rapid release of atmospherically deposited PBC on sea ice and a slow sinking rate were responsible for the comparable PBC concentrations between the MIZ and mid-latitudinal Pacific Ocean (ML). On the Chukchi and Bering Shelves (CBS), PBC concentrations were also comparable to those obtained in the ML. Further, significant deficits of (234)Th revealed the rapid sinking of PBC on the CBS. These results implied additional source terms for PBC in addition to atmospheric deposition and fluvial discharge on the western Arctic shelves. Based on (234)Th/(238)U disequilibria, the net sinking rate of PBC out of the surface water was -0.8 ± 2.5 μmol m(-3) d(-1) (mean ± s.d.) in the MIZ. In contrast, on the shelves, the average sinking rate of PBC was 6.1 ± 4.6 μmol m(-3) d(-1). Thus, the western Arctic Shelf was probably an effective location for burying PBC. PMID:27417410

  7. Abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ziming; Yang, Weifeng; Chen, Min; Zheng, Minfang; Hu, Wangjiang

    2016-07-01

    The abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon (PBC) were examined for the first time in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans. In the central Arctic Ocean, high PBC concentrations with a mean of 0.021 ± 0.016 μmol L-1 were observed in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). A number of parameters, including temperature, salinity and 234Th/238U ratios, indicated that both the rapid release of atmospherically deposited PBC on sea ice and a slow sinking rate were responsible for the comparable PBC concentrations between the MIZ and mid-latitudinal Pacific Ocean (ML). On the Chukchi and Bering Shelves (CBS), PBC concentrations were also comparable to those obtained in the ML. Further, significant deficits of 234Th revealed the rapid sinking of PBC on the CBS. These results implied additional source terms for PBC in addition to atmospheric deposition and fluvial discharge on the western Arctic shelves. Based on 234Th/238U disequilibria, the net sinking rate of PBC out of the surface water was -0.8 ± 2.5 μmol m-3 d-1 (mean ± s.d.) in the MIZ. In contrast, on the shelves, the average sinking rate of PBC was 6.1 ± 4.6 μmol m-3 d-1. Thus, the western Arctic Shelf was probably an effective location for burying PBC.

  8. Abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ziming; Yang, Weifeng; Chen, Min; Zheng, Minfang; Hu, Wangjiang

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon (PBC) were examined for the first time in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans. In the central Arctic Ocean, high PBC concentrations with a mean of 0.021 ± 0.016 μmol L−1 were observed in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). A number of parameters, including temperature, salinity and 234Th/238U ratios, indicated that both the rapid release of atmospherically deposited PBC on sea ice and a slow sinking rate were responsible for the comparable PBC concentrations between the MIZ and mid-latitudinal Pacific Ocean (ML). On the Chukchi and Bering Shelves (CBS), PBC concentrations were also comparable to those obtained in the ML. Further, significant deficits of 234Th revealed the rapid sinking of PBC on the CBS. These results implied additional source terms for PBC in addition to atmospheric deposition and fluvial discharge on the western Arctic shelves. Based on 234Th/238U disequilibria, the net sinking rate of PBC out of the surface water was −0.8 ± 2.5 μmol m−3 d−1 (mean ± s.d.) in the MIZ. In contrast, on the shelves, the average sinking rate of PBC was 6.1 ± 4.6 μmol m−3 d−1. Thus, the western Arctic Shelf was probably an effective location for burying PBC. PMID:27417410

  9. Improved Thin, Flexible Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Wollen, Peter J.; Surina, Frank C.; Fale, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Flexible heat pipes of an improved type are fabricated as layers of different materials laminated together into vacuum- tight sheets or tapes. In comparison with prior flexible heat pipes, these flexible heat pipes are less susceptible to leakage. Other advantages of these flexible heat pipes, relative to prior flexible heat pipes, include high reliability and greater ease and lower cost of fabrication. Because these heat pipes are very thin, they are highly flexible. When coated on outside surfaces with adhesives, these flexible heat pipes can be applied, like common adhesive tapes, to the surfaces of heat sinks and objects to be cooled, even if those surfaces are curved.

  10. A study on the carcinogenicity of human diets in rats: the influence of heating and the addition of vegetables and fruit.

    PubMed

    Alink, G M; Kuiper, H A; Beems, R B; Koeman, J H

    1989-07-01

    The influence of dietary factors such as total composition, thermal processing, and the addition of vegetables and fruit on the tumour rate in rats was studied in a long-term experiment. Groups of 50 male and 50 female Wistar rats were fed one of the following diets: a semi-synthetic animal diet (A, control); diet A to which vegetables and fruit were added (B); an uncooked human diet (meat, bread and eggs) supplemented with semi-synthetic compounds (C); diet C with fried or baked products (D); a complete human diet consisting of heated products, vegetables and fruit prepared according to mean consumption figures in The Netherlands (E). The animal diets (A and B) contained 26.0 energy (E)% protein, 21.6 E% fat, 52.4 E% carbohydrate and 10.7% (w/w) fibre. The human diets contained 13.2 E% protein, 40.6 E% fat, 46.2 E% carbohydrate and 5% (w/w) fibre. The rats were fed ad lib. for 142 wk. In males and females fed human diets (C, D or E) hepatocellular vacuolization was observed. Male rats (but not female) fed the human diet had a significantly (P less than 0.02) higher incidence of epithelial tumours than those fed the animal diet. This increase was mainly due to tumours of the pituitary and thyroid. Frying and baking of food products (diet D) and the addition of vegetables and fruit (diet E) induced minor differences in tumour rate, but they were not statistically significant. PMID:2777146

  11. A study on the carcinogenicity of human diets in rats: the influence of heating and the addition of vegetables and fruit.

    PubMed

    Alink, G M; Kuiper, H A; Beems, R B; Koeman, J H

    1989-07-01

    The influence of dietary factors such as total composition, thermal processing, and the addition of vegetables and fruit on the tumour rate in rats was studied in a long-term experiment. Groups of 50 male and 50 female Wistar rats were fed one of the following diets: a semi-synthetic animal diet (A, control); diet A to which vegetables and fruit were added (B); an uncooked human diet (meat, bread and eggs) supplemented with semi-synthetic compounds (C); diet C with fried or baked products (D); a complete human diet consisting of heated products, vegetables and fruit prepared according to mean consumption figures in The Netherlands (E). The animal diets (A and B) contained 26.0 energy (E)% protein, 21.6 E% fat, 52.4 E% carbohydrate and 10.7% (w/w) fibre. The human diets contained 13.2 E% protein, 40.6 E% fat, 46.2 E% carbohydrate and 5% (w/w) fibre. The rats were fed ad lib. for 142 wk. In males and females fed human diets (C, D or E) hepatocellular vacuolization was observed. Male rats (but not female) fed the human diet had a significantly (P less than 0.02) higher incidence of epithelial tumours than those fed the animal diet. This increase was mainly due to tumours of the pituitary and thyroid. Frying and baking of food products (diet D) and the addition of vegetables and fruit (diet E) induced minor differences in tumour rate, but they were not statistically significant.

  12. Evaluation of nitrous acid sources and sinks in urban outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Elliott T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Steiner, Allison L.; Dibb, Jack; Scheuer, Eric; Gong, Longwen; Rutter, Andrew P.; Cevik, Basak K.; Kim, Saewung; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James

    2016-02-01

    Intensive air quality measurements made from June 22-25, 2011 in the outflow of the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) metropolitan area are used to evaluate nitrous acid (HONO) sources and sinks. A two-layer box model was developed to assess the ability of established and recently identified HONO sources and sinks to reproduce observations of HONO mixing ratios. A baseline model scenario includes sources and sinks established in the literature and is compared to scenarios including three recently identified sources: volatile organic compound-mediated conversion of nitric acid to HONO (S1), biotic emission from the ground (S2), and re-emission from a surface nitrite reservoir (S3). For all mechanisms, ranges of parametric values span lower- and upper-limit values. Model outcomes for 'likely' estimates of sources and sinks generally show under-prediction of HONO observations, implying the need to evaluate additional sources and variability in estimates of parameterizations, particularly during daylight hours. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to model scenarios constructed with sources S1-S3 added independently and in combination, generally showing improved model outcomes. Adding sources S2 and S3 (scenario S2/S3) appears to best replicate observed HONO, as determined by the model coefficient of determination and residual sum of squared errors (r2 = 0.55 ± 0.03, SSE = 4.6 × 106 ± 7.6 × 105 ppt2). In scenario S2/S3, source S2 is shown to account for 25% and 6.7% of the nighttime and daytime budget, respectively, while source S3 accounts for 19% and 11% of the nighttime and daytime budget, respectively. However, despite improved model fit, there remains significant underestimation of daytime HONO; on average, a 0.15 ppt/s unknown daytime HONO source, or 67% of the total daytime source, is needed to bring scenario S2/S3 into agreement with observation. Estimates of 'best fit' parameterizations across lower to upper-limit values results in a moderate reduction of the unknown

  13. Students' Views of Floating & Sinking. Learning in Science Project (Primary). Working Paper No. 116.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddulph, Fred

    This study investigated the meanings and ideas held and questions asked by children (ages 7-14) about floating and sinking (in water). Data were collected from interviews using "interview-about-instances" (IAI) cards (included in an appendix) and 10 objects which either floated or sank. Additional data were collected from classroom surveys and…

  14. World's carbon budget: Sinks and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Interest in natural and man-made carbon dioxide production is stirred because it resides after formation in critical atmospheric zones. To determine the oncoming “greenhouse” effect, indeed to determine whether there will be a greenhouse effect, investigators have tried to sum up the global carbon cycle. In accounting for the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide produced at the earth's surface, it has been postulated that most of the unbalanced sources can be identified with the earth's biomass and not so much with man's combustion of fossil fuels (Ecol. Monogr., 53, 235, 1983). New figures on the calculated areas of tropical forests suggest otherwise.

  15. Oceanic phosphorus imbalance: Magnitude of the mid-ocean ridge flank hydrothermal sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; McManus, James; Mottl, Michael J.; Giambalvo, Emily

    2003-09-01

    We present a new estimate for the crustal phosphorous sink that results from reactions among seawater, basalt, and sediment blanketing low temperature mid-ocean ridge flank hydrothermal systems. New estimates for global hydrothermal power output, sediment thickness, and the dissolved phosphate concentrations in basement formation fluids indicate that fluid flow through ridge flanks removes 2.8 × 1010 mol P yr-1. This value is larger (130%) than the riverine dissolved flux of inorganic phosphate and is as much as 35% of the sedimentary P sink. The concordant seawater flux (2.1 × 1016 kg yr-1) is 65% of the riverine fluid flux and circulates a fluid volume equivalent to the entire ocean in about 70,000 yr. Additional sampling of seafloor springs is required to further constrain the range of calculated phosphate fluxes; nevertheless the modern phosphorus budget is clearly unbalanced with total sinks outpacing sources.

  16. Heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2003-08-12

    A heat exchange apparatus comprising a coolant conduit or heat sink having attached to its surface a first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles and a second radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles thermally coupled to a body to be cooled and meshed with, but not contacting the first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles.

  17. The overlooked tropical oceanic CO2 sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibánhez, J. Severino P.; Araujo, Moacyr; Lefèvre, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The intense rainfall in the tropical Atlantic spatially overlaps with the spread of the Amazon plume. Based on remote-sensed sea surface salinity and rainfall, we removed the contribution of rainfall to the apparent Amazon plume area, thus refining the quantification of its extension (0.84 ± 0.06 × 106 km2 to 0.89 ± 0.06 × 106 km2). Despite the previous overestimation of the Amazon plume area due to the influence of rainfall (>16%), our calculated annual CO2 flux based on rainfall-corrected sea surface CO2 fugacity confirms that the Amazon River plume is an atmospheric CO2 sink of global importance (-7.61 ± 1.01 to -7.85 ± 1.02 Tg C yr-1). Yet we show that current sea-air CO2 flux assessments for the tropical Atlantic could be overestimated in about 10% by neglecting the CO2 sink associated to the Amazon plume. Thus, including the Amazon plume, the sea-air CO2 exchange for the tropical Atlantic is estimated to be 81.1 ± 1.1 to 81.5 ± 1.1 Tg C yr-1.

  18. Geological characterization of the Prestige sinking area.

    PubMed

    Ercilla, Gemma; Córdoba, Diego; Gallart, Josep; Gràcia, Eulalia; Muñoz, Josep A; Somoza, Luis; Vázquez, Juan T; Vilas, Federico

    2006-01-01

    The tanker Prestige sank off NW Iberia on the 19th November 2002. The stern and bow of the Prestige wreck are located on the southwestern edge of the Galicia Bank, at 3565 m and 3830 m water depths, respectively. This bank is a structural high controlled by major faults with predominant N-S, NNE-SSW, and NNW-SEE trends. It is characterized by moderate to low seismic activity. The faults have controlled the local depositional architecture, deforming, fracturing, relocating and distributing sediments since the Valangian (early Cretaceous). The Prestige sinking area corresponds to an asymmetric half-graben structure with a N-S trend, which conditions the present-day morphology. The faulted flank outcrops and its activity and erosion have favoured the occurrence of mass-movements (slumps, slump debris, mass-flows and turbidity currents), building valleys and depositional lobes. Nearsurface sediments comprise mostly terrigenous and biogenous turbiditic muds and sands with a minor presence of hemipelagic muds, except on the fault scarp where pelagites predominate. Potential geological hazards resulting from tectonic and sedimentary processes affect almost the entire Prestige sinking area. PMID:16769414

  19. Causes of sinks near Tucson, Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, John P.; Pool, Donald R.; Konieczki, A. D.; Carpenter, Michael C.

    Land subsidence in the form of sinks has occurred on and near farmlands near Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, USA. The sinks occur in alluvial deposits along the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River, and have made farmlands dangerous and unsuitable for farming. More than 1700 sinks are confined to the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River and are grouped along two north-northwestward-trending bands that are approximately parallel to the river and other flood-plain drainages. An estimated 17,000m3 of sediment have been removed in the formation of the sinks. Thirteen trenches were dug to depths of 4-6m to characterize near-surface sediments in sink and nonsink areas. Sediments below about 2m included a large percentage of dispersive clays in sink areas. Sediments in nonsink areas contain a large component of medium- to coarse-grained, moderately to well sorted sand that probably fills a paleochannel. Electromagnetic surveys support the association of silts and clays in sink areas that are highly electrically conductive relative to sand in nonsink areas. Sinks probably are caused by the near-surface process of subsurface erosion of dispersive sediments along pre-existing cracks in predominantly silt and clay sediments. The pre-existing cracks probably result from desiccation or tension that developed during periods of water-table decline and channel incision during the past 100 years or in earlier periods. Résumé Des effondrements en forme d'entonnoir se sont produits sur et près d'exploitations agricoles de Pima (Arizona). Ces entonnoirs apparaissent dans les alluvions le long de la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz ; ils ont rendu ces terrains dangereux et inexploitables pour l'agriculture. Plus de 1700 entonnoirs existent dans la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz et sont groupés en deux bandes orientées nord-nord-ouest, approximativement parallèles à la rivière et aux autres chenaux de la plaine d'inondation. Un volume de sédiments estim

  20. Causes of sinks near Tucson, Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, John P.; Pool, Donald R.; Konieczki, A. D.; Carpenter, Michael C.

    Land subsidence in the form of sinks has occurred on and near farmlands near Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, USA. The sinks occur in alluvial deposits along the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River, and have made farmlands dangerous and unsuitable for farming. More than 1700 sinks are confined to the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River and are grouped along two north-northwestward-trending bands that are approximately parallel to the river and other flood-plain drainages. An estimated 17,000m3 of sediment have been removed in the formation of the sinks. Thirteen trenches were dug to depths of 4-6m to characterize near-surface sediments in sink and nonsink areas. Sediments below about 2m included a large percentage of dispersive clays in sink areas. Sediments in nonsink areas contain a large component of medium- to coarse-grained, moderately to well sorted sand that probably fills a paleochannel. Electromagnetic surveys support the association of silts and clays in sink areas that are highly electrically conductive relative to sand in nonsink areas. Sinks probably are caused by the near-surface process of subsurface erosion of dispersive sediments along pre-existing cracks in predominantly silt and clay sediments. The pre-existing cracks probably result from desiccation or tension that developed during periods of water-table decline and channel incision during the past 100 years or in earlier periods. Résumé Des effondrements en forme d'entonnoir se sont produits sur et près d'exploitations agricoles de Pima (Arizona). Ces entonnoirs apparaissent dans les alluvions le long de la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz ; ils ont rendu ces terrains dangereux et inexploitables pour l'agriculture. Plus de 1700 entonnoirs existent dans la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz et sont groupés en deux bandes orientées nord-nord-ouest, approximativement parallèles à la rivière et aux autres chenaux de la plaine d'inondation. Un volume de sédiments estim

  1. Salon sink radiculopathy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Stitik, T P; Nadler, S F; Foye, P M

    1999-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy can be diagnosed on physical examination with the Spurling test, which narrows neural foramina via neck extension along with coupled rotation and side-bending. In the presence of cervical radiculopathy, this test can reproduce radicular symptoms by transmitting compressive forces to affected nerve roots as they traverse the neural foramina. Treatment of cervical radiculopathy includes patient education to avoid obvious postures that exacerbate radicular symptoms and to assume positions that centralize discomfort. A potentially harmful position to which many patients are unwittingly subjected at least several times per year occurs when their hair is being shampooed in a salon sink before a haircut. This posture causes neck extension and is combined with rotation and side-bending as the patient's head is being manipulated during the shampooing. When the stylist then also applies a mild compressive force while shampooing the patient's hair, hyperextension of the neck is produced. We present two patients with cervical radiculopathy that was significantly exacerbated after the patient's hair had been shampooed in a salon sink; subsequently, these patients required oral administration of steroids. These cases illustrate that patients with suspected or known cervical radiculopathy should be forewarned to avoid this otherwise seemingly innocuous activity.

  2. Methyl bromide: Ocean sources, ocean sinks, and climate sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Anbar, A.D.; Yung, Y.L.; Chavez, F.P.

    1996-03-01

    This study was performed to examine conflicting conclusions of two previously published studies which estimated the size of oceanic sources of methyl bromide. In addition, the sensitivity of atmospheric methyl bromide to climatic variations was examined. A steady state mass balance model was used to reexamine data from the previous studies. Linear scaling of methyl bromide production rates to chlorophyll content provided agreement between the two models. The results suggest that the open ocean is a small net sink for atmospheric methyl bromide, rather than a large net source. A high rate of biological production of methyl bromide in seawater is also strongly indicated. A coupled ocean-atmosphere model indicated that methyl bromide variations induced by climatic change can be larger than those resulting from 25% variations in anthropogenic sources. Quantifying marine production rates of methyl bromide is suggested as a necessary step in assessing stratospheric ozone loss. 63 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Do grasslands act as a perpetual sink for carbon?

    PubMed

    Smith, Pete

    2014-09-01

    It is increasingly commonly suggested that grasslands are a perpetual sink for carbon, and that just maintaining grasslands will yield a net carbon sink. I examine the evidence for this from repeated soil surveys, long term grassland experiments and simple mass balance calculations. I conclude that it is untenable that grasslands act as a perpetual carbon sink, and the most likely explanation for observed grassland carbon sinks over short periods is legacy effects of land use and land management prior to the beginning of flux measurement periods. Simply having grassland does not result is a carbon sink, but judicious management or previously poorly managed grasslands can increase the sink capacity. Given that grasslands are a large store of carbon, and that it is easier and faster for soils to lose carbon that it is for them to gain carbon, it is an important management target to maintain these stocks.

  4. Age-dependent forest carbon sink: Estimation via inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao; Shi, Peijun; Jia, Gensuo; Dai, Yongjiu; Zhao, Xiang; Shangguan, Wei; Du, Ling; Wu, Hao; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-12-01

    Forests have been recognized to sequester a substantial amount of carbon (C) from the atmosphere. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the magnitude and time course of the C sink. Revealing the intrinsic relationship between forest age and C sink is crucial for reducing uncertainties in prediction of forest C sink potential. In this study, we developed a stepwise data assimilation approach to combine a process-based Terrestrial ECOsystem Regional model, observations from multiple sources, and stochastic sampling to inversely estimate carbon cycle parameters including carbon sink at different forest ages for evergreen needle-leaved forests in China. The new approach is effective to estimate age-dependent parameter of maximal light-use efficiency (R2 = 0.99) and, accordingly, can quantify a relationship between forest age and the vegetation and soil C sinks. The estimated ecosystem C sink increases rapidly with age, peaks at 0.451 kg C m-2 yr-1 at age 22 years (ranging from 0.421 to 0.465 kg C m-2 yr-1), and gradually decreases thereafter. The dynamic patterns of C sinks in vegetation and soil are significantly different. C sink in vegetation first increases rapidly with age and then decreases. C sink in soil, however, increases continuously with age; it acts as a C source when the age is less than 20 years, after which it acts as a sink. For the evergreen needle-leaved forest, the highest C sink efficiency (i.e., C sink per unit net primary productivity) is approximately 60%, with age between 11 and 43 years. Overall, the inverse estimation of carbon cycle parameters can make reasonable estimates of age-dependent C sequestration in forests.

  5. Omnivory in birds is a macroevolutionary sink

    PubMed Central

    Burin, Gustavo; Kissling, W. Daniel; Guimarães, Paulo R.; Şekercioğlu, Çağan H.; Quental, Tiago B.

    2016-01-01

    Diet is commonly assumed to affect the evolution of species, but few studies have directly tested its effect at macroevolutionary scales. Here we use Bayesian models of trait-dependent diversification and a comprehensive dietary database of all birds worldwide to assess speciation and extinction dynamics of avian dietary guilds (carnivores, frugivores, granivores, herbivores, insectivores, nectarivores, omnivores and piscivores). Our results suggest that omnivory is associated with higher extinction rates and lower speciation rates than other guilds, and that overall net diversification is negative. Trait-dependent models, dietary similarity and network analyses show that transitions into omnivory occur at higher rates than into any other guild. We suggest that omnivory acts as macroevolutionary sink, where its ephemeral nature is retrieved through transitions from other guilds rather than from omnivore speciation. We propose that these dynamics result from competition within and among dietary guilds, influenced by the deep-time availability and predictability of food resources. PMID:27052750

  6. Omnivory in birds is a macroevolutionary sink.

    PubMed

    Burin, Gustavo; Kissling, W Daniel; Guimarães, Paulo R; Şekercioğlu, Çağan H; Quental, Tiago B

    2016-01-01

    Diet is commonly assumed to affect the evolution of species, but few studies have directly tested its effect at macroevolutionary scales. Here we use Bayesian models of trait-dependent diversification and a comprehensive dietary database of all birds worldwide to assess speciation and extinction dynamics of avian dietary guilds (carnivores, frugivores, granivores, herbivores, insectivores, nectarivores, omnivores and piscivores). Our results suggest that omnivory is associated with higher extinction rates and lower speciation rates than other guilds, and that overall net diversification is negative. Trait-dependent models, dietary similarity and network analyses show that transitions into omnivory occur at higher rates than into any other guild. We suggest that omnivory acts as macroevolutionary sink, where its ephemeral nature is retrieved through transitions from other guilds rather than from omnivore speciation. We propose that these dynamics result from competition within and among dietary guilds, influenced by the deep-time availability and predictability of food resources.

  7. Omnivory in birds is a macroevolutionary sink.

    PubMed

    Burin, Gustavo; Kissling, W Daniel; Guimarães, Paulo R; Şekercioğlu, Çağan H; Quental, Tiago B

    2016-01-01

    Diet is commonly assumed to affect the evolution of species, but few studies have directly tested its effect at macroevolutionary scales. Here we use Bayesian models of trait-dependent diversification and a comprehensive dietary database of all birds worldwide to assess speciation and extinction dynamics of avian dietary guilds (carnivores, frugivores, granivores, herbivores, insectivores, nectarivores, omnivores and piscivores). Our results suggest that omnivory is associated with higher extinction rates and lower speciation rates than other guilds, and that overall net diversification is negative. Trait-dependent models, dietary similarity and network analyses show that transitions into omnivory occur at higher rates than into any other guild. We suggest that omnivory acts as macroevolutionary sink, where its ephemeral nature is retrieved through transitions from other guilds rather than from omnivore speciation. We propose that these dynamics result from competition within and among dietary guilds, influenced by the deep-time availability and predictability of food resources. PMID:27052750

  8. Characterization of phosphorus in sinking particles in Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranhofer, M. L.; Benitez-Nelson, C.; Thunell, R.

    2004-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient utilized by all organisms for biological productivity, yet little is known about its cycling within the marine realm. In this study, we used a five-step sequential sediment extraction method (SEDEX) to examine the composition of P in sinking particles obtained from one of the world's largest anoxic basins, Cariaco Basin, Venezuela. This method, which is usually applied to sediments, chemically separates particulate P into 5 phases: loosely bound or exchangeable (PEx), iron-bound (PFe), authigenic (PAut), detrital (PDet), and organic (POrg). Samples were collected from November 2000 to April 2002 using four automated sediment traps moored at depths of 275, 455, 930 and 1250 m, with the 275 m trap located just above the oxic/anoxic interface. Our results indicate that the composition of particulate P changes dramatically as the material sinks through the water column. The 275 m trap was comprised of a mixture of PEx (57 %), POrg (23 %) and PFe (15 %), whereas the deepest trap was dominated by POrg (55 %) and PEx (26 %). Total P fluxes decreased by a factor of four between 275 and 1250 m (85.7 versus 18.5 \\mu mol m-2 d-1), with much of this decrease due to the > 75 % loss of PEx (49.2 to 4.9 \\mu mol m-2 d-1) and PFe (12.6 to 1.8 \\mu mol m-2 d-1). POrg decreased by only 50 % between these two depths (19.9 versus 10.2 \\mu mol m-2 d-1). Our results are consistent with the expectation that PEx is the most labile fraction of P and PFe is rapidly reduced in the anoxic bottom waters of Cariaco Basin. PEx correlates well with organic C (COrg) only in samples from the shallowest trap (r2 = 0.6), while in the deeper traps there is a strong correlation with terrigenous material (r2 = 0.6). This implies a change in the major source, and hence lability of this material as it sinks to the sea floor. POrg was very well correlated to COrg at all depths (r2 > 0.9), implying little to no preferential remineralization below 275 m. Additional

  9. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Phoenix Refrigeration Systems, Inc.'s heat pipe addition to the Phoenix 2000, a supermarket rooftop refrigeration/air conditioning system, resulted from the company's participation in a field test of heat pipes. Originally developed by NASA to control temperatures in space electronic systems, the heat pipe is a simple, effective, heat transfer system. It has been used successfully in candy storage facilities where it has provided significant energy savings. Additional data is expected to fully quantify the impact of the heat pipes on supermarket air conditioning systems.

  10. Passive heat transfer means for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Burelbach, James P.

    1984-01-01

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. Means such as shrouding normally isolated the secondary condensing section from effective heat transfer with the heat sink, but a sensor responds to overheat conditions of the reactor to open the shrouding, which thereby increases the cooling capacity of the heat pipe. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  11. Sinking in Quicksand: An Applied Approach to the Archimedes Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, G. M.; Evans, S. C.; Moreno-Atanasio, R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a laboratory experiment that explains the phenomenon of sinking in quicksand simulated as a fluidized bed. The paper demonstrates experimentally and theoretically that the proportion of a body that sinks in quicksand depends on the volume fraction of solids and the density of the body relative to the…

  12. 30 CFR 57.19111 - Shaft-sinking ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shaft-sinking ladders. 57.19111 Section 57... Hoisting Shafts § 57.19111 Shaft-sinking ladders. Substantial fixed ladders shall be provided from the... ladder, wire rope ladder, or other extension ladders shall be used from the fixed ladder or lower...

  13. 30 CFR 56.19111 - Shaft-sinking ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Shaft-sinking ladders. 56.19111 Section 56... Shafts § 56.19111 Shaft-sinking ladders. Substantial fixed ladders shall be provided from the collar to... an emergency power source shall be provided. When persons are on the shaft bottom, a chain...

  14. 30 CFR 57.19111 - Shaft-sinking ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Shaft-sinking ladders. 57.19111 Section 57... Hoisting Shafts § 57.19111 Shaft-sinking ladders. Substantial fixed ladders shall be provided from the... ladder, wire rope ladder, or other extension ladders shall be used from the fixed ladder or lower...

  15. 30 CFR 56.19111 - Shaft-sinking ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shaft-sinking ladders. 56.19111 Section 56... Shafts § 56.19111 Shaft-sinking ladders. Substantial fixed ladders shall be provided from the collar to... an emergency power source shall be provided. When persons are on the shaft bottom, a chain...

  16. 78 FR 21417 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ..., Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register on October 22, 2012 (77 FR 64545). The... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... drawn stainless steel sinks from China, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the Harmonized...

  17. 77 FR 23752 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... the notice in the Federal Register of March 7, 2012 (77 FR 13631). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... (April 2012), entitled Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from China: Investigation Nos. 701-TA-489 and...

  18. Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Kobel, Mark; Rogers, Paul; Kaya, Tarik; Paquin, Krista C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices that have gained increasing acceptance for space and terrestrial applications. The operating temperature of an LHP is a function of its operating conditions. The LHP usually reaches a steady operating temperature for a given heat load and sink temperature. The operating temperature will change when the heat load and/or the sink temperature changes, but eventually reaches another steady state in most cases. Under certain conditions, however, the loop operating temperature never really reaches a true steady state, but instead becomes oscillatory. This paper discusses the temperature oscillation phenomenon using test data from a miniature LHP.

  19. Vibration suppression of composite laminated plate with nonlinear energy sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye-Wei; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Shuai; Xu, Ke-Fan; Chen, Li-Qun

    2016-06-01

    The composite laminated plate is widely used in supersonic aircraft. So, there are many researches about the vibration suppression of composite laminated plate. In this paper, nonlinear energy sink (NES) as an effective method to suppress vibration is studied. The coupled partial differential governing equations of the composite laminated plate with the nonlinear energy sink (NES) are established by using the Hamilton principle. The fourth-order Galerkin discrete method is used to truncate the partial differential equations, which are solved by numerical integration method. Meanwhile study about the precise effectiveness of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) by discussing the different installation location of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) at the same speed. The results indicate that the nonlinear energy sink (NES) can significantly suppress the severe vibration of the composite laminated plate with speed wind loadings in to protect the composite laminated plate from excessive vibration.

  20. Sinks as integrative elements of the anthropogenic metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Ulrich; Brunner, Paul H.

    2015-04-01

    The anthropogenic metabolism is an open system requiring exchange of materials and energy between the anthroposphere and the environment. Material and energy flows are taken from nature and become utilized by men. After utilization, the materials either remain in the anthroposphere as recycling products, or they leave the anthroposphere as waste and emission flows. To accommodate these materials without jeopardizing human and environmental health, limited natural sinks are available; thus, man-made sinks have to be provided where natural sinks are missing or overloaded. The oral presentation (1) suggests a coherent definition of the term "sink", encompassing natural and man-made processes, (2) presents a framework to analyse and evaluate anthropogenic material flows to sinks, based on the tool substance flow analysis and impact assessment methodology, and (3) applies the framework in a case study approach for selected substances such as Copper and Lead in Vienna and Perfluorooctane sulfonate in Switzerland. Finally, the numeric results are aggregated in terms of a new indicator that specifies on a regional scale which fractions of anthropogenic material flows to sinks are acceptable. The following results are obtained: In Vienna, 99% of Cu flows to natural and man-made sinks are in accordance with accepted standards. However, the 0.7% of Cu entering urban soils and the 0.3% entering receiving waters surpass the acceptable level. In the case of Pb, 92% of all flows into sinks prove to be acceptable, but 8% are disposed of in local landfills with limited capacity. For PFOS, 96% of all flows into sinks are acceptable. 4% cannot be evaluated due to a lack of normative criteria, despite posing a risk for human health and the environment. The case studies corroborate the need and constraints of sinks to accommodate inevitable anthropogenic material flows.

  1. Carbon cycle and climate change, a tale of increasing emissions and uncertain future sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciais, P.; Sabine, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 has increased by 40% in the atmosphere above pre-industrial levels, and is reaching close to 400 ppm. It's a fact that the increase of CO2 is due to human-caused emissions from land use change and fossil fuel use. Yet, an average of 54% of these human emissions was removed from the atmosphere by CO2 sinks in the ocean and the land biosphere. In the IPCC AR5 report, an update of the global carbon budget is provided, together with CH4 sources and sinks, over the last 3 decades. The first finding is the recent acceleration of fossil fuel CO2 emissions during the last decade, and the fact that sinks have increased proportionally with emissions. Future projections of the coupled climate-carbon cycle system using CMIP5 models, translated into compatible emissions for each RCP pathway radiative forcing trajectory will be presented. When the carbon cycle is coupled to simulations of climate change, the sinks weaken, causing a positive feedback on warming, but uncertainties on the magnitude of this feedback and on the role of each regions, remain very high, as shown by the large spread between models. The second finding concerns additional feedbacks, most likely of positive sign, such as CO2 and CH4 emissions from thawed permafrost and nutrient limitations on land carbon storage. These feedbacks were not included in the CMIP5 models and represent a large (but uncertain) source of extra warming for any given economic scenario of anthropogenic emissions

  2. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profile Analysis of Prunus persica in Response to Low Sink Demand after Fruit Removal.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; Xu, Hongguo; Liu, Guotian; Fan, Peige; Liang, Zhenchang; Li, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Prunus persica fruits were removed from 1-year-old shoots to analysis photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence and genes changes in leaves to low sink demand caused by fruit removal (-fruit) during the final stage of rapid fruit growth. A decline in net photosynthesis rate was observed, accompanied with a decrease in stomatal conductance. The intercellular CO2 concentrations and leaf temperature increased as compared with a normal fruit load (+fruit). Moreover, low sink demand significantly inhibited the donor side and the reaction center of photosystem II. 382 genes in leaf with an absolute fold change ≥1 change in expression level, representing 116 up- and 266 down-regulated genes except for unknown transcripts. Among these, 25 genes for photosynthesis were down-regulated, 69 stress and 19 redox related genes up-regulated under the low sink demand. These studies revealed high leaf temperature may result in a decline of net photosynthesis rate through down-regulation in photosynthetic related genes and up-regulation in redox and stress related genes, especially heat shock proteins genes. The complex changes in genes at the transcriptional level under low sink demand provided useful starting points for in-depth analyses of source-sink relationship in P. persica. PMID:27446115

  3. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profile Analysis of Prunus persica in Response to Low Sink Demand after Fruit Removal

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wei; Xu, Hongguo; Liu, Guotian; Fan, Peige; Liang, Zhenchang; Li, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Prunus persica fruits were removed from 1-year-old shoots to analysis photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence and genes changes in leaves to low sink demand caused by fruit removal (−fruit) during the final stage of rapid fruit growth. A decline in net photosynthesis rate was observed, accompanied with a decrease in stomatal conductance. The intercellular CO2 concentrations and leaf temperature increased as compared with a normal fruit load (+fruit). Moreover, low sink demand significantly inhibited the donor side and the reaction center of photosystem II. 382 genes in leaf with an absolute fold change ≥1 change in expression level, representing 116 up- and 266 down-regulated genes except for unknown transcripts. Among these, 25 genes for photosynthesis were down-regulated, 69 stress and 19 redox related genes up-regulated under the low sink demand. These studies revealed high leaf temperature may result in a decline of net photosynthesis rate through down-regulation in photosynthetic related genes and up-regulation in redox and stress related genes, especially heat shock proteins genes. The complex changes in genes at the transcriptional level under low sink demand provided useful starting points for in-depth analyses of source-sink relationship in P. persica. PMID:27446115

  4. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profile Analysis of Prunus persica in Response to Low Sink Demand after Fruit Removal.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; Xu, Hongguo; Liu, Guotian; Fan, Peige; Liang, Zhenchang; Li, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Prunus persica fruits were removed from 1-year-old shoots to analysis photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence and genes changes in leaves to low sink demand caused by fruit removal (-fruit) during the final stage of rapid fruit growth. A decline in net photosynthesis rate was observed, accompanied with a decrease in stomatal conductance. The intercellular CO2 concentrations and leaf temperature increased as compared with a normal fruit load (+fruit). Moreover, low sink demand significantly inhibited the donor side and the reaction center of photosystem II. 382 genes in leaf with an absolute fold change ≥1 change in expression level, representing 116 up- and 266 down-regulated genes except for unknown transcripts. Among these, 25 genes for photosynthesis were down-regulated, 69 stress and 19 redox related genes up-regulated under the low sink demand. These studies revealed high leaf temperature may result in a decline of net photosynthesis rate through down-regulation in photosynthetic related genes and up-regulation in redox and stress related genes, especially heat shock proteins genes. The complex changes in genes at the transcriptional level under low sink demand provided useful starting points for in-depth analyses of source-sink relationship in P. persica.

  5. Effects of dietary addition of heat-killed Mycobacterium phlei on growth performance, immune status and anti-oxidative capacity in early weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jin-Feng; Wu, Wei-Gao; Zhang, Xiao-Qing; Tu, Wei; Liu, Zhen-Xiang; Fang, Re-Jun

    2016-08-01

    The contradiction between high susceptibility of early weaned piglets to enteric pathogens and rigid restriction of antibiotic use in the diet is still prominent in the livestock production industry. To address this issue, the study was designed to replace dietary antibiotics partly or completely by an immunostimulant, namely heat-killed Mycobacterium phlei (M. phlei). Piglets (n = 192) were randomly assigned to one of the four groups: (1) basal diet (Group A), (2) basal diet + a mixture of antibiotics (80 mg/kg diet, Group B), (3) basal diet + a mixture of antibiotics (same as in Group B, but 40 mg/kg diet) + heat-killed M. phlei (1.5 g/kg diet) (Group C) and (4) basal diet + heat-killed M. phlei (3 g/kg diet) (Group D). All piglets received the respective diets from days 21 to 51 of age and were weaned at the age of 28 d. Compared with the Control (Group A), in all other groups the average daily gain, average daily feed intake, small intestinal villus height:crypt depth ratio and protein levels of occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunal mucosa were increased. A decreased incidence of diarrhoea in conjunction with an increased sIgA concentration in the intestinal mucosa and serum IL-12 and IFN-γ concentrations was found in groups supplemented with heat-killed M. phlei (Groups C and D), but not in Group B. Groups C and D also showed decreased IL-2 concentrations in the intestinal mucosa with lower TLR4 and phosphor-IκB protein levels. The antioxidant capacity was reinforced in Groups C and D, as evidenced by the reduction in malondialdehyde and enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes in serum. These data indicate that heat-killed M. phlei is a promising alternative to antibiotic use for early weaned piglets via induction of protective immune responses. PMID:27216553

  6. A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Final report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.I.

    1998-11-01

    The ultimate goal of this research is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which the complex interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are controlled in plants. As soluble sugar levels have been shown to play a vital role in a variety of source-sink interactions, a key aspect of the authors research is to determine the role of sugar-regulated gene expression in mediating source-sink interactions. In addition, as a critical aspect of source-sink interactions is the channeling of fixed carbon into different storage forms, they have pursued the findings that fumaric acid represents a significant form of storage carbon in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. In the future, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are coordinated will be a pre-requisite to developing more rationale approaches to improving harvest indices in crop species.

  7. Ornamental plants as sinks and bioindicators.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Pallavi; Ghosh, Chirashree

    2013-01-01

    Mitigation of urban air pollution is a big challenge, especially for the metropolitan cities of the world. In an Indian metropolis like Delhi, even after the implementation of several control policies, no such remarkable change has been observed in its air quality. Globally, afforestation or greenbelt development is an effective and well-recognized pollution abatement process. The aim of our present study was to examine the biochemical response of some naturalized ornamental plant species, viz. Dracaena deremensis, Tagetes erecta, Rosa indica and Dianthus caryophyllus. During experimental study, plants were kept at selected sites which were categorized in terms of traffic density (emission source) and vegetative pattern during winter months for 120 days. Four biochemical parameters, viz. total chlorophyll, ascorbic acid, pH, relative water contents along with Air Pollution Tolerance Indices were determined from foliar samples at each selected site. D. deremensis and T. erecta were classified under tolerant while R. indica and D. caryophyllus were marked as in sensitive category. Based on the sensitivity of selected plant species, it has been recommended that D. deremensis and T. erecta may be used as sinks for the abatement of air pollution at highly polluted sites whereas R. indica and D. caryophyllus can be used as bioindicators.

  8. The Kitchen Sink and the Professors Drawer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenardic, A.

    2005-12-01

    Many of the demonstrations that have been most effective in teaching an introductory Earth science class at Rice have been developed on the spot before lectures as I realized that some hands on, visual material would help make a point more clear. This lead me to rifle through my own desk drawer and use whatever was available (e.g., rulers, rubber bands, etc.). Such demos went over very well in the first years I taught. Students liked the fact they could go home and redo them, without having to run to the hardware store. This increased the hands on value and made the demos all the more tangible. In turn, the greater direct contact provided a memory hook to lock the main point of the demo into long term memory. I have continued to use "out of the drawer" demos and I will present a few of the successful ones based on student responses. Enjoying cooking, I have also had demo ideas come to me the night before lecture during dinner prep. Although some of the kitchen sink demos are not as easy to redo by students themselves, they do maintain a high "direct contact' factor to them. I will present one or two of these kitchen demos as well.

  9. A note on convective heat transfer of an MHD Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Jawad; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood; Ali, Ramzan

    2015-11-01

    This article focuses on the exact solution regarding convective heat transfer of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet. The effects of joule and viscous dissipation, internal heat source/sink and thermal radiation on the heat transfer characteristics are taken in account in the presence of a transverse magnetic field for two types of boundary heating process namely prescribed power law surface temperature (PST) and prescribed heat flux (PHF). Similarity transformations are used to reduce the governing non-linear momentum and thermal boundary layer equations into a set of ordinary differential equations. The exact solutions of the reduced ordinary differential equations are developed in the form of confluent hypergeometric function. The influence of the pertinent parameters on the temperature profile is examined. In addition the results for the wall temperature gradient are also discussed in detail.

  10. A note on convective heat transfer of an MHD Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Jawad; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood; Ali, Ramzan

    2015-11-15

    This article focuses on the exact solution regarding convective heat transfer of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet. The effects of joule and viscous dissipation, internal heat source/sink and thermal radiation on the heat transfer characteristics are taken in account in the presence of a transverse magnetic field for two types of boundary heating process namely prescribed power law surface temperature (PST) and prescribed heat flux (PHF). Similarity transformations are used to reduce the governing non-linear momentum and thermal boundary layer equations into a set of ordinary differential equations. The exact solutions of the reduced ordinary differential equations are developed in the form of confluent hypergeometric function. The influence of the pertinent parameters on the temperature profile is examined. In addition the results for the wall temperature gradient are also discussed in detail.

  11. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  12. Not all calcite ballast is created equal: differing effects of foraminiferan and coccolith calcite on the formation and sinking of aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K.; De La Rocha, C. L.; Gallinari, M.; Cortese, G.

    2013-09-01

    Correlation between particulate organic carbon (POC) and calcium carbonate sinking through the deep ocean has led to the idea that ballast provided by calcium carbonate is important for the export of POC from the surface ocean. While this idea is certainly to some extent true, it is worth considering in more nuance, for example, examining the different effects on the aggregation and sinking of POC of small, non-sinking calcite particles like coccoliths and large, rapidly sinking calcite like planktonic foraminiferan tests. We have done that here in a simple experiment carried out in roller tanks that allow particles to sink continuously without being impeded by container walls. Coccoliths were efficiently incorporated into aggregates that formed during the experiment, increasing their sinking speed compared to similarly sized aggregates lacking added calcite ballast. The foraminiferan tests, which sank as fast as 700 m d-1, became associated with only very minor amounts of POC. In addition, when they collided with other, larger, foraminferan-less aggregates, they fragmented them into two smaller, more slowly sinking aggregates. While these effects were certainly exaggerated within the confines of the roller tanks, they clearly demonstrate that calcium carbonate ballast is not just calcium carbonate ballast- different forms of calcium carbonate ballast have notably different effects on POC aggregation, sinking, and export.

  13. Not all calcite ballast is created equal: differing effects of foraminiferan and coccolith calcite on the formation and sinking of aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K.; De La Rocha, C. L.; Gallinari, M.; Cortese, G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlation between particulate organic carbon (POC) and calcium carbonate sinking through the deep ocean has led to the idea that ballast provided by calcium carbonate is important for the export of POC from the surface ocean. While this idea is certainly to some extent true, it is worth considering in more nuance, for example, examining the different effects on the aggregation and sinking of POC of small, non-sinking calcite particles like coccoliths and large, rapidly sinking calcite like planktonic foraminiferan tests. We have done that here in a simple experiment carried out in roller tanks that allow particles to sink continuously without being impeded by container walls. Coccoliths were efficiently incorporated into aggregates that formed during the experiment, increasing their sinking speed compared to similarly sized aggregates lacking added calcite ballast. The foraminiferan tests, which sank as fast as 700 m d-1, became associated with only very minor amounts of POC. In addition, when they collided with other, larger, foram-less aggregates, they fragmented them into two smaller, more slowly sinking aggregates. While these effects were certainly exaggerated within the confines of the rolling tanks, they clearly demonstrate that calcium carbonate ballast is not just calcium carbonate ballast - different forms of calcium carbonate ballast have notably different effects on POC aggregation, sinking, and export.

  14. Ground-source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

    2009-07-14

    Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground

  15. Investigation of heat pump efficiencies using groundwater and/or ground coil in the Gulf Coast region. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, H.T.

    1982-08-01

    This project examines the energy efficiencies of five different water source heat pump systems. This is further supported by an experimental effort in which an existing residence is retrofitted with a heat pump and other energy sources: well water as a heat source/sink, vertical geothermal well as heat source/heat sink/storage, horizontal buried metal and plastic ground coils to use as heat source/heat sink, and a solar assist system. The energy elements are operated individually and in combination configurations to determine performance, and cost effectiveness of the energy alternatives are explored.

  16. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  17. A large and persistent carbon sink in the world's forests.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yude; Birdsey, Richard A; Fang, Jingyun; Houghton, Richard; Kauppi, Pekka E; Kurz, Werner A; Phillips, Oliver L; Shvidenko, Anatoly; Lewis, Simon L; Canadell, Josep G; Ciais, Philippe; Jackson, Robert B; Pacala, Stephen W; McGuire, A David; Piao, Shilong; Rautiainen, Aapo; Sitch, Stephen; Hayes, Daniel

    2011-08-19

    The terrestrial carbon sink has been large in recent decades, but its size and location remain uncertain. Using forest inventory data and long-term ecosystem carbon studies, we estimate a total forest sink of 2.4 ± 0.4 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C year(-1)) globally for 1990 to 2007. We also estimate a source of 1.3 ± 0.7 Pg C year(-1) from tropical land-use change, consisting of a gross tropical deforestation emission of 2.9 ± 0.5 Pg C year(-1) partially compensated by a carbon sink in tropical forest regrowth of 1.6 ± 0.5 Pg C year(-1). Together, the fluxes comprise a net global forest sink of 1.1 ± 0.8 Pg C year(-1), with tropical estimates having the largest uncertainties. Our total forest sink estimate is equivalent in magnitude to the terrestrial sink deduced from fossil fuel emissions and land-use change sources minus ocean and atmospheric sinks.

  18. A large and persistent carbon sink in the world's forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pan, Y.; Birdsey, R.A.; Fang, J.; Houghton, R.; Kauppi, P.E.; Kurz, W.A.; Phillips, O.L.; Shvidenko, A.; Lewis, S.L.; Canadell, J.G.; Ciais, P.; Jackson, R.B.; Pacala, S.W.; McGuire, A.D.; Piao, S.; Rautiainen, A.; Sitch, S.; Hayes, D.

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon sink has been large in recent decades, but its size and location remain uncertain. Using forest inventory data and long-term ecosystem carbon studies, we estimate a total forest sink of 2.4 ?? 0.4 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C year-1) globally for 1990 to 2007. We also estimate a source of 1.3 ?? 0.7 Pg C year-1 from tropical land-use change, consisting of a gross tropical deforestation emission of 2.9 ?? 0.5 Pg C year-1 partially compensated by a carbon sink in tropical forest regrowth of 1.6 ?? 0.5 Pg C year-1. Together, the fluxes comprise a net global forest sink of 1.1 ?? 0.8 Pg C year-1, with tropical estimates having the largest uncertainties. Our total forest sink estimate is equivalent in magnitude to the terrestrial sink deduced from fossil fuel emissions and land-use change sources minus ocean and atmospheric sinks.

  19. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with heat pipes

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.; Prenger, F.C. Jr.

    1985-10-25

    A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 4 to 20 K range utilizes heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the magnetic material at the appropriate points during the material's movement. In one embodiment circular disks of magnetic material can be interleaved with the ends of the heat pipes. In another embodiment a mass of magnetic material reciprocatingly moves between the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the object of cooling to the magnetic material and the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the magnetic material to a heat sink.

  20. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with heat pipes

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Prenger, Jr., F. Coyne

    1987-01-01

    A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 4 to 20 K range utilizes heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the magnetic material at the appropriate points during the material's movement. In one embodiment circular disks of magnetic material can be interleaved with the ends of the heat pipes. In another embodiment a mass of magnetic material reciprocatingly moves between the end of the heat pipe of pipes that transmits heat from the object of cooling to the magnetic material and the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the magnetic material to a heat sink.

  1. Reduced toxicological activity of cigarette smoke by the addition of ammonia magnesium phosphate to the paper of an electrically heated cigarette: subchronic inhalation toxicology.

    PubMed

    Moennikes, O; Vanscheeuwijck, P M; Friedrichs, B; Anskeit, E; Patskan, G J

    2008-05-01

    Cigarette smoke is a complex chemical mixture that causes a variety of diseases, such as lung cancer. With the electrically heated cigarette smoking system (EHCSS), temperatures are applied to the tobacco below those found in conventional cigarettes, resulting in less combustion, reduced yields of some smoke constituents, and decreased activity in some standard toxicological tests. The first generation of electrically heated cigarettes (EHC) also resulted in increased formaldehyde yields; therefore, a second generation of EHC was developed with ammonium magnesium phosphate (AMP) in the cigarette paper in part to address this increase. The toxicological activity of mainstream smoke from these two generations of EHC and of a conventional reference cigarette was investigated in two studies in rats: a standard 90-day inhalation toxicity study and a 35-day inhalation study focusing on lung inflammation. Many of the typical smoke exposure-related changes were found to be less pronounced after exposure to smoke from the second-generation EHC with AMP than to smoke from the first-generation EHC or the conventional reference cigarette, when compared on a particulate matter or nicotine basis. Differences between the EHC without AMP and the conventional reference cigarette were not as prominent. Overall, AMP incorporated in the EHC cigarette paper reduced the inhalation toxicity of the EHCSS more than expected based on the observed reduction in aldehyde yields. PMID:18464053

  2. Heat Transfer in a Two-Phase Closed-Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji

    A two-phase closed-loop thermosyphon is a device which transports heat energy from a heat source to a sink under the body force field and has many practical applications. The critical heat flux of this thermosyphon is larger than that of a non-loop thermosyphon, because the flooding phenomenon occurring in the no-loop one does not occur. In addition, there is another merit that the evaporator and the condencer can be installed in comparatively arbitrary position because these are interconnected by piping. In most previous investigations of the two-phase closed-loop thermosyphons, overall heat resistances were measured. The overall heat resistance, however, consists of three heat resistances; the heat resistances in the evaporator and the condenser, and the transport resistance in the interconnecting pipe. Therefore, we should consider these heat resistances separately. In the present study, we took note of the heat resistances (or heat transfer coefficients) of the evaporator and the condenser. The experiment was performed using two experimental setups and three kinds of test liquid. And, the effects of rotation angle, heat flux, inside temperature (or inside pressure) and liquid charge on the heat transfer coefficients were investigated.

  3. Anaerobic Nitrogen Turnover by Sinking Diatom Aggregates at Varying Ambient Oxygen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    In the world’s oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host anaerobic nitrogen cycling at ambient oxygen levels well above the hypoxic threshold. Aggregates were produced from the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema marinoi and the natural microbial community of seawater. Microsensor profiling through the center of sinking aggregates revealed internal anoxia at ambient 40% air saturation (∼100 μmol O2 L-1) and below. Accordingly, anaerobic nitrate turnover inside the aggregates was evident within this range of ambient oxygen levels. In incubations with 15N-labeled nitrate, individual Skeletonema aggregates produced NO2- (up to 10.7 nmol N h-1 per aggregate), N2 (up to 7.1 nmol N h-1), NH4+ (up to 2.0 nmol N h-1), and N2O (up to 0.2 nmol N h-1). Intriguingly, nitrate stored inside the diatom cells served as an additional, internal nitrate source for dinitrogen production, which may partially uncouple anaerobic nitrate turnover by diatom aggregates from direct ambient nitrate supply. Sinking diatom aggregates can contribute directly to fixed-nitrogen loss in low-oxygen environments in the ocean and vastly expand the ocean volume in which anaerobic nitrogen turnover is possible, despite relatively high ambient oxygen levels. Depending on the extent of intracellular nitrate consumption during the sinking process, diatom aggregates may also be involved in the long-distance export of nitrate to the deep ocean. PMID:26903977

  4. Connecting Source with Sink: The Role of Arabidopsis AAP8 in Phloem Loading of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Santiago, James P; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2016-05-01

    Allocation of large amounts of nitrogen to developing organs occurs in the phloem and is essential for plant growth and seed development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and many other plant species, amino acids represent the dominant nitrogen transport forms in the phloem, and they are mainly synthesized in photosynthetically active source leaves. Following their synthesis, a broad spectrum of the amino nitrogen is actively loaded into the phloem of leaf minor veins and transported within the phloem sap to sinks such as developing leaves, fruits, or seeds. Controlled regulation of the source-to-sink transport of amino acids has long been postulated; however, the molecular mechanism of amino acid phloem loading was still unknown. In this study, Arabidopsis AMINO ACID PERMEASE8 (AAP8) was shown to be expressed in the source leaf phloem and localized to the plasma membrane, suggesting its function in phloem loading. This was further supported by transport studies with aap8 mutants fed with radiolabeled amino acids and by leaf exudate analyses. In addition, biochemical and molecular analyses revealed alterations in leaf nitrogen pools and metabolism dependent on the developmental stage of the mutants. Decreased amino acid phloem loading and partitioning to sinks led to decreased silique and seed numbers, but seed protein levels were unchanged, demonstrating the importance of AAP8 function for sink development rather than seed quality. Overall, these results show that AAP8 plays an important role in source-to-sink partitioning of nitrogen and that its function affects source leaf physiology and seed yield. PMID:27016446

  5. Photosynthesis down-regulation precedes carbohydrate accumulation under sink limitation in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Nebauer, Sergio G; Renau-Morata, Begoña; Guardiola, José Luis; Molina, Rosa-Victoria

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis down-regulation due to an imbalance between sources and sinks in Citrus leaves could be mediated by excessive accumulation of carbohydrates. However, there is limited understanding of the physiological role of soluble and insoluble carbohydrates in photosynthesis regulation and the elements triggering the down-regulation process. In this work, the role of non-structural carbohydrates in the regulation of photosynthesis under a broad spectrum of source-sink relationships has been investigated in the Salustiana sweet orange. Soluble sugar and starch accumulation in leaves, induced by girdling experiments, did not induce down-regulation of the photosynthetic rate in the presence of sinks (fruits). The leaf-to-fruit ratio did not modulate photosynthesis but allocation of photoassimilates to the fruits. The lack of strong sink activity led to a decrease in the photosynthetic rate and starch accumulation in leaves. However, photosynthesis down-regulation due to an excess of total soluble sugars or starch was discarded because photosynthesis and stomatal conductance reduction occurred prior to any significant accumulation of these carbohydrates. Gas exchange and fluorescence parameters suggested biochemical limitations to photosynthesis. In addition, the expression of carbon metabolism-related genes was altered within 24 h when strong sinks were removed. Sucrose synthesis and export genes were inhibited, whereas the expression of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was increased to cope with the excess of assimilates. In conclusion, changes in starch and soluble sugar turnover, but not sugar content per se, could provide the signal for photosynthesis regulation. In these conditions, non-stomatal limitations strongly inhibited the photosynthetic rate prior to any significant increase in carbohydrate levels. PMID:21367744

  6. Anaerobic Nitrogen Turnover by Sinking Diatom Aggregates at Varying Ambient Oxygen Levels.

    PubMed

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N

    2016-01-01

    In the world's oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host anaerobic nitrogen cycling at ambient oxygen levels well above the hypoxic threshold. Aggregates were produced from the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema marinoi and the natural microbial community of seawater. Microsensor profiling through the center of sinking aggregates revealed internal anoxia at ambient 40% air saturation (∼100 μmol O2 L(-1)) and below. Accordingly, anaerobic nitrate turnover inside the aggregates was evident within this range of ambient oxygen levels. In incubations with (15)N-labeled nitrate, individual Skeletonema aggregates produced NO2 (-) (up to 10.7 nmol N h(-1) per aggregate), N2 (up to 7.1 nmol N h(-1)), NH4 (+) (up to 2.0 nmol N h(-1)), and N2O (up to 0.2 nmol N h(-1)). Intriguingly, nitrate stored inside the diatom cells served as an additional, internal nitrate source for dinitrogen production, which may partially uncouple anaerobic nitrate turnover by diatom aggregates from direct ambient nitrate supply. Sinking diatom aggregates can contribute directly to fixed-nitrogen loss in low-oxygen environments in the ocean and vastly expand the ocean volume in which anaerobic nitrogen turnover is possible, despite relatively high ambient oxygen levels. Depending on the extent of intracellular nitrate consumption during the sinking process, diatom aggregates may also be involved in the long-distance export of nitrate to the deep ocean. PMID:26903977

  7. Graphite Foam Heat Exchangers for Thermal Management

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, J.W.

    2004-06-07

    Improved thermal management is needed to increase the power density of electronic and more effectively cool electronic enclosures that are envisioned in future aircraft, spacecraft and surface ships. Typically, heat exchanger cores must increase in size to more effectively dissipate increased heat loads, this would be impossible in many cases, thus improved heat exchanger cores will be required. In this Phase I investigation, MRi aimed to demonstrate improved thermal management using graphite foam (Gr-foam) core heat exchangers. The proposed design was to combine Gr-foams from POCO with MRi's innovative low temperature, active metal joining process (S-Bond{trademark}) to bond Gr-foam to aluminum, copper and aluminum/SiC composite faceplates. The results were very favorable, so a Phase II SBIR with the MDA was initiated. This had primarily 5 tasks: (1) bonding, (2) thermal modeling, (3) cooling chip scale packages, (4) evaporative cooling techniques and (5) IGBT cold plate development. The bonding tests showed that the ''reflow'' technique with S-Bond{reg_sign}-220 resulted in the best and most consistent bond. Then, thermal modeling was used to design different chip scale packages and IGBT cold plates. These designs were used to fabricate many finned graphite foam heat sinks specifically for two standard type IC packages, the 423 and 478 pin chips. These results demonstrated several advantages with the foam. First, the heat sinks with the foam were lighter than the copper/aluminum sinks used as standards. The sinks for the 423 design made from foam were not as good as the standard sinks. However, the sinks made from foam for the 478 pin chips were better than the standard heat sinks used today. However, this improvement was marginal (in the 10-20% better regime). However, another important note was that the epoxy bonding technique resulted in heat sinks with similar results as that with the S-bond{reg_sign}, slightly worse than the S-bond{reg_sign}, but still

  8. Influence of self heating and Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} addition on the microstructural development of calcium aluminate cement

    SciTech Connect

    Gosselin, Christophe Gallucci, Emmanuel; Scrivener, Karen

    2010-10-15

    Hydrated Calcium Aluminate Cement (CAC) is known to have a complex microstructure involving different phase assemblages strongly dependant on the temperature. This work presents an experimental approach to study the microstructure of CAC pastes from the first minute of hydration with controlled time-temperature histories up to several months of curing. The self heating usually occurring in the CAC concrete is considered and its influence on the growth and assemblage of the hydration products and subsequent space filling is shown. Quantification of the degree of CA hydration by BSE image analysis is used to understand the evolution of phases throughout the hydration process. Lithium sulphate is commonly used to control the setting time of CAC based materials. It is shown that this promotes the formation of more stable hydrates, but slightly reduces the extent of CA hydration.

  9. Modeling the Energy Performance of Event-Driven Wireless Sensor Network by Using Static Sink and Mobile Sink

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiehui; Salim, Mariam B.; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) designed for mission-critical applications suffer from limited sensing capacities, particularly fast energy depletion. Regarding this, mobile sinks can be used to balance the energy consumption in WSNs, but the frequent location updates of the mobile sinks can lead to data collisions and rapid energy consumption for some specific sensors. This paper explores an optimal barrier coverage based sensor deployment for event driven WSNs where a dual-sink model was designed to evaluate the energy performance of not only static sensors, but Static Sink (SS) and Mobile Sinks (MSs) simultaneously, based on parameters such as sensor transmission range r and the velocity of the mobile sink v, etc. Moreover, a MS mobility model was developed to enable SS and MSs to effectively collaborate, while achieving spatiotemporal energy performance efficiency by using the knowledge of the cumulative density function (cdf), Poisson process and M/G/1 queue. The simulation results verified that the improved energy performance of the whole network was demonstrated clearly and our eDSA algorithm is more efficient than the static-sink model, reducing energy consumption approximately in half. Moreover, we demonstrate that our results are robust to realistic sensing models and also validate the correctness of our results through extensive simulations. PMID:22163503

  10. The role of chemical additives to the phase change process of CaCl2.6H2O to optimize its performance as latent heat energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutjahja, I. M.; U, S. Rahayu A.; Kurniati, Nia; Pallitine, Ivyalentine D.; Kurnia, D.

    2016-08-01

    CaCl2.6H2O is one of salt hydrate based phase change material (PCM) which is suitable for room air-temperature stabilizer because it has the melting temperature just above the human comfort zone temperature (Tm ∼⃒ 29 oC) and a relatively large heat entalphy (AH ∼⃒ 190 kJ/kg). This paper reports the role of the type of chemical additives to PCM CaCl2.6H2O to the phase change process throughout the solidification process or heat release in order to optimize its performance as latent heat energy storage system. In this research we used several kinds of chemical additive, namely SrCl2.6H2O (1.0 wt%), BaCO3 (0.5 wt%), and K2CO3 (0.5 wt%). In terms of its latent time for phase change process the order the effectiveness of those chemical additives are reduced from SrCl2.6H2O, BaCO3and K2CO3. We found that this is also related to their role in suppression supercooling and phase separation effects which occurs during crystallization process of CaCl2.6H2O.

  11. Estimates of zonally averaged tropical diabatic heating in AMIP GCM simulations. PCMDI report No. 25

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    An understanding of the processess that generate the atmospheric diabatic heating rates is basic to an understanding of the time averaged general circulation of the atmosphere and also circulation anomalies. Knowledge of the sources and sinks of atmospheric heating enables a fuller understanding of the nature of the atmospheric circulation. An actual assesment of the diabatic heating rates in the atmosphere is a difficult problem that has been approached in a number of ways. One way is to estimate the total diabatic heating by estimating individual components associated with the radiative fluxes, the latent heat release, and sensible heat fluxes. An example of this approach is provided by Newell. Another approach is to estimate the net heating rates from consideration of the balance required of the mass and wind variables as routinely observed and analyzed. This budget computation has been done using the thermodynamic equation and more recently done by using the vorticity and thermodynamic equations. Schaak and Johnson compute the heating rates through the integration of the isentropic mass continuity equation. The estimates of heating arrived at all these methods are severely handicapped by the uncertainties in the observational data and analyses. In addition the estimates of the individual heating components suffer an additional source of error from the parameterizations used to approximate these quantities.

  12. Sources and sinks of carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The data base required to adequately ascertain seasonal source and sink strengths in the arctic regions is difficult to obtain. However, there are now a reasonable quantity of data for this polar region to estimate sources and sinks within the Arctic which may contribute significantly to the annual tropospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration fluctuation. The sea-ice-air and the sea-air interfaces account for most of the contribution to the sources and sinks for carbon dioxide. Although the arctic and subarctic region is small in extent, it certainly is not impervious and ice sealed. Our estimate, based on historical data and current research, indicates that the Arctic, which is about 4% of the earth's surface, is an annual net sink for approx. 10/sup 15/ g CO/sub 2/ accounting for an equivalent of approx. 3% of the annual anthropogenic contribution of CO/sub 2/ to the troposphere.

  13. 19. INTERIOR OF PANTRY SHOWING SHELVES, PLUMBING FOR A SINK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR OF PANTRY SHOWING SHELVES, PLUMBING FOR A SINK, AND 1-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOW ON SOUTH WALL. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  14. INVESTIGATING ENVIRONMENTAL SINKS OF MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS WITH ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Possible environmental sinks (wastewater effluents, biosolids, sediments) of macrolide antibiotics (i.e., azithromycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin)are investigated using state-of-the-art analytical chemistry techniques.

  15. Interior of niche with small sink and cabinets behind original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of niche with small sink and cabinets behind original nurses' station - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Type "B" Casualty Dressing & Decontamination Station, Intersection of Eighth Street, Avenue E & Central Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. 6. NORTHWEST INTERIOR VIEW IN SOUTHEAST ROOM WITH SINK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. NORTHWEST INTERIOR VIEW IN SOUTHEAST ROOM WITH SINK AND WORK STATION - Juniata Mill Complex, Camp Bunk House, 22.5 miles Southwest of Hawthorne, between Aurora Crater & Aurora Peak, Hawthorne, Mineral County, NV

  17. Lighting system with heat distribution face plate

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

    2013-09-10

    Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

  18. Hot balls splash and sink fast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Jeremy; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur; Chan, Derek

    2011-11-01

    When a heated sphere is immersed in a liquid, we induce an inverted Leidenfrost effect whereby the sphere is wrapped in a vapour jacket which protects it from physical contact with the liquid and, when released to fall freely in the liquid, the sphere's terminal velocity can increase dramatically compared to a cold ball. This Leidenfrost-induced vapour layer can lead to significant drag reduction by up to 85% which appears to be the limiting case for drag reduction techniques based on gas layer injection. In a related experiment, when the heated sphere is released from above the surface, the dynamics of the entry are significantly different from the cold case, resulting in a prompt splash and cavity formation. We propose that this experiment is the ultimate non-wetting scenario during water-entry problems.

  19. Great Basin NV Play Fairway Analysis - Carson Sink

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Faulds

    2015-10-28

    All datasets and products specific to the Carson Sink basin. Includes a packed ArcMap (.mpk), individually zipped shapefiles, and a file geodatabase for the Carson Sink area; a GeoSoft Oasis montaj project containing GM-SYS 2D gravity profiles along the trace of our seismic reflection lines; a 3D model in EarthVision; spreadsheet of links to published maps; and spreadsheets of well data.

  20. Post-sieve element transport of photoassimilates in sink regions.

    PubMed

    Patrick, J W; Offler, C E

    1996-08-01

    Photoassimilate transport from the sieve elements to the recipient sink cells, principally in the form of sucrose, provides a link between sink metabolism and compartmentation with phloem import. Phloem unloading has focused attention on photoassimilate transport across the sieve element boundary. However, post-sieve element transport can be of equal or greater significance. Three cellular pathways of sieve element unloading and post-sieve element transport are identified. These are apoplastic, symplastic and symplastic interrupted by an apoplastic step. The symplastic path is considered to be the common path, while the remaining pathways serve specialized functions. In particular, the apoplastic step isolates the sieve element transport function from the effects of solute concentration or osmotic changes in the sink cells. Switching between apo- and symplastic routes within a given sink has been found to be linked with such changes. Plasmodesmatal transport undoubtedly involves a diffusive component, but whether bulk flow contributes to the symplastic flux of photoassimilate from the sieve elements to the recipient sink cells is yet to be established unequivocally. Efflux across the plasma membranes of the sieve element-companion cell (se-cc) complexes and other vascular cells occurs by passive diffusion. Along the axial route, retrieval from the phloem apoplast is mediated by sucrose/proton symport. However, this mechanism is absent in terminal sinks. Non-vascular efflux from the maternal tissues of developing seed is passive in cereals and energy-coupled in certain grain legumes. Accumulation of sugars from the apoplast of all sinks with an apoplastic step universally occurs by a plasma membrane-bound sugar/proton symport mechanism. Regulation of symplastic transport could be mediated by a combination of sink metabolism and compartmentation coupled with changes in the transport properties of the interconnecting plasmodesmata. PMID:21245245

  1. Aggregation and sinking behaviour of resuspended fluffy layer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, Kai; Forster, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The influence of pelagic diatom addition ( Skeletonema costatum) on aggregation dynamics of resuspended fluffy layer material containing natural microorganism assemblages (bacteria and pennate diatoms) was studied during two roller table experiments. Sediment samples were taken at a fine sand site (16 m water depth) located in Mecklenburg Bight, south-western Baltic Sea. Fluff was experimentally resuspended from sediment cores and aggregation processes with and without S. costatum were studied in rotating tanks. Total particulate matter was incorporated into artificial aggregates in equal shares after both roller table experiments. However, biogenic parameters (particulate organic carbon, particulate organic nitrogen, and carbohydrate equivalents), as well as cell numbers of bacteria and pennate diatoms were found in higher percentages in S. costatum aggregates compared to aggregates without S. costatum. Transparent exopolymer particles were apparently irrelevant in the aggregation process during both experiments. Settling velocities of S. costatum aggregates exceeding 1000 μm in diameter showed a significantly higher mean settling velocity compared to aggregates without S. costatum of the same size. The pronounced effect of pelagic diatoms on aggregation processes of fluff in terms of particle attributes, size, and therewith sinking velocities could be demonstrated and may lead to further insight into near bed particle transport in coastal waters.

  2. Night temperature and source–sink effects on overall growth, cell number and cell size in bell pepper ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Rebecca L.; Cruz-Huerta, Nicacio; Williamson, Jeffrey G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Ovary swelling, and resultant fruit malformation, in bell pepper flowers is favoured by low night temperature or a high source–sink ratio. However, the interaction between night temperature and source–sink ratio on ovary swelling and the contribution of cell size and cell number to ovary swelling are unknown. The present research examined the interactive effects of night temperature and source–sink ratio on ovary size, cell number and cell size at anthesis in bell pepper flowers. Methods Bell pepper plants were grown in growth chambers at night temperatures of either 20 °C (HNT) or 12 °C (LNT). Within each temperature treatment, plants bore either 0 (non-fruiting) or two developing fruits per plant. Ovary fresh weight, cell size and cell number were measured. Key Results Ovary fresh weights in non-fruiting plants grown at LNT were the largest, while fresh weights were smallest in plants grown at HNT with fruits. In general, mesocarp cell size in ovaries was largest in non-fruiting plants grown at either LNT or HNT and smallest in fruiting plants at HNT. Mesocarp cell number was greater in non-fruiting plants under LNT than in the rest of the night temperature/fruiting treatments. These responses were more marked in ovaries sampled after 18 d of treatment compared with those sampled after 40 d of treatment. Conclusions Ovary fresh weight of flowers at anthesis increased 65 % in non-fruiting plants grown under LNT compared with fruiting plants grown under HNT. This increase was due primarily to increases in mesocarp cell number and size. These results indicate that the combined effects of LNT and high source–sink ratio on ovary swelling are additive. Furthermore, the combined effects of LNT and low source–sink ratio or HNT and high source–sink ratio can partially overcome the detrimental effects of LNT and high source–sink ratio. PMID:22933415

  3. Sinking and fit of abutment of locking taper implant system

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Seung-Jin; Kim, Hee-Jung; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Unlike screw-retention type, fixture-abutment retention in Locking taper connection depends on frictional force so it has possibility of abutment to sink. PURPOSE In this study, Bicon® Implant System, one of the conical internal connection implant system, was used with applying loading force to the abutments connected to the fixture. Then the amount of sinking was measured. MATERIAL AND METHODS 10 Bicon® implant fixtures were used. First, the abutment was connected to the fixture with finger force. Then it was tapped with a mallet for 3 times and loads of 20 kg corresponding to masticatory force using loading application instrument were applied successively. The abutment state, slightly connected to the fixture without pressure was considered as a reference length, and every new abutment length was measured after each load's step was added. The amount of abutment sinking (mm) was gained by subtracting the length of abutment-fixture under each loading condition from reference length. RESULTS It was evident, that the amount of abutment sinking in Bicon® Implant System increased as loads were added. When loads of 20 kg were applied more than 5 - 7 times, sinking stopped at 0.45 ± 0.09 mm. CONCLUSION Even though locking taper connection type implant shows good adaption to occlusal force, it has potential for abutment sinking as loads are given. When locking taper connection type implant is used, satisfactory loads are recommended for precise abutment location. PMID:21165262

  4. Influence of additives on the increase of the heating value of Bayah’s coal with upgrading brown coal (UBC) method

    SciTech Connect

    Heriyanto, Heri; Widya Ernayati, K.; Umam, Chairul; Margareta, Nita

    2015-12-29

    UBC (upgrading brown coal) is a method of improving the quality of coal by using oil as an additive. Through processing in the oil media, not just the calories that increase, but there is also water repellent properties and a decrease in the tendency of spontaneous combustion of coal products produced. The results showed a decrease in the water levels of natural coal bayah reached 69%, increase in calorific value reached 21.2%. Increased caloric value and reduced water content caused by the water molecules on replacing seal the pores of coal by oil and atoms C on the oil that is bound to increase the percentage of coal carbon. As a result of this experiment is, the produced coal has better calorific value, the increasing of this new calorific value up to 23.8% with the additive waste lubricant, and the moisture content reduced up to 69.45%.

  5. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  6. Trade, transport, and sinks extend the carbon dioxide responsibility of countries: An editorial essay

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Glen P; Marland, Gregg; Hertwich, Edgar G.; Saikku, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Globalization and the dynamics of ecosystem sinks need be considered in post-Kyoto climate negotiations as they increasingly affect the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. Currently, the allocation of responsibility for greenhouse gas mitigation is based on territorial emissions from fossil-fuel combustion, process emissions and some land-use emissions. However, at least three additional factors can significantly alter a country's impact on climate from carbon dioxide emissions. First, international trade causes a separation of consumption from production, reducing domestic pollution at the expense of foreign producers, or vice versa. Second, international transportation emissions are not allocated to countries for the purpose of mitigation. Third, forest growth absorbs carbon dioxide and can contribute to both carbon sequestration and climate change protection. Here we quantify how these three factors change the carbon dioxide emissions allocated to China, Japan, Russia, USA, and European Union member countries. We show that international trade can change the carbon dioxide currently allocated to countries by up to 60% and that forest expansion can turn some countries into net carbon sinks. These factors are expected to become more dominant as fossil-fuel combustion and process emissions are mitigated and as international trade and forest sinks continue to grow. Emission inventories currently in wide-spread use help to understand the global carbon cycle, but for long-term climate change mitigation a deeper understanding of the interaction between the carbon cycle and society is needed. Restructuring international trade and investment flows to meet environmental objectives, together with the inclusion of forest sinks, are crucial issues that need consideration in the design of future climate policies. And even these additional issues do not capture the full impact of changes in the carbon cycle on the global climate system.

  7. Sink-source interactions between a galling aphid and its narrowleaf cottonwood host: Within and between plant variation

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    The authors examined within and between plant variation in the capacity of the leaf gallin aphid, Pemphigus betae, to manipulate the sink-source translocation patterns of its host, narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia). Within a plant, a series of {sup 14}C-labeling experiments showed that P. betae actively manipulated host translocation patterns by acting as a strong sink and fed on assimilates produced in surrounding plant tissues serving as sources. Food resources drawn into the galled leaf from storage tissues in the stem and from surrounding leaves were a major resource for this herbivore in addition to resources from the galled leaf blade. Aphids compete for resources with natural plant sinks, such as developing fruits. In common gardens containing aphid resistant and aphid susceptible clones, I tested the hypothesis that aphid gall success on resistant trees is limited by competition between aphid-induced sinks and the plant's natural sinks, and that the intensity of intraplant competition was determined by the genetically determined architecture of the tree. Through bud removal, a resistant clone could be given the architecture of a susceptible clone. Aphid survival was increased two fold on architecturally modified resistant clones.

  8. A 10-kW SiC Inverter with A Novel Printed Metal Power Module With Integrated Cooling Using Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Ayers, Curtis William; Campbell, Steven L; Wiles, Randy H; Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-01-01

    With efforts to reduce the cost, size, and thermal management systems for the power electronics drivetrain in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), wide band gap semiconductors including silicon carbide (SiC) have been identified as possibly being a partial solution. This paper focuses on the development of a 10-kW all SiC inverter using a high power density, integrated printed metal power module with integrated cooling using additive manufacturing techniques. This is the first ever heat sink printed for a power electronics application. About 50% of the inverter was built using additive manufacturing techniques.

  9. An alternative hypothesis for sink development above salt cavities in the Detroit area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stump, Daniel; Nieto, A.S.; Ege, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    uniaxial and triaxial testing, the Sylvania Sandstone in the Detroit area has been shown to have low compressive strength. In addition, it exhibits an explosive type failure whereby over 50 percent of the sample is reduced to loose granular sand. As a result of these characteristics, the Sylvania Sandstone can loose its cohesion when subjected to high horizontal stresses. Efforts at mechanically modeling the Sylvania were made to account for the measurements and observations. Linear arch theory was used for an elastic analysis. Linear arch theory predicts two modes of failure: (1) arch crushing, a compressive failure of the upper portion of the arch due to compressive stresses exceeding the compressive strength of the material, and (2) arch collapse, a sagging of the beds due to compressive strains which reduce the arch line to a length less than the original arch length. The arch crushing mode of failure would then yield the loose granular sand as observed in laboratory testing. Arch collapse would simply result in bed sagging without granulation of the sandstone. Arch collapse is favored by thin-bedded material while arch crushing is favored by thick-bedded material. Arch crushing seems to be a likely mode of failure for the Windsor-Detroit sinks. It is believed that after a crushing failure the sand-water slurry (specific gravity 1.2) which exceeds the density of the cavity brine will migrate downward through cracks and open joints eventually reaching the practically limitless open spaces of the rubble column and salt cavity. As the extent of the cavity within the Sylvania increases in depth and width because of sand migration, a critical span will be reached where the immediately overlying upper Sylvania and the overlying Detroit River Dolomite will fail. The collapse will allow a path for the approximately 100 ft of clay to collapse, resulting in a sink as the surface manifestation.

  10. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-12-31

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  11. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-10-01

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and an uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  12. Raptor Electrocution: A Case Study on Ecological Traps, Sinks, and Additive Mortality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, James F.

    2009-01-01

    The recovery from human persecution of some upper trophic level wildlife species coupled with ongoing expansion of human-dominated landscapes is leading to increased human-wildlife interactions in urban environments. Raptors in particular are drawn to high resource concentrations of potential nest sites and prey, and are colonizing cities across…

  13. Identifying Greater Sage-Grouse source and sink habitats for conservation planning in an energy development landscape.

    PubMed

    Kirol, Christopher P; Beck, Jeffrey L; Huzurbazar, Snehalata V; Holloran, Matthew J; Miller, Scott N

    2015-06-01

    Conserving a declining species that is facing many threats, including overlap of its habitats with energy extraction activities, depends upon identifying and prioritizing the value of the habitats that remain. In addition, habitat quality is often compromised when source habitats are lost or fragmented due to anthropogenic development. Our objective was to build an ecological model to classify and map habitat quality in terms of source or sink dynamics for Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Atlantic Rim Project Area (ARPA), a developing coalbed natural gas field in south-central Wyoming, USA. We used occurrence and survival modeling to evaluate relationships between environmental and anthropogenic variables at multiple spatial scales and for all female summer life stages, including nesting, brood-rearing, and non-brooding females. For each life stage, we created resource selection functions (RSFs). We weighted the RSFs and combined them to form a female summer occurrence map. We modeled survival also as a function of spatial variables for nest, brood, and adult female summer survival. Our survival-models were mapped as survival probability functions individually and then combined with fixed vital rates in a fitness metric model that, when mapped, predicted habitat productivity (productivity map). Our results demonstrate a suite of environmental and anthropogenic variables at multiple scales that were predictive of occurrence and survival. We created a source-sink map by overlaying our female summer occurrence map and productivity map to predict habitats contributing to population surpluses (source habitats) or deficits (sink habitat) and low-occurrence habitats on the landscape. The source-sink map predicted that of the Sage-Grouse habitat within the ARPA, 30% was primary source, 29% was secondary source, 4% was primary sink, 6% was secondary sink, and 31% was low occurrence. Our results provide evidence that energy development and avoidance of

  14. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  15. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  16. Primary production, sinking fluxes and the microbial food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Anthony F.; Silver, Mary W.

    1988-04-01

    The size distribution of pelagic producers and the size and trophic position of consumers determine the composition and magnitude of sinking fluxes from the surface communities in a simple model of oceanic food webs. Picoplankton, the dominant producers in the model, contribute little to the sinking material, due primarily to the large number of trophic steps between picoplankton and the consumers that produce the sinking particles. Net phytoplankton are important contributors to the sinking materials, despite accounting for a small fraction of the total primary production. These net phytoplankton, especially those capable of nitrogen fixation, also dominate the fraction of the new production that is exported on its first pass through the food chain. The sinking flux is strongly determined by the community structure of the consumers and varies by an order of magnitude for different food webs. The model indicates that generalist grazers, zooplankton that consume a broad size spectrum of prey (including pico-and nanoplankton), play a critical role in exporting particles. The role of generalists that occasionally form swarms, such as thaliaceans (salps and doliolids), can be particularly difficult to assess. Short-term studies probably miss the relatively infrequent population blooms of these grazers, events that could control the average, long-term exports from surface oceanic communities.

  17. Long-term decline of the Amazon carbon sink.

    PubMed

    Brienen, R J W; Phillips, O L; Feldpausch, T R; Gloor, E; Baker, T R; Lloyd, J; Lopez-Gonzalez, G; Monteagudo-Mendoza, A; Malhi, Y; Lewis, S L; Vásquez Martinez, R; Alexiades, M; Álvarez Dávila, E; Alvarez-Loayza, P; Andrade, A; Aragão, L E O C; Araujo-Murakami, A; Arets, E J M M; Arroyo, L; Aymard C, G A; Bánki, O S; Baraloto, C; Barroso, J; Bonal, D; Boot, R G A; Camargo, J L C; Castilho, C V; Chama, V; Chao, K J; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Cornejo Valverde, F; da Costa, L; de Oliveira, E A; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T L; Fauset, S; Forsthofer, M; Galbraith, D R; Grahame, E S; Groot, N; Hérault, B; Higuchi, N; Honorio Coronado, E N; Keeling, H; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Laurance, S; Licona, J; Magnussen, W E; Marimon, B S; Marimon-Junior, B H; Mendoza, C; Neill, D A; Nogueira, E M; Núñez, P; Pallqui Camacho, N C; Parada, A; Pardo-Molina, G; Peacock, J; Peña-Claros, M; Pickavance, G C; Pitman, N C A; Poorter, L; Prieto, A; Quesada, C A; Ramírez, F; Ramírez-Angulo, H; Restrepo, Z; Roopsind, A; Rudas, A; Salomão, R P; Schwarz, M; Silva, N; Silva-Espejo, J E; Silveira, M; Stropp, J; Talbot, J; ter Steege, H; Teran-Aguilar, J; Terborgh, J; Thomas-Caesar, R; Toledo, M; Torello-Raventos, M; Umetsu, R K; van der Heijden, G M F; van der Hout, P; Guimarães Vieira, I C; Vieira, S A; Vilanova, E; Vos, V A; Zagt, R J

    2015-03-19

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide records indicate that the land surface has acted as a strong global carbon sink over recent decades, with a substantial fraction of this sink probably located in the tropics, particularly in the Amazon. Nevertheless, it is unclear how the terrestrial carbon sink will evolve as climate and atmospheric composition continue to change. Here we analyse the historical evolution of the biomass dynamics of the Amazon rainforest over three decades using a distributed network of 321 plots. While this analysis confirms that Amazon forests have acted as a long-term net biomass sink, we find a long-term decreasing trend of carbon accumulation. Rates of net increase in above-ground biomass declined by one-third during the past decade compared to the 1990s. This is a consequence of growth rate increases levelling off recently, while biomass mortality persistently increased throughout, leading to a shortening of carbon residence times. Potential drivers for the mortality increase include greater climate variability, and feedbacks of faster growth on mortality, resulting in shortened tree longevity. The observed decline of the Amazon sink diverges markedly from the recent increase in terrestrial carbon uptake at the global scale, and is contrary to expectations based on models.

  18. Temperate Forest Methane Sink Diminished by Tree Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, P.; Pitz, S.

    2015-12-01

    Global budgets ascribe 4-10% of atmospheric CH4 sinks to upland soils and assume that soils are the sole surface for CH4 exchange between upland forests and the atmosphere. The prevailing dogma that upland forests are sinks of atmospheric CH4 was challenged a decade ago by large discrepancies in bottom-up versus top-down models of CH4 concentrations over upland forests that are still unexplained. Evidence of a novel abiotic mechanism for CH4 production from plant tissue is too small to explain the discrepancy. Alternative hypotheses for this observation have been proposed, but not tested. Here we demonstrate that CH4 is emitted from the stems of dominant tree species in an upland forest. Tree emissions occur throughout the growing season while soils adjacent to the trees are consuming CH4, challenging the concept that forests are uniform sinks of CH4. Scaling by stem surface area showed the forest to be a net CH4 source during a wet sample in June and a reduced CH4 sink by 5% annually. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycling in the rate of CH4 emissions, pointing to soils as the CH4 source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for CH4 transport. We propose the forests are smaller CH4 sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Stem emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration, resolving differences between models and measurements.

  19. Long-term decline of the Amazon carbon sink.

    PubMed

    Brienen, R J W; Phillips, O L; Feldpausch, T R; Gloor, E; Baker, T R; Lloyd, J; Lopez-Gonzalez, G; Monteagudo-Mendoza, A; Malhi, Y; Lewis, S L; Vásquez Martinez, R; Alexiades, M; Álvarez Dávila, E; Alvarez-Loayza, P; Andrade, A; Aragão, L E O C; Araujo-Murakami, A; Arets, E J M M; Arroyo, L; Aymard C, G A; Bánki, O S; Baraloto, C; Barroso, J; Bonal, D; Boot, R G A; Camargo, J L C; Castilho, C V; Chama, V; Chao, K J; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Cornejo Valverde, F; da Costa, L; de Oliveira, E A; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T L; Fauset, S; Forsthofer, M; Galbraith, D R; Grahame, E S; Groot, N; Hérault, B; Higuchi, N; Honorio Coronado, E N; Keeling, H; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Laurance, S; Licona, J; Magnussen, W E; Marimon, B S; Marimon-Junior, B H; Mendoza, C; Neill, D A; Nogueira, E M; Núñez, P; Pallqui Camacho, N C; Parada, A; Pardo-Molina, G; Peacock, J; Peña-Claros, M; Pickavance, G C; Pitman, N C A; Poorter, L; Prieto, A; Quesada, C A; Ramírez, F; Ramírez-Angulo, H; Restrepo, Z; Roopsind, A; Rudas, A; Salomão, R P; Schwarz, M; Silva, N; Silva-Espejo, J E; Silveira, M; Stropp, J; Talbot, J; ter Steege, H; Teran-Aguilar, J; Terborgh, J; Thomas-Caesar, R; Toledo, M; Torello-Raventos, M; Umetsu, R K; van der Heijden, G M F; van der Hout, P; Guimarães Vieira, I C; Vieira, S A; Vilanova, E; Vos, V A; Zagt, R J

    2015-03-19

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide records indicate that the land surface has acted as a strong global carbon sink over recent decades, with a substantial fraction of this sink probably located in the tropics, particularly in the Amazon. Nevertheless, it is unclear how the terrestrial carbon sink will evolve as climate and atmospheric composition continue to change. Here we analyse the historical evolution of the biomass dynamics of the Amazon rainforest over three decades using a distributed network of 321 plots. While this analysis confirms that Amazon forests have acted as a long-term net biomass sink, we find a long-term decreasing trend of carbon accumulation. Rates of net increase in above-ground biomass declined by one-third during the past decade compared to the 1990s. This is a consequence of growth rate increases levelling off recently, while biomass mortality persistently increased throughout, leading to a shortening of carbon residence times. Potential drivers for the mortality increase include greater climate variability, and feedbacks of faster growth on mortality, resulting in shortened tree longevity. The observed decline of the Amazon sink diverges markedly from the recent increase in terrestrial carbon uptake at the global scale, and is contrary to expectations based on models. PMID:25788097

  20. Experimental demonstration of accelerated extinction in source-sink metapopulations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John M; Griffen, Blaine D

    2013-01-01

    Population extinction is a fundamental ecological process which may be aggravated by the exchange of organisms between productive (source) and unproductive (sink) habitat patches. The extent to which such source-sink exchange affects extinction rates is unknown. We conducted an experiment in which metapopulation effects could be distinguished from source-sink effects in laboratory populations of Daphnia magna. Time-to-extinction in this experiment was maximized at intermediate levels of habitat fragmentation, which is consistent with a minority of theoretical models. These results provided a baseline for comparison with experimental treatments designed to detect effects of concentrating resources in source patches. These treatments showed that source-sink configurations increased population variability (the coefficient of variation in abundance) and extinction hazard compared with homogeneous environments. These results suggest that where environments are spatially heterogeneous, accurate assessments of extinction risk will require understanding the exchange of organisms among population sources and sinks. Such heterogeneity may be the norm rather than the exception because of both the intrinsic heterogeneity naturally exhibited by ecosystems and increasing habitat fragmentation by human activity. PMID:24223275

  1. Undocumented water column sink for cadmium in open ocean oxygen-deficient zones.

    PubMed

    Janssen, David J; Conway, Tim M; John, Seth G; Christian, James R; Kramer, Dennis I; Pedersen, Tom F; Cullen, Jay T

    2014-05-13

    Cadmium (Cd) is a micronutrient and a tracer of biological productivity and circulation in the ocean. The correlation between dissolved Cd and the major algal nutrients in seawater has led to the use of Cd preserved in microfossils to constrain past ocean nutrient distributions. However, linking Cd to marine biological processes requires constraints on marine sources and sinks of Cd. Here, we show a decoupling between Cd and major nutrients within oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) in both the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans, which we attribute to Cd sulfide (CdS) precipitation in euxinic microenvironments around sinking biological particles. We find that dissolved Cd correlates well with dissolved phosphate in oxygenated waters, but is depleted compared with phosphate in ODZs. Additionally, suspended particles from the North Atlantic show high Cd content and light Cd stable isotope ratios within the ODZ, indicative of CdS precipitation. Globally, we calculate that CdS precipitation in ODZs is an important, and to our knowledge a previously undocumented marine sink of Cd. Our results suggest that water column oxygen depletion has a substantial impact on Cd biogeochemical cycling, impacting the global relationship between Cd and major nutrients and suggesting that Cd may be a previously unidentified tracer for water column oxygen deficiency on geological timescales. Similar depletions of copper and zinc in the Northeast Pacific indicate that sulfide precipitation in ODZs may also have an influence on the global distribution of other trace metals. PMID:24778239

  2. Metabolite transport and associated sugar signalling systems underpinning source/sink interactions.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Cara A; Paul, Matthew J; Foyer, Christine H

    2016-10-01

    Metabolite transport between organelles, cells and source and sink tissues not only enables pathway co-ordination but it also facilitates whole plant communication, particularly in the transmission of information concerning resource availability. Carbon assimilation is co-ordinated with nitrogen assimilation to ensure that the building blocks of biomass production, amino acids and carbon skeletons, are available at the required amounts and stoichiometry, with associated transport processes making certain that these essential resources are transported from their sites of synthesis to those of utilisation. Of the many possible posttranslational mechanisms that might participate in efficient co-ordination of metabolism and transport only reversible thiol-disulphide exchange mechanisms have been described in detail. Sucrose and trehalose metabolism are intertwined in the signalling hub that ensures appropriate resource allocation to drive growth and development under optimal and stress conditions, with trehalose-6-phosphate acting as an important signal for sucrose availability. The formidable suite of plant metabolite transporters provides enormous flexibility and adaptability in inter-pathway coordination and source-sink interactions. Focussing on the carbon metabolism network, we highlight the functions of different transporter families, and the important of thioredoxins in the metabolic dialogue between source and sink tissues. In addition, we address how these systems can be tailored for crop improvement. PMID:27487250

  3. Undocumented water column sink for cadmium in open ocean oxygen-deficient zones

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, David J.; Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.; Christian, James R.; Kramer, Dennis I.; Pedersen, Tom F.; Cullen, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a micronutrient and a tracer of biological productivity and circulation in the ocean. The correlation between dissolved Cd and the major algal nutrients in seawater has led to the use of Cd preserved in microfossils to constrain past ocean nutrient distributions. However, linking Cd to marine biological processes requires constraints on marine sources and sinks of Cd. Here, we show a decoupling between Cd and major nutrients within oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) in both the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans, which we attribute to Cd sulfide (CdS) precipitation in euxinic microenvironments around sinking biological particles. We find that dissolved Cd correlates well with dissolved phosphate in oxygenated waters, but is depleted compared with phosphate in ODZs. Additionally, suspended particles from the North Atlantic show high Cd content and light Cd stable isotope ratios within the ODZ, indicative of CdS precipitation. Globally, we calculate that CdS precipitation in ODZs is an important, and to our knowledge a previously undocumented marine sink of Cd. Our results suggest that water column oxygen depletion has a substantial impact on Cd biogeochemical cycling, impacting the global relationship between Cd and major nutrients and suggesting that Cd may be a previously unidentified tracer for water column oxygen deficiency on geological timescales. Similar depletions of copper and zinc in the Northeast Pacific indicate that sulfide precipitation in ODZs may also have an influence on the global distribution of other trace metals. PMID:24778239

  4. Undocumented water column sink for cadmium in open ocean oxygen-deficient zones.

    PubMed

    Janssen, David J; Conway, Tim M; John, Seth G; Christian, James R; Kramer, Dennis I; Pedersen, Tom F; Cullen, Jay T

    2014-05-13

    Cadmium (Cd) is a micronutrient and a tracer of biological productivity and circulation in the ocean. The correlation between dissolved Cd and the major algal nutrients in seawater has led to the use of Cd preserved in microfossils to constrain past ocean nutrient distributions. However, linking Cd to marine biological processes requires constraints on marine sources and sinks of Cd. Here, we show a decoupling between Cd and major nutrients within oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) in both the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans, which we attribute to Cd sulfide (CdS) precipitation in euxinic microenvironments around sinking biological particles. We find that dissolved Cd correlates well with dissolved phosphate in oxygenated waters, but is depleted compared with phosphate in ODZs. Additionally, suspended particles from the North Atlantic show high Cd content and light Cd stable isotope ratios within the ODZ, indicative of CdS precipitation. Globally, we calculate that CdS precipitation in ODZs is an important, and to our knowledge a previously undocumented marine sink of Cd. Our results suggest that water column oxygen depletion has a substantial impact on Cd biogeochemical cycling, impacting the global relationship between Cd and major nutrients and suggesting that Cd may be a previously unidentified tracer for water column oxygen deficiency on geological timescales. Similar depletions of copper and zinc in the Northeast Pacific indicate that sulfide precipitation in ODZs may also have an influence on the global distribution of other trace metals.

  5. High levels of acute phase proteins and soluble 70 kDa heat shock proteins are independent and additive risk factors for mortality in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kocsis, Judit; Mészáros, Tamás; Madaras, Balázs; Tóth, Éva Katalin; Kamondi, Szilárd; Gál, Péter; Varga, Lilian; Prohászka, Zoltán

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we reported that high soluble Hsp70 (sHsp70) level was a significant predictor of mortality during an almost 3-year-long follow-up period in patients with colorectal cancer. This association was the strongest in the group of <70-year-old female patients as well as in those who were in a less advanced stage of the disease at baseline. According to these observations, measurement of the serum level of sHsp70 is a useful, stage-independent prognostic marker in colorectal cancer, especially in patients without distant metastasis. Since many literature data indicated that measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other acute phase proteins (APPs) may also be suitable for predicting the mortality of patients with colorectal cancer, it seemed reasonable to study whether the effect of sHsp70 and other APPs are related or independent. In order to answer this question, we measured the concentrations of CRP as well as of other complement-related APPs (C1 inhibitor, C3, and C9) along with that of the MASP-2 complement component in the sera of 175 patients with colorectal cancer and known levels of sHsp70, which have been used in our previous study. High (above median) levels of CRP, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), and sHsp70 were found to be independently associated with poor patient survival, whereas no such association was observed with the other proteins tested. According to the adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis, the additive effect of high sHsp70, CRP, and C1-INH levels on the survival of patients exceeded that of high sHsp70 alone, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.83 (1.13–70.9). In some subgroups of patients, such as in females [HR 4.80 (1.07–21.60)] or in ≤70-year-old patients [HR 11.53 (2.78–47.70)], even greater differences were obtained. These findings indicate that the clinical mortality–prediction value of combined measurements of sHsp70, CRP, and C1-INH with inexpensive methods can be very high, especially in specific subgroups of

  6. Sources/sinks analysis with satellite sensing for exploring global atmospheric CO2 distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, C.; Nassar, R.; Kim, J.

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in CO2 budget analysis since space-borne measurements of global CO2 distribution have been conducted (e.g, GOSAT project). Here we simulated the global CO2 distribution to estimate individual source/sink contributions. The chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) was used in order to simulate the global CO2 distribution with updated global sources/sinks with 2°x2.5° horizontal resolution. In addition, 3-D emissions from aviation and chemical oxidation of CO are implemented. The model simulated CO2 amounts were compared with the GOSAT column averaged CO2 column (SWIR L2 data) from April 2009 to May 2010. The seasonal cycles of CO2 concentration were compared and the regional patterns of CO2 distribution are explained by the model with a systemic difference by 1 ~ 2% in the CO2 concentration. In other work, the GEOS-Chem CO2 concentrations show reasonable agreement with GLOBALVIEW-CO2. We further estimated the sources/sinks contributions to the global CO2 budget through 9 tagged CO2 tracers (fossil fuels, ocean exchanges, biomass burning, biofuel burning, balanced biosphere, net terrestrial exchange, ship emissions, aviation emissions, and oxidation from carbon precursors) over the years 2005-2009. Global CO2 concentration shows an increase of 2.1 ppbv/year in which the human fossil fuel and cement emissions are the main driving force (5.0 ppbv/year) for the trend. Net terrestrial and oceanic exchange of CO2 are main sinks (-2.1 ppbv/year and -0.7 ppbv/year, respectively). Our model results will help to suggest the level of reduction in global human CO2 emissions which could control the global CO2 trends in 21th century.

  7. Timescales for detection of trends in the ocean carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Galen A.; Pilcher, Darren J.; Fay, Amanda R.; Lindsay, Keith; Long, Matthew C.; Lovenduski, Nicole S.

    2016-02-01

    The ocean has absorbed 41 per cent of all anthropogenic carbon emitted as a result of fossil fuel burning and cement manufacture. The magnitude and the large-scale distribution of the ocean carbon sink is well quantified for recent decades. In contrast, temporal changes in the oceanic carbon sink remain poorly understood. It has proved difficult to distinguish between air-to-sea carbon flux trends that are due to anthropogenic climate change and those due to internal climate variability. Here we use a modelling approach that allows for this separation, revealing how the ocean carbon sink may be expected to change throughout this century in different oceanic regions. Our findings suggest that, owing to large internal climate variability, it is unlikely that changes in the rate of anthropogenic carbon uptake can be directly observed in most oceanic regions at present, but that this may become possible between 2020 and 2050 in some regions.

  8. Subterranean atmospheres may act as daily methane sinks.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Alvarez-Gallego, Miriam; Garcia-Anton, Elena; Pla, Concepcion; Benavente, David; Jurado, Valme; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, methane (CH4) has received increasing scientific attention because it is the most abundant non-CO2 atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) and controls numerous chemical reactions in the troposphere and stratosphere. However, there is much that is unknown about CH4 sources and sinks and their evolution over time. Here we show that near-surface cavities in the uppermost vadose zone are now actively removing atmospheric CH4. Through seasonal geochemical tracing of air in the atmosphere, soil and underground at diverse geographic and climatic locations in Spain, our results show that complete consumption of CH4 is favoured in the subsurface atmosphere under near vapour-saturation conditions and without significant intervention of methanotrophic bacteria. Overall, our results indicate that subterranean atmospheres may be acting as sinks for atmospheric CH4 on a daily scale. However, this terrestrial sink has not yet been considered in CH4 budget balances. PMID:25912519

  9. The reinvigoration of the Southern Ocean carbon sink.

    PubMed

    Landschützer, Peter; Gruber, Nicolas; Haumann, F Alexander; Rödenbeck, Christian; Bakker, Dorothee C E; van Heuven, Steven; Hoppema, Mario; Metzl, Nicolas; Sweeney, Colm; Takahashi, Taro; Tilbrook, Bronte; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2015-09-11

    Several studies have suggested that the carbon sink in the Southern Ocean-the ocean's strongest region for the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 -has weakened in recent decades. We demonstrated, on the basis of multidecadal analyses of surface ocean CO2 observations, that this weakening trend stopped around 2002, and by 2012, the Southern Ocean had regained its expected strength based on the growth of atmospheric CO2. All three Southern Ocean sectors have contributed to this reinvigoration of the carbon sink, yet differences in the processes between sectors exist, related to a tendency toward a zonally more asymmetric atmospheric circulation. The large decadal variations in the Southern Ocean carbon sink suggest a rather dynamic ocean carbon cycle that varies more in time than previously recognized.

  10. Review of tribological sinks in six major industries

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T.; Gruber, T.; Barber, S.

    1985-09-01

    Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.

  11. Timescales for detection of trends in the ocean carbon sink.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Galen A; Pilcher, Darren J; Fay, Amanda R; Lindsay, Keith; Long, Matthew C; Lovenduski, Nicole S

    2016-02-25

    The ocean has absorbed 41 per cent of all anthropogenic carbon emitted as a result of fossil fuel burning and cement manufacture. The magnitude and the large-scale distribution of the ocean carbon sink is well quantified for recent decades. In contrast, temporal changes in the oceanic carbon sink remain poorly understood. It has proved difficult to distinguish between air-to-sea carbon flux trends that are due to anthropogenic climate change and those due to internal climate variability. Here we use a modelling approach that allows for this separation, revealing how the ocean carbon sink may be expected to change throughout this century in different oceanic regions. Our findings suggest that, owing to large internal climate variability, it is unlikely that changes in the rate of anthropogenic carbon uptake can be directly observed in most oceanic regions at present, but that this may become possible between 2020 and 2050 in some regions. PMID:26911782

  12. N-SINK - reduction of waste water nitrogen load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Sanni; Tiirola, Marja; Arvola, Lauri; Huotari, Jussi; Tulonen, Tiina; Rissanen, Antti; Nykänen, Hannu

    2014-05-01

    Protection of the Baltic Sea from eutrophication is one of the key topics in the European Union environmental policy. One of the main anthropogenic sources of nitrogen (N) loading into Baltic Sea are waste water treatment plants, which are currently capable in removing only 40-70% of N. European commission has obliged Finland and other Baltic states to reduce nitrate load, which would require high monetary investments on nitrate removal processes in treatment plants. In addition, forced denitrification in treatment plants would increase emissions of strong greenhouse gas N2O. In this project (LIFE12 FI/ENV/597 N-SINK) we will develop and demonstrate a novel economically feasible method for nitrogen removal using applied ecosystem services. As sediment is known to have enormous capacity to reduce nitrate to nitrogen gas through denitrification, we predict that spatial optimization of the waste water discharge would be an efficient way to reduce nitrate-based load in aquatic systems. A new sediment filtration approach, which will increase both the area and time that nitrified waste water will be in contact with the reducing microbes of the sediment, is tested. Compared to the currently implemented practice, where purified waste water is discharged though one-point outlet system, we expect that sediment filtration system will result in more efficient denitrification and decreased N load to aquatic system. We will conduct three full-scale demonstrations in the receiving water bodies of waste water treatment plants in Southern and Central Finland. The ecosystem effects of sediment filtration system will be monitored. Using the most advanced stable isotope techniques will allow us accurately measure denitrification and unfavoured DNRA (reduction of nitrite to ammonium) activity.

  13. High-temperature self-circulating thermoacoustic heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, S.; Swift, G. W.; Reid, R. S.

    2005-07-01

    Thermoacoustic and Stirling engines and refrigerators use heat exchangers to transfer heat between the oscillating flow of their thermodynamic working fluids and external heat sources and sinks. An acoustically driven heat-exchange loop uses an engine's own pressure oscillations to steadily circulate its own thermodynamic working fluid through a physically remote high-temperature heat source without using moving parts, allowing for a significant reduction in the cost and complexity of thermoacoustic and Stirling heat exchangers. The simplicity and flexibility of such heat-exchanger loops will allow thermoacoustic and Stirling machines to access diverse heat sources and sinks. Measurements of the temperatures at the interface between such a heat-exchange loop and the hot end of a thermoacoustic-Stirling engine are presented. When the steady flow is too small to flush out the mixing chamber in one acoustic cycle, the heat transfer to the regenerator is excellent, with important implications for practical use.

  14. Two decades of ocean CO2 sink and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le QuÉRÉ, C.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Bousquet, P.; Ciais, P.; Francey, R.; Heimann, M.; Keeling, C. D.; Keeling, R. F.; Kheshgi, H.; Peylin, P.; Piper, S. C.; Prentice, I. C.; Rayner, P. J.

    2003-04-01

    Atmospheric CO2 has increased at a nearly identical average rate of 3.3 and 3.2 Pg C yr-1 for the decades of the 1980s and the 1990s, in spite of a large increase in fossil fuel emissions from 5.4 to 6.3 Pg C yr-1. Thus, the sum of the ocean and land CO2 sinks was 1 Pg C yr-1 larger in the 1990s than in to the 1980s. Here we quantify the ocean and land sinks for these two decades using recent atmospheric inversions and ocean models. The ocean and land sinks are estimated to be, respectively, 0.3 (0.1 to 0.6) and 0.7 (0.4 to 0.9) Pg C yr-1 larger in the 1990s than in the 1980s. When variability less than 5 yr is removed, all estimates show a global oceanic sink more or less steadily increasing with time, and a large anomaly in the land sink during 1990-1994. For year-to-year variability, all estimates show 1/3 to 1/2 less variability in the ocean than on land, but the amplitude and phase of the oceanic variability remain poorly determined. A mean oceanic sink of 1.9 Pg C yr-1 for the 1990s based on O2 observations corrected for ocean outgassing is supported by these estimates, but an uncertainty on the mean value of the order of ±0.7 Pg C yr-1 remains. The difference between the two decades appears to be more robust than the absolute value of either of the two decades.

  15. Degraded Land Restoration in Reinstating CH4 Sink.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Gupta, Vijai K

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, contributes about one third to the global green house gas emissions. CH4-assimilating microbes (mostly methanotrophs) in upland soils play very crucial role in mitigating the CH4 release into the atmosphere. Agricultural, environmental, and climatic shifts can alter CH4 sink profiles of soils, likely through shifts in CH4-assimilating microbial community structure and function. Landuse change, as forest and grassland ecosystems altered to agro-ecosystems, has already attenuated the soil CH4 sink potential, and are expected to be continued in the future. We hypothesized that variations in CH4 uptake rates in soils under different landuse practices could be an indicative of alterations in the abundance and/or type of methanotrophic communities in such soils. However, only a few studies have addressed to number and methanotrophs diversity and their correlation with the CH4 sink potential in soils of rehabilitated/restored lands. We focus on landuse practices that can potentially mitigate CH4 gas emissions, the most prominent of which are improved cropland, grazing land management, use of bio-fertilizers, and restoration of degraded lands. In this perspective paper, it is proposed that restoration of degraded lands can contribute considerably to improved soil CH4 sink strength by retrieving/conserving abundance and assortment of efficient methanotrophic communities. We believe that this report can assist in identifying future experimental directions to the relationships between landuse changes, methane-assimilating microbial communities and soil CH4 sinks. The exploitation of microbial communities other than methanotrophs can contribute significantly to the global CH4 sink potential and can add value in mitigating the CH4 problems.

  16. Degraded Land Restoration in Reinstating CH4 Sink.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Gupta, Vijai K

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, contributes about one third to the global green house gas emissions. CH4-assimilating microbes (mostly methanotrophs) in upland soils play very crucial role in mitigating the CH4 release into the atmosphere. Agricultural, environmental, and climatic shifts can alter CH4 sink profiles of soils, likely through shifts in CH4-assimilating microbial community structure and function. Landuse change, as forest and grassland ecosystems altered to agro-ecosystems, has already attenuated the soil CH4 sink potential, and are expected to be continued in the future. We hypothesized that variations in CH4 uptake rates in soils under different landuse practices could be an indicative of alterations in the abundance and/or type of methanotrophic communities in such soils. However, only a few studies have addressed to number and methanotrophs diversity and their correlation with the CH4 sink potential in soils of rehabilitated/restored lands. We focus on landuse practices that can potentially mitigate CH4 gas emissions, the most prominent of which are improved cropland, grazing land management, use of bio-fertilizers, and restoration of degraded lands. In this perspective paper, it is proposed that restoration of degraded lands can contribute considerably to improved soil CH4 sink strength by retrieving/conserving abundance and assortment of efficient methanotrophic communities. We believe that this report can assist in identifying future experimental directions to the relationships between landuse changes, methane-assimilating microbial communities and soil CH4 sinks. The exploitation of microbial communities other than methanotrophs can contribute significantly to the global CH4 sink potential and can add value in mitigating the CH4 problems. PMID:27379053

  17. Degraded Land Restoration in Reinstating CH4 Sink

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Gupta, Vijai K.

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, contributes about one third to the global green house gas emissions. CH4-assimilating microbes (mostly methanotrophs) in upland soils play very crucial role in mitigating the CH4 release into the atmosphere. Agricultural, environmental, and climatic shifts can alter CH4 sink profiles of soils, likely through shifts in CH4-assimilating microbial community structure and function. Landuse change, as forest and grassland ecosystems altered to agro-ecosystems, has already attenuated the soil CH4 sink potential, and are expected to be continued in the future. We hypothesized that variations in CH4 uptake rates in soils under different landuse practices could be an indicative of alterations in the abundance and/or type of methanotrophic communities in such soils. However, only a few studies have addressed to number and methanotrophs diversity and their correlation with the CH4 sink potential in soils of rehabilitated/restored lands. We focus on landuse practices that can potentially mitigate CH4 gas emissions, the most prominent of which are improved cropland, grazing land management, use of bio-fertilizers, and restoration of degraded lands. In this perspective paper, it is proposed that restoration of degraded lands can contribute considerably to improved soil CH4 sink strength by retrieving/conserving abundance and assortment of efficient methanotrophic communities. We believe that this report can assist in identifying future experimental directions to the relationships between landuse changes, methane-assimilating microbial communities and soil CH4 sinks. The exploitation of microbial communities other than methanotrophs can contribute significantly to the global CH4 sink potential and can add value in mitigating the CH4 problems. PMID:27379053

  18. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 STORAGE AND SINK ENHANCEMENT OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bert Bock; Richard Rhudy; Howard Herzog; Michael Klett; John Davison; Danial G. De La Torre Ugarte; Dale Simbeck

    2003-02-01

    This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for CO{sub 2} storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO{sub 2} in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MW{sub e} integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study were combined with the storage costs from this study to allow comparison among capture and storage approaches as well as sink enhancements.

  19. Two-Pipe Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Device like heat pipe transports heat over long distance with negligible loss in temperature, though with considerably smaller total weight. Uses no pumps or other mechanical means to move working fluid: Instead converts part of available thermal energy to kinetic energy upon vaporization. Vapor carries thermal energy in form of latent heat of vaporization. Delivers thermal energy with drop in temperature of only fraction of degree from source sink.

  20. Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

  1. Seawater Circulation and Thermal Sink at OCEAN Ridges - FIELD Evidence in Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A. A.; Boudier, F. I.; Cathles, L. M.; Buck, W. R.; Celerier, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Exceptionally, the lowermost gabbros in the Oman ophiolite are black and totally fresh, except for minute traces of impregnation by seawater fluids at very high temperature (~1000°C). These black gabbros sharply contrast with normal, whitish gabbros altered down to Low-T~500-350°C. These hydrous alterations are ascribed to an unconventional model of seawater circulation and cooling of the permanent magma chambers of fast spreading ocean ridges. In this model, gabbros issued from the magma chamber cross a ~100 m thick thermal boundary layer (TBL) before reaching a narrow, Low-T high permeability channel where the heated return seawater is flowing towards black smokers and the local gabbros are altered. Uprising mantle diapirs in Oman diverge at ~5 km on each side of the palaeo-ridge axis and feed an overlying magma chamber that closes at this distance from axis. Preservation of black gabbros along the Moho implies that the loop of seawater alteration locally does not reach Moho beyond this ~5km distance (otherwise black gabbros would be altered in whitish gabbros). This defines an internal "thermal sink" within ~5 km to the ridge axis. There, the sink is efficiently cooled by the active hydrothermal convection that is ridge transverse. This has been documented near the Galapagos ridge by marine geophysical data, within the same distance. Beyond this critical distance, the cooling system becomes dominantly conductive and ridge-parallel. The TBL and attached return flow channels must be rising into the overcooled, accreted crust. Beyond the thermal sink, the 500°C isotherm rebounds into the crust. It is only after ~ 1My of crustal drift that this isotherm penetrates into the uppermost mantle in a sustained fashion, developing serpentinites at the expense of peridotites.

  2. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.; Kosson, R.; Haslett, R.

    1980-01-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application (300 MW sub t storage for 6 hours). Two concepts were selected for hardware development: (1) a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and (2) a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which was nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. In addition to improving performance by providing a nearly constant transfer rate during discharge, these active heat exchanger concepts were estimated to cost at least 25% less than the passive tube-shell design.

  3. 14. View of interior, north and east walls featuring sink, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View of interior, north and east walls featuring sink, facing east (Note: B/W scale on wall in foreground is in 1/2 ft increments) - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  4. 19. INTERIOR OF KITCHEN SHOWING UPDATED CABINETS, COUNTER TOP, SINK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR OF KITCHEN SHOWING UPDATED CABINETS, COUNTER TOP, SINK, AND FAUCET, AND ORIGINAL WOODFRAMED SLIDING GLASS WINDOW IN NORTH WALL AT PHOTO LEFT CENTER OVERLOOKING FRONT PORCH. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  5. 15. INTERIOR OF KITCHEN SHOWING UPDATED CABINETS, OUNTER TOP, SINK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR OF KITCHEN SHOWING UPDATED CABINETS, OUNTER TOP, SINK, AND FAUCET, AND ORIGINAL WOOD FRAMED SLIDING-GLASS WINDOW IN NORTH WALL OVERLOOKING FRONT PORCH. VIEW TO NORTH. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  6. Can climate variability contribute to the ``missing'' CO2 sink?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Aiguo; Fung, Inez Y.

    1993-09-01

    The contemporary carbon budget for the atmosphere requires a large "missing" carbon sink to balance anthropogenic carbon inputs. We investigated climatic effects on carbon exchanges between the atmosphere and the undisturbed biosphere and assessed the possible contribution of climate variability to the carbon sink. Empirical models and global temperature and precipitation data sets were used in the study. It was found that climate perturbations during 1940-1988 caused considerable variations in plant productivity and soil respiration. The different sensitivities of the fluxes to climate perturbations led to a significant carbon accumulation in the biosphere. The cumulative carbon sink for the period 1950-1984 (˜20±5 GtC or 1012 kg C) was predominantly located in mid-latitudes in the northern hemisphere (30°-60°N) and could amount to half of the missing CO2 sink as derived from deconvolution analyses. Our results indicate that climate variations have unequal impacts on biospheric carbon fluxes from different ecosystems and imply that caution must be exercised in generalizing in situ observations to the globe.

  7. Biomineralization in plants as a long-term carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailleau, Guillaume; Braissant, Olivier; Verrecchia, Eric P.

    Carbon sequestration in the global carbon cycle is almost always attributed to organic carbon storage alone, while soil mineral carbon is generally neglected. However, due to the longer residence time of mineral carbon in soils (102-106 years), if stored in large quantities it represents a potentially more efficient sink. The aim of this study is to estimate the mineral carbon accumulation due to the tropical iroko tree (Milicia excelsa) in Ivory Coast. The iroko tree has the ability to accumulate mineral carbon as calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in ferralitic soils, where CaCO3 is not expected to precipitate. An estimate of this accumulation was made by titrating carbonate from two characteristic soil profiles in the iroko environment and by identifying calcium (Ca) sources. The system is considered as a net carbon sink because carbonate accumulation involves only atmospheric CO2 and Ca from Ca-carbonate-free sources. Around one ton of mineral carbon was found in and around an 80-year-old iroko stump, proving the existence of a mineral carbon sink related to the iroko ecosystem. Conservation of iroko trees and the many other biomineralizing plant species is crucial to the maintenance of this mineral carbon sink.

  8. Seismicity in Romania--evidence for the sinking lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Roman, C

    1970-12-19

    The revision of Romanian earthquakes shows a distribution suggesting a sinking lithosphere under the Carpathian arc. Thermal and gravitational anomalies, as well as petrological and tectonic features, provide further evidence on the cause and character of intermediate earthquakes of Romania. This is consistent with the theory of plate tectonics in south-east Europe.

  9. EVALUATION OF SINK EFFECTS ON VOCS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sink strength of two common indoor materials, a carpet and a gypsum board, was evaluated by environmental chamber tests with four volatile organic compounds (VOCs): propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, 2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethanol (BEE), and texanol. These oxygenated compounds rep...

  10. THE INTERACTION OF VAPOUR PHASE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS WITH INDOOR SINKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of indoor air pollutants with interior surfaces (i.e., sinks) is a well known, but poorly understood, phenomenon. Studies have shown that re-emissions of adsorbed organic vapours can contribute to elevated concentrations of organics in indoor environments. Researc...

  11. Intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of source-sink dynamics

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Many factors affect the presence and exchange of individuals among subpopulations and influence not only the emergence, but the strength of ensuing source-sink dynamics within metapopulations, yet their relative contributions remain largely unexplored. 2. To help identify the...

  12. Role of sources and temporal sinks in a marine amphipod.

    PubMed

    Munguia, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    Spatially structured habitats challenge populations to have positive growth rates and species often rely on dispersing propagules to occupy habitats outside their fundamental niche. Most marine species show two main life stages, a dispersing stage and a sedentary stage affecting distribution and abundance patterns. An experimental study on Corophium acherusicum, a colonial tube-building amphipod, showed the strong influence that a source population can have on new habitats. More importantly, this study shows the effect of temporal sinks where newly established populations can show reduced growth rates if the propagule supply from a source is removed. Sink populations had a reduction in abundance and became male-biased as females left colonies. The consequences arising from short-term dispersal and temporal sinks could be due to different selection pressures at the source and sink populations. These consequences can become reflected in long-term dynamics of marine populations if we shift focus to non-random dispersal models incorporating behaviour and stage-dependent dispersal. PMID:25673002

  13. Sinking Maps: A Conceptual Tool for Visual Metaphor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giampa, Joan Marie

    2012-01-01

    Sinking maps, created by Northern Virginia Community College professor Joan Marie Giampa, are tools that teach fine art students how to construct visual metaphor by conceptually mapping sensory perceptions. Her dissertation answers the question, "Can visual metaphor be conceptually mapped in the art classroom?" In the Prologue, Giampa…

  14. Problematic Issue for Students: Does It Sink or Float?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ünal, Suat; Costu, Bayram

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate grade-eight students' conceptions of sinking and floating. Firstly, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 students to determine students' difficulties and to develop a multiple-choice diagnostic test. In designing the content of the interview questions, grade-eight science curriculum, research on…

  15. Children's Typically-Perceived-Situations of Floating and Sinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joung, Yong Jae

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore children's typically-perceived-situations (TPS) of "floating" and "sinking". TPS refers to the situation rising spontaneously in an individual's mind when they first think of a phenomenon or concept. Data were collected from 148 Year 5 Korean children. As a result of analysing the data according to three…

  16. MASTER BATH SHOWING SINK WITH VANITY AND THE MEDICINE CABINET. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MASTER BATH SHOWING SINK WITH VANITY AND THE MEDICINE CABINET. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Single-Family Type 6, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Nuclear energy plant with improved device for removing after-heat and emergency heat

    SciTech Connect

    Buscher, E.; Vinzens, K.

    1980-01-29

    The nuclear energy installation includes a nuclear reactor core, a primary circulatory loop connected to the reactor core and a circulating liquid metal medium therein heated by the reactor core. A first heat exchanger has a primary side connected in the primary circulatory loop, and a secondary side, a secondary circulatory loop connected to the secondary side of the first heat exchanger and a circulating liquid metal medium therein heated by heat transfer in the first heat exchanger from the liquid metal medium of the primary circulatory loop. A second heat exchanger has a primary side connected in the secondary circulatory loop, and a secondary side, a tertiary circulatory loop connected to the secondary side of the second heat exchanger and a circulating water/steam medium therein heated by heat transfer in the second heat exchanger from the liquid metal medium of the secondary circulatory loop. A condenser has a vapor/condensate side thereof connected in the tertiary circulatory loop, and a coolant side thereof connectible to a heat sink outside the installation. A third heat exchanger has a primary side connected to the primary side of the first heat exchanger, and a secondary side, a quaternary coolant loop connected to the secondary side of the third heat exchanger and connectible through the condenser to the heat sink.

  18. Carbon sink activity and GHG budget of managed European grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Katja; Herfurth, Damien; Soussana, Jean-Francois; Fluxnet Grassland Pi's, European

    2013-04-01

    In agriculture, a large proportion (89%) of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission saving potential may be achieved by means of soil C sequestration. Recent demonstrations of carbon sink activities of European ecosystemes, however, often questioned the existence of C storing grasslands, as though a net sink of C was observed, uncertainty surrounding this estimate was larger than the sink itself (Janssens et al., 2003, Schulze et al., 2009. Then again, some of these estimates were based on a small number of measurements, and on models. Not surprising, there is still, a paucity of studies demonstrating the existence of grassland systems, where C sequestration would exceed (in CO2 equivalents) methane emissions from the enteric fermentation of ruminants and nitrous oxide emissions from managed soils. Grasslands are heavily relied upon for food and forage production. A key component of the carbon sink activity in grasslands is thus the impact of changes in management practices or effects of past and recent management, such as intensification as well as climate (and -variation). We analysed data (i.e. flux, ecological, management and soil organic carbon) from a network of European grassland flux observation sites (36). These sites covered different types and intensities of management, and offered the opportunity to understand grassland carbon cycling and trade-offs between C sinks and CH4 and N2O emissions. For some sites, the assessment of carbon sink activities were compared using two methods; repeated soil inventory and determination of the ecosystem C budget by continuous measurement of CO2 exchange in combination with quantification of other C imports and exports (net C storage, NCS). In general grassland, were a potential sink of C with 60±12 g C /m2.yr (median; min -456; max 645). Grazed sites had a higher NCS compared to cut sites (median 99 vs 67 g C /m2.yr), while permanent grassland sites tended to have a lower NCS compared to temporary sown grasslands (median 64 vs

  19. Strong carbon sink of monsoon tropical seasonal forest in Southern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshcherevskaya, Olga; Anichkin, Alexandr; Avilov, Vitaly; Duy Dinh, Ba; Luu Do, Phong; Huan Tran, Cong; Kurbatova, Julia

    2014-05-01

    EC procedures were applied to the raw 10-Hz data, including time-lag compensation, block average, WPL-correction, planar fit, low- and high-frequency corrections etc. in EddyPro software (LI-COR Inc., USA). Calculated fluxes with bad quality flags (more than 6 of 9) were excluded. Spikes due to rains, instrument malfunction were removed too. Storage of CO2 from the surface to the measurement level which is very significant in tall tropical forest was added to the flux. Then low-turbulence correction was applied with u*-threshold of 0.178 m s-1. After these steps only 43 % of 30-min data of 2012 still presented, so the rate of gaps was 57 % (mainly at night and in rains). Data were gapfilled using on-line tool at the web-site of Max-Plank Institute, Germany and Flux-Analysis Tool, Japan. Different gap-filling procedures (non-linear regressions, look-up tables, model evaluation, artificial gaps-method) as well as u*-threshold shifting from 0 to 0.25 resulted in drift of 2012 net carbon exchange total from -296 to -612 g C m-2 (strong carbon sink still remain). Unfortunately, the situation of more then 50 % of gaps in CO2 flux is usual for tropical EC stations because of frequent calm nights. So, a gap-filling algorithm is extremely important for evaluation of long-term totals. We found for Vietnamese data that even few spikes which were not removed before gap-filling can change all-year total by up to 20-50 g m-2 year-1. Especially 'powerful' are big positive values at night in rare-occurred good turbulence. Possibly these values are physical. But they influence regressions in look-up table method dramatically because amount of data in peak of rainy season in night-time is too small. So, the gap-filling algorithm happened to be very sensitive to spikes. Additionally, striking was the fact that storage of CO2 appeared to be the main factor influencing 1-year totals after gap-filling procedure. Taking storage into account shifted the 2012 sum from +182 to -402 g m-2 year

  20. Earth-coupled heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, J. A.

    1981-08-01

    The object of the research work was to demonstrate that a water source heat pump could be used with an earth-coupled heat exchanger which was buried in an absorption field of a domestic sewage disposal system to provide the heating and cooling requirements for residential use in an energy efficient fashion. The system consists of a 3 ton heat pump (nominal rating of 34,000 Btu/hr), a closed-loop heat exchanger which was fabricated from 200 feet of 2 inch diameter cast iron soil pipe, and a calorimeter house which had heat transmission characteristics similar to a 100 sq ft house. The earth-coupled heat exchanger was connected to the water side heat exchanger of the heat pump. Water was circulated through the heat exchanger coil in the earth and through the water side heat exchanger of the heat pump. The earth served as the energy source (for heating) or sink (for cooling) for the heat pump.

  1. European land CO2 sink influenced by NAO and East-Atlantic Pattern coupling

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Ana; Janssens, Ivan A.; Gouveia, Célia M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Ciais, Philippe; Chevallier, Frédéric; Peñuelas, Josep; Rödenbeck, Christian; Piao, Shilong; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Running, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale climate patterns control variability in the global carbon sink. In Europe, the North-Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) influences vegetation activity, however the East-Atlantic (EA) pattern is known to modulate NAO strength and location. Using observation-driven and modelled data sets, we show that multi-annual variability patterns of European Net Biome Productivity (NBP) are linked to anomalies in heat and water transport controlled by the NAO–EA interplay. Enhanced NBP occurs when NAO and EA are both in negative phase, associated with cool summers with wet soils which enhance photosynthesis. During anti-phase periods, NBP is reduced through distinct impacts of climate anomalies in photosynthesis and respiration. The predominance of anti-phase years in the early 2000s may explain the European-wide reduction of carbon uptake during this period, reported in previous studies. Results show that improving the capability of simulating atmospheric circulation patterns may better constrain regional carbon sink variability in coupled carbon-climate models. PMID:26777730

  2. Sink to Source Transition in Tendrils of a Semileafless Mutant, Pisum sativum cv Curly.

    PubMed

    Côté, R; Gerrath, J M; Peterson, C A; Grodzinski, B

    1992-12-01

    Sink to source transition parallels loss of thigmotropic capacity in tendrils of a semileafless mutant, Pisum sativum cv Curly. Macroscopic tendril development is subdivided based on thigmotropic capacity. Stage I is the elongation stage and, although the rate of photosynthesis is similar to that of stage II and III tendrils, dark respiration rates are higher in stage I. During stage II, tendrils are thigmotropic and act as a sink. Even though stage II tendrils have CO(2) exchange characteristics similar to those of stage III tendrils, which are coiled, our fluorescein, (14)C-partitioning, and (11)C-translocation experiments suggest that stage I and II tendrils do not export carbon. Only stage III tendrils act as sources of newly fixed carbon. Export from them is blocked by cold, heat girdling of the petiole, or anoxia treatment of the tendrils. A late stage II tendril complex, in which coiling is occurring, may be exporting photoassimilates; however, this phenomenon can be attributed to the fact that the pea leaf is a compound structure and there may be one or more stage III tendrils, no longer thigmotropic, within the tendril complex. Photosynthetic maturity in pea tendrils occurs at stage III and is characterized by the ability of these tendrils to export photoassimilates. PMID:16653179

  3. Photosynthetic characteristics of sinking microalgae under the sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Michel, Christine; Gosselin, Michel; Demers, Serge; Fukuchi, Mitsuo; Taguchi, Satoru

    2014-12-01

    The photosynthetic characteristics of sinking a microalgal community were studied to compare with the ice algal community in the sea ice and the phytoplankton community in the water column under the sea ice at the beginning of the light season in the first-year sea ice ecosystem on the Mackenzie Shelf, in the western Canadian Arctic. The phytoplankton community was collected using a water bottle, whereas the sinking algal community was collected using particle collectors, and the ice algal community was obtained by using an ice-core sampler from the bottom portion of ice core. Photosynthesis versus irradiance (P-E) incubation experiments were conducted on deck to obtain the initial slope (αB) and the maximum photosynthetic rate (PmB) of the three algal communities. The αB and the PmB of the light saturation curve, and chlorophyll a (Chl a) specific absorption coefficient (āph*) between the sinking microalgal community and the ice algal community were similar and were distinctly different from the phytoplankton community. The significant linear relationship between αB and PmB, which was obtained among the three groups, may suggest that a photo-acclimation strategy is common for all algal communities under the low light regime of the early season. Although the sinking algal community could be held for the entire duration of deployment at maximum, this community remained photosynthetically active once exposed to light. This response suggests that sinking algal communities can be the seed population, which results in a subsequent phytoplankton bloom under the sea ice or in a surface layer, as well as representing food for the higher trophic level consumers in the Arctic Ocean even before the receding of the sea ice.

  4. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  6. Comparison between treatment of kitchen-sink wastewater and a mixture of kitchen-sink and washing-machine wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Huelgas, A; Nakajima, M; Nagata, H; Funamizu, N

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a submerged membrane bioreactor was used to treat 'higher-load' grey water: (a) kitchen-sink wastewater only, and (b) a mixture of kitchen-sink wastewater and washing-machine wastewater. For each type of wastewater, three systems operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were investigated. In the mixture of kitchen-sink wastewater and washing-machine wastewater, the reactor with a short HRT of four hours was stopped due to foaming. It has been observed that for both types of wastewater, an HRT of eight hours or longer can be used for the treatment. However, it has been observed that a higher COD in the permeate of the mixture can be obtained compared with that of the kitchen-sink wastewater only. This indicated that washing-machine wastewater has some component that is not easily biodegradable. The total linear akylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) removal was > 99% even at a concentration of 10-23 mg 1(-1).

  7. Evaluating Importance of Heat Transport Mechanisms Neglected in Design of Low Temperature Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, C. D.; Sukop, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    this system is operated to extract heat, a cooler plume forms at the base of the aquifer. Conversely, a lens of warm groundwater forms at the top of the aquifer when the system is used to dispose of heat. The combined effects of multiple ground energy sources and sinks in this configuration showed clear interference patterns indicating that individual borehole heat exchangers could not be evaluated independently. This work suggests that additional heat transport mechanisms should be considered when evaluating the performance of ground energy systems. The effects of heterogeneity, dispersion, and thermal exchange between the aquifer matrix and groundwater were not addressed with this work and should be investigated in future studies.

  8. The relative role of refractoriness and source-sink relationship in reentry generation during simulated acute ischemia.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lucía; Trénor, Beatriz; Alonso, José M; Tobón, Catalina; Saiz, Javier; Ferrero, José M

    2009-08-01

    During acute myocardial ischemia, reentrant episodes may lead to ventricular fibrillation (VF), giving rise to potentially mortal arrhythmias. VF has been traditionally related to dispersion of refractoriness and more recently to the source-sink relationship. Our goal is to theoretically investigate the relative role of dispersion of refractoriness and source-sink mismatch in vulnerability to reentry in the specific situation of regional myocardial acute ischemia. The electrical activity of a regionally ischemic tissue was simulated using a modified version of the Luo-Rudy dynamic model. Ischemic conditions were varied to simulate the time-course of acute ischemia. Our results showed that dispersion of refractoriness increased with the severity of ischemia. However, no correlation between dispersion of refractoriness and the width of the vulnerable window was found. Additionally, in approximately 50% of the reentries, unidirectional block (UDB) took place in cells completely recovered from refractoriness. We examined patterns of activation after premature stimulation and they were intimately related to the source-sink relationship, quantified by the safety factor (SF). Moreover, the isoline where the SF dropped below unity matched the area where propagation failed. It was concluded that the mismatch of the source-sink relationship, rather than solely refractoriness, was the ultimate cause of the UDB leading to reentry. The SF represents a very powerful tool to study the mechanisms responsible for reentry.

  9. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  10. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  11. Self-actuating heat switches for redundant refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Chung K. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A dual refrigeration system for cooling a sink device is described, which automatically thermally couples the cold refrigerator to the sink device while thermally isolating the warm refrigerator from the sink device. The system includes two gas gap heat switches that each thermally couples one of the refrigerators to the sink device, and a pair of sorption pumps that are coupled through tubes to the heat switches. When the first refrigerator is operated and therefore cold, the first pump which is thermally coupled to it is also cooled and adsorbs gas to withdraw it from the second heat switch, to thereby thermally isolate the sink device from the warm second refrigerator. With the second refrigerator being warm, the second pump is also warm and desorbs gas, so the gas lies in the first switch, to close that switch and therefore thermally couple the cold first refrigerator to the sink device. Thus, the heat switches are automatically switched according to the temperature of the corresponding refrigerator.

  12. Gravity Survey of the Carson Sink - Data and Maps

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    A detailed gravity survey was carried out for the entire Carson Sink in western Nevada (Figure 1) through a subcontract to Zonge Engineering, Inc. The Carson Sink is a large composite basin containing three known, blind high‐temperature geothermal systems (Fallon Airbase, Stillwater, and Soda Lake). This area was chosen for a detailed gravity survey in order to characterize the gravity signature of the known geothermal systems and to identify other potential blind systems based on the structural setting indicated by the gravity data. Data: Data were acquired at approximately 400, 800, and 1600 meter intervals for a total of 1,243 stations. The project location and station location points are presented in Figure 14. The station distribution for this survey was designed to complete regional gravity coverage in the Carson Sink area without duplication of available public and private gravity coverage. Gravity data were acquired using a Scintrex CG‐5 gravimeter and a LaCoste and Romberg (L&R) Model‐G gravimeter. The CG‐5 gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.001 milligals and a typical repeatability of less than 0.005 milligals. The L&R gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.01 milligals and a typical repeatability of 0.02 milligals. The basic processing of gravimeter readings to calculate through to the Complete Bouguer Anomaly was made using the Gravity and Terrain Correction software version 7.1 for Oasis Montaj by Geosoft LTD. Results: The gravity survey of the Carson Sink yielded the following products. Project location and station location map (Figure 14). Complete Bouguer Anomaly @ 2.67 gm/cc reduction density. Gravity Complete Bouguer Anomaly at 2.50 g/cc Contour Map (Figure 15). Gravity Horizontal Gradient Magnitude Shaded Color Contour Map. Gravity 1st Vertical Derivative Color Contour Map. Interpreted Depth to Mesozoic Basement (Figure 16), incorporating drill‐hole intercept values. Preliminary Interpretation of Results: The Carson Sink

  13. A thermosyphon heat pipe cooler for high power LEDs cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Tian, Wenkai; Lv, Lucang

    2016-08-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) cooling is facing the challenge of high heat flux more seriously with the increase of input power and diode density. The proposed unique thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink is particularly suitable for cooling of high power density LED chips and other electronics, which has a heat dissipation potential of up to 280 W within an area of 20 mm × 22 mm (>60 W/cm2) under natural air convection. Meanwhile, a thorough visualization investigation was carried out to explore the two phase flow characteristics in the proposed thermosyphon heat pipe. Implementing this novel thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink in the cooling of a commercial 100 W LED integrated chip, a very low apparent thermal resistance of 0.34 K/W was obtained under natural air convection with the aid of the enhanced boiling heat transfer at the evaporation side and the enhanced natural air convection at the condensation side.

  14. Sinking velocity of particulate radiocesium in the northwestern North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Makio C.; Kawakami, Hajime

    2014-06-01

    Sinking particles (SP) were collected by time series sediment traps at two depths in the northwestern Pacific before and after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, and accident-derived particulate radiocesium was measured. Radiocesium (137Cs) was first detected at 500 m (4810 m) about 2 weeks (1 month) after the accident. 137Cs of SP collected over 1 year revealed that the time lag between two depths was larger than that for the first 137Cs detection (about 2 weeks). We estimated the transient sinking velocity (SV) from the cumulative temporal 137Cs flux and the time lags at the two depths. Although the SV of SP collected in very early period was large, the estimated SV of most particulate 137Cs (about 80%) was about 50 m d-1. Based on comparison of 137Cs concentration in total SP with that in SP without organic materials, we suspect that most of the 137Cs was likely incorporated into aluminosilicates.

  15. Salt marshes: An important coastal sink for dissolved uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Church, T.M.; Sarin, M.M.; Fleisher, M.Q.; Ferdelman, T.G.

    1996-10-01

    The global budget for marine uranium demands another geochemical sink other than deep-sea systems, and the coastal environment may host some or all of this missing sink. In a previous paper, we have shown that some large subtidal estuaries are seasonal summer sinks at low salinities. In this paper, we show that intertidal salt marshes are even stronger sinks at all salinities, if for somewhat different reasons. Uranium was sampled in dissolved and particulate fractions over several tidal cycles and seasons for a lower Delaware Bay salt marsh (Canary Creek, Lewes, Delaware, USA), and uniquely, during summer months, the dissolved uranium is nonconservative. Moreover, because uranium extraction is greater on higher tides and occurs over the entire salinity gradient, this processing appears associated with surface of vegetated high marsh, We hypothesize that either (1) uranium scavenging occurs during the process of tidal mixing and attendant flocculation of humic acids and iron oxides-favoring this process is the presence of sulfonate complexes in salt marsh humic substances, and iron coprecipitation during its extensive redox cycling in the salt marsh-or (2) uranium extraction occurs at the marsh surface during extensive flooding of the salt marsh surface sediments-favoring this process is the increase in sulfuric acidity at the summer salt marsh surface that could destabilize the tetracarbonate species of U(VI). The latter option is favored by both field observations of maximum removal at the surface during the spring and summer tide conditions, and selective extraction of sediment phases where uranium is found as adsorbed and complexed forms in the ascorbate-citrate and humic acid fractions, respectively. Mass balance calculations show that under steady-state conditions, nearly two-thirds of the uranium extracted from tidal waters is retained in the sediments, while one-third is exported as U-enriched particles during ebbing tides. 41 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Citrus alongside the sinking wreckage of MV Pacific Star in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Citrus alongside the sinking wreckage of MV Pacific Star in the Pacific Ocean. Pacific Star's captain used his vessel to ram the cutter after he was ordered to stop and submit to inspection by a boarding team. Citrus was not seriously damaged in the collision. U.S. Coast Guard personnel recovered a large amount of marijuana from the wreckage - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter CITRUS, Coos Bay, Coos County, OR

  17. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Maher, Damien T; Sippo, James Z; Tait, Douglas R; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m(-2) d(-1), while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m(-2) d(-1). If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 10(8) mol yr(-1)) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change.

  18. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Damien T.; Sippo, James Z.; Tait, Douglas R.; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m−2 d−1, while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m−2 d−1. If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 108 mol yr−1) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change. PMID:27172603

  19. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Maher, Damien T; Sippo, James Z; Tait, Douglas R; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m(-2) d(-1), while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m(-2) d(-1). If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 10(8) mol yr(-1)) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change. PMID:27172603

  20. Pristine mangrove creek waters are a sink of nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Damien T.; Sippo, James Z.; Tait, Douglas R.; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, but large uncertainties remain in global budgets. Mangroves are thought to be a source of N2O to the atmosphere in spite of the limited available data. Here we report high resolution time series observations in pristine Australian mangroves along a broad latitudinal gradient to assess the potential role of mangroves in global N2O budgets. Surprisingly, five out of six creeks were under-saturated in dissolved N2O, demonstrating mangrove creek waters were a sink for atmospheric N2O. Air-water flux estimates showed an uptake of 1.52 ± 0.17 μmol m‑2 d‑1, while an independent mass balance revealed an average sink of 1.05 ± 0.59 μmol m‑2 d‑1. If these results can be upscaled to the global mangrove area, the N2O sink (~2.0 × 108 mol yr‑1) would offset ~6% of the estimated global riverine N2O source. Our observations contrast previous estimates based on soil fluxes or mangrove waters influenced by upstream freshwater inputs. We suggest that the lack of available nitrogen in pristine mangroves favours N2O consumption. Widespread and growing coastal eutrophication may change mangrove waters from a sink to a source of N2O to the atmosphere, representing a positive feedback to climate change.