Science.gov

Sample records for additional heat treatment

  1. Improved superconducting properties of melt-textured Nd123 by additional heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikumoto, N.; Yoshioka, J.; Murakami, M.

    1997-02-01

    We have investigated the effect of additional heat-treatment on the superconducting transition and the flux pinning properties of NdBaCuO melt-textured in air. After the heat-treatment at high temperatures, >900°C, under low oxygen partial pressure, P(O 2) = 0.001 atm, the superconducting transition became sharper accompanied by an increase of Jc. However, the increase of Jc was very small and the secondary peak effect commonly observed in NdBaCuO melt textured in low P(O 2) could not be observed. Transmission electron microscopic observations and energy dispersive X-ray analyses show that the spatial variation of the Nd/Ba ratio is reduced after high-temperature heat-treatment, which indicates that an improvement in Tc and Jc is attributed to a suppression of Nd substitution on the Ba site.

  2. Decrease in the acrylamide content in canned coffee by heat treatment with the addition of cysteine.

    PubMed

    Narita, Yusaku; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2014-12-17

    Acrylamide (AA) is classified as a Group 2A carcinogen according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Although coffee contains a small amount of AA, it is a popular beverage worldwide. Approximately 10 billion canned coffees are consumed each year in Japan. In this study, we investigated how to decrease AA contained in canned coffee by modifying the heat treatment used for sterilization during the manufacturing process. The AA content of both types of canned coffee (black and milk) was decreased by approximately 95% by heat treatment with adding cysteine at 121 °C for 6 min. The content was also decreased by heat treatment with dithiothreitol, although that with cystine had no effect. Therefore, it is shown that thiol groups in cysteine and dithiothreitol might play an important role in decreasing the AA content. PMID:25420187

  3. Effect of Boron Addition and Initial Heat-Treatment Temperature on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steels Under Different Heat-Treatment Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murty, B. S.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of initial heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of boron-free and boron-containing modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (P91 and P91B, respectively) has been studied under different heat-treatment conditions. The prior austenite grains evolved in P91 steel, having different prior austenite grain sizes, were found to be similar in size after heat treatment in the range of 1073 K to 1448 K (800 °C to 1175 °C) for 5 minutes. The microstructural evolution in P91B steel having different prior austenite grain sizes appeared to be uniform when subjected to different heat-treatment temperatures with the prior austenite grain size being similar to that of initial grain size. Lath martensite was observed in P91B steel after all heat treatments. On the other hand, lath martensite was observed in P91 steel only when subjected to high-temperature heat treatment, whereas subgrain/substructure as well as coarse precipitates were observed after a lower temperature heat treatment. Large differences in the hardness/strength values between different microstructures corresponding to coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) and intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ) of P91 steel weldment were due to the distinct difference in these microstructures. The difference in hardness/strength values between the CGHAZ and ICHAZ was found to be insignificant in P91B steel under similar heat-treatment conditions.

  4. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. PMID

  5. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2016-03-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  6. Effect of additional heat treatment of 2024-T3 on the growth of fatigue crack in air and in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louwaard, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of ductility on the fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum alloys, fatigue tests were carried out on central notched specimens of 2024-T3 and 2024-T8 sheet material. The 2024-T8 material was obtained by an additional heat treatment applied on 2024-T3 (18 hours at 192 C), which increased the static yield strength from 43.6 to 48.9 kgf/sq mm. A change in the ultimate strength was not observed. Fatigue tests were carried out on both materials in humid air and in high vacuum. According to a new crack propagation model, crack extension is supported to be caused by a slip-related process and debonding triggered by the environment. This model predicts an effect of the ductility on the crack growth rate which should be smaller in vacuum than in humid air; however, this was not confirmed. In humid air the crack-growth rate in 2024-T8 was about 2 times faster than in 2024-T3, while in vacuum the ratio was about 2.5. Crack closure measurements gave no indications that crack closure played a significant role in both materials. Some speculative explanations are briefly discussed.

  7. Improving high temperature creep resistance of reduced activation steels by addition of nitrogen and intermediate heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. B.; Zhang, C.; Xia, Z. X.; Yang, Z. G.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we report an enhanced high-temperature creep resistance in reduced activation ferrite/martensite (RAFM) steels, by introducing nitrogen (0.035 wt%, M3 steel) and employing a novel intermediate heat treatment I-Q-T (intermediate treatment, quenching and tempering). In comparison with all the control groups, the uniaxial tests of the I-Q-T treated M3 steel showed significant increase in rupture time and decrease in elongation. The microstructures of the samples were further characterized to elucidate the origin of the enhanced creep resistance. It is found that, by introducing nitrogen, the primary TaC particles were refined; by employing the I-Q-T heat treatment, the dispersed fine secondary MX precipitates, as well as the lath subgrains containing high-density dislocations, were increased: all are responsible for the improved creep resistance.

  8. Effect of heat treatment, pH, sugar concentration, and metal addition on green color retention in homogenized puree of Thompson seedless grape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homogenized puree of Thompson seedless (Vitis vinifera ‘Thompson Seedless’) grape was treated under different conditions, including heating time (5-30 min), temperature (20-80°C) and pH (2-10). Treatments with separate additions of glucose, fructose, and sucrose at concentrations of 100-600 g/L and ...

  9. Additional heat treatment of non-porous coatings obtained on medium carbon steel substrates by electron beam cladding of a Ti-Mo-C powder composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mul, D. O.; Drobyaz, E. A.; Zimoglyadova, T. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Lazurenko, D. V.; Shevtsova, L. I.

    2016-04-01

    The structure and microhardness of surface layers, obtained by non-vacuum electron beam cladding of Ti-Mo-C powder mixture on a steel substrate after different types of heat treatment, were investigated. After cladding samples were heat treated in a furnace at 200...500 °C, as well as quenched at 860 ° C and then underwent high-temperature tempering. Heat treatment of cladded coatings induced tempering of martensite and precipitation of cementite particles (Fe3C). Transmission electron microscopy of the samples after heating and holding at 300 ° C revealed precipitation of nanosized cubical TiC particles. The formation of hard nanosized particles led to the surface layer microhardness growth. The highest level of microhardness (which was 1.2...1.5-fold higher in comparison with coating microhardness after heat treatment) was achieved after heating of the claded material at 300 °C and 400 °C Additional quenching of samples at 860 °C did not increase the microhardness level.

  10. Effects of Al Content and Addition of Third Element on Fabrication of Ti-Al Intermetallic Coatings by Heat Treatment of Warm-Sprayed Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz, J.; Kuroda, S.; Minagawa, K.; Murakami, H.; Araki, H.; Kurzydłowski, K. J.

    2015-06-01

    Four powder mixtures of titanium and aluminum with 50:50, 40:60, 30:70, and 20:80 atomic ratios were used as feedstock for Warm Spray process to produce composite coatings. A two-stage heat treatment at 600 and 1000 °C was applied to the deposits in order to obtain titanium aluminide intermetallic phases. The microstructure, chemical, and phase composition of the as-deposited and heat-treated coatings were investigated using SEM, EDS, and XRD. It was found that the Al content affects on the thickness expansion of the heat-treated Ti-Al coatings significantly and also has a major influence on the porosity development, which is caused by the Kirkendall effect. The effects of adding a third element Si and heat treatment with pressure to produce denser Ti-Al intermetallic coating were also examined. The investigated hot-pressed coatings with addition of Si exhibited much denser microstructure and contained Ti-Al intermetallic phases with titanium silicide precipitates.

  11. Heat treatment and the use of additives to improve the stability of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in shellfish tissue reference materials for internal quality control and proficiency testing.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Stephen; Clion, Valentin; Auroy, Virginie; Foley, Barry; Turner, Andrew D

    2015-06-01

    The need for homogenous reference materials stable for paralytic shellfish toxins is vital for the monitoring and quality assurance of these potent neurotoxins in shellfish. Two stabilisation techniques were investigated, heat treatment through autoclaving and the addition of preserving additives into the tissue matrix. Short and long-term stability experiments as well as homogeneity determination were conducted on materials prepared by both techniques in comparison with an untreated control using two LC-FLD methods. Both techniques improved the stability of the matrix and the PSP toxins present compared to the controls. A material was prepared using the combined techniques of heat treatment followed by spiking with additives and data is presented from this optimised reference material as used over a two year period in the Irish national monitoring program and in a development exercise as part of a proficiency testing scheme operated by QUASIMEME (Quality Assurance of Information for Marine Environmental Monitoring in Europe) since 2011. The results were indicative of the long-term stability of the material as evidenced through consistent assigned values in the case of the proficiency testing scheme and a low relative standard deviation of 10.5% for total toxicity data generated over 24 months. PMID:25816999

  12. Multi-heat addition turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, Leo C. (Inventor); Brabbs, Theodore A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A multi-heat addition turbine engine (MHATE) incorporates a plurality of heat addition devices to transfer energy to air and a plurality of turbines to extract energy from the air while converting it to work. The MHATE provides dry power and lower fuel consumption or lower combustor exit temperatures.

  13. Heat treatment study 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The microstructural variations in nickel based superalloys that result from modifications in processing were examined. These superalloys include MAR-M246(HF) and PWA1480. Alternate heat treatments for equiaxed as-cast specimens were studied and a sample matrix of 42 variations in the heat treatments were processed, as well as different directional solidification parameters. Variation in temperature and times for both solution and aging were performed. Photomicrographs were made of the microstructure and volume fraction analysis of primary gamma-prime and aged gamma-prime precipitates were performed. The results of the heat treatment, cooling rate, and directional solidification experiments are discussed.

  14. Heat treatment for superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, Fredric H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A cobalt-free nickel-base superalloy composed of in weight % 15 Cr-5 Mo-3.5 Ti-4 Al-0.07 (max) C-remainder Ni is given a modified heat treatment. With this heat treatment the cobalt-free alloy achieves certain of the mechanical properties of the corresponding cobalt-containing nickel-base superalloy at 1200 F (650 C). Thus, strategic cobalt can be replaced by nickel in the alloy.

  15. Heat treatment furnace

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  16. Heat Exchange, Additive Manufacturing, and Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick

    2015-02-23

    Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured undistorted snapshots of refrigerants flowing through small heat exchangers, helping them to better understand heat transfer in heating, cooling and ventilation systems.

  17. The heat treatment of duralumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    When certain light aluminum alloys are heat-treated, quenched and aged, there is considerable improvement in their tensile properties. This paper presents different methods of accomplishing these heat treatments.

  18. Phytosanitary Heat Treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter by Neil Heather and Guy Hallman, in “Pest Management and Phytosanitary Trade Barriers,” CABI Press, deals with disinfestations of food commodities. Disinfestation of food commodities with heat to satisfy phytosanitary requirements has the advantage of freedom from chemical residue...

  19. 2. SALEMBROSIUS CONTINUOUS GASFIRED HEAT TREATING LINE AT HEAT TREATMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SALEM-BROSIUS CONTINUOUS GAS-FIRED HEAT TREATING LINE AT HEAT TREATMENT PLANT OF THE DUQUESNE WORKS. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Heat Treatment Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  20. Induction heat treatment of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.; Stutz, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the induction heating. After reviewing heat treating operations for steel and the principles of the heat treatment of steel, an overview of induction heat treating is provided. Next, consideration is given to equipment and equipment selection, coil design, power requirements and temperature control. A discussion of surface and through hardening of steel is provided, including information on frequency and power selection and quenching apparatus. Tempering is considered, followed by information on control of residual stresses, cracking, temper brittleness and the important metallurgical and hardness differences between induction and furnace treated steel.

  1. Treatment of suspected heat illness.

    PubMed

    Eichner, E R

    1998-06-01

    1. Despite advances in the art and science of fluid balance, exertional heat illness -- even life-threatening heat stroke -- remains a threat for some athletes today. 2. Risk factors for heat illness include: being unacclimatized, unfit, or hypohydrated; certain illnesses or drugs; not drinking in long events; and a fast finishing pace. 3. Heat cramps typically occur in conditioned athletes who compete for hours in the sun. They can be prevented by increasing dietary salt and staying hydrated. 4. Early diagnosis of heat exhaustion can be vital. Early warning signs include: flushed face, hyperventilation, headache, dizziness, nausea, tingling arms, piloerection, chilliness, incoordination, and confusion. 5. Pitfalls in the diagnosis of heat illness include: confusion preventing self-diagnosis; the lack of trained spotters; rectal temperature not taken promptly; the problem of "seek not, find not;" and the mimicry of heat illness. 6. Heat stroke is a medical emergency. Mainstays of therapy include: emergency on-site cooling; intravenous fluids; treating hypoglycemia as needed; intravenous diazepam for seizures or severe cramping or shivering; and hospitalizing if response is slow or atypical. 7. The best treatment is prevention. Tips to avoiding heat illness include: rely not on thirst; drink on schedule; favor sports drinks; monitor weight; watch urine; shun caffeine and alcohol; key on meals for fluids and salt; stay cool when you can; and know the early warning signs of heat illness. PMID:9694424

  2. Induction heating plant for heat treatment of spherical metal products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, V. N.; Titov, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    A control system for an induction heating plant is developed and studied to perform symmetric high-rate surface induction heating of spherical metal products with given technological parameters for heat treatment.

  3. Hyperbaric post weld heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Saunderson, S.; Waller, D.

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes a sub-sea hyperbaric Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) system developed jointly by SHELL UK EXPLORATION and PRODUCTION and COMEX DIVING. It discusses: assessment of power requirements and equipment, initial tests conducted in the COMEX hydrosphere and in shallow water in Marseille, and full scale North Sea trials at - 150 m, comparing the performance and results of two separate power sources and control units. Particular attention is drawn to the importance of the elements, insulation and controls used to achieve uniform distribution of heat at the required temperature in a HELIOX environment.

  4. Analysis and Evaluation of Supersonic Underwing Heat Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luidens, Roger W.; Flaherty, Richard J.

    1959-01-01

    The linearized theory for heat addition under a wing has been developed to optimize wing geometry, heat addition, and angle of attack. The optimum wing has all of the thickness on the underside of the airfoil, with maximum-thickness point well downstream, has a moderate thickness ratio, and operates at an optimum angle of attack. The heat addition is confined between the fore Mach waves from under the trailing surface of the wing. By linearized theory, a wing at optimum angle of attack may have a range efficiency about twice that of a wing at zero angle of attack. More rigorous calculations using the method of characteristics for particular flow models were made for heating under a flat-plate wing and for several wings with thickness, both with heat additions concentrated near the wing. The more rigorous calculations yield in practical cases efficiencies about half those estimated by linear theory. An analysis indicates that distributing the heat addition between the fore waves from the undertrailing portion of the wing is a way of improving the performance, and further calculations appear desirable. A comparison of the conventional ramjet-plus wing with underwing heat addition when the heat addition is concentrated near the wing shows the ramjet to be superior on a range basis up to Mach number of about B. The heat distribution under the wing and the assumed ramjet and airframe performance may have a marked effect on this conclusion. Underwing heat addition can be useful in providing high-altitude maneuver capability at high flight Mach numbers for an airplane powered by conventional ramjets during cruise.

  5. Recent additions in the treatment of cough

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide, cough is regarded as a challenging clinical problem due to its frequency and often limited therapeutic options. Chronic cough that remains refractory to usual medical treatment causes significant quality of life impairment in people with this problem. Methods We have examined current evidence on recent additions in the treatment of cough, specifically treatment of refractory chronic cough with speech pathology and gabapentin. Relevant randomised control trials, reviews and case reports were identified through a PubMed and SCOPUS search of English-language literature referring to these concepts over the last eight years. Summary Of the one hundred and two articles comprising this review the majority investigated the role of the transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors TRP Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRPA1 in cough and the potential of TRP antagonists as effective anti-tussives. However, these have only been tested in the laboratory and therefore their clinical effectiveness is unknown. Behavioural treatments such as speech pathology have gained momentum and this was evident in the increasing number of articles investigating its positive effect on cough. Investigation on the effectiveness of neuromodulating medications in the treatment of cough have been supported primarily through case series reports and prospective reviews however; their use (particularly gabapentin) has been significantly advanced through recently conducted randomised controlled trials. Conclusions Recent additions in the treatment of chronic cough have been significant as they consider cough to have a unifying diagnosis of cough hypersensitivity with or without the presence of a neuropathic basis. Primarily, effective treatments for chronic cough target these areas and include behavioural treatment such as speech pathology and pharmaceutical treatment with neuromodulating medications such as gabapentin. PMID:25383209

  6. Simulating heat addition via mass addition in constant area compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiser, W. H.; McClure, W. B.; Wood, C. W.

    1995-01-01

    A study conducted demonstrated the striking similarity between the influence of heat addition and mass addition on compressible flows. These results encourage the belief that relatively modest laboratory experiments employing mass addition can be devised that will reproduce the leading phenomena of heat addition, such as the axial variation of properties, choking, and wall-boundary-layer separation. These suggest that some aspects of the complex behavior of dual-mode ramjet/scramjet combustors could be experimentally evaluated or demonstrated by replacing combustion with less expensive, more easily controlled, and safer mass addition.

  7. 29 CFR 1919.36 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.36 Section 1919.36 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.36 Heat treatment. (a) The annealing of wrought iron gear required by this part shall...

  8. 29 CFR 1919.80 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.80 Section 1919.80 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.80 Heat treatment. (a) Wherever heat treatment of any loose gear is recommended by the manufacturer, it shall be carried out...

  9. 29 CFR 1919.80 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.80 Section 1919.80 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.80 Heat treatment. (a) Wherever heat treatment of any loose gear is recommended by the manufacturer, it shall be carried out...

  10. 29 CFR 1919.36 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.36 Section 1919.36 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.36 Heat treatment. (a) The annealing of wrought iron gear required by this part shall...

  11. 29 CFR 1919.36 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.36 Section 1919.36 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.36 Heat treatment. (a) The annealing of wrought iron gear required by this part shall...

  12. 29 CFR 1919.36 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.36 Section 1919.36 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.36 Heat treatment. (a) The annealing of wrought iron gear required by this part shall...

  13. 29 CFR 1919.36 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.36 Section 1919.36 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.36 Heat treatment. (a) The annealing of wrought iron gear required by this part shall...

  14. 29 CFR 1919.80 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.80 Section 1919.80 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.80 Heat treatment. (a) Wherever heat treatment of any loose gear is recommended by the manufacturer, it shall be carried out...

  15. 29 CFR 1919.80 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.80 Section 1919.80 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.80 Heat treatment. (a) Wherever heat treatment of any loose gear is recommended by the manufacturer, it shall be carried out...

  16. 29 CFR 1919.80 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.80 Section 1919.80 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.80 Heat treatment. (a) Wherever heat treatment of any loose gear is recommended by the manufacturer, it shall be carried out...

  17. Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt

    2004-10-15

    Heat treatment practices used by steel foundries have been carefully studied as part of comprehensive heat treatment procedure development trials. These studies highlight the relationships between critical heat treatment process control parameters and heat treatment success. Foundry heat treatment trials to develop heat treatment procedure qualification have shed light on the relationship between heat treatment theory and current practices. Furnace load time-temperature profiles in steel foundries exhibit significant differences depending on heat treatment equipment, furnace loading practice, and furnace maintenance. Time-temperature profiles of the furnace control thermocouples can be very different from the time-temperature profiles observed at the center of casting loads in the furnace. Typical austenitrization temperatures and holding times used by steel foundries far exceed what is required for transformation to austenite. Quenching and hardenability concepts were also investigated. Heat treatment procedure qualification (HTPQ) schema to demonstrate heat treatment success and to pre-qualify other alloys and section sizes requiring lesser hardenability have been developed. Tempering success is dependent on both tempering time and temperature. As such, furnace temperature uniformity and control of furnace loading during tempering is critical to obtain the desired mechanical properties. The ramp-up time in the furnace prior to the establishment of steady state heat treatment conditions contributes to the extent of heat treatment performed. This influence of ramp-up to temperature during tempering has been quantified.

  18. Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification for Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Mariol Charles; Nicholas Deskevich; Vipin Varkey; Robert Voigt; Angela Wollenburg

    2004-04-29

    Heat treatment practices used by steel foundries have been carefully studied as part of comprehensive heat treatment procedure qualification development trials. These studies highlight the relationships between critical heat treatment process control parameters and heat treatment success. Foundry heat treatment trials to develop heat treatment procedure qualifications have shed light on the relationship between heat treatment theory and current practices. Furnace load time-temperature profiles in steel foundries exhibit significant differences depending on heat treatment equipment, furnace loading practice, and furnace maintenance. Time-temperature profiles of furnace control thermocouples can be very different from the time-temperature profiles observed at the center of casting loads in the furnace. Typical austenitization temperatures and holding times used by steel foundries far exceed what is required for transformation to austenite. Quenching and hardenability concepts were also investigated. Heat treatment procedure qualification (HTPQ) schema to demonstrate heat treatment success and to pre-qualify other alloys and section sizes requiring lesser hardenability have been developed. Tempering success is dependent on both tempering time and temperature. As such, furnace temperature uniformity and control of furnace loading during tempering is critical to obtain the desired mechanical properties. The ramp-up time in the furnace prior to the establishment of steady state heat treatment conditions contributes to the extent of heat treatment performed. This influence of ramp-up to temperature during tempering has been quantified.

  19. Acidization of a Direct Heat Hydrothermal Well and its Potential in Developing Additional Direct Heat Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Strawn, J. A.; Prestwich, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A matrix acid treatment on a limestone formation in a low temperature hydrothermal production well in South Dakota has resulted in a 40% increase in heat (BTU) available for use in space heating a hospital. The results of this experimental treatment on the Madison Limestone suggest a significant potential may exist for similar applications, particularly throughout the western United States. This paper presents the results of the acid treatment, suggests other possible areas for similar application, and analyzes the economics for successful treatments.

  20. Proper use of sludge-control additives in residential heating oil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tatnall, R.E.

    1995-04-01

    Discussed are various aspects of heating oil `sludge`: How it forms, typical problems it causes, how sludge-control additives work, what should be expected of them, and what happens in a contaminated system when such additives are used. Test results from laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that performance of commercially available additives varies greatly. The concept of `end-of-the-line` treatment is described and compared with bulk fuel treatment. A procedure is described whereby a retailer can test additives himself, and thus determine just what those additives will or will not do for his business. Finally, the economics of an effective treatment program are outlined.

  1. HEAT: High accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry. III. Additional improvements and overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, M. E.; Vazquez, J.; Ruscic, B.; Wilson, A. K.; Gauss, J.; Stanton, J. F.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. t Mainz; The Univ. of Texas; Univ. of North Texas

    2008-01-01

    Effects of increased basis-set size as well as a correlated treatment of the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer approximation are studied within the context of the high-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry (HEAT) theoretical model chemistry. It is found that the addition of these ostensible improvements does little to increase the overall accuracy of HEAT for the determination of molecular atomization energies. Fortuitous cancellation of high-level effects is shown to give the overall HEAT strategy an accuracy that is, in fact, higher than most of its individual components. In addition, the issue of core-valence electron correlation separation is explored; it is found that approximate additive treatments of the two effects have limitations that are significant in the realm of <1 kJ mol{sup -1} theoretical thermochemistry.

  2. 29 CFR 1919.16 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.16 Section 1919.16 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.16 Heat treatment. (a) All chains...

  3. 29 CFR 1919.16 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.16 Section 1919.16 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.16 Heat treatment. (a) All chains...

  4. 29 CFR 1919.16 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.16 Section 1919.16 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.16 Heat treatment. (a) All chains...

  5. 29 CFR 1919.16 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.16 Section 1919.16 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.16 Heat treatment. (a) All chains...

  6. 29 CFR 1919.16 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.16 Section 1919.16 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.16 Heat treatment. (a) All chains...

  7. Additional Treatments Offer Little Benefit for Pancreatic Cancer: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 158633.html Additional Treatments Offer Little Benefit for Pancreatic Cancer: Study Neither extra chemotherapy drug nor add-on ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Additional treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer don't appear to boost survival, a new ...

  8. Fundamental aspects of postharvest heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Susan; Pedreschi, Romina

    2014-01-01

    Heat treatments have been investigated for use in many aspects of postharvest storage. They have been developed for insect control, prevention of fungal development and prevention of postharvest storage disorders including chilling injury. The treatment times and temperature range vary widely, from days at 35 °C to 39 °C in hot air, to up to 63 °C for less than a minute in hot water. Much of the research has been performed to develop solutions to a particular problem, and less investigation has been conducted on the responses of the commodity to the treatment. However, since the turn of the century, a number of groups have been active in examining the molecular responses and changes that occur in commodities during and after the heat treatment. This review examines the changes at the level of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome that occur in response to the different heat treatments. PMID:26504541

  9. PILOT-SCALE ANAEROBIC FILTER TREATMENT OF HEAT TREATMENT LIQUOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation was undertaken to demonstrate the application of the anaerobic filter in the treatment of liquor waste resulting from heat treatment of raw sludge in municipal sewage treatment plants. The liquor which contains high concentrations of soluble wastes is often ret...

  10. 49 CFR 179.400-12 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.400-12 Section 179...-12 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner tank is not required. (b) The... postweld heat treatment. Welds securing the following need not be postweld heat treated when it is...

  11. Maraging superalloys and heat treatment processes

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.; Gelles, David S.; Thomas, Larry E.

    1986-01-01

    Described herein are nickel-chromium-iron maraging, gamma prime strengthened superalloys containing about 18 to 25 weight percent nickel, about 4 to 8 weight percent chromium, gamma prime forming elements such as aluminum and/or titanium, and a solid solution strengthening element, such as molybdenum. After heat treatment, which includes at least one ausaging treatment and at least one maraging treatment, a microstructure containing gamma prime phase and decomposed Fe-Ni-Cr type martensite is produced.

  12. Predicting microbial heat inactivation under nonisothermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Mounir; Condón, Santiago; Pagán, Rafael

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an equation that accurately predicts microbial heat inactivation under nonisothermal treatments at constantly rising heating rates (from 0.5 to 5 degrees C/min) in media with different pH values (4.0 or 7.4). The survival curves of all bacteria (Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Senftenberg 775W, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) tested under isothermal treatments were nearly linear. For the most heat-resistant microorganism (E. faecium), the estimated DT-values at pH 7.4 were at least 100 times those of the second most thermotolerant microorganism (Salmonella Senftenberg 775W). The heat resistance of E. faecium was up to 30 times lower at pH 4.0 than at pH 7.4. However, E. faecium was still the most heat-resistant microorganism under nonisothermal treatments at both pH values. Inactivation under nonisothermal conditions was not accurately estimated from heat resistance parameters of isothermal treatments when microbial adaptation or sensibilization occurred during the heating up lag phases. The under-prediction of the number of survivors might be greater than 15 log CFU within the nonisothermal treatment conditions investigated. Therefore, the nonisothermal survival curves of the most heat-resistant microorganisms were fitted with the following equation: log S(t) = -(t/delta)P. This equation accurately described the survival curves of all the bacteria tested. We observed a linear relationship between the log of the scale parameter (delta) and the log of the heating rate. A p value characteristic of each microorganism and pH tested was calculated. Two equations capable of predicting the inactivation rate of all bacteria tested under nonisothermal treatments at pH 7.4, 5.5, or 4.0 were developed. The model was evaluated in skim milk and apple juice. The results of this study could be used to help minimize public health risks and to extend the shelf life of those foods

  13. 10. Water treatment plant, view to S. 1965 addition is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Water treatment plant, view to S. 1965 addition is in the foreground - Fort Benton Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, Lots 9-13 of Block 7, Fort Benton Original Townsite at Missouri River, Fort Benton, Chouteau County, MT

  14. Local Laser Heat Treatments of Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Hietala, M.; Mäntyjärvi, K.

    In this work UHS structural and abrasion resistant (AR) steels were heat treated with a single 4 kW Yb: YAG-laser beam. Aim of the softening heat treatments was to enhance the formability locally with minimized strength lose. 1.8 mm thick B24CR boron steel was used for hardening tests. Study presents the possibilities and limitations in laser processing showing that a single laser beam is suitable for heat treating of sheets through the whole cross-section up to the thickness of 6 mm. In the case of the 6 mm thick sheets, the achieved maximum temperature in the cross-section varies as a function of the depth. Consequently, the microstructure and mechanical properties differ between the surfaces and the center of the cross-section (layered microstructure). For better understanding, all layers were tested in tensile tests. The 10 mm thick sheet was heat treated separately on the both surfaces by heating to a lower temperature range to produce a shallow tempered layer. The tensile and bendability tests as well as hardness measurements indicated that laser heat treatment can be used to highly improve the bendability locally without significant strength losses. Laser process has been optimized by transverse scanning movement and with a simple FE-model.

  15. 39 CFR 3050.41 - Treatment of additional financial reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Treatment of additional financial reports. 3050.41 Section 3050.41 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.41 Treatment of additional financial reports. (a) For purposes of the reports required by § 3050.40(a)(2),...

  16. Plasma treatment of heat-resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V. A.; Kosmachev, P. V.; Skripnikova, N. K.; Bezukhov, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    Refractory lining of thermal generating units is exposed to chemical, thermal, and mechanical attacks. The degree of fracture of heat-resistant materials depends on the chemical medium composition, the process temperature and the material porosity. As is known, a shortterm exposure of the surface to low-temperature plasma (LTP) makes possible to create specific coatings that can improve the properties of workpieces. The aim of this work is to produce the protective coating on heat-resistant chamotte products using the LTP technique. Experiments have shown that plasma treatment of chamotte products modifies the surface, and a glass-ceramic coating enriched in mullite is formed providing the improvement of heat resistance. For increasing heat resistance of chamotte refractories, pastes comprising mixtures of Bacor, alumina oxide, and chamot were applied to their surfaces in different ratios. It is proved that the appropriate coating cannot be created if only one of heat-resistant components is used. The required coatings that can be used and recommended for practical applications are obtained only with the introduction of powder chamot. The paste composition of 50% chamot, 25% Bacor, and 25% alumina oxide exposed to plasma treatment, has demonstrated the most uniform surface fusion.

  17. Very high-vacuum heat treatment facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1987-01-01

    A vacuum heat treatment facility, with hot zone dimensions of 12 x 19 x 19 cm, has been designed and constructed at a cost substantially below that of a commercial unit. The design incorporates efficient water cooling and a resistive heating element. A vacuum pressure of 1.5 x 10 to the -8th torr at room temperature has been obtained after baking. The temperature limit is approximately 1900 C. This limit results from the choice of niobium as the hot zone material.

  18. Improved Heat Treatment Of Steel Alloy 4340

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lawrence B.

    1993-01-01

    New process takes significantly less time than prior heat-treatment processes. Involves placing steel plate directly in furnace and heat-treating. Plate then quenched in slowly moving oil to reduce stresses. Any deflection then pressed out. Possible uses of 4340 steel include new and improved bulletproof vests for military and police personnel and armor for bulletproof automobiles for military, police, diplomatic, and private users. Also used in other military land vehicles as tanks and in both military and civilian aircraft. Lighter armorplate enables land vehicles and aircraft to attain greater speed and maneuverability, consume less fuel, and afford better protection from snipers or terrorists.

  19. 49 CFR 179.220-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... § 171.7 of this subchapter). (c) When cold formed heads are used on the outer shell they must be heat... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.220-11 Section 179... Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner container is not a...

  20. 49 CFR 179.400-12 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.400-12 Section 179... and 107A) § 179.400-12 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner tank is not... closing seams, must be postweld heat treated as prescribed in AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix...

  1. 49 CFR 179.400-12 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.400-12 Section 179...-12 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner tank is not required. (b) The... postweld heat treated as prescribed in AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7...

  2. 49 CFR 179.400-12 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.400-12 Section 179...-12 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner tank is not required. (b) The... postweld heat treated as prescribed in AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7...

  3. 49 CFR 179.400-12 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.400-12 Section 179...-12 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner tank is not required. (b) The... postweld heat treated as prescribed in AAR Specifications for Tank Cars, appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7...

  4. In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Nguyen, Scott Vinh

    2010-12-07

    Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

  5. Assessment of NASA Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment Method for Multiple Forging Batch Heat Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John (Technical Monitor); Lemsky, Joe

    2004-01-01

    NASA dual microstructure heat treatment technology previously demonstrated on single forging heat treat batches of a generic disk shape was successfully demonstrated on a multiple disk batch of a production shape component. A group of four Rolls-Royce Corporation 3rd Stage AE2100 forgings produced from alloy ME209 were successfully dual microstructure heat treated as a single heat treat batch. The forgings responded uniformly as evidenced by part-to-part consistent thermocouple recordings and resultant macrostructures, and from ultrasonic examination. Multiple disk DMHT processing offers a low cost alternative to other published dual microstructure processing techniques.

  6. 7 CFR 305.29 - Vacuum heat treatment schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vacuum heat treatment schedule. 305.29 Section 305.29... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Heat Treatments § 305.29 Vacuum heat treatment schedule. T111-a-1. Place bay leaves in a vacuum chamber. Starting at 0 hour, gradually reduce to 0.133...

  7. Anodic Oxidative Modification of Egg White for Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masahito; Handa, Akihiro; Yamaguchi, Yusuke; Kodama, Risa; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-31

    A new functionalization of egg white was achieved by an electrochemical reaction. The method involves electron transfer from thiol groups of egg white protein to form disulfide bonds. The oxidized egg white produced less hydrogen sulfide during heat treatment; with sufficient application of electricity, almost no hydrogen sulfide was produced. In addition, gels formed by heating electrochemically oxidized egg white exhibited unique properties, such as a lower gelation temperature and a softened texture, presumably due to protein aggregation and electrochemically mediated intramolecular disulfide bond formation. PMID:27518910

  8. 1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST INSIDE OF THE HEAT TREATMENT BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST INSIDE OF THE HEAT TREATMENT BUILDING AT BATCH FURNACES, QUENCHING PIT IN FOREGROUND. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Heat Treatment Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  9. Nitrogen Flow in a Nanonozzle with Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkin, Sergey; Zhang, Zetian; Gatsonis, Nikolaos

    2012-11-01

    The nitrogen flow in conical nanonozzles at atmospheric pressures are investigated using a three-dimensional unstructured direct simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) method. The DSMC simulations are performed in computational domains that feature the plenum, the nanonozzle region and the external plume expansion region. The inlet and outlet boundaries are modeled by the Kinetic-Moment (KM) boundary conditions method. This methodology is based on the local one dimensional inviscid (LODI) formulation used in compressible (continuous) flow computations. The cross section for elastic collisions is based on the variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The Larsen-Borgnakke (L-B) model is used to simulate the exchange of the internal energy in the collision pair. Solid surfaces are modeled as being either diffuse or specularly reflecting. The effects of Knudsen number, aspect ratio, and nanonozzle scale on the heat transfer are investigating by ranging the throat diameters from 100-500 nm, exit diameter from 100-1000 nm, stagnation pressure from 1-10atm, and wall temperature from 300K-500K. Finite backpressure and vacuum conditions are considered. Macroscopic flow variables are obtained and compared with continuum predictions in order to elucidate the impacts of nanoscale.

  10. 49 CFR 179.200-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.200-11 Section 179... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-11 Postweld heat treatment. When specified in § 179.201-1, after welding is complete, postweld heat treatment must be in...

  11. 49 CFR 179.220-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.220-11 Section 179... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-11 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner container is not a specification requirement. (b)...

  12. 49 CFR 179.220-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.220-11 Section 179... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-11 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner container is not a specification requirement. (b)...

  13. 49 CFR 179.200-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.200-11 Section 179... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-11 Postweld heat treatment. When specified in § 179.201-1, after welding is complete, postweld heat treatment must be in...

  14. 49 CFR 179.200-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.200-11 Section 179... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-11 Postweld heat treatment. When specified in § 179.201-1, after welding is complete, postweld heat treatment must be in...

  15. 49 CFR 179.220-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.220-11 Section 179... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-11 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner container is not a specification requirement. (b)...

  16. 49 CFR 179.200-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.200-11 Section 179... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-11 Postweld heat treatment. When specified in § 179.201-1, after welding is complete, postweld heat treatment must be in...

  17. 49 CFR 179.220-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.220-11 Section 179... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-11 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner container is not a specification requirement. (b)...

  18. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  19. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  20. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  1. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  2. [Treatment of syphilis with malaria or heat].

    PubMed

    Verhave, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    Until the end of the Second World War, syphilis was a common sexually transmitted infection. This stigmatising infectious disease caused mental decline, paralysis and eventually death. The history of syphilis was given public attention because of 'malaria therapy', which had been applied from the First World War onwards in patients with paralytic dementia. In 1917, the Austrian physician Julius Wagner-Jauregg (1857-1940) induced fever in these patients by infecting them with malaria parasites; in 1927, he received the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the healing properties of malarial fever. One source, not cited anywhere, is an interview that the American bacteriologist and science writer/medical journalist Paul de Kruif conducted with Wagner-Jauregg in 1930. The reporting of this meeting, and De Kruif's later involvement in the mechanical heat treatment of patients with syphilis, form the inspiration for this article. When penicillin became available, both treatments became obsolete. PMID:27165455

  3. 7 CFR 305.8 - Heat treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... equipment that is capable of adequately circulating air or water (as relevant to the treatment), changing... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Heat treatment requirements. 305.8 Section 305.8... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.8 Heat treatment requirements....

  4. 7 CFR 305.8 - Heat treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... equipment that is capable of adequately circulating air or water (as relevant to the treatment), changing... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Heat treatment requirements. 305.8 Section 305.8... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.8 Heat treatment requirements....

  5. Efficacy of heat treatment for disinfestation of concrete grain silos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field experiments were conducted in 2007 and 2008 to evaluate heat treatment for disinfestations of empty concrete elevator silos. A Mobile Heat Treatment Unit was used to introduce heat into silos to attain target conditions of 50°C for at least 6 h. Ventilated plastic containers with a capacity of...

  6. 49 CFR 179.300-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.300-10 Section 179... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-10 Postweld heat treatment. After welding is complete, steel tanks and all attachments welded thereto, must be postweld heat...

  7. 49 CFR 179.300-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.300-10 Section 179... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-10 Postweld heat treatment. After welding is complete, steel tanks and all attachments welded thereto, must be postweld heat...

  8. 49 CFR 179.300-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.300-10 Section 179... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-10 Postweld heat treatment. After welding is complete, steel tanks and all attachments welded thereto, must be postweld heat...

  9. Mortality of insect life stages during simulated heat treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    . Heat treatment for insect disinfestation uses elevated air temperatures that are lethal to stored-product insects. Heat treatment has been demonstrated in our research to offer a reduced-risk alternative to fumigation or residual pesticide use in empty bins. Heat is also compatible with organic gr...

  10. 49 CFR 179.200-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.200-11 Section 179.200-11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... Postweld heat treatment. When specified in § 179.201-1, after welding is complete, postweld heat...

  11. Decomposition of Fluorinated Graphene under Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Plšek, Jan; Drogowska, Karolina Anna; Valeš, Václav; Ek Weis, Johan; Kalbac, Martin

    2016-06-20

    Fluorination modifies the electronic properties of graphene, and thus it can be used to provide material with on-demand properties. However, the thermal stability of fluorinated graphene is crucial for any application in electronic devices. Herein, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and Raman spectroscopy were used to address the impact of the thermal treatment on fluorinated graphene. The annealing, at up to 700 K, caused gradual loss of fluorine and carbon, as was demonstrated by XPS. This loss was associated with broad desorption of CO and HF species, as monitored by TPD. The minor single desorption peak of CF species at 670 K is suggested to rationalize defect formation in the fluorinated graphene layer during the heating. However, fluorine removal from graphene was not complete, as some fraction of strongly bonded fluorine can persist despite heating to 1000 K. The role of intercalated H2 O and OH species in the defluorination process is emphasised. PMID:27161096

  12. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  13. 7 CFR 305.8 - Heat treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Heat treatment requirements. 305.8 Section 305.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS § 305.8 Heat treatment requirements....

  14. 29 CFR 1919.17 - Exemptions from heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemptions from heat treatment. 1919.17 Section 1919.17... from heat treatment. Gear made of steel, or gear which contains (as in ball bearings swivels), or is... treatment shall be exempt from the requirements of § 1919.16. Such gear, however, shall be...

  15. 49 CFR 179.100-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.100-10 Section 179...-10 Postweld heat treatment. (a) After welding is complete, steel tanks and all attachments welded... treatment is prohibited. (c) Tank and welded attachments, fabricated from ASTM A 240/A 240M (IBR, see §...

  16. 49 CFR 179.100-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.100-10 Section 179... treatment. (a) After welding is complete, steel tanks and all attachments welded thereto must be postweld..., appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (b) For aluminum tanks, postweld heat treatment...

  17. 29 CFR 1919.17 - Exemptions from heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemptions from heat treatment. 1919.17 Section 1919.17... from heat treatment. Gear made of steel, or gear which contains (as in ball bearings swivels), or is... treatment shall be exempt from the requirements of § 1919.16. Such gear, however, shall be...

  18. A method for shipboard treatment of multiple heat casualties.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, W B; Krafte-Jacobs, B; Hansen, W; Saldana, M

    1992-03-01

    A method is presented for the treatment aboard ship of multiple patients afflicted with life-threatening heat illness, using an inflatable life raft cooling system. The potential benefits of this method include: (1) the utilization of readily available materials aboard U.S. Naval vessels; (2) the provision for rapid patient cooling by evaporation while maintaining patient safety and comfort; (3) the ability to treat many patients simultaneously with minimal attendant personnel; and (4) the maintenance of patient access allowing for monitoring and the administration of additional supportive measures. PMID:1603408

  19. Effects of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of SiC p/6061 Al composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldun, D.; Martin, P.; Sun, J.

    1992-10-01

    Metal-matrix composites have been receiving considerable attention as light-weight materials for use in many advanced technology applications. Silicon carbide (SiC) particles and whiskers have several advantages over other discontinuous reinforcements. Studies have shown that heat treatment can change the mechanical properties of metal-matrix composites. Modified heat treatments were developed for SiC p/6061 Al composites through a series of heat treatment with varied solution temperatures and aging time. Mechanical tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of the composites in three conditions; as-received, annealed, and heat treated. The modified heat treatments resulted in increases in the yield strength of up to 12% over the manufacturer’s reported yield strength for the standard T6 heat treatment. The trends which occur during heat treatment of SiC p/6061 Al are simular to those which occur during heat treatment of aluminum alloys. In addition, the relationship between the mechanical properties and the heat treatment parameters was documented. Throughout this study, the values of elastic modules were rather erratic compared to the strength values. Scanning Electron Microscope fractographic analysis revealed various fracture initiation sites, such as particle clusters and iron inclusions.

  20. Effects of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of kenaf fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carada, Paulo Teodoro D. L.; Fujii, Toru; Okubo, Kazuya

    2016-05-01

    Natural fibers are utilized in various ways. One specific application of it, is in the field natural fiber composite (NFC). Considerable amount of researches are conducted in this field due to rising concerns in the harmful effects of synthetic materials to the environment. Additionally, these researches are done in order to overcome the drawbacks which limit the wide use of natural fiber. A way to improve NFC is to look into the reinforcing component (natural fiber). Treatments, which are classified as mechanical or chemical in nature, can be done in order to improve the performance of the natural fiber. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of heat treatment in the mechanical properties of kenaf fiber. In addition, the response of mechanical properties after exposure to high moisture environment of heat-treated kenaf fibers was observed. Heat treatment was done for one hour with the following heating temperatures: 140, 160, 180, and 200 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis was done to calculate the crystallinity index of kenaf fibers after heat treatment. The results showed that increase in tensile strength can be attained when kenaf fibers are heat treated at 140 °C. However, the tensile modulus showed inconsistency with respect to heat treatment temperature. The computed crystallinity index of the fiber matched the tensile strength observed in non-treated and heat-treated kenaf fibers. The results obtained in this study can be used for applications where heat treatment on kenaf fibers is needed.

  1. Additional Treatment Services in a Cocaine Treatment Study: Level of Services Obtained and Impact on Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Matthew; Gallop, Robert; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Ring-Kurtz, Sarah; Present, Julie; Weiss, Roger D.; Crits-Christoph, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the level of additional treatment services obtained by patients enrolled in the NIDA Cocaine Collaborative Study, a multi-center efficacy trial of four treatments for cocaine dependence, and to determine whether these services impact treatment outcome. Cocaine-dependent patients (N = 487) were recruited at five sites and randomly assigned to six months of one of four psychosocial treatments. Assessments were made at baseline, monthly during treatment, and at follow-ups at 9, 12, 15, and 18 months post-randomization. On average, patients received little or no additional treatment services during active treatment (first 6 months), but the rate of obtaining most services increased during the follow-up phase (month 7 to 18). In general, the treatment groups did not differ in the rates of obtaining non-protocol services. For all treatment groups, patients with greater psychiatric severity received more medical and psychiatric services during active treatment and follow-up. Use of treatment services was unrelated to drug use outcomes during active treatment. However, during the follow-up period, increased use of psychiatric medication, 12-step attendance, and 12-step participation was related to less drug use. The results suggest that during uncontrolled follow-up phases, additional non-protocol services may potentially confound the interpretation of treatment group comparisons in drug use outcomes. PMID:18463998

  2. INVESTIGATIONS OF HEAT TREATMENT FOR PAPER MILL SLUDGE CONDITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of oxidative and nonoxidative heat treatment processes for the conditioning of hydrous sludges originating in pulp and paper industry manufacturing or wastewater treatment operations was defined on the basis of laboratory scale investigation. Sludges employed in th...

  3. 49 CFR 179.100-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.100-10 Section 179... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-10 Postweld heat... heat treated as a unit in compliance with the requirements of AAR Specifications for Tank...

  4. 49 CFR 179.100-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.100-10 Section 179... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-10 Postweld heat... heat treated as a unit in compliance with the requirements of AAR Specifications for Tank...

  5. 49 CFR 179.100-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.100-10 Section 179... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-10 Postweld heat... heat treated as a unit in compliance with the requirements of AAR Specifications for Tank...

  6. Heat acclimation improves intermittent sprinting in the heat but additional pre-cooling offers no further ergogenic effect.

    PubMed

    Castle, Paul; Mackenzie, Richard W; Maxwell, Neil; Webborn, Anthony D J; Watt, Peter W

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 10 days of heat acclimation with and without pre-cooling on intermittent sprint exercise performance in the heat. Eight males completed three intermittent cycling sprint protocols before and after 10 days of heat acclimation. Before acclimation, one sprint protocol was conducted in control conditions (21.8 ± 2.2°C, 42.8 ± 6.7% relative humidity) and two sprint protocols in hot, humid conditions (33.3 ± 0.6°C, 52.2 ± 6.8% relative humidity) in a randomized order. One hot, humid condition was preceded by 20 min of thigh pre-cooling with ice packs (-16.2 ± 4.5°C). After heat acclimation, the two hot, humid sprint protocols were repeated. Before heat acclimation, peak power output declined in the heat (P < 0.05) but pre-cooling prevented this. Ten days of heat acclimation reduced resting rectal temperature from 37.8 ± 0.3°C to 37.4 ± 0.3°C (P < 0.01). When acclimated, peak power output increased by ∼2% (P < 0.05, main effect) and no reductions in individual sprint peak power output were observed. Additional pre-cooling offered no further ergogenic effect. Unacclimated athletes competing in the heat should pre-cool to prevent reductions in peak power output, but heat acclimate for an increased peak power output. PMID:21777052

  7. Heat transfer characteristics for some coolant additives used for water cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ziyan, H.Z.; Helali, A.H.B.

    1996-12-31

    Engine coolants contain certain additives to prevent engine overheating or coolant freezing in cold environments. Coolants, also, contain corrosion and rust inhibitors, among other additives. As most engines are using engine cooling solutions, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of engine coolants on the boiling heat transfer coefficient. This has its direct impact on radiator size and environment. This paper describes the apparatus and the measurement techniques. Also, it presents the obtained boiling heat transfer results at different parameters. Three types of engine coolants and their mixtures in distilled water are evaluated, under sub-cooled and saturated boiling conditions. A profound effect of the presence of additives in the coolant, on heat transfer, was clear since changes of heat transfer for different coolants were likely to occur. The results showed that up to 180% improvement of boiling heat transfer coefficient is experienced with some types of coolants. However, at certain concentrations other coolants provide deterioration or not enhancement in the boiling heat transfer characteristics. This investigation proved that there are limitations, which are to be taken into consideration, for the composition of engine coolants in different environments. In warm climates, ethylene glycol should be kept at the minimum concentration required for dissolving other components, whereas borax is beneficial to the enhancement of the heat transfer characteristics.

  8. 29 CFR 1919.17 - Exemptions from heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemptions from heat treatment. 1919.17 Section 1919.17... from heat treatment. Gear made of steel, or gear which contains (as in ball bearings swivels), or is permanently attached to (as with blocks) equipment made of materials which cannot be subjected to...

  9. 29 CFR 1919.17 - Exemptions from heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemptions from heat treatment. 1919.17 Section 1919.17... from heat treatment. Gear made of steel, or gear which contains (as in ball bearings swivels), or is permanently attached to (as with blocks) equipment made of materials which cannot be subjected to...

  10. 29 CFR 1919.17 - Exemptions from heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemptions from heat treatment. 1919.17 Section 1919.17... from heat treatment. Gear made of steel, or gear which contains (as in ball bearings swivels), or is permanently attached to (as with blocks) equipment made of materials which cannot be subjected to...

  11. 49 CFR 179.300-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.300-10 Section 179.300-10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... Postweld heat treatment. After welding is complete, steel tanks and all attachments welded thereto, must...

  12. Censored data treatment using additional information in intelligent medical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkova, Z. N.

    2015-11-01

    Statistical procedures are a very important and significant part of modern intelligent medical systems. They are used for proceeding, mining and analysis of different types of the data about patients and their diseases; help to make various decisions, regarding the diagnosis, treatment, medication or surgery, etc. In many cases the data can be censored or incomplete. It is a well-known fact that censorship considerably reduces the efficiency of statistical procedures. In this paper the author makes a brief review of the approaches which allow improvement of the procedures using additional information, and describes a modified estimation of an unknown cumulative distribution function involving additional information about a quantile which is known exactly. The additional information is used by applying a projection of a classical estimator to a set of estimators with certain properties. The Kaplan-Meier estimator is considered as an estimator of the unknown cumulative distribution function, the properties of the modified estimator are investigated for a case of a single right censorship by means of simulations.

  13. Induction heat treatment as a means of increasing production

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, G.F.; Shamov, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    The economic effectiveness of induction heat treatment was determined by a number of factors, including: saving energy and resources by substituting surface hardening for bulk or casehardening, improving labor productivity by process automation and including induction heat treatment equipment in the production line. Induction heating was found to be quick, does not require protection from oxidation, makes it possible to mechanize and automate the production process, and improves stabilization properties after annealing.

  14. Effects of heat treatment on carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. Kyle; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1990-01-01

    Commercially produced carbon fibers were heat treated to graphitization temperatures. The fibers were characterized for mechanical and physical properties, including density, D0002 spacing, strength, and modulus in both the 'as received' and heat treated conditions. Mechanical property changes were correlated with the physical property changes in the fibers.

  15. Effects of different additives with assistance of microwave heating for heavy metal stabilization in electronic industry sludge.

    PubMed

    Jothiramalingam, R; Lo, Shang-Lien; Chen, Ching-lung

    2010-01-01

    Electronic industrial wastewater sludge in Taiwan is normally passed through an acid-extraction process to reclaim most of the copper ions, the remaining residue may still need to be treated by various stabilization technologies using suitable additives. Cement solidification is used as the common method to stabilize the industrial wastewater sludge in Taiwan. However, this method has the disadvantage of an increase in waste volume. In the present study selective additives such as sodium sulfide, barium manganate and different phase of alumina were tested as a possible alternate additive to stabilize the heavy metal ion in the treated solid waste sludge via microwave heating treatment. The effects of additive amount, power of microwave irradiation and reaction time have been studied. Heavy metal leaching capacity is determined by using standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test and elemental content in the leachate is analyzed by inductively coupled plasma analysis. Sodium sulfide is effectively stabilizing the leaching copper ion with high selectivity in the presence of microwave irradiation and finally stabilized in the form of copper sulfide, which is a significant reaction to stabilize the copper ion leaching in the waste sludge. Complete stabilization of heavy metal ion and copper ion content (<5mgL(-1)) in industrial sludge is achieved by heating the microwave treated barium manganate and alumina additives by adopting suitable reaction conditions. Hybrid microwave and conventional heating process with minor amount of additive providing the efficient heavy metal stabilization for treated electronic industry waste sludge. PMID:19945139

  16. Heat treatment of cobalt-chromium alloy wire.

    PubMed

    Fillmore, G M; Tomlinson, J L

    1976-04-01

    This study shows that the ability of cobalt-chromium wire to resist permanent deformation is definitely affected by the temperature of heat treatment. For each temperature of heat treatment up to 1200 degrees F there is progressively greater resistance to permanent deformation; at temperatures of heat treatment above 1200 degrees F, however, there is a rapid decline in resistance to permanent deformation due to partial annealing. The maximum resistance to permanent deformation occurs from heat treatment in the temperature range of 1100 degrees to 1200 degrees F. A clinician desiring maximum resistance to permanent deformation from a .016 inches x .022 inches cobalt-chromium archwire should heat-treat the wire at 1100 degrees to 1200 degrees F for 5 minutes in a dental furnace. If the wire was in a highly work-hardened condition as were the wire specimens of this study, he could expect an increase in resistance to permanent deformation of approximately 174 percent. Heat treatment at lower temperatures could be used in situations requiring less than maximum resistance to permanent deformation. Heat treatment at 900 degrees F would give approximately a 95 percent increase in resistance to permanent deformation. Of course, heat treatment would not be indicated when the desired level of resistance to permanent deformation was not greater than the amount exhibited in the untreated wires of this study. When an electrical resistance heat-treatment unit and 950 degrees F temper-indicating paste were used, the clinician would expect increased resistance to permanent deformation similar to that seen in the wires heat-treated with a dental furnace at 800 degrees and 900 degrees F, i.e., about half of that obtained by the 1200 degrees F treatment. This study has determined the effects that various temperatures of heat treatment have on the resistance to permanent deformation of cobalt-chromium wire specimens which were formed into a specific pattern of loops. The following

  17. Archaeological investigations of stone tool heat treatment technology in southeastern Missouri: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutcheon, Patrick T.

    Nearly sixty years of research demonstrate that stone tool heat treatment was practiced in prehistory and has a discontinuous, global distribution. Yet, the ability to positively identify heat treatment in the archaeological record or explain exactly how it works remains out of reach. A review of heat-treatment literature reveals that researchers attempting to identify the heat-treatment mechanism have used multiple experimental protocols. Reliance on replicative knapping to assess thermally induced mechanical alterations in heat-treated chert has introduced uncontrolled variation. Absence of explicit theory to guide such research has generated differing descriptions of results when rock is heated. A research design sets out three questions: (1) What is the heat-treatment mechanism? (2) Is this mechanism reversible? (3) How can we identify heat treatment in the archaeological record? A series of experiments are performed to test some of the hypotheses from the heat-treatment literature. Once these are tested and found false, an hypothesis from fracture mechanics theory is forwarded and tested with additional experiments. The results of these experiments substantiate (do not reject) the hypothesis that water loss occurring between 250sp°C and 375sp°C makes chert a more homogeneous material which breaks more easily and predictably. Another series of experiments tests the reversibility of thermally induced water loss (the basis of the heat-treatment mechanism). These results reveal that the flatter, more specular fracture surfaces present on post-heating flake scars are not reversible. In the absence of physical post-depositional alteration of the archaeological record, lustrous flake scars can be used to identify heat treatment. An archaeological application is based in evolutionary theory and a model for the use of heat-treatment technology is constructed to identify crucial variables necessary when considering the use and change in frequency of heat treatment

  18. Heat Treatment of Friction-Stir-Welded 7050 Aluminum Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petter, George E.; Figert, John D.; Rybicki, Daniel J.; Burns, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    A method of heat treatment has been developed to reverse some of the deleterious effects of friction stir welding of plates of aluminum alloy 7050. This alloy is considered unweldable by arc and high-energy-density beam fusion welding processes. The alloy can be friction stir welded, but as-welded workpieces exhibit low ductility, low tensile and yield strengths, and low resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Heat treatment according to the present method increases tensile and yield strengths, and minimizes or eliminates stress corrosion cracking. It also increases ductility. This method of heat treatment is a superior alternative to a specification-required heat treatment that caused the formation of large columnar grains, which are undesired. Workpieces subjected to the prior heat treatment exhibited elongations <2 percent, and standard three-point bend specimens shattered. The development of the present heat treatment method was guided partly by the principles that (1) by minimizing grain sizes and relieving deformation stresses, one can minimize or eliminate stress corrosion cracking and (2) the key to maximizing strength and eliminating residual stresses is to perform post-weld solution heating for as long a time as possible while incurring little or no development of large columnar grains in friction stir weld nuggets. It is necessary to perform some of the solution heat treatment (to soften the alloy and improve machine welding parameters) before welding. The following is an example of thickness- dependent pre- and post-weld heat treatments according to the present method: For plates 0.270 in. (approx.6.86 mm) thick milled from plates 4.5 in. (114.3 mm) thick, perform pre-weld solution heating at 890 F (477 C) for 1 hour, then cool in air. After friction stir welding, perform solution heating for 10 minutes, quench, hold at room temperature for 96 hours, then age at 250 F (121 C) for 5 hours followed by 325 F (163 C) for 27 hours.

  19. Heat treatment of organic polymers in a flow of a gaseous heat carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravskii, G. I.; Vinogradov, L. M.; Greben'kov, A. Zh.; Drozdov, V. N.; Egorov, N. N.

    1996-11-01

    Processes of heat and mass transfer are studied during heat treatment of organic polymers in a superheated-steam flow. Promising environmentally safe engineering processes of treatment of plant biomass, plastics, and rubber wastes that contain petroleum products of sludges and soils are described.

  20. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  1. Heat treatment of exchangers to remove coke

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.D.

    1990-02-20

    This patent describes a process for preparing furfural coke for removal from metallic surfaces. It comprises: heating the furfural coke without causing an evolution of heat capable of undesirably altering metallurgical properties of the surfaces in the presence of a gas containing molecular oxygen at a sufficient temperature below 800{degrees}F (427{degrees}C) for a sufficient time to change the crush strength of the coke so as to permit removal with a water jet at a pressure of five thousand pounds per square inch.

  2. Characterization of polyparaphenylene subjected to different heat treatment temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.D.M.; Matthews, M.J.; Marucci, A.; Pimenta, M.A.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Endo, M.; Hiraoka, T.

    1998-07-01

    The authors investigated the structural and electronic properties of samples of polyparaphenylene (PPP), derived from two synthesis methods (the Kovacic and Yamamoto methods). These samples have been subjected to different heat-treatment temperatures (650 C {le} T{sub HT} {le} 2,000 C) and their properties are compared to the polymer prior to heat-treatment (T{sub HT} = 0 C). The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of heat-treated PPP based on the two synthesis methods reflects the differences in electronic structure of the starting polymers. The PL emission from the heat-treated Yamamoto polymer is quenched at much lower T{sub HT} than from the Kovacic material. However, Raman spectra taken of the material resulting from heat-treatment of the polymer (using both preparation methods) indicate the presence of phonon modes for PPP in samples at T{sub HT} up to 650 C.

  3. Effect of Heat Treatment on Properties of Glass Nanocomposite Sealants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Bok; Ha, Su-Jeong; Jang, Dong-Hoon; Park, Sung; Bae, Joongmyeon; Lee, Jae Chun

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of heat treatments on the viscosities and electrical conductivities of glass sealants to be used in solid oxide fuel cells. Glass-based sealants, both with and without an alumina nanopowder added as a nanofiller, were heat treated at temperatures ranging from 750 degrees C to 770 degrees C for periods of up to 240 h. The effects of heat treatments on the viscosities, electrical conductivities and phase transformations of the sealants were investigated. The results showed that alumina nanopowder added to the glass increased both high-temperature electrical conductivities and the viscosities of the sintered glass nanocomposite sealants. However, lengthy heat treatments decreased the electrical conductivities of the glass nanocomposite sealants. This decrease in the conductivities of the heat-treated glass nanocomposites was attributed to the crystallization of glass phase, owing to the dissolution of the alumina nanofiller in the sealing glass. PMID:26328386

  4. Overview of Heat Addition and Efficiency Predictions for an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Reid, Terry V.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. Microporous bulk insulation is used in the ground support test hardware to minimize the loss of thermal energy from the electric heat source to the environment. The insulation package is characterized before operation to predict how much heat will be absorbed by the convertor and how much will be lost to the environment during operation. In an effort to validate these predictions, numerous tasks have been performed, which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs. This test and modeling effort included: (a) making thermophysical property measurements of test setup materials to provide inputs to the numerical models, (b) acquiring additional test data that was collected during convertor tests to provide numerical models with temperature profiles of the test setup via thermocouple and infrared measurements, (c) using multidimensional numerical models (computational fluid dynamics code) to predict net heat input of an operating convertor, and (d) using validation test hardware to provide direct comparison of numerical results and validate the multidimensional numerical models used to predict convertor net heat input. This effort produced high fidelity ASC net heat input predictions, which were successfully validated using

  5. Heat Treatment. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filer, Herb; Broste, Dale

    This lesson was developed for a course in sludge treatment and disposal. The lesson describes the Porteous heat treatment method of sludge conditioning and compares that system to the Zimpro wet air oxidation process. The theory of heat treatment, system of components and functions, and concepts of operation are addressed in the lesson. The…

  6. 9 CFR 590.575 - Heat treatment of dried whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (spray or pan dried) and with the lot number or production code number. (b) The minimum requirements for heat treatment of spray or pan dried albumen shall be as follows: (1) Spray dried albumen shall be... less than 7 days and until it is salmonella negative. (2) Pan dried albumen shall be heated...

  7. 9 CFR 590.575 - Heat treatment of dried whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (spray or pan dried) and with the lot number or production code number. (b) The minimum requirements for heat treatment of spray or pan dried albumen shall be as follows: (1) Spray dried albumen shall be... less than 7 days and until it is salmonella negative. (2) Pan dried albumen shall be heated...

  8. 9 CFR 590.575 - Heat treatment of dried whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... whites is an approved method for pasteurization and the product shall be heated throughout for such times... (spray or pan dried) and with the lot number or production code number. (b) The minimum requirements for heat treatment of spray or pan dried albumen shall be as follows: (1) Spray dried albumen shall...

  9. 9 CFR 590.575 - Heat treatment of dried whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... whites is an approved method for pasteurization and the product shall be heated throughout for such times... (spray or pan dried) and with the lot number or production code number. (b) The minimum requirements for heat treatment of spray or pan dried albumen shall be as follows: (1) Spray dried albumen shall...

  10. 9 CFR 590.575 - Heat treatment of dried whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... whites is an approved method for pasteurization and the product shall be heated throughout for such times... (spray or pan dried) and with the lot number or production code number. (b) The minimum requirements for heat treatment of spray or pan dried albumen shall be as follows: (1) Spray dried albumen shall...

  11. Heat-treatment of metal parts facilitated by sand embedment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briscoe, C. C.; Kelley, R. C.

    1966-01-01

    Embedding metal parts of complex shape in sand contained in a steel box prevents strains and warping during heat treatment. The sand not only provides a simple, inexpensive support for the parts but also ensures more uniform distribution of heat to the parts.

  12. 49 CFR 179.300-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.300-10 Section 179.300-10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-10 Postweld heat...

  13. 13. INTERIOR MIDDLE BAY DETAIL VIEW, FACING NORTHWEST. HEAT TREATMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR MIDDLE BAY DETAIL VIEW, FACING NORTHWEST. HEAT TREATMENT EQUIPMENT ABANDONED ON SITE. ALSO, TRACKS ALONG EQUIPMENT FOR MOVEMENT OF MATERIAL. - NASA Industrial Plant, Missile Research Laboratory, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Evaluating the heat pump alternative for heating enclosed wastewater treatment facilities in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, C. J.; Phetteplace, G. E.

    1982-05-01

    This report presents a five-step procedure for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using heat pumps to recover heat from treatment plant effluent. The procedure is meant to be used at the facility planning level by engineers who are unfamiliar with this technology. An example of the use of the procedure and general design information are provided. Also, the report reviews the operational experience with heat pumps at wastewater plants located in Fairbanks, Alaska, Madison, Wisconsin, and Wilton, Maine.

  15. Influence of Alumina Addition to Aluminum Fins for Compact Heat Exchangers Produced by Cold Spray Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farjam, Aslan; Cormier, Yannick; Dupuis, Philippe; Jodoin, Bertrand; Corbeil, Antoine

    2015-10-01

    In this work, aluminum and aluminum-alumina powder mixtures were used to produce pyramidal fin arrays on aluminum substrates using cold spray as an additive manufacturing process. Using aluminum-alumina mixtures instead of pure aluminum powder could be seen as a cost-effective measure, preventing nozzle clogging or the need to use expensive polymer nozzles that wear out rapidly during cold spray. The fin geometries that were produced were observed using a 3D digital microscope to determine the flow passages width and fins' geometric details. Heat transfer and pressure drop tests were carried out using different ranges of appropriate Reynolds numbers for the sought commercial application to compare each fin array and determine the effect of alumina content. It was found that the presence of alumina reduces the fins' performance when compared to pure aluminum fins but that they were still outperforming traditional fins. Numerical simulations were performed to model the fin arrays and were used to predict the pressure loss in the fin array and compare these results with experimental values. The numerical model opens up new avenues in predicting different applicable operating conditions and other possible fin shapes using the same fin composition, instead of performing costly and time-consuming experiments.

  16. Optical fiber temperature sensors: applications in heat treatments for foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa-Morales, María Elena; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2010-10-01

    Heat treatments are important methods to provide safe foods. Conventional heat treatments involve the application of steam and recently microwave treatments have been studied and applied as they are considered as fast, clean and efficient. Optical fiber sensing is an excellent tool to measure the temperature during microwave treatments. This paper shows the application of optical fiber temperature sensing during the heat treatment of different foods such as vegetables (jalapeño pepper and cilantro), cheese and ostrich meat. Reaching the target temperature, important bacteria were inactivated: Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia coli. Thus, the use of optical fiber sensors has resulted be a useful way to develop protocols to inactivate microorganisms and to propose new methods for food processing.

  17. Hemodialysis Catheter Heat Transfer for Biofilm Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ian P; Sturtevant, Rachael; Heung, Michael; Solomon, Michael J; Younger, John G; VanEpps, J Scott

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are not easily treated, and many catheters (e.g., hemodialysis catheters) are not easily replaced. Biofilms (the source of infection) on catheter surfaces are notoriously difficult to eradicate. We have recently demonstrated that modest elevations of temperature lead to increased staphylococcal susceptibility to vancomycin and significantly soften the biofilm matrix. In this study, using a combination of microbiological, computational, and experimental studies, we demonstrate the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of using heat as an adjuvant treatment for infected hemodialysis catheters. Specifically, we show that treating with heat in the presence of antibiotics led to additive killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis with similar trends seen for Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The magnitude of temperature elevation required is relatively modest (45-50°C) and similar to that used as an adjuvant to traditional cancer therapy. Using a custom-designed benchtop model of a hemodialysis catheter, positioned with tip in the human vena cava as well as computational fluid dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that these temperature elevations are likely achievable in situ with minimal increased in overall blood temperature. PMID:26501916

  18. Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Beckermann, Christoph; Carlson, Kent

    2011-07-22

    Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting's overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions of

  19. Heat treatment of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Ager, J.W. III; Brown, I.G.

    1997-02-01

    Amorphous hard carbon films of varying sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} fractions have been deposited on Si using filtered cathodic are deposition with pulsed biasing. The films were heat treated in air up to 550 C. Raman investigation and nanoindentation were performed to study the modification of the films caused by the heat treatment. It was found that films containing a high sp{sup 3} fraction sustain their hardness for temperatures at least up to 400 C, their structure for temperatures up to 500 C, and show a low thickness loss during heat treatment. Films containing at low sp{sup 3} fraction graphitize during the heat treatment, show changes in structure and hardness, and a considerable thickness loss.

  20. An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

    2006-12-31

    An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

  1. Additive Manufacturing for Cost Efficient Production of Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, Holly; Ross, Nicole

    2015-10-30

    An additive manufacture technique known as laminated object manufacturing (LOM) was used to fabricate compact ceramic heat exchanger prototypes. LOM uses precision CO2 laser cutting of ceramic green tapes, which are then precision stacked to build a 3D object with fine internal features. Modeling was used to develop prototype designs and predict the thermal response, stress, and efficiency in the ceramic heat exchangers. Build testing and materials analyses were used to provide feedback for the design selection. During this development process, laminated object manufacturing protocols were established. This included laser optimization, strategies for fine feature integrity, lamination fluid control, green handling, and firing profile. Three full size prototypes were fabricated using two different designs. One prototype was selected for performance testing. During testing, cross talk leakage prevented the application of a high pressure differential, however, the prototype was successful at withstanding the high temperature operating conditions (1300 °F). In addition, analysis showed that the bulk of the part did not have cracks or leakage issues. This led to the development of a module method for next generation LOM heat exchangers. A scale-up cost analysis showed that given a purpose built LOM system, these ceramic heat exchangers would be affordable for the applications.

  2. Modeled heating and surface erosion comparing motile (gas borne) and stationary (surface coating) inert particle additives

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1982-09-27

    The unsteady, non-similar, chemically reactive, turbulent boundary layer equations are modified for gas plus dispersed solid particle mixtures, for gas phase turbulent combustion reactions and for heterogeneous gas-solid surface erosive reactions. The exterior (ballistic core) edge boundary conditions for the solutions are modified to include dispersed particle influences on core propellant combustion-generated turbulence levels, combustion reactants and products, and reaction-induced, non-isentropic mixture states. The wall surface (in this study it is always steel) is considered either bare or coated with a fixed particle coating which is conceptually non-reactive, insulative, and non-ablative. Two families of solutions are compared. These correspond to: (1) consideration of gas-borne, free-slip, almost spontaneously mobile (motile) solid particle additives which influence the turbulent heat transfer at the uncoated steel surface and, in contrast, (2) consideration of particle-free, gas phase turbulent heat transfer to the insulated surface coated by stationary particles. Significant differences in erosive heat transfer are found in comparing the two families of solutions over a substantial range of interior ballistic flow conditions. The most effective influences on reducing erosive heat transfer appear to favor mobile, gas-borne particle additives.

  3. Model Scramjet Inlet Unstart Induced by Mass Addition and Heat Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Seong-Kyun; Baccarella, Damiano; McGann, Brendan; Liu, Qili; Wermer, Lydiy; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-11-01

    The inlet unstart phenomena in a model scramjet are investigated at an arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. The unstart induced by nitrogen or ethylene jets at low or high enthalpy Mach 4.5 freestream flow conditions are compared. The jet injection pressurizes the downstream flow by mass addition and flow blockage. In case of the ethylene jet injection, heat release from combustion increases the backpressure further. Time-resolved schlieren imaging is performed at the jet and the lip of the model inlet to visualize the flow features during unstart. High frequency pressure measurements are used to provide information on pressure fluctuation at the scramjet wall. In both of the mass and heat release driven unstart cases, it is observed that there are similar flow transient and quasi-steady behaviors of unstart shockwave system during the unstart processes. Combustion driven unstart induces severe oscillatory flow motions of the jet and the unstart shock at the lip of the scramjet inlet after the completion of the unstart process, while the unstarted flow induced by solely mass addition remains relatively steady. The discrepancies between the processes of mass and heat release driven unstart are explained by flow choking mechanism.

  4. Ecological Optimization and Parametric Study of an Irreversible Regenerative Modified Brayton Cycle with Isothermal Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Sudhir K.; Kaushik, Subhash C.; Tiwari, Vivek

    2003-12-01

    An ecological optimization along with a detailed parametric study of an irreversible regenerative Brayton heat engine with isothermal heat addition have been carried out with external as well as internal irreversibilities. The ecological function is defined as the power output minus the power loss (irreversibility) which is ambient temperature times the entropy generation rate. The external irreversibility is due to finite temperature difference between the heat engine and the external reservoirs while the internal irreversibilities are due to nonisentropic compression and expansion processes in the compressor and the turbine respectively and the regenerative heat loss. The ecological function is found to be an increasing function of the isothermal-, sink- and regenerative-side effectiveness, isothermal-side inlet temperature, component efficiencies and sink-side temperature while it is found to be a decreasing function of the isobaric-side temperature and effectiveness and the working fluid heat capacitance rate. The effects of the isobaric-side effectiveness are found to be more than those of the other parameters and the effects of turbine efficiency are found to be more than those of the compressor efficiency on all the performance parameters of the cycle.

  5. One-dimensional analysis of thermal choking in case of heat addition in ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazato, Yoshiaki; Masuda, Mitsuharu; Matsuo, Kazuyasu; Kashitani, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2000-09-01

    The thermal choking phenomenon is of great importance in an inlet isolator in dual-mode ram jet/scramjet combustor. In some cases the choked flow creates a pseudo-shock wave including a shock train in it at the engine inlet and causes large amounts of drag and radically reduces the performance of the engine at high flight Mach numbers. The present paper describes a one-dimensional flow model taking account of the upstream boundary-layer as well as heat addition by using a mass-weighted averaging technique. The simple relationships for the flow field in a constant area duct in which the effect of the upstream boundary-layer is considered but the effect of the wall friction in the duct can be neglected are presented. The results of the calculation such as the maximum heat addition when the thermal choking occurs, the downstream Mach number and the static pressure ratio are presented and examined in detail.

  6. Heat-treatment by using induction heating on the Minsk Tractor Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmovich, L.S.; Baranov, V.S.; Koshelenkov, K.N.; Fel'dman, L.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    The Minsk Tractor Plant uses a technique for hardening preceded by induction heating for more than 50% of its heat-treated parts made from 45, 40Kh, 38KhGs, and 33KhS steels. The majority of parts undergo heat-treatment on the machining lines. This method made it possible to develop and put into service an automatic device for strainless hardening of strips in the forced conditions. Improving and introducing this new technological process, equipment, and fittings for heat treatment by induction heating was found to increase the life of the tractor parts, reduce labor costs for their manufacture as well as increase savings in electricity and rolled materials.

  7. High pressure homogenization versus heat treatment: effect on survival, growth, and metabolism of dairy Leuconostoc strains.

    PubMed

    Guglielmotti, D M; Patrignani, F; Lanciotti, R; Guerzoni, M E; Reinheimer, J A; Quiberoni, A

    2012-09-01

    The effect of high pressure homogenization (HPH) with respect to a traditional heat treatment on the inactivation, growth at 8°C after treatments, and volatile profile of adventitious Leuconostoc strains isolated from Cremoso Argentino spoiled cheeses and ingredients used for their manufacture was evaluated. Most Leuconostoc strains revealed elevated resistance to HPH (eight passes, 100 MPa), especially when resuspended in skim milk. Heat treatment was more efficient than HPH in inactivating Leuconostoc cells at the three initial levels tested. The levels of alcohols and sulfur compounds increased during incubation at 8°C in HPH-treated samples, while the highest amounts of aldehydes and ketones characterized were in heated samples. Leuconostoc cells resuspended in skim milk and subjected to one single-pass HPH treatment using an industrial-scale machine showed remarkable reductions in viable cell counts only when 300 and 400 MPa were applied. However, the cell counts of treated samples rose rapidly after only 5 days of storage at 8°C. The Leuconostoc strains tested in this work were highly resistant to the inactivation treatments applied. Neither HPH nor heat treatment assured their total destruction, even though they were more sensitive to the thermal treatment. To enhance the inhibitory effect on Leuconostoc cells, HPH should be combined with a mild heat treatment, which in addition to efficient microbial inactivation, could allow maximal retention of the physicochemical properties of the product. PMID:22947471

  8. Dry heat treatment affects wheat bran surface properties and hydration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Pieter J; Hemdane, Sami; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-07-15

    Heat stabilization of wheat bran aims at inactivation of enzymes which may cause rancidity and processability issues. Such treatments may however cause additional unanticipated phenomena which may affect wheat bran technological properties. In this work, the impact of toasting on wheat bran hydration capacity and hydration kinetics was studied. Hydration properties were assessed using the Enslin-Neff and drainage centrifugation water retention capacity methods, thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle goniometry, next to more traditional methods. While equilibrium hydration properties of bran were not affected by the heat treatment, the rate at which the heat treated bran hydrated was, however, very significantly reduced compared to the untreated bran. This phenomenon was found to originate from the formation of a lipid coating during the treatment rendering the bran surface hydrophobic. These insights help to understand and partially account for the modified processability of heat treated bran in food applications. PMID:26948645

  9. 40 CFR 141.711 - Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Treatment for Cryptosporidium Treatment Technique Requirements § 141.711 Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements. (a) Filtered systems must provide the level of additional treatment for....5-log. (b)(1) Filtered systems must use one or more of the treatment and management options...

  10. Effects of heat treatment parameters on liquid whole egg proteins.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Reyhan Selin; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Soykut, Esra Acar; Ertaş, Nusret

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of heat treatment parameters on liquid whole egg (LWE) proteins by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Heat treatment (at 60-68°C for 1-5min) was applied to LWE. Treated LWE was centrifuged and supernatant was taken for measurement of UV-VIS spectroscopy and CE. The change in UV absorbance showed loss of protein solubility depending on heat treatments parameters. Electropherograms of samples demonstrated the effect of treatment parameters on composition of LWE proteins. It was found that conalbumin and lysozyme were influenced by the treatment, while ovalbumin and ovomucoid were not affected. CE combined with principal component analysis (PCA) was used for classification of samples untreated or treated and treated at different treatment parameters. The results of the study revealed that the extent of heat treatment in LWE samples could be determined with PCA of the CE measurements. PMID:27596410

  11. Effect of heat treatment on stainless steel orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Cuoghi, Osmar Aparecido; Kasbergen, Geraldo Francisco; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos; Mendonça, Marcos Rogério de; Tondelli, Pedro Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of heat treatment on CrNi stainless steel orthodontic archwires. Half of forty archwires of each thickness - 0.014" (0.35 mm), 0.016" (0.40 mm), 0.018" (0.45 mm) and 0.020" (0.50 mm) (totalling 160 archwires) - were subjected to heat treatment while the remainder were not. All of the archwires had their individual thickness measured in the anterior and posterior regions using AutoCad 2000 software before and after compressive and tensile strength testing. The data was statistically analysed utilising multivariance ANOVA at a 5% significance level. All archwires without heat treatment that were subjected to tensile strength testing presented with anterior opening, which was more accentuated in the 0.020" archwires. In the posterior region, the opening produced by the tensile force was more accentuated in the archwires without heat treatment. There was greater stability in the thermally treated archwires, especially those subjected to tensile strength testing, which indicates that the heat treatment of orthodontic archwires establishes a favourable and indispensable condition to preserve the intercanine width. PMID:21359492

  12. Polymeric additives for antistatic treatment of sheet molding composites (SMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedan-Smolka, Michaela; Schubert, Katrin; Taeger, Antje; Marks, Hagen

    2016-03-01

    Novel oligomeric/polymeric additives with ionic units were synthesized in a one pot procedure in order to enhance the specific surface resistivity of SMC-materials. In contrast to industrially used inorganic salts or carbon materials, such as carbon black or CNT's, these substances are nearly colorless and matrix compatible and, resulting from that, easy to homogenize with the SMC-matrix. Furthermore, it was found, that additives which can be covalently bonded to the matrix during the molding procedure are preferred compared to physically mixed substances. The effectiveness of chemically bonded substances regarding with the lowering of the specific surface resistivity is higher and selected additives do not change the reactivity and resulting mechanical properties of the molded material.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon removal from petroleum sludge cake using thermal treatment with additives.

    PubMed

    Pakpahan, Edward Nixon; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed; Chantara, Somporn; Wiriya, Wan

    2013-01-01

    Petroleum sludge is a hazardous waste that contains various organic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which have carcinogenic-mutagenic and toxic characteristics. This study focuses on the thermal treatment (indirect heating) of petroleum sludge cake for PAH degradation at 250, 450, and 650 degrees C using Ca(OH)2 + NaHCO3 as an additive. The treatment was conducted in a rotary drum electric heater. All experiments were carried out in triplicate. Concentrations of the 16 priority PAHs in gas (absorbed on Amberlite XAD-4 adsorbent), particulate (on quartz filter) and residue phases were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The samples were extracted with acetonitrile by ultra-sonication prior to GC-MS analysis. The use of additive was beneficial and a temperature of 450 degrees C was suitable for PAH degradation. Low levels of PAH emissions, particularly carcinogenic PAH and toxic equivalent concentration (sigma TEC), were observed in gas, particulate and residue phases after treatment. PMID:23530354

  14. The influence of heat accumulation on the surface roughness in powder-bed additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidinia, Mahdi; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-03-01

    The influence of heat accumulation on surface roughness during powder-bed additive manufacturing was investigated. A series of Ti-6Al-4V thin plates were produced by using an identical heat input by electron beam melting® (EBM). Spacing distances of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm were used. The surface roughness of as-built thin plates was measured using a two-axis profilometer. A numerical model was developed to study the influence of spacing distance on heat accumulation. An inverse relationship between the spacing distance and surface roughness was revealed. The experimental and numerical results showed that the surface quality of buildups could be controlled not only by process parameters, but also by the arrangement of components in the buildup chamber. At a constant spacing distance, an increase in the number of powder layers resulted in the accumulation of more heat between the thin plates. An increase in the spacing distance resulted in an upward translation of the Bearing Area Curve (BAC) toward shallower depths, with a reduced core roughness depth (Rk) and peak height (Rpk). A logarithmic regression equation was established from the experimental data. This equation could be used to predict the surface roughness of parts fabricated by EBM® in the studied range of spacing distances.

  15. Bacillus cereus endospores exhibit a heterogeneous response to heat treatment and low-temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Ultan P; Wilkinson, Martin G

    2008-04-01

    Bacillus cereus endospores were challenged by heat treatments simulating typical domestic/industrial cooking regimes and the resulting effects on germination, viability and sub-lethal heat damage determined using differential plate counting on a rich versus selective medium, flow cytometry (FCM), beta-D-glucuronidase (GUD) activity and OD(600) measurement. Additionally, these techniques were used to investigate the effect on endospores of storage in a non-nutrient medium at 4 degrees C for 1 month. Plate counting revealed that heating generated sub-populations of sub-lethally damaged endospores, with the more severe heat treatments generating larger proportions of sub-lethally damaged endospores. These findings were also reflected in FCM analyses, which detected large amounts of heterogeneity among the populations of heat-treated endospores and uncovered differences in the proportions of membrane-damaged endospores and those displaying esterase activity pre- and post-treatment. Plate count data suggested that both the control and heat-treated endospores lost viability during storage, with FCM data indicating that the proportion of membrane-damaged endospores increased and those displaying the esterase activity decreased. The FCM, GUD and OD(600) data suggested that germination rates decreased with the increasing severity of heat treatment. This study demonstrates that a combination of plate counting and FCM can be used to detect heterogeneity in the response of endospores to insults. PMID:18206765

  16. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2013-05-28

    Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  17. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Henh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2009-10-20

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  18. Effect of heat treatment temperature on nitinol wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Daymond, M. R.; Yu, C.; Ren, Y.

    2014-08-01

    In-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been used to study the influence of the heat treatment temperature on the subsequent micromechanical behavior of nitinol wire. It was found that increase in the heat treatment temperature rotated the austenite texture from the {332}B2 fiber towards the {111}B2 fiber, and the texture of the Stress-Induced Martensite phase changed from the ( 1 ¯ 40)B19' to the ( 1 ¯ 20)B19' fiber accordingly. Heat treatment at a low temperature reduces the internal residual strains in the austenite during super-elastic deformation and therefore improves the materials fatigue performance. The development of internal residual strains in austenite is controlled by transformation induced plasticity and the reversal martensite to austenite transformation.

  19. Effect of heat treatment temperature on nitinol wire

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Daymond, M. R.; Yu, C.; Ren, Y.

    2014-08-18

    In-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been used to study the influence of the heat treatment temperature on the subsequent micromechanical behavior of nitinol wire. It was found that increase in the heat treatment temperature rotated the austenite texture from the (332){sub B2} fiber towards the (111){sub B2} fiber, and the texture of the Stress-Induced Martensite phase changed from the (1{sup ¯}40){sub B19'} to the (1{sup ¯}20){sub B19'} fiber accordingly. Heat treatment at a low temperature reduces the internal residual strains in the austenite during super-elastic deformation and therefore improves the materials fatigue performance. The development of internal residual strains in austenite is controlled by transformation induced plasticity and the reversal martensite to austenite transformation.

  20. Hot-Pack and 1-MHz Ultrasound Treatments Have an Additive Effect on Muscle Temperature Increase

    PubMed Central

    Draper, David O.; Harris, Shane T.; Schulthies, Shane; Durrant, Earlene; Knight, Kenneth L.; Ricard, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Therapeutic ultrasound is an effective deep heating modality commonly applied alone or after cooling or heating of the treatment area. The purpose of this study was to examine the tissue temperature rise in the human triceps surae muscle group after ultrasound with prior heating via a silicate gel hot pack. Design and Setting: This study was designed as a 2 × 2 × 3 factorial with repeated measures on two factors (depth and time). Independent variables were temperature of pack (hot and room temperature), depth of measurement (1 cm and 3 cm), and time (beginning, after pack application, and after ultrasound). The dependent variable was tissue temperature. Subjects were assigned to one of two treatment groups: ultrasound preceded by a 15-minute hot pack treatment or ultrasound preceded by a 15-minute application with a silicate gel pack at room temperature. Measurements were taken while subjects were treated in a university training room. Subjects: Twenty-one uninjured male and female college student volunteers were randomly assigned to one of the two pack groups. Measurements: The hot packs were stored in 75°C water. A 1-MHz ultrasound treatment was administered for 10 minutes at an intensity of 1.5 W/cm². Tissue temperature was measured every 30 seconds using 23-gauge hypodermic microprobes interfaced with a telethermometer and inserted 1 and 3 cm below the surface of anesthetized triceps surae muscle. Results: At both tissue depths, there was a 0.8°C greater increase in tissue temperature with hot packs and ultrasound. At 1 cm, ultrasound increased temperature 3.5°C after a 0.5°C rise during the room temperature-pack application, but only 0.6°C after a 3.8°C increase during hot-pack application. At 3 cm, ultrasound increased temperature 3.85°C following a slight (-0.26°C) decrease during the room temperature-pack application and 3.68°C after a 0.74°C increase during hot-pack application. Conclusions: Vigorous increases in deep muscle

  1. Field Heat Treatment Technician: Competency Profile. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 20908.1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The graduate of the Field Heat Treatment Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able: (1) use heat treatment equipment to apply heat to materials in order to change a material's properties; (2) Use their knowledge of the properties of heat, industry codes and specifications to determine how heat treatment will…

  2. Heat transfer and material flow during laser assisted multi-layer additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2014-09-28

    A three-dimensional, transient, heat transfer, and fluid flow model is developed for the laser assisted multilayer additive manufacturing process with coaxially fed austenitic stainless steel powder. Heat transfer between the laser beam and the powder particles is considered both during their flight between the nozzle and the growth surface and after they deposit on the surface. The geometry of the build layer obtained from independent experiments is compared with that obtained from the model. The spatial variation of melt geometry, cooling rate, and peak temperatures is examined in various layers. The computed cooling rates and solidification parameters are used to estimate the cell spacings and hardness in various layers of the structure. Good agreement is achieved between the computed geometry, cell spacings, and hardness with the corresponding independent experimental results.

  3. Heat transfer and material flow during laser assisted multi-layer additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2014-09-01

    A three-dimensional, transient, heat transfer, and fluid flow model is developed for the laser assisted multilayer additive manufacturing process with coaxially fed austenitic stainless steel powder. Heat transfer between the laser beam and the powder particles is considered both during their flight between the nozzle and the growth surface and after they deposit on the surface. The geometry of the build layer obtained from independent experiments is compared with that obtained from the model. The spatial variation of melt geometry, cooling rate, and peak temperatures is examined in various layers. The computed cooling rates and solidification parameters are used to estimate the cell spacings and hardness in various layers of the structure. Good agreement is achieved between the computed geometry, cell spacings, and hardness with the corresponding independent experimental results.

  4. Ultrasonic verification of microstructural changes due to heat treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation was measured for polycrystalline samples of nickel and copper with various grain-size distributions produced by heat treatment. Attenuation as a function of frequency was determined for a sample having a known mean grain diameter. Once this function was determined, it could be scaled to determine the mean grain size of other samples of the same material with different mean grain diameters. These results were obtained by using broadband pulse-echo ultrasound in the 25 to 100 MHz frequency range. The results suggest an ultrasonic, nondestructive approach for verifying heat treatment of metals.

  5. Rapid Heat Treatment of Aluminum High-Pressure Diecastings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumley, R. N.; Polmear, I. J.; Curtis, P. R.

    2009-07-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that common high-pressure diecasting (HPDC) alloys, such as those based on the Al-Si-Cu and Al-Si-Mg-(Cu) systems, may be successfully heat treated without causing surface blistering or dimensional instability. In some compositions, the capacity to exploit age hardening may allow the proof stress values to be doubled when compared to the as-cast condition. This heat treatment procedure involves the use of severely truncated solution treatment cycles conducted at lower than normal temperatures, followed by quenching and natural or artificial aging. The potential therefore exists to develop and evaluate secondary HPDC alloys designed specifically for rapid heat treatment, while still displaying high castability. This article reports results of an experimental program in which responses of various alloy compositions to age hardening have been investigated with the primary aim of further reducing the duration and cost of the heat treatment cycle while maintaining high tensile properties. Composition ranges have been established for which values of 0.2 pct proof stress exceeding 300 MPa ( i.e., increases of ~100 pct above as-cast values) can be achieved using a procedure that involves a total time for solution treatment plus age hardening of only 30 minutes. This rapid aging behavior is shown to be related to precipitation of the complex Q' phase, which forms primarily when Mg contents of the alloys are above ~0.2 wt pct.

  6. Exergy Analysis and Second Law Efficiency of a Regenerative Brayton Cycle with Isothermal Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubeh, Naser M.

    2005-09-01

    The effect of two heat additions, rather than one, in a gas turbine engine is analyzed from the second law of thermodynamics point of view. A regenerative Brayton cycle model is used for this study, and compared with other models of Brayton cycle. All fluid friction losses in the compressor and turbine are quantified by an isentropic efficiency term. The effect of pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, ambient temperature, altitude, and altitude with variable ambient temperature on irreversibility "exergy destroyed" and second law efficiency was investigated and compared for all models. The results are given graphically with the appropriate discussion and conclusion.

  7. Structural changes of synthetic opal by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Okudera, Hiroki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji; Katayama, Shin'ichi; Koyano, Mikio; Ito, Nobuaki

    2013-10-01

    The structural changes of synthetic opal by heat treatment up to 1,400 °C were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The results indicate that the dehydration and condensation of silanol in opal are very important factors in the structural evolution of heat-treated synthetic opal. Synthetic opal releases water molecules and silanols by heat treatment up to 400 °C, where the dehydration of silanol may lead to the condensation of a new Si-O-Si network comprising a four-membered ring structure of SiO4 tetrahedra, even at 400 °C. Above 600 °C, water molecules are lost and the opal surface and internal silanol molecules are completely dehydrated by heat effect, and the medium-temperature range structure of opal may begin to thermally reconstruct to six-membered rings of SiO4 tetrahedra. Above 1,000 °C, the opal structure almost approaches that of silica glass with an average structure of six-membered rings. Above 1,200 °C, the opal changes to low-cristobalite; however, minor evidence of low-tridymite stacking was evident after heat treatment at 1,400 °C.

  8. Effects of Si Addition and Heating Ar on the Electromigration Performance of Al-Alloy Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dok Won; Lee, Byung-Zu; Jeong, Jong Yeul; Park, Hyun; Shim, Kyu Cheol; Kim, Jong Seok; Park, Young Bae; Woo, Sun-Woong; Lee, Jeong-gun

    2002-02-01

    The electromigration (EM) performance of Ti/Al-alloy multilayered metallization with one-step sputtered Al-alloy has been studied. The Al-alloys investigated included Al-1.0%Si-0.5%Cu and Al-0.5%Cu, and the Al-alloy films were prepared with and without heating Ar. The package-level EM test results indicate that the EM resistance of the Al-Si-Cu stack is nearly identical to that of the Al-Cu stack. Si addition was found to degrade the microstructure of the Al-alloy film, while it had the retarding effect on the Ti/Al reaction, which suggests that there exists a trade-off between the film microstructure and the formation of TiAl3 intermetallic compound. The EM performance of the one-step sputtered Al-alloy stack was enhanced by the use of heating Ar during the deposition of Al-alloy film, which has been attributed to the improved microstructure of the Al-alloy film by the use of heating Ar.

  9. Using geothermal energy to heat a portion of a formation for an in situ heat treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Pieterson, Roelof; Boyles, Joseph Michael; Diebold, Peter Ulrich

    2010-06-08

    Methods of using geothermal energy to treat subsurface formations are described herein. Methods for using geothermal energy to treat a subsurface treatment area containing or proximate to hydrocarbons may include producing geothermally heated fluid from at least one subsurface region. Heat from at least a portion of the geothermally heated fluid may be transferred to the subsurface treatment area to heat the subsurface treatment area. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  10. Impact Toughness and Heat Treatment for Cast Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for transforming a cast component made of modified aluminum alloy by increasing the impact toughness coefficient using minimal heat and energy. The aluminum alloy is modified to contain 0.55%-0.60% magnesium, 0.10%-0.15% titanium or zirconium, less than 0.07% iron, a silicon-tomagnesium product ratio of 4.0, and less than 0.15% total impurities. The shortened heat treatment requires an initial heating at 1,000deg F. for up to I hour followed by a water quench and a second heating at 350deg F. to 390deg F. for up to I hour. An optional short bake paint cycle or powder coating process further increase.

  11. Integrated flue gas treatment condensing heat exchanger for pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Warchol, J.J.; Schulze, K.H.; Carrigan, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    Condensing heat exchangers recover both sensible and latent heat from flue gases. Using Teflon{reg_sign} to cover the heat exchanger tubes and inside surfaces that are exposed to the flue gas ensures adequate material lifetime in the corrosive environment encountered when the flue gas temperature drops below the acid dew point. A recent design improvement, called the integrated flue gas treatment (IFGT) concept, offers the ability to remove pollutants from the flue gas, as well as recover waste heat. It has been shown to remove SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, particulates, and trace emissions. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is undertaking an extensive program to optimize this technology for a variety of flue gas applications. This paper summarizes the current status of IFGT technology and the development activities that are in progress.

  12. Integrated modeling and heat treatment simulation of austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepp, E.; Hurevich, V.; Schäfer, W.

    2012-07-01

    The integrated modeling and simulation of the casting and heat treatment processes for producing austempered ductile iron (ADI) castings is presented. The focus is on describing different models to simulate the austenitization, quenching and austempering steps during ADI heat treatment. The starting point for the heat treatment simulation is the simulated microstructure after solidification and cooling. The austenitization model considers the transformation of the initial ferrite-pearlite matrix into austenite as well as the dissolution of graphite in austenite to attain a uniform carbon distribution. The quenching model is based on measured CCT diagrams. Measurements have been carried out to obtain these diagrams for different alloys with varying Cu, Ni and Mo contents. The austempering model includes nucleation and growth kinetics of the ADI matrix. The model of ADI nucleation is based on experimental measurements made for varied Cu, Ni, Mo contents and austempering temperatures. The ADI kinetic model uses a diffusion controlled approach to model the growth. The models have been integrated in a tool for casting process simulation. Results are shown for the optimization of the heat treatment process of a planetary carrier casting.

  13. Research Findings on Heat Treatment of Pathogens and Indicator Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat or thermal treatment has been used for many years for reducing the densities of pathogens in food and beverages. Its application for disinfection of municipal sludges has occurred only recently. One method for achieving Class A biosolids is to thermally treat sludges either ...

  14. 49 CFR 179.500-6 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... proper inspection. (b) To check uniformity of heat treatment, Brinnel hardness tests shall be made at 18 inch intervals on the entire longitudinal axis. The hardness shall not vary more than 35 points in the length of the tank. No hardness tests need be taken within 12 inches from point of head to shell...

  15. 49 CFR 179.500-6 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... proper inspection. (b) To check uniformity of heat treatment, Brinnel hardness tests shall be made at 18 inch intervals on the entire longitudinal axis. The hardness shall not vary more than 35 points in the length of the tank. No hardness tests need be taken within 12 inches from point of head to shell...

  16. 49 CFR 179.500-6 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... extent sufficient to allow proper inspection. (b) To check uniformity of heat treatment, Brinnel hardness tests shall be made at 18 inch intervals on the entire longitudinal axis. The hardness shall not vary more than 35 points in the length of the tank. No hardness tests need be taken within 12 inches...

  17. 49 CFR 179.500-6 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... proper inspection. (b) To check uniformity of heat treatment, Brinnel hardness tests shall be made at 18 inch intervals on the entire longitudinal axis. The hardness shall not vary more than 35 points in the length of the tank. No hardness tests need be taken within 12 inches from point of head to shell...

  18. 49 CFR 179.500-6 - Heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... proper inspection. (b) To check uniformity of heat treatment, Brinnel hardness tests shall be made at 18 inch intervals on the entire longitudinal axis. The hardness shall not vary more than 35 points in the length of the tank. No hardness tests need be taken within 12 inches from point of head to shell...

  19. 7 CFR 305.25 - Dry heat treatment schedules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... temperature. T518-2-1 180-200 2 hours. 1 A minimum of two temperature probes must be placed in the heat treating equipment in order to determine that all niger seed being treated reaches the target temperature... schedules. Treatment schedule Temperature ( °F) Time Directions T302-a-1-2 168 minimum At least 2...

  20. Heat treatment stabilizes welded aluminum jigs and tool structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehnert, R. S.

    1966-01-01

    Heat treatment processes, applied after welding but before machining, imparts above normal stability to welded aluminum jigs and tool structures. Weight saving will not be realized in these tools if rigidity equal to that of a comparable steel tool is required.

  1. Heat treatment study of aluminum casting alloy M45

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1967-01-01

    Study determines the heat treatment cycle of aluminum casting alloy M-45 which will increase the strength levels of the alloy while maintaining optimum stress corrosion resistance. Evidence indicates that present production castings are overaged too severely to take full advantage of the strength of the alloy.

  2. Heat treatment procedure to increase ductility of degraded nickel alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Tests demonstrate the room temperature ductility of degraded Rene 41 can be increased to acceptable values by solution heat treatment at a temperature of 2050 degrees to 2150 degrees F /1 to 2 hours/ and cooling through a controlled temperature range followed by normal aging in air /16 hours at 1400 degrees F/.

  3. Pre-weld heat treatment improves welds in Rene 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of Rene 41 prior to welding reduces the incidence of cracking during post-weld heat treatment. The microstructure formed during the slow cooling rate favors elevated temperature ductility. Some vestiges of this microstructure are apparently retained during welding and thus enhance strain-age crack resistance in air.

  4. Potential heat treatments for quarantine security of exotic tropical fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potential heat treatments (HT) were developed to control fruit flies in selected tropical fruits (avocado, guava, longan, passion fruit, and persimmon). Hawaii has three fruit flies of economic and quarantine importance, Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly), oriental fruit fly, and melon fly. Previous r...

  5. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  6. Variation of Mechanical Properties of High RRR And Reactor Grade Niobium With Heat Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapati Myneni; H. Umezawa

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting rf cavities used as accelerating structures in particle accelerators are made from high purity niobium with residual resistance ratios greater than 250. Reactor grade niobium is also used to make wave-guide and/or end group components for these accelerating structures. The major impurities in this type of niobium are interstitially dissolved gases such as hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen in addition to carbon. After fabricating the niobium accelerating structures, they are subjected to heat treatments for several hours in vacuum at temperatures of up to 900 C for degassing hydrogen or up to 1400 C for improving the thermal conductivity of niobium considerably. These heat treatments are affecting the mechanical properties of niobium drastically. In this paper the variation of the mechanical properties of high purity and reactor grade niobium with heat treatments in a vacuum of {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr and temperatures from 600 C to 1250 C for periods of 10 to 6 hours are presented.

  7. Heat transition during magnetic heating treatment: Study with tissue models and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrich, Franziska; Rahn, Helene; Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic heating treatment (MHT) is well known as a promising therapy for cancer diseases. Depending on concentration and specific heating power of the magnetic material as well as on parameters of the magnetic field, temperatures between 43 and 55 °C can be reached. This paper deals with the evaluation of heat distribution around such a heat source in a tissue model, thereby focusing on the heat transfer from tissue enriched with magnetic nanoparticles to regions of no or little enrichment of magnetic nanoparticles. We examined the temperature distribution with several tissue phantoms made of polyurethane (PUR) with similar thermal conductivity coefficient as biological tissue. These phantoms are composed of a cylinder with one sphere embedded, enriched with magnetic fluid. Thereby the spheres have different diameters in order to study the influence of the surface-to-volume ratio. The phantoms were exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The magnetically induced heat increase within the phantoms was measured with thermocouples. Those were placed at defined positions inside the phantoms. Based on the measured results a 3-dimensional simulation of each phantom was built. We achieved an agreement between the measured and simulated temperatures for all phantoms produced in this experimental study. The established experiment theoretically allows a prediction of temperature profiles in tumors and the surrounding tissue for the potential cancer treatment and therefore an optimization of e.g. the respective magnetic nanoparticles concentrations for the desirable rise of temperature.

  8. Influence of Heat Treatment on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruthiventi, S.; Basavakumar, K. G.; Nambala, S.; Subramanyacharyulu, G.

    2014-04-01

    Spheroidal Graphite Iron (SG Iron) is popularly known as ductile iron or nodular cast iron which is a special case of cast iron having carbon content of more than 3 wt% in volume and graphite is in the form of spherical tiny sized particles. Since the last three decades, the demand for SG Iron has been increasing due to its superior mechanical properties such as high strength and toughness, this nature leads to the usage of SG Iron in numerous industrial applications. From the earlier studies, it has been proved that addition of alloying elements to SG Iron leads to change in properties such as increased tensile strength and hardness. Heat-treatment of alloys is one of the valuable methods to achieve better properties. In the present study, the microstructures and mechanical properties of SG Iron were studied after various heat treatments beyond the limits, and tests were done to measure its mechanical properties like tensile strength, hardness, impact strength. Digital microphotographs, scanning electron microphotographs were analysed before and after the heat treatment. Results indicated great change in mechanical properties after the heat-treatment. From the results it can be concluded that the heat treatment of SG Iron results in changed composition of alloys, which also leads to economical growth of SG Iron.

  9. IMPACT OF COMPOSITION AND HEAT TREATMENT ON PORE SIZE IN POROUS WALLED HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Raszewski, F; Erich Hansen, E; Ray Schumacher, R; David Peeler, D

    2007-12-04

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a new geometric form: hollow glass microspheres (HGMs), with unique porous walls. The new geometric form combines the existing technology of HGMs with basic glass science knowledge in the realm of glass-in-glass phase separation. Conceptually, the development of a HGM with porous walls (referred to as a PWHGM) provides a unique system in which various media or filling agents can be incorporated into the PWHGM (via transport through the porous walls) and ultimately has the capacity to serve as a functional delivery system in various industrial applications. Applications of these types of systems could range from hydrogen storage, molecular sieves, drug and bioactive delivery systems, to environmental, chemical and biological indicators, relevant to Energy, Environmental Processing and Homeland Security fields. As a specific example, previous studies at SRNL have introduced materials capable of hydrogen storage (as well as other materials) into the interior of the PWHGMs. The goal of this project was to determine if the microstructure (i.e., pore size and pore size distribution) of a PWHGM could be altered or tailored by varying composition and/or heat treatment (time and/or temperature) conditions. The ability to tailor the microstructure through composition or heat treatments could provide the opportunity to design the PWHGM system to accommodate different additives or fill agents. To meet this objective, HGMs of various alkali borosilicate compositions were fabricated using a flame forming apparatus installed at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory (ACTL). HGMs were treated under various heat treatment conditions to induce and/or enhance glass in glass phase separation. Heat treatment temperatures ranged from 580 C to 620 C, while heat treatment times were either 8 or 24 hours. Of the two primary variables assessed in this study, heat treatment temperature was determined to be most effective in changing the

  10. Effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on erosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of erosion by glass beads and crushed glass and by heat treatments on the erosional resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy and 1045 steel were studied. The aluminum alloy's erosion resistance was found to be insensitive to mechanical surface treatment applied before testing, and was determined to depend on the properties of the work-hardened surface layer; this was also demonstrated for aluminum alloy single crystals. The aluminum alloy heat treatments included annealing, solution, and precipitation. Solution was found to increase erosion resistance but precipitation had the opposite effect. Hardness showed no correlation with erosion resistance for either aluminum alloy steel. The steel tests showed that crushed glass provides an order of magnitude more erosion than glass beads.

  11. Microwave heat treatment of natural ruby and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, S.; Pradhan, S. K.; Jeevitha, M.; Acharya, P.; Debata, M.; Dash, T.; Nayak, B. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2016-03-01

    Natural ruby (in the form of gemstone) collected from Odisha has been heat-treated by microwave (MW). A 3-kW industrial MW furnace with SiC susceptors was used for the heat treatment. The ruby samples showed noticeable improvements (qualitative), may be attributed to account for the improvement in clarity and lustre. Optical absorption in 200-800 nm range and photoluminescence peak at 693 nm (with 400 nm λ ex) clearly show that subtle changes do take place in the ruby after the heat treatment. Further, inorganic compound phases and valence states of elements (impurities) in the ruby were studied by X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The valence states of the main impurities such as Cr, Fe, and Ti, in the untreated and MW heat-treated ruby, as revealed from XPS, have been discussed in depth. The overall results demonstrate for the first time the effect of fast heating like MW on the microstructural properties of the gemstone and various oxidation states of impurity elements in the natural ruby.

  12. Heat strokes: aetiopathogenesis, neurological characteristics, treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Yaqub, B; Al Deeb, S

    1998-04-01

    Heat stroke is a thermal insult to the cerebral thermoregulatory system controlling heat production and heat dissipation. The thermal insult may be environmental as in 'classic heat stroke' or endogenous as in 'exertional heat stroke' in joggers or runners. The insult will lead to a steady rise in body core temperature to 40 degrees C or more, exhaustion of sweating with hot dry skin and central nervous system disturbances ranging from confusion to deep coma. Multisystem insult will follow leading to a fatal outcome, if not diagnosed and treated promptly. Rapid evaporative cooling and support of vital organs are the essential factors in the management of this condition. If treated early, no sequelae results, however, pancerebellar syndrome and spastic or flaccid paraparesis have been described in a few cases. Limited sun exposure, proper use of sunscreens, adequate fluid and electrolyte replacement and acclimatization are the key factors for prevention. Despite appropriate prevention and prompt treatment, heat stroke is unlikely to be totally prevented, but the mortality has improved dramatically to less than 10%. PMID:9588849

  13. Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Thomas David

    2009-11-03

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

  14. Effect of alkali and heat treatments for bioactivity of TiO2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seo young; Kim, Yu kyoung; Park, Il song; Jin, Guang chun; Bae, Tae sung; Lee, Min ho

    2014-12-01

    In this study, for improving the bioactivity of titanium used as an implant material, alkali and heat treatments were carried out after formation of the nanotubes via anodization. Nanotubes with uniform length, diameter, and thickness were formed by anodization. The alkali and heat-treated TiO2 nanotubes were covered with the complex network structure, and the Na compound was generated on the surface of the specimens. In addition, after 5 and 10 days of immersion in the SBF, the crystallized OCP and HAp phase was significantly increased on the surface of the alkali-treated TiO2 nanotubes (PNA) and alkali and heat-treated TiO2 nanotubes (PNAH) groups. Cell proliferation was decreased due to the formation of amorphous sodium titanate (Na2TiO3) layer on the surface of the PNA group. However, anatase and crystalline sodium titanate were formed on the surface of the PNAH group after heat treatment at 550 °C, and cell proliferation was improved. Thus, PNA group had higher HAp forming ability in the simulated body fluid. Additional heat treatment affected on enhancement of the bioactivity and the attachment of osteoblasts for PNA group.

  15. Charge state of arginine as an additive on heat-induced protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Takumi; Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    Arginine (Arg) is one of the most versatile solvent additives, such as suppressing protein aggregation, increasing solubility of small aromatic compounds and peptides, and preventing protein binding on solid surfaces. In this study, we investigated the role of the charged state of α-amino group of Arg for the prevention of protein aggregation. As expected, Arg effectively suppressed thermal aggregation of hen egg-white lysozyme at neutral pH, whereas the suppression effect diminished at and above pH 9.0, which corresponds to the pK of Arg's α-amino group. The pH dependence of Arg as an aggregation suppressor was confirmed by additional experiments with neutral proteins, bovine hemoglobin and bovine γ-globulin. Interestingly, N-acetylated arginine, which lacks the α-amino group, showed a weaker suppressive effect on protein aggregation than Arg, even at neutral pH. These results indicate that both positively charged α-amino group and guanidinium group play important roles in suppressing heat-induced protein aggregation by Arg. The elucidated limitation of Arg at alkaline pH provides new insight in the application as well as the mechanism of Arg as a solvent additive. PMID:26987431

  16. Precipitation of sword bean proteins by heating and addition of magnesium chloride in a crude extract.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Kaho; Masuda, Tetsuya; Takenaka, Yasuyuki; Masui, Hironori; Tani, Fumito; Arii, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Sword bean (Canavalia gladiata) seeds are a traditional food in Asian countries. In this study, we aimed to determine the optimal methods for the precipitation of sword bean proteins useful for the food development. The soaking time for sword beans was determined by comparing it with that for soybeans. Sword bean proteins were extracted from dried seeds in distilled water using novel methods. We found that most proteins could be precipitated by heating the extract at more than 90 °C. Interestingly, adding magnesium chloride to the extract at lower temperatures induced specific precipitation of a single protein with a molecular weight of approximately 48 kDa. The molecular weight and N-terminal sequence of the precipitated protein was identical to that of canavalin. These data suggested that canavalin was precipitated by the addition of magnesium chloride to the extract. Our results provide important insights into the production of processed foods from sword bean. PMID:27022983

  17. Heat Treatment of Friction Stir Welded 7X50 Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petter, George E. (Inventor); Figert, John D. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Burnes, Timothy H. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for treating alloy before and after friction stir welding, the method comprising the following steps. First solution heat treating a multiplicity of aluminum-zinc alloy engineered components for a first time period at a first temperature. First air cooling the components in ambient air at room temperatwe until the components are cooled to room temperature. Friction stir welding the components to form an assembly. Second solution heat treating the assembly for a second time period at a second temperature. Additional steps and embodiments are considered.

  18. Effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on erosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of mechanical surface treatments as well as heat treatments on the erosion resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy and 1045 steel were studied. Mechanical surface treatments were found to have little or no effect on the erosion resistance. This is due to the formation by particle impact of a work hardened surface layer regardless of the initial surface condition. The erosion resistance of Al single crystals is found to be independent of orientation. This is due to destruction of the surface microstructure and formation of a polycrystalline surface layer by the impact of erodant particles as observed by X-ray diffraction. While upon solution treatment of annealed 6061 aluminum the increase in hardness is accompanied by an increase in erosion resistance, precipitation treatment which causes a further increase in hardness results in slightly lower erosion resistance. Using two types of erodant particles, glass beads and crushed glass, the erosion rate is found to be strongly dependent on erodant particle shape, being an order of magnitude higher for erosion with crushed glass as compared to glass beads. While for erosion with glass beads heat treatment of 1045 steel had a profound effect on its erosion resistance, little or no such effect was observed for erosion with crushed glass.

  19. Effect of heat treatment on the phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of citrus peel extract.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guihua; Ye, Xingqian; Chen, Jianchu; Liu, Donghong

    2007-01-24

    This paper reports the effects of heat treatment on huyou (Citrus paradisi Changshanhuyou) peel in terms of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with a photodiode array (PDA) detector was used in this study for the analysis of phenolic acids (divided into four fractions: free, ester, glycoside, and ester-bound) and flavanone glycosides (FGs) in huyou peel (HP) before and after heat treatment. The results showed that after heat treatment, the free fraction of phenolic acids increased, whereas ester, glycoside, and ester-bound fractions decreased and the content of total FGs declined (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of methanol extract of HP increased (P < 0.05), which was evaluated by total phenolics contents (TPC) assay, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS*+) method, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The correlation coefficients among TPC, ABTS, FRAP assay, and total cinnamics and benzoics (TCB) in the free fraction were significantly high (P < 0.05), which meant that the increase of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of HP extract was due at least in part to the increase of TCB in free fraction. In addition, FGs may be destroyed when heated at higher temperature for a long time (for example, 120 degrees C for 90 min or 150 degrees C for 30 min). Therefore, it is suggested that a proper and reasonable heat treatment could be used to enhance the antioxidant capacity of citrus peel. PMID:17227062

  20. Evaluations of bioactivity and mechanical properties of poly (epsilon-caprolactone)/silica nanocomposite following heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Joon; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2004-03-01

    A composite material consisting of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and silica was prepared and evaluated as a bioactive bone substitute. The composite was synthesized by the co-condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate and PCL and end-capped with triethoxysilane (Si-PCL). The as-prepared specimens were subjected to an initial heat treatment of 2 days at 60 degrees C, followed by further heat-treatments at 100 degrees C, 150 degrees C, and 200 degrees C for 24 h. The tensile mechanical properties of the heat-treated specimens were determined, and additional specimens were exposed to a simulated body fluid (SBF) for different periods of time. The SBF exposure led to the deposition of a layer of apatite crystals on the surface of the composites. It was found that increasing the second heat-treatment temperature produced an increase in tensile strength and Young's modulus of the composite but a decrease in the initial rate of apatite formation. These phenomena are explained in terms of the condensation reaction that takes place between the silanol groups in the silica and Si-PCL as the heat-treatment temperature is increased. PMID:14762919

  1. Nonlinear feedback in a six-dimensional Lorenz Model: impact of an additional heating term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.-W.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a six-dimensional Lorenz model (6DLM) is derived, based on a recent study using a five-dimensional (5-D) Lorenz model (LM), in order to examine the impact of an additional mode and its accompanying heating term on solution stability. The new mode added to improve the representation of the steamfunction is referred to as a secondary streamfunction mode, while the two additional modes, that appear in both the 6DLM and 5DLM but not in the original LM, are referred to as secondary temperature modes. Two energy conservation relationships of the 6DLM are first derived in the dissipationless limit. The impact of three additional modes on solution stability is examined by comparing numerical solutions and ensemble Lyapunov exponents of the 6DLM and 5DLM as well as the original LM. For the onset of chaos, the critical value of the normalized Rayleigh number (rc) is determined to be 41.1. The critical value is larger than that in the 3DLM (rc ~ 24.74), but slightly smaller than the one in the 5DLM (rc ~ 42.9). A stability analysis and numerical experiments obtained using generalized LMs, with or without simplifications, suggest the following: (1) negative nonlinear feedback in association with the secondary temperature modes, as first identified using the 5DLM, plays a dominant role in providing feedback for improving the solution's stability of the 6DLM, (2) the additional heating term in association with the secondary streamfunction mode may destabilize the solution, and (3) overall feedback due to the secondary streamfunction mode is much smaller than the feedback due to the secondary temperature modes; therefore, the critical Rayleigh number of the 6DLM is comparable to that of the 5DLM. The 5DLM and 6DLM collectively suggest different roles for small-scale processes (i.e., stabilization vs. destabilization), consistent with the following statement by Lorenz (1972): If the flap of a butterfly's wings can be instrumental in generating a tornado, it can

  2. Nonlinear feedback in a six-dimensional Lorenz model: impact of an additional heating term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.-W.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a six-dimensional Lorenz model (6DLM) is derived, based on a recent study using a five-dimensional (5-D) Lorenz model (LM), in order to examine the impact of an additional mode and its accompanying heating term on solution stability. The new mode added to improve the representation of the streamfunction is referred to as a secondary streamfunction mode, while the two additional modes, which appear in both the 6DLM and 5DLM but not in the original LM, are referred to as secondary temperature modes. Two energy conservation relationships of the 6DLM are first derived in the dissipationless limit. The impact of three additional modes on solution stability is examined by comparing numerical solutions and ensemble Lyapunov exponents of the 6DLM and 5DLM as well as the original LM. For the onset of chaos, the critical value of the normalized Rayleigh number (rc) is determined to be 41.1. The critical value is larger than that in the 3DLM (rc ~ 24.74), but slightly smaller than the one in the 5DLM (rc ~ 42.9). A stability analysis and numerical experiments obtained using generalized LMs, with or without simplifications, suggest the following: (1) negative nonlinear feedback in association with the secondary temperature modes, as first identified using the 5DLM, plays a dominant role in providing feedback for improving the solution's stability of the 6DLM, (2) the additional heating term in association with the secondary streamfunction mode may destabilize the solution, and (3) overall feedback due to the secondary streamfunction mode is much smaller than the feedback due to the secondary temperature modes; therefore, the critical Rayleigh number of the 6DLM is comparable to that of the 5DLM. The 5DLM and 6DLM collectively suggest different roles for small-scale processes (i.e., stabilization vs. destabilization), consistent with the following statement by Lorenz (1972): "If the flap of a butterfly's wings can be instrumental in generating a tornado, it can

  3. Effect of foam on temperature prediction and heat recovery potential from biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Corbala-Robles, L; Volcke, E I P; Samijn, A; Ronsse, F; Pieters, J G

    2016-05-15

    Heat is an important resource in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) which can be recovered. A prerequisite to determine the theoretical heat recovery potential is an accurate heat balance model for temperature prediction. The insulating effect of foam present on the basin surface and its influence on temperature prediction were assessed in this study. Experiments were carried out to characterize the foam layer and its insulating properties. A refined dynamic temperature prediction model, taking into account the effect of foam, was set up. Simulation studies for a WWTP treating highly concentrated (manure) wastewater revealed that the foam layer had a significant effect on temperature prediction (3.8 ± 0.7 K over the year) and thus on the theoretical heat recovery potential (30% reduction when foam is not considered). Seasonal effects on the individual heat losses and heat gains were assessed. Additionally, the effects of the critical basin temperature above which heat is recovered, foam thickness, surface evaporation rate reduction and the non-absorbed solar radiation on the theoretical heat recovery potential were evaluated. PMID:27017195

  4. Dissolution of iron intermetallics in Al-Si alloys through nonequilibrium heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Anantha Narayanan, L. |; Samuel, F.H.; Gruzleski, J.E.

    1995-08-01

    Conventional heat treatment techniques in Al-Si alloys to achieve optimum mechanical properties are limited to precipitation strengthening processes due to the presence of second-phase particles and spheroidization of silicon particles. The iron intermetallic compounds present in the microstructure of these alloys are reported to be stable, and they do not dissolve during conventional (equilibrium) heat treatments. The dissolution behavior of iron intermetallics on nonequilibrium heat treatment has been investigated by means of microstructure and mechanical property studies. The dissolution of iron intermetallics improves with increasing solution temperature. The addition of manganese to the alloy hinders the dissolution of iron intermetallics. Nonequilibrium heat treatment increases the strength properties of high iron alloys until a critical solution temperature is exceeded. Above this temperature, a large amount of liquid phase is formed as a result of interdendritic and grain boundary melting. The optimum solution treatment temperature for Al-6Si-3.5Cu-0.3Mg-1Fe alloys is found to be between 515 C and 520 C.

  5. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  6. Additive impacts on particle emissions from heating low emitting cooking oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouei Torkmahalleh, M.; Zhao, Y.; Hopke, P. K.; Rossner, A.; Ferro, A. R.

    2013-08-01

    The effect of five additives, including table salt, sea salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and turmeric, on the emission of PM2.5 and ultrafine particles (UFP) from heated cooking oil (200 °C) were studied. One hundred milligrams of the additives were added individually to either canola or soybean oil without stirring. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt reduced the PM2.5 emission of canola oil by 86% (p < 0.001), 88% (p < 0.001), and 91% (p < 0.001), respectively. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt also decreased the total particle number emissions of canola oil by 45% (p = 0.003), 52% (p = 0.001), and 53% (p < 0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder showed no changes in the PM2.5 and total number emissions of canola oil. Table salt and sea salt, decreased the level of PM2.5 emissions from soybean oil by 47% (p < 0.001) and 77% (p < 0.001), respectively. No differences in the PM2.5 emissions were observed when other additives were added to soybean oil. Black pepper, sea salt, and table salt reduced the total particle number emissions from the soybean oil by 51%, 61% and 68% (p < 0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder had no effect on soybean oil with respect to total particle number emissions. Our results indicate that table salt, sea salt, and black pepper can be used to reduce the particle total number and PM2.5 emissions when cooking with oil.

  7. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  8. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  9. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  10. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  11. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  12. Investigation of heat distribution during magnetic heating treatment using a polyurethane-ferrofluid phantom-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrich, F.; Rahn, H.; Odenbach, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic heating treatment can be used as an adjuvant treatment for cancer therapy. In this therapy, magnetic nanoparticles are enriched inside the tumour and exposed to an alternating magnetic field. Due to magnetic losses the temperature in the tumour rises. The resulting temperature profile inside the tumour is useful for the therapeutic success. In this context heat transfer between tissue with nanoparticles and tissue without nanoparticles is a highly important feature which is actually not understood in detail. In order to investigate this, a phantom has been created which can be used to measure the temperature profile around a region enriched with magnetic nanoparticles. This phantom is composed of a material, which has similar thermal conductivity as human tissue. A tempered water bath surrounds the phantom to establish a constant surrounding temperature simulating the heat sink provided by the human body in a real therapeutic application. It has been found that even at a low concentration of magnetic nanoparticles around 13 mg/ml, sufficient heating of the enriched region can be achieved. Moreover it has been observed that the temperature drops rapidly in the material surrounding the enriched region. Corresponding numerical investigations provide a basis for future recalculations of the temperature inside the tumour using temperature data obtained in the surrounding tissue.

  13. Corrosion and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Water Dispersed with Carboxylate Additives and Multi Walled Carbon Nano Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, Chellapilla V. K. N. S. N.; Srinivas, Vadapalli

    2016-02-01

    This paper summarizes a recent work on anti-corrosive properties and enhanced heat transfer properties of carboxylated water based nanofluids. Water mixed with sebacic acid as carboxylate additive found to be resistant to corrosion and suitable for automotive environment. The carboxylated water is dispersed with very low mass concentration of carbon nano tubes at 0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 %. The stability of nanofluids in terms of zeta potential is found to be good with carboxylated water compared to normal water. The heat transfer performance of nanofluids is carried out on an air cooled heat exchanger similar to an automotive radiator with incoming air velocities across radiator at 5, 10 and 15 m/s. The flow Reynolds number of water is in the range of 2500-6000 indicating developing flow regime. The corrosion resistance of nanofluids is found to be good indicating its suitability to automotive environment. There is a slight increase in viscosity and marginal decrease in the specific heat of nanofluids with addition of carboxylate as well as CNTs. Significant improvement is observed in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids dispersed with CNTs. During heat transfer experimentation, the inside heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient has also improved markedly. It is also found that the velocity of air and flow rate of coolant plays an important role in enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient.

  14. SDS-PAGE Analysis of Soluble Proteins in Reconstituted Milk Exposed to Different Heat Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Snezana; Barac, Miroljub; Macej, Ognjen; Vucic, Tanja; Lacnjevac, Caslav

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the impact of the heat treatment of reconstituted skim milk conducted at different temperatures, and the adding of demineralized whey on the protein solubility, soluble protein composition and interactions involved between proteins in a chemical complex. Commercial skim milk has been reconstituted and heat treated at 75°C, 85°C and 90°C for 20 minutes. Demineralized whey has been added in concentrations of 0.5%, 1.0 and 2.0%. The soluble protein composition has been determined by the polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and by the densitometric analysis. Due to the different changes occurred during treatments at different temperatures, proteins of heat-treated samples containing added demineralized whey have had significantly different solubility. At lower temperatures (75°C and 85°C) the adding of demineralized whey decreased the protein solubility by 5.28%-26.41%, while the addition of demineralized whey performed at 90°C increased the soluble protein content by 5.61%-28.89%. Heat treatments, as well as the addition of demineralized whey, have induced high molecular weight complex formation. β-Lg, α-La and κ-casein are involved in high molecular weight complexes. The disulfide interactions between denatured molecules of these proteins are mostly responsible for the formation of coaggregates. The level of their interactions and the soluble protein composition are determined by the degree of temperature.

  15. Effect of heat treatment on precipitation on V-5Cr-5Ti heat BL63

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Li, H.

    1996-04-01

    The microstructures of V-5Cr-5Ti heat BL63 are compared following heat treatments at 1125{degrees}C for 1 h and 1125{degrees}C for 1 h followed by 890{degrees}C for 24 h. Following the 890{degrees}C treatment, precipitate density was increased due to the presence of a moderate density of highly elongated particles. Microchemical analysis showed that these particles often contained both Ti and V, some particles showed minor amounts of Si, S, and P, but it was also possible to show that these precipitates were enriched in O rather than C or N. Following the 1125{degrees}C heat treatment, only Si was found as a minor impurity in large particles, but S could be identified at grain boundaries, which were coated with a fine distribution of precipitates. The embrittlement observed is ascribed to a combination of interstitial solid solution hardening and grain boundary embrittlement, with interstitial hardening likely the dominant factor.

  16. Grain refinement of 2Mn-0.1C steel by repetitive heat treatment and recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M. H.; Shibata, A.; Tsuji, N.

    2015-08-01

    Grain refinement in metals is well-known as one of the most effective methods to enhance their strength without addition of other elements. In this study, repetitive heat treatment combined with subsequent cold-rolling and recrystallization were investigated to obtain ultrafine-grained ferrite. Ultrafine-grained (UFG) ferritic structure having a mean grain size smaller than 1 μm was fabricated by repetitive heat treatment at 810 °C for 180 s and cold rolling by 90% plus a recrystallization heat treatment at 600 °C. Starting from this UFG ferrite, finegrained dual phase (DP) steel composed of ferrite and martensite phases with grain sizes smaller than 3 pm could be also obtained by intercritical heat treatment at 740 °C for 30 minutes followed by water-quenching. The mechanical properties of the ultrafine-grained ferritic and DP structured specimens were evaluated by tensile test. Results of the tensile test showed that finegrained ferritic and DP structures had higher yield and tensile strength than the coarse-grained ferritic and DP structures of the same steel.

  17. 46 CFR 56.80-15 - Heat treatment of bends and formed components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used without a postheat treatment. (e) For other materials the heat... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heat treatment of bends and formed components. 56.80-15... PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Bending and Forming § 56.80-15 Heat treatment of bends and...

  18. Chemical Modification for PAN Fibers during Heat-treatment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Yin, Wenyan

    Chemical modification for Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers during heat-treatment process were systematically studied by DSC, FT-IR, EA, XPS, etal. Comparing with original PAN fibers, chemical reactions, structures and elemental compositions of fibers modified with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solutions were totally changed at a certain extent. KMnO4 had reduced the activation energy of cyclization, decreased the area and widened the peak of exothermic curve, decreased the velocity of cyclization reaction, increased the oxygen content about 67%, hence increased C-O-C and C=O groups and the core/shell ratio.

  19. One-dimensional analysis of unsteady flows due to supercritical heat addition in high speed condensing steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, N. A.; Hasini, H.; Yusoff, M. Z.

    2013-06-01

    Unsteadiness in supersonic flow in nozzles can be generated by the release of heat due to spontaneous condensation. The heat released is termed "supercritical" and may be responsible for turbine blades failure in turbine cascade as it causes a supersonic flow to decelerate. When the Mach number is reduced to unity, the flow can no longer sustain the additional heat and becomes unstable. This paper aims to numerically investigate the unsteadiness caused by supercritical heat addition in one-dimensional condensing flows. The governing equations for mass, momentum and energy, coupled with the equations describing the wetness fraction and droplet growth are integrated and solved iteratively to reveal the final solution. Comparison is made with well-established experimental and numerical solution done by previous researchers that shows similar phenomena.

  20. Assessment of heat treatment of various types of milk.

    PubMed

    Sakkas, Lambros; Moutafi, Alexandra; Moschopoulou, Ekaterini; Moatsou, Golfo

    2014-09-15

    Raw milk (RM), reconstituted condensed milk (CM) and three types of reconstituted milk powders (SMPs) were heated indirectly at 80-140°C for 4 s. Native β-lactoglobulin after 90°C treatment of RM was 1132±167 mg/L but no reliable quantities were estimated at temperatures >100°C, whereas 218±43 mg/L residual α-lactalbumin were found at 130°C. Average lactulose contents from 51 to 1549 mg/L were detected at ⩾100°C; average furosine was 1.9 and 126.5 mg/L in raw and 140°C treated milks respectively. The behaviour of heated CM was similar to that of heated RM except for higher furosine concentration. Reconstituted SMPs contained high quantities of lactulose and furosine, the ratio of which was lower than in similarly treated RM. Among the market milks analysed, the group of high-pasteurised milks was highly variable; i.e. native β-lactoglobulin was 69-2831 mg/L, lactulose 0-824 mg/L and furosine 3.3-68.8 mg/L. PMID:24767058

  1. Changes in some physical properties induced by vacuum heat treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultquist, A. E.

    1972-01-01

    A method is proposed for reducing or eliminating outgassing of materials by heat treating them in vacuum prior to use. This may be performed on the raw material prior to manufacturing and installation or after fabrication of parts. Processing of a fabricated part can be performed only on relatively small parts and on assemblies containing no components which are affected by the required temperatures and pressures. Processing conditions of temperature and time are dependent on the particular application and the materials involved. Silicone-coated fiber glass cloth was vacuum-heat treated for 100 hrs at 400 + or - 25 F at pressures of 0.001 torr or less. The materials were tested in terms of tensile strength and tear properties in both the smooth and several creased configurations. Data obtained on one side silicone coated fiber glass showed large reductions in these properties as a result of the vacuum-heat treatment. The problem was alleviated by coating both sides of the fiber glass.

  2. Process Integrated Heat Treatment of a Microalloyed Medium Carbon Steel: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Sebastian; Schledorn, Mareike; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Milenin, Andrij; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Air-water spray cooling was employed during a heat treatment to enhance the mechanical properties of microalloyed medium carbon steel test cylinders (38MnVS6, 88 mm diameter). Using appropriate cooling times and intensities, the test cylinders' surfaces could be quenched and subsequently self-tempered by the residual heat of the core. Simultaneously, it was possible to keep the core regions of the cylinders in the bainitic regime and carry out a quasi-isothermal holding. The resulting microstructures consisted of tempered martensite (near-surface) and bainite with pearlite and ferrite (core). Compared to the standard heat treatment (controlled air cooling), the tensile properties (proof stress and ultimate tensile strength) could be improved for both near-surface and core regions with the adapted spray cooling. A hardness profile with 450 HV10 surface hardness and a hardening depth of more than 11 mm could be realized. In addition, an increase of the impact toughness for the core was achieved, resulting in approximately 25 J charpy impact energy. This is a substantial improvement compared to standard heat treatment procedure and values reported in the literature and can be attributed to the reduced pearlite volume fraction and the increased amount of fine bainite.

  3. Overview of Heat Addition and Efficiency Predictions for an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Reid, Terry; Schifer, Nicholas; Briggs, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    Past methods of predicting net heat input needed to be validated. Validation effort pursued with several paths including improving model inputs, using test hardware to provide validation data, and validating high fidelity models. Validation test hardware provided direct measurement of net heat input for comparison to predicted values. Predicted value of net heat input was 1.7 percent less than measured value and initial calculations of measurement uncertainty were 2.1 percent (under review). Lessons learned during validation effort were incorporated into convertor modeling approach which improved predictions of convertor efficiency.

  4. The Effects of Heat Treatment and Microstructure Variations on Disk Superalloy Properties at High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Telesman, Jack; Garg, Anita

    2008-01-01

    The effects of heat treatment and resulting microstructure variations on high temperature mechanical properties were assessed for a powder metallurgy disk superalloy LSHR. Blanks were consistently supersolvus solution heat treated and quenched at two cooling rates, than aged at varying temperatures and times. Tensile, creep, and dwell fatigue crack growth tests were then performed at 704 C. Gamma' precipitate microstructures were quantified. Relationships between heat treatment-microstructure, heat treatment-mechanical properties, and microstructure-mechanical properties were assessed.

  5. Effect of cerium addition on casting/chill interfacial heat flux and casting surface profile during solidification of Al-14%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, Al-14 wt. % Si alloy was solidified against copper, brass and cast iron chills, to study the effect of Ce melt treatment on casting/chill interfacial heat flux transients and casting surface profile. The heat flux across the casting/chill interface was estimated using inverse modelling technique. On addition of 1.5% Ce, the peak heat flux increased by about 38%, 42% and 43% for copper, brass and cast iron chills respectively. The effect of Ce addition on casting surface texture was analyzed using a surface profilometer. The surface profile of the casting and the chill surfaces clearly indicated the formation of an air gap at the periphery of the casting. The arithmetic average value of the profile departure from the mean line (Ra) and arithmetical mean of the absolute departures of the waviness profile from the centre line (Wa) were found to decrease on Ce addition. The interfacial gap width formed for the unmodified and Ce treated casting surfaces at the periphery were found to be about 35µm and 13µm respectively. The enhancement in heat transfer on addition of Ce addition was attributed to the lowering of the surface tension of the liquid melt. The gap width at the interface was used to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) across the chill surface after the formation of stable solid shell. It was found that the HTC decreased along the radial direction for copper and brass chills and increased along radial direction for cast iron chills.

  6. Coalescence of parallel finite length single-walled carbon nanotubes by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xueming; Qiao, Fangwei; Zhu, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Pu; Chen, Dongci; To, Albert C.

    2013-03-01

    Fusion of parallel finite length single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without initially introducing structural defects is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Three different models that impose different constraints are adopted to simulate the heat welding and coalescence of the parallel SWCNTs. It is found that the ultrathin as well as some larger diameter, finite length SWCNTs, for example (8,0) and (10,0) SWCNTs can be coalesced to become a unique single-walled tube solely via high temperature heat treatment. It is observed that the ends of the nanotubes are prone to close at high temperature during the high temperature treatment. In addition, the fusion process and mechanism of parallel SWCNTs with different lengths and radii are discussed.

  7. Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Myron Ira; Vinegar; Harold J.; Baker, Ralph Sterman; Heron, Goren

    2010-11-30

    Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

  8. Impact of Age, Gender, and Addition of Probiotics on Treatment Success for Helicobacter pylori in Children

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Noam; Shaoul, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of age, gender, and the use of probiotics with standard treatment regimen on Helicobacter pylori eradication. Based on endoscopic findings and clinical presentation, selected patients were treated with standard triple therapy (omeprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin). Those who failed were offered a repeat treatment with omeprazole, metronidazole, and amoxicillin. After the publications of the possible advantages of probiotic treatment on H pylori eradication, the probiotic agent “Probiotica Forte” was routinely added to the treatment. Eradication was noted for 94/130 patients (72%) and for 128/197 patients (65%) with or without probiotic agent, respectively (P = .23). For second-line treatment eradication was noted in 33/46 (72%) and in 9/20 (45%) with or without probiotic agent, respectively (P = .053). The addition of probiotics may improve eradication success especially in addition to second-line treatment. PMID:27335981

  9. 40 CFR 141.711 - Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements. 141.711 Section 141.711 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium...

  10. Effect of pre-storage heat treatment on enzymological changes in peach.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Parshant; Masoodi, F A

    2010-08-01

    Peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) fruit was subjected to hot water and moist hot air treatment at varying temperatures. The activities of polyphenoloxidase (PPO) and polygalacturonase (PG) were monitored during storage for 0, 3 and 6 days. PPO activity decreased in all treatments during storage. This decrease was more in hot water treated fruits than in hot air. PPO activity decreased with the increase in treatment duration. However, the PG activity increased in heat treated fruits as well as control. This increase was more in mild heat treatments as compared to severe heat treatment. Both polyphenol and pectin contents decreased during storage in both heat treatments. PMID:23572672

  11. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and hot crack susceptibility of laser-drilled turbine blades made from Rene 80

    SciTech Connect

    Osterle, W. Krause, S.; Neidel, A.; Oder, G.; Voelker, J.

    2008-11-15

    Turbine components from conventionally cast nickel-base alloy Rene 80 show different hot cracking susceptibilities depending on their heat treatment conditions leading to slightly different microstructures. Electron probe micro-analysis, focused ion beam technique and analytical transmission electron microscopy were applied to reveal and identify grain boundary precipitates and the {gamma}-{gamma}'-microstructure. The distribution of borides along grain boundaries was evaluated statistically by quantitative metallography. The following features could be correlated with an increase of cracking susceptibility: i) Increasing grain size, ii) increasing fraction of grain boundaries with densely spaced borides, iii) lack of secondary {gamma}'-particles in matrix channels between the coarse cuboidal {gamma}'-precipitates. The latter feature seems to be responsible for linking-up of cracked grain boundary precipitates which occurred as an additional cracking mechanism after one heat treatment, whereas decohesion at the boride-matrix-interface in the heat affected zone of laser-drilled holes was observed for both heat treatments.

  12. Efficacy of delayed atmospheric modification in a heat/modified atmosphere phytosanitary treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The combination of heat and low levels of oxygen increases mortality to insects infesting fruit compared with either heat or low oxygen alone. This combination treatment shows promise to disinfest commodities of quarantine pests. Heated air/modified atmosphere treatments employ the modified atmosp...

  13. 46 CFR 54.25-7 - Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) for applicable requirements.) (b) Cargo tanks which are fabricated of carbon or low alloy steel as... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-7 Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56). (a) Postweld heat treatment is required for all...

  14. Structural transitions in alumina nanoparticles by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Nirmal; Khanna, Atul; Chen, Banghao; González, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    γ-alumina nanoparticles were annealed sequentially at 800°C, 950°C and 1100°C and structural transitions as a function of heat treatment were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) methods.. XRD studies found that γ-Al2O3 is stable upto a temperature of at least 950°C and transforms to the thermodynamically stable α-phase after annealing at 1100°C. MAS-NMR revealed that γ-alumina contains AlO4 and AlO6 structural units in the ratio 1: 2, while α-phase contains only AlO6 units. DSC confirmed that γ → α transition initiates at 1060°C.

  15. Post weld heat treatment of offshore structures -- A fabricators viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Lochhead, J.C.

    1996-12-01

    The operation involving post weld heat treatment (PWHT) of certain components during the fabrication of offshore structures has been a contentious issue since its inception. It has been driven by parent material property requirements, inadequacy of early welding consumables, lack of fundamental performance data and, as a result, over conservative engineering. It inherited procedures generally derived from the pressure vessel industry and until relatively recently did not receive specialized attention. The history of the route by which the current regulations or guidelines have been derived is clearly explained in other dissertations. This paper attempts to explain the ramifications of the current situation as seen by a fabricator. At first sight it may appear a relatively simple exercise which does not create fundamental problems. Unfortunately this is not the situation.

  16. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS... a NOX Budget unit that monitors and reports NOX mass emissions using a NOX concentration system and a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  17. Effect of post heat-treatment of composition-controlled PdFe nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yun Sik; Choi, Kwang-Hyun; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Myeong Jae; Baik, Jaeyoon; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Mi-Ju; Lee, Stanfield Youngwon; Kim, Minhyoung; Shin, Heejong; Lee, Kug-Seung; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Composition-controlled and carbon-supported PdFe nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared via a modified chemical synthesis after heat-treatment at high temperature under a reductive atmosphere. This novel synthesis, which combines the polyol reduction method and hydride method, was used to obtain monodispersed PdFe NPs. In addition, to induce structural modifications, the as-prepared PdFe NPs received heat-treatment under a reductive atmosphere. Structural characterization, including high-resolution powder diffraction (HRPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis, indicated that heat-treated PdFe NPs exhibited a higher degree of alloying and surface Pd atomic composition compared with as-prepared ones. Furthermore, new crystalline phases were detected after heat-treatment. Thanks to the structural alterations, heat-treated PdFe NPs showed ∼3 and ∼18 times higher mass- and area-normalized oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities, respectively than commercial Pt/C. Single cell testing with heat-treated PdFe catalysts exhibited a ∼2.5 times higher mass-normalized maximum power density than the reference cell. Surface structure analyses, including cyclic voltammetry (CV), COad oxidation, and XPS, revealed that, after heat-treatment, a downshift of the Pd d-band center occurred, which led to a decrease in the affinity of Pd for oxygen species, resulting in more favorable ORR kinetics.

  18. Tolerance of Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to heated controlled atmosphere treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Combination heat and controlled atmosphere (CA) postharvest phytosanitary treatments are environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical fumigants. A controlled atmosphere/ heating block system (CA-HBS) was used to rapidly assess tolerances of adult maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais, both under reg...

  19. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  20. Quantification of Treatment Effect Modification on Both an Additive and Multiplicative Scale

    PubMed Central

    Girerd, Nicolas; Rabilloud, Muriel; Pibarot, Philippe; Mathieu, Patrick; Roy, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background In both observational and randomized studies, associations with overall survival are by and large assessed on a multiplicative scale using the Cox model. However, clinicians and clinical researchers have an ardent interest in assessing absolute benefit associated with treatments. In older patients, some studies have reported lower relative treatment effect, which might translate into similar or even greater absolute treatment effect given their high baseline hazard for clinical events. Methods The effect of treatment and the effect modification of treatment were respectively assessed using a multiplicative and an additive hazard model in an analysis adjusted for propensity score in the context of coronary surgery. Results The multiplicative model yielded a lower relative hazard reduction with bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting in older patients (Hazard ratio for interaction/year = 1.03, 95%CI: 1.00 to 1.06, p = 0.05) whereas the additive model reported a similar absolute hazard reduction with increasing age (Delta for interaction/year = 0.10, 95%CI: -0.27 to 0.46, p = 0.61). The number needed to treat derived from the propensity score-adjusted multiplicative model was remarkably similar at the end of the follow-up in patients aged < = 60 and in patients >70. Conclusions The present example demonstrates that a lower treatment effect in older patients on a relative scale can conversely translate into a similar treatment effect on an additive scale due to large baseline hazard differences. Importantly, absolute risk reduction, either crude or adjusted, can be calculated from multiplicative survival models. We advocate for a wider use of the absolute scale, especially using additive hazard models, to assess treatment effect and treatment effect modification. PMID:27045168

  1. Estimation of the Heat Capacities of Organic Liquids as a Function of Temperature using Group Additivity. I. Hydrocarbon Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Růžička, Vlastimil; Domalski, Eugene S.

    1993-05-01

    A second-order group additivity method has been developed for the estimation of the heat capacity of liquid hydrocarbons as a function of temperature in the range from the melting temperature to the normal boiling temperature. The temperature dependence of group contributions and structural corrections has been represented by a polynomial expression. The adjustable parameters in the polynomials have been calculated using a weighted least squares minimization procedure. Recommended heat capacities from a large compilation of critically evaluated data that contains over 1300 organic liquids served as a database both for the development and testing of the method.

  2. Influence of heat treatment on spray-dried mixtures of Amioca starch and Carbopol 974P used as carriers for nasal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Coucke, D; Pringels, E; Foreman, P; Adriaensens, P; Carleer, R; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2009-08-13

    A mucoadhesive spray-dried starch/poly(acrylic acid) powder underwent different heat treatments in order to induce cross-linking between the functional groups of starch (Amioca) and poly(acrylic acid) (Carbopol 974P). After heat treatment the water-absorbing capacity, viscosity and elasticity of the mucoadhesive powder increased. NMR analysis in combination with FT-IR indicated that heat treatment induced a low degree of cross-linking between the polymers. Nasal administration of Amioca/Carbopol 974P powders without heat treatment resulted in an absolute bioavailability in rabbits of 8.2+/-3.0% for insulin. Due to the difference in water-absorbing capacity (which opened the tight junctions of the nasal mucosa), elasticity and plasticity (which reduced mucociliairy clearance and prolonged residence time) heat treatment at 120 degrees C improved the bioavailability: 26.4+/-21.9, 36.5+/-11.0 and 19.3+/-17.3% after heat treatment during 30 min, 1 h and 4 h, respectively. Heat treatment at 60 degrees C was less efficient. This study demonstrated that the nasal insulin absorption improved via heat treatment of the Amioca/Carbopol 974P powder (prior to the addition of insulin). The bioavailability-enhancing effect of a 1 h heat treatment at 120 degrees C was confirmed using the same polymer matrix in combination with different drugs (salmon calcitonin, human growth hormone and metoprolol tartrate). PMID:19477256

  3. Laser-heat puncturing as highly effective method of post-tuberculous cystalgia treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koultchavenia, Ekaterina V.

    1999-07-01

    The tuberculosis of an urine bladder in men develops is authentic less often, and recovery is authentic more often, than in the women. In 39,1 percent of the women with nephrotuberculosis and urocystis and urocystis tuberculosis a specific cystitides is finished in development of post- tuberculous cystalgia. One of starting mechanism of dysuria after the transferred urocystis tuberculosis in the women in menopause is hormonal insufficiency. The method of laser heat puncturing, developed by us, for the treatment this complication is highly effective, does not require additional introduction of medicines, can be executed as in hospitals, and in our-patient.

  4. The Effect of Heat Treatment on the Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The results of the fatigue evaluation on Alloy 10, run under NASA's Ultrasafe Project, are the subject of this report. Crack growth evaluation will be examined in a separate report. The eight heat treatments studied were designed to evaluate the effect of solution temperature, cooling rate, and stabilization on key mechanical properties of Alloy 10, including fatigue life. Two temperatures were studied, 750 and 1300 F, which represent projected application temperatures for the bore and rim locations in a disk. In addition to fatigue life, the cyclic stress-strain response and failure modes of the fatigue specimens are also reviewed in this report.

  5. Effect of heat treatment on stiffness and damping of Sic/Ti-15-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment on material properties of Sic/Ti-15-3 was measured by vibration tests. Heat treatment changes the microstructure, which stiffens the matrix and reduces its damping capacity. Test results illustrate how the changes in matrix material affect the stiffness and damping properties of the composite. Damping was found to be more sensitive than stiffness to microstructural changes in the matrix. Effects of heat treatment temperature and exposure time are presented.

  6. DNA polymerase activity in heat killing and hyperthermic radiosensitization of mammalian cells as observed after fractionated heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, J B; Burgman, P; Kampinga, H H; Konings, A W

    1986-03-01

    Possible relations between hyperthermic inactivation of alpha and beta DNA polymerase activity and hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization were investigated. Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) cells and HeLa S3 cells were treated with fractionated doses of hyperthermia. The heating schedules were chosen such that the initial heat treatment resulted in either thermotolerance or thermosensitization (step-down heating) for the second heat treatment. The results show that for DNA polymerase activity and heat radiosensitization (cell survival) no thermotolerance or thermosensitization is observed. Thus hyperthermic cell killing and DNA polymerase activity are not correlated. The correlation of hyperthermic radiosensitization and DNA polymerase activity was substantially less than observed in previous experiments with normotolerant and thermotolerant HeLa S3 cells. We conclude that alpha and beta DNA polymerase inactivation is not always the critical cellular process responsible for hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization. Other possible cellular systems that might determine these processes are discussed. PMID:3754338

  7. Effect of heat treatment on stiffness and damping of SiC/Ti-15-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment on material properties of SiC/Ti-15-3 was measured by vibration tests. Heat treatment changes the microstructure, which was found to stiffen the matrix and reduce its damping capacity. Test results indicate how these changes in the matrix affect the corresponding properties of the composite. Measurements show that heat treatment affects damping properties of the composite to a greater extent than stiffness properties. The extent of change in mechanical properties is shown to depend on heat treatment temperature and exposure time.

  8. Temperature Profile Measurements During Heat Treatment of BSCCO 2212 Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, Alvin; /Fermilab

    2011-04-14

    The temperature profile of two different BSCCO 2212 coils has been analyzed. The profiles are obtained from thermocouples imbedded in the windings during the heat treatment that activates the 2212. The melting and freezing of the 2212 is clearly observed. A model that describes the data and can be used to guide the processing of new coils has been developed. We have obtained the thermal history of two BSCCO coils, one from NHMFL (1) that had 10 layers of 1 mm diameter wire with 0.15 mm insulation and a second coil from OST that had 24 layers with similar insulation and conductor size. Both coils had thermocouples imbedded in the windings and excellent recordings of the temperature over the whole reaction cycle were available for analysis. There are several features that we will address in this note. Measurements have shown that the I{sub c} of the conductor is a sensitive function of its thermal history. This brings up the question of the absolute accuracy of the thermometry in the range around 882 C, the MP of 2212. The reference for the treatment profile is really related to this MP and to small deviations around it. Since the heat of fusion of 2212 is rather large, it generates a clear signal during the melting and cooling transition that automatically generates the relative temperature markers. The physics is the same as the way ice in water maintains an isothermal environment until it is all melted. A related question is the thermal response time of the coil package. The temperature cycles that are being used to optimize strand and small coils can have rapid changes easily implemented whereas a large coil may have such a large thermal time constant that the optimum cycle may not be attainable. A simple analytical model that works well for small solenoids has been developed and an ANSYS (5) program that works for larger coils with more complicated geometry has been set up but will not be discussed in this note.

  9. Apparatus for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2008-04-15

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  10. Methods for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2010-08-03

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  11. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Compliance Times for Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Monitoring and Reporting § 60.4176 Additional... mass emissions using a Hg concentration monitoring system and a flow monitoring system shall...

  12. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Compliance Times for Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Monitoring and Reporting § 60.4176 Additional... mass emissions using a Hg concentration monitoring system and a flow monitoring system shall...

  13. Addition of alkali to the hydrothermal-mechanochemical treatment of Eucalyptus enhances its enzymatic saccharification.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Maki; Endo, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    The effects of alkali on hydrothermal-mechanochemical treatment (hydrothermal treatment combined with wet-milling) were examined with the aim of improving pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass before enzymatic saccharification. After enzymatic saccharification, the highest glucose yield was obtained by autoclaving at 170°C in the presence of 20% NaOH per substrate weight. The wood fiber was unraveled into finer nanofibers by hydrothermal-mechanochemical treatment, thus increasing the specific surface area of the substrate from 11 to 132m(2)/g. Adding 20% NaOH to the treatment further increased the specific surface area of the already fibrillated substrate by 76% (232m(2)/g) due to lignin removal and ester bond cleavage between lignin and hemicellulose. This increase in specific surface area was closely related to the increase in enzymatic digestibility; therefore, NaOH addition may have enhanced the effect of hydrothermal-mechanochemical treatment. PMID:24378778

  14. Pre-treatment factors associated with detecting additional brain metastases at stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wardak, Zabi; Augustyn, Alexander; Zhu, Hong; Mickey, Bruce E; Whitworth, Louis A; Madden, Christopher J; Barnett, Samuel L; Abdulrahman, Ramzi E; Nedzi, Lucien A; Timmerman, Robert D; Choe, Kevin S

    2016-06-01

    The number of brain metastases identified on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key factor in consideration of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). However, additional lesions are often detected on high-resolution SRS-planning MRI. We investigated pre-treatment clinical characteristics that are associated with finding additional metastases at SRS. Patients treated with SRS for brain metastases between the years of 2009-2014 comprised the study cohort. All patients underwent frame-fixed, 1 mm thick MRI on the day of SRS. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed for an association with increase in number of metastases identified on SRS-planning MRI. 289 consecutive SRS cases were analyzed. 725 metastases were identified on pre-treatment MRI and 1062 metastases were identified on SRS-planning MRI. An increase in the number of metastases occurred in 34 % of the cases. On univariate analysis, more than four metastases and the diameter of the largest lesion were significantly associated with an increase in number of metastases on SRS-planning MRI. When stratified by the diameter of the largest lesion into <2, 2-3, or ≥3 cm, additional metastases were identified in 37, 29, and 18 %, respectively. While this increase in the number of metastases is largely due to the difference in imaging technique, the number and size of the metastases were also associated with finding additional lesions. These clinical factors may be considered when determining treatment options for brain metastases. PMID:26966096

  15. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aesthetic value improvement of the ruby stone using heat treatment and its synergetic surface study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.; Singh, Saroj K.; Mishra, Barada K.

    2015-02-01

    The surface behavior of the natural ruby stones before and after heat treatment with metal oxide additives like: zinc oxide (ZnO) and lead oxide (PbO) have been studied. The surface appearance of the ruby stones processed with the metal oxides changed whereas the bulk densities of the stones remained within the range of 3.9-4.0 g/cm3. The cracks healing and pores filling by the metal oxides on the surface of the ruby have been examined using scanning electron microscopy. The chemical compositions based on the XPS survey scans are in good agreement with the expected composition. The phase and crystallinity of the ruby stones original and heat-treated were obtained from their X-ray diffraction patterns. The change in peak separation between R1 and R2 - peaks in photoluminescence spectra and the contrary binding energy shift of the Al 2p peaks in the X-ray photoelectron spectra have been explicated. Moreover, in this work we describe the change in surface chemical and physical characteristics of the ruby stone before and after heat treatment.

  17. The aroma of goat milk: seasonal effects and changes through heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Siefarth, Caroline; Buettner, Andrea

    2014-12-10

    Goat milk was characterized and analyzed by human sensory evaluation and gas chromatography/olfactometry (GC/O). Most potent odor-active compounds were determined in (a) raw goat's milk from two different seasons and (b) heated goat's milk after different treatment intensities. A trained panel found sensorial differences between winter and summer milks (seasonal effect) and milks from different farms (farm-specific effect). A total of 54 odor-active compounds with flavor dilution (FD) factors ≥8 were detected of which 42 odorants were identified. 4-Ethyloctanoic acid, 3-methylindole (skatol) and one unknown compound (RI 2715) showed highest intensities in all raw milks. With heat treatment, goat-like, stable-like, and (cooked) milk-like odor characteristics decreased while caramel-like or vanilla-like notes increased. In total, 66 odor-active compounds were detected in heated goat milks (FD ≥ 8). To the best of our knowledge, only 16 of the 42 identified odorants were reported before in raw goat's milk. Additionally, for the first time the presence of 1-benzopyran-2-one (coumarin) could be confirmed in ruminant milk. PMID:25405703

  18. Emulsifying properties and oil/water (O/W) interface adsorption behavior of heated soy proteins: effects of heating concentration, homogenizer rotating speed, and salt addition level.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhumei; Chen, Yeming; Kong, Xiangzhen; Zhang, Caimeng; Hua, Yufei

    2014-02-19

    The adsorption of heat-denatured soy proteins at the oil/water (O/W) interface during emulsification was studied. Protein samples were prepared by heating protein solutions at concentrations of 1-5% (w/v) and were then diluted to 0.3% (w/v). The results showed that soy proteins that had been heated at higher concentrations generated smaller droplet size of emulsion. Increase in homogenizer rotating speed resulted in higher protein adsorption percentages and lower surface loads at the O/W interface. Surface loads for both unheated and heated soy proteins were linearly correlated with the unadsorbed proteins' equilibrium concentration at various rotating speeds. With the rise in NaCl addition level, protein adsorption percentage and surface loads of emulsions increased, whereas lower droplet sizes were obtained at the ionic strength of 0.1 M. The aggregates and non-aggregates displayed different adsorption behaviors when rotating speed or NaCl concentration was varied. PMID:24460091

  19. Sintering and properties of Si3N4 with and without additives by HIP treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuratani, S.; Shimada, M.; Koizumi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) of Si3N4 powders with and without additives was performed using a glass container, and various kinds of pressureless-sintered Si3N4 were HIP'ed without a container. The effects of HIP treatment on density, microstructure, flexural strength, microhardness, and fracture toughness on Si3N4 ceramics were studied. Using a glass container it was difficult to reach theoretical density. The microhardness of HIP'ed Si3N4 without additives was low, and the fracture toughness of HIP'ed Si3N4 with and without additives was 22 to 25 W/m-K, and it decreased with increasing the amount of additives. The density and flexural strength, and hardness of pressureless-sintered Si3N4 which contained Al2O and Y2O3 as oxide additives were remarkably improved by HIP treatment using nitrogen as a pressure transmitting gas. It is very important to select the sintering conditions for fabricating the presintered body of Si3N4 in order to improve the mechanical properties of Si3N4 by HIP treatment.

  20. Effects of Various Heat Treatments on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2000-01-01

    Uncontained failures of aircraft engine fan blades are serious events that can cause equipment damage and loss of life. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification requires that all engines demonstrate the ability to contain a released fan blade with the engine running at full power. However, increased protection generally comes at the expense of weight. Proper choice of materials is therefore imperative to an optimized design. The process of choosing a good casing material is done primarily through trial and error. This costly procedure could be minimized if there was a better understanding of the relationships among static material properties, impact properties, and failure mechanisms. This work is part of a program being conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to study these relationships. Ballistic impact tests were conducted on flat, square sheets of Inconel 718 that had been subjected to different heat treatments. Two heat treatments and the as-received condition were studied. In addition, results were compared with those from an earlier study involving a fourth heat treatment. The heat treatments were selected on the basis of their effects on the static tensile properties of the material. The impact specimens used in this study were 17.8-cm square panels that were centered and clamped over a 15.2-cm square hole in a 1.27-cm-thick steel plate. Three nominal plate thickness dimensions were studied, 1.0, 1.8, and 2.0 mm. For each thickness, all the specimens were taken from the same sheet of material. The projectile was a Ti-6Al-4V cylinder with a length of 25.4 mm, a diameter of 12.7 mm, and a mass ranging from 14.05 to 14.20 g. The projectiles were accelerated toward the specimens at normal incidence using a gas gun with a 2-m-long, 12.7-mm inner-diameter barrel. The ballistic limit for each heat treatment condition and thickness was determined by conducting a number of impact tests that bracketed as closely as possible the velocity

  1. IMPROVING DESIGN AND OPERATION OF HEAT TREATMENT/LOW PRESSURE OXIDATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the investigation is to document possible improvements to design, operation, and maintenance of heat treatment and low pressure oxidation systems for conditioning sludge prior to dewatering in municipal wastewater treatment plants. The information in the report is ...

  2. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Hsu, Julia

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  3. Effect of crystallization heat treatment on the microstructure of niobium-doped fluorapatite glass-ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Denry, I.; Holloway, J.A.; Gupta, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to study the effect of heat treatment temperature and heating rate on the microstructure and crystalline phases and assess the domain of existence of sub-micrometer fluorapatite crystals in niobium-doped fluorapatite glass-ceramics for biomedical applications. Glass-ceramic specimens were prepared by casting and heat treatment between 700 and 1200°C using a fast or a slow heating rate. The microstructure was characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline phases were analyzed by x-ray diffraction. AFM of the as-cast glass revealed that amorphous phase separation occurred in this system. XRD confirmed the presence of fluorapatite in all specimens, together with forsterite and enstatite at higher temperatures. Both heating rate and heat treatment temperature strongly influenced microstructure and crystallinity. A dual microstructure with sub-micrometer fluorapatite crystals and polygonal forsterite crystals was obtained when slow heating rates and crystallization temperatures between 950 and 1100°C were used. Needle-shaped fluorapatite crystals appeared after heat treatment above 1100°C. Fast heating rates led to an increase in crystal size. Heat treatment temperatures should remain below 1100°C, together with slow heating rates, to prevent crystal dissolution, and preserve a dual microstructure of finely dispersed sub-micrometer crystals without growth of needle-shaped crystals. PMID:22454333

  4. High-temperature strength of prealloyed-powder products increased by heat/pressure treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashbrook, R. L.; Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Heat treatment process involves heating products to a temperature above the solidus, and subsequently applying pressure at a temperature below the solidus. Technique can be modified to one step process involving simultaneous application if both high pressure and heat. Process is not limited to cobalt-base alloys.

  5. Computer simulation of velocity and temperature fields during gas quenching in vacuum heat treatment furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Meekisho, L.; Zhang, J.; Blicblau, A.; Doyle, D.

    1995-12-31

    Gas quenching is a form of cooling process in heat treatment, especially widely applied in vacuum heat treatment. Using computational fluid dynamic package Flow-3D and self-programmed heat transfer software, the gas flow velocity distribution during some of the typical gas quenching processes and temperature fields within the components are simulated. The simulated results are not only important in determining the heat transfer behavior of the quenched components, but also helpful in quenching optimization, quenching equipment design and further simulation and final distortion control of the heat treated components.

  6. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  7. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  8. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  9. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  10. 46 CFR 56.80-15 - Heat treatment of bends and formed components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Heat treatment of bends and formed components. 56.80-15 Section 56.80-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Bending and Forming § 56.80-15 Heat treatment of bends and formed components. (a) Carbon-steel piping that has...

  11. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  12. 76 FR 3077 - Notice of Decision To Revise a Heat Treatment Schedule for Emerald Ash Borer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... accordance with Sec. 305.3(a)(1), we published a notice \\2\\ in the Federal Register on August 25, 2010 (75 FR... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Decision To Revise a Heat Treatment Schedule for... are advising the public of our decision to revise a heat treatment schedule for the emerald ash...

  13. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Devices Using Additive-Subtractive Manufacturing Techniques: Application to Waste-Heat Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are well suited for waste-heat energy harvesting applications as opposed to primary energy generation. Commercially available thermoelectric modules are flat, inflexible and have limited sizes available. State-of-art manufacturing of TEG devices relies on assembling prefabricated parts with soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping. Furthermore, efforts to incorporate them onto curved surfaces such as exhaust pipes, pump housings, steam lines, mixing containers, reaction chambers, etc. require custom-built heat exchangers. This is costly and labor-intensive, in addition to presenting challenges in terms of space, thermal coupling, added weight and long-term reliability. Additive manufacturing technologies are beginning to address many of these issues by reducing part count in complex designs and the elimination of sub-assembly requirements. This work investigates the feasibility of utilizing such novel manufacturing routes for improving the manufacturing process of thermoelectric devices. Much of the research in thermoelectricity is primarily focused on improving thermoelectric material properties by developing of novel materials or finding ways to improve existing ones. Secondary to material development is improving the manufacturing process of TEGs to provide significant cost benefits. To improve the device fabrication process, this work explores additive manufacturing technologies to provide an integrated and scalable approach for TE device manufacturing directly onto engineering component surfaces. Additive manufacturing techniques like thermal spray and ink-dispenser printing are developed with the aim of improving the manufacturing process of TEGs. Subtractive manufacturing techniques like laser micromachining are also studied in detail. This includes the laser processing parameters for cutting the thermal spray materials efficiently by

  14. Heat and lime-treatment as effective control methods for E. coli O157:H7 in organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Avery, Lisa M; Williams, A Prysor; Killham, Ken; Jones, David L

    2009-05-01

    Land-application of abattoir wastes is economically appealing and may provide an effective means of closing the nutrient cycling loop. This practise is constrained, however, by legislation which necessitates pre-treatment to remove pathogenic micro-organisms prior to land-spreading. Here we investigated whether heat-treatment or lime addition could eliminate Escherichia coli O157:H7 from three contrasting abattoir wastes. We found that treatment at 60 degrees C for 10 min effectively eradicated the organism while treatment for the same length of time at 50 degrees C led to 2-4 log reductions, but not a complete kill. Temperatures of 72 degrees C induced waste solidification rendering its use impractical. The potential for re-growth in heat-treated and untreated wastes was also investigated. Survival was significantly greater in heat-treated wastes, although the difference was less than half a log unit in magnitude. This effect of heat-treatment on pathogen survival appeared to be ameliorated when wastes were mixed with soil. No viable E. coli O157:H7 cells were recovered from any waste after application of lime (CaO) at a rate of 10 gl(-1), even after enrichment. Our results indicate that pasteurisation-style or liming treatments may provide a suitable alternative method for reducing pathogen loads in abattoir wastes, so that they can be applied to land with minimal biological risk. PMID:19181517

  15. 7 CFR 58.236 - Pasteurization and heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-heat. The finished product shall not exceed 1.5 mg. undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of...) Medium-heat. The finished product shall show undenatured whey protein nitrogen between the levels of... than 6.0 undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of non-fat dry milk as classified in the...

  16. 7 CFR 58.236 - Pasteurization and heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-heat. The finished product shall not exceed 1.5 mg. undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of...) Medium-heat. The finished product shall show undenatured whey protein nitrogen between the levels of... than 6.0 undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of non-fat dry milk as classified in the...

  17. 7 CFR 58.236 - Pasteurization and heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-heat. The finished product shall not exceed 1.5 mg. undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of...) Medium-heat. The finished product shall show undenatured whey protein nitrogen between the levels of... than 6.0 undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of non-fat dry milk as classified in the...

  18. 7 CFR 58.236 - Pasteurization and heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-heat. The finished product shall not exceed 1.5 mg. undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of...) Medium-heat. The finished product shall show undenatured whey protein nitrogen between the levels of... than 6.0 undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of non-fat dry milk as classified in the...

  19. Solar Injury and Heat Illness. Treatment and Prevention in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Greg

    1995-01-01

    Children are especially vulnerable to solar injury and heat illness. Physicians can lower children's risk through education about short-term and long-term sequelae and through various prevention efforts. The paper discusses how to screen for risk factors and how to prevent and treat heat illness and solar injury. (SM)

  20. Heat Treatments of ZnSe Starting Materials for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of different heat treatments on stoichiometry and residual gas pressure in ZnSe physical vapor transport system was investigated. The dependence of the amount and composition of the residual gas on various heat treatment procedures is reported. Heat treatment of ZnSe starting materials by baking under the condition of dynamic vacuum to adjust its stoichiometry was performed and the effectiveness of the treatment was confirmed by the measurements of the partial pressure of Se2, P(sub Se2), in equilibrium with the heat treated samples. Optimum heat treatment procedures on the ZnSe starting material for the physical vapor transport process are discussed and verified experimentally.

  1. Structural modifications of disordered mesocarbon microbeads with lower temperatures of heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Haridoss, P.; Uribe, F.A.; Garzon, F.H.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    We describe the variation of structural and physical properties of mesocarbon microbeads, a potential anode material for rechargeable lithium batteries, as a function of heat-treatment temperature in the range 400{endash}1100thinsp{degree}C. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies indicated changes in the morphology of the mesocarbons with heat treatment. X-ray studies show that average crystallite size varies considerably with heat treatment. The d{sub 002} spacing decreases with increasing heat treatment temperatures. The electronic conductivity of the mesocarbon microbeads also increases substantially with increasing heat-treatment temperature. Based on thermogravimetrical analysis (TGA) and other measurements, we find that organic fractions volatilizes out of these carbons in two distinct stages. The observed weight loss correlates with the structural changes observed. We suggest that these observations are consistent with two types of hydrogenated fractions present in the {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} mesocarbons. {copyright} {ital 1998 Materials Research Society.}

  2. The Tensile Properties of Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Superalloys During Quenching Heat Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete T.; Biles, Tiffany; Konkel, William

    2001-01-01

    There is a need to increase the temperature capabilities of superalloy turbine disks. This would allow full utilization of higher temperature combustor and airfoil concepts under development. One approach to meet this goal is to modify the processing and chemistry of advanced alloys, while preserving the ability to use rapid cooling supersolvus heat treatments to achieve coarse grain, fine gamma prime microstructures. An important step in this effort is to understand the key high temperature tensile properties of advanced alloys as they exist during supersolvus heat treatments. This could help in projecting cracking tendencies of disks during quenches from supersolvus heat treatments. The objective of this study was to examine the tensile properties of two advanced disk superalloys during simulated quenching heat treatments. Specimens were cooled from the solution heat treatment temperatures at controlled rates, interrupted, and immediately tensile tested at various temperatures. The responses and failure modes were compared and related to the quench cracking tendencies of disk forgings.

  3. Heat Treatments of ZnSe Starting Materials for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of different heat treatments on stoichiometry and residual gas pressure in ZnSe physical vapor transport system was investigated. The dependence of the amount and composition of the residual gas on various heat treatment procedures is reported. Heat treatment of ZnSe starting materials by baking under the condition of dynamic vacuum to adjust its stoichiometry was performed and the effectiveness of the treatment was confirmed by the measurements of the partial pressure of Se2, P(sub Se2), in equilibrium with the heat treated samples. Optimum heat treatment procedures on the ZnSe starting material for the physical vapor transport process are discussed and verified experimentally.

  4. Estimation of the Heat Capacities of Organic Liquids as a Function of Temperature Using Group Additivity. An Amendment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zábranský, Milan; Růžička, Vlastimil

    2004-12-01

    An amendment to a second-order group additivity method for the estimation of the heat capacity of pure organic liquids as a function of temperature in the range from the melting temperature to the normal boiling temperature is reported. The temperature dependence of various group contributions and structural corrections is represented by a series of second order polynomial expressions. The group contribution parameters have been developed from an extended database of more than 1800 recommended heat capacity values. The present method should be more versatile and more accurate than the previous one [Růžička and Domalski, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 22, 597, 619 (1993)] due to the use of a larger database and an improved procedure for parameter calculation.

  5. 7 CFR 305.8 - Heat treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the treatment container. (2) Sensor equipment must be adequate to monitor the treatment, its type and... official authorized by APHIS prior to beginning the treatment. Sensor equipment must be locked before...

  6. The Effect of Post-Heat Treatment on Microstructure of 316L Cold-Sprayed Coatings and Their Corrosion Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikici, B.; Yilmazer, H.; Ozdemir, I.; Isik, M.

    2016-04-01

    The combined effects of process gases and post-heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of 316L cold-sprayed coatings on Al5052 substrates have been investigated in this study. The stainless steel coatings were subjected to heat treatment at four different temperatures (250, 500, 750, and 1000 °C) to study the effect of heat treatment. In addition, the corrosion performances of the coatings at different process temperatures have been compared using the potentiodynamic scanning technique. Microstructural characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The results of present study showed that cold-sprayed stainless steel coatings processed with helium exhibited higher corrosion resistance than those of coatings sprayed with nitrogen process gas. This could partially be attributed to the reduction in porosity level (4.9%) and improvement of particle-particle bonding. In addition, evaluation of the mechanical and microstructural properties of the coatings demonstrated that subsequent heat treatment has major influence on the deposited layers sprayed with He process gas.

  7. Bioactive titanate layers formed on titanium and its alloys by simple chemical and heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    To reveal general principles for obtaining bone-bonding bioactive metallic titanium, Ti metal was heat-treated after exposure to a solution with different pH. The material formed an apatite layer at its surface in simulated body fluid when heat-treated after exposure to a strong acid or alkali solution, because it formed a positively charged titanium oxide and negatively charged sodium titanate film on its surface, respectively. Such treated these Ti metals tightly bonded to living bone. Porous Ti metal heat-treated after exposure to an acidic solution exhibited not only osteoconductive, but also osteoinductive behavior. Porous Ti metal exposed to an alkaline solution also exhibits osteoconductivity as well as osteoinductivity, if it was subsequently subjected to acid and heat treatments. These acid and heat treatments were not effective for most Ti-based alloys. However, even those alloys exhibited apatite formation when they were subjected to acid and heat treatment after a NaOH treatment, since the alloying elements were removed from the surface by the latter. The NaOH and heat treatments were also not effective for Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys. These alloys displayed apatite formation when subjected to CaCl2 treatment after NaOH treatment, forming Ca-deficient calcium titanate at their surfaces after subsequent heat and hot water treatments. The bioactive Ti metal subjected to NaOH and heat treatments has been clinically used as an artificial hip joint material in Japan since 2007. A porous Ti metal subjected to NaOH, HCl and heat treatments has successfully undergone clinical trials as a spinal fusion device. PMID:25893014

  8. Bioactive Titanate Layers Formed on Titanium and Its Alloys by Simple Chemical and Heat Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    To reveal general principles for obtaining bone-bonding bioactive metallic titanium, Ti metal was heat-treated after exposure to a solution with different pH. The material formed an apatite layer at its surface in simulated body fluid when heat-treated after exposure to a strong acid or alkali solution, because it formed a positively charged titanium oxide and negatively charged sodium titanate film on its surface, respectively. Such treated these Ti metals tightly bonded to living bone. Porous Ti metal heat-treated after exposure to an acidic solution exhibited not only osteoconductive, but also osteoinductive behavior. Porous Ti metal exposed to an alkaline solution also exhibits osteoconductivity as well as osteoinductivity, if it was subsequently subjected to acid and heat treatments. These acid and heat treatments were not effective for most Ti-based alloys. However, even those alloys exhibited apatite formation when they were subjected to acid and heat treatment after a NaOH treatment, since the alloying elements were removed from the surface by the latter. The NaOH and heat treatments were also not effective for Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys. These alloys displayed apatite formation when subjected to CaCl2 treatment after NaOH treatment, forming Ca-deficient calcium titanate at their surfaces after subsequent heat and hot water treatments. The bioactive Ti metal subjected to NaOH and heat treatments has been clinically used as an artificial hip joint material in Japan since 2007. A porous Ti metal subjected to NaOH, HCl and heat treatments has successfully undergone clinical trials as a spinal fusion device. PMID:25893014

  9. Preparation and Heat-Treatment of DWPF Simulants With and Without Co-Precipitated Noble Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David C.:Eibling, Russel E

    2005-08-01

    simulants were visually very viscous compared to the traditional SB3 simulant. (4) Heat-treatment reduced the viscosity of the two new simulants with and without coprecipitated noble metals, though they were still more viscous than the traditional SB3. (5) The approach of using a 97 C heat-treatment step to qualitatively simulate tank farm aging may not be optimal. A significant change in the base equivalent molarities of both simulants was observed during heat-treatment. (6) Heat-treatment appeared to make phosphates insoluble in water. The following recommendations came out of the work: (1) Washed slurry should be checked for TIC and base equivalents before calculating the final trim chemical additions of sodium carbonate and sodium hydroxide. (2) Final insoluble trim chemicals should be added to the slurry in the cross-flow filtration unit mixing tank, since significant slurry is lost in the CUF equipment. Adding the chemicals here would keep them in the correct proportion relative to the precipitated insoluble solids. (3) A composite wash and decant sample should be prepared containing proportionally weighted masses of each aqueous stream removed during preparation of a co-precipitated noble metal simulant. This sample should then be checked for noble metal losses. This would reduce the sample load, while still confirming that there was no significant noble metal loss. (4) A study of the impact of heat-treatment on existing simulants should be undertaken. If there is a shift in base equivalents, then SRNL acid stoichiometries may be biased relative to real waste. The study should be extended to several real wastes as well.

  10. Macitentan: An important addition to the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Anjan; Singh Brashier, Dick B; Tejus, Anantharamu; Sharma, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Macitentan is an orphan drug for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays a critical role of pathophysiology of PAH. Macitentan, a new dual endothelin receptor antagonist, has reportedly improved prognosis of PAH patients by delaying the progression of disease. It prevents the binding of ET-1 to both endothelin A (ETA) and endothelin B (ETB) receptors. Macitentan displays higher efficacy, lesser adverse effects and drug interactions. It has completed phase III trials in 2012 for treatment of PAH and has been tried for ischemic digital ulcers in systemic sclerosis, recurrent glioblastoma and combination with chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Safety data for macitentan were obtained primarily from a placebo-controlled clinical study in 742 patients with PAH. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug on 13 October 2013. It is an important addition to long-term treatment of PAH. PMID:25709357

  11. Heat treatment effects in Cu2S-CdS heterojunction photovoltaic cells. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenbruch, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    The optical and electronic properties of single crystal Cu2S-CdS photovoltaic cells were investigated. In these cells trapped charge near the interface which is manifested by a persistent increase in junction capacitance (the photocapacitance) plays a significant role in determining the carrier transport properties. It was found that the severe degradation in short-circuit current observed in heat-treated cells can be separated into two components: (1) a relatively small thermal component occurring on heat-treatment in the dark, and (2) a much larger degradation caused by exposure to light at room temperature. By a short additional heat-treatment above approximately 100 C the cell can be completely restored to its condition before the optically caused degradation with no effect on the depletion layer width.

  12. Carbonated aqueous media for quench heat treatment of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, U. Vignesh; Rao, K. M. Pranesh; Pai, M. Ashwin; Prabhu, K. Narayan

    2016-07-01

    Distilled water and polyalkylene glycol (PAG)-based aqueous quenchants of 5 and 10 vol.% with and without carbonation were prepared and used as heat transfer media during immersion quenching. Cooling curves were recorded during quenching of an inconel 600 cylindrical probe instrumented with multiple thermocouples. It was observed that the vapor stage duration was prolonged and the wetting front ascended uniformly for quenching with carbonated media. The cooling data were analyzed by determining the critical cooling parameters and by estimating the spatially dependent probe/quenchant interfacial heat flux transients. The study showed significantly reduced values of heat transfer rate for carbonated quenchants compared to quenchants without carbonation. Further, the reduction was more pronounced in the case of PAG-based carbonated quenchants than carbonated distilled water. The results also showed the dependence of heat transfer characteristics of the carbonated media on polymer concentration. The effect of quench uniformity on the microstructure of the material was assessed.

  13. 7 CFR 58.236 - Pasteurization and heat treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-heat. The finished product shall not exceed 1.5 mg. undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of... than 6.0 undenatured whey protein nitrogen per gram of non-fat dry milk as classified in the...

  14. Hardening by cooling rate control and post-firing heat treatment in Pd-Ag-Sn alloy for bonding porcelain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Young-Jun; Seol, Hyo-Joung; Cho, Mi-Hyang; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the hardening effect by controlling the cooling rate during the porcelain firing process and performing an additional post-firing heat treatment in a Pd-Ag-Sn alloy. The most effective cooling rate for alloy hardening was determined by cooling the specimens at various cooling rates after oxidation treatment. A subsequent porcelain firing simulation followed by cooling at the selected cooling rate was performed. A post-firing heat treatment was then done at 600°C in a porcelain furnace. The hardening mechanism was characterized by a hardness test, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Alloy softening occurred during the porcelain firing process followed by cooling at a controlled cooling rate. A post-firing heat treatment allowed apparent precipitation hardening. It is advisable to perform a postfiring heat treatment at 600°C in a porcelain furnace by annealing metal substructure after porcelain fusing. PMID:27041022

  15. High-Temperature Heat Treatment Study on a Large-Grain Nb Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, P. Dhakal, R. Myneni, P. Maheshwari, F.A. Stevie

    2011-07-01

    Improvement of the cavity performance by a high-temperature heat-treatment without subsequent chemical etching have been reported for large-grain Nb cavities treated by buffered chemical polishing, as well as for a fine-grain cavity treated by vertical electropolishing. Changes in the quality factor, Q{sub 0}, and maximum peak surface magnetic field achieved in a large-grain Nb single-cell cavity have been determined as a function of the heat treatment temperature, between 600 °C and 1200 °C. The highest Q{sub 0} improvement of about 30% was obtained after heat-treatment at 800 °C-1000 °C. Measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry on large-grain samples heat-treated with the cavity showed large reduction of hydrogen concentration after heat treatment.

  16. Treatment-resistant depression in adolescents: is the addition of cognitive behavioral therapy of benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Sarah E; Cox, Georgina R; Merry, Sally N

    2011-01-01

    Background Many young people with major depression fail first-line treatments. Treatment-resistant depression has various definitions in the literature but typically assumes nonresponse to medication. In young people, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the recommended first-line intervention, thus the definition of treatment resistance should be expanded. Therefore, our aim was to synthesize the existing evidence of any interventions for treatment-resistant depression, broadly defined, in children and adolescents and to investigate the effectiveness of CBT in this context. Methods We used Cochrane Collaboration methodology, with electronic searches of Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, and the Cochrane Depression Anxiety and Neurosis Group trials registers. Only randomized controlled trials were included, and were assessed for risk of bias. Meta- analysis was undertaken where possible and appropriate. Results Of 953 articles retrieved, four trials were eligible for inclusion. For one study, only the trial registration document was available, because the study was never completed. All other studies were well conducted with a low risk of bias, although one study had a high dropout rate. Two studies assessed the effect of adding CBT to medication. While an assertive trial of antidepressants does appear to lead to benefit, when compared with placebo, there was no significant advantage, in either study, or in a meta-analysis of data from these trials, that clearly demonstrated an additional benefit of CBT. The third trial showed little advantage of a tricyclic antidepressant over placebo in the context of an inpatient admission. Conclusion Few randomized controlled trials have investigated interventions for treatment-resistant depression in young people, and results from these show modest benefit from antidepressants with no additional benefit over medication from CBT. Overall, there is a lack of evidence about effective interventions to treat young people who have failed to

  17. Effect of heat treatment and heat-to-heat variations in the fatigue-crack growth response of Alloy 718. Part 2. Microscopic observation

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.

    1980-04-01

    The microstructural aspects that influenced the room temperature and elevated temperature fatigue-crack propagation response of annealed, conventional, and modified heat-treated Alloy 718 were studied. Electron fractographic examination of Alloy 718 fatigue fracture surfaces revealed that operative crack growth mechanisms were dependent on heat treatment, heat-to-heat variations, temperature, and prevailing crack tip stress intensity level. In the low temperature regime (below 538{sup 0}C), all fracture surfaces exhibited a faceted appearance at low {Delta} levels, which is indicative of crystallographic fracture along intense inhomogeneous slip bands. The facets in the modified Alloy 718, however, were found to be rather poorly defined since the modified heat treatment tends to promote more homogeneous slip processes. Under progressively higher stress intensity levels, the room temperature and elevated temperature fatigue fracture surfaces exhibited striations, followed by a combination of striations and dimple rupture at the highest {Delta} values. Striation spacing measurements in all three heat-treated conditions were generally found to be in agreement with macroscopic growth rates at 24 and 538{sup 0}C. Under high temperature conditions (above 538{sup 0}C), evidence of intergranular fracture was also detected on the fatigue fracture surfaces, particularly at low stress intensity levels. This intergranular failure mechanism was found to be more extensive in the modified heat-treated Alloy 718. 17 figures.

  18. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  19. The Mechanism of η Phase Precipitation in A286 Superalloy During Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifollahi, M.; Razavi, S. H.; Kheirandish, Sh.; Abbasi, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    In this research, the mechanism of eta (η-Ni3Ti) phase precipitation in iron-nickel-based A286 superalloy was assessed during aging heat treatment in the temperature range between 650 and 900 °C for the times of 1-30 h. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, differential thermal analysis, and x-ray diffractometry were used to describe the η phase transformation. The results showed that the major precipitates at temperatures below 840 °C were γ' and η. The η phase started to precipitate at the expense of the γ' phase after prolonged aging. The η phase existed in the samples aged at temperature higher than 760 °C with cellular morphology. The η volume fraction increased with increasing heat treatment time. In addition, when the aging temperature was increased from 760 to 820 °C, the η volume fraction increased and then decreased after 840 °C. The η phase morphology also changed from cellular to Widmanstätten-type during aging. The time-temperature-precipitation diagrams of these morphologies are presented. The results indicated the differences in precipitation mechanisms of η phase at 840 and 860 °C.

  20. Grain Refinement of a gamma-TiAl Alloy Through Isothermal Forging and Heat Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmati-Manesh, S.; Bahmanpour, H.

    2010-03-11

    Effect of initial massive type structure of a gamma-TiAl based alloy on its hot deformed and stabilized microstructure was investigated. A gamma alloy with composition of Ti-47Al-12Nb-0.5Si was subjected to rapid quenching from alpha phase field. The quenched sample was deformed at high temperature. Further post deformation heat treatment was conducted to stabilize the as-deformed structure. It was shown that Nb and Si have important roles in grain refinement of the final product. Presence of niobium in the alloy made the diffusion controlled eutectoid reaction sluggish and assisted the formation of massive type gamma phase (gamma{sub m}) by rapid cooling from alpha phase field. Silicon addition assisted the microstructural refinement by forming hard and finely dispersed titanium silicide particles. These particles act as preferred sites for dynamic recrystallization during hot deformation. Massive gamma phase tends to deform uniformly and decompose to equilibrium phases after final heat treatment and results in a very fine grained microstructure.

  1. Group additive values for the gas-phase standard enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of oxygenates.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Paschalis D; Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Papayannakos, Nikos; Marin, Guy B

    2013-11-25

    A complete and consistent set of 60 Benson group additive values (GAVs) for oxygenate molecules and 97 GAVs for oxygenate radicals is provided, which allow to describe their standard enthalpies of formation, entropies and heat capacities. Approximately half of the GAVs for oxygenate molecules and the majority of the GAVs for oxygenate radicals have not been reported before. The values are derived from an extensive and accurate database of thermochemical data obtained by ab initio calculations at the CBS-QB3 level of theory for 202 molecules and 248 radicals. These compounds include saturated and unsaturated, α- and β-branched, mono- and bifunctional oxygenates. Internal rotations were accounted for by using one-dimensional hindered rotor corrections. The accuracy of the database was further improved by adding bond additive corrections to the CBS-QB3 standard enthalpies of formation. Furthermore, 14 corrections for non-nearest-neighbor interactions (NNI) were introduced for molecules and 12 for radicals. The validity of the constructed group additive model was established by comparing the predicted values with both ab initio calculated values and experimental data for oxygenates and oxygenate radicals. The group additive method predicts standard enthalpies of formation, entropies, and heat capacities with chemical accuracy, respectively, within 4 kJ mol(-1) and 4 J mol(-1) K(-1) for both ab initio calculated and experimental values. As an alternative, the hydrogen bond increment (HBI) method developed by Lay et al. (T. H. Lay, J. W. Bozzelli, A. M. Dean, E. R. Ritter, J. Phys. Chem.- 1995, 99, 14514) was used to introduce 77 new HBI structures and to calculate their thermodynamic parameters (Δ(f)H°, S°, C(p)°). The GAVs reported in this work can be reliably used for the prediction of thermochemical data for large oxygenate compounds, combining rapid prediction with wide-ranging application. PMID:24123572

  2. Randomised comparison between adrenaline injection alone and adrenaline injection plus heat probe treatment for actively bleeding ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S. S.; Lau, J. Y.; Sung, J. J.; Chan, A. C.; Lai, C. W.; Ng, E. K.; Chan, F. K.; Yung, M. Y.; Li, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare endoscopic adrenaline injection alone and adrenaline injection plus heat probe for the treatment of actively bleeding peptic ulcers. DESIGN: Randomised prospective study of patients admitted with actively bleeding peptic ulcers. SETTING: One university hospital. SUBJECTS: 276 patients with actively bleeding ulcers detected by endoscopy within 24 hours of admission: 136 patients were randomised to endoscopic adrenaline injection alone and 140 to adrenaline injection plus heat probe treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Initial endoscopic haemostasis; clinical rebleeding; requirement for operation; requirement for blood transfusion; hospital stay, ulcer healing at four weeks; and mortality in hospital. RESULTS: Initial haemostasis was achieved in 131/134 patients (98%) who received adrenaline injection alone and 135/136 patients (99%) who received additional heat probe treatment (P = 0.33). Outcome as measured by clinical rebleeding (12 v 5), requirement for emergency operation (14 v 8), blood transfusion (2 v 3 units), hospital stay (4 v 4 days), ulcer healing at four weeks (79.1% v 74%), and in hospital mortality (7 v 8) were not significantly different in the two groups. In the subgroup of patients with spurting haemorrhage 8/27 (29.6%; 14.5% to 50.3%) patients from the adrenaline injection alone group and 2/31 (6.5%; 1.1% to 22.9%) patients from the dual treatment group required operative intervention. The relative risk of this was lower in the dual treatment group (0.17; 0.03 to 0.87). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the dual treatment group than the adrenaline injection alone group (4 v 6 days, P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The addition of heat probe treatment after endoscopic adrenaline injection confers an advantage in ulcers with spurting haemorrhage. PMID:9158465

  3. Characterization of Machine Variability and Progressive Heat Treatment in Selective Laser Melting of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, T.; Tilson, W.; Jones, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The absence of an economy of scale in spaceflight hardware makes additive manufacturing an immensely attractive option for propulsion components. As additive manufacturing techniques are increasingly adopted by government and industry to produce propulsion hardware in human-rated systems, significant development efforts are needed to establish these methods as reliable alternatives to conventional subtractive manufacturing. One of the critical challenges facing powder bed fusion techniques in this application is variability between machines used to perform builds. Even with implementation of robust process controls, it is possible for two machines operating at identical parameters with equivalent base materials to produce specimens with slightly different material properties. The machine variability study presented here evaluates 60 specimens of identical geometry built using the same parameters. 30 samples were produced on machine 1 (M1) and the other 30 samples were built on machine 2 (M2). Each of the 30-sample sets were further subdivided into three subsets (with 10 specimens in each subset) to assess the effect of progressive heat treatment on machine variability. The three categories for post-processing were: stress relief, stress relief followed by hot isostatic press (HIP), and stress relief followed by HIP followed by heat treatment per AMS 5664. Each specimen (a round, smooth tensile) was mechanically tested per ASTM E8. Two formal statistical techniques, hypothesis testing for equivalency of means and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), were applied to characterize the impact of machine variability and heat treatment on six material properties: tensile stress, yield stress, modulus of elasticity, fracture elongation, and reduction of area. This work represents the type of development effort that is critical as NASA, academia, and the industrial base work collaboratively to establish a path to certification for additively manufactured parts. For future

  4. Specific heat treatment of selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qianli; Liu, Xujie; Yang, Xing; Zhang, Ranran; Shen, Zhijian; Feng, Qingling

    2015-12-01

    The ductility of as-fabricated Ti-6Al-4V falls far short of the requirements for biomedical titanium alloy implants and the heat treatment remains the only applicable option for improvement of their mechanical properties. In the present study, the decomposition of as-fabricated martensite was investigated to provide a general understanding on the kinetics of its phase transformation. The decomposition of asfabricated martensite was found to be slower than that of water-quenched martensite. It indicates that specific heat treatment strategy is needed to be explored for as-fabricated Ti-6Al-4V. Three strategies of heat treatment were proposed based on different phase transformation mechanisms and classified as subtransus treatment, supersolvus treatment and mixed treatment. These specific heat treatments were conducted on selective laser melted samples to investigate the evolutions of microstructure and mechanical properties. The subtransus treatment leaded to a basket-weave structure without changing the morphology of columnar prior β grains. The supersolvus treatment resulted in a lamellar structure and equiaxed β grains. The mixed treatment yielded a microstructure that combines both features of the subtransus treatment and supersolvus treatment. The subtransus treatment is found to be the best choice among these three strategies for as-fabricated Ti-6Al-4V to be used as biomedical implants.

  5. The Effect of Heat Treatment on Residual Stress and Machining Distortions in Advanced Nickel Base Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an extension of NASA's AST and IDPAT Programs which sought to predict the effect of stabilization heat treatments on residual stress and subsequent machining distortions in the advanced disk alloy, ME-209. Simple "pancake" forgings of ME-209 were produced and given four heat treats: 2075F(SUBSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/NO AGE; 2075F/OIL QUENCH/1400F@8HR;2075F/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/l400F@8HR; and 2160F(SUPERSOLVUS)/OIL QUENCH/1550F@3HR/ 1400F@8HR. The forgings were then measured to obtain surface profiles in the heat treated condition. A simple machining plan consisting of face cuts from the top surface followed by measurements of the surface profile opposite the cut were made. This data provided warpage maps which were compared with analytical results. The analysis followed the IDPAT methodology and utilized a 2-D axisymmetric, viscoplastic FEA code. The analytical results accurately tracked the experimental data for each of the four heat treatments. The 1550F stabilization heat treatment was found to significantly reduce residual stresses and subsequent machining distortions for fine grain (subsolvus) ME209, while coarse grain (supersolvus) ME209 would require additional time or higher stabilization temperatures to attain the same degree of stress relief.

  6. Effects of heat treatment on shape-setting and non-linearmechanical properties of Nitinol stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Yinong; Qi, Min; Yang, Dazhi

    2007-07-01

    NiTi shape memory alloy is a temperature sensitive material with non-linear mechanical properties and good biocompatibility, which can be used for medical devices such as stent, catheter guide wire and orthodontic wire. The majority of nitinol stents are of the self-expanding type basing on the superelasticity. Nitinol stents are shape set into the open condition and compressed and inserted into the delivery catheter. Additional the shape-setting treatment can be used as a tool to accurately tune the transformation temperatures and mechanical properties. In this study, different heat treatments have been performed on the Ti-50.7at%Ni alloy wires. And results of shape-setting, austenite transformation finish temperature and non-linear mechanical property of NiTi shape memory alloy at body temperature have been investigated. The experimental results show that the proper shape-setting temperature should be chosen between 450-550 °C. And the shape-setting results were stabilization when the NiTi wires were constrain-treated at 500 and 550°C and ageing time longer than 10 minutes. The austenite finish temperatures increased with ageing time and increased first and then decreased with ageing temperature. The peak values were obtained at 400°C. When the heat treatments was performed at the same temperature, both the upper plateau stresses and lower plateau stresses decreased with the ageing time. Most of treated nitinol wires owned good recovery ability at body temperature and the permanent sets were less than 0.05% when short time ageing treatment was performed at 500°C.

  7. Effect of ultrahigh-temperature continuous ohmic heating treatment on fresh orange juice.

    PubMed

    Leizerson, Shirly; Shimoni, Eyal

    2005-05-01

    The scope of this study is the effect of ohmic heating thermal treatment on liquid fruit juice made of oranges. Effects of ohmic heating on the quality of orange juice were examined and compared to those of heat pasteurization at 90 degrees C for 50 s. Orange juice was treated at temperatures of 90, 120, and 150 degrees C for 1.13, 0.85, and 0.68 s in an ohmic heating system. Microbial counts showed complete inactivation of bacteria, yeast, and mold during ohmic and conventional treatments. The ohmic heating treatment reduced pectin esterase activity by 98%. The reduction in vitamin C was 15%. Ohmic-heated orange juice maintained higher amounts of the five representative flavor compounds than did heat-pasteurized juice. Sensory evaluation tests showed no difference between fresh and ohmic-heated orange juice. Thus, high-temperature ohmic-heating treatment can be effectively used to pasteurize fresh orange juice with minimal sensory deterioration. PMID:15853396

  8. The Facial Aesthetic index: An additional tool for assessing treatment need

    PubMed Central

    Sundareswaran, Shobha; Ramakrishnan, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Facial Aesthetics, a major consideration in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, may not be judged correctly and completely by simply analyzing dental occlusion or osseous structures. Despite this importance, there is no index to guarantee availability of treatment or prioritize patients based on their soft tissue treatment needs. Individuals having well-aligned teeth but unaesthetic convex profiles do not get included for treatment as per current malocclusion indices. The aim of this investigation is to develop an aesthetic index based on facial profiles which could be used as an additional tool with malocclusion indices. Materials and Methods: A chart showing typical facial profile changes due to underlying malocclusions was generated by soft tissue manipulations of standardized profile photographs of a well-balanced male and female face. A panel of 62 orthodontists judged the profile photographs of 100 patients with different soft tissue patterns for assessing profile variations and treatment need. The index was later tested in a cross-section of school population. Statistical analysis was done using “irr” package of R environment version 2.15.1. Results: The index exhibited very good reliability in determining profile variations (Fleiss kappa 0.866, P < 0.001), excellent reproducibility (kappa 0.9078), high sensitivity, and specificity (95.7%). Testing in population yielded excellent agreement among orthodontists (kappa 0.9286). Conclusions: A new Facial Aesthetic index, based on patient's soft tissue profile requirements is proposed, which can complement existing indices to ensure treatment to those in need. PMID:27127752

  9. Thermal treatment of low permeability soils using electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Udell, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The acceleration of recovery rates of second phase liquid contaminants from the subsurface during gas or water pumping operations is realized by increasing the soil and ground water temperature. Electrical heating with AC current is one method of increasing the soil and groundwater temperature and has particular applicability to low permeability soils. Several mechanisms have been identified that account for the enhanced removal of the contaminants during electrical heating. These are vaporization of liquid contaminants with low boiling points, temperature-enhanced evaporation rates of semi-volatile components, and removal of residual contaminants by the boiling of residual water. Field scale studies of electrical heating and fluid extraction show the effectiveness of this technique and its applicability to contaminants found both above and below the water table and within low permeability soils. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Heat-treatment effects in neutron transmutation doped epitaxial silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from a gaseous silicon compound onto a heated silicon substrate may be used to deposit an epitaxial SI layer and to obtain an electrical p-n junction. The dopant concentration in the epi-Si layer is a function of the gaseous dopant ion content, flow rate, temperature gradient, and any migration of impurities (autodoping) from the heated substrate. This technical note describes some results of carrier concentration, mobility, and resistivity measurements on small (0.5 cm/sup 2/) epi-Si samples using the van der Pauw (vdP) technique.

  11. Additive protection by LDR and FGF21 treatment against diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes model

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Minglong; Yu, Lechu; Zhang, Fangfang; Lu, Xuemian; Li, Xiaokun; Cheng, Peng; Lin, Xiufei; He, Luqing; Jin, Shunzi; Tan, Yi; Yang, Hong; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    The onset of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is associated with both systemic and renal changes. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21 prevents diabetic complications mainly by improving systemic metabolism. In addition, low-dose radiation (LDR) protects mice from DN directly by preventing renal oxidative stress and inflammation. In the present study, we tried to define whether the combination of FGF21 and LDR could further prevent DN by blocking its systemic and renal pathogeneses. To this end, type 2 diabetes was induced by feeding a high-fat diet for 12 wk followed by a single dose injection of streptozotocin. Diabetic mice were exposed to 50 mGy LDR every other day for 4 wk with and without 1.5 mg/kg FGF21 daily for 8 wk. The changes in systemic parameters, including blood glucose levels, lipid profiles, and insulin resistance, as well as renal pathology, were examined. Diabetic mice exhibited renal dysfunction and pathological abnormalities, all of which were prevented significantly by LDR and/or FGF21; the best effects were observed in the group that received the combination treatment. Our studies revealed that the additive renal protection conferred by the combined treatment against diabetes-induced renal fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative damage was associated with the systemic improvement of hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. These results suggest that the combination treatment with LDR and FGF21 prevented DN more efficiently than did either treatment alone. The mechanism behind these protective effects could be attributed to the suppression of both systemic and renal pathways. PMID:25968574

  12. Influence of dimethyl dicarbonate on the resistance of Escherichia coli to a combined UV-Heat treatment in apple juice

    PubMed Central

    Gouma, Maria; Gayán, Elisa; Raso, Javier; Condón, Santiago; Álvarez, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Commercial apple juice inoculated with Escherichia coli was treated with UV-C, heat (55°C) and dimethyl dicarbonate – DMDC (25, 50, and 75 mg/L)-, applied separately and in combination, in order to investigate the possibility of synergistic lethal effects. The inactivation levels resulting from each treatment applied individually for a maximum treatment time of 3.58 min were limited, reaching 1.2, 2.9, and 0.06 log10 reductions for UV, heat, and DMDC (75 mg/L), respectively. However, all the investigated combinations resulted in a synergistic lethal effect, reducing the total treatment time and UV dose, with the synergistic lethal effect being higher when larger concentrations of DMDC were added to the apple juice. The addition of 75 mg/L of DMDC prior to the combined UV-C light treatment at 55°C resulted in 5 log10 reductions after only 1.8 min, reducing the treatment time and UV dose of the combined UV-Heat treatment by 44%. PMID:26042117

  13. Influence of dimethyl dicarbonate on the resistance of Escherichia coli to a combined UV-Heat treatment in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Gouma, Maria; Gayán, Elisa; Raso, Javier; Condón, Santiago; Álvarez, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Commercial apple juice inoculated with Escherichia coli was treated with UV-C, heat (55°C) and dimethyl dicarbonate - DMDC (25, 50, and 75 mg/L)-, applied separately and in combination, in order to investigate the possibility of synergistic lethal effects. The inactivation levels resulting from each treatment applied individually for a maximum treatment time of 3.58 min were limited, reaching 1.2, 2.9, and 0.06 log10 reductions for UV, heat, and DMDC (75 mg/L), respectively. However, all the investigated combinations resulted in a synergistic lethal effect, reducing the total treatment time and UV dose, with the synergistic lethal effect being higher when larger concentrations of DMDC were added to the apple juice. The addition of 75 mg/L of DMDC prior to the combined UV-C light treatment at 55°C resulted in 5 log10 reductions after only 1.8 min, reducing the treatment time and UV dose of the combined UV-Heat treatment by 44%. PMID:26042117

  14. Review of thermo-physical properties, wetting and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids and their applicability in industrial quench heat treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of quenching process during industrial heat treatment mainly depends on the heat transfer characteristics of the quenching medium. In the case of quenching, the scope for redesigning the system or operational parameters for enhancing the heat transfer is very much limited and the emphasis should be on designing quench media with enhanced heat transfer characteristics. Recent studies on nanofluids have shown that these fluids offer improved wetting and heat transfer characteristics. Further water-based nanofluids are environment friendly as compared to mineral oil quench media. These potential advantages have led to the development of nanofluid-based quench media for heat treatment practices. In this article, thermo-physical properties, wetting and boiling heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids are reviewed and discussed. The unique thermal and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids would be extremely useful for exploiting them as quench media for industrial heat treatment. PMID:21711877

  15. Application of high performance industrial furnace to heat treatment technology and its possibilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, Takashi; Tsuzuki, Hitoshi

    1999-07-01

    Gas firing heat treatment furnaces in which the protective gas must be sent for the purpose of non-decarburization and non-oxidation or carburizing are heated up indirectly by means of radiant tube burners, and regenerative burners are applied to the radiant tube combustion for High Performance Heat Treatment Furnace. As the result of regenerative burner application, the surface temperature distribution at the radiant tube is unified low in comparison with conventional radiant tube burners. This means that the radiant tube burner can be applied to high temperature heat treatment furnaces (e.g., brazing furnace, sintering furnace) in place of the electric heating. As regards the direct firing heat treatment furnace, the agitating effect of the regenerative burner combustion by the high-cycle switched operation and the high nozzle speed of the combustion air, can make the furnace compact and simple even at the lower furnace temperature. And the development of the gas-rich firing for the regenerative burner can extend the application range of High Performance Heat Treatment Furnace to the field of the non-oxidation treatment. (e.g., copper bright annealing etc.)

  16. Influence of Heat Treatment for Coating of Nickel Plating on Hollow Glass Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sijie; Zhang, Wei

    Ni-plated hollow glass beads (GBs) were firstly prepared by pd-activation and electroless plating, then Ni-plated GBs were heat treated at 450°C for 1 h, Ni-plated GBs/PVC composite was fabricated by using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) adhesive. The microstructure and component of Ni-plated GBs surface were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometer; heat insulation and reflectivity were detected by heat insulation instrument (home-made) and vector network analyzer. The results show coatings prepared by electroless plating were uniform, the nickel element in the coating was higher than 95.71% (mass fraction); with heat treatment, the surface roughness of coating was greater, and the reflectivity descended apparently, the D-value was 1 dB at the frequency of 15 GHz, but the influence of heat treatment for heat insulation of Ni-plated GBs was not great.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on the crystal structure, martensitic transformation and magnetic properties of Mn53Ni25Ga22 ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, G. F.; Gao, Z. Y.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the effect of heat treatment on crystal structure, martensitic transformation, thermodynamic behavior and magnetic properties of polycrystalline Mn53Ni25Ga22 ferromagnetic shape memory alloy was systematically investigated. The results show that the heat treatment has obvious effect on martensitic transformation temperatures, crystal structure and hysteresis loops. Heat treatment greatly effects on transformation temperatures due to modified composition of the matrix. Martensitic transformation temperature, saturation magnetization decreased with the increase heat treatment temperature, reaching their minimum values at the heat treatment temperature of 1173 K for 12 h. Curie temperature of maximum values obtained at solution-treated of 1173 K for 12 h. In other word, increasing heat treatment temperature and time has an effect on Curie temperature. In addition, the annealed alloy Mn53Ni25Ga22 may completely dissolve in vacuum tubes at 1173 K for 12 h. It is found that the studied alloys have some (Mn,Ni)4 Ga-type compound precipitates, which can be seen dispersing both in grain interiors and on grain boundaries at other heat treatment process. Lastly, Rietveld analysis shows the good agreement between experiment and calculated data of XRD patterns.

  18. Effects of Heat and Momentum Addition Inside and Outside the Compound Sonic Point of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Webb, G. M.; McKenzie, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the effect of heat and momentum addition to the solar wind for a model including the effects of Alfven waves and plasma pressure (proton plus electron pressure). The mass flux per unit area in 1D flow maximizes when the flow speed equals the compound sound speed, including the effects of the Alfven wave pressure. We discuss the analogue of the Laval nozzle for the solar wind flow, and the dependence of the effective nozzle area as a function of radial distance, and the relationship of the nozzle area to the momentum equation and the Mach number of the flow. An analysis is carried out of the effects of heat and momentum addition to the wind, using a thin slice approximation, which leads to Rankine Hugoniot relations for weak deflagrations and detonations (i.e. the combustion Hugoniot). The linearized Hugoniot is used to analyze the effects of small momentum and energy addition to the wind in the thin slice approximation. We obtain the fully nonlinear Rankine Hugoniot equation solutions. The analysis also holds in the presence of Alfven waves, in which the wave energy exchange equation yields the wave action flux conservation law when their contribution to the compound sound speed is taken into account. The effective polytropic index γgamma and flow speed relative to the compound flow speed ahead of the slice play crucial roles in determining whether local acceleration or deceleration results. Some results are at first sight unexpected since γgamma for Alfven waves ranges from -1/2 (in sub-Alfvenic flow) to 3/2 in super-Alfvenic flow.

  19. Fabrication and heat treatment of high strength Al-Cu-Mg alloy processed using selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hu; Zhu, Haihong; Nie, Xiaojia; Qi, Ting; Hu, Zhiheng; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    The proposed paper illustrates the fabrication and heat treatment of high strength Al-Cu-Mg alloy produced by selective laser melting (SLM) process. Al-Cu-Mg alloy is one of the heat treatable aluminum alloys regarded as difficult to fusion weld. SLM is an additive manufacturing technique through which components are built by selectively melting powder layers with a focused laser beam. The process is characterized by short laser-powder interaction times and localized high heat input, which leads to steep thermal gradients, rapid solidification and fast cooling. In this research, 3D Al-Cu-Mg parts with relative high density of 99.8% are produced by SLM from gas atomized powders. Room temperature tensile tests reveal a remarkable mechanical behavior: the samples show yield and tensile strengths of about 276 MPa and 402 MPa, respectively, along with fracture strain of 6%. The effect of solution treatment on microstructure and related tensile properties is examined and the results demonstrate that the mechanical behavior of the SLMed Al-Cu-Mg samples can be greatly enhanced through proper heat treatment. After T4 solution treatment at 540°C, under the effect of precipitation strengthening, the tensile strength and the yield strength increase to 532 MPa and 338 MPa, respectively, and the elongation increases to 13%.

  20. Effect of heat treatment on the detection of intact bovine beta-lactoglobulins by LC mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Monaci, Linda; van Hengel, Arjon J

    2007-04-18

    Lactoglobulin (LG) is the most abundant protein of the whey fraction of cow's milk, and due to its high nutritional value as well as its technological properties it is widely used as an ingredient in food preparation. As a consequence of heat treatment, milk proteins may undergo structural changes such as protein unfolding and aggregation, in addition to chemical modifications. This, in turn can change the allergenic potential of LG. In this study, the potential of mass spectrometry has been exploited to investigate LG protein modification and stability as a consequence of thermal treatments applied to both standard solutions and milk samples. An investigation into the charge-state distribution in ESI-MS source revealed that, in standard solutions, a higher degree of protonation accompanies increases in the severity of the heat treatment applied. In contrast, the analysis of milk samples revealed a higher stability of the charge-state distribution of LG. However, we observed modification of LG spectra after heating of standard solutions as well as milk samples caused by lactosylation. The degree of LG lactosylation has been investigated in raw milk samples by LC-MS and provides a potential marker to trace heat treatments. PMID:17381107

  1. Heat treatment effect on microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of Cr26 white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaoping; Shen, Yehui; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Dequan

    2015-01-01

    High chromium cast iron(HCCI) is taken as material of coal water slurry pump impeller, but it is susceptible to produce serious abrasive wear and erosion wear because of souring of hard coal particles. The research on optimization of heat treatments to improve abrasive wear properties of HCCI is insufficient, so effect of heat treatments on the microstructure, hardness, toughness, and wear resistance of Cr26 HCCI is investigated to determine the optimal heat treatment process for HCCI. A series of heat treatments are employed. The microstructures of HCCI specimens are examined by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and impact fracture toughness of as-cast and heat treated specimens are measured. The wear tests are assessed by a Type M200 ring-on block wear tester. The results show the following: With increase of the quenching temperature from 950 °C to 1050 °C, the hardness of Cr26 HCCI increased to a certain value, kept for a time and then decreased. The optimal heat treatment process is 2 h quenching treatment at 1000 °C, followed by a subsequent 2 h tempering at 400 °C. The hardness of HCCI is related to the precipitation and redissolution of secondary carbides in the process of heat treatment. The subsequent tempering treatment would result in a slight decrease of hardness but increase of toughness. The wear resistance is much related to the "supporting" effect of the matrix and the "protective" effect of the hard carbide embedded in the matrix, and the wear resistance is further dependent on the hardness and the toughness of the matrix. This research can provide an important insight on developing an optimized heat treatment method to improve the wear resistance of HCCI.

  2. [The influence of oil heat treatment on wood decay resistance by Fourier infrared spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Ma, Shu-Ling; Feng, Li-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Wood preservative treatment can improve defects of plantation wood such as easy to corrupt and moth eaten. Among them heat-treatment is not only environmental and no pollution, also can improve the corrosion resistance and dimension stability of wood. In this test Poplar and Mongolian Seoteh Pine was treated by soybean oil as heat-conducting medium, and the heat treatment wood was studied for indoor decay resistance; wood chemical components before and after treatment, the effect of heat treatment on wood decay resistance performance and main mechanism of action were analysed by Fourier infrared spectrometric. Results showed that the mass loss rate of poplar fell from 19.37% to 5% and Mongolian Seoteh Pine's fell from 8.23% to 3.15%, so oil heat treatment can effectively improve the decay resistance. Infrared spectrum analysis shows that the heat treatment made wood's hydrophilic groups such as hydroxyl groups in largely reduced, absorbing capacity decreased and the moisture of wood rotting fungi necessary was reduced; during the heat treatment wood chemical components such as cellulose, hemicellu lose were degraded, and the nutrient source of wood rotting fungi growth necessary was reduced. Wood decay fungi can grow in the wood to discredit wood is because of that wood can provide better living conditions for wood decay fungi, such as nutrients, water, oxygen, and so on. The cellulose and hemicellulose in wood is the main nutrition source of wood decay fungi. So the oil heat-treatment can reduce the cellulose, hemicellulose nutrition source of wood decay fungi so as to improve the decay resistance of wood. PMID:25208386

  3. 46 CFR 56.80-15 - Heat treatment of bends and formed components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used without a postheat treatment. (e) For other materials the heat... installation. (g) Austenitic stainless-steel pipe that has been heated for bending or other forming may be used... components. (a) Carbon-steel piping that has been heated to at least 1,650 °F (898 °C) for bending or...

  4. 46 CFR 56.80-15 - Heat treatment of bends and formed components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used without a postheat treatment. (e) For other materials the heat... installation. (g) Austenitic stainless-steel pipe that has been heated for bending or other forming may be used... components. (a) Carbon-steel piping that has been heated to at least 1,650 °F (898 °C) for bending or...

  5. 46 CFR 56.80-15 - Heat treatment of bends and formed components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used without a postheat treatment. (e) For other materials the heat... installation. (g) Austenitic stainless-steel pipe that has been heated for bending or other forming may be used... components. (a) Carbon-steel piping that has been heated to at least 1,650 °F (898 °C) for bending or...

  6. Effects of thermal treatments on the characterisation and utilisation of red mud with sawdust additive.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanju; Naidu, Ravi; Ming, Hui; Dharmarajan, Rajarathnam; Du, Jianhua

    2016-06-01

    Extremely large amounts of red mud (bauxite residue) are generated globally every year from alumina refining industries, which are being disposed of on engineered landfills. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of thermal treatments on red mud for development of utilisation strategies. Thermal treatments of red mud samples and their characterisations were investigated under inert (N2) and oxidative (air) conditions with and without sawdust addition at 200-600°C. After calcination, the resulting samples were analysed using thermogravimetric-infrared spectroscopy (TG-IR) for functional group transformations, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for thermal loss profiles and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineral transformations. The characterisation results showed that in N2 environment, boehmite in red mud was transferred to transition alumina at around 400°C while losing water from structural components. The addition of sawdust for incubation and calcination of red mud in air increased the surface area, whereas that in nitrogen atmosphere lead to reduction of hematite to magnetite at around 500°C. The incorporated carbon materials played a major role in increasing the surface area especially for pore size less than 2.5 nm. This treated red mud with altered mineral composition and improved properties for binding contaminants can be used for environmental remediation and in the process of metal recovery such as iron. PMID:26951343

  7. Radio Frequency Heat Treatments to Disinfest Dried Pulses of Cowpea Weevil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore the potential of radio frequency (RF) heat treatments as an alternative to chemical fumigants for disinfestation of dried pulses, the relative heat tolerance and dielectric properties of different stages of the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) was determined. Among the immature st...

  8. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Drying, blending, packaging, and heat..., blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. (a) General. Processing rooms shall be... seams and of materials that can be kept clean and which will have no deleterious effect on the...

  9. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Drying, blending, packaging, and heat..., blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. (a) General. Processing rooms shall be... seams and of materials that can be kept clean and which will have no deleterious effect on the...

  10. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Drying, blending, packaging, and heat..., blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. (a) General. Processing rooms shall be... seams and of materials that can be kept clean and which will have no deleterious effect on the...

  11. Dry heat and hot water treatments for disinfesting cottonseed of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential of low- and high-temperature dry heat, and hot water treatments, for disinfesting cottonseed of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum was investigated. Naturally infected seeds from Louisiana were air-heated in incubators set at temperatures of 30, 35, and 40 degrees C for up to 24 we...

  12. Development of the heat treatment system for the 40 T hybrid magnet superconducting outsert.

    PubMed

    Chen, W G; Chen, Z M; Chen, Z Y; Huang, P C; He, P; Zhu, J W

    2011-10-01

    The heat treatment of Nb(3)Sn coil with the glass fabric insulation is one of the key and critical processes for the outsert solenoids of the 40 T hybrid magnet, which could be wound with cable-in-conduit conductors using the insulation-wind-and-react technique. The manufacturing of the large vertical type vacuum/Ar atmosphere-protection heat treatment system has been completed and recently installed in the High Magnetic Filed Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The heat treatment system composed mainly the furnace, the purging gas supply system, the control system, the gas impurities monitoring system, and so on. At present, the regulation and testing of the heat treatment system has been successfully finished, and all of technical parameters meet or exceed specifications. PMID:22047328

  13. Reproducibility of High-Q SRF Cavities by High Temperature Heat Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2014-07-01

    Recent work on high-temperature (> 600 °C) heat treatment of ingot Nb cavities in a customized vacuum furnace for several hours showed the possibility of achieving Q0-values of up to ~5×1010 at 2.0 K, 1.5 GHz and accelerating gradients of ~20 MV/m. This contribution presents results on further studies of the heat treatment process to produce cavities with high Q0 values for continuous-wave accelerator application. Single-cell cavities of different Nb purity have been processed through few cycles of heat-treatments and chemical etching. Measurements of Q0 as a function of temperature at low RF field and of Q0 as a function of the RF field at or below 2.0 K have been made after each treatment. Measurements by TOF-SIMS of the impurities depth profiles were made on samples heat treated with the cavities.

  14. Effects of Winding Strain and Heat Treatment on Properties of 316 LN and Haynes 242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, K.; Walsh, R. P.; Toplosky, V. J.; Goddard, R. E.; Lu, J.; Dixon, I. R.

    2008-03-01

    The outer coils of the hybrid magnets at the NHMFL are superconducting magnet and use Cable-in-Conduit-Conductor (CICC) technology. This technology requires us to wind the coils before the Nb3Sn heat treatment is undertaken. The winding introduces both tensile and compressive stresses to the conduit alloys. The subsequent heat treatment has to be done when the conduit alloys are under the pre-stress. We have simulated the conduit heat treatments with the alloys under various stress levels, and undertaken tensile tests at 4 K and microstructure examinations. The results indicate that the pre-stress before the heat treatment influences the microstructure and therefore tensile test properties of the conduit alloys at 4 K. The tensile test property changes are related to the grain boundary precipitation variation introduced by pre-stress.

  15. Measurements of Nb3Sn conductor dimension changes during heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bocian, D.; Ambrosio, G.; Whitson, G.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    During the heat treatment of Nb{sub 3}Sn coils the conductor material properties change significantly. These effects together with the changes of the conductor dimensions during heat treatment may introduce large strain in the coils for accelerator magnets. The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) has initiated a study aiming at understanding the thermal expansion and contraction of Nb3Sn strands, cables and coils during heat treatment. Several measurements on strands and cables were performed in order to have sufficient inputs for finite element simulation of the dimensional changes during heat treatment. In this paper the results of measurements of OST-RRP Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor used in the LARP magnet program are discussed.

  16. Heat Treatment Devices and Method of Operation Thereof to Produce Dual Microstructure Superalloys Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John (Inventor); Gabb, Timothy P. (Inventor); Kantzos, Peter T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A heat treatment assembly and heat treatment methods are disclosed for producing different microstructures in the bore and rim portions of nickel-based superalloy disks, particu- larly suited for gas turbine applications. The heat treatment assembly is capable of being removed from the furnace and disassembled to allow rapid fan or oil quenching of the disk. For solutioning heat treatments of the disk, temperatures higher than that of this solvus temperature of the disk are used to produce coarse grains in the rim of each disk so as to give maximum creep and dwell crack resistance at the rim service temperature. At the same time, solution temperature lower than the solvus temperature of the disk are provided to produce fine grain in the bore of the disk so as to give maximum strength and low cycle fatigue resistance.

  17. Nitrification in lake sediment with addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Liu, Juanfeng; Wang, Zhixin; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), non-hazardous by-products generated during potable water production, can effectively reduce the lake internal phosphorus (P) loading and improve water quality in lakes. It stands to reason that special attention regarding the beneficial reuse of WTRs should be given not only to the effectiveness of P pollution control, but also to the effects on the migration and transformation of other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen (N)). In this work, based on laboratory enrichment tests, the effects of WTRs addition on nitrification in lake sediment were investigated using batch tests, fluorescence in situ hybridization, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis techniques. The results indicated that WTRs addition had minor effects on the morphologies of AOB and NOB; however, the addition slightly enhanced the sediment nitrification potential from 12.8 to 13.2 μg-N g(-1)-dry sample h(-1) and also increased the ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) abundances, particularly the AOB abundances (P < 0.05), which increased from 1.11 × 10(8) to 1.31 × 10(8) copies g(-1)-dry sample. Moreover, WTRs addition was beneficial to the enrichment of Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira multiformis and promoted the emergence of a new Nitrospira cluster, causing the increase in AOB and NOB diversities. Further analysis showed that the variations of nitrification in lake sediment after WTRs addition were primarily due to the decrease of bioavailable P, the introduction of new nitrifiers and the increase of favorable carriers for microorganism attachment in sediments. Overall, these results suggested that WTRs reuse for the control of lake internal P loading would also lead to conditions that are beneficial to nitrification. PMID:24681379

  18. Use of heat treatment to modify the structure of a hard-faced layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, M. D.; Kraev, G. V.; Poletika, I. M.

    1992-02-01

    The methods of metal physics and x-ray diffraction analysis are used to study the effect of heat treatments (quenching, tempering, high-temperature tempering) on the structure and properties (hardness, wear resistance) of a layer composed of an electroslag hard-facing alloyed with boron carbide and chromium. It is shown that the most effective heat treatment for increasing the hardness and wear resistance of the layer is one which includes high-temperature tempering, quenching, and low-temperature tempering.

  19. Heat treatment adaptations in Clostridium perfringens vegetative cells.

    PubMed

    Novak, J S; Tunick, M H; Juneja, V K

    2001-10-01

    Vegetative cells of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxigenic strains NCTC 8679, NCTC 8238. and H6 were grown at 37 degrees C followed by a 60-min exposure to 28 degrees C or 46 degrees C. D10-values, as a measure of thermal resistance at 60 degrees C, were significantly lower for 28 degrees C exposures as compared with cultures given 37 and 46 degrees C exposures. Following refrigeration at 4 degrees C for 24 h, D10-values for the 37 and 46 degrees C samples could not be differentiated from 28 degrees C samples. Western immunoblot analyses of lysates from heat-adapted cells also detected the increased expression of proteins reacting with antiserum directed against the molecular chaperonins from Escherichia coli; GroEL, DnaJ, and the small acid soluble protein from Bacillus subtilis, SspC. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) identified thermal transitions corresponding to ribosomal protein denaturations at 72.1 +/- 0.5 degrees C. Any cellular heat adaptations in the DSC profiles were lost following refrigeration for several days to simulate minimally processed food storage conditions. Further analyses of high-speed pellets from crude cell extract fractions using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis detected the differential gene expression of at least four major proteins in heat-adapted vegetative cells of C. perfringens. N-terminal amino acid analyses identified two of the proteins as glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and rubrerythrin. Both appear to have roles in this anaerobe under stressful conditions. PMID:11601701

  20. Nanoparticles for cancer treatment: role of heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Avedisian, C Thomas; Cavicchi, Richard E; McEuen, Paul L; Zhou, Xinjian

    2009-04-01

    An overview is presented of an approach for treating cancer that uses nanoparticles to deliver heat to diseased areas after absorbing energy from a laser of the appropriate wavelength. The implications are discussed of the relationship of parameters necessary to raise the temperature to therapeutically beneficial levels. Tight focusing is required for a continuous-wave laser to sufficiently heat individual nanoparticles because of heat loss to the surrounding fluid during the period of exposure. The natural thermal confinement of pulse lasers minimizes this effect because of the finite thermal diffusion time, which restricts the absorbed energy to a region around the particle, that offers the potential for achieving high temperatures that can promote phase change on the surface of a nanoparticle or even melting of the particle. A discussion of a way to potentially measure temperature on the scale of an individual nanoparticle is included based on using a single-walled nanotube (SWNT) of carbon as a thermistor. The challenges of this undertaking are that SWNTs do not always follow Ohm's law, they may exhibit metallic or semiconductor behavior with an often unpredictable result in manufacturing, and no two SWNTs behave identically, which necessitates calibration for each SWNT. Some results are presented that show the electrical characteristics of SWNTs and their potential for exploitation in this application. PMID:19426306

  1. Effect of Ag nanoparticle addition and ultrasonic treatment on a stable TiO2 nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subhrakanti; Mukherjee, Jonaki; Manna, Manindra; Ghosh, Pampa; Das, Sumitesh; Denys, Mark B

    2012-09-01

    Nanoparticles, when homogeneously dispersed in a base fluid, e.g. water, ethylene glycol etc. are commonly known as nanofluids. Nanofluids have gained attention in the scientific community for their enhanced thermal properties. One of the major problems in using nanofluids as a heat transfer medium for commercial applications is that, in most of the closed circuit industrial cooling processes, the cooling fluid has to be replaced after several cycles of cooling operation because of an increased presence of contaminants. If nanofluids were used as a coolant, it would be very hard to separate the nanoparticles from the waste fluid. The present work is aimed at the separation and recycling of nanoparticles from fluid waste by means of quick settling of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using silver nanoparticles along with ultrasonic treatment. It is observed that with increasing silver concentration and time of ultrasonication, the stability of the dispersion decreases. There is a value for both the silver concentration and ultrasonication time above which the settling time decreases drastically. PMID:22421063

  2. Addition of meloxicam to the treatment of clinical mastitis improves subsequent reproductive performance.

    PubMed

    McDougall, S; Abbeloos, E; Piepers, S; Rao, A S; Astiz, S; van Werven, T; Statham, J; Pérez-Villalobos, N

    2016-03-01

    A blinded, negative controlled, randomized intervention study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that addition of meloxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, to antimicrobial treatment of mild to moderate clinical mastitis would improve fertility and reduce the risk of removal from the herd. Cows (n=509) from 61 herds in 8 regions (sites) in 6 European countries were enrolled. Following herd-owner diagnosis of mild to moderate clinical mastitis within the first 120 d of lactation in a single gland, the rectal temperature, milk appearance, and California Mastitis Test score were assessed. Cows were randomly assigned within each site to be treated either with meloxicam or a placebo (control). All cows were additionally treated with 1 to 4 intramammary infusions of cephalexin and kanamycin at 24-h intervals. Prior to treatment and at 14 and 21 d posttreatment, milk samples were collected for bacteriology and somatic cell count. Cows were bred by artificial insemination and pregnancy status was subsequently defined. General estimating equations were used to determine the effect of treatment (meloxicam versus control) on bacteriological cure, somatic cell count, the probability of being inseminated by 21 d after the voluntary waiting period, the probability of conception to first artificial insemination, the number of artificial insemination/conception, the probability of pregnancy by 120 or 200 d postcalving, and the risk of removal by 300 d after treatment. Cox's proportional hazards models were used to test the effect of treatment on the calving to first insemination and calving to conception intervals. Groups did not differ in terms of age, clot score, California Mastitis Test score, rectal temperature, number of antimicrobial treatments given or bacteria present at the time of enrollment, but cows treated with meloxicam had greater days in milk at enrollment. Cows treated with meloxicam had a higher bacteriological cure proportion than those treated with

  3. First principles based group additive values for the gas phase standard entropy and heat capacity of hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon radicals.

    PubMed

    Sabbe, Maarten K; De Vleeschouwer, Freija; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Waroquier, Michel; Marin, Guy B

    2008-11-27

    In this work a complete and consistent set of 95 Benson group additive values (GAVs) for standard entropies S(o) and heat capacities C(p)(o) of hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon radicals is presented. These GAVs include 46 groups, among which 25 radical groups, which, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported before. The GAVs have been determined from a set of B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) ideal gas statistical thermodynamics values for 265 species, consistently with previously reported GAVs for standard enthalpies of formation. One-dimensional hindered rotor corrections for all internal rotations are included. The computational methodology has been compared to experimental entropies (298 K) for 39 species, with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) between experiment and calculation of 1.2 J mol(-1) K(-1), and to 46 experimental heat capacities (298 K) with a resulting MAD = 1.8 J mol(-1) K(-1). The constructed database allowed evaluation of corrections on S(o) and C(p)(o) for non-nearest-neighbor effects, which have not been determined previously. The group additive model predicts the S(o) and C(p)(o) within approximately 5 J mol(-1) K(-1) of the ab initio values for 11 of the 14 molecules of the test set, corresponding to an acceptable maximal deviation of a factor of 1.6 on the equilibrium coefficient. The obtained GAVs can be applied for the prediction of S(o) and C(p)(o) for a wide range of hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon radicals. The constructed database also allowed determination of a large set of hydrogen bond increments, which can be useful for the prediction of radical thermochemistry. PMID:18980365

  4. Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores using various combinations of ultraviolet treatment with addition of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqing; Zhou, Lingling; Zhang, Yongji; Tan, Chaoqun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at comparing the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores by various combinations of UV treatment and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) addition. The combinations included sequential (UV-H2O2, H2O2-UV) and simultaneous (UV/H2O2) processes. Results showed that B. subtilis spores achieved a certain inactivation effect through UV treatment. However, hardly any inactivation effect by H2O2 alone was observed. H2O2 had a significant synergetic effect when combined with UV treatment, while high irradiance and H2O2 concentration both favored the reaction. When treated with 0.60 mm H2O2 and 113.0 μW/cm(2) UV irradiance for 6 min, the simultaneous UV/H2O2 treatment showed significantly improved disinfection effect (4.13 log) compared to that of UV-H2O2 (3.03 log) and H2O2-UV (2.88 log). The relationship between the inactivation effect and the exposure time followed a typical pseudo-first-order kinetics model. The pseudo-first-order rate constants were 0.478, 0.447 and 0.634 min(-1), for the UV-H2O2, H2O2-UV and UV/H2O2 processes, respectively, further confirming the optimal disinfection effect of the UV/H2O2 process. The disinfection could be ascribed to the OH radicals, as verified by the level of para-chlorobenzoic acid (pCBA). PMID:24447294

  5. Effects of different heat treatments on lysozyme quantity and antimicrobial activity of jenny milk.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Labella, C; Elshafie, H S; Camele, I; Musto, M; Paolino, R; D'Adamo, C; Freschi, P

    2016-07-01

    Thermal treatments are used to improve milk microbial safety, shelf life, and biological activity of some of its components. However, thermal treatments can reduce the nutritional quality of milk, affecting the molecular structure of milk proteins, such as lysozyme, which is a very important milk component due to its antimicrobial effect against gram-positive bacteria. Jenny milk is characterized by high lysozyme content. For this reason, in the last few years, it has been used as an antimicrobial additive in dairy products as an alternative to hen egg white lysozyme, which can cause allergic reactions. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pasteurization and condensation on the concentration and antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk. Furthermore, lysozyme quantity and activity were tested in raw and pasteurized milk after condensation at 40 and 20% of the initial volume. Reversed-phase HPLC was performed under fluorescence detection to monitor lysozyme in milk samples. We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of the tested milk against Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus mojavensis, Clavibacter michiganensis, Clostridium tyrobutyricum, Xanthomonas campestris, and Escherichia coli. Condensation and pasteurization did not affect the concentration or antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk, except for B. mojaventis, which showed resistance to lysozyme in milk samples subjected to heat treatments. Moreover, lysozyme in jenny milk showed antimicrobial activity similar to synthetic antibiotics versus some gram-positive strains and also versus the gram-negative strain X. campestris. PMID:27157571

  6. Smoothing of surface of silica glass by heat treatment in wet atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Osawa, Kenta; Katayama, Keiichi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Masuno, Atsunobu; Zhang Yingjiu; Utsuno, Futoshi; Sugahara, Yoshiyuki; Koya, Kazuo; Fujinoki, Akira; Tawarayama, Hiromasa; Kawazoe, Hiroshi

    2011-05-15

    The effect of heat treatment on the surface morphology of fused silica glass substrates was investigated. It was found that the water vapor pressure during heat treatment had a strong influence on the flattening of the silica glass surface. The surface of the frosted glass changed into a transparent and lustrous surface after heat treatment with water vapor at 1200 deg. C for 48 h, whereas surface irregularities remained for heat treatment under a dry atmosphere. It was suggested that the difference in surface flattening was caused by changes in surface viscosity that depended on the concentration of OH groups on the surface. In order to quantitatively understand the effect of the heat treatment atmosphere, power spectral density (PSD) analysis and a novel peak and valley method were applied to the experimental results. From the PSD analysis, it was found that the Mullins' model could not explain the smoothing behavior by heat treatment. The peak and valley method, which could separate the surface morphology into the surface irregularities and the background undulation, revealed that the Mullins' model limitation was mainly for the surface and the background undulation could be understood within the model. These results indicate that there are different mechanisms between for the surface smoothing and for the relaxation of the background undulation.

  7. The effect of heat treatment on the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazni Ismail, Noor; Khatif, Nurul Aida Amir; Aliff Kamil Awang Kecik, Mohamad; Hanafiah Shaharudin, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    This paper covers the effect of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of medium carbon steel. The main objective of this project is to investigate the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel treated at different heat treatment processes. Three types of heat treatment were performed in this project which are annealing, quenching and tempering. During annealing process, the specimens were heated at 900°C and soaked for 1 hour in the furnace. The specimens were then quenched in a medium of water and open air, respectively. The treatment was followed by tempering processes which were done at 300°C, 450°C, and 600°C with a soaking time of 2 hours for each temperature. After the heat treatment process completed, Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test were performed. The results collected from the Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test on the samples after quenching and tempering were compared and analysed. The fractured surfaces of the samples were also been examined by using Scanning Electron Microscope. It was observed that different heat treatment processes gave different hardness value and impact property to the steel. The specimen with the highest hardness was found in samples quenched in water. Besides, the microstructure obtained after tempering provided a good combination of mechanical properties due to the process reduce brittleness by increasing ductility and toughness.

  8. Heat treatment mechanism and biodegradable characteristics of ZAX1330 Mg alloy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Da-Jun; Hung, Fei-Yi; Lui, Truan-Sheng; Yeh, Ming-Long

    2015-06-01

    Heat treatments are key processes in the development of biodegradable magnesium implants. The aim of this study is to investigate the factors of microstructures and metallurgical segregation on the functionality of biodegradable magnesium alloy. The solid solution heat treatment and strain induced melting activation heat treatment were employed to alter the microstructures of ZAX1330 alloy in this study. Heat treatments caused a significant change on grain size and distribution of secondary phases. The fine-grained microstructure enhanced the mechanical strength, corrosion resistance and achieved the lowest degradation rate in simulated body fluid solution. In coarse-grained microstructure systems, grain growth followed liquid phase formation. The corrosion rate increased due to a larger cathodic region. The status of micro-alloyed calcium (in solid solution or segregated) influenced the microstructural evolution mechanisms, mechanical strength, and degradation properties. A cytotoxicity test and a live/dead assay showed that ZAX1330 had good cytocompatibility, which varied with heat treatment, and no cell toxicity. The results suggest that heat treatment should be controlled precisely in order to improve the cytocompatibility of magnesium alloys for application in orthopedic implants. PMID:25842139

  9. Coarsening Kinetics and Morphological Evolution in a Two-Phase Titanium Alloy During Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwei; Zeng, Weidong; Jia, Zhiqiang; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Yawei

    2016-03-01

    The effects of alpha/beta heat treatment on microstructure evolution of Ti-17 alloy with a lamellar colony structure are established. Heat treatment experiments are conducted at 1103 or 1063 K for times ranging from 10 min to 8 h. The main features of microstructure evolution during heat treatment comprise static globularization and coarsening of primary alpha phase. Such behaviors can be accelerated by higher heat treatment temperature. Furthermore, globularization and coarsening behaviors show a faster rate at higher prestrain. In order to better understand the microstructure evolution of Ti-17 alloy during alpha/beta heat treatment, static globularization and coarsening behaviors are modeled in the theoretical frame of the Johnson-Mehl-Avarmi-Kolmogorov (JMAK) and Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) theories, respectively. The JMAK and LSW kinetics parameters are derived under different experimental conditions. Agreements between measurements and predictions are found, indicating that the JMAK and LSW theories can be used to predict and trace static globularization and coarsening processes of Ti-17 alloy during alpha/beta heat treatment.

  10. No Major Differences Found between the Effects of Microwave-Based and Conventional Heat Treatment Methods on Two Different Liquid Foods

    PubMed Central

    Géczi, Gábor; Horváth, Márk; Kaszab, Tímea; Alemany, Gonzalo Garnacho

    2013-01-01

    Extension of shelf life and preservation of products are both very important for the food industry. However, just as with other processes, speed and higher manufacturing performance are also beneficial. Although microwave heating is utilized in a number of industrial processes, there are many unanswered questions about its effects on foods. Here we analyze whether the effects of microwave heating with continuous flow are equivalent to those of traditional heat transfer methods. In our study, the effects of heating of liquid foods by conventional and continuous flow microwave heating were studied. Among other properties, we compared the stability of the liquid foods between the two heat treatments. Our goal was to determine whether the continuous flow microwave heating and the conventional heating methods have the same effects on the liquid foods, and, therefore, whether microwave heat treatment can effectively replace conventional heat treatments. We have compared the colour, separation phenomena of the samples treated by different methods. For milk, we also monitored the total viable cell count, for orange juice, vitamin C contents in addition to the taste of the product by sensory analysis. The majority of the results indicate that the circulating coil microwave method used here is equivalent to the conventional heating method based on thermal conduction and convection. However, some results in the analysis of the milk samples show clear differences between heat transfer methods. According to our results, the colour parameters (lightness, red-green and blue-yellow values) of the microwave treated samples differed not only from the untreated control, but also from the traditional heat treated samples. The differences are visually undetectable, however, they become evident through analytical measurement with spectrophotometer. This finding suggests that besides thermal effects, microwave-based food treatment can alter product properties in other ways as well. PMID

  11. New pyrometallurgical process of EAF dust treatment with CaO addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chairaksa-Fujimoto, Romchat; Inoue, Yosuke; Umeda, Naoyoshi; Itoh, Satoshi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The non-carbothermic zinc pyrometallurgical processing of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust was investigated on a laboratory scale. The main objective of this process was to convert highly stable zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4), which accounts for more than half of total zinc in the EAF dust, into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 by CaO addition. The EAF dust was mixed with CaO powder in various ratios, pressed into pellets, and heated in a muffle furnace in air at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1100°C for a predetermined holding time. All ZnFe2O4 was transformed into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 at a minimum temperature of 900°C within 1 h when sufficient CaO to achieve a Ca/Fe molar ratio of 1.1 was added. However, at higher temperatures, excess CaO beyond the stoichiometric ratio was required because it was consumed by reactions leading to the formation of compounds other than ZnFe2O4. The evaporation of halides and heavy metals in the EAF dust was also studied. These components could be preferentially volatilized into the gas phase at 1100°C when CaO was added.

  12. Heat treatment for endocrinological investigations on plasma positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, M R; Knapp, M L; Ghany, H C; Mayne, P D

    1987-01-01

    The effects of heat treatment of serum samples on the hormone analyses used in this laboratory were studied. Total T4, testosterone, progesterone, and growth hormone were not systematically affected by heat treatment over the whole range of analyte concentrations studied; for thyroid stimulating hormone, no effect was noted on serum samples with concentrations of less than 10 mU/l. Significant changes occurred in total T3, cortisol, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and prolactin. It is suggested that with appropriate preliminary study, heat treated plasma samples may be used in endocrinological investigations without adversely affecting the diagnostic validity of the results. PMID:3108328

  13. Heat Shock Protein–Peptide and HSP-Based Immunotherapies for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Maxim; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular residing heat shock proteins (HSPs) with a molecular weight of approximately 70 and 90 kDa function as molecular chaperones that assist folding/unfolding and transport of proteins across membranes and prevent protein aggregation after environmental stress. In contrast to normal cells, tumor cells have higher cytosolic heat shock protein 70 and Hsp90 levels, which contribute to tumor cell propagation, metastasis, and protection against apoptosis. In addition to their intracellular chaperoning functions, extracellular localized and membrane-bound HSPs have been found to play key roles in eliciting antitumor immune responses by acting as carriers for tumor-derived immunogenic peptides, as adjuvants for antigen presentation, or as targets for the innate immune system. The interaction of HSP–peptide complexes or peptide-free HSPs with receptors on antigen-presenting cells promotes the maturation of dendritic cells, results in an upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules, induces secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and immune modulatory nitric oxides, and thus integrates adaptive and innate immune phenomena. Herein, we aim to recapitulate the history and current status of HSP-based immunotherapies and vaccination strategies in the treatment of cancer. PMID:27199993

  14. UV-Heat Treatments for the Control of Foodborne Microbial Pathogens in Chicken Broth.

    PubMed

    Gouma, M; Gayán, E; Raso, J; Condón, S; Álvarez, I

    2015-01-01

    This investigation established the process criteria for using UV-C light and mild heat (UV-H treatment) to inactivate 5-Log10 cycles (performance criterion) of common foodborne pathogen populations, Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, when inoculated in chicken broth. To define the target microorganism and the proper UV-H treatment conditions (including UV dose, treatment time, and temperature) that would achieve the stated performance criterion, mathematical equations based on Geeraerd's model were developed for each microorganism. For the sake of comparison, inactivation equations for heat treatments were also performed on the same chicken broth and for the same microorganisms. L. monocytogenes was the most UV-H resistant microorganism at all temperatures, requiring a UV dose between 6.10 J/mL (5.6 min) and 2.26 J/mL (2.09 min) to achieve 5-Log10 reductions. In comparison with UV treatments at room temperatures, the combination of UV and mild heat allowed both the UV dose and treatment time to be reduced by 30% and 63% at 55 °C and 60 °C, respectively. Compared to heat treatments, the UV-H process reduced the heating time for 5-Log10 reductions of all the investigated microorganisms in chicken broth from 20-fold to 2-fold when the operating temperature varied from 53 to 60 °C. PMID:26539493

  15. UV-Heat Treatments for the Control of Foodborne Microbial Pathogens in Chicken Broth

    PubMed Central

    Gouma, M.; Gayán, E.; Raso, J.; Condón, S.; Álvarez, I.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation established the process criteria for using UV-C light and mild heat (UV-H treatment) to inactivate 5-Log10 cycles (performance criterion) of common foodborne pathogen populations, Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, when inoculated in chicken broth. To define the target microorganism and the proper UV-H treatment conditions (including UV dose, treatment time, and temperature) that would achieve the stated performance criterion, mathematical equations based on Geeraerd's model were developed for each microorganism. For the sake of comparison, inactivation equations for heat treatments were also performed on the same chicken broth and for the same microorganisms. L. monocytogenes was the most UV-H resistant microorganism at all temperatures, requiring a UV dose between 6.10 J/mL (5.6 min) and 2.26 J/mL (2.09 min) to achieve 5-Log10 reductions. In comparison with UV treatments at room temperatures, the combination of UV and mild heat allowed both the UV dose and treatment time to be reduced by 30% and 63% at 55°C and 60°C, respectively. Compared to heat treatments, the UV-H process reduced the heating time for 5-Log10 reductions of all the investigated microorganisms in chicken broth from 20-fold to 2-fold when the operating temperature varied from 53 to 60°C. PMID:26539493

  16. Effects of heat treatment on chitosan nanocomposite film reinforced with nanocrystalline cellulose and tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Rubentheren, V; Ward, Thomas A; Chee, Ching Yern; Nair, Praveena; Salami, Erfan; Fearday, Christopher

    2016-04-20

    This article presents an analysis of the influence of heat treatment on chitosan nanocomposite film. A series of samples comprising: pure chitosan film, chitosan film embedded with nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), chitosan film crosslinked with tannic acid and chitosan film with a blend of NCC and tannic acid were heat treated using a convection oven. Fourier-transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction test (XRD) shows the changes in chemical interaction of the heat treated films. The heat treated films show significant improvements in moisture absorption. Tensile strength and Young's Modulus were increased up to 7MPa and 259MPa, respectively when the samples were subjected to heat treatment. For the NCC particles, a transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to inspect the structural properties of cellulose particle in suspension form. PMID:26876845

  17. Induction hardening: Differences to a conventional heat treatment process and optimization of its parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, A.; Ressel, G.; Prevedel, P.; Raninger, P.; Panzenböck, M.; Marsoner, S.; Ebner, R.

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of obtaining similar mechanical properties with faster heating processes than the conventional ones has been of interest for several years. In the present study, investigations were performed in terms of the influences of such fast heat-treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. This investigation compares an inductive with a conventional furnace heat treating process of a 50CrMo4 steel, however only the austenitizing treatment was changed and subsequent quenching and tempering was done in the same way. To this end experiments with a middle frequency generator, using different heating rates and austenitizing temperatures, were conducted and followed by oil quenching of the workpieces. The resulting structures were characterized regarding their microstructures and mechanical properties in order to gather a better understanding of the differences between the inductive and the conventional heat treating process. As a main result it was found, that the fast austenitized samples exhibited worse ductility than the conventional treated material.

  18. Method for detecting pollutants. [through chemical reactions and heat treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Richards, R. R.; Conway, E. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for detecting and measuring trace amounts of pollutants of the group consisting of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide in a gaseous environment. A sample organic solid material that will undergo a chemical reaction with the test pollutant is exposed to the test environment and thereafter, when heated in the temperature range of 100-200 C., undergoes chemiluminescence that is measured and recorded as a function of concentration of the test pollutant. The chemiluminescence of the solid organic material is specific to the pollutant being tested.

  19. Fracture toughness of Ti-6Al-4V after welding and postweld heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, K.K.; Sundaresan, S.

    1997-02-01

    The fracture toughness (J{sub IC}) of the fusion zone of Ti-6Al-4V alloy welds was studied in terms of microstructural changes in the as-welded condition and following postweld heat treatment. Gas tungsten arc and electron beam welds were produced in sheet material over a limited range of heat input and subsequently heat treated at 700 C and 900 C. In the as-welded condition, the weld microstructure was a mixture of diffusional and martensitic alpha phases, whose proportion varied wit heat input and cooling rate. The fusion zone exhibited low ductility resulting from the highly acicular microstructure and a large prior-beta grain size. Postweld heat treatment tempered the martensite and coarsened the microstructure, but a beneficial effect on ductility was realized only after treatment at 900 C. Fracture toughness in the as-welded condition was greater than for the base metal and was attributed to the lamellar microstructure of the fusion zone and absence of continuous alpha film along the grain boundaries. Postweld heat treatment at 700 C reduced the fracture toughness considerably and, as in the case of ductility, it was necessary to heat treat at 900 C to produce an improvement.

  20. Treatment of enterococcus faecalis bacteria by a helium atmospheric cold plasma brush with oxygen addition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Huang Jun; Wang Xingquan; Lv Guohua; Zhang Guoping; Du Ning; Liu Xiaodi; Guo Lihong; Yang Size

    2012-07-01

    An atmospheric cold plasma brush suitable for large area and low-temperature plasma-based sterilization is designed. Results demonstrate that the He/O{sub 2} plasma more effectively kills Enterococcus faecalis than the pure He plasma. In addition, the sterilization efficiency values of the He/O{sub 2} plasma depend on the oxygen fraction in Helium gas. The atmospheric cold plasma brush using a proper ratio of He/O{sub 2} (2.5%) reaches the optimum sterilization efficiency. After plasma treatment, the cell structure and morphology changes can be observed by the scanning electron microscopy. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  1. Treatment of enterococcus faecalis bacteria by a helium atmospheric cold plasma brush with oxygen addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Jun; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiao-Di; Wang, Xing-Quan; Lv, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Guo-Ping; Guo, Li-Hong; Yang, Si-Ze

    2012-07-01

    An atmospheric cold plasma brush suitable for large area and low-temperature plasma-based sterilization is designed. Results demonstrate that the He/O2 plasma more effectively kills Enterococcus faecalis than the pure He plasma. In addition, the sterilization efficiency values of the He/O2 plasma depend on the oxygen fraction in Helium gas. The atmospheric cold plasma brush using a proper ratio of He/O2 (2.5%) reaches the optimum sterilization efficiency. After plasma treatment, the cell structure and morphology changes can be observed by the scanning electron microscopy. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  2. Exhaust after-treatment system with in-cylinder addition of unburnt hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Gerald N.; Kesse, Mary L.

    2007-10-30

    Certain exhaust after-treatment devices, at least periodically, require the addition of unburnt hydrocarbons in order to create reductant-rich exhaust conditions. The present disclosure adds unburnt hydrocarbons to exhaust from at least one combustion chamber by positioning, at least partially within a combustion chamber, a mixed-mode fuel injector operable to inject fuel into the combustion chamber in a first spray pattern with a small average angle relative to a centerline of the combustion chamber and a second spray pattern with a large average angle relative to the centerline of the combustion chamber. An amount of fuel is injected in the first spray pattern into a non-combustible environment within the at least one combustion chamber during at least one of an expansion stroke and exhaust stroke. The exhaust with the unburnt amount of fuel is moved into an exhaust passage via an exhaust valve.

  3. Inactivation of Salmonella Enteriditis and Salmonella Senftenberg in liquid whole egg using generally recognized as safe additives, ionizing radiation and heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of combining irradiation followed by heat on Salmonella Enteriditis and Salmonella Senftenberg inoculated into liquid whole egg (LWE) with added nisin, EDTA, sorbic acid, carvacrol, or combinations of these GRAS additives was investigated. Synergistic reductions of Salmonella populations ...

  4. Effect of heat treatment on the antioxidant activity of extracts from citrus peels.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seok-Moon; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Dong-Ryul; Jo, Seong-Chun; Nam, K C; Ahn, D U; Lee, Seung-Cheol

    2004-06-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the antioxidant activity of extracts from Citrus unshiu peels was evaluated. Citrus peels (CP) (5 g) were placed in Pyrex Petri dishes (8.0 cm diameter) and heat-treated at 50, 100, or 150 degrees C for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min in an electric muffle furnace. After heat treatment, 70% ethanol extract (EE) and water extract (WE) (0.1 g/10 mL) of CP were prepared, and total phenol contents (TPC), radical scavenging activity (RSA), and reducing power of the extracts were determined. The antioxidant activities of CP extracts increased as heating temperature increased. For example, heat treatment of CP at 150 degrees C for 60 min increased the TPC, RSA, and reducing power of EE from 71.8 to 171.0 microM, from 29.64 to 64.25%, and from 0.45 to 0.82, respectively, compared to non-heat-treated control. In the case of WE from CP heat-treated at the same conditions (150 degrees C for 60 min), the TPC, RSA, and reducing power also increased from 84.4 to 204.9 microM, from 15.81 to 58.26%, and from 0.27 to 0.96, respectively. Several low molecular weight phenolic compounds such as 2,3-diacetyl-1-phenylnaphthalene, ferulic acid, p-hydroxybenzaldoxime, 5-hydroxyvaleric acid, 2,3-diacetyl-1-phenylnaphthalene, and vanillic acid were newly formed in the CP heated at 150 degrees C for 30 min. These results indicated that the antioxidant activity of CP extracts was significantly affected by heating temperature and duration of treatment on CP and that the heating process can be used as a tool for increasing the antioxidant activity of CP. PMID:15161203

  5. Effect of heat treatments on oxidation kinetics in AZ91 and AM60 magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Barrena, M.I. Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Matesanz, L.; Soria, A.

    2011-10-15

    The effect of heat treatments on a non protective atmosphere (air) on the morphology and composition of the oxide in AM60 and AZ91 alloys has been evaluated. With the aim of evaluating the loss of alloying elements during heat treatment, a study of these alloys has been carried out using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In order to determine the nature of the oxides the reaction products generated were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results show that the nature and morphology of the oxides generated are related to the temperature and the time of the heating conditions applied. - Highlights: {yields} The effect of heat treatments on the oxide growth in Mg-Al alloys has been evaluated. {yields} The nature and morphology of the oxides have been characterized. {yields} These oxides are associated to the time and the temperature conditions.

  6. Effects of heat and high-pressure treatments on the solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jieqiong; Sheng, Wei; Wang, Shuo; Fu, Tong-Jen

    2016-05-15

    The effects of dry and moist heat, autoclave sterilization and high-pressure treatment on the biochemical characteristics and immunological properties of almond proteins were investigated. Changes in the solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins extracted from treated almond flour were evaluated using a total protein assay, indirect competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IC-ELISA), and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Almond proteins were stable during dry-heat treatment at temperatures below 250°C. Dry heat at 400°C, boiling, autoclave sterilization and high-pressure treatment in the presence of water at ⩾ 500 MPa greatly reduced the solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins. SDS-PAGE revealed that the protein profiles of almond flour samples treated under these conditions also changed significantly. The synergistic effects of heat, pressure and the presence of water contributed to significant changes in solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins. PMID:26776044

  7. Characterization of precipitates in X12CrMoWVNbN10-1-1 steel during heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xingang; Gu, Jianfeng; Han, Lizhan

    2014-09-01

    The characterization of precipitates in X12CrMoWVNbN10-1-1 steel during the heat treatment was carried out for revealing the evolution of the precipitates. In addition to other microstructural parameters (such as dislocation and subgrains), the precipitate also plays an important role for microstructural stability which is a prerequisite for long term creep strength. In this paper, the precipitates during the heat treatment for this steel were characterized using physicochemical phase analyses and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the Fe-rich M3C carbides and Nb-rich MX particles were detected in the samples cooled in furnace from austenitization at 1080 °C for 16 h. However, after water cooling, only Nb-rich MX particles existed. During tempering at 570 °C for 18 h, the formation of Cr-rich M7C3 was detected but was replaced partially by Cr-rich M23C6. Additional Cr-rich M2N nitride was also found. After two successive tempering (570 °C + 690 °C) for 24 h, Cr-rich M7C3 was completely replaced. The microchemical analyses of the extracted residues during heat treatment were also discussed. The results gave rise to an indication that the precipitation of precipitates nearly completed in first tempering and the transformation from Cr-rich M7C3 to Cr-rich M23C6 mainly occurred in the second tempering.

  8. Menu driven heat treatment control of thin walled bodies

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Booth, Jr., Russell R.; Grimm, Noel P.; Batenburg, Abram; Thomas, Vaughn M.

    1992-01-01

    A process for controlling the heating of a thin-walled body according to a predetermined temperature program by means of electrically controllable heaters, comprising: disposing the heaters adjacent one surface of the body such that each heater is in facing relation with a respective zone of the surface; supplying heat-generating power to each heater and monitoring the temperature at each surface zone; and for each zone: deriving (16,18,20), on the basis of the temperature values obtained in the monitoring step, estimated temperature values of the surface at successive time intervals each having a first selected duration; generating (28), on the basis of the estimated temperature values derived in each time interval, representations of the temperature, THSIFUT, which each surface zone will have, based on the level of power presently supplied to each heater, at a future time which is separated from the present time interval by a second selected duration; determining (30) the difference between THSIFUT and the desired temperature, FUTREFTVZL, at the future time which is separated from the present time interval by the second selected duration; providing (52) a representation indicating the power level which sould be supplied to each heater in order to reduce the difference obtained in the determining step; and adjusting the power level supplied to each heater by the supplying step in response to the value of the representation provided in the providing step.

  9. Using stress relaxation tests for evaluating and optimizing postweld heat treatments of alloy 625 welds

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, M.J.; Messler, N.Y.R.W. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Alloy 625 (UNS N06625) is a solid-solution-strengthened, nickel based, chromium-molybdenum alloy used for its high strength and excellent corrosion resistance, Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance and, to a lesser extent, strength can be enhanced by precipitation of intergranular carbides by appropriate heat treatment. In welded structures, dissolution of carbides near the fusion line in the heat-affected zone renders denuded regions susceptible to preferential SCC attack that is greatly aggravated by residual stresses. To reduce the propensity for SCC in weldments, manufacturing practice typically includes methods for reducing residual stresses, usually using postweld heat treatments (PWHT). With appropriate heat treatment, grain boundary carbides can be restored and welding-induced residual stresses can be reduced at the same time. A series of heat treatments was performed between 1,050 and 1,800 F (566 and 9826 C) to determine effectiveness in relieving welding-induced stresses. Stress relaxation testing of all-weld-metal specimens was compared to residual stress measurements in full-scale weldments using a hole-drilling strain gauge technique. The much simpler stress relaxation method provided an excellent measure of residual stresses and proved to be an expeditious way to select optimum postweld heat treatments for reducing those welding-induced stresses.

  10. A previously undescribed organic residue sheds light on heat treatment in the Middle Stone Age.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Patrick; Porraz, Guillaume; Bellot-Gurlet, Ludovic; February, Edmund; Ligouis, Bertrand; Paris, Céline; Texier, Pierre-Jean; Parkington, John E; Miller, Christopher E; Nickel, Klaus G; Conard, Nicholas J

    2015-08-01

    South Africa has in recent years gained increasing importance for our understanding of the evolution of 'modern human behaviour' during the Middle Stone Age (MSA). A key element in the suite of behaviours linked with modern humans is heat treatment of materials such as ochre for ritual purposes and stone prior to tool production. Until now, there has been no direct archaeological evidence for the exact procedure used in the heat treatment of silcrete. Through the analysis of heat-treated artefacts from the Howiesons Poort of Diepkloof Rock Shelter, we identified a hitherto unknown type of organic residue - a tempering-residue - that sheds light on the processes used for heat treatment in the MSA. This black film on the silcrete surface is an organic tar that contains microscopic fragments of charcoal and formed as a residue during the direct contact of the artefacts with hot embers of green wood. Our results suggest that heat treatment of silcrete was conducted directly using an open fire, similar to those likely used for cooking. These findings add to the discussion about the complexity of MSA behaviour and appear to contradict previous studies that had suggested that heat treatment of silcrete was a complex (i.e., requiring a large number of steps for its realization) and resource-consuming procedure. PMID:26073074

  11. Effect of a supersolvus heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a powder metallurgy processed nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Darryl Slade

    Powder Metallurgy (P/M) processed nickel-base superalloys are used as turbine disk materials in jet engines. The P/M processing results in a homogenous microstructure. Large amounts of strengthening elements can be incorporated into the chemistry of these P/M alloys. In addition, the ability to produce near net-shaped parts with powder consolidation may offer the potential for large cost savings. However, the fatigue properties of P/M superalloys in the as-consolidated form have suffered because of the defect sensitivity of the as-consolidated microstructure. Expensive, thermomechanical steps are necessary to break down defects, so that the P/M parts can be considered defect-tolerant. As a result, the true potential cost savings for using P/M superalloys in turbines have never been realized. This program was undertaken to examine the potential for utilizing an alternate heat treatment with P/M Alloy 720LI to generate a potentially defect-tolerant microstructure. This heat treatment had a soak above the gamma' solvus temperature followed by a controlled cool through the solvus. This produced gamma grains with a regular array of large dendritic-shaped secondary gamma' within the grains. Mechanical testing was carried out to fully evaluate the effect of this alternate heat treatment on the mechanical properties of Alloy 720LI. The standard heat treatment had longer lifetimes at the lower stress range conditions during high cycle fatigue; however, the alternate heat treatment was superior at the highest stress range. Fracture analysis suggests that this is due to the grain size difference. During tensile testing, the standard heat treatment had higher yield and ultimate strengths but lower ductility than the alternate heat treatment. This is thought to be due to the larger amounts of tertiary gamma ' present in the microstructure produced by the standard heat treatment. Finally, the standard heat treatment had longer creep lifetimes at the lowest test temperature. The

  12. Effect of PAC addition on immersed ultrafiltration for the treatment of algal-rich water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Tian, Jiayu; Nan, Jun; Gao, ShanShan; Liang, Heng; Wang, Meilian; Li, Guibai

    2011-02-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition on the treatment of algal-rich water by immersed ultrafiltration (UF), in terms of permeate quality and membrane fouling. Experiments were performed with a hollow-fiber polyvinyl chloride ultrafiltration membrane at a laboratory scale, 20-25°C and 10 L/(m(2) h) constant permeate flux. UF could achieve an absolute removal of Microcystis aeruginosa cells, but a poor removal of algogenic organic matter (AOM) released into water, contaminants responsible for severe membrane fouling. The addition of 4 g/L PAC to the immersed UF reactor significantly alleviated the development of trans-membrane pressure and enhanced the removal of dissovled organic carbon (by 10.9±1.7%), UV(254) (by 27.1±1.7%), and microcystins (expressed as MC-LR(eq), by 40.8±4.2%). However, PAC had little effect on the rejection of hydrophilic high molecular weight AOM such as carbohydrates and proteins. It was also identified that PAC reduced the concentrations of carbohydrates and proteins in the reactor due to decreased light intensity, as well as the MC-LR(eq) concentration by PAC adsorption. PMID:21216530

  13. A heat treatment procedure to produce fine-grained lamellar microstructures in a P/M titanium aluminide alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Peter

    A process for fabricating advanced aerospace titanium aluminide alloys starting from metal powders (the hot isostatically consolidated P/M process) is presented in this thesis. This process does not suffer the difficulties of chemical inhomogeneities and coarse grain structure of castings. In addition heat treatments which take advantage of the refined structure of HIP processed materials are developed to achieve microstructure control and subsequent mechanical property control. It is shown that a better "property balance" is possible after the heat treatment of HIP consolidated materials than it is with alternative processing. It is well understood that the standard microstructures (near-gamma, duplex, nearly lamellar, and fully lamellar) do not have the balanced mechanical properties (tensile, yield, creep and fatigue strength, ductility and fracture toughness) necessary for optimal performance in aero engine and automotive applications. In this work a fine-grained fully lamellar (FGFL) microstructure is developed for property control and in particular for achieving a much improved property balance. A heat treatment procedure for this purpose which consists of cyclic processing in the alpha transus temperature region to achieve an FGFL structure with grain sizes in the range of 50 mum to 150 mum is presented. Compared with conventional duplex structured materials, the minimum creep rate is an order of magnitude lower with only a 10% loss in tensile yield strength. Moreover, a three-fold increase in tensile elongation is possible by converting to an FGFL structure with only a 30% loss in minimum creep rate. These are attractive trade-offs when considering the use of these alloys for aerospace purposes. A thorough literature review of the mechanisms of formation of standard microstructures and their deformation under mechanical loading is contained in the thesis. In addition, conventional techniques to produce FGFL microstructures in wrought and cast materials are

  14. Biochar Addition to Stormwater Treatment Media for Enhanced Removal of Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Jin, J.; Tian, J.; Chiu, P.; Guo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Urban stormwater management systems, such as bioretention facilities, require substantial land area and are often ineffective in removing nitrogen. This project seeks to improve nitrogen removal in bioretention media by modifying the hydraulic and treatment characteristics of the infiltration medium with biochar addition. A commercial wood biochar pyrolyzed from Southern Yellow Pine at 500°C was used. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that biochar addition to a typical bioretention medium (soil-mix: 4% saw dust, 88% sand, 8% clay) increased ammonium sorption at typical stormwater concentrations (2 mg/L) by a factor of 6, total porosity by 16.6%, and water retention at most matric potentials. The effect of the biochar-amended medium on nitrate removal was evaluated in pilot-scale experiments. Side-by-side experimental cells (91 cm dia., 1.2 m deep) were constructed to treat stormwater runoff from a parking lot. The control cell contained 100% soil mix while the biochar cell contained 4% biochar and 96% soil-mix by mass. Treatment media were 76.2 cm in depth and overlain by 5.1 cm of wood mulch in both cells, with a water table maintained at the bottom of the treatment zones. Cells were instrumented with TDR moisture sensors, pressure transducers, and redox and temperature sensors. Two pilot-scale experiments were conducted that included a bromide tracer and nitrate with a hydraulic loading of 5.5cm/h for 24 h in early spring and 36 h in summer. Effluent was continuously sampled for nitrogen compounds during these tests. Tracer tests and TDR measurements showed that biochar increased the average volumetric water content of the vadose zone by 14.7% and the mean residence time by 12.6%. For the spring field test at 14°C, nitrate in the control cell effluent increased by 6.1% but decreased by 43.5% for the biochar cell. For the summer field test at 22°C, 30.6% and 84.7% of influent nitrate was removed in the control and biochar cells, respectively. In the summer

  15. Effect of Multistage Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingdong; Wen, Haiming; Zhang, Han; Gu, Jianfeng; Li, Chuanwei; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of Cu-rich precipitates (CRPs) and reverted austenite (RA) on the strength and impact toughness of a Cu-containing 3.5 wt pct Ni high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel after various heat treatments involving quenching (Q), lamellarization (L), and tempering (T) is studied using electron back-scatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography. The QT sample exhibits high strength but low impact toughness, whereas the QL samples mostly possess improved impact toughness but moderate strength, but the QLT samples again have degraded impact toughness due to additional tempering. The dispersion of nanoscale CRPs, which are formed during tempering, is responsible for the enhanced strength but simultaneously leads to the degraded impact toughness. The RA formed during lamellarization contributes to the improved impact toughness. Based on the present study, new heat treatment schedules are proposed to balance strength and impact toughness by optimizing the precipitation of CRPs and RA.

  16. Effects of post-weld heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of laser welds in GH3535 superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kun; Jiang, Zhenguo; Leng, Bin; Li, Chaowen; Chen, Shuangjian; Tao, Wang; Zhou, Xingtai; Li, Zhijun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of laser welds before and after post-weld heat treatment processes were studied. The results show that the tensile strength of the joints can be increased by 90 MPa by a post-weld heat treatment process at 871 °C for 6 h, exceeding the strength of the original state of the base metal. Besides, elongation of the joints are also increased to 43% by the process, whereas the elongation of as-welded joints are only 22%. In addition, the Charpy impact properties of laser welds almost do not change. Second phase precipitates, which were identified as Mo-Si rich M6C-type carbides by transmission electron diffraction and scanning electron microscope, were observed at solidification grain boundaries and solidification subgrain boundaries. These carbides can pin dislocations during the following tensile deformation, hence are responsible for the strengthening of tensile properties of the joints.

  17. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    PubMed

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators. PMID:27387899

  18. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... treatment rooms and facilities. 590.548 Section 590.548 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND..., blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. (a) General. Processing rooms shall be... rooms shall be well-lighted and have ceilings and walls of a tile surface, enamel paint, or other...

  19. The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Mamum, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A,; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Adderley, Philip A.; Poelker, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  20. Cyclic Deformation Behavior of a Rare-Earth Containing Extruded Magnesium Alloy: Effect of Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, F. A.; Chen, D. L.; Li, D. J.; Zeng, X. Q.

    2015-03-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating strain-controlled cyclic deformation behavior of a rare-earth (RE) element containing Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (GW103K) alloy in different states (as-extruded, peak-aged (T5), and solution-treated and peak-aged (T6)). The addition of RE elements led to an effective grain refinement and weak texture in the as-extruded alloy. While heat treatment resulted in a grain growth modestly in the T5 state and significantly in the T6 state, a high density of nano-sized and bamboo-leaf/plate-shaped β' (Mg7(Gd,Y)) precipitates was observed to distribute uniformly in the α-Mg matrix. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength, as well as the maximum and minimum peak stresses during cyclic deformation in the T5 and T6 states were significantly higher than those in the as-extruded state. Unlike RE-free extruded Mg alloys, symmetrical hysteresis loops in tension and compression and cyclic stabilization were present in the GW103K alloy in different states. The fatigue life of this alloy in the three conditions, which could be well described by the Coffin-Manson law and Basquin's equation, was equivalent within the experimental scatter and was longer than that of RE-free extruded Mg alloys. This was predominantly attributed to the presence of the relatively weak texture and the suppression of twinning activities stemming from the fine grain sizes and especially RE-containing β' precipitates. Fatigue crack was observed to initiate from the specimen surface in all the three alloy states and the initiation site contained some cleavage-like facets after T6 heat treatment. Crack propagation was characterized mainly by the characteristic fatigue striations.

  1. Improvements in Mechanical Properties of 319 Al Alloy Engine Blocks Through Cost-Effective Solution Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, A.; Ravindran, C.; MacKay, R.

    2014-08-01

    The use of Al engine blocks has increased significantly to improve vehicle fuel efficiency. However, the gray cast iron cylinder liners cause the development of large tensile residual stress along the cylinder bores which necessitates the optimization of mechanical properties in this region to prevent premature engine failure. This study compared the microstructure of T4-treated Al billet castings of varying cooling rate to that of the cylinder region of T4-treated (current production schedule) Al engine blocks. The aim of this study was to develop a cost-effective small scale heat treatment optimization method for engine block production. Comparisons in microstructure between the engine block and the billet castings were carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The results suggest that the microstructure and hardness at the top, middle, and bottom of the cylinder were similar to those of each representative billet casting, indicating that heat treatment resulted in successful replication of the engine block locations. In addition, tensile testing revealed that the YS and UTS increased slightly following T4 treatment for all billet castings, which was also observed at the middle of the engine block cylinder bridge. As such, this method can be an effective forerunner for future heat treatment optimization in Al engine block production.

  2. 40 CFR 141.711 - Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cryptosporidium treatment requirements. 141.711 Section 141.711 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Treatment Technique Requirements § 141.711 Filtered system...

  3. 40 CFR 141.711 - Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cryptosporidium treatment requirements. 141.711 Section 141.711 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Treatment Technique Requirements § 141.711 Filtered system...

  4. 40 CFR 141.711 - Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cryptosporidium treatment requirements. 141.711 Section 141.711 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Treatment Technique Requirements § 141.711 Filtered system...

  5. Automatic optimization of localized heat treatment for Al-Si-Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, A.; Holzmann, T.

    2016-03-01

    Material properties of aluminium alloys can usually be achieved by a heat treatment and quenching procedure. In case that only local strengthening is needed, a local heat treatment and quenching strategy could be an option to the energy intensive, time consuming and costly treatment of the whole part. One of the essential problem using a local strengthening procedure is the lack of knowledge about suitable process parameters. Therefore, a multiple criteria optimization approach with local strengthening as target function was set up, whereby the material constitution was calculated based on the precipitation evolution during local heat treatment and cooling. By automatically varying the exposure time and laser power, a series of process simulations was performed to find adequate process parameters for the sufficient local strengthening of the alloy.

  6. Effects of 35 C Heat Treatments on Photosensitive Grand Rapids Lettuce Seed Germination 1

    PubMed Central

    Carpita, Nicholas C.; Nabors, Murray W.

    1976-01-01

    Grand Rapids lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds were given 35 C heat treatments to increase photodormancy in a subsequent 20 C dark period. Short heat treatments (1-5 hours) induced a significant germination percentage increase of from 16% to over 50% depending on seed lot. With longer heat treatments dark germination percentage was gradually reduced to zero. If given at the end of 35 C, far red or red followed by far red further increased the amount of dark germination. Thermodormancy also delayed red-stimulated germination by 10 hours or more when red was given following a long 35 C treatment. The presence of Pfr was required during this time since far red light remained effective in reversing at least 50% of the red stimulation for up to 16 hours compared to only 4 hours in nonheat-treated seeds. PMID:16659537

  7. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John

    2012-06-15

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 Degree-Sign C) and high ({approx}800 Degree-Sign C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 Degree-Sign C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 Degree-Sign C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 Degree-Sign C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  8. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Wayne Rigby, John Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 deg C) and high ({approx}800 deg C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 deg C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 x 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 deg C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 deg C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  9. Improving the efficiency of plasma heat treatment of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdrakhmanov, Az T.; Israphilov, I. H.; Galiakbarov, A. T.; Samigullin, A. D.; Gabdrakhmanov, Al T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an effective way of the plasma hardening the surface layer at the expense combined influence of the plasma jet and a cold air flow. After that influence occurs a distinctive by plasma treatment microstructure with increased microhardness (an increase of 35%) and depth. There is proposed an improved design of the vortex tube for receiving the air flow with a temperature of 20 C to - 120C.

  10. Optimization of microwave heating in an existing cubicle cavity by incorporating additional wave guide and control components

    SciTech Connect

    Erle, R.R.; Eschen, V.G.; Sprenger, G.S.

    1995-04-01

    The use of microwave energy to thermally treat Low Level (LLW), Transuranic (TRU), and mixed waste has been under development at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) since 1986. During that time, the technology has progressed from bench-scale tests, through pilot-scale tests, and finally to a full-scale demonstration unit. Experimental operations have been conducted on a variety of non-radioactive surrogates and actual radioactive waste forms. Through these studies and development efforts, the Microwave Vitrification Engineering Team (MVET) at Rocky Flats has successfully proven the application of microwave energy for waste treatment operations. In the microwave solidification process, microwave energy is used to heat a mixture of waste and glass frit to produce a vitrified product that meets all the current acceptance criteria at the final disposal sites. All of the development to date has utilized a multi-mode microwave system to provide the energy to treat the materials. Currently, evaluations are underway on modifications to the full-scale demonstration system that provide a single-mode operation as a possible method to optimize the system. This poster presentation describes the modifications made to allow the single-mode operation.

  11. Recent advances and current status of the use of heat treatments in postharvest disease management systems: Is it time to turn up the heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eco-friendly approaches to postharvest disease management in harvested commodities, such as heat treatments and biological control utilizing antagonistic yeasts, is an active research field. The current review focuses on the physiological and molecular aspects of heat treatment on all the major par...

  12. Combined heat transfer and kinetic models to predict cooking loss during heat treatment of beef meat.

    PubMed

    Kondjoyan, Alain; Oillic, Samuel; Portanguen, Stéphane; Gros, Jean-Bernard

    2013-10-01

    A heat transfer model was used to simulate the temperature in 3 dimensions inside the meat. This model was combined with a first-order kinetic models to predict cooking losses. Identification of the parameters of the kinetic models and first validations were performed in a water bath. Afterwards, the performance of the combined model was determined in a fan-assisted oven under different air/steam conditions. Accurate knowledge of the heat transfer coefficient values and consideration of the retraction of the meat pieces are needed for the prediction of meat temperature. This is important since the temperature at the center of the product is often used to determine the cooking time. The combined model was also able to predict cooking losses from meat pieces of different sizes and subjected to different air/steam conditions. It was found that under the studied conditions, most of the water loss comes from the juice expelled by protein denaturation and contraction and not from evaporation. PMID:23747627

  13. Effect of heat-moisture treatment on the structural, physicochemical, and rheological characteristics of arrowroot starch.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Larissa S; Moraes, Jaqueline; Albano, Kivia M; Telis, Vânia R N; Franco, Célia M L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of heat-moisture treatment on structural, physicochemical, and rheological characteristics of arrowroot starch was investigated. Heat-moisture treatment was performed with starch samples conditioned to 28% moisture at 100 ℃ for 2, 4, 8, and 16 h. Structural and physicochemical characterization of native and modified starches, as well as rheological assays with gels of native and 4 h modified starches subjected to acid and sterilization stresses were performed. Arrowroot starch had 23.1% of amylose and a CA-type crystalline pattern that changed over the treatment time to A-type. Modified starches had higher pasting temperature and lower peak viscosity while breakdown viscosity practically disappeared, independently of the treatment time. Gelatinization temperature and crystallinity increased, while enthalpy, swelling power, and solubility decreased with the treatment. Gels from modified starches, independently of the stress conditions, were found to have more stable apparent viscosities and higher G' and G″ than gels from native starch. Heat-moisture treatment caused a reorganization of starch chains that increased molecular interactions. This increase resulted in higher paste stability and strengthened gels that showed higher resistance to shearing and heat, even after acid or sterilization conditions. A treatment time of 4 h was enough to deeply changing the physicochemical properties of starch. PMID:26163566

  14. Can Additional Homeopathic Treatment Save Costs? A Retrospective Cost-Analysis Based on 44500 Insured Persons

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Julia K.; Reinhold, Thomas; Witt, Claudia M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the health care costs for patients using additional homeopathic treatment (homeopathy group) with the costs for those receiving usual care (control group). Methods Cost data provided by a large German statutory health insurance company were retrospectively analysed from the societal perspective (primary outcome) and from the statutory health insurance perspective. Patients in both groups were matched using a propensity score matching procedure based on socio-demographic variables as well as costs, number of hospital stays and sick leave days in the previous 12 months. Total cumulative costs over 18 months were compared between the groups with an analysis of covariance (adjusted for baseline costs) across diagnoses and for six specific diagnoses (depression, migraine, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and headache). Results Data from 44,550 patients (67.3% females) were available for analysis. From the societal perspective, total costs after 18 months were higher in the homeopathy group (adj. mean: EUR 7,207.72 [95% CI 7,001.14–7,414.29]) than in the control group (EUR 5,857.56 [5,650.98–6,064.13]; p<0.0001) with the largest differences between groups for productivity loss (homeopathy EUR 3,698.00 [3,586.48–3,809.53] vs. control EUR 3,092.84 [2,981.31–3,204.37]) and outpatient care costs (homeopathy EUR 1,088.25 [1,073.90–1,102.59] vs. control EUR 867.87 [853.52–882.21]). Group differences decreased over time. For all diagnoses, costs were higher in the homeopathy group than in the control group, although this difference was not always statistically significant. Conclusion Compared with usual care, additional homeopathic treatment was associated with significantly higher costs. These analyses did not confirm previously observed cost savings resulting from the use of homeopathy in the health care system. PMID:26230412

  15. Effect of homogenization heat treatment on the microstructure and heat-affected zone microfissuring in welded cast alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Huang; Richards, N.L.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of homogenization temperature on microfissuring in the heat-affected zones of electron-beam welded cast INCONEL 718 has been studied. The material was homogenized at various temperatures in the range of 1,037 C and 1,163 C and air-cooled. The homogenized material was then electron-beam welded by the bead-on-plate welding technique. The microstructures and microfissuring in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) were evaluated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The grain boundary segregation of various elements was evaluated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). It was observed that the total crack length (TCL) of microfissures first decreases with homogenization temperature and then increases, with a minimum occurring in the specimen heat treated at 1,163 C. This trend coincides with the variation in segregation of B at grain boundaries with homogenization temperature and has been explained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium segregation of B to grain boundaries during the homogenization heat treatment. No other element was observed to segregate at the grain boundaries. The variation in volume fraction of phases like {delta}-Ni{sub 3}Nb, MC carbide, and Laves phases does not follow the same trend as that observed for TCL and B segregation at the grain boundaries. Therefore, microfissuring in HAZ of welded cast INCONEL 718 is attributed to the segregation of B at the grain boundaries.

  16. Effect of homogenization heat treatment on the microstructure and heat- affected zone microfissuring in welded cast alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao; Chaturvedi, M. C.; Richards, N. L.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of homogenization temperature on microfissuring in the heat-affected zones of electronwelded cast INCONEL 718 has been studied. The material was homogenized at various temperatures in the range of 1037 ° to 1163 ° and air-cooled. The homogenized material was then electron-beam welded by the bead-on-plate welding technique. The microstructures and microfissuring in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) were evaluated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The grain boundary segregation of various elements was evaluated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). It was observed that the total crack length (TCL) of microfissures first decreases with homogenization temperature and then increases, with a minimum occurring in the specimen heat treated at 1163 °. This trend coincides with the variation in segregation of B at grain boundaries with homogenization temperature and has been explained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium segregation of B to grain boundaries during the homogenization heat treatment. No other element was observed to segregate at the grain boundaries. The variation in volume fraction of phases like δ-Ni3Nb, MC carbide, and Laves phases does not follow the same trend as that observed for TCL and B segregation at the grain boundaries. Therefore, microfissuring in HAZ of welded cast INCONEL 718 is attributed to the segregation of B at the grain boundaries.

  17. ASME code post weld heat treatment requirements: Current issues

    SciTech Connect

    McEnerney, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    An understanding of current ASME Code PWHT issues requires consideration of various governing factors. These include: historical perspective regarding rule development and needs for PWHT, design criteria dictating the purpose, potential adverse effects, validity of existing and/or need for additional global PWHT parameters, and fundamental questions and/or inadequate current requirements regarding local PWHT. Various activities to address the current issues are in progress at different code task groups and organizations.

  18. An additional simple denitrification bioreactor using packed gel envelopes applicable to industrial wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masahiko; Uemoto, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2007-08-15

    A simple denitrification bioreactor for nitrate-containing wastewater without organic compounds was developed. This bioreactor consisted of packed gel envelopes in a single tank. Each envelope comprised two plates of gels containing Paracoccus denitrificans cells with an internal space between the plates. As an electron donor for denitrification, ethanol was injected into the internal space and not directly into the wastewater. P. denitrificans cells in the gel reduced nitrate to nitrogen gas by using the injected ethanol. Nitrate-containing desulfurization wastewater derived from a coal-fired thermal power plant was continuously treated with 20 packed gel envelopes (size, 1,000 x 900 x 12 mm; surface area, 1.44 m(2)) in a reactor tank (volume 1.5 m(3)). When the total nitrogen concentration in the inflow was around 150 mg-N x L(-1), the envelopes removed approximately 60-80% of the total nitrogen, and the maximum nitrogen removal rate was 5.0 g-N x day(-1) per square meter of the gel surface. This value corresponded to the volumetric nitrogen removal performance of 0.109 kg-N x m(-3) x day(-1). In each envelope, a high utilization efficiency of the electron donor was attained, although more than the double amount of the electron donor was empirically injected in the present activated sludge system to achieve denitrification when compared with the theoretical value. The bioreactor using the envelopes would be extremely effective as an additional denitrification system because these envelopes can be easily installed in the vacant spaces of preinstalled water treatment systems, without requiring additional facilities for removing surplus ethanol and sludge. PMID:17252606

  19. Effect of heat treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, J.K.

    1999-12-01

    Constant elongation rate tests (CERT) were conducted to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of alloy 600 (UNS NO6600) in 140 C and 50% caustic solution at {minus}900 mV vs saturated calomel electrode (SCE). Results showed: (1) Heat treatment at low temperature for a long time (600 C for 260 h) led to a material that was not susceptible to caustic intergranular (IG) cracking. Increase in heat treatment temperature enhanced IG cracking susceptibility. Caustic IGSCC susceptibility was at maximum near the carbon solubility limit. However, when the heat treatment temperature was higher than the carbon solubility limit, a significant decrease in crack growth rate was observed. (2) Grain boundaries acted as a preferential crack path when grain boundary carbon segregation was likely. Thermodynamic considerations suggested that severe caustic IGSCC susceptibility near the carbon solubility limit could be explained in terms of carbon segregation at the grain boundaries. (3) IGSCC in caustic solution did not seem to be caused by chromium depletion. (4) Although formation of semi-continuous IG carbides and IGSCC resistance seemed to exhibit a similar chronological response with heat treatment, it was unlikely that grain boundary IG carbides played a role in caustic IGSCC susceptibility.

  20. Effect of heat treatments on the performance of polymer optical fiber sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nianbing; Zhao, Mingfu; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Li, Yishan; Xiong, Zhonggang

    2016-06-13

    Although the numerous advantages of polymer optical fiber (POF) sensors have been applied in different fields, the measurement consistency and sensitivity of POF evanescent wave (EW) sensors are still affected by its thermal stability and water absorption. Therefore, we perform a study to demonstrate the mechanism of the effect of heat treatments on physical and optical properties of POF EW sensors. We investigate the surface morphology, composition, refractive index, geometry, and weight of the fiber-sensing region subjected to water and vacuum heat treatments. We examine the spectral transmission and transmitted light intensity of POF sensors. We present a theoretical investigation of the effect of heat treatments on the sensitivity of POF EW sensors. The performance of the prepared sensor is evaluated using glucose and Chlorella pyrenoidosa analytes. We discovered that the spectral transmission and transmitted light intensity of the fibers shows little effect of vacuum heat treatments. In particular, the sensors, which subject to vacuum heat treatment at 110 °C for 3 h, exhibit temperature-independent measuring consistency and high sensitivity in glucose solutions in the temperature range 15-60 °C and also show high sensitivity in Chlorella pyrenoidosa solutions. PMID:27410357

  1. Cheap and Cheerful Stream Restoration - An Example of System Wide Woody Addition Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, J. M.; Bennett, S. N.; Bouwes, N.; Camp, R.

    2012-12-01

    Stream restoration has been plagued with high price tags, limited spatial extents, and questionable effectiveness in light of largely absent monitoring efforts. One prominent example is the placement of large woody debris (LWD) structures and engineered log jams that are frequently employed to promote heterogeneity of instream habitat. Ironically, many of these treatments attempt to lock in place and over-engineer the woody structures as opposed to allowing them to adjust and rearrange themselves as natural LWD would have. We are in the midst of a large scale restoration experiment using LWD to recover ESA-listed steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in the Asotin Creek Watershed of Southeast Washington. The project is an Intensively Monitored Watershed (IMW) where the restoration treatment and monitoring use a hierarchal staircase design maximizing the power to detect a population level response in steelhead. We are treating over 12 km of stream with enough LWD input (> 200 pieces per km) to mimic the historic background wood loading and encourage the stream to reshape and regularly rework itself leaving. We are using hundreds of structures we call DWS (dynamic woody structures), which generally consist of a series of wooden fence posts driven into the stream bed and complex LWD anchored between them to invoke a specific hydrogeomorphic response. The real advantage of these DWS are their cost. They can be installed quickly (15-30 minutes each) and cheaply (< $100/DWS); even in remote settings with a 2-3 person crew, hydraulic post pounder, very cheap materials, and avoiding impacts associated with operating heavy equipment. This allows us to install lots of the structures at high density (every 5-15 channel widths) over an entire stream system. We call this overall approach System Wide Woody Addition Treatment (SWWAT). In the long term, we hypothesize that the SWWAT will provide an intial input LWD that will become a part of study creeks which are more

  2. Recognition and treatment of exertional heat illness at a marathon race.

    PubMed

    Hostler, David; Franco, Vanessa; Martin-Gill, Chris; Roth, Ronald N

    2014-01-01

    Exertional heat illness is rarely encountered by individual EMS providers but can be common in certain settings and events. The notion that significantly altered mental status must accompany elevated core temperature in heat illness may delay recognition and treatment. We report on a series of marathon and half-marathon runners who suffered exertional heat illness during a marathon race in relatively mild conditions. Altered mental status was not uniformly present. All patients were treated in the finish line medical tent and responded well to cooling. More than half were discharged from the medical tent without being transported to the hospital. This case series demonstrates that many runners respond to early identification and treatment of exertional heat illness. Significant preparation is required by the medical providers to handle the rapid influx of patients at the conclusion of the event. PMID:24460521

  3. Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil.

  4. Effect of heat treatment temperature on superconducting performance of B 4C added MgB 2/Nb conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljamaa, J.; Kario, A.; Dobročka, E.; Reissner, M.; Kulich, M.; Kováč, P.; Häßler, W.

    2012-02-01

    A previously observed enhancing effect of addition of 10 wt.% of B 4C on critical current density ( Jc) dependence on magnetic flux density ( B) in MgB 2 superconductors is examined here in more detail. Nb sheathed in situ MgB 2 monofilamentary Powder-in-Tube (PIT) samples are prepared with the 10 wt.% addition of boron carbide. The samples are heat treated at different temperatures, namely at 650, 700, 750, and 800 °C for 30 min. The phases and lattice parameters of the samples are studied using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The amount of B 4C does not decrease from the initial amount with increasing heat treatment temperature ( Tht) but instead increases. This indicates that some of the Mg from the precursor reacts with the Nb sheath. Magnetic Jc( B) characteristics are obtained at several temperatures in external B in a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The magnetic and transport Jc( B) results disagree with each other which can be explained by unsuitability of Nb as the sheath with higher Tht. From these results, also pinning force densities ( Fp) are calculated. No effect on pinning mechanism of B 4C added samples is observed by the heat treatment conditions. Resistance dependencies on temperature are also measured in a Physical Properties Measurement System (PPMS). Mg deficiency with high Tht is supported by these measurements.

  5. The effect of heat treatment on the gouging abrasion resistance of alloy white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Are, I. R. S.; Arnold, B. K.

    1995-02-01

    A series of heat treatments was employed to vary the microstructure of four commercially important alloy white cast irons, the wear resistance of which was then assessed by the ASTM jaw-crusher gouging abrasion test. Compared with the as-cast condition, standard austenitizing treatments produced a substantial increase in hardness, a marked decrease in the retained aus-tenite content in the matrix, and, in general, a significant improvement in gouging abrasion resistance. The gouging abrasion resistance tended to decline with increasing austenitizing tem-perature, although the changes in hardness and retained austenite content varied, depending on alloy composition. Subcritical heat treatment at 500 ° following hardening reduced the retained austenite content to values less than 10 pct, and in three of the alloys it caused a significant fall in both hardness and gouging abrasion resistance. The net result of the heat treatments was the development of optimal gouging abrasion resistance at intermediate levels of retained aus-tenite. The differing responses of the alloys to both high-temperature austenitizing treatments and to subcritical heat treatments at 500 ° were related to the effects of the differing carbon and alloying-element concentrations on changes in the M s temperature and secondary carbide precipitation.

  6. Heat-treatment effect on impact properties of reduced-activation steels*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Maziasz, P. J.; Alexander, D. J.

    1991-03-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the impact behavior of eight experimental heats of reduced-activation ferritic steels was investigated. Steels with 2 {1}/{4}, 5, 9, and 12 wt% Cr and containing tungsten, vanadium, and tantalum were examined. Impact properties of steels with 2 {1}/{4} wt% Cr depended on microstructure, which was affected by cooling rate after austenitization. By heat-treating the 2 {1}/{4} wt% Cr steels to change the microstructure from a bainitic structure containing ferrite to one without ferrite, the ductile-brittle transition temperatures were reduced substantially. The cooling rate had essentially no effect on the high-chromium martensitic steels.

  7. Effects of Heat Treatments on Aluminum Oxide Coatings Deposited on Ni-BASED Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiufeng; Luo, Fa; Hseih, Chunhan; Li, Xiangyu

    2015-12-01

    AlxOy films coated on both Ni-based superalloy and silica substrates were prepared by DC reactive magnetron sputtering. Post-deposition annealing was carried out on those as-deposited films. And then 1 h heat treatments were done on the annealed films at constant temperatures ranging from 600-900°C to simulate the high-temperature application. The AlxOy film heated at 600°C exhibited good film property. Bonding strength between the 600°C-heated AlxOy film and the Ni-based substrate was about 11.6 MPa.

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment on Silicon Carbide Based Joining Materials for Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Jones, Russell H.; Nozawa, T.; Kotani, M.; Kishimoto, H.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2001-10-01

    Two general approaches to obtaining silicon carbide-based joint materials were used. The first method relies on reactions between silicon and carbon to form silicon carbide, or to bond silicon carbide powders together. The second method consists of pyrolysing a polycarbosilane polymer to yield an amorphous, covalently bonded material. In order to assess the long-term durability of the joint materials, various heat treatments were performed and the effects on the mechanical properties of the joints were measured. Although the joints derived from the polycarbosilane polymer were not the strongest, the value of strength measured was not affected by heat treatment. On the other hand, the value of the strength of the reaction-based joints was affected by heat treatment, indicating the presence of residual stresses or unreacted material subsequent to processing. Further investigation of reaction-based joining should consist of detailed microscopic studies; however, continued study of joints derived from polymers is also warranted.

  9. Heat stroke during long-term clozapine treatment: should we be concerned about hot weather?

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Maurício Scopel; Oliveira, Lucas Mendes; Lobato, Maria Inês Rodrigues; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo

    2016-03-01

    Objective To describe the case of a patient with schizophrenia on clozapine treatment who had an episode of heat stroke. Case description During a heat wave in January and February 2014, a patient with schizophrenia who was on treatment with clozapine was initially referred for differential diagnose between systemic infection and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, but was finally diagnosed with heat stroke and treated with control of body temperature and hydration. Comments This report aims to alert clinicians take this condition into consideration among other differential diagnoses, especially nowadays with the rise in global temperatures, and to highlight the need for accurate diagnosis of clinical events during pharmacological intervention, in order to improve treatment decisions and outcomes. PMID:27074342

  10. Hydrogen Degassing Study During the Heat Treatment of 1.3-GHZ SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, Mijoung; Kim, H. J.; Rowe, A.; Wong, M.

    2013-10-02

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities undergo a number of processes as part of its manufacturing procedure in order to optimize their performance. Among these processes is a high temperature hydrogen degas heat treatment used to prevent 'Q' decrease. The heat treatment occurs in the processing sequence after either chemically or mechanically polishing the cavity. This paper summarizes the hydrogen measurements during the heat treatment of a sample of chemically and mechanically polished single-cell and nine-cell 1.3-GHz cavities. The hydrogen measurements are analyzed according the polishing method, the polishing history, the amount of time that the cavity was baked at 800°C, and the temperature ramp rate.

  11. Discontinuous Precipitation in Ni-Base Superalloys During Solution Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, D.; D'Souza, N.; Kelleher, J.; Gardner, S.; Dong, Z. H.; West, G. D.; Dong, Hongbiao

    2015-09-01

    Discontinuous precipitation in single-crystal Ni-base superalloys during solution heat treatment has been studied. It is found that discontinuous precipitation occurs at temperatures approaching the solvus, where volume diffusion is dominant. Diffusion of Al ahead of the boundary leads to gamma prime precipitation and is accompanied by a loss in the driving force available for advancement of the grain boundary. The rate of gamma prime precipitation was tracked using in situ neutron diffraction during isothermal hold. Gamma prime precipitation is accompanied by super-saturation of Cr and W within the channels ahead of the interface. The driving force calculated for the initial stages of DP was [10-5 to 10-4] N/[ μm2 of the grain boundary]. The results provide an insight into discontinuous precipitation during solution heat treatment of Ni-base single-crystal alloys and are useful in optimizing the heat treatment process to avoid surface defect formation.

  12. Effect of heat treatment time on microstructure and electrical conductivity in LATP glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sonigra, Dhiren E-mail: ajit.kulkarni@iitb.ac.in; Soman, Swati E-mail: ajit.kulkarni@iitb.ac.in; Kulkarni, Ajit R. E-mail: ajit.kulkarni@iitb.ac.in

    2014-04-24

    Glass-ceramic is prepared by heat treatment of melt quenched 14Li{sub 2}O−9Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}−38TiO{sub 2}−39P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass in the vicinity of crystallization temperature. Growth of ceramic phase is controlled by tuning heat treatment time at fixed temperature. Ceramic phase was identified to be LiTi{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} from X Ray Diffraction analysis. Microstructural evolution of this phase with hold time was observed under high resolution Scanning Electron Microscope. DC conductivity is observed to increase by 4-5 orders of magnitude in this glass-ceramic compared to parent glass. However, formation of pores and cracks with very large heat treatment time seem to hinder further increase of conductivity.

  13. Heated-controlled atmosphere postharvest treatments for Macchiademus diplopterus (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae) and Phlyctinus callosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Johnson, S A; Neven, L G

    2011-04-01

    Nonchemical, environmentally friendly quarantine treatments are preferred for use in postharvest control of insect pests. Combined high temperature and controlled atmosphere quarantine treatments for phytosanitary fruit pests Macchiademus diplopterus (Distant) (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae) and Phlyctinus callosus (Schoenherr) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) were investigated to determine the potential of such treatments for quarantine security. Field-collected, aestivating M. diplopterus adults and P. callosus adults were treated using a controlled atmosphere waterbath system. This system simulates the controlled atmosphere temperature treatment system (CATTS) used to control a number of phytosanitary pests in the United States and allows for a rapid assessment of pest response to treatment. Insects were treated under regular air conditions and a controlled atmosphere of 1% oxygen, 15% carbon dioxide in nitrogen, at two ramping heat rates, 12 and 24 degrees C/h. Treatment of both species was more effective under both heating rates when the controlled atmosphere condition was applied. Under these conditions of controlled atmospheres, mortality of P. callosus was greater when the faster heating rate was used, but the opposite was true for M. diplopterus. This could be due to the physiological condition of aestivation contributing to metabolic arrest in response to the stresses being applied during treatment. Results indicate that the potential for the development of CATTS treatments for these phytosanitary pests, particularly P. callosus, is promising. PMID:21510185

  14. Influence of heat treatments on microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance of weld alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Cortial, F.; Corrieu, J.M.; Vernot-Loier, C.

    1995-05-01

    The effects of heat treatments of the industrial type on the structural, mechanical, and corrosion resistance characteristics of weld alloy 625 have been studied. During the heat treatment, the mean concentration ratios of Nb, Mo, Si, Cr, Ni, and Fe elements between the interdendritic spaces and dendrite cores show little evolution up to 850 C. Beyond that temperature, this ratio approximates 1, and the composition heterogeneity has practically disappeared at 1,000 C. An eight-hour heat treatment at temperatures between 650 C and 750 C results in increased mechanical strength values and reduced ductility and impact strength linked to the precipitation of body-centered tetragonal metastable intermetallic {gamma}{double_prime} Ni{sub 3}Nb phase in the interdendritic spaces. An eight-hour treatment in the temperature range between 750 C and 950 C has catastrophic effects on all mechanical characteristics in relation with the precipitation, in the interdendritic spaces, of the stable orthorhombic intermetallic {delta} Ni{sub 3}(Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Ti) phase. At 1,000 C, the ductility and impact strength are restored. However, the higher the beat treatment temperature, the weaker the mechanical strength. Heat treatments have no effect on the pitting resistance of weld alloy 625 in sea water. The comparison of the results of this study on weld alloy 625 with those previously obtained on forged metal 625 shows that heat treatments below 650 C and above 1,000 C are the sole treatments to avoid embrittlement and impairment of the corrosion resistance characteristics of alloy 625.

  15. Effect of Heat Treatment Temperature on the Spectral Properties of Cu-Ni Coating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-zhen; Shen, Qin-weii; Liu, Xiao-zhou; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Liang-wei; Qi, Jie

    2015-04-01

    Cu-Ni coatings were prepared on the surface of nickel by electrodeposition method, and Cu-Ni coatings were heat-treated in 25-900 °C. Heat-treated Cu-Ni coatings were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, respectively. Effects of heat treatment temperature on the spectral properties of Cu-Ni coatings were studied. The surface of Cu-Ni coating is composed of the nodules. The nodules of Cu-Ni coating surface become smaller with the increase in heat treatment temperature in 25-600 °C. The nodules of Cu-Ni coating surface become smaller and the dividing line between the nodules becomes more blurred with the increase in heat treatment temperature in 600-900 °C. The contents of copper in Cu-Ni coating decrease from 82.52 at % to 78.30 at % with the increase in heat treatment temperature in the range of 25-900 °C; the contents of nickel in Cu-Ni coating increase from 17.48 at % to 21.70 at % with the increase in heat treatment temperature in the range of 25-900 °C. The crystal structure of Cu-Ni coating is Cu0:8lNi0.19 cubic crystal structure. The crystal structure of the CuO0.81Ni0.19 becomes more complete with the increase in heat treatment temperature in 25- 300 °C. Part of crystal structure of the Cu0.81AlNi0.19 can turn Cu0.8lNi0.19 cubic crystal structure into Cu3.8Ni cubic crystal structure, and is advantageous to Cu3.8Ni (311) and Cu0.81Ni0.19 (311) growth with the increase in heat treatment temperature in 600-900 °C. PMID:26197608

  16. Effects of heat treatment on mechanical properties of base metal wrought wire clasps.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Nokubi, T; Yasui, S; Kibi, M; Okuno, Y

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of heat treatment and soldering on the change of shape and mechanical properties of cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy wrought wire clasps. The change of distance between the tips of the clasp arm was measured and mechanical properties were examined using the bending test. The following results were obtained. 1) By heat treatment at 500-700 degrees C for 10 minutes, bending rigidity and deflection at the proportional limit of the clasp arm increased significantly (p < 0.01), while permanent deformation after the bending test decreased considerably (p < 0.01). Concerning the deformation of clasp arms by heating, the distance between clasp tips increased remarkably above 500 degrees C (p < 0.01). 2) These mechanical properties of clasp arms were improved both by electric resistance soldering with silver solder and by heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 10 minutes after soldering. From these results, it was concluded that electric resistance soldering and adequate heat treatment were very effective to improve the mechanical properties of the clasp arm, especially to increase the deflection at the proportional limit and reduce the permanent deformation. PMID:1364130

  17. Detailed near-infrared study of the `water'-related transformations in silcrete upon heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Lauer, Christoph; Buck, Gerald; Miller, Christopher E.; Nickel, Klaus G.

    2016-08-01

    In archaeology, lithic heat treatment is the process of modifying a rock for stone tool production using fire. Although the earliest known cases of heat treatment come from South Africa and involved silcrete, a microcrystalline pedogenic silica rock, its thermal transformations remain poorly understood. We investigate the `water'-related transformations in silcrete using direct transmission near-infrared spectroscopy. We found that SiOH is noticeably lost between 250 and 450 °C and hydroxyl reacts with H2O, part of which is trapped in the structure of the rocks. This water can only be evaporated through heat-induced fracturing at high temperatures, imposing maximum temperatures for silcrete heat treatment of approximately 500 °C. Between 250 and 450 °C new siloxane bonds are formed according to the reaction 2SiOH → Si-O-Si + H2O, which can be expected to transform the rock's mechanical properties. The tolerance of silcrete for relatively fast ramp rates can be explained by its pore volume and low SiOH content, ensuring good water evaporation. These results shed light on the processes taking place in silcrete during heat treatment and allow for a better understanding of the parameters needed for it.

  18. Combined cetuximab and genistein treatment shows additive anti-cancer effect on oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Kim, Myung-Jin; Kim, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Soung-Min; Park, Ju-Yong; Myoung, Hoon

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potency of EGFR pathway inhibition achieved by combining cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, and genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which target extracellular and intracellular domains of the receptor, respectively, in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in vitro and in vivo. Two OSCC cell lines, HSC3 and KB, were treated with cetuximab (C, 0-400mug/ml), genistein (G, 0-80muM), or a combination of both at a range of concentrations. Downstream protein expression of EGFR, p-EGFR, and p-Akt were evaluated by Western blot. Cell proliferation and apoptosis indices were calculated to assess anti-cancer effects in vitro. The in vivo effects of cetuximab and genistein on tumor cell growth were examined using an OSCC xenografted nude mouse model and immunohistochemical analyses of proliferation (PCNA) and microvessel density (CD31). Treatment of cells with dual anti-EGFR agents reduced the expressions of p-EGFR, and p-Akt in HSC3 cell line, but there was no significant difference in downregulation between cetuximab alone and in combination with genistein in KB cells. Both HSC3 and KB cells showed a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation significantly with single agent treatment and combination (p<0.05). In low concentration, combined cetuximab and genistein therapy resulted in additive growth inhibition and more apoptosis compared to that achieved with single-agent exposure in both cell lines. A combination of cetuximab and genistein significantly inhibited tumor growth and caused a substantial growth delay in in vivo models of both cell lines while each single-agent exposure caused no delay of tumor growth. Immunohistochemical staining with PCNA revealed that the group receiving combined cetuximab and genistein exhibited the lowest number of proliferating cells and microvessel density (p<0.05). Combined therapy with genistein and cetuximab can add the potency of EGFR signaling inhibition. Because not all

  19. Enhancement of minority carrier diffusion length in grains of cast Si by hydrogen heat treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimila-Arroyo, J.; Duenas-Santos, F.; del Valle, J. L.

    Minority carrier diffusion length (mcdl) enhancement in the bulk of grains of cast poly-silicon for solar cells has been produced by hydrogen heat treatments. Measurements made by LBIC method, showed an increase of mcdl in the bulk of grains from a mean value of 53 microns to a mean value of 69 microns, before and after the hydrogen heat treatments, respectively, under white light illumination. A mean increase ratio of 33% in the mcdl was obtained in a reproducible way and it was verified that hydrogen was effectively responsible. This result clearly establishes the hydrogen passivating role in this material

  20. Identification of heat treatments for better formability in an aluminum-lithium alloy sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairwa, M. L.; Desai, Sharvari G.; Date, P. P.

    2005-10-01

    Research in the weight of an automobile is a continuous process among auto manufacturers. The “body in white” (BIW, i.e., the body of the car) deserves attention, being a major contributor to the weight of the vehicle. By virtue of a high strength to weight ratio (density smaller than aluminum) and a higher Young’s modulus than aluminum, aluminum-lithium alloy sheet appears to hold promise as an autobody material. Because auto components are required in large numbers and are formed at room temperature, formability under these conditions becomes significant. Aluminum-lithium alloys acquire, because of aging over a short period of time, a good amount of strength and hence dent resistance. In principle, they can be given, through suitable heat treatments, a high formability as well as dent resistance, i.e., an ideal combination of properties. To this end, tensile properties have been determined for a number of heat treatments comprising three different solutionizing temperatures and for three aging times at each of the three aging temperatures. Considerable influence of heat treatment was observed on the mechanical properties (which in turn characterize both formability and dent resistance), such as the strain hardening exponent, average normal anisotropy, yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and percentage elongation to failure. For each property, the best three heat treatments leading to a high formability were identified. Consequently, heat treatments that imparted the greatest formability for processes such as deep drawing and stretch forming have been identified. The investigations show that the best heat treatment for one property may not be the best for another property, calling for a compromise to obtain the most practicable heat treatment schedule. Results shed light on not only the biaxial formability but also springback behavior that is important in the BIW components. Further, the properties obtained from the heat treatment giving good formability

  1. Influence of heat treatment on mechanical properties of 300M Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngblood, J. L.; Raghavan, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    The plane strain fracture toughness and tensile strength response of 300M Steel to a wide variety of austenitizing and tempering temperatures were investigated. The results make it possible for one to select heat treatments which provide an optimum combination of strength and toughness for a variety of structural applications. In particular, improvements in toughness on the order of 20% were found possible with no loss in tensile properties by increasing the austenitizing temperature from the currently employed 1144 K to 1255 K or higher, and this change in heat treatment therefore appears worthy of general implementation.

  2. Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Spheroidized 1045 Steel by Induction Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwook; Shin, Jung-Ho; Choi, Young; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2016-04-01

    The effects of induction heat treatment on the formation of carbide particles and mechanical properties of spheroidized 1045 steel were investigated by means of microstructural analysis and tensile testing. The induction spheroidization accelerated the formation of spherical cementite particles and effectively softened the steel. The volume fraction of cementite was found to be a key factor that affected the mechanical properties of spheroidized steels. Further tests showed that sequential spheroidization by induction and furnace heat treatments enhanced elongation within a short spheroidization time, resulting in better mechanical properties. This was due to the higher volume fraction of spherical cementite particles that had less diffusion time for particle coarsening.

  3. The oxidation behavior of SiC sintered with Al-B-C and improved oxidation resistance via heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sixta, M

    1997-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of high strength and high toughness SiC, sintered with Al, B, and C (ABC-SiC), was examined. Kinetic data were acquired and the parabolic rate constant for oxidation was determined and compared with literature data on various SiC materials. The role of secondary phases on the oxide morphology was explored. ABC-SiC was compared to commercially available SiC, Hexoloy, and SiC sintered with 10% yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). Two-step sintering (pre-coarsening) was employed with holds for 48 hours at 600--1,600 C, prior to the typical hot-pressing conditions of 1,900 C for 1 hour, to change the chemistry and reduce the number of bubbles in the silica scale. The effects on the oxide thickness and integrity was examined as a function of the precoarsening heat treatment temperature. Additionally, the hot-pressed ABC-SiC was subjected to heat treatments (anneals) at 1,800 C for 1 hour in nitrogen, Ar, and vacuum environments, and the effects on subsequent oxidation were evaluated. The Ar and vacuum heat treatments dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of ABC-SiC. Finally, reoxidation experiments were performed to try to alter the surface chemistry of the SiC to improve the oxidation resistance. The four-point bend strengths and two-parameter Weibull plots of the most successful heat treatments were compared with the standard ABC-SiC to ensure that significant degradation did not result from altering the processing of the material.

  4. Additional cooling and heating load improvements in seasonal performance modeling of room and central air conditioners and heat pumps. Topical report, Subtask 3. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-09

    The study focuses on improving the load modeling technique of Seasonal Performance Model (SPM) in order to estimate a more realistic load for seasonal analysis calculations on an hourly basis. A computer simulation program, Seasonal Performance Model Load (SPMLD), was used to calculate the cooling and heating loads for a typical residence in Caribou, Maine; Columbia, Missouri; and Fort Worth, Texas. The derivation of the SPMLD is described and changes made to improve cooling and heating load estimates are identified. (MCW)

  5. Conjugate heat transfer analysis of an ultrasonic molten metal treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Youli; Bian, Feilong; Wang, Yanli; Zhao, Qian

    2014-09-01

    In piezoceramic ultrasonic devices, the piezoceramic stacks may fail permanently or function improperly if their working temperatures overstep the Curie temperature of the piezoceramic material. While the end of the horn usually serves near the melting point of the molten metal and is enclosed in an airtight chamber, so that it is difficult to experimentally measure the temperature of the transducer and its variation with time, which bring heavy difficulty to the design of the ultrasonic molten metal treatment system. To find a way out, conjugate heat transfer analysis of an ultrasonic molten metal treatment system is performed with coupled fluid and heat transfer finite element method. In modeling of the system, the RNG model and the SIMPLE algorithm are adopted for turbulence and nonlinear coupling between the momentum equation and the energy equation. Forced air cooling as well as natural air cooling is analyzed to compare the difference of temperature evolution. Numerical results show that, after about 350 s of working time, temperatures in the surface of the ceramic stacks in forced air cooling drop about 7 K compared with that in natural cooling. At 240 s, The molten metal surface emits heat radiation with a maximum rate of about 19 036 W/m2, while the heat insulation disc absorbs heat radiation at a maximum rate of about 7922 W/m2, which indicates the effectiveness of heat insulation of the asbestos pad. Transient heat transfer film coefficient and its distribution, which are difficult to be measured experimentally are also obtained through numerical simulation. At 240 s, the heat transfer film coefficient in the surface of the transducer ranges from -17.86 to 20.17 W/(m2 · K). Compared with the trial and error method based on the test, the proposed research provides a more effective way in the design and analysis of the temperature control of the molten metal treatment system.

  6. Heat Treatment of Thixo-Formed Hypereutectic X210CrW12 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogal, Łukasz; Dutkiewicz, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Steel is a particularly challenging material to semisolid process because of the high temperatures involved and the potential for surface oxidation. Hot-rolled X210CrW12 tool steel was applied as a feedstock for thixoforming. The samples were heated up to 1525 K (1250 °C) to obtain 30 pct of the liquid phase. They were pressed in the semisolid state into a die preheated up to 473 K (200 °C) using a device based on a high-pressure die casting machine. As a result, a series of main bucket tooth thixo-casts for a mining combine was obtained. The microstructure of the thixo-cast consisted of austenite globular grains (average grain size 46 μm) surrounded by a eutectic mixture (ferrite, austenite, and M7C3 carbides). The average hardness of primary austenite grains was 470 HV0.02 and that of eutectic 551 HV0.02. The X-ray analysis confirmed the presence of 11.8 pct α-Fe, 82.4 pct γ-Fe, and 5.8 pct M7C3 carbides in the thixo-cast samples. Thermal and dilatometric effects were registered in the solid state, and the analysis of curves enabled the determination of characteristic temperatures of heat treatment: 503 K, 598 K, 693 K, 798 K, 828 K, 903 K, and 953 K (230 °C, 325 °C, 420 °C, 525 °C, 555 °C, 630 °C, 680 °C). The thixo-casts were annealed at these temperatures for 2 hours. During annealing in the temperature range 503 K to 693 K (230 °C to 420 °C), the hardness of primary globular grains continuously decreased down to 385HV0.02. The X-ray diffraction showed a slight shift of peaks responsible for the tension release. Moreover, after the treatment at 693 K (420 °C), an additional peak from precipitated carbides was observed in the X-ray diffraction. Thin plates of perlite (average hardness 820 HV0.02) with carbide precipitates appeared at the boundaries of globular grains at 798 K (525 °C). They occupied 17 pct of the grain area. Plates of martensite were found in the center of grains, while the retained austenite was observed among them (average

  7. Effect of grinding and heat treatment on the mechanical behavior of zirconia ceramic.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gabriela Freitas; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Amaral, Marina; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of grinding on roughness, flexural strength, and reliability of a zirconia ceramic before and after heat treatment. Seven groups were tested (n = 15): a control group (labeled CG, untreated), and six groups of samples ground with diamond discs, simulating diamond burs, with grits of 200 µm (G80); 160 µm (G120), and 25 µm (G600), either untreated or heat-treated at 1200°C for 2 h (labeled A). Yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal discs were manufactured, ground, and submitted to roughness and crystalline phase analyses before the biaxial flexural strength test. There was no correlation between roughness (Ra and Rz) and flexural strength. The reliability of the materials was not affected by grinding or heat treatment, but the characteristic strength was higher after abrasion with diamond discs, irrespective of grit size. The X-ray diffraction data showed that grinding leads to a higher monoclinic (m) phase content, whereas heat treatment produces reverse transformation, leading to a fraction of m-phase in ground samples similar to that observed in the control group. However, after heat treatment, only the G80A samples presented strength similar to that of the control group, while the other groups showed higher strength values. When zirconia pieces must be adjusted for clinical use, a smoother surface can be obtained by employing finer-grit diamond burs. Moreover, when the amount of monoclinic phase is related to the degradation of zirconia, the laboratory heat treatment of ground pieces is indicated for the reverse transformation of zirconia crystals. PMID:26676188

  8. The influence of distal-end heat treatment on deflection of nickel-titanium archwire

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marcelo Faria; Pinzan-Vercelino, Célia Regina Maia; Gurgel, Júlio de Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the deflection-force behavior of nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic wires adjacent to the portion submitted to heat treatment. Material and Methods: A total of 106 segments of NiTi wires (0.019 x 0.025-in) and heat-activated NiTi wires (0.016 x 0.022-in) from four commercial brands were tested. The segments were obtained from 80 archwires. For the experimental group, the distal portion of each segmented archwire was subjected to heat treatment (n = 40), while the other distal portion of the same archwire was used as a heating-free control group (n = 40). Deflection tests were performed in a temperature-controlled universal testing machine. Unpaired Student's t-tests were applied to determine if there were differences between the experimental and control groups for each commercial brand and size of wire. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the tested groups with the same size and brand of wire. Conclusions: Heat treatment applied to the distal ends of rectangular NiTi archwires does not permanently change the elastic properties of the adjacent portions. PMID:27007766

  9. Heat Treatment Effect on Fracture Toughness of F82H Irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Hirose, Takanori; Odette, G.R.; Okubo, N.; Jitsukawa, Shiro; Sawai, T.

    2011-01-01

    Irradiation hardening and fracture toughness of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel F82H after irradiation were investigated with a focus on changing the fracture toughness transition temperature as a result of several heat treatments. The specimens were standard F82H-IEA (IEA), F82H-IEA with several heat treatments (Mod1 series) and a heat of F82H (Mod3) containing 0.1 % tantalum. The specimens were irradiated up to 20 dpa at 300oC in the High Flux Isotope Reactor under a collaborative research program between JAEA/US-DOE. The results of hardness tests showed that irradiation hardening of IEA was comparable with that of Mod3. However, the fracture toughness-transition temperature of Mod3 was lower than that of IEA. The transition temperature of Mod1 was also lower than that of the IEA heat. These results suggest that optimization of specifications on the heat treatment condition and modification of the minor alloying elements seem to be effective to reduce the fracture toughness-transition temperature after irradiation.

  10. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the full FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.

  11. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the fullmore » FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.« less

  12. Proteomic profiling of camel and cow milk proteins under heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Felfoul, Imène; Jardin, Julien; Gaucheron, Frédéric; Attia, Hamadi; Ayadi, M A

    2017-02-01

    Cow and camel milk proteins before and after heat treatment at 80°C for 60min were identified using LC/MS and LC-MS/MS following monodimensional electrophoresis. The database used for the identification of camel and cow proteins was set from http://www.uniprot.org/. The obtained results showed that, after heating, camel milk at 80°C for 60min, camel α-lactalbumin (α-la) and peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP) were not detected while camel serum albumin (CSA) was significantly diminished. When heating cow milk at 80°C for 60min, α-lactalbumin (α-la) and β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were not significantly detected. Moreover, 19 protein bands from SDS-PAGE were analyzed and a total of 45 different proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. Casein fractions were kept intact under a heat treatment of 80°C during 60min of both camel and cow milks. Camel and bovine whey proteins were affected by a heat treatment of 80°C for 60min. PMID:27596405

  13. Effect of chemical heat treatment on the fatigue resistance of titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Matokhnyuk, L.E.; Nochovnaya, N.A.; Voinalovich, A.V.; Yakovleva, T.Y.

    1985-11-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of titanium alloy articles, chemical heat treatment, in particular, oxidation and nitriding diffusion impregnation of the article is performed. As a result of this treatment there is a marked increase in surface layer hardness. The change in structure and properties of surface layers have a marked effect on material resistance in fatigue failure as well as on sensitivity to stress concentration. This is the subject of the research discussed here.

  14. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  15. Influence of homogenization and artificial aging heat treatments on corrosion behavior of Mg-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Beldjoudi, T.; Fiaud, C.; Robbiola, L. . Lab. d'Etudes de la Corrosion)

    1993-09-01

    The influence of heat treatment on corrosion behavior of magnesium-aluminum (Mg-9Al) alloys was investigated by studying the electrochemical properties of Mg-9Al in the solution-treated (T4) and artificially aged (T6) conditions. The alloys' properties were compared to those of pure Mg, the intermetallic Mg[sub 17]Al[sub 12] phase, and different Mg-Al-based alloys (Mg-3Al, AZ91). The Mg-9Al alloy exhibited better corrosion resistance in the T6 condition than in the T4 condition because of the intermetallic Mg[sub 17]Al[sub 12] precipitates present n the T6 alloy. The mechanism responsible for this behavior was attributed to a more protective porous film on the T6 matrix alloy than on the T4 alloy. Addition of zinc did not modify these results. Localized corrosion testing showed the Mg-Al alloys were attacked preferentially in relation to magnesium silicide (Mg[sub 2]Si) precipitates which were characterized clearly using metallurgical examinations.

  16. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the sizemore » of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.« less

  17. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  18. Investigation of laser heating effect of metallic nanoparticles on cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, G. S.; Liu, X. M.; Chen, H. J.; Yu, J. S.; Chen, X. D.; Yao, Y.; Qi, L. M.; Chen, Z. J.

    2016-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles can be applied for hyperthermia therapy of cancer treatment to enhance the efficacy because of their high absorption rate. The absorption of laser energy by metallic nanoparticles is strongly dependent on the concentration, shape, material of nanoparticles and the wavelength of the laser. However, there is no systematic investigation on the heating effect involving different material, concentration and laser wavelength. In this paper, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and sliver nanowires (AgNWs) with different concentrations are heated by 450nm and 532nm wavelength laser to investigate the heating effect. The result shows that the temperature distribution of heated metallic nanoparticles is non-uniform.

  19. The Effect of Solution Heat Treatment on an Advanced Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Kantzos, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    Five heat treat options for an advanced nickel-base disk alloy, LSHR, have been investigated. These included two conventional solution heat treat cycles, subsolvus/oil quench and supersolvus/fan cool, which yield fine grain and coarse grain microstructure disks respectively, as well as three advanced dual microstructure heat treat (DMHT) options. The DMHT options produce disks with a fine grain bore and a coarse grain rim. Based on an overall evaluation of the mechanical property data, it was evident that the three DMHT options achieved a desirable balance of properties in comparison to the conventional solution heat treatments for the LSHR alloy. However, one of the DMHT options, SUB/DMHT, produced the best set of properties, largely based on dwell crack growth data. Further evaluation of the SUB/DMHT option in spin pit experiments on a generic disk shape demonstrated the advantages and reliability of a dual grain structure at the component level.

  20. Fluxless Brazing and Heat Treatment of a Plate-Fin Sandwich Actively Cooled Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    The processes and techniques used to fabricate plate-fin sandwich actively cooled panels are presented. The materials were 6061 aluminum alloy and brazing sheet having clad brazing alloy. The panels consisted of small scale specimens, fatigue specimens, and a large 0.61 m by 1.22 m test panel. All panels were fluxless brazed in retorts in heated platen presses while exerting external pressure to assure intimate contact of details. Distortion and damage normally associated with that heat treatment were minimized by heat treating without fixtures and solution quenching in an organic polymer solution. The test panel is the largest fluxless brazed and heat treated panel of its configuration known to exist.

  1. On post-weld heat treatment cracking in tig welded superalloy ATI 718Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asala, G.; Ojo, O. A.

    The susceptibility of heat affected zone (HAZ) to cracking in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welded Allvac 718Plus superalloy during post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was studied. Contrary to the previously reported case of low heat input electron beam welded Allvac 718Plus, where HAZ cracking occurred during PWHT, the TIG welded alloy is crack-free after PWHT, notwithstanding the presence of similar micro-constituents that caused cracking in the low input weld. Accordingly, the formation of brittle HAZ intergranular micro-constituents may not be a sufficient factor to determine cracking propensity, the extent of heat input during welding may be another major factor that influences HAZ cracking during PWHT of the aerospace superalloy Allvac 718Plus.

  2. Influence of heat treatment on hydrogen ingress into V-4Cr-4Ti alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Ryo; Hatano, Yuji; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Matsui, Hideki; Watanabe, Kuniaki

    2004-08-01

    Specimens of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy were heated at 1273 K in vacuum, and the influence of this heat treatment on H 2 absorption was examined at temperatures from 523 to 1023 K under the presence of water vapor of 10 -5 Pa. The rate of H 2 absorption was significantly reduced by the heat treatment in the temperature range examined. Such reduction in the absorption rate was ascribed to the surface segregation of Ti and increase in surface oxygen coverage caused by preferential oxidation of segregating Ti by water vapor. Comparison with data reported by other researchers [J. Nucl. Mater. 233-237 (1996) 376; Fusion Technol. 34 (1998) 868; J. Nucl. Mater. 233-237 (1996) 510] indicated the strong barrier effect of Ti oxide against hydrogen ingress.

  3. YIELD STRENGTH PREDICTION FOR RAPID AGE-HARDENING HEAT TREATMENT OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hebi; Sabau, Adrian S; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Skszek, Timothy; Niu, X

    2013-01-01

    A constitutive model has been developed to predict the yield strength aging curves for aluminum casting alloys during non-isothermal age-hardening processes. The model provides the specific relationship between the process variables and yield strength. Several aging heat treatment scenarios have been investigated using the proposed model, including two-step aging recipes. Two-step aging heat treatments involve a low temperature regime to promote nucleation of secondary phases and a second step at higher temperature for the growth of the secondary phases. The predicted results show that yield strength of approximately 300MPa might be obtained in shorter aging time, of approximately 30 minutes. Thus, better mechanical properties can be obtained by optimizing the time-temperature schedules for the precipitation hardening process of heat treatable aluminum alloys.

  4. Changes in acidity of Fe-pillared/delaminated smectites on heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bandosz, T.J.; Cheng, K.

    1997-07-15

    Hydroxy-iron smectites were prepared using solutions with a OH/Fe content of about 1.2 and 2.5. To study thermal stability, the samples were heated in air at temperatures between 473 and 873 K. Changes in surface chemistry imposed by heat treatment were evaluated using potentiometric titration. The pK{sub a} distributions revealed peaks characteristic for iron complexes (Fe{sup III}) deposited on the surface of smectite. Heat treatment resulted in significant changes in the chemistry of the material and creation of new species; however, the sorbents textural properties did not alter significantly. Data obtained from X-ray diffraction and sorption of nitrogen demonstrate that iron species are adsorbed mainly on the external surface of smectite and that the properties of the final products depend upon the OH/Fe ratio of hydroxy-iron solutions used in their preparation.

  5. Thermal treatments of foods: a predictive general-purpose code for heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, Anna Angela

    2005-05-01

    Thermal treatments of foods required accurate processing protocols. In this context, mathematical modeling of heat and mass transfer can play an important role in the control and definition of the process parameters as well as to design processing systems. In this work a code able to simulate heat and mass transfer phenomena within solid bodies has been developed. The code has been written with the ability of describing different geometries and it can account for any kind of different initial/boundary conditions. Transport phenomena within multi-layer bodies can be described, and time/position dependent material parameters can be implemented. Finally, the code has been validated by comparison with a problem for which the analytical solution is known, and by comparison with a differential scanning calorimetry signal that described the heating treatment of a raw potato (Solanum tuberosum).

  6. Implantable polymer/metal thin film structures for the localized treatment of cancer by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Theriault, Christian; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an implantable polymer/metal alloy thin film structure for localized post-operative treatment of breast cancer. A combination of experiments and models is used to study the temperature changes due to Joule heating by patterned metallic thin films embedded in poly-dimethylsiloxane. The heat conduction within the device and the surrounding normal/cancerous breast tissue is modeled with three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The FEM simulations are used to explore the potential effects of device geometry and Joule heating on the temperature distribution and lesion (thermal dose). The FEM model is validated using a gel model that mimics biological media. The predictions are also compared to prior results from in vitro studies and relevant in vivo studies in the literature. The implications of the results are discussed for the potential application of polymer/metal thin film structures in hyperthermic treatment of cancer.

  7. Electrical energy consumption and heating requirements of municipal wastewater treatment plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M. H.; Wang, L. K.

    1982-02-01

    Electrical energy consumption models were developed. The unit operations/processes of pumping, screening and comminution,, grit removal, sedimentation, chlorination, gravity thickening, anaerobic digestion, vacuum filtration, incineration, and diffused air flotation are examined. The mathematical models of total heating requirements of biological wastewater treatment plants are also presented.

  8. High pressure and heat treatments effects on pectic substances in guava juice.

    PubMed

    Yen, G C; Lin, H T

    1998-01-01

    Effects of high pressure treatment on changes in pectic substances in guava juice were investigated and compared with those of heat treated samples. The viscosity and turbidity of guava juice pressurized at 6000 atm and 25 degrees C for 10 min increased slightly, whereas the viscosity of juice heated at 95 degrees C for 5 min decreased from 362 to 285 cps while turbidity increased from 0.87 to 1.15 (OD 600 nm). There were no apparent changes in water soluble, oxalate soluble and alkali soluble pectins in the pressurized juice. However, heat treated juice exhibited a decrease in its water and alkali soluble pectins and a slight increase in oxalate soluble pectin. The DEAE-cellulose profiles of pectic substances in guava juice were apparently unchanged after high pressure treatment while they were markedly changed by heat treatment, due to coagulation or degradation. During thermal processing, the degradation of pectin in guava juice caused a decrease in viscosity while the coagulation of pectin resulted in an increase in turbidity and cloud content. High pressure treatment showed no marked changes in pectic substances and cloud content in guava juice and maintained its natural viscous properties. PMID:9598192

  9. Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shackson, R.H.

    1991-10-09

    This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

  10. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. 590.548 Section 590.548 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT)...

  11. 46 CFR 52.05-15 - Heat treatment (modifies PW-10).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1...-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Requirements for Boilers Fabricated by Welding § 52.05-15 Heat treatment (modifies PW-10). (a) Vessels...

  12. 46 CFR 52.05-15 - Heat treatment (modifies PW-10).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1...-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Requirements for Boilers Fabricated by Welding § 52.05-15 Heat treatment (modifies PW-10). (a) Vessels...

  13. 46 CFR 52.05-15 - Heat treatment (modifies PW-10).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1...-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Requirements for Boilers Fabricated by Welding § 52.05-15 Heat treatment (modifies PW-10). (a) Vessels...

  14. 46 CFR 52.05-15 - Heat treatment (modifies PW-10).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1...-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Requirements for Boilers Fabricated by Welding § 52.05-15 Heat treatment (modifies PW-10). (a) Vessels...

  15. 46 CFR 52.05-15 - Heat treatment (modifies PW-10).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 52.01-1...-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Requirements for Boilers Fabricated by Welding § 52.05-15 Heat treatment (modifies PW-10). (a) Vessels...

  16. The metallography of heat treatment effects in a nickel-base casting alloy. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Goodall, T G; Lewis, A J

    1979-08-01

    A series of standard tensile specimens produced from a nickel-base removable partial denture casting alloy were subjected to heat treatments at three temperatures and three periods at each temperature. The microstructures developed within the castings disclose changes in both the matrix and interdendritic zones. PMID:296698

  17. Effect of Alloying, Heat Treatment and Carbon Content on White Layer Formation in Machining of Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sangil; Melkote, Shreyes N; Riester, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the effects of alloying, carbon content, and heat treatment on white layer formation in machining of steels. The investigation is carried out by machining steels that differ in alloying, heat treatment and carbon content, via orthogonal cutting tests performed with low cBN content tools. The depth of white layer and its hardness are measured for every case. Specifically, the thickness and hardness of white layer produced in cutting AISI 1045 and AISI 4340 annealed steels are compared to determine the effect of alloying on white layer formation. The effect of heat treatment on white layer formation and its hardness are investigated by machining annealed and hardened (53 HRC) AISI 4340 steels. The effect of carbon content on white layer formation is investigated by cutting hardened AISI 52100 and AISI 4340 steels of the same hardness (53 HRC). The results of the study show that alloying, heat treatment, and carbon content influence white layer formation and its hardness.

  18. Changes in acoustic emission peaks in precipitation strengthened alloys with heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Carpenter, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic emission was measured during tensile deformation in a number of precipitation-strengthened alloys as a function of prior heat treatment. The alloys tested included 7075, 6061, and 2219 aluminum; a modified A-286 stainless steel (JBK-75) and an experimental beryllium-containing stainless steel; and Incoloy 903. A rms voltage peak was observed in all the alloys near the onset of plastic flow, and a second peak was usually observed in 7075, 2219, and Incoloy 903 at plastic strains greater than 1%. Some evidence of a second peak was also observed in 6061 aluminum. Changes with heat treatment in the stress and strain at which the second peak occurred were consistent with the peak arising from the fracture of inclusions. The shifts in the location of the peak were in a direction so as to make the stress on the inclusions at the second peak relatively insensitive to prior heat treatment. The amplitude distributions of acoustic emission signals were also consistent with this interpretation. The strain at which the first acoustic emission peak occurred also varied with heat treatment, but the dependence of peak location on prior aging was different for the various alloys.

  19. Heat treatment temperature influence on ASTM A890 GR 6A super duplex stainless steel microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo; E-mail: marcelo.martins@sulzer.com; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2005-09-15

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are ferrous alloys with up to 26% chromium, 8% nickel, 5% molybdenum and 0.3% nitrogen, which are largely used in applications in media containing ions from the halogen family, mainly the chloride ion (Cl{sup -}). The emergence of this material aimed at substituting Copper-Nickel alloys (Cupro-Nickel) that despite presenting good corrosion resistance, has mechanical properties quite inferior to steel properties. The metallurgy of duplex and super duplex stainless steel is complex due to high sensitiveness to sigma phase precipitation that becomes apparent, due to the temperatures they are exposed on cooling from solidification as well as from heat treatment processes. The objective of this study was to verify the influence of heat treating temperatures on the microstructure and hardness of ASTM A890/A890M Gr 6A super duplex stainless steel type. Microstructure control is of extreme importance for castings, as the chemical composition and cooling during solidification inevitably provide conditions for precipitation of sigma phase. Higher hardness in these materials is directly associated to high sigma phase concentration in the microstructure, precipitated in the ferrite/austenite interface. While heat treatment temperature during solution treatment increases, the sigma phase content in the microstructure decreases and consequently, the material hardness diminishes. When the sigma phase was completely dissolved by the heat treatment, the material hardness was influenced only due to ferrite and austenite contents in the microstructure.

  20. Additional treatment of wastewater reduces endocrine disruption in wild fish--a comparative study of tertiary and advanced treatments.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Alice; Green, Christopher; Nicol, Elizabeth; Beresford, Nicola; Kanda, Rakesh; Henshaw, Alan; Churchley, John; Jobling, Susan

    2012-05-15

    Steroid estrogens are thought to be the major cause of feminization (intersex) in wild fish. Widely used wastewater treatment technologies are not effective at removing these contaminants to concentrations thought to be required to protect aquatic wildlife. A number of advanced treatment processes have been proposed to reduce the concentrations of estrogens entering the environment. Before investment is made in such processes, it is imperative that we compare their efficacy in terms of removal of steroid estrogens and their feminizing effects with other treatment options. This study assessed both steroid removal and intersex induction in adult and early life stage fish (roach, Rutilus rutilus). Roach were exposed directly to either secondary (activated sludge process (ASP)), tertiary (sand filtrated (SF)), or advanced (chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)), granular activated charcoal (GAC)) treated effluents for six months. Surprisingly, both the advanced GAC and tertiary SF treatments (but not the ClO(2) treatment) significantly removed the intersex induction associated with the ASP effluent; this was not predicted by the steroid estrogen measurements, which were higher in the tertiary SF than either the GAC or the ClO(2). Therefore our study highlights the importance of using both biological and chemical analysis when assessing new treatment technologies. PMID:22500691

  1. Genetic characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from food processing facilities before and after postcook chiller heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Eglezos, Sofroni; Dykes, Gary A; Huang, Bixing; Turner, Mark S; Seale, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Possible selection for and establishment of stress-resistant Listeria monocytogenes variants as a consequence of heating interventions is of concern to the food industry. Lineage analysis and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was performed on 20 L. monocytogenes isolates, of which 15 were obtained before and 5 were obtained after heat treatment of a postcook meat chiller. The ctsR gene (a class III heat shock gene regulator) from 14 isolates was amplified and sequenced because previous work has indicated that spontaneous mutations can occur in this gene during heat treatment. Heat treatment of the meat chiller did not significantly change the relative abundance of the various L. monocytogenes lineages; lineage II strains (less-heat-resistant isolates) dominated both before and after heat treatment. MLVA typing confirmed that some isolates of L. monocytogenes occur both before and after heat treatment of the chiller. No isolate of L. monocytogenes indicated any likely functionally significant mutations in ctsR. This study indicates the absence of any obvious difference in the profiles of L. monocytogenes strains obtained before and after heat treatment of a meat chiller, based on the characteristics examined. Although this finding supports the effectiveness of heat treatment, the limited number of strains used and characteristics examined mean that further study on a larger scale is required before firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:23905808

  2. Effect of Composition and Heat Treatment on MnBi Magnetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jun; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Bowden, Mark E.; Xie, Wei; Li, Guosheng; Nie, Zimin; Zarkevich, Nikolai; Kramer, Matthew J.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-08-17

    The metallic compound MnBi is a promising rare-earth-free permanent magnet material. Compare to other rare-earth-free candidates, MnBi stands out for its high intrinsic coercivity (Hci) and its large positive temperature coefficient. Several groups have demonstrated that the Hci of MnBi compound in thin film or in powder form can exceed 12 kOe and 26 kOe at 300 K and 523 K, respectively. Such steep increase in Hci with increasing temperature is unique to MnBi. Consequently, MnBi is a highly sought-after hard phase for exchange coupling nanocomposite magnets. The reaction between Mn and Bi is peritectic, so Mn tends to precipitate out of the MnBi liquid during the solidification process. As result, the composition of the Mn-Bi alloy with the largest amount of the desired LTP (low temperature phase) MnBi and highest saturation magnetization will be over-stoichiometric and rich in Mn. The amount of additional Mn required to compensate the Mn precipitation depends on solidification rate: the faster the quench speed, the less Mn precipitates. Here we report a systematic study of the effect of composition and heat treatments on the phase contents and magnetic properties of Mn-Bi alloys. In this study, Mn-Bi alloys with 14 compositions were prepared using conventional metallurgical methods such as arc melting and vacuum heat treatment, and the obtained alloys were analyzed for compositions, crystal structures, phase content, and magnetic properties. The results show that the composition with 55 at.% Mn exhibits the highest LTP MnBi content and the highest magnetization. The sample with this composition shows >90 wt.% LTP MnBi content. Its measured saturation magnetization is 68 emu/g with 2.3 T applied field at 300 K; its coercivity is 13 kOe and its energy product is 12 MGOe at 300 K. A bulk magnet fabricated using this powder exhibits an energy product of 8.2 MGOe.

  3. Investigation into the effect of heat treatment on the thermal conductivity of 3-D carbon/carbon fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Burchell, T.D. ); Baker, C.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The material used in this study was a carbon-carbon fiber composite manufactured from precursor yarn and petroleum based pitch through a process of repetitive densification of a woven preform. The resultant high temperature-high strength material exhibits relatively high thermal conductivity and is thus of interest to the fusion energy, plasma materials interactions (PMI) and plasma facing components (PFC) communities. Carbon-carbon fiber composite manufacture involves two distinct processes, preform weaving and component densification. In this study three samples were subjected to an additional heat treatment of 2550, 2750 or 3000{degree}C at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) subsequent to their fourth graphitization at 2400{degree}C. It should be noted that no effort was made to optimize the composite for thermal conductivity, but rather only to provide a material with which to evaluate the effect of the final heat treatment temperature on the thermal conductivity. The fiber is the primary source of heat conduction in the composite. Consequently, increasing the fiber volume fraction, and/or the fiber thermal conductivity is expected to increase the composite thermal conductivity. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Effect of composition and heat treatment on MnBi magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jun; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Bowden, Mark E; Xie, Wei; Li, Guosheng; Nie, Zimin; Zarkevich, Nikolai; Kramer, Matthew J; Johnson, Duane

    2014-10-01

    The metallic compound MnBi is a promising rare-earth-free permanent magnet material, unique among all candidates for its high intrinsic coercivity (Hci) and its large positive temperature coefficient. The Hci of MnBi in thin-film or powder form can exceed 12 and 26 kOe at 300 and 523 K, respectively. Such a steep rise in Hci with increasing temperature is unique to MnBi. Consequently, MnBi is a highly sought-after hard phase for exchange coupling nanocomposite magnets. However, the reaction between Mn and Bi is peritectic, and hence Mn tends to precipitate out of the MnBi liquid during the solidification process. As result, when the alloy is prepared using conventional induction or arc-melting casting methods, additional Mn is required to compensate the precipitation of Mn. In addition to composition, post-casting annealing plays an important role in obtaining a high content of MnBi low-temperature phase (LTP) because the annealing encourages the Mn precipitates and the unreacted Bi to react, forming the desired LTP phase. Here we report a systematic study of the effect of composition and heat treatments on the phase content and magnetic properties of Mn–Bi alloys. In this study, 14 compositions were prepared using conventional metallurgical methods, and the compositions, crystal structures, phase content and magnetic properties of the resulting alloys were analyzed. The results show that the composition with 55 at.% Mn exhibits both the highest LTP content (93 wt.%) and magnetization (74 emu g-1 with 9 T applied field at 300 K).

  5. Protein extraction from heat-stabilized defatted rice bran. 1. Physical processing and enzyme treatments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanhu; Hettiarachchy, Navam S; Shellhammer, Thomas H

    2002-12-01

    Physical processing with or without enzyme treatments on protein extraction from heat-stabilized defatted rice bran (HDRB) was evaluated. Freeze-thaw, sonication, high-speed blending, and high-pressure methods extracted 12%, 15%, 16%, and 11% protein, respectively. Sonication (0-100%, 750 W), followed by amylase and combined amylase and protease treatments, extracted 25.6-33.9% and 54.0-57.8% protein, respectively. Blending followed by amylase and protease treatment extracted 5.0% more protein than the nonblended enzymatic treatments. High-pressure treatments, 0-800 MPa, with water or amylase-protease combinations, extracted 10.5-11.1% or 61.8-66.6% protein, respectively. These results suggest that physical processing in combination with enzyme treatments can be effective in extracting protein from HDRB. PMID:12452673

  6. A study on the re-solution heat treatment of AA 2618 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbek, Ibrahim . E-mail: iozbek@sakarya.edu.tr

    2007-03-15

    In the present study, the effects of re-solution treatment of AA2618 aluminum alloy has been investigated. Solution heat treatments of 520-640 deg. C for 14-24 h were applied followed by artificial aging. Characterization studies that were carried out by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques showed that recrystallisation was not observed by solution treatment at 530 deg. C whereas it did occur as the solution treatment and the duration time were increased above 530 deg. C. Increasing the solution treatment temperature further coarsened both the grains and the precipitates, resulting in significant reduction in hardness. Al{sub 9}FeNi-type intermetallics are not completely dissolved by these solution treatments.

  7. Influence of heat treatment on antioxidant capacity and (poly)phenolic compounds of selected vegetables.

    PubMed

    Juániz, Isabel; Ludwig, Iziar A; Huarte, Estibaliz; Pereira-Caro, Gema; Moreno-Rojas, Jose Manuel; Cid, Concepción; De Peña, María-Paz

    2016-04-15

    The impact of cooking heat treatments (frying in olive oil, frying in sunflower oil and griddled) on the antioxidant capacity and (poly)phenolic compounds of onion, green pepper and cardoon, was evaluated. The main compounds were quercetin and isorhamnetin derivates in onion, quercetin and luteolin derivates in green pepper samples, and chlorogenic acids in cardoon. All heat treatments tended to increase the concentration of phenolic compounds in vegetables suggesting a thermal destruction of cell walls and sub cellular compartments during the cooking process that favor the release of these compounds. This increase, specially that observed for chlorogenic acids, was significantly correlated with an increase in the antioxidant capacity measured by DPPH (r=0.70). Griddled vegetables, because of the higher temperature applied during treatment in comparison with frying processes, showed the highest amounts of phenolic compounds with increments of 57.35%, 25.55% and 203.06% compared to raw onion, pepper and cardoon, respectively. PMID:26616976

  8. Graphene transport properties upon exposure to PMMA processing and heat treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammelgaard, Lene; Caridad, José M.; Cagliani, Alberto; Mackenzie, David M. A.; Petersen, Dirch H.; Booth, Timothy J.; Bøggild, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of graphene's electrical transport properties due to processing with the polymer polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and heat are examined in this study. The use of stencil (shadow mask) lithography enables fabrication of graphene devices without the usage of polymers, chemicals or heat, allowing us to measure the evolution of the electrical transport properties during individual processing steps from the initial as-exfoliated to the PMMA-processed graphene. Heating generally promotes the conformation of graphene to SiO2 and is found to play a major role for the electrical properties of graphene while PMMA residues are found to be surprisingly benign. In accordance with this picture, graphene devices with initially high carrier mobility tend to suffer a decrease in carrier mobility, while in contrast an improvement is observed for low carrier mobility devices. We explain this by noting that flakes conforming poorly to the substrate will have a higher carrier mobility which will however be reduced as heat treatment enhance the conformation. We finally show the electrical properties of graphene to be reversible upon heat treatments in air up to 200 °C.

  9. Heat treatment results in a loss of transgene-encoded activities in several tobacco lines.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, K; Dröge-Laser, W; Köhne, S; Broer, I

    1997-01-01

    Heat treatment (37 degrees C) of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants led to a reversible reduction or complete loss of transgene-encoded activities in about 40% of 10 independent transformants carrying the luciferase-coding region fused to the 355 cauliflower mosaic virus or the soybean small subunit promoter and the nopaline synthase promoter driving the neomycin phosphotransferase gene, whereas the other lines had temperature-tolerant activities. Temperature sensitivity or tolerance of transgene-encoded activities was heritable. In some of the lines, temperature sensitivity of the transgene-encoded activities depended on the stage of development, occurring in either seedlings (40% luciferase and 50% neomycin phosphotransferase) or adult plants (both 40%). The phenomenon did not correlate with copy numbers or the homo- or hemizygous state of the transgenes. In lines harboring a temperature-sensitive luciferase activity, reduction of bioluminescence was observed after 2 to 3 h at 37 degrees C. Activity was regained after 2 h of subsequent cultivation at 25 degrees C. Irrespective of the reaction to the heat treatment, the level of luciferase RNA was slightly increased at 37 degrees C. Only in lines showing temperature sensitivity of transgene-encoded activities was the amount of luciferase and neomycin phosphotransferase strongly reduced. In sterile culture, heat treatment for 15 d did not cause visible damage or changes in plant morphology. In all plants tested a slight induction of the heat-shock response was observed at 37 degrees C. PMID:9390430

  10. Effect of heat treatment on carbon fiber surface properties and fibers/epoxy interfacial adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhishuang; Zhang, Baoyan; Shi, Fenghui; Li, Min; Zhang, Zuoguang; Gu, Yizhuo

    2011-08-01

    Carbon fiber surface properties are likely to change during the molding process of carbon fiber reinforced matrix composite, and these changes could affect the infiltration and adhesion between carbon fiber and resin. T300B fiber was heat treated referring to the curing process of high-performance carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites. By means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), activated carbon atoms can be detected, which are defined as the carbon atoms conjunction with oxygen and nitrogen. Surface chemistry analysis shows that the content of activated carbon atoms on treated carbon fiber surface, especially those connect with the hydroxyl decreases with the increasing heat treatment temperature. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) analysis reveals that the dispersive surface energy γSd increases and the polar surface energy γSsp decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases to 200. Contact angle between carbon fiber and epoxy E51 resin, which is studied by dynamic contact angle test (DCAT) increases with the increasing heat treatment temperature, indicating the worse wettability comparing with the untreated fiber. Moreover, micro-droplet test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the treated carbon fiber/epoxy is lower than that of the untreated T300B fiber which is attributed to the decrement of the content of reactive functional groups including hydrogen group and epoxy group.

  11. Functional Properties of Glutinous Rice Flour by Dry-Heat Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yang; Liu, Chengzhen; Jiang, Suisui; Cao, Jinmiao; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    Glutinous rice flour (GRF) and glutinous rice starch (GRS) were modified by dry-heat treatment and their rheological, thermal properties and freeze-thaw stability were evaluated. Compared with the native GRF and GRS, the water-holding ability of modified GRF and GRS were enhanced. Both the onset and peak temperatures of the modified samples increased while the endothermic enthalpy change decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, dry heating remarkably increased the apparent viscosities of both GRF and GRS. Importantly, compared with GRS samples, the storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G") values of modified GRF increased more greatly and the tanδ values decreased more remarkably, indicating that the dry-heat treatment showed more impact on the GRF and a higher viscoelasticity compared with GRS. Our results suggest the dry-heat treatment of GRF is a more effective method than that of GRS, which omits the complex and tedious process for purifying GRS, and thereby has more practical applications in the food industry. PMID:27537844

  12. Functional Properties of Glutinous Rice Flour by Dry-Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yang; Liu, Chengzhen; Jiang, Suisui; Cao, Jinmiao; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    Glutinous rice flour (GRF) and glutinous rice starch (GRS) were modified by dry-heat treatment and their rheological, thermal properties and freeze-thaw stability were evaluated. Compared with the native GRF and GRS, the water-holding ability of modified GRF and GRS were enhanced. Both the onset and peak temperatures of the modified samples increased while the endothermic enthalpy change decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, dry heating remarkably increased the apparent viscosities of both GRF and GRS. Importantly, compared with GRS samples, the storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G") values of modified GRF increased more greatly and the tanδ values decreased more remarkably, indicating that the dry-heat treatment showed more impact on the GRF and a higher viscoelasticity compared with GRS. Our results suggest the dry-heat treatment of GRF is a more effective method than that of GRS, which omits the complex and tedious process for purifying GRS, and thereby has more practical applications in the food industry. PMID:27537844

  13. Microbial safety control of compost material with cow dung by heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chun-ming

    2007-01-01

    Various kinds of pathogenic bacteria derived from the intestinal tract of animals exist in compost material like cow dung. In order to sterilize the pathogenic bacteria completely in compost material, the cow dung was put into a heat treatment machine in pilot plan, and harmless condition in short time was examined. The results indicated, pathogenic indicator bacteria such as coliform bacteria, fecal coliform, Escherichia coli and salmonella were all 106 cfu/g dw at the beginning, died rapidly when cow dung temperature rose to above 50 degrees C, and not detected at 54-68 degrees C for 6-24 h heat treatment. Coliform bacteria and salmonella in heated cow dung were not detected by re-growth culture and enrichment culture examination. Moreover, it was hardly influenced on the fermentation ability of composting microbe, organic decomposition bacteria. During heat treatment, the mesophile decreased rapidly and the thermophile stabilized or increased, and the most of composting microbe were bacillus in cow dung by fluorescence microscope, this indicated that bacillus was dominator and composting microbe in composting process. PMID:17966859

  14. Effect of post-harvest heat treatment on proteome change of peach fruit during ripening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yu, Zhifang; Jiang, Li; Jiang, Juan; Luo, Haibo; Fu, Linran

    2011-06-10

    The extracted proteins from the heat-treated peach fruit (dipped in hot water at 48°C for 10min and then stored at room temperature (20°C-25°C) for up to 6 days) were used for proteomic analysis in order to understand the response of post-harvest peach fruit to heat treatment during ripening stage at proteomic level. After two dimensional gels electrophoresis (2-DE) was conducted, more than 600 protein spots were detected. Among them, 35 differently expressed spots (P<0.05) were selected to be excised and analyzed using MALDI-TOF/TOF, and finally 30 protein spots were confidently identified according to NCBI database. The results demonstrated that among the thirty protein spots expressed particularly induced by heat treatment, 43% were related to stress response, 17% to cell structure, 13% to protein fate, 7% to glycolytic pathway, 3% to ripening and senescence and 17% to unclassified. All of them are involved in the regulation of peach fruit development and ripening. All these indicated that the self-defense capability of peach fruit was improved by heat treatment. The study will enable future detailed investigation of gene expression and function linked with peach fruit ripening. PMID:21550427

  15. Effect of Pre- and Post-weld Heat Treatments on Linear Friction Welded Ti-5553

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanjara, Priti; Dalgaard, Elvi; Gholipour, Javad; Cao, Xinjin; Cuddy, Jonathan; Jonas, John J.

    2014-10-01

    Linear friction welding allows solid-state joining of near-beta ( β) titanium alloy Ti-5553 (Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr). In the as-welded condition, the weld zone (WZ) exhibits β grain refinement and marked softening as compared with Ti-5553 in the solution heat treated and aged condition. The softening of the weldment is attributed to the depletion of the strengthening alpha ( α) phase in the WZ and the adjacent thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ). Specifically, in near- β titanium alloys, the strength of the material mainly depends on the shape, size, distribution, and fraction of the primary α and other decomposition products of the β phase. Hence, a combination of pre- and post-weld heat treatments were applied to determine the conditions that allow mitigating the α phase depletion in the WZ and TMAZ of the welds. The mechanical response of the welded samples to the heat treatments was determined by performing microhardness measurements and tensile testing at room temperature with an automated 3D deformation measurement system. It was found that though the joint efficiency in the as-welded condition was high (96 pct), strain localization and failure occurred in the TMAZ. The application of post-weld solution heat treatment with aging was effective in restoring α, increasing the joint efficiency (97 to 99 pct) and inducing strain localization and failure in the parent material region.

  16. Effects of alloy heat treatment on oxidation kinetics and scale morphology for Crofer 22 APU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdefrau, Neal J.; Chen, Lei; Sun, Ellen Y.; Aindow, Mark

    2013-11-01

    The effect of alloy heat treatment on the oxidation kinetics and oxide scale microstructure of Crofer 22 APU has been studied. Parabolic oxidation rate constants were measured for the as-received alloy and after pre-oxidation heat treatment in argon at 1050 °C for 1 and 4 h. The oxide scale microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam milling and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the alloy forms a two-layer scale with a continuous chromia layer and a discontinuous MnCr2O4 overlayer. Two forms of internal oxides were also formed: subscale pockets of spinel and isolated TiOx precipitates in the underlying alloy. The pre-oxidation heat treatment had a profound effect on the grain size and morphology of the Cr2O3 and MnCr2O4 layers in the scale. The heat-treated samples exhibit a 3.5× lower parabolic oxidation rate constant than the as-received Crofer 22 APU. This improvement in oxidation resistance is attributed to the dramatic differences in the morphology of the oxide scale that forms during the earliest stages of oxidation (<5 h). The implications of these findings for oxidation mechanisms and long-term SOFC performance are discussed.

  17. The state of the art on heat treatment quenching technologies in China

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, L.

    1996-12-31

    The progress on heat treatment quenching technologies in the past decade in China has been reviewed in the present paper. The technologies concerned in the R&D and application of quenching media, verification of cooling rate, improving and control of quenching process, and the modelling and simulation of the processes are described. The author points out that although there are a lot of R&D achievements from universities and research institutes, it is necessary to pay attention to quenching technologies for most of heat treating factories and workshops.

  18. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved. PMID:26142888

  19. Influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of end-chill cast Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeshvaghani, R. Arabi; Ghahvechian, H.; Pirnajmeddin, H.; Shahverdi, H. R.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and wear behavior of Zn-27Al alloys with different copper content. In order to study the relationship between microstructure features and wear behavior, the alloys prepared by an end-chill cast apparatus and then heat treated. Heat treatment procedure involved solutionizing at temperature of 350 °C for 72 h followed by cooling within the furnace to room temperature. Microstructural characteristics of as-cast and heat-treated alloys at different distances from the chill were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Wear tests were performed using a pin-on-disk test machine. To determine the wear mechanisms, the worn surfaces of the samples were also examined by SEM and EDS. Results showed that heat treatment led to the complete dissolution of as-cast dendritic microstructure and formation of a fine lamellar structure with well-distributed microconstituents. Moreover, addition of copper up to 1 wt% had no significant change in the microstructure, while addition of 2 and 4 wt% copper resulted in formation of ɛ (CuZn4) particle in the interdendritic regions. The influence of copper content on the wear behavior of the alloys was explained in terms of microstructural characteristics. Delamination was proposed as the dominant wear mechanism.

  20. Susceptibility of Lasioderma serricorne (F.)(Coleoptera: Anobiidae) life stages to elevated temperatures used during structural heat treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat treatment of food-processing facilities involves using elevated temperatures (46 to 60°C for 24 h) for management of stored-product insect pests. Heat treatment is a viable alternative in certain circumstances to the fumigant methyl bromide in certain situations, which is being phased out in t...

  1. Additive, Multi-Component Treatment of Emerging Refusal Topographies in a Pediatric Feeding Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, William G.; Jaquess, David L.; Bogard, Jennifer D.; Morton, Jane F.

    2010-01-01

    This case study describes inter-disciplinary treatment of chronic food refusal and tube dependency in a 2-year-old female with a pediatric feeding disorder. Evidence-based behavioral components--including escape extinction (EE), differential reinforcement of alterative mealtime behavior (DRA), and stimulus fading--were introduced sequentially as…

  2. The effect of mechanical surface and heat treatments on the erosion resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D.; Brainard, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of both mechanical surface treatments and heat treatments on the erosion resistance of 6061 aluminum alloy were studied in order to gain a better understanding of material properties which affect erosion behavior. It was found that mechanical surface treatments have little or no effect on the erosion resistance. This is due to the formation by particle impact of a work-hardened surface layer, independent of the initial surface condition. The erosion resistance of aluminum single crystals was found to be independent of orientation, which is due to destruction of the surface microstructure and formation of a polycrystalline surface layer by the particle impact as observed by X-ray diffraction. Although on solution treatment of annealed aluminum 6061 the increase in hardness is accompanied by an increase in erosion resistance, precipitation treatment (which causes a further increase in hardness) results in a slightly lower erosion resistance.

  3. Improved microstructure in Ag/Bi-2223 composite tapes by systematic variation of heat treatment parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y. L.; Miller, D. J.; Baurceanu, R. M.; Maroni, V. A.; Parrella, R. D.

    2002-10-01

    Multifilament-type, silver-sheathed (Bi, Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Ag/Bi-2223) composite tapes produced by the powder-in-tube (PIT) method were given a first heat treatment that employed either a standard (STD) single oxygen pressure/temperature (pO2/T) set point or a novel variable pO2/T treatment referred to as thermal sliding heat treatment (TSHT). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to provide a comparative analysis of the Bi-2223 grain colony microstructure and connectivity, nonsuperconducting second phase (NSP) composition and distribution, and grain boundary character in the STD- and TSHT-type post-first-heat-treatment Ag/Bi-2223 tape specimens. The dominant NSPs in STD and TSHT specimens were (Ca, Sr)2CuO3, (Ca, Sr)14Cu24O41, and amorphous phases that were randomly distributed in the filaments. The number and size of the NSPs in the STD specimens were sufficient to cause substantial misalignment of Bi-2223 grain colonies throughout the filament cores. However, the TSHT specimens (when compared to the STD specimens) expressed an improved microstructure with fewer/smaller NSPs that were localized mainly in the interior regions of the filaments. Also, the Bi-2223 grain colonies in TSHT specimens were more robust and better aligned from the silver-sheath/Bi-2223 interface to the mid-core region of each filament.

  4. The Effect of Homogenization Heat Treatment on Thermal Expansion Coefficient and Dimensional Stability of Low Thermal Expansion Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Hao; Liu, Zong-Pei; Pan, Yung-Ning

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of homogenization heat treatment on α value [coefficient of thermal expansion (10-6 K-1)] of low thermal expansion cast irons was studied. In addition, constrained thermal cyclic tests were conducted to evaluate the dimensional stability of the low thermal expansion cast irons with various heat treatment conditions. The results indicate that when the alloys were homogenized at a relatively low temperature, e.g., 1023 K (750 °C), the elimination of Ni segregation was not very effective, but the C concentration in the matrix was moderately reduced. On the other hand, if the alloys were homogenized at a relatively high temperature, e.g., 1473 K (1200 °C), opposite results were obtained. Consequently, not much improvement (reduction) in α value was achieved in both cases. Therefore, a compound homogenization heat treatment procedure was designed, namely 1473 K (1200 °C)/4 hours/FC/1023 K (750 °C)/2 hours/WQ, in which a relatively high homogenization temperature of 1473 K (1200 °C) can effectively eliminate the Ni segregation, and a subsequent holding stage at 1023.15 K (750 °C) can reduce the C content in the matrix. As a result, very low α values of around (1 to 2) × 10-6 K-1 were obtained. Regarding the constrained thermal cyclic testing in 303 K to 473 K (30 °C to 200 °C), the results indicate that regardless of heat treatment condition, low thermal expansion cast irons exhibit exceedingly higher dimensional stability than either the regular ductile cast iron or the 304 stainless steel. Furthermore, positive correlation exists between the α 303.15 K to 473.15 K value and the amount of shape change after the thermal cyclic testing. Among the alloys investigated, Heat I-T3B (1473 K (1200 °C)/4 hours/FC/1023 K (750 °C)/2 hours/WQ) exhibits the lowest α 303 K to 473 K value (1.72 × 10-6 K-1), and hence has the least shape change (7.41 μm) or the best dimensional stability.

  5. The Effect of Homogenization Heat Treatment on Thermal Expansion Coefficient and Dimensional Stability of Low Thermal Expansion Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Hao; Liu, Zong-Pei; Pan, Yung-Ning

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of homogenization heat treatment on α value [coefficient of thermal expansion (10-6 K-1)] of low thermal expansion cast irons was studied. In addition, constrained thermal cyclic tests were conducted to evaluate the dimensional stability of the low thermal expansion cast irons with various heat treatment conditions. The results indicate that when the alloys were homogenized at a relatively low temperature, e.g., 1023 K (750 °C), the elimination of Ni segregation was not very effective, but the C concentration in the matrix was moderately reduced. On the other hand, if the alloys were homogenized at a relatively high temperature, e.g., 1473 K (1200 °C), opposite results were obtained. Consequently, not much improvement (reduction) in α value was achieved in both cases. Therefore, a compound homogenization heat treatment procedure was designed, namely 1473 K (1200 °C)/4 hours/FC/1023 K (750 °C)/2 hours/WQ, in which a relatively high homogenization temperature of 1473 K (1200 °C) can effectively eliminate the Ni segregation, and a subsequent holding stage at 1023.15 K (750 °C) can reduce the C content in the matrix. As a result, very low α values of around (1 to 2) × 10-6 K-1 were obtained. Regarding the constrained thermal cyclic testing in 303 K to 473 K (30 °C to 200 °C), the results indicate that regardless of heat treatment condition, low thermal expansion cast irons exhibit exceedingly higher dimensional stability than either the regular ductile cast iron or the 304 stainless steel. Furthermore, positive correlation exists between the α 303.15 K to 473.15 K value and the amount of shape change after the thermal cyclic testing. Among the alloys investigated, Heat I-T3B (1473 K (1200 °C)/4 hours/FC/1023 K (750 °C)/2 hours/WQ) exhibits the lowest α 303 K to 473 K value (1.72 × 10-6 K-1), and hence has the least shape change (7.41 μm) or the best dimensional stability.

  6. In situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation after drive process treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Stanecki, John

    2010-09-21

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing a drive fluid to a hydrocarbon containing layer of the tar sands formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the layer. At least some first hydrocarbons from the layer are produced. Heat is provided to the layer from one or more heaters located in the formation. At least some second hydrocarbons are produced from the layer of the formation. The second hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons that are upgraded compared to the first hydrocarbons produced by using the drive fluid.

  7. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  8. Effects of Heat Treatments on the On-Line Service Life of a Press Die Manufactured by W-Edm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kye-Kwang; Lee, Yong-Shin

    Effects of heat treatments on the on-line service life of a press die manufactured by W-EDM are studied. In this work, four manufacturing processes for a press die are considered: (1) milling and then grinding, (2) wire-cut electric discharge machining (W-EDM), (3) low temperature heat treatment after W-EDM, and (4) high temperature heat treatment after W-EDM. On-line punching experiments for an automobile part of BL646-chain are performed. The amount of wear of the die and punch, roll-over and burnish depth in the punched chain are measured every 1,000 strokes. Overall productivities are carefully compared. Finally, it is concluded that heat treatment after W-EDM for a press die can enhance its on-line service life. Especially, high temperature heat treatment after W-EDM is very attractive as a fast and cheap manufacturing method for a press die.

  9. UASB Treatment of Methanolic Pulp Wastewater with Addition of Waste Starch and Incinerated Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Shintaro; Kobaysashi, Takuro; Li, Yu-You; Harada, Hideki

    The pulp wastewater consists mainly of methanol. It is expected to treat using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process. Paper manufactories also produce waste starch and incinerated ash. The integrated treating for these wastes is desirable. In this study, two UASB reactors were operated to treat pulp wastewater with addition of waste starch and with addition of incinerated ash, receptively. Continuous operations of a UASB reactor treating pulp wastewater with addition of waste starch (PS reactor) and a UASB reactor treating pulp wastewater with addition of incinerated ash (PA reactor) , were investigated at mesophilic conditions. The PS reactor performed well with an average 93.7% total CODCr and 97.3% soluble CODCr removal efficiency in average at a maximum volumetric loading rate (VLR) of 16.0 kgCOD/m3/d. The PA reactor was also successfully operated with an average 95.3% total CODCr and 97.5% soluble CODCr removal efficiency in average at a maximum VLR of 14.6 kgCOD/m3/d. Successfully developed granules were obtained after over 140 days of operation in both reactors, and the granules were 1 to 2 mm in mean diameter. Microbial analysis revealed the genus Methanomethylovorans was predominant in the granules of both reactors.

  10. Measured effects of retrofits -- a refrigerant oil additive and a condenser spray device -- on the cooling performance of a heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Sand, J.R.; Baxter, V.D.; Linkous, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    A 15-year old, 3-ton single package air-to-air heat pump was tested in laboratory environmental chambers simulating indoor and outdoor conditions. After documenting initial performance, the unit was retrofitted with a prototype condenser water-spray device and retested. Results at standard ARI cooling rating conditions (95 F outdoor dry bulb and 80/67 F indoor dry bulb/wet bulb temperatures) showed the capacity increased by about 7%, and the electric power demand dropped by about 8%, resulting in a steady-state EER increase of 17%. Suction and discharge pressures were reduced by 7 and 37 psi, respectively. A refrigerant oil additive formulated to enhance refrigerant-side heat transfer was added at a dose of one ounce per ton of rated capacity, and the unit was tested for several days at the same 95 F outdoor conditions and showed essentially no increase in capacity, and a slight 3% increase in steady-state EER. Adding more additive lowered the EER slightly. Suction and discharge pressures were essentially unchanged. The short-term testing showed that the condenser-spray device was effective in increasing the cooling capacity and lowering the electrical demand on an old and relatively inefficient heat pump, but the refrigerant additive had little effect on the cooling performance of the unit. Sprayer issues to be resolved include the effect of a sprayer on a new, high-efficiency air conditioner/heat pump, reliable long-term operation, and economics.

  11. Hydrothermal treatment of incineration fly ash for PCDD/Fs decomposition: the effect of iron addition.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Zhen; Hu, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Peng-Fei

    2012-12-01

    The catalytic effect of Fe addition on the decomposition of polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) contained in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash during the hydrothermal process was investigated. Influencing factors, such as Fe addition mode, reaction time and cooling procedure after reaction, were tested to evaluate their effects. Experimental results indicated that Fe addition in the form of a mixture of ferrous sulphate and ferric sulphate enhanced decomposition of PCDD/Fs contained in the MSWI fly ash, particularly for the decomposition of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-dioxin and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-furan under the reaction temperature of 563 K. The decomposition rate of PCDD/Fs reached 90.33% by international toxicity equivalent (I-TEQ) when Fe was added as a mixture of ferrous and ferric sulphates by 5% (wt/wt) with the Fe (III)/Fe (II) ratio being 2; without Fe addition, the decomposition rate of PCDD/Fs was only 46.17% by I-TEQ in the same process. Fe addition in the form of ferrous sulphate alone also showed an enhancing effect on PCDD/Fs decomposition, but the associated decomposition rates were relatively lower, suggesting iron oxides formed from the mixture of ferric and ferrous sulphates are more favourable catalysts. At the same time, the cooling procedure after the hydrothermal reaction became more flexible if Fe was added in the form of a mixture of ferric and ferrous sulphates. Although a longer reaction time was helpful to increase decomposition rates of PCDD/Fs, 1 h was proved to be a reasonable time under this condition. PMID:23437649

  12. Is There an Additional Value of Inpatient Treatment for Patients with Atopic Dermatitis?

    PubMed

    van der Schaft, Jorien; Keijzer, Welmoed W; Sanders, Koos J G; de Groot, Jette J C; van den Bersselaar, Donna L C M; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Doorn-Op den Akker, Margreet M; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; de Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S

    2016-08-23

    An inpatient treatment and education programme has been developed for patients with difficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD), with the aim of achieving adequate self-management and long-term disease control. This observational study included adult patients diagnosed with difficult to control AD, admitted for a structured inpatient treatment and education programme. The primary outcome was the Six Area, Six Sign Atopic Dermatitis (SASSAD) score. In total, 79 patients (mean ± SD age 38.8 ± 17.1 years) were included. The median duration of hospitalization was 11 days (interquartile range 8-14). The mean percentage decrease in SASSAD score between admission and discharge was 60.7%, of which 64 (81.0%) patients achieved SASSAD50. The mean percentage decrease in SASSAD score was 69.0% during follow-up, of which 63 (79.7%) patients still had a SASSAD50. In the majority of these patients with difficult to control AD the admission resulted in sustained disease control. This could be achieved by optimization of treatment with topical corticosteroids. PMID:26983375

  13. Ultraviolet and pulsed electric field treatments have additive effect on inactivation of E. coli in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Gachovska, T K; Kumar, S; Thippareddi, H; Subbiah, J; Williams, F

    2008-11-01

    Apple juice inoculated with Escherichia coli ATCC 23472 was processed continuously using either ultraviolet (UV), high-voltage pulsed electric field (PEF), or a combination of the PEF and UV treatment systems. Apple juice was pumped through either of the systems at 3 flow rates (8, 14, and 20 mL/min). E. coli was reduced by 3.46 log CFU/mL when exposed in a 50 cm length of UV treatment chamber at 8 mL/min (2.94 s treatment time with a product temperature increase of 13 degrees C). E. coli inactivation of 4.87 log CFU/mL was achieved with a peak electric field strength of 60 kV/cm and 11.3 pulses (average pulse width of 3.5 mus, product temperature increased to 52 degrees C). E. coli reductions resulting from a combination treatment of UV and PEF applied sequentially were evaluated. A maximum E. coli reduction of 5.35 log CFU/mL was achieved using PEF (electrical field strength of 60 kV/cm, specific energy of 162 J/mL, and 11.3 pulses) and UV treatments (length of 50 cm, treatment time of 2.94 s, and flow rate of 8 mL/min). An additive effect was observed for the combination treatments (PEF and UV), regardless of the order of treatment (P > 0.05). E. coli reductions of 5.35 and 5.30 log CFU/mL with PEF treatment (electrical field strength of 60 kV/cm, specific energy of 162 J/mL, and 11.3 pulses) followed by UV (length of 30 cm, treatment time of 1.8 s, and flow rate of 8 mL/min) and UV treatment followed by PEF (same treatment conditions), respectively. No synergistic effect was observed. PMID:19021811

  14. Does addition of `mud-pack and hot pool treatment' to patient education make a difference in fibromyalgia patients? A randomized controlled single blind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bağdatlı, Ali Osman; Donmez, Arif; Eröksüz, Rıza; Bahadır, Güler; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled single-blind study is to explore whether addition of mud-pack and hot pool treatments to patient education make a significant difference in short and mild term outcomes of the patients with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to either balneotherapy with mud-pack and hot pool treatments (35) or control (35) groups. After randomization, five patients from balneotherapy group and five patients from control group were dropped out from the study with different excuses. All patients had 6-h patient education programme about fibromyalgia syndrome and were given a home exercise programme. The patients in balneotherapy group had heated pool treatment at 38 °C for 20 min a day, and mud-pack treatment afterwards on back region at 45 °C. Balneotherapy was applied on weekdays for 2 weeks. All patients continued to take their medical treatment. An investigator who was blinded to the intervention assessed all the patients before and after the treatment, at the first and the third months of follow-up. Outcome measures were FIQ, BDI and both patient's and physician's global assessments. Balneotherapy group was significantly better than control group at after the treatment and at the end of the first month follow-up assessments in terms of patient's and physician's global assessment, total FIQ score, and pain intensity, fatigue, non-refreshed awaking, stiffness, anxiety and depression subscales of FIQ. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of BDI scores. It is concluded that patient education combined with 2 weeks balneotherapy application has more beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome as compared to patient education alone.

  15. The influence of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of Ni-Ti file materials.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Kana; Yahata, Yoshio; Hayashi, Yohsuke; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Ebihara, Arata; Hanawa, Takao; Suda, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of Ni-Ti file materials. Ni-Ti wire (1.00 mm ø) was processed into a conical shape with 0.30-mm diameter tip and 0.06 taper. Specimens were heated for 30 min at 300, 400, 450, 500 or 600°C. Non-heated specimens were used as controls. DSC, a cantilever-bending test and cyclic fatigue test were performed. Ms and Af for groups 400 and 450 were higher than those for others (p<0.05). The load/deflection ratios of groups 400, 450 and 500 were lower than that of group 600 (p<0.05). The bending load values at 2.0-mm deflection of groups 400, 450 and 500 were lower than those of group 300 and the control group (p<0.05). The NCFs of groups 400, 450 and 500 exceeded that of group 600(p<0.05). Changes in flexibility with heat treatment could improve the cyclic fatigue properties of Ni-Ti instruments. PMID:24492108

  16. The effect of heat treatment and skimming on precipitate formation in caprine and bovine milks.

    PubMed

    Miloradovic, Zorana N; Kljajevic, Nemanja V; Jovanovic, Snezana T; Vucic, Tanja R; Macej, Ognjen D

    2015-02-01

    Caprine and bovine milks have a similar overall gross composition, but vary considerably in the ratios of their casein components. These differences in colloidal casein micelles could affect directly or indirectly the heat stability of caprine and bovine milks at their natural pH. In the present work, the differences in colloidal stability of caprine and bovine milk have been studied by analysing the effect of heat treatment and skimming on precipitation of proteins. Raw and heated milk samples (70 °C/5 min, 80°C/5 min and 90°C/5 min) were centrifuged at 600, 2000, and 4500  g . The amount of precipitate formed after skimming was measured and the protein composition of both precipitates and supernatants analysed using the SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) and densitometry. In caprine milk, the heat treatment prior to skimming had a statistically significant effect on protein precipitation. Centrifugal force had a statistically significant effect on amount of precipitate for both milks, but the amount was 2 to 4 times higher for caprine milk. When defatting the milk for electrophoresis, a centrifugal force of 600  g appeared to be the most appropriate, in order to avoid protein loss and a possible error in the interpretation of results. Results of this study could also serve as the basis for further investigations on adjusting the skimming conditions for caprine milk in industrial dairy processing environment. PMID:25406911

  17. Effects of heat treatment on oil-binding ability of rice flour.

    PubMed

    Tabara, Aya; Nakagawa, Mariko; Ushijima, Yuki; Matsunaga, Kotaro; Seguchi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Heat-treated (120 °C for 120 min) rice flour showed high affinity to oil (oil-binding ability). This oil-binding ability could be observed by shaking the heat-treated rice flour (2.0 g), oil (4.0 mL), and water (20 mL) vigorously in a test tube, and the oil bound to the rice flour sank into the water. To examine the time-dependent levels of the oil-binding ability, rice flour was heat-treated at 120 °C for 10, 20, 40, 60, and 120 min, and the precipitated volume of oil/rice flour complex increased with an increase of the heating time. The oil-binding ability of the rice flour was not affected by the treatments with diethyl ether or boiled chloroform/methanol (2:1) solutions, which suggested no relationship to the oil in the rice flour, but was lost upon alkali (0.2% NaOH solution) or pepsin treatment, which suggested its relationship to the rice proteins. PMID:25926032

  18. Resistant starch improvement of rice starches under a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatments.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pham Van; Vien, Ngo Lam; Lan Phi, Nguyen Thi

    2016-01-15

    The effects of a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatment on formation of resistant starch (RS) and characteristics of high-amylose, normal and waxy rice starches were investigated in this study. The degrees of polymerization of the rice starches treated with citric acid, lactic acid or acetic acid were significantly reduced as compared to the native starches. The RS contents of acid and heat-moisture treated rice starches were in a range of 30.1-39.0%, significantly higher than those of native rice starches (6.3-10.2%) and those of heat-moisture treated rice starches (18.5-23.9%). The acid and heat-moisture treatments reduced swelling power and viscosity, but increased solubility of the starches, while the crystalline structure did not change. Among the organic acids used, citric acid had the most impact on starch characteristics and RS formation, followed by lactic acid and acetic acid. The results are useful in production of RS for functional food application. PMID:26258703

  19. Surface analysis of TFTR vacuum vessel samples subjected to the post-weld heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Cecchi, J.L.; Dylla, H.F.

    1980-11-01

    To ensure the dimensional stability of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel, it is necessary to perform a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). This process consists of heating the vessel segments to approx. 450/sup 0/C for 1.5 h. The large size of the segments precludes a vacuum bake previous to installation. Effects of the PWHT on the vacuum vessel surface were studied using small samples of vessel material which were subjected to a variety of PWHT procedures, including inert gas purges and different oven designs. Changes in topography and near-surface chemistry were investigated with SEM and sputter-Auger electron spectroscopy. These samples were compared with the surface properties of non-baked UHV-quality stainless steel. The primary difference noted between the PWHT samples and the non-baked control was the thickness of the passivation oxide layer. The thickness of this mixed oxide (FeO/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3//NiO) on the control sample was less than or equal to 100 A. The thickness of the oxide layer on the heat-treated samples ranged between 230 to 350 A, depending on the method of the PWHT. The effect of hydrogen glow discharge cleaning on these thicker oxide layers, and the consequences of such heat treatment procedure relative to oxygen impurity production in fusion devices are discussed.

  20. Combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis of cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Agu, R.C.; Amadife, A.E.; Ude, C.M.; Onyia, A.; Ogu, E.O.; Okafor, M.; Ezejiofor, E.

    1997-12-31

    The effect of combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis (various concentrations) on cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production was investigated. At high concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (1--5 M), hydrolysis of the CGW biomass was achieved but with excessive charring or dehydration reaction. At lower acid concentrations, hydrolysis of CGW biomass was also achieved with 0.3--0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, while partial hydrolysis was obtained below 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (the lowest acid concentration that hydrolyzed CGW biomass) at 120 C and 1 atm pressure for 30 min. A 60% process efficiency was achieved with 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in hydrolyzing the cellulose and lignin materials present in the CGW biomass. High acid concentration is therefore not required for CGW biomass hydrolysis. The low acid concentration required for CGW biomass hydrolysis, as well as the minimal cost required for detoxification of CGW biomass because of low hydrogen cyanide content of CGW biomass would seem to make this process very economical. From three liters of the CGW biomass hydrolysate obtained from hydrolysis with 0.3M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, ethanol yield was 3.5 (v/v%) after yeast fermentation. However, although the process resulted in gainful utilization of CGW biomass, additional costs would be required to effectively dispose new by-products generated from CGW biomass processing.