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Sample records for additional heating power

  1. Heat Pipes Cool Power Magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I.; Chester, M.; Luedke, E.

    1983-01-01

    Configurations originally developed for space use are effective in any orientation. Heat pipes integrated into high-power, high-frequency, highvoltage spaceflight magnetics reduce weight and improve reliability by lowering internal tempertures. Two heat pipes integrated in design of power transformer cool unit in any orientation. Electrostatic shield conducts heat from windings to heat pipe evaporator. Technology allows dramatic reductions in size and weight, while significantly improving reliability. In addition, all attitude design of heat pipes allows operation of heat pipes independent of local gravity forces.

  2. Additive Manufacturing/Diagnostics via the High Frequency Induction Heating of Metal Powders: The Determination of the Power Transfer Factor for Fine Metallic Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Caravias, George; Holcomb, Matthew

    2015-03-11

    Grid Logic Inc. is developing a method for sintering and melting fine metallic powders for additive manufacturing using spatially-compact, high-frequency magnetic fields called Micro-Induction Sintering (MIS). One of the challenges in advancing MIS technology for additive manufacturing is in understanding the power transfer to the particles in a powder bed. This knowledge is important to achieving efficient power transfer, control, and selective particle heating during the MIS process needed for commercialization of the technology. The project s work provided a rigorous physics-based model for induction heating of fine spherical particles as a function of frequency and particle size. This simulation improved upon Grid Logic s earlier models and provides guidance that will make the MIS technology more effective. The project model will be incorporated into Grid Logic s power control circuit of the MIS 3D printer product and its diagnostics technology to optimize the sintering process for part quality and energy efficiency.

  3. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  4. Heat pipe cooled power magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chester, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A high frequency, high power, low specific weight (0.57 kg/kW) transformer developed for space use was redesigned with heat pipe cooling allowing both a reduction in weight and a lower internal temperature rise. The specific weight of the heat pipe cooled transformer was reduced to 0.4 kg/kW and the highest winding temperature rise was reduced from 40 C to 20 C in spite of 10 watts additional loss. The design loss/weight tradeoff was 18 W/kg. Additionally, allowing the same 40 C winding temperature rise as in the original design, the KVA rating is increased to 4.2 KVA, demonstrating a specific weight of 0.28 kg/kW with the internal loss increased by 50W. This space environment tested heat pipe cooled design performed as well electrically as the original conventional design, thus demonstrating the advantages of heat pipes integrated into a high power, high voltage magnetic. Another heat pipe cooled magnetic, a 3.7 kW, 20A input filter inductor was designed, developed, built, tested, and described. The heat pipe cooled magnetics are designed to be Earth operated in any orientation.

  5. Waste Heat to Power Market Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Elson, Amelia; Tidball, Rick; Hampson, Anne

    2015-03-01

    Waste heat to power (WHP) is the process of capturing heat discarded by an existing process and using that heat to generate electricity. In the industrial sector, waste heat streams are generated by kilns, furnaces, ovens, turbines, engines, and other equipment. In addition to processes at industrial plants, waste heat streams suitable for WHP are generated at field locations, including landfills, compressor stations, and mining sites. Waste heat streams are also produced in the residential and commercial sectors, but compared to industrial sites these waste heat streams typically have lower temperatures and much lower volumetric flow rates. The economic feasibility for WHP declines as the temperature and flow rate decline, and most WHP technologies are therefore applied in industrial markets where waste heat stream characteristics are more favorable. This report provides an assessment of the potential market for WHP in the industrial sector in the United States.

  6. Solid-State Additive Manufacturing for Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norfolk, Mark; Johnson, Hilary

    2015-03-01

    Energy densities in devices are increasing across many industries including power generation, high power electronics, manufacturing, and automotive. Increasingly, there is a need for very high efficiency thermal management devices that can pull heat out of a small area at higher and higher rates. Metal additive manufacturing (AM) technologies have the promise of creating parts with complex internal geometries required for integral thermal management. However, this goal has not been met due to constraints in fusion-based metal 3D printers. This work presents a new strategy for metal AM of heat exchangers using an ultrasonic sheet lamination approach.

  7. Heat Exchange, Additive Manufacturing, and Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick

    2015-02-23

    Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured undistorted snapshots of refrigerants flowing through small heat exchangers, helping them to better understand heat transfer in heating, cooling and ventilation systems.

  8. Cornwall combined heat and power system

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, E.; Andersson, B.; Eriksson, L.; Doyle, R.

    1995-09-01

    The production of a small amount of locally generated electric energy in order to stabilize future costs was an attractive idea to Cornwall Electric. A combined heat and power project would enable Cornwall Electric to reduce fuel sensitivity risk and generally provide a balanced portfolio. Based on this, FVB & Cornwall Electric developed a smaller co-generation and district heating proposal. This system was installed during the summer and autumn of 1994 and the district heating portion was commissioned just before Christmas 1994. There are 11 buildings connected to the system of which two are hospitals that were converted from steam to hot water heating. The co-generation portion of the project was commissioned during February 1995 and consists of 2 x 2.5 MW{sub el} spark ignited reciprocating engines running on natural gas. Waste heat, in the form of hot water, will be recovered off the two engines to be utilized by the district heating system. The heat from the engines will provide 90% of the yearly heating energy that the connected buildings require. The paper will describe how the original project was re-conceived and how barriers, that appeared during the development and marketing of the new service, were overcome. It will also describe, in detail, the design of the co-generation plant and the district heating system. In addition, this paper will discuss problems that were encountered during construction and how they were dealt with including the experience gained during the construction and commissioning of the project.

  9. Heat-powered water pump

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, D.G.

    1980-04-08

    A heat-powered water pump includes a flexible diaphragm as the pumping element with a volatile liquid as a working fluid. The flexible diaphragm is enclosed within a vessel and isolates the working fluid from the water to be pumped. One-way valves control the direction of water flow through the pump. A u-shaped siphon tube acts as a temporary reservoir for the pumped water and is siphoned empty after being filled. A portion of the water siphoned from the u-shaped siphon tube is recirculated through the vessel in heat exchange relationship with the working fluid to condense the working fluid. A reservoir of warm water is maintained in thermal contact with the flexible diaphragm to minimize condensation of the working fluid by thermal contact with the water through the diaphragm.

  10. Influence of heat recuperation in ORC power plant on efficiency of waste heat utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsukiewicz-Gozdur, Aleksandra

    2010-10-01

    The present work is devoted to the problem of utilization of the waste heat contained in the exhaust gases having the temperature of 350 °C. Conversion of the waste heat into electricity using a power plant working with organic fluid cycles is considered. Three Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power plant solutions are analysed and compared: a solution with the basic, single thermodynamic conversion cycle, one with internal heat recuperation and one with external heat recuperation. It results from the analysis that it is the proper choice of the working fluid evaporation temperature that fundamentally affects the maximum of the ORC plant output power. Application of the internal heat recuperation in the plant basic cycle results in the output power increase of approx. 5%. Addition of the external heat recuperation to the plant basic cycle, in the form of a secondary supercritical ORC power cycle can rise the output power by approx. 2%.

  11. High thermal power density heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.F.

    1980-10-01

    Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. The first heat pipe is used to cool the nuclear reactor while the second heat pipe is connected thermally and electrically to a thermionic converter. If the receiver requires greater thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparatively low thermal power densities through the electrically non-conducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  12. Thulium heat sources for space power application

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J. )

    1993-01-15

    Reliable electrical power supplies for use in transportation and remote systems will be an important part of space exploration activities on planet surfaces. A potential power source is available through the use of thulium, a rare earth metal. Heat sources can be produced by neutron activation of naturally occurring thulium (Tm-169) targets in the base station nuclear power reactor. The resulting Tm-170 heat sources can be used in thermoelectric generators to power instrumentation and telecommunications systems located at remote sites. Combined with a dynamic Sterling or Brayton cycle conversion system, the heat source can power a lightweight electrical source for rovers or other surface transportation systems.

  13. Heat-Powered Pump for Liquid Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed thermoelectromagnetic pump for liquid metal powered by waste heat; needs no battery, generator, or other external energy source. Pump turns part of heat in liquid metal into pumping energy. In combination with primary pump or on its own, thermoelectric pump circulates coolant between reactor and radiator. As long as there is decay heat to be removed, unit performs function.

  14. Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

    1984-08-30

    The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

  15. Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Huebotter, Paul R.; McLennan, George A.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

  16. Generator powered electrically heated diesel particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J

    2014-03-18

    A control circuit for a vehicle powertrain includes a switch that selectivity interrupts current flow between a first terminal and a second terminal. A first power source provides power to the first terminal and a second power source provides power to the second terminal and to a heater of a heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The switch is opened during a DPF regeneration cycle to prevent the first power source from being loaded by the heater while the heater is energized.

  17. Solar-powered Rankine heat pump for heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, J.

    1978-01-01

    The design, operation and performance of a familyy of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. The systems feature a reversible heat pump operating with R-11 as the working fluid and using a motor-driven centrifugal compressor. In the cooling mode, solar energy provides the heat source for a Rankine power loop. The system is operational with heat source temperatures ranging from 155 to 220 F; the estimated coefficient of performance is 0.7. In the heating mode, the vapor-cycle heat pump processes solar energy collected at low temperatures (40 to 80 F). The speed of the compressor can be adjusted so that the heat pump capacity matches the load, allowing a seasonal coefficient of performance of about 8 to be attained.

  18. Solar dynamic space power system heat rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Gustafson, E.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    A radiator system concept is described that meets the heat rejection requirements of the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. The heat pipe radiator is a high-reliability, high-performance approach that is capable of erection in space and is maintainable on orbit. Results are present of trade studies that compare the radiator system area and weight estimates for candidate advanced high performance heat pipes. The results indicate the advantages of the dual-slot heat pipe radiator for high temperature applications as well as its weight-reduction potential over the range of temperatures to be encountered in the solar dynamic heat rejection systems.

  19. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators.

    PubMed

    Zebarjadi, M

    2016-04-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one.

  20. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2016-04-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one.

  1. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators

    PubMed Central

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one. PMID:27033717

  2. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators.

    PubMed

    Zebarjadi, M

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show cooling from sidewalls increases the efficiency for Bi values less than one, and decreases the efficiency for Bi values larger than one. PMID:27033717

  3. Heat acclimation improves intermittent sprinting in the heat but additional pre-cooling offers no further ergogenic effect.

    PubMed

    Castle, Paul; Mackenzie, Richard W; Maxwell, Neil; Webborn, Anthony D J; Watt, Peter W

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 10 days of heat acclimation with and without pre-cooling on intermittent sprint exercise performance in the heat. Eight males completed three intermittent cycling sprint protocols before and after 10 days of heat acclimation. Before acclimation, one sprint protocol was conducted in control conditions (21.8 ± 2.2°C, 42.8 ± 6.7% relative humidity) and two sprint protocols in hot, humid conditions (33.3 ± 0.6°C, 52.2 ± 6.8% relative humidity) in a randomized order. One hot, humid condition was preceded by 20 min of thigh pre-cooling with ice packs (-16.2 ± 4.5°C). After heat acclimation, the two hot, humid sprint protocols were repeated. Before heat acclimation, peak power output declined in the heat (P < 0.05) but pre-cooling prevented this. Ten days of heat acclimation reduced resting rectal temperature from 37.8 ± 0.3°C to 37.4 ± 0.3°C (P < 0.01). When acclimated, peak power output increased by ∼2% (P < 0.05, main effect) and no reductions in individual sprint peak power output were observed. Additional pre-cooling offered no further ergogenic effect. Unacclimated athletes competing in the heat should pre-cool to prevent reductions in peak power output, but heat acclimate for an increased peak power output. PMID:21777052

  4. Power control for heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Dineen, J.J.

    1984-12-11

    A power control arrangement for a Stirling engine includes a sleeve mounted in each cylinder for axial movement and a port in the sleeve leading to a dead space. The port is covered by the piston at a position that is determined by the piston position and the axial adjustment of the sleeve. The compression phase of the Stirling cycle for that piston begins when the port is covered, so the position of the sleeve is used to set the Stirling engine power level. 10 figs.

  5. Power control for heat engines

    DOEpatents

    Dineen, John J.

    1984-01-01

    A power control arrangement for a Stirling engine includes a sleeve mounted in each cylinder for axial movement and a port in the sleeve leading to a dead space. The port is covered by the piston at a position that is determined by the piston position and the axial adjustment of the sleeve. The compression phase of the Stirling cycle for that piston begins when the port is covered, so the position of the sleeve is used to set the Stirling engine power level.

  6. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Truşcă, M. R. C. Albert, Ş. Tudoran, C. Soran, M. L. Fărcaş, F.; Abrudean, M.

    2013-11-13

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  7. Heat pipe reactors for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. R.; Ranken, W. A.; Salmi, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    A family of heat pipe reactors design concepts has been developed to provide heat to a variety of electrical conversion systems. Three power plants are described that span the power range 1-500 kWe and operate in the temperature range 1200-1700 K. The reactors are fast, compact, heat-pipe cooled, high-temperature nuclear reactors fueled with fully enriched refractory fuels, UC-ZrC or UO2. Each fuel element is cooled by an axially located molybdenum heat pipe containing either sodium or lithium vapor. Virtues of the reactor designs are the avoidance of single-point failure mechanisms, the relatively high operating temperature, and the expected long lifetimes of the fuel element components.

  8. A New Thermodynamic Power Conversion Cycle and Heat Engine for Space Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Karl W.

    2004-02-01

    A new heat engine concept has been invented that operates on a new two-phase thermodynamic power conversion cycle. This device exploits the space flight proven technique of using a porous capillary structure to separate liquid from vapor through heat addition. This new thermodynamic cycle, the Baker cycle, is different from the existing Rankine because liquid and vapor are at different pressures and are separated during the phase change heat addition process as opposed to the Rankine cycle where liquid and vapor are at the same pressure and mixed during phase change heat addition. This new cycle also differs from Rankine because the heat addition process occurs at varying pressures and temperatures, where as in a Rankine cycle heat addition occurs at constant pressure. It is advantageous to apply this new cycle to space applications because management of the two-phase working fluid in micro gravity can be accomplished as never before using space flight proven Loop Heat Pipe and Capillary Pumped Loop technology. This new power system contains many components with significant flight heritage. Thermodynamic performance calculations are presented for several design cases. The new power cycle and system is inherently more efficient than single-phase systems because minimal compression power is required. One case shows 31.1% overall efficiency with a maximum working fluid temperature of 637.4 K. Since the heat addition process occurs at varying temperatures, waste heat from the spacecraft could be tapped and recovered to supply a large portion of the input energy. For the example cases discussed, between 63.1 to 84.4% of the total input energy could be waste heat. This new system could be used in conjunction with phase change thermal energy storage to supplement power production replacing batteries for solar low-earth-orbit applications. It could also be used as a power converter with a radioisotope heat source yielding efficiencies over 30% while requiring a maximum

  9. Non-additive model for specific heat of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Silva, R.; Mello, V. D.

    2016-10-01

    By using non-additive Tsallis entropy we demonstrate numerically that one-dimensional quasicrystals, whose energy spectra are multifractal Cantor sets, are characterized by an entropic parameter, and calculate the electronic specific heat, where we consider a non-additive entropy Sq. In our method we consider an energy spectra calculated using the one-dimensional tight binding Schrödinger equation, and their bands (or levels) are scaled onto the [ 0 , 1 ] interval. The Tsallis' formalism is applied to the energy spectra of Fibonacci and double-period one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We analytically obtain an expression for the specific heat that we consider to be more appropriate to calculate this quantity in those quasiperiodic structures.

  10. New geothermal heat extraction process to deliver clean power generation

    ScienceCinema

    Pete McGrail

    2016-07-12

    A new method for capturing significantly more heat from low-temperature geothermal resources holds promise for generating virtually pollution-free electrical energy. Scientists at the Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will determine if their innovative approach can safely and economically extract and convert heat from vast untapped geothermal resources. The goal is to enable power generation from low-temperature geothermal resources at an economical cost. In addition to being a clean energy source without any greenhouse gas emissions, geothermal is also a steady and dependable source of power.

  11. THERMOCHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER

    SciTech Connect

    PROJECT STAFF

    2011-10-31

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is an integral part of a concentrated solar power (CSP) system. It enables plant operators to generate electricity beyond on sun hours and supply power to the grid to meet peak demand. Current CSP sensible heat storage systems employ molten salts as both the heat transfer fluid and the heat storage media. These systems have an upper operating temperature limit of around 400 C. Future TES systems are expected to operate at temperatures between 600 C to 1000 C for higher thermal efficiencies which should result in lower electricity cost. To meet future operating temperature and electricity cost requirements, a TES concept utilizing thermochemical cycles (TCs) based on multivalent solid oxides was proposed. The system employs a pair of reduction and oxidation (REDOX) reactions to store and release heat. In the storage step, hot air from the solar receiver is used to reduce the oxidation state of an oxide cation, e.g. Fe3+ to Fe2+. Heat energy is thus stored as chemical bonds and the oxide is charged. To discharge the stored energy, the reduced oxide is re-oxidized in air and heat is released. Air is used as both the heat transfer fluid and reactant and no storage of fluid is needed. This project investigated the engineering and economic feasibility of this proposed TES concept. The DOE storage cost and LCOE targets are $15/kWh and $0.09/kWh respectively. Sixteen pure oxide cycles were identified through thermodynamic calculations and literature information. Data showed the kinetics of re-oxidation of the various oxides to be a key barrier to implementing the proposed concept. A down selection was carried out based on operating temperature, materials costs and preliminary laboratory measurements. Cobalt oxide, manganese oxide and barium oxide were selected for developmental studies to improve their REDOX reaction kinetics. A novel approach utilizing mixed oxides to improve the REDOX kinetics of the selected oxides was proposed. It partially

  12. Modular control of fusion power heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, D. R.

    2012-08-24

    This work is motivated by the growing demand for auxiliary heating on small and large machines worldwide. Numerous present and planned RF experiments (EBW, Lower Hybrid, ICRF, and ECH) are increasingly complex systems. The operational challenges are indicative of a need for components of real-time control that can be implemented with a moderate amount of effort in a time- and cost-effective fashion. Such a system will improve experimental efficiency, enhance experimental quality, and expedite technological advancements. The modular architecture of this control-suite serves multiple purposes. It facilitates construction on various scales from single to multiple controller systems. It enables expandability of control from basic to complex via the addition of modules with varying functionalities. It simplifies the control implementation process by reducing layers of software and electronic development. While conceived with fusion applications in mind, this suite has the potential to serve a broad range of scientific and industrial applications. During the Phase-I research effort we established the overall feasibility of this modular control-suite concept. We developed the fundamental modules needed to implement open-loop active-control and demonstrated their use on a microwave power deposition experiment.

  13. Power Compensation for ICRF Heating in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gen; Qin, Chengming; Mao, Yuzhou; Zhao, Yanping; Yuan, Shuai; Zhang, Xinjun

    2016-08-01

    The source system covering a working frequency range of 24 MHz to 70 MHz with a total maximum output power of 12 MW has already been fabricated for Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating in EAST from 2012. There are two continuous wave (CW) antennas consisting of four launching elements each fed by a separate 1.5 MW transmitter. Due to the strong mutual coupling among the launching elements, the injection power for launching elements should be imbalance to keep the k‖ (parallel wave number) spectrum of the launcher symmetric for ICRF heating. Cross power induced by the mutual coupling will also induce many significant issues, such as an uncontrollable phase of currents in launching elements, high voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR), and impedance mismatching. It is necessary to develop a power compensation system for antennas to keep the power balance between the feed points. The power balance system consists of two significant parts: a decoupler and phase control. The decoupler helps to achieve ports isolation to make the differential phase controllable and compensate partly cross power. After that, the differential phase of 0 or π will keep the power balance of two feed points completely. The first power compensation system consisting of four decouplers was assembled and tested for the port B antenna at the working frequency of 35 MHz. With the application of the power compensation system, the power balance, phase feedback control, and voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) had obviously been improved in the 2015 EAST campaign. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2015GB101001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575237, 11375235, 11375236)

  14. 50 CFR 453.06 - Additional Committee powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.06 Additional Committee powers. (a) Secure information....

  15. 50 CFR 453.06 - Additional Committee powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.06 Additional Committee powers. (a) Secure information....

  16. 50 CFR 453.06 - Additional Committee powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.06 Additional Committee powers. (a) Secure information....

  17. 50 CFR 453.06 - Additional Committee powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.06 Additional Committee powers. (a) Secure information....

  18. 50 CFR 453.06 - Additional Committee powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.06 Additional Committee powers. (a) Secure information....

  19. High thermal power density heat transfer. [thermionic converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. The heat pipe is used to cool the nuclear reactor while the heat pipe is connected thermally and electrically to a thermionic converter. If the receiver requires greater thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparatively low thermal power densities through the electrically non-conducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  20. High power heating of magnetic reconnection in merging tokamak experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Yamada, T.; Gi, K.; Watanabe, T.; , T., Ii; Gryaznevich, M.; Scannell, R.; Conway, N.; Crowley, B.; Michael, C.

    2015-05-01

    Significant ion/electron heating of magnetic reconnection up to 1.2 keV was documented in two spherical tokamak plasma merging experiment on MAST with the significantly large Reynolds number R˜105. Measured 1D/2D contours of ion and electron temperatures reveal clearly energy-conversion mechanisms of magnetic reconnection: huge outflow heating of ions in the downstream and localized heating of electrons at the X-point. Ions are accelerated up to the order of poloidal Alfven speed in the reconnection outflow region and are thermalized by fast shock-like density pileups formed in the downstreams, in agreement with recent solar satellite observations and PIC simulation results. The magnetic reconnection efficiently converts the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic energy mostly into ion thermal energy through the outflow, causing the reconnection heating energy proportional to square of the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic field Brec2 ˜ Bp2. The guide toroidal field Bt does not affect the bulk heating of ions and electrons, probably because the reconnection/outflow speeds are determined mostly by the external driven inflow by the help of another fast reconnection mechanism: intermittent sheet ejection. The localized electron heating at the X-point increases sharply with the guide toroidal field Bt, probably because the toroidal field increases electron confinement and acceleration length along the X-line. 2D measurements of magnetic field and temperatures in the TS-3 tokamak merging experiment also reveal the detailed reconnection heating mechanisms mentioned above. The high-power heating of tokamak merging is useful not only for laboratory study of reconnection but also for economical startup and heating of tokamak plasmas. The MAST/TS-3 tokamak merging with Bp > 0.4 T will enables us to heat the plasma to the alpha heating regime: Ti > 5 keV without using any additional heating facility.

  1. Solar-powered turbocompressor heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Landerman, A.M.; Biancardi, F.R.; Melikian, G.; Meader, M.D.; Kepler, C.E.; Anderson, T.J.; Sitler, J.W.

    1982-08-12

    The turbocompressor comprises a power turbine and a compressor turbine having respective rotors and on a common shaft, rotatably supported by bearings. A first working fluid is supplied by a power loop and is expanded in the turbine. A second working fluid is compressed in the turbine and is circulated in a heat pump loop. A lubricant is mixed with the second working fluid but is excluded from the first working fluid. The bearings are cooled and lubricated by a system which circulates the second working fluid and the intermixed lubricant through the bearings. Such system includes a pump, a thermostatic expansion valve for expanding the working fluid into the space between the bearings, and a return conduit system for withdrawing the expanded working fluid after it passes through the bearings and for returning the working fluid to the evaporator. A shaft seal excludes the lubricant from the power turbine. The power loop includes a float operable by liquid working fluid in the condenser for controlling a recirculation valve so as to maintain a minimum liquid level in the condenser, while causing a feed pump to pump most of the working fluid into the vapor generator. The heat pump compressor loop includes a float in the condenser for operating and expansion valve to maintain a minimum liquid working fluid level in the condenser while causing most of the working fluid to be expanded into the evaporator.

  2. A heat receiver design for solar dynamic space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W.; Dustin, Miles O.; Crane, Roger

    1990-01-01

    An advanced heat pipe receiver designed for a solar dynamic space power system is described. The power system consists of a solar concentrator, solar heat receiver, Stirling heat engine, linear alternator and waste heat radiator. The solar concentrator focuses the sun's energy into a heat receiver. The engine and alternator convert a portion of this energy to electric power and the remaining heat is rejected by a waste heat radiator. Primary liquid metal heat pipes transport heat energy to the Stirling engine. Thermal energy storage allows this power system to operate during the shade portion of an orbit. Lithium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic is the thermal energy storage material. Thermal energy storage canisters are attached to the midsection of each heat pipe. The primary heat pipes pass through a secondary vapor cavity heat pipe near the engine and receiver interface. The secondary vapor cavity heat pipe serves three important functions. First, it smooths out hot spots in the solar cavity and provides even distribution of heat to the engine. Second, the event of a heat pipe failure, the secondary heat pipe cavity can efficiently transfer heat from other operating primary heat pipes to the engine heat exchanger of the defunct heat pipe. Third, the secondary heat pipe vapor cavity reduces temperature drops caused by heat flow into the engine. This unique design provides a high level of reliability and performance.

  3. The power of a critical heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campisi, Michele; Fazio, Rosario

    2016-06-01

    Since its inception about two centuries ago thermodynamics has sparkled continuous interest and fundamental questions. According to the second law no heat engine can have an efficiency larger than Carnot's efficiency. The latter can be achieved by the Carnot engine, which however ideally operates in infinite time, hence delivers null power. A currently open question is whether the Carnot efficiency can be achieved at finite power. Most of the previous works addressed this question within the Onsager matrix formalism of linear response theory. Here we pursue a different route based on finite-size-scaling theory. We focus on quantum Otto engines and show that when the working substance is at the verge of a second order phase transition diverging energy fluctuations can enable approaching the Carnot point without sacrificing power. The rate of such approach is dictated by the critical indices, thus showing the universal character of our analysis.

  4. The power of a critical heat engine.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele; Fazio, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Since its inception about two centuries ago thermodynamics has sparkled continuous interest and fundamental questions. According to the second law no heat engine can have an efficiency larger than Carnot's efficiency. The latter can be achieved by the Carnot engine, which however ideally operates in infinite time, hence delivers null power. A currently open question is whether the Carnot efficiency can be achieved at finite power. Most of the previous works addressed this question within the Onsager matrix formalism of linear response theory. Here we pursue a different route based on finite-size-scaling theory. We focus on quantum Otto engines and show that when the working substance is at the verge of a second order phase transition diverging energy fluctuations can enable approaching the Carnot point without sacrificing power. The rate of such approach is dictated by the critical indices, thus showing the universal character of our analysis. PMID:27320127

  5. The power of a critical heat engine.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele; Fazio, Rosario

    2016-06-20

    Since its inception about two centuries ago thermodynamics has sparkled continuous interest and fundamental questions. According to the second law no heat engine can have an efficiency larger than Carnot's efficiency. The latter can be achieved by the Carnot engine, which however ideally operates in infinite time, hence delivers null power. A currently open question is whether the Carnot efficiency can be achieved at finite power. Most of the previous works addressed this question within the Onsager matrix formalism of linear response theory. Here we pursue a different route based on finite-size-scaling theory. We focus on quantum Otto engines and show that when the working substance is at the verge of a second order phase transition diverging energy fluctuations can enable approaching the Carnot point without sacrificing power. The rate of such approach is dictated by the critical indices, thus showing the universal character of our analysis.

  6. The power of a critical heat engine

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Michele; Fazio, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Since its inception about two centuries ago thermodynamics has sparkled continuous interest and fundamental questions. According to the second law no heat engine can have an efficiency larger than Carnot's efficiency. The latter can be achieved by the Carnot engine, which however ideally operates in infinite time, hence delivers null power. A currently open question is whether the Carnot efficiency can be achieved at finite power. Most of the previous works addressed this question within the Onsager matrix formalism of linear response theory. Here we pursue a different route based on finite-size-scaling theory. We focus on quantum Otto engines and show that when the working substance is at the verge of a second order phase transition diverging energy fluctuations can enable approaching the Carnot point without sacrificing power. The rate of such approach is dictated by the critical indices, thus showing the universal character of our analysis. PMID:27320127

  7. Overview of Heat Addition and Efficiency Predictions for an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Reid, Terry V.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. Microporous bulk insulation is used in the ground support test hardware to minimize the loss of thermal energy from the electric heat source to the environment. The insulation package is characterized before operation to predict how much heat will be absorbed by the convertor and how much will be lost to the environment during operation. In an effort to validate these predictions, numerous tasks have been performed, which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs. This test and modeling effort included: (a) making thermophysical property measurements of test setup materials to provide inputs to the numerical models, (b) acquiring additional test data that was collected during convertor tests to provide numerical models with temperature profiles of the test setup via thermocouple and infrared measurements, (c) using multidimensional numerical models (computational fluid dynamics code) to predict net heat input of an operating convertor, and (d) using validation test hardware to provide direct comparison of numerical results and validate the multidimensional numerical models used to predict convertor net heat input. This effort produced high fidelity ASC net heat input predictions, which were successfully validated using

  8. Two-Dimensional, Supersonic, Linearized Flow with Heat Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Harvard

    1959-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the forces on a thin supersonic wing underneath which the air is heated. The analysis is limited principally to linearized theory but nonlinear effects are considered. It is shown that significant advantages to external heating would exist if the heat were added well below and ahead of the wing.

  9. Evidence for an Additional Heat Source in the Warm Ionized Medium of Galaxies.

    PubMed

    Reynolds; Haffner; Tufte

    1999-11-01

    Spatial variations of the [S ii]/Halpha and [N ii]/Halpha line intensity ratios observed in the gaseous halo of the Milky Way and other galaxies are inconsistent with pure photoionization models. They appear to require a supplemental heating mechanism that increases the electron temperature at low densities, ne. This would imply that in addition to photoionization, which has a heating rate per unit volume proportional to n2e, there is another source of heat with a rate per unit volume proportional to a lower power of ne. One possible mechanism is the dissipation of interstellar plasma turbulence, which, according to Minter & Spangler, heats the ionized interstellar medium in the Milky Way at a rate of approximately 1x10-25ne ergs cm-3 s-1. If such a source were present, it would dominate over photoionization heating in regions where ne less, similar0.1 cm-3, producing the observed increases in the [S ii]/Halpha and [N ii]/Halpha intensity ratios at large distances from the galactic midplane as well as accounting for the constancy of [S ii]/[N ii], which is not explained by pure photoionization. Other supplemental heating sources, such as magnetic reconnection, cosmic rays, or photoelectric emission from small grains, could also account for these observations, provided they supply approximately 10-5 ergs s-1 per square centimeter of the Galactic disk to the warm ionized medium.

  10. Utilizing Radioisotope Power System Waste Heat for Spacecraft Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantano, David R.; Dottore, Frank; Geng, Steven M.; Schrieber, Jeffrey G.; Tobery, E. Wayne; Palko, Joseph L.

    2005-01-01

    One of the advantages of using a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for deep space or planetary surface missions is the readily available waste heat, which can be used to maintain electronic components within a controlled temperature range, to warm propulsion tanks and mobility actuators, and to gasify liquid propellants. Previous missions using Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) dissipated a very large quantity of waste heat due to the relatively low efficiency of the thermoelectric conversion technology. The next generation RPSs, such as the 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) will have much higher conversion efficiencies than their predecessors and therefore may require alternate approaches to transferring waste heat to the spacecraft. RTGs, with efficiencies of approx. 6 to 7% and 200 C housing surface temperatures, would need to use large and heavy radiator heat exchangers to transfer the waste heat to the internal spacecraft components. At the same time, sensitive spacecraft instruments must be shielded from the thermal radiation by using the heat exchangers or additional shields. The SRG110, with an efficiency around 22% and 50 C nominal housing surface temperature, can use the available waste heat more efficiently by more direct heat transfer methods such as heat pipes, thermal straps, or fluid loops. The lower temperatures allow the SRG110 much more flexibility to the spacecraft designers in configuring the generator without concern of overheating nearby scientific instruments, thereby eliminating the need for thermal shields. This paper will investigate using a high efficiency SRG110 for spacecraft thermal management and outline potential methods in several conceptual missions (Lunar Rover, Mars Rover, and Titan Lander) to illustrate the advantages with regard to ease of assembly, less complex interfaces, and overall mass savings.

  11. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  12. 46 CFR 129.550 - Power for cooking and heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power for cooking and heating. 129.550 Section 129.550... INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.550 Power for cooking and heating. (a) Equipment for cooking and heating must be suitable for marine use. Equipment designed and installed to comply with...

  13. 46 CFR 129.550 - Power for cooking and heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power for cooking and heating. 129.550 Section 129.550... INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.550 Power for cooking and heating. (a) Equipment for cooking and heating must be suitable for marine use. Equipment designed and installed to comply with...

  14. 46 CFR 129.550 - Power for cooking and heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power for cooking and heating. 129.550 Section 129.550... INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.550 Power for cooking and heating. (a) Equipment for cooking and heating must be suitable for marine use. Equipment designed and installed to comply with...

  15. 46 CFR 129.550 - Power for cooking and heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power for cooking and heating. 129.550 Section 129.550... INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.550 Power for cooking and heating. (a) Equipment for cooking and heating must be suitable for marine use. Equipment designed and installed to comply with...

  16. 46 CFR 129.550 - Power for cooking and heating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power for cooking and heating. 129.550 Section 129.550... INSTALLATIONS Miscellaneous Electrical Systems § 129.550 Power for cooking and heating. (a) Equipment for cooking and heating must be suitable for marine use. Equipment designed and installed to comply with...

  17. High thermal power density heat transfer apparatus providing electrical isolation at high temperature using heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J. F.

    1985-03-19

    This invention is directed to transferring heat from an extremely high temperature source to an electrically isolated lower temperature receiver. The invention is particularly concerned with supplying thermal power to a thermionic converter from a nuclear reactor with electric isolation. Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. The heat pipe is used to cool the nuclear reactor while the heat pipe is connected thermally and electrically to a thermionic converter. If the receiver requires greater thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparatively low thermal power densities through the electrically nonconducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  18. Heat engine development for solar thermal power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, H. Q.; Jaffe, L. D.

    The technical status of three heat engines (Stirling, high-temperature Brayton, and Combined cycle) for use in solar thermal power systems is presented. Performance goals necessary to develop a system competitive with conventional power requirements include an external heated engine output less than 40 kW, and efficiency power conversion subsystem at least 40% at rated output, and a half-power efficiency of at least 37%. Results show that the Stirling engine can offer a 39% efficiency with 100 hours of life, and a 20% efficiency with 10,000 hours of life, but problems with seals and heater heads exist. With a demonstrated efficiency near 31% at 1500 F and a minimum lifetime of 100,000 hours, the Brayton engine does not offer sufficient engine lifetime, efficiency, and maintenance for solar thermal power systems. Examination of the Rankine bottoming cycle of the Combined cycle engine reveals a 30 year lifetime, but a low efficiency. Additional development of engines for solar use is primarily in the areas of components to provide a long lifetime, high reliability, and low maintenance (no more than $0.001/kW-hr).

  19. High power heating of magnetic reconnection in merging tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Gi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Ii, T.; Yamada, T.; Gryaznevich, M.; Scannell, R.; Conway, N.; Crowley, B.; Michael, C.

    2015-05-15

    Significant ion/electron heating of magnetic reconnection up to 1.2 keV was documented in two spherical tokamak plasma merging experiment on MAST with the significantly large Reynolds number R∼10{sup 5}. Measured 1D/2D contours of ion and electron temperatures reveal clearly energy-conversion mechanisms of magnetic reconnection: huge outflow heating of ions in the downstream and localized heating of electrons at the X-point. Ions are accelerated up to the order of poloidal Alfven speed in the reconnection outflow region and are thermalized by fast shock-like density pileups formed in the downstreams, in agreement with recent solar satellite observations and PIC simulation results. The magnetic reconnection efficiently converts the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic energy mostly into ion thermal energy through the outflow, causing the reconnection heating energy proportional to square of the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic field B{sub rec}{sup 2}  ∼  B{sub p}{sup 2}. The guide toroidal field B{sub t} does not affect the bulk heating of ions and electrons, probably because the reconnection/outflow speeds are determined mostly by the external driven inflow by the help of another fast reconnection mechanism: intermittent sheet ejection. The localized electron heating at the X-point increases sharply with the guide toroidal field B{sub t}, probably because the toroidal field increases electron confinement and acceleration length along the X-line. 2D measurements of magnetic field and temperatures in the TS-3 tokamak merging experiment also reveal the detailed reconnection heating mechanisms mentioned above. The high-power heating of tokamak merging is useful not only for laboratory study of reconnection but also for economical startup and heating of tokamak plasmas. The MAST/TS-3 tokamak merging with B{sub p} > 0.4 T will enables us to heat the plasma to the alpha heating regime: T{sub i} > 5 keV without using any additional heating facility.

  20. Alternative Radioisotopes for Heat and Power Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, T.; Sarsfield, M.; Rice, T.

    Production of 238Pu requires considerable facilities including a nuclear reactor and reprocessing plants that are very expensive to build and operate. Thus, a more economical alternative is very attractive to the industry. There are many alternative radioisotopes that exist but few that satisfy the criteria of performance, availability and cost to produce. Any alternative to 238Pu must exist in a chemical form that is compatible with the materials required to safely encapsulate the heat source at the high temperatures of operation and potential launch failure scenarios. The chemical form must also have suitable thermal properties to ensure maximum energy conversion efficiencies when integrated into radioisotope thermoelectric generators over the required mission durations. In addition, the radiation dose must be low enough for operators during production and not so prohibitive that excessive shielding mass is required on the space craft. This paper will focus on the preferred European alternative of 241Am, and the issues that will need to be addressed.

  1. Development of a thermoelectric self-powered residential heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, K.; Hayden, A. C. S.

    Self-powered heating equipment has the potential for high overall energy efficiency and can provide an effective means of providing on site power and energy security in residential homes. It is also attractive for remote communities where connection to the grid is not cost effective. Self-powered residential heating systems operate entirely on fuel combustion and do not need externally generated electricity. Excess power can be provided for other electrical loads. To realize this concept, one must develop a reliable and low maintenance means of generating electricity and integrate it into fuel-fired heating equipment. In the present work, a self-powered residential heating system was developed using thermoelectric power generation technology. A thermoelectric module with a power generation capacity of 550 W was integrated into a fuel-fired furnace. The thermoelectric module has a radial configuration that fits well with the heating equipment. The electricity generated is adequate to power all electrical components for a residential central heating system. The performance of the thermoelectric module was examined under various operating conditions. The effects of heat transfer conditions were studied in order to maximize electric power output. A mathematical model was established and used to look into the influence of heat transfer coefficients and other parameters on electric power output and efficiency.

  2. Development of Thermoelectric Self-Powered Heating Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, K.; Hayden, A. C. S.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, a self-powered residential heating system was developed using thermoelectric generation technology. A full-size prototype was designed, constructed, and tested, in which Bi2Te3-based thermoelectric modules were incorporated into a gas-fired heating boiler. Up to 161 W of electricity is generated by the thermoelectric modules. This is sufficient to power all the electrical components of the residential heating equipment including pump, fan, blower, valves, and control panel. In this way, the heating system can operate entirely on fuel combustion and does not need externally generated electricity. The performance of the thermoelectric devices has been investigated in the integrated heating system under various operating conditions. The energy system's advantages include simplicity, low noise, clean operation, and low maintenance. The thermoelectric self-powered heating system could provide the consumer with heating system reliability and a reduction in electric power consumption.

  3. High thermal power density heat transfer apparatus providing electrical isolation at high temperature using heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1985-03-01

    This invention is directed to transferring heat from an extremely high temperature source to an electrically isolated lower temperature receiver. The invention is particularly concerned with supplying thermal power to a thermionic converter from a nuclear reactor with electric isolation. Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. If the receiver requires gratr thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparative low thermal power densities through the electrically nonconducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  4. High thermal power density heat transfer apparatus providing electrical isolation at high temperature using heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention is directed to transferring heat from an extremely high temperature source to an electrically isolated lower temperature receiver. The invention is particularly concerned with supplying thermal power to a thermionic converter from a nuclear reactor with electric isolation. Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. If the receiver requires gratr thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparative low thermal power densities through the electrically nonconducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  5. Design of a nuclear isotope heat source assembly for a spaceborne mini-Brayton power module.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wein, D.; Gorland, S. H.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a study to develop a feasible design definition of a heat source assembly (HSA) for use in nominal 500-, 1200-, or 2000-W(e) mini-Brayton spacecraft power systems. The HSA is a modular design which is used either as a single unit to provide thermal energy to the 500-W(e) mini-Brayton power module or in parallel with one or two additional HSAs for the 1200- or 2000-W(e) power module systems. Principal components consist of a multihundred watt RTG isotope heat source, a heat source heat exchanger which transfers the thermal energy from the heat source to the mini-Brayton power conversion system, an auxiliary cooling system which provides requisite cooling during nonoperation of the power conversion module and an emergency cooling system which precludes accidental release of isotope fuel in the event of system failure.

  6. Heat-Pipe-Associated Localized Thermoelectric Power Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jo; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Jang, Ju-Chan; Lee, Wook-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The present study focused on how to improve the maximum power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system and move heat to any suitable space using a TEG associated with a loop thermosyphon (loop-type heat pipe). An experimental study was carried out to investigate the power output, the temperature difference of the thermoelectric module (TEM), and the heat transfer performance associated with the characteristic of the researched heat pipe. Currently, internal combustion engines lose more than 35% of their fuel energy as recyclable heat in the exhaust gas, but it is not easy to recycle waste heat using TEGs because of the limited space in vehicles. There are various advantages to use of TEGs over other power sources, such as the absence of moving parts, a long lifetime, and a compact system configuration. The present study presents a novel TEG concept to transfer heat from the heat source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any location. This simple and novel design for a TEG can be applied to future hybrid cars. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate power of around 1.8 V with T TEM = 58°C. The heat transfer performance of a loop-type heat pipe with various working fluids was investigated, with water at high heat flux (90 W) and 0.05% TiO2 nanofluid at low heat flux (30 W to 70 W) showing the best performance in terms of power generation. The heat pipe can transfer the heat to any location where the TEM is installed.

  7. 4. FLOOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FLOOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. Also includes plot plan at 1 inch to 100 feet. John Hudspeth, architect, foot of Main Street, Alameda, California. Sheet 3. Plan no. 10,548. Scale 1/4 inch and h inch to the foot. April 30, 1945, last revised 6/22/45. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Boiler House, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  8. 3. ELEVATIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ELEVATIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. John Hudspeth, architect, foot of Main Street, Alameda, California. Sheet 4. Plan no. 10,548. Scale 1/4 inch to the foot, elevations, and one inch to the foot, sections and details. April 30, 1945, last revised 6/19/45. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Boiler House, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  9. Thermal Energy Corporation Combined Heat and Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E. Bruce; Brown, Tim; Mardiat, Ed

    2011-12-31

    To meet the planned heating and cooling load growth at the Texas Medical Center (TMC), Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) implemented Phase 1 of a Master Plan to install an additional 32,000 tons of chilled water capacity, a 75,000 ton-hour (8.8 million gallon) Thermal Energy Storage (TES) tank, and a 48 MW Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. The Department of Energy selected TMC for a $10 million grant award as part of the Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology, Recovery Act: Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficiency Industrial Equipment Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000044 to support the installation of a new 48 MW CHP system at the TMC located just outside downtown Houston. As the largest medical center in the world, TMC is home to many of the nation's best hospitals, physicians, researchers, educational institutions, and health care providers. TMC provides care to approximately six million patients each year, and medical instruction to over 71,000 students. A medical center the size of TMC has enormous electricity and thermal energy demands to help it carry out its mission. Reliable, high-quality steam and chilled water are of utmost importance to the operations of its many facilities. For example, advanced medical equipment, laboratories, laundry facilities, space heating and cooling all rely on the generation of heat and power. As result of this project TECO provides this mission critical heating and cooling to TMC utilizing a system that is both energy-efficient and reliable since it provides the capability to run on power independent of the already strained regional electric grid. This allows the medical center to focus on its primary mission providing top quality medical care and instruction without worrying about excessive energy costs or the loss of heating and cooling due to the risk of power

  10. Experimental study of enhanced heat transfer by addition of CuO nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesumathy, Stella; Udayakumar, M.; Suresh, S.

    2012-06-01

    An energy storage system has been designed to study the thermal characteristics of paraffin wax with an embedded nano size copper oxide (CuO) particle. This paper presents studies conducted on phase transition times, heat fraction as well as heat transfer characteristics of paraffin wax as phase change material (PCM) embedded with CuO nanoparticles. 40 nm mean size CuO particles of 2, 5 and 10% by weight were dispersed in PCM for this study. Experiments were performed on a heat exchanger with 1.5-10 l/min of heat transfer fluid (HTF) flow. Time-based variations of the temperature distributions are revealed from the results of observations of melting and solidification curves. The results strongly suggested that the thermal conductivity enhances 6, 6.7 and 7.8% in liquid state and in dynamic viscosity it enhances by 5, 14 and 30% with increasing mass fraction of the CNEPs. The thermal conductivity ratio of the composites can be augmented by a factor up to 1.3. The heat transfer coefficient during solidification increased about 78% for the maximum flow rate. The analysis of experimental results reveals that the addition of copper oxide nanoparticles to the paraffin wax enhances both the conduction and natural convection very effectively in composites and in paraffin wax. The paraffin wax-based composites have great potential for energy storage applications like industrial waste heat recovery, solar thermal applications and solar based dynamic space power generation with optimal fraction of copper oxide nanoparticles.

  11. Heat Rejection Concepts for Brayton Power Conversion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siamidis, John; Mason, Lee; Beach, Duane; Yuko, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications. The Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Space Brayton conversion system designs tend to optimize at efficiencies of about 20 to 25 percent with radiator temperatures in the 400 to 600 K range. A notional HRS was developed for a 100 kWe-class Brayton power system that uses a pumped sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport loop coupled to a water heat pipe radiator. The radiator panels employ a sandwich construction consisting of regularly-spaced circular heat pipes contained within two composite facesheets. Heat transfer from the NaK fluid to the heat pipes is accomplished by inserting the evaporator sections into the NaK duct channel. The paper evaluates various design parameters including heat pipe diameter, heat pipe spacing, and facesheet thickness. Parameters were varied to compare design options on the basis of NaK pump pressure rise and required power, heat pipe unit power and radial flux, radiator panel areal mass, and overall HRS mass.

  12. Drag reducing effects of polymer additives in a plate heat exchanger for the OTEC system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, N.; Yoon, S.; Kim, C.; Seo, T.

    1999-07-01

    Experiments were undertaken for a 15kW Alfa-Laval plate heat exchanger utilizing polyethylene oxide as a polymer additive. Concentrations of polymer additives were 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 100, 200 and 400 wppm at 25 C and mass flow rates were 0.6kg/s, 0.7kg/s, 0.8kg/s and 0.9kg/s in normal operating ranges of the plate heat exchanger. The maximum effects of drag reductions were found at 20 wppm polymer concentration and at approximately 0.7kg/s of mass flow rate. The results show that there exist optimum polymer concentration and at approximately 0.7kg/s of mass flow rate. The results show that there exist optimum polymer concentration and mass flow rate for the plate heat exchanger for maximum drag reduction effects. In most cases, drag reduction of approximately 20% has been obtained. It means considerable savings in pumping power for a large size OTEC plant.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM"PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, Zack; Lipman, Timothy; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris

    2010-06-01

    The effectiveness of combined heat and power (CHP) systems for power interruption intolerant,"premium power," facilities is the focus of this study. Through three real-world case studies and economic cost minimization modeling, the economic and environmental performance of"premium power" CHP is analyzed. The results of the analysis for a brewery, data center, and hospital lead to some interesting conclusions about CHP limited to the specific CHP technologies installed at those sites. Firstly, facilities with high heating loads prove to be the most appropriate for CHP installations from a purely economic standpoint. Secondly, waste heat driven thermal cooling systems are only economically attractive if the technology for these chillers can increase above the current best system efficiency. Thirdly, if the reliability of CHP systems proves to be as high as diesel generators they could replace these generators at little or no additional cost if the thermal to electric (relative) load of those facilities was already high enough to economically justify a CHP system. Lastly, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, the modeled CHP systems provide some degree of decreased emissions, estimated at approximately 10percent for the hospital, the application with the highest relative thermal load in this case

  14. A thermosyphon heat pipe cooler for high power LEDs cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Tian, Wenkai; Lv, Lucang

    2016-08-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) cooling is facing the challenge of high heat flux more seriously with the increase of input power and diode density. The proposed unique thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink is particularly suitable for cooling of high power density LED chips and other electronics, which has a heat dissipation potential of up to 280 W within an area of 20 mm × 22 mm (>60 W/cm2) under natural air convection. Meanwhile, a thorough visualization investigation was carried out to explore the two phase flow characteristics in the proposed thermosyphon heat pipe. Implementing this novel thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink in the cooling of a commercial 100 W LED integrated chip, a very low apparent thermal resistance of 0.34 K/W was obtained under natural air convection with the aid of the enhanced boiling heat transfer at the evaporation side and the enhanced natural air convection at the condensation side.

  15. Heat pipe nuclear reactor for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koening, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A heat-pipe-cooled nuclear reactor has been designed to provide 3.2 MWth to an out-of-core thermionic conversion system. The reactor is a fast reactor designed to operate at a nominal heat-pipe temperature of 1675 K. Each reactor fuel element consists of a hexagonal molybdenum block which is bonded along its axis to one end of a molybdenum/lithium-vapor heat pipe. The block is perforated with an array of longitudinal holes which are loaded with UO2 pellets. The heat pipe transfers heat directly to a string of six thermionic converters which are bonded along the other end of the heat pipe. An assembly of 90 such fuel elements forms a hexagonal core. The core is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield, a thin thermal neutron absorber, and a BeO reflector containing boron-loaded control drums.

  16. Heat Rejection Concepts for Lunar Fission Surface Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siamidis, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for lunar surface Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for surface power applications. Surface reactors may be used for the moon to power human outposts enabling extended stays and closed loop life support. The Brayton Heat Rejection System (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Space Brayton conversion system designs tend to optimize at efficiencies of about 20 to 25 percent with radiator temperatures in the 400 K to 600 K range. A notional HRS was developed for a 100 kWe-class Brayton power system that uses a pumped water heat transport loop coupled to a water heat pipe radiator. The radiator panels employ a tube and fin construction consisting of regularly-spaced circular heat pipes contained within two composite facesheets. The water heat pipes interface to the coolant through curved sections partially contained within the cooling loop. The paper evaluates various design parameters including radiator panel orientation, coolant flow path, and facesheet thickness. Parameters were varied to compare design options on the basis of H2O pump pressure rise and required power, heat pipe unit power and radial flux, radiator area, radiator panel areal mass, and overall HRS mass.

  17. Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer

    DOEpatents

    Misage, Robert; Scheffler, Glenn W.; Setzer, Herbert J.; Margiott, Paul R.; Parenti, Jr., Edmund K.

    1988-01-01

    A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

  18. Testing and plugging power plant heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Sutor, F.

    1994-12-31

    Heat Exchanger tubes fail for any number of reasons including but certainly not limited to the cumulative effects of corrosion, erosion, thermal stress and fatigue. This presentation will attempt to identify the most common techniques for determining which tubes are leaking and then introduce the products in use to plug the leaking tubes. For the sake of time I will limit the scope of this presentation to include feedwater heaters and secondary system heat exchangers such as Hydrogen Coolers, Lube Oil Coolers, and nuclear Component Cooling Water, Emergency Cooling Water, Regenerative Heat Recovery heat exchangers.

  19. Comparison of an impedance heating system to mineral insulated heat trace for power tower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, J.E.; Kolb, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    A non-conventional type of heating system is being tested at Sandia National Laboratories for solar thermal power tower applications. In this system, called impedance heating, electric current flows directly through the pipe to maintain the desired temperature. The pipe becomes the resistor where the heat is generated. Impedance heating has many advantages over previously used mineral insulated (MI) heat trace. An impedance heating system should be much more reliable than heat trace cable since delicate junctions and cabling are not used and the main component, a transformer, is inherently reliable. A big advantage of impedance heating is the system can be sized to rapidly heat up the piping to provide rapid response times necessary in cyclic power plants such as solar power towers. In this paper, experimental results from testing an impedance heating system are compared to MI heat trace. The authors found impedance heating was able to heat piping rapidly and effectively. There were not significant stray currents and impedance heating did not affect instrumentation.

  20. Lithium Dinitramide as an Additive in Lithium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorkovenko, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    Lithium dinitramide, LiN(NO2)2 has shown promise as an additive to nonaqueous electrolytes in rechargeable and non-rechargeable lithium-ion-based electrochemical power cells. Such non-aqueous electrolytes consist of lithium salts dissolved in mixtures of organic ethers, esters, carbonates, or acetals. The benefits of adding lithium dinitramide (which is also a lithium salt) include lower irreversible loss of capacity on the first charge/discharge cycle, higher cycle life, lower self-discharge, greater flexibility in selection of electrolyte solvents, and greater charge capacity. The need for a suitable electrolyte additive arises as follows: The metallic lithium in the anode of a lithium-ion-based power cell is so highly reactive that in addition to the desired main electrochemical reaction, it engages in side reactions that cause formation of resistive films and dendrites, which degrade performance as quantified in terms of charge capacity, cycle life, shelf life, first-cycle irreversible capacity loss, specific power, and specific energy. The incidence of side reactions can be reduced through the formation of a solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) a thin film that prevents direct contact between the lithium anode material and the electrolyte. Ideally, an SEI should chemically protect the anode and the electrolyte from each other while exhibiting high conductivity for lithium ions and little or no conductivity for electrons. A suitable additive can act as an SEI promoter. Heretofore, most SEI promotion was thought to derive from organic molecules in electrolyte solutions. In contrast, lithium dinitramide is inorganic. Dinitramide compounds are known as oxidizers in rocket-fuel chemistry and until now, were not known as SEI promoters in battery chemistry. Although the exact reason for the improvement afforded by the addition of lithium dinitramide is not clear, it has been hypothesized that lithium dinitramide competes with other electrolyte constituents to react with

  1. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  2. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  3. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  4. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  5. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional requirements to provide heat... requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of a Hg Budget unit that monitors and reports Hg... monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  6. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  7. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional requirements to provide heat... requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of a Hg Budget unit that monitors and reports Hg... monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  8. Geometric Heat Engines Featuring Power that Grows with Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Raz, O; Subaşı, Y; Pugatch, R

    2016-04-22

    Thermodynamics places a limit on the efficiency of heat engines, but not on their output power or on how the power and efficiency change with the engine's cycle time. In this Letter, we develop a geometrical description of the power and efficiency as a function of the cycle time, applicable to an important class of heat engine models. This geometrical description is used to design engine protocols that attain both the maximal power and maximal efficiency at the fast driving limit. Furthermore, using this method, we also prove that no protocol can exactly attain the Carnot efficiency at nonzero power.

  9. Geometric Heat Engines Featuring Power that Grows with Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz, O.; Subaşı, Y.; Pugatch, R.

    2016-04-01

    Thermodynamics places a limit on the efficiency of heat engines, but not on their output power or on how the power and efficiency change with the engine's cycle time. In this Letter, we develop a geometrical description of the power and efficiency as a function of the cycle time, applicable to an important class of heat engine models. This geometrical description is used to design engine protocols that attain both the maximal power and maximal efficiency at the fast driving limit. Furthermore, using this method, we also prove that no protocol can exactly attain the Carnot efficiency at nonzero power.

  10. Photocell heat engine solar power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taussig, R. T.; Vaidyanathan, T. S.; Hoverson, S.; Bruzzone, C.; Christiansen, W.

    1980-01-01

    A combined photocell heat engine concept is proposed for high efficiency solar energy conversion in space. In this concept the short wavelength portion of the solar spectrum is split by a dichroic filter and sent to a bank of photocells. The long wave-length remainder of the spectrum is used by the heat engine. This technique allows the photocells to operate with the minimum amount of waste heat, increasing their efficiency and reducing the amount of cooling required. The heat engine operates by direct absorption in a working fluid containing broadband absorber molecules or particulates. A window in the heat engine admits the long wave-lengths from the solar spectrum. The window may also reflect a portion of the internal gaseous reradiation spectrum (e.g., a heat mirror) to help reduce radiation losses. Flow-induced thermal gradients may also reduce reradiation losses in the case of optically thick working fluids. The efficiencies computed for the photocell heat engine solar energy converter can be as high as 42 percent.

  11. Experience with organic Rankine cycles in heat recovery power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bronicki, L.Y.; Elovic, A.; Rettger, P.

    1996-11-01

    Over the last 30 years, organic Rankine cycles (ORC) have been increasingly employed to produce power from various heat sources when other alternatives were either technically not feasible or economical. These power plants have logged a total of over 100 million turbine hours of experience demonstrating the maturity and field proven technology of the ORC cycle. The cycle is well adapted to low to moderate temperature heat sources such as waste heat from industrial plants and is widely used to recover energy from geothermal resources. The above cycle technology is well established and applicable to heat recovery of medium size gas turbines and offers significant advantages over conventional steam bottoming cycles.

  12. Heat pipe cooled reactors for multi-kilowatt space power supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranken, W. A.; Houts, M. G.

    Three nuclear reactor space power system designs are described that demonstrate how the use of high temperature heat pipes for reactor heat transport, combined with direct conversion of heat to electricity, can result in eliminating pumped heat transport loops for both primary reactor cooling and heat rejection. The result is a significant reduction in system complexity that leads to very low mass systems with high reliability, especially in the power range of 1 to 20 kWe. In addition to removing heat exchangers, electromagnetic pumps, and coolant expansion chambers, the heat pipe/direct conversion combination provides such capabilities as startup from the frozen state, automatic rejection of reactor decay heat in the event of emergency or accidental reactor shutdown, and the elimination of single point failures in the reactor cooling system. The power system designs described include a thermoelectric system that can produce 1 to 2 kWe, a bimodal modification of this system to increase its power level to 5 kWe and incorporate high temperature hydrogen propulsion capability, and a moderated thermionic reactor concept with 5 to 20 kWe power output that is based on beryllium modules that thermally couple cylindrical thermionic fuel elements (TFE's) to radiator heat pipes.

  13. Heat pipe cooled reactors for multi-kilowatt space power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Ranken, W.A.; Houts, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    Three nuclear reactor space power system designs are described that demonstrate how the use of high temperature heat pipes for reactor heat transport, combined with direct conversion of heat to electricity, can result in eliminating pumped heat transport loops for both primary reactor cooling and heat rejection. The result is a significant reduction in system complexity that leads to very low mass systems with high reliability, especially in the power range of 1 to 20 kWe. In addition to removing heat exchangers, electromagnetic pumps, and coolant expansion chambers, the heat pipe/direct conversion combination provides such capabilities as startup from the frozen state, automatic rejection of reactor decay heat in the event of emergency or accidental reactor shutdown, and the elimination of single point failures in the reactor cooling system. The power system designs described include a thermoelectric system that can produce 1 to 2 kWe, a bimodal modification of this system to increase its power level to 5 kWe and incorporate high temperature hydrogen propulsion capability, and a moderated thermionic reactor concept with 5 to 20 kWe power output that is based on beryllium modules that thermally couple cylindrical thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) to radiator heat pipes.

  14. Integrated three-dimensional module heat exchanger for power electronics cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bennion, Kevin; Lustbader, Jason

    2013-09-24

    Embodiments discussed herein are directed to a power semiconductor packaging that removes heat from a semiconductor package through one or more cooling zones that are located in a laterally oriented position with respect to the semiconductor package. Additional embodiments are directed to circuit elements that are constructed from one or more modular power semiconductor packages.

  15. Model of Heat Exchangers for Waste Heat Recovery from Diesel Engine Exhaust for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Chad; Vuppuluri, Prem; Shi, Li; Hall, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    The performance and operating characteristics of a hypothetical thermoelectric generator system designed to extract waste heat from the exhaust of a medium-duty turbocharged diesel engine were modeled. The finite-difference model consisted of two integrated submodels: a heat exchanger model and a thermoelectric device model. The heat exchanger model specified a rectangular cross-sectional geometry with liquid coolant on the cold side, and accounted for the difference between the heat transfer rate from the exhaust and that to the coolant. With the spatial variation of the thermoelectric properties accounted for, the thermoelectric device model calculated the hot-side and cold-side heat flux for the temperature boundary conditions given for the thermoelectric elements, iterating until temperature and heat flux boundary conditions satisfied the convection conditions for both exhaust and coolant, and heat transfer in the thermoelectric device. A downhill simplex method was used to optimize the parameters that affected the electrical power output, including the thermoelectric leg height, thermoelectric n-type to p-type leg area ratio, thermoelectric leg area to void area ratio, load electrical resistance, exhaust duct height, coolant duct height, fin spacing in the exhaust duct, location in the engine exhaust system, and number of flow paths within the constrained package volume. The calculation results showed that the configuration with 32 straight fins was optimal across the 30-cm-wide duct for the case of a single duct with total height of 5.5 cm. In addition, three counterflow parallel ducts or flow paths were found to be an optimum number for the given size constraint of 5.5 cm total height, and parallel ducts with counterflow were a better configuration than serpentine flow. Based on the reported thermoelectric properties of MnSi1.75 and Mg2Si0.5Sn0.5, the maximum net electrical power achieved for the three parallel flow paths in a counterflow arrangement was 1

  16. A high power, Coated Particle Fuel Compact Radioisotope Heat Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2001-02-01

    A Coated Particle Fuel Compact, Radioisotope Heater Unit (CPFC-RHU) is proposed, which is capable of generating thermal power in excess of 27 W. This power output is more than four times that of a Hexa-RHU, which generates only six watts of thermal power. The design of the CPFC-RHU is identical to that of the Hexa-RHU, except that the six Pt-30Rh clad fuel pellets and the POCO graphite support in the latter are replaced with single-sized, ZrC coated, 238PuO2 fuel particles ~500 μm in diameter. In addition to fully retaining the helium gas generated by the radioactive decay of the fuel, the CPFC offers promise for enhanced safety. Thermal analyses of the CPFC-RHU show that while the Hexa-RHU is suitable for use in a radioisotope power system (RPS) operating at a converter hot-side temperature of 473 K, the CPFC-RHU could also be used at higher temperatures of 773 K and 973 K with a thermal efficiency >60%. Even at a 473 K converter hot-side temperature, the CPFC-RHU offers higher thermal efficiency (>90%) than the Hexa-RHU (~75%). The CPFC-RHU final design provides constant temperature, with almost uniform radial heat flux to the converter, for enhanced performance, better integration, and higher overall efficiency of the RPS. The present CPFC-RHU fills a gap in the power needs for future space missions requiring electric power of 1-15 W, from a single RPS. .

  17. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  18. Thermionic Power Cell To Harness Heat Energies for Geothermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Greer, Harold F.

    2011-01-01

    A unit thermionic power cell (TPC) concept has been developed that converts natural heat found in high-temperature environments (460 to 700 C) into electrical power for in situ instruments and electronics. Thermionic emission of electrons occurs when an emitter filament is heated to gwhite hot h temperatures (>1,000 C) allowing electrons to overcome the potential barrier and emit into the vacuum. These electrons are then collected by an anode, and transported to the external circuit for energy storage.

  19. High-Power Liquid-Metal Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Fujita, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Proposed closed-loop system for transfer of thermal power operates at relatively high differential pressure between vapor and liquid phases of liquid-metal working fluid. Resembles "capillary-pumped" liquid-metal heat-transfer loop except electric field across permselective barrier of beta alumina keeps liquid and vapor separate at heat-input end. Increases output thermal power, contains no moving parts, highly reliable and well suited to long-term unattended operation.

  20. In-volume heating using high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenkov, Valentin S.; Kiyko, Vadim V.; Vdovin, Gleb V.

    2015-03-01

    High-power lasers are useful instruments suitable for applications in various fields; the most common industrial applications include cutting and welding. We propose a new application of high-power laser diodes as in-bulk heating source for food industry. Current heating processes use surface heating with different approaches to make the heat distribution more uniform and the process more efficient. High-power lasers can in theory provide in-bulk heating which can sufficiently increase the uniformity of heat distribution thus making the process more efficient. We chose two media (vegetable fat and glucose) for feasibility experiments. First, we checked if the media have necessary absorption coefficients on the wavelengths of commercially available laser diodes (940-980 nm). This was done using spectrophotometer at 700-1100 nm which provided the dependences of transmission from the wavelength. The results indicate that vegetable fat has noticeable transmission dip around 925 nm and glucose has sufficient dip at 990 nm. Then, after the feasibility check, we did numerical simulation of the heat distribution in bulk using finite elements method. Based on the results, optimal laser wavelength and illuminator configuration were selected. Finally, we carried out several pilot experiments with high-power diodes heating the chosen media.

  1. Heat pipe heat transport system for the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Life issues relating to a sodium heat pipe heat transport system are described. The heat pipe system provides heat, at a temperature of 1050 K, to a 50 kWe Stirling engine/linear alternator power converter called the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC). The converter is being developed under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration program. Since corrosion of heat pipe materials in contact with sodium can impact the life of the heat pipe, a literature review of sodium corrosion processes was performed. It was found that the impurity reactions, primarily oxygen, and dissolution of alloy elements were the two corrosion process likely to be operative in the heat pipe. Approaches that are being taken to minimize these corrosion processes are discussed.

  2. Acidization of a Direct Heat Hydrothermal Well and its Potential in Developing Additional Direct Heat Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Strawn, J. A.; Prestwich, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A matrix acid treatment on a limestone formation in a low temperature hydrothermal production well in South Dakota has resulted in a 40% increase in heat (BTU) available for use in space heating a hospital. The results of this experimental treatment on the Madison Limestone suggest a significant potential may exist for similar applications, particularly throughout the western United States. This paper presents the results of the acid treatment, suggests other possible areas for similar application, and analyzes the economics for successful treatments.

  3. Power generation plant integrating concentrated solar power receiver and pressurized heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Sakadjian, Bartev B; Flynn, Thomas J; Hu, Shengteng; Velazquez-Vargas, Luis G; Maryamchik, Mikhail

    2016-10-04

    A power plant includes a solar receiver heating solid particles, a standpipe receiving solid particles from the solar receiver, a pressurized heat exchanger heating working fluid by heat transfer through direct contact with heated solid particles flowing out of the bottom of the standpipe, and a flow path for solid particles from the bottom of the standpipe into the pressurized heat exchanger that is sealed by a pressure P produced at the bottom of the standpipe by a column of heated solid particles of height H. The flow path may include a silo or surge tank comprising a pressure vessel connected to the bottom of the standpipe, and a non-mechanical valve. The power plant may further include a turbine driven by heated working fluid discharged from the pressurized heat exchanger, and a compressor driven by the turbine.

  4. Device for removing heat of decomposition in a steam power plant heated by nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Emsperger, W.; Werker, E.

    1980-12-02

    Device for removing heat of decomposition in a steam power plant heated by nuclear energy and having a steam generator with a water-steam separating tank connected downstream of the steam generator in travel direction of the steam generated thereby includes a start-up circulatory loop for the steam power plant connected to the steam generator and including the water-steam separating tank therein, the start-up circulatory loop being formed of a feed water line and an outlet line from the water-steam separating tank and further including an externally cooled heat exchanger connected therein for removing after-heat.

  5. Combined heat supply from heat and power plants with gas-net-heaters and thermo-transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozdrenko, G. V.; Grigoryeva, O. K.; Frantseva, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    The article considers the process scheme and the cycle of power unit of heat and power plant in the system of combined heat supply with gas-net-heaters and interblock Freon thermo-transformers. Methodology and indicators for evaluation of efficiency of the heating power unit at such heat supply are presented.

  6. Sensible heat receiver for solar dynamic space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Petrefski, Chris

    1991-01-01

    A sensible heat receiver is considered which uses a vapor grown carbon fiber-carbon (VGCF/C) composite as the thermal storage medium and which was designed for a 7-kW Brayton engine. This heat receiver stores the required energy to power the system during eclipse in the VGCF/C composite. The heat receiver thermal analysis was conducted through the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA) software package. The sensible heat receiver compares well with other latent and advanced sensible heat receivers analyzed in other studies, while avoiding the problems associated with latent heat storage salts and liquid metal heat pipes. The concept also satisfies the design requirements for a 7-kW Brayton engine system. The weight and size of the system can be optimized by changes in geometry and technology advances for this new material.

  7. Sensible heat receiver for solar dynamic space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Petrefski, Chris

    1991-01-01

    A sensible heat receiver considered in this study uses a vapor grown carbon fiber-carbon (VGCF/C) composite as the thermal storage media and was designed for a 7 kW Brayton engine. The proposed heat receiver stores the required energy to power the system during eclipse in the VGCF/C composite. The heat receiver thermal analysis was conducted through the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA) software package. The sensible heat receiver compares well with other latent and advanced sensible heat receivers analyzed in other studies while avoiding the problems associated with latent heat storage salts and liquid metal heat pipes. The concept also satisfies the design requirements for a 7 kW Brayton engine system. The weight and size of the system can be optimized by changes in geometry and technology advances for this new material.

  8. A fast spectrum heat pipe cooled thermionic power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Joseph C.; Determan, William R.; Van Hagan, Thomas H.; Wuchte, Thomas, Captain

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design and performance characteristics of a heat pipe cooled thermionic (HPTI) power system being developed by a team headed by Rockwell International and General Atomics (GA). The design utilizes multicell, in-core thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) in a fast spectrum reactor core that is passively cooled by in-core heat pipes. The fast spectrum promotes competitive mass scalability over the power range of interest for future military application of 10 to 100 kWe without changing basic components or technologies. The number of TFEs and companion uranium nitride fuel elements are merely varied to achieve the critical mass requirements for each power level. The redundant in-core heat pipes in conjunction with an internally redundant heat pipe radiator help assure meeting key design goals for no single point failures and high survivability to both natural and hostile threats. These attractive attributes are achieved using already developed or under development technology.

  9. 21 CFR 890.5950 - Powered heating unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered heating unit. 890.5950 Section 890.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5950 Powered...

  10. 21 CFR 890.5950 - Powered heating unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered heating unit. 890.5950 Section 890.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5950 Powered...

  11. 21 CFR 890.5950 - Powered heating unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered heating unit. 890.5950 Section 890.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5950 Powered...

  12. Low-power nuclear engineering for heat production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursky, A. S.; Kalygin, V. V.; Semidotsky, I. I.

    2012-05-01

    The paper shows the expediency and importance of the development of low-power nuclear engineering as well as feasibility indices of an up-to-date nuclear power plant intended for regional energy production. A high reliability of the vessel-type boiling reactor with a natural coolant circulation is shown under various operating conditions of a nuclear heat production plant.

  13. 21 CFR 890.5740 - Powered heating pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered heating pad. 890.5740 Section 890.5740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5740 Powered...

  14. 21 CFR 890.5950 - Powered heating unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered heating unit. 890.5950 Section 890.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5950 Powered...

  15. 21 CFR 890.5740 - Powered heating pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered heating pad. 890.5740 Section 890.5740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5740 Powered...

  16. 21 CFR 890.5740 - Powered heating pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered heating pad. 890.5740 Section 890.5740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5740 Powered...

  17. 21 CFR 890.5740 - Powered heating pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered heating pad. 890.5740 Section 890.5740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5740 Powered...

  18. 21 CFR 890.5950 - Powered heating unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered heating unit. 890.5950 Section 890.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5950 Powered...

  19. 21 CFR 890.5740 - Powered heating pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered heating pad. 890.5740 Section 890.5740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5740 Powered...

  20. Development of Electric Power Units Driven by Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Takao; Kaneko, Atsushi; Uchimura, Tomoyuki; Irie, Kiichi; Watanabe, Hiroyoshi

    For the development of a simple and compact power generator driven by waste heat, working fluids and an expander were studied, then a practical electric power unit was put to test. Many working fluids were calculated with the low temperature power cycle (evaporated at 77°C, condensed at 42°C),and TFE,R123,R245fa were selected to be suitable for the cycle. TFE(Trifluoroethanol CF3CH2OH) was adopted to the actual power generator which was tested. A radial turbine was adopted as an expander, and was newly designed and manufactured for working fluid TFE. The equipment was driven by hot water as heat source and cooling water as cooling source, and generated power was connected with electric utility. Characteristics of the power generating cycle and characteristics of the turbine were obtained experimentally.

  1. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    Sizing procedures are presented for latent heat thermal energy storage systems that can be used for electric utility off-peak energy storage, solar power plants and other preliminary design applications.

  2. The LDEF heat pipe experiment power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    A heatpipe experiment for a long duration exposure facility is described. The design and configuration of the power system of the spacecraft is reported with emphasis placed on its solar array panels, 12-ampere hour 18-cell nickel battery, and its electronic controller.

  3. Heat powered refrigeration compressor. Semi-annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Goad, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop and improve the design of previously started prototypes of the Heat Powered Refrigeration Compressor. To build this prototype and ready it for testing by the University of Evansville is another goal. This prototype will be of similar capacity as the compressor that will eventually be commercially produced. This unit can operate on almost any moderate temperature water heat source. This heat source could include such applications as industrial waste heat, solar, wood burning stove, resistance electrical heat produced by a windmill, or even perhaps heat put out by the condenser of another refrigeration system. Work performed in the past four months has consisted of: engineering of HX-1; comparisons of specifications from different companies to ensure state of the art applications of parts for project; coordinating project requirements with machine shop; designing condenser; and partial assembly of HX-1.

  4. Lunar Surface Stirling Power Systems Using Isotope Heat Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Penswick, L. Barry; Shaltens, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, NASA has used the decay of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) (in the form of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS)) as a heat source for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), which have provided electrical power for many NASA missions. While RTGs have an impressive reliability record for the missions in which they have been used, their relatively low thermal to electric conversion efficiency and the scarcity of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) has led NASA to consider other power conversion technologies. NASA is considering returning both robotic and human missions to the lunar surface and, because of the long lunar nights (14.75 Earth days), isotope power systems are an attractive candidate to generate electrical power. NASA is currently developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) as a candidate higher efficiency power system that produces greater than 160 W with two GPHS modules at the beginning of life (BOL) (32% efficiency). The ASRG uses the same Pu-238 GPHS modules, which are used in RTG, but by coupling them to a Stirling convertor provides a four-fold reduction in the number of GPHS modules. This study considers the use of americium-241 (Am-241) as a substitute for the Pu-238 in Stirling- convertor-based Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for power levels from tens of watts to 5 kWe. The Am-241 is used as a substitute for the Pu-238 in GPHS modules. Depending on power level, different Stirling heat input and removal systems are modeled. It was found that substituting Am-241 GPHS modules into the ASRG reduces power output by about one-fifth while maintaining approximately the same system mass. In order to obtain the nominal 160 W of electrical output of the Pu-238 ASRG requires 10 Am-241 GPHS modules. Higher power systems require changing from conductive coupling heat input and removal from the Stirling convertor to either pumped loops or heat pipes. Liquid metal pumped loops are considered as the primary heat transportation on the hot

  5. Heat Pipe-Assisted Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ju-Chan; Chi, Ri-Guang; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Lee, Wook-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Currently, large amounts of thermal energy dissipated from automobiles are emitted through hot exhaust pipes. This has resulted in the need for a new efficient recycling method to recover energy from waste hot exhaust gas. The present experimental study investigated how to improve the power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system assisted by a wickless loop heat pipe (loop thermosyphon) under the limited space of the exhaust gas pipeline. The present study shows a novel loop-type heat pipe-assisted TEG concept to be applied to hybrid vehicles. The operating temperature of a TEG's hot side surface should be as high as possible to maximize the Seebeck effect. The present study shows a novel TEG concept of transferring heat from the source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any local place with a loop-type heat pipe. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate an electromotive force power of around 1.3 V in the case of 170°C hot exhaust gas. Two thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for a conductive block model and four Bi2Te3 TEMs with a heat pipe-assisted model were installed in the condenser section. Heat flows to the condenser section from the evaporator section connected to the exhaust pipe. This novel TEG system with a heat pipe can be placed in any location on an automobile.

  6. Improving the turbine district heating installations of single-circuit nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondurov, E. P.; Kruglikov, P. A.; Smolkin, Yu. V.

    2015-10-01

    Ways for improving the turbine district heating installations of single-circuit nuclear power plants are considered as a possible approach to improving the nuclear power plant energy efficiency. The results of thermal tests carried out at one of single-circuit NPPs in Russia with a view to reveal the possibilities of improving the existing heat-transfer equipment of the turbine district heating installation without making significant investments in it were taken as a basis for the analysis. The tests have shown that there is certain energy saving potential in some individual units and elements in the turbine district heating installation's process circuit. A significant amount of thermal energy can be obtained only by decreasing the intermediate circuit temperature at the inlet to the heater of the first district-heating extraction. The taking of this measure will also lead to an additional amount of generated electricity because during operation with the partially loaded first heater, the necessary amount of heat has to be obtained from the peaking heater by reducing live steam. An additional amount of thermal energy can also be obtained by eliminating leaks through the bypass control valves. The possibility of achieving smaller consumption of electric energy for power plant auxiliaries by taking measures on reducing the available head in the intermediate circuit installation's pump unit is demonstrated. Partial cutting of pump impellers and dismantling of control valves are regarded to be the most efficient methods. The latter is attributed to qualitative control of the turbine district heating installation's thermal load. Adjustment of the noncondensable gas removal system will make it possible to improve the performance of the turbine district heating installation's heat-transfer equipment owing to bringing the heat-transfer coefficients in the heaters to the design level. The obtained results can be used for estimating the energy saving potential at other

  7. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Reynolds number to the 0.6 power with peak Nusselt numbers near 75 at a Reynolds number of 10,000. Open-celled metallic foams offer three important characteristics which enable them to perform well in heat exchange applications. They contain a very large surface area to volume ratio, a highly complex flow passage through the foam, and in many cases, significant thermal conductivity in the solid phase. Unfortunately, difficulty arises when metal foams are implemented in heat exchanger designs. The performance of the foam has not been characterized in a way which is conducive to analytical design of high performance heat exchangers. The second part of this work provides both flow and heat transfer measurements for metal foam geometries. Full-field velocity measurements through a foam sample were acquired using MRV. The measurements show transverse velocities on the order of 25-30% of the Darcy velocity, UD, which produce enhanced thermal dispersion within the foam matrix. A mechanical dispersion coefficient, DM, was formed which demonstrates the transverse dispersion to be 13 times the kinematic viscosity and 9 times the thermal diffusivity of air at 20°C and 1 atm. To describe the heat transfer performance of the foam as a fin, we have developed a new method that utilizes a well documented, periodic heat exchanger core test and a new one heated wall (OHW) test which when used in conjunction are shown to determine the convective performance (hmAc), the conductive performance (ksAc), and the effective bond resistance associated to attaching metal foams to primary heat transfer surfaces (RBond). Small pore diameter foams, d ≤ 1 mm, where found to perform approximately a factor of 2 greater per unit volume than a comparable fine-fin heat exchanger surface at the same pumping power which points to the fact the foam as a system is conduction limited not convection limited.

  8. Dynamic effect of sodium-water reaction in fast flux test facility power addition sodium pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.N.; Anderson, M.J.

    1990-03-01

    The Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) is a demonstration and test facility of the sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. A power addition'' to the facility is being considered to convert some of the dumped, unused heat into electricity generation. Components and piping systems to be added are sodium-water steam generators, sodium loop extensions from existing dump heat exchangers to sodium-water steam generators, and conventional water/steam loops. The sodium loops can be subjected to the dynamic loadings of pressure pulses that are caused by postulated sodium leaks and subsequent sodium-water reaction in the steam generator. The existing FFTF secondary pipes and the new power addition sodium loops were evaluated for exposure to the dynamic effect of the sodium-water reaction. Elastic and simplified inelastic dynamic analyses were used in this feasibility study. The results indicate that both the maximum strain and strain range are within the allowable limits. Several cycles of the sodium-water reaction can be sustained by the sodium pipes that are supported by ordinary pipe supports and seismic restraints. Expensive axial pipe restraints to withstand the sodium-water reaction loads are not needed, because the pressure-pulse-induced alternating bending stresses act as secondary stresses and the pressure pulse dynamic effect is a deformation-controlled quantity and is self-limiting. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Analysis of heat transfer in portable power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd Azman; Ali, Ahmad Nazrin

    2016-03-01

    Portable power supply (PPS) is developed based on the necessity in supplying instant power to support domestic appliances during power shortage or in remote area. In this paper, the heat transfer inside the PPS is analyzed and demonstrated by temperature change during battery charging and discharging. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model of the PPS battery and housing are developed. The heat flow inside the PPS is studied at different conditions of battery and air flows. The increment of the temperature inside the PPS could cause the PPS system to damage and unsafe. Few elements are manipulated for the study, such as battery positions, holedimensions and fan models in order toimprove the design of PPS. Experimental approach is also conducted to validate the temperature and heat transfer in the PPS.

  10. Research and development of the Osmo-Hydro Power heat engine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-25

    The Osmo-Hydro Power (OHP) or Pressure-Retarded Osmosis (PRO) heat engine is a possible means for producing economical electric power from low-temperature heat sources. The engine utilizes semipermeable membranes to cause the permeation of a solvent from a dilute low-pressure solution to a concentrated high-pressure solution. The potential energy thus acquired is converted to useful energy by means of a turbogenerator. The process can be considered as one in which the free energy of mixing is converted to useful power. By appropriate application of a heat source and a heat sink, the original dilute and concentrated solutions are recovered, thus completing the heat engine cycle. The results of this initial project to study osmotic power generation from waste heat indicate what research paths must be followed to continue the development of distillation and conjugation as unmixing methods. In addition, precipitation and stratification have been shown to be desirable because of the possibility of readily matching a binary system with either a membrane presently available or one readily modified from an existing membrane. The OHP heat engine in its ultimate development would have the following general characteristics: it would be able to utilize low-grade heat sources, such as unconcentrated solar energy or waste heat below 100/sup 0/C., heat sources as low as 50/sup 0/C can be used; the engine should be able to produce electricity for 0.12 $/kWh, or less, but the thermal efficiency will be less than 25% of Carnot efficiency at the same temperature limits; and the engine would be modular; i.e., it could be scaled up or down largely by adding or subtracting discrete permeator and heat exchanger units.

  11. Development of High-power LED Lighting Luminaires Using Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin-Juine; Huang, Huan-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Wei; Wu, Min-Sheng

    High-power LED should reject about 6 times of heat of the conventional lighting device and keep the LED junction temperature below 80°C to assure reliability and low light decay. In addition, no fan is allowed and the heat dissipation design should not interfere with the industrial design of lighting fixture and have a light weight. This thus creates an extreme thermal management problem. The present study has shown that, using a special heat dissipation technology (loop heat pipe), the high-power LED lighting luminaire with input power from 36 to 150W for outdoor and indoor applications can be achieved with light weight, among 0.96 to 1.57 kg per 1,000 lumen of net luminous flux output from the luminaire. The loop heat pipe uses a flexible connecting pipe as the condenser which can be wounded around the reflector of the luminaire to dissipate the heat to the ambient air by natural convection. For roadway or street lighting application, the present study shows that a better optical design of LED lamps can further result in power consumption reduction, based on the same illumination on road surface. The high-power LED luminaries developed in the present study have shown that the energy saving is > 50% in road lighting applications as compared to sodium light or > 70% compared to mercury light.

  12. Novel Power Electronics Three-Dimensional Heat Exchanger: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, K.; Cousineau, J.; Lustbader, J.; Narumanchi, S.

    2014-08-01

    Electric drive systems for vehicle propulsion enable technologies critical to meeting challenges for energy, environmental, and economic security. Enabling cost-effective electric drive systems requires reductions in inverter power semiconductor area. As critical components of the electric drive system are made smaller, heat removal becomes an increasing challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate an integrated approach to the design of thermal management systems for power semiconductors that matches the passive thermal resistance of the packaging with the active convective cooling performance of the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger concept builds on existing semiconductor thermal management improvements described in literature and patents, which include improved bonded interface materials, direct cooling of the semiconductor packages, and double-sided cooling. The key difference in the described concept is the achievement of high heat transfer performance with less aggressive cooling techniques by optimizing the passive and active heat transfer paths. An extruded aluminum design was selected because of its lower tooling cost, higher performance, and scalability in comparison to cast aluminum. Results demonstrated a heat flux improvement of a factor of two, and a package heat density improvement over 30%, which achieved the thermal performance targets.

  13. INTRACORPOREAL HEAT DISSIPATION FROM A RADIOISOTOPE-POWERED ARTIFICIAL HEART.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Fred N.; Hagen, Kenneth G.; Whalen, Robert L.; Fuqua, John M.; Norman, John C.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of radioisotope-fueled circulatory support systems depends on the ability of the body to dissipate the reject heat from the power source driving the blood pump as well as to tolerate chronic intracorporeal radiation. Our studies have focused on the use of the circulating blood as a heat sink. Initial in vivo heat transfer studies utilized straight tube heat exchangers (electrically and radioisotope energized) to replace a segment of the descending aorta. More recent studies have used a left ventricular assist pump as a blood-cooled heat exchanger. This approach minimizes trauma, does not increase the area of prosthetic interface with the blood, and minimizes system volume. Heat rejected from the thermal engine (vapor or gas cycle) is transported from the nuclear power source in the abdomen to the pump in the thoracic cavity via hydraulic lines. Adjacent tissue is protected from the fuel capsule temperature (900 to 1200 degrees F) by vacuum foil insulation and polyurethane foam. The in vivo thermal management problems have been studied using a simulated thermal system (STS) which approximates the heat rejection and thermal transport mechanisms of the nuclear circulatory support systems under development by NHLI. Electric heaters simulate the reject heat from the thermal engines. These studies have been essential in establishing the location, suspension, surgical procedures, and postoperative care for implanting prototype nuclear heart assist systems in calves. The pump has a thermal impedance of 0.12 degrees C/watt. Analysis of the STS data in terms of an electrical analog model implies a heat transfer coefficient of 4.7 x 10(-3) watt/cm(2) degrees C in the abdomen compared to a value of 14.9 x 10(-3) watt/cm(2) degrees C from the heat exchanger plenum into the diaphragm.

  14. INTRACORPOREAL HEAT DISSIPATION FROM A RADIOISOTOPE-POWERED ARTIFICIAL HEART

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Fred N.; Hagen, Kenneth G.; Whalen, Robert L.; Fuqua, John M.; Norman, John C.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of radioisotope-fueled circulatory support systems depends on the ability of the body to dissipate the reject heat from the power source driving the blood pump as well as to tolerate chronic intracorporeal radiation. Our studies have focused on the use of the circulating blood as a heat sink. Initial in vivo heat transfer studies utilized straight tube heat exchangers (electrically and radioisotope energized) to replace a segment of the descending aorta. More recent studies have used a left ventricular assist pump as a blood-cooled heat exchanger. This approach minimizes trauma, does not increase the area of prosthetic interface with the blood, and minimizes system volume. Heat rejected from the thermal engine (vapor or gas cycle) is transported from the nuclear power source in the abdomen to the pump in the thoracic cavity via hydraulic lines. Adjacent tissue is protected from the fuel capsule temperature (900 to 1200°F) by vacuum foil insulation and polyurethane foam. The in vivo thermal management problems have been studied using a simulated thermal system (STS) which approximates the heat rejection and thermal transport mechanisms of the nuclear circulatory support systems under development by NHLI. Electric heaters simulate the reject heat from the thermal engines. These studies have been essential in establishing the location, suspension, surgical procedures, and postoperative care for implanting prototype nuclear heart assist systems in calves. The pump has a thermal impedance of 0.12°C/watt. Analysis of the STS data in terms of an electrical analog model implies a heat transfer coefficient of 4.7 × 10−3 watt/cm2°C in the abdomen compared to a value of 14.9 × 10−3 watt/cm2°C from the heat exchanger plenum into the diaphragm. Images PMID:15215968

  15. Heat transfer characteristics for some coolant additives used for water cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ziyan, H.Z.; Helali, A.H.B.

    1996-12-31

    Engine coolants contain certain additives to prevent engine overheating or coolant freezing in cold environments. Coolants, also, contain corrosion and rust inhibitors, among other additives. As most engines are using engine cooling solutions, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of engine coolants on the boiling heat transfer coefficient. This has its direct impact on radiator size and environment. This paper describes the apparatus and the measurement techniques. Also, it presents the obtained boiling heat transfer results at different parameters. Three types of engine coolants and their mixtures in distilled water are evaluated, under sub-cooled and saturated boiling conditions. A profound effect of the presence of additives in the coolant, on heat transfer, was clear since changes of heat transfer for different coolants were likely to occur. The results showed that up to 180% improvement of boiling heat transfer coefficient is experienced with some types of coolants. However, at certain concentrations other coolants provide deterioration or not enhancement in the boiling heat transfer characteristics. This investigation proved that there are limitations, which are to be taken into consideration, for the composition of engine coolants in different environments. In warm climates, ethylene glycol should be kept at the minimum concentration required for dissolving other components, whereas borax is beneficial to the enhancement of the heat transfer characteristics.

  16. Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclure, Patrick Ray; Poston, David Irvin; Dasari, Venkateswara Rao; Reid, Robert Stowers

    2015-11-12

    An important niche for nuclear energy is the need for power at remote locations removed from a reliable electrical grid. Nuclear energy has potential applications at strategic defense locations, theaters of battle, remote communities, and emergency locations. With proper safeguards, a 1 to 10-MWe (megawatt electric) mobile reactor system could provide robust, self-contained, and long-term power in any environment. Heat pipe-cooled fast-spectrum nuclear reactors have been identified as a candidate for these applications. Heat pipe reactors, using alkali metal heat pipes, are perfectly suited for mobile applications because their nature is inherently simpler, smaller, and more reliable than “traditional” reactors. The goal of this project was to develop a scalable conceptual design for a compact reactor and to identify scaling issues for compact heat pipe cooled reactors in general. Toward this goal two detailed concepts were developed, the first concept with more conventional materials and a power of about 2 MWe and a the second concept with less conventional materials and a power level of about 5 MWe. A series of more qualitative advanced designs were developed (with less detail) that show power levels can be pushed to approximately 30 MWe.

  17. Efficiency at maximum power of thermally coupled heat engines.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2012-04-01

    We study the efficiency at maximum power of two coupled heat engines, using thermoelectric generators (TEGs) as engines. Assuming that the heat and electric charge fluxes in the TEGs are strongly coupled, we simulate numerically the dependence of the behavior of the global system on the electrical load resistance of each generator in order to obtain the working condition that permits maximization of the output power. It turns out that this condition is not unique. We derive a simple analytic expression giving the relation between the electrical load resistance of each generator permitting output power maximization. We then focus on the efficiency at maximum power (EMP) of the whole system to demonstrate that the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency may not always be recovered: The EMP varies with the specific working conditions of each generator but remains in the range predicted by irreversible thermodynamics theory. We discuss our results in light of nonideal Carnot engine behavior.

  18. Efficiency at maximum power of thermally coupled heat engines.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2012-04-01

    We study the efficiency at maximum power of two coupled heat engines, using thermoelectric generators (TEGs) as engines. Assuming that the heat and electric charge fluxes in the TEGs are strongly coupled, we simulate numerically the dependence of the behavior of the global system on the electrical load resistance of each generator in order to obtain the working condition that permits maximization of the output power. It turns out that this condition is not unique. We derive a simple analytic expression giving the relation between the electrical load resistance of each generator permitting output power maximization. We then focus on the efficiency at maximum power (EMP) of the whole system to demonstrate that the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency may not always be recovered: The EMP varies with the specific working conditions of each generator but remains in the range predicted by irreversible thermodynamics theory. We discuss our results in light of nonideal Carnot engine behavior. PMID:22680454

  19. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Komppula, J. Tarvainen, O.

    2015-10-15

    A theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g., electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization, and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  20. Modeling of high power ICRF heating experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Skinner, C.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wong, K.L.; Khudaleev, A.; Petrov, M.P.; Murakami, M.

    1993-04-01

    Over the past two years, ICRF heating experiments have been performed on TFTR in the hydrogen minority heating regime with power levels reaching 11.2 MW in helium-4 majority plasmas and 8.4 MW in deuterium majority plasmas. For these power levels, the minority hydrogen ions, which comprise typically less than 10% of the total electron density, evolve into la very energetic, anisotropic non-Maxwellian distribution. Indeed, the excess perpendicular stored energy in these plasmas associated with the energetic minority tail ions is often as high as 25% of the total stored energy, as inferred from magnetic measurements. Enhanced losses of 0.5 MeV protons consistent with the presence of an energetic hydrogen component have also been observed. In ICRF heating experiments on JET at comparable and higher power levels and with similar parameters, it has been suggested that finite banana width effects have a noticeable effect on the ICRF power deposition. In particular, models indicate that finite orbit width effects lead to a reduction in the total stored energy and of the tail energy in the center of the plasma, relative to that predicted by the zero banana width models. In this paper, detailed comparisons between the calculated ICRF power deposition profiles and experimentally measured quantities will be presented which indicate that significant deviations from the zero banana width models occur even for modest power levels (P{sub rf} {approximately} 6 MW) in the TFTR experiments.

  1. Modeling of high power ICRF heating experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Skinner, C.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wong, K.L. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Khudaleev, A.; Petrov, M.P. ); Murakami, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Over the past two years, ICRF heating experiments have been performed on TFTR in the hydrogen minority heating regime with power levels reaching 11.2 MW in helium-4 majority plasmas and 8.4 MW in deuterium majority plasmas. For these power levels, the minority hydrogen ions, which comprise typically less than 10% of the total electron density, evolve into la very energetic, anisotropic non-Maxwellian distribution. Indeed, the excess perpendicular stored energy in these plasmas associated with the energetic minority tail ions is often as high as 25% of the total stored energy, as inferred from magnetic measurements. Enhanced losses of 0.5 MeV protons consistent with the presence of an energetic hydrogen component have also been observed. In ICRF heating experiments on JET at comparable and higher power levels and with similar parameters, it has been suggested that finite banana width effects have a noticeable effect on the ICRF power deposition. In particular, models indicate that finite orbit width effects lead to a reduction in the total stored energy and of the tail energy in the center of the plasma, relative to that predicted by the zero banana width models. In this paper, detailed comparisons between the calculated ICRF power deposition profiles and experimentally measured quantities will be presented which indicate that significant deviations from the zero banana width models occur even for modest power levels (P[sub rf] [approximately] 6 MW) in the TFTR experiments.

  2. Ultra-low power operation of self-heated, suspended carbon nanotube gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikkadi, Kiran; Muoth, Matthias; Maiwald, Verena; Roman, Cosmin; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    We present a suspended carbon nanotube gas sensor that senses NO2 at ambient temperature and recovers from gas exposure at an extremely low power of 2.9 μW by exploiting the self-heating effect for accelerated gas desorption. The recovery time of 10 min is two orders of magnitude faster than non-heated recovery at ambient temperature. This overcomes an important bottleneck for the practical application of carbon nanotube gas sensors. Furthermore, the method is easy to implement in sensor systems and requires no additional components, paving the way for ultra-low power, compact, and highly sensitive gas sensors.

  3. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of thermal energy storage (TES) in the latent heat of molten salts as a means of conserving fossil fuels and lowering the cost of electric power was evaluated. Public utility systems provided electric power on demand. This demand is generally maximum during late weekday afternoons, with considerably lower overnight and weekend loads. Typically, the average demand is only 60% to 80% of peak load. As peak load increases, the present practice is to purchase power from other grid facilities or to bring older less efficient fossil-fuel plants on line which increase the cost of electric power. The widespread use of oil-fired boilers, gas turbine and diesel equipment to meet peaking loads depletes our oil-based energy resources. Heat exchangers utilizing molten salts can be used to level the energy consumption curve. The study begins with a demand analysis and the consideration of several existing modern fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants for use as models. Salts are evaluated for thermodynamic, economic, corrosive, and safety characteristics. Heat exchanger concepts are explored and heat exchanger designs are conceived. Finally, the economics of TES conversions in existing plants and new construction is analyzed. The study concluded that TES is feasible in electric power generation. Substantial data are presented for TES design, and reference material for further investigation of techniques is included.

  4. Analysis of the Impact of Decreasing District Heating Supply Temperature on Combined Heat and Power Plant Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonina, Alona; Bolonins, Genadijs; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2014-12-01

    District heating systems are widely used to supply heat to different groups of heat consumers. The district heating system offers great opportunities for combined heat and power production. In this paper decreasing district heating supply temperature is analysed in the context of combined heat and power plant operation. A mathematical model of a CHP plant is developed using both empirical and theoretical equations. The model is used for analysis of modified CHP plant operation modes with reduced district heating supply temperature. Conclusions on the benefits of new operation modes are introduced.

  5. Recent Advances in Power Conversion and Heat Rejection Technology for Fission Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Under the Exploration Technology Development Program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are jointly developing Fission Surface Power (FSP) technology for possible use in human missions to the Moon and Mars. A preliminary reference concept was generated to guide FSP technology development. The concept consists of a liquid-metal-cooled reactor, Stirling power conversion, and water heat rejection, with Brayton power conversion as a backup option. The FSP project has begun risk reduction activities on some key components with the eventual goal of conducting an end-to-end, non-nuclear, integrated system test. Several power conversion and heat rejection hardware prototypes have been built and tested. These include multi-kilowatt Stirling and Brayton power conversion units, titanium-water heat pipes, and composite radiator panels.

  6. HEAT: High accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry. III. Additional improvements and overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, M. E.; Vazquez, J.; Ruscic, B.; Wilson, A. K.; Gauss, J.; Stanton, J. F.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. t Mainz; The Univ. of Texas; Univ. of North Texas

    2008-01-01

    Effects of increased basis-set size as well as a correlated treatment of the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer approximation are studied within the context of the high-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry (HEAT) theoretical model chemistry. It is found that the addition of these ostensible improvements does little to increase the overall accuracy of HEAT for the determination of molecular atomization energies. Fortuitous cancellation of high-level effects is shown to give the overall HEAT strategy an accuracy that is, in fact, higher than most of its individual components. In addition, the issue of core-valence electron correlation separation is explored; it is found that approximate additive treatments of the two effects have limitations that are significant in the realm of <1 kJ mol{sup -1} theoretical thermochemistry.

  7. Proper use of sludge-control additives in residential heating oil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tatnall, R.E.

    1995-04-01

    Discussed are various aspects of heating oil `sludge`: How it forms, typical problems it causes, how sludge-control additives work, what should be expected of them, and what happens in a contaminated system when such additives are used. Test results from laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that performance of commercially available additives varies greatly. The concept of `end-of-the-line` treatment is described and compared with bulk fuel treatment. A procedure is described whereby a retailer can test additives himself, and thus determine just what those additives will or will not do for his business. Finally, the economics of an effective treatment program are outlined.

  8. Combined heat and power in the draft of the new Russian energy strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, A. S.; Pankrushina, T. G.; Urvantseva, L. V.; Khorshev, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    Comparison of combined heat and power development trends in Russia and other countries allowed us to assess world CHP development trends for different regions of Russia. The paper presents a methodological approach to a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness and extent of the CHP development proposed by ERI RAS. This approach is based on a unified representation of both energy consumption of all Russian cities and the sources of their supply. In addition, combined heat and power is considered in a complex relationship with other types of power generators and fuel industries. The applicability of this approach for the study of the development prospects of diverse CHP plants was shown. The presented methodical approach was used to develop draft scenarios of the Energy Strategy of Russia until 2035. The performed assessment of preferred application areas and effective extent of CHP development indicated the reasonability of continuing growth of CHP capacity and their role in the district heating system in Russia.

  9. Development of a solar-powered Rankine cycle heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancardi, F. R.; Melikian, G.; Sitler, J. W.

    1982-03-01

    The first prototype 18-ton solar-powered turbocompressor heat pump module was successfully designed, built and tested for more than 250 hr. in a specially-designed laboratory facility at UTRC. Operation in both the cooling and heat pump mode was demonstrated over a wide range of building, climatic, and collector/storage conditions. The design point performance of the heat pump in both the cooling and heat pump modes was confirmed, and performance mapping of the module completed. The heat pump demonstrated the wide operating range possible (using 200 to 300 F hot water) and high heat pump mode performance levels, such as a COP of 1.4 to 2.5 and 500,000 Btu/hr capacity. In cooling, a COP of 0.5 to 0.75 and up to 20 tons was demonstrated. In a simulation of operation in an actual building, the heat pump smoothly and accurately followed the building load for a full day. A detailed assessment of the individual module components was completed and performance, cost and reliability improvements were identified. No evidence of R11 decomposition or component wear or corrosion was found.

  10. Study of improved confinement by a stepwise increase of the input heating power for tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, Muhammad; Mohamed, Mabruka; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2016-09-01

    This paper is an extension of the brief study by Sarah Douglas et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20 (2013) 114504] where in the study a sinusoidal perturbation of the heating power has been studied. In this paper a stepwise increase of the heating power and its influence on the L-H transition are studied. Using a function, Atanh(t/T) for the transition of input heating power for tokamak plasmas, i.e. the addition of the perturbation, Atanh(t/T), to constant power q0 is shown to promote the confinement, leading to the L-H transition at a lower value of q0, as compared to the case of constant q0 without the Atanh(t/T) perturbation. It is seen that the input heating power Q that consists of constant part q0 in addition to a function Atanh(t/T) provides the L-H transition for relatively small A and much wider range values of 1/T as compared to Sarah Douglas et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20 (2013) 114504].

  11. Engineering design aspects of the heat-pipe power system

    SciTech Connect

    Capell, B.M.; Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.; Berte, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Heat-pipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term, low-cost space power system designed at Los Alamos that can provide up to 1,000 kWt for many space nuclear applications. The design of the reactor is simple, modular, and adaptable. The basic design allows for the use of a variety of power conversion systems and reactor materials (including the fuel, clad, and heat pipes). This paper describes a project that was undertaken to develop a database supporting many engineering aspects of the HPS design. The specific tasks discussed in this paper are: the development of an HPS materials database, the creation of finite element models that will allow a wide variety of investigations, and the verification of past calculations.

  12. Isotope heat source simulator for testing of space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Smith, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A reliable isotope heat source simulator was designed for use in a Brayton power system. This simulator is composed of an electrically heated tungsten wire which is wound around a boron nitride core and enclosed in a graphite jacket. Simulator testing was performed at the expected operating temperature of the Brayton power system. Endurance testing for 5012 hours was followed by cycling the simulator temperature. The integrity of this simulator was maintained throughout testing. Alumina beads served as a diffusion barrier to prevent interaction between the tungsten heater and boron nitride core. The simulator was designed to maintain a surface temperature of 1311 to 1366 K (1900 to 2000 F) with a power input of approximately 400 watts. The design concept and the materials used in the simulator make possible man different geometries. This flexibility increases its potential use.

  13. Engineering design aspects of the heat-pipe power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capell, B. M.; Houts, M. G.; Poston, D. I.; Berte, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Heat-pipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term, low-cost space power system designed at Los Alamos that can provide up to 1,000 kWt for many space nuclear applications. The design of the reactor is simple, modular, and adaptable. The basic design allows for the use of a variety of power conversion systems and reactor materials (including the fuel, clad, and heat pipes). This paper describes a project that was undertaken to develop a database supporting many engineering aspects of the HPS design. The specific tasks discussed in this paper are: the development of an HPS materials database, the creation of finite element models that will allow a wide variety of investigations, and the verification of past calculations.

  14. Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, Zack; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris; Kammen, Dan

    2008-09-30

    This report analyzes the current economic and environmental performance of combined heat and power (CHP) systems in power interruption intolerant commercial facilities. Through a series of three case studies, key trade-offs are analyzed with regard to the provision of black-out ridethrough capability with the CHP systems and the resutling ability to avoid the need for at least some diesel backup generator capacity located at the case study sites. Each of the selected sites currently have a CHP or combined heating, cooling, and power (CCHP) system in addition to diesel backup generators. In all cases the CHP/CCHP system have a small fraction of the electrical capacity of the diesel generators. Although none of the selected sites currently have the ability to run the CHP systems as emergency backup power, all could be retrofitted to provide this blackout ride-through capability, and new CHP systems can be installed with this capability. The following three sites/systems were used for this analysis: (1) Sierra Nevada Brewery - Using 1MW of installed Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells operating on a combination of digestor gas (from the beer brewing process) and natural gas, this facility can produce electricty and heat for the brewery and attached bottling plant. The major thermal load on-site is to keep the brewing tanks at appropriate temperatures. (2) NetApp Data Center - Using 1.125 MW of Hess Microgen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators, with exhaust gas and jacket water heat recovery attached to over 300 tons of of adsorption chillers, this combined cooling and power system provides electricity and cooling to a data center with a 1,200 kW peak electrical load. (3) Kaiser Permanente Hayward Hospital - With 180kW of Tecogen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators this CHP system generates steam for space heating, and hot water for a city hospital. For all sites, similar assumptions are made about the economic and technological constraints of the

  15. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  16. Utilizing Radioisotope Power System Waste Heat for Spacecraft Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantano, David R.; Dottore, Frank; Tobery, E. Wayne; Geng, Steven M.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Palko, Joseph L.

    2005-01-01

    An advantage of using a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for deep space or planetary surface missions is the readily available waste heat, which can be used for a number of beneficial purposes including: maintaining electronic components within a controlled temperature range, warming propulsion tanks and mobility actuators, and maintaining liquid propellants above their freezing temperature. Previous missions using Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) dissipated large quantities of waste heat due to the low efficiency of the thermoelectric conversion technology. The next generation RPSs, such as the 110-Watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) will have higher conversion efficiencies, thereby rejecting less waste heat at a lower temperature and may require alternate approaches to transferring waste heat to the spacecraft. RTGs, with efficiencies of 6 to 7 percent, reject their waste heat at the relatively high heat rejection temperature of 200 C. This is an advantage when rejecting heat to space; however, transferring heat to the internal spacecraft components requires a large and heavy radiator heat exchanger. At the same time, sensitive spacecraft instruments must be shielded from the thermal radiation of the RTG. The SRG110, with an efficiency around 22 percent and 50 C nominal housing surface temperature, can readily transfer the available waste heat directly via heat pipes, thermal straps, or fluid loops. The lower temperatures associated with the SRG110 avoid the chances of overheating other scientific components, eliminating the need for thermal shields. This provides the spacecraft designers more flexibility when locating the generator for a specific mission. A common misconception with high-efficiency systems is that there is not enough waste heat for spacecraft thermal management. This paper will dispel this misconception and investigate the use of a high-efficiency SRG110 for spacecraft thermal management and outline potential methods of

  17. System and method for high power diode based additive manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    El-Dasher, Bassem S.; Bayramian, Andrew; Demuth, James A.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Torres, Sharon G.

    2016-04-12

    A system is disclosed for performing an Additive Manufacturing (AM) fabrication process on a powdered material forming a substrate. The system may make use of a diode array for generating an optical signal sufficient to melt a powdered material of the substrate. A mask may be used for preventing a first predetermined portion of the optical signal from reaching the substrate, while allowing a second predetermined portion to reach the substrate. At least one processor may be used for controlling an output of the diode array.

  18. Advanced sensible heat solar receiver for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Timothy J.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis, through in-house efforts, has begun a study to generate a conceptual design of a sensible heat solar receiver and to determine the feasibility of such a system for space power applications. The sensible heat solar receiver generated in this study uses pure lithium as the thermal storage medium and was designed for a 7 kWe Brayton (PCS) operating at 1100 K. The receiver consists of two stages interconnected via temperature sensing variable conductance sodium heat pipes. The lithium is contained within a niobium vessel and the outer shell of the receiver is constructed of third generation rigid, fibrous ceramic insulation material. Reradiation losses are controlled with niobium and aluminum shields. By nature of design, the sensible heat receiver generated in this study is comparable in both size and mass to a latent heat system of similar thermal capacitance. The heat receiver design and thermal analysis was conducted through the combined use of PATRAN, SINDA, TRASYS, and NASTRAN software packages.

  19. Advanced sensible heat solar receiver for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Timothy J.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis, through in-house efforts, has begun a study to generate a conceptual design of a sensible heat solar receiver and to determine the feasibility of such a system for space power applications. The sensible heat solar receiver generated in this study uses pure lithium as the thermal storage medium and was designed for a 7 kWe Brayton (PCS) operating at 1100 K. The receiver consists of two stages interconnected via temperature sensing variable conductance sodium heat pipes. The lithium is contained within a niobium vessel and the outer shell of the receiver is constructed of third generation rigid, fibrous ceramic insulation material. Reradiation losses are controlled with niobium and aluminum shields. By nature of design, the sensible heat receiver generated in this study is comparable in both size and mass to a latent heat system of similar thermal capacitance. The heat receiver design and thermal analysis were conducted through the combined use of PATRAN, SINDA, TRASYS, and NASTRAN software packages.

  20. High Power Heating of Magnetic Reconnection in UTokyo Spherical Tokamak Merging Experiment: TS-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Y.; Kawanami, M.; Kimura, K.; Nakai, R.; Nishida, K.; Ishida, R.; Yamanaka, H.; Kuwahata, A.; Tanabe, H.; Inomoto, M.; Cheng, C. Z.; TS; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Significant ion heating of magnetic reconnection up to 0.2keV and 1.2keV were documented in two tokamak merging experiments: TS-3 and MAST, leading us to a new high-field merging experiment: TS-U in University of Tokyo. 1D and 2D contours of ion and electron temperatures measured in TS-3 already revealed clear energy-conversion of magnetic reconnection: huge outflow heating of ions in the downstream and electron heating localized at the X-point. It is noted that the ion heating energy is proportional to square of the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic field Brec. It is because the reconnection outflow accelerates ions up to the poloidal Alfven speed. The accelerated ions are thermalized by shock-like density pileups in the downstreams. These results agree qualitatively with recent solar satellite observations and PIC simulation results. Based on those results, our poster will show the design of upscaled high-field tokamak merging experiment: TS-U. The high-power heating of tokamak merging is useful not only for laboratory study of reconnection heating mechanisms but also for economical startup and heating of tokamak plasmas. The tokamak merging with Brec>0.3T will enables us to heat the tokamak plasma to the burning regime: Ti>5keV without using any additional heating facility.

  1. Heat pipe radiators for solar dynamic space power system heat rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, Eric; Carlson, Albert

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a concept development study of heat rejection systems for Space Station solar dynamic power systems. The thermal performance and weights of each of the heat rejection subsystems have been addressed in detail, and critical technologies which require development tests and evaluation for successful demonstration were assessed and identified. Baseline and several alternate heat rejection system configurations and optimum designs were developed for both Brayton and Rankine cycles. The thermal performance, mass properties, assembly requirements, reliability, maintenance requirements, and life cycle costs were determined for each of the system configurations. Trade studies were performed on each configuration with respect to the heat pipe wall thickness and the amount of redundancy to determine the effects on system reliability, maintenance requirements, and life cycle costs. An optimum design was then selected for each configuration.

  2. Possible high power limitations from RF pulsed heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, David P.; Bowden, Gordon B.; Menegat, Al; Siemann, Robert H.

    1999-05-01

    One of the possible limitations to achieving high power in RF structures is damage to metal surfaces due to RF pulsed heating. Such damage may lead to degradation of RF performance. An experiment to study RF pulsed heating on copper has been developed at SLAC. The experiment consists of operating two pillbox cavities in the TE011 mode using a 50 MW X-Band klystron. The estimated temperature rise of the surface of copper is 350 °C for a power input of 20 MW to each cavity with a pulse length of 1.5 μs. Preliminary results from an experiment performed earlier are presented. A revised design for continued experiments is also presented along with relevant theory and calculations.

  3. Investigation of Low Power Operation in a Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents test results of an experimental study of low power operation in a loop heat pipe. The main objective was to demonstrate how changes in the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core would affect the loop behavior, The fluid inventory and the relative tilt between the evaporator and the compensation chamber were varied so as to create different vapor void fractions in the evaporator core. The effect on the loop start-up, operating temperature, and capillary limit was investigated. Test results indicate that the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core is the single most important factor in determining the loop operation at low powers.

  4. Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, David; Lemar, Paul

    2015-12-01

    This report estimates the potential for opportunity fuel combined heat and power (CHP) applications in the United States, and provides estimates for the technical and economic market potential compared to those included in an earlier report. An opportunity fuel is any type of fuel that is not widely used when compared to traditional fossil fuels. Opportunity fuels primarily consist of biomass fuels, industrial waste products and fossil fuel derivatives. These fuels have the potential to be an economically viable source of power generation in various CHP applications.

  5. Car companies look to generate power from waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirber, Michael

    2008-04-01

    You might think that the steam engine is an outdated technology that had its heyday centuries ago, but in fact steam is once again a hot topic with vehicle manufacturers. Indeed, the next generation of hybrid cars and trucks may incorporate some form of steam power. Honda, for example, has just released details of a new prototype hybrid car that recharges its battery using a steam engine that exploits waste heat from the exhaust pipe.

  6. Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Market Transformation project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done in developing evaluating the performance of 5 kW stationary combined heat and power fuel cell systems that have been deployed in Oregon and California. It also describes the business case that was developed to identify markets and address cost.

  7. Heat conduction in double-walled carbon nanotubes with intertube additional carbon atoms.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liu; Feng, Yanhui; Tan, Peng; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-07-01

    Heat conduction of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with intertube additional carbon atoms was investigated for the first time using a molecular dynamics method. By analyzing the phonon vibrational density of states (VDOS), we revealed that the intertube additional atoms weak the heat conduction along the tube axis. Moreover, the phonon participation ratio (PR) demonstrates that the heat transfer in DWCNTs is dominated by low frequency modes. The added atoms cause the mode weight factor (MWF) of the outer tube to decrease and that of the inner tube to increase, which implies a lower thermal conductivity. The effects of temperature, tube length, and the number and distribution of added atoms were studied. Furthermore, an orthogonal array testing strategy was designed to identify the most important structural factor. It is indicated that the tendencies of thermal conductivity of DWCNTs with added atoms change with temperature and length are similar to bare ones. In addition, thermal conductivity decreases with the increasing number of added atoms, more evidently for atom addition concentrated at some cross-sections rather than uniform addition along the tube length. Simultaneously, the number of added atoms at each cross-section has a considerably more remarkable impact, compared to the tube length and the density of chosen cross-sections to add atoms.

  8. Simulation of MLI concerning the influence of an additional heat load on intermediate layers

    SciTech Connect

    Funke, Thomas; Golle, Steffen; Haberstroh, Christoph

    2014-01-29

    Multilayer insulation (MLI) is commonly used in most cryogenic devices such as LHe cryostats or storage vessels. Numerical and experimental studies of such insulation systems are known from literature. The temperature distribution of intermediate layers has been investigated as well. Experiments using temperature sensors, for example thermocouples, to determine the temperature of intermediate layers had been described. Naturally such wiring causes additional heat load on the respective layer and influences the equilibrium temperature. A mathematical model of heat transfer through MLI has been developed to investigate the temperature distribution across the MLI layers. The model comprises a combination of radiation, residual gas conduction and conductive heat flux. An analysis for variable cold and warm boundary temperatures and various residual gases and pressures is carried out. In addition to the model an experimental test rig will be built for the verification of the model. The paper presents the influence of an additional heat load on an intermediate layer on the temperature distribution and on the overall thermal performance of MLI.

  9. Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study

    SciTech Connect

    Frank J. Hartz Rob Taylor Grant Davies

    2011-12-30

    One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

  10. Effect of ionic additive on pool boiling critical heat flux of titania/water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jung-Yeul; Kim, Hyungdae; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    TiO2/water nanofluids were prepared and tested to investigate the effects of an ionic additive (i.e., nitric acid in this study) on the critical heat flux (CHF) behavior in pool boiling. Experimental results showed that the ionic additive improved the dispersion stability but reduced the CHF increase in the nanofluid. The additive affected the self-assembled nanoparticle structures formed on the heater surfaces by creating a more uniform and smoother structure, thus diminishing the CHF enhancement in nanofluids.

  11. Influence of Alumina Addition to Aluminum Fins for Compact Heat Exchangers Produced by Cold Spray Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farjam, Aslan; Cormier, Yannick; Dupuis, Philippe; Jodoin, Bertrand; Corbeil, Antoine

    2015-10-01

    In this work, aluminum and aluminum-alumina powder mixtures were used to produce pyramidal fin arrays on aluminum substrates using cold spray as an additive manufacturing process. Using aluminum-alumina mixtures instead of pure aluminum powder could be seen as a cost-effective measure, preventing nozzle clogging or the need to use expensive polymer nozzles that wear out rapidly during cold spray. The fin geometries that were produced were observed using a 3D digital microscope to determine the flow passages width and fins' geometric details. Heat transfer and pressure drop tests were carried out using different ranges of appropriate Reynolds numbers for the sought commercial application to compare each fin array and determine the effect of alumina content. It was found that the presence of alumina reduces the fins' performance when compared to pure aluminum fins but that they were still outperforming traditional fins. Numerical simulations were performed to model the fin arrays and were used to predict the pressure loss in the fin array and compare these results with experimental values. The numerical model opens up new avenues in predicting different applicable operating conditions and other possible fin shapes using the same fin composition, instead of performing costly and time-consuming experiments.

  12. Laser heat treatment of aerosol-jet additive manufactured graphene patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabari, Elahe; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2015-09-01

    In this article, a laser processing protocol for heat treatment of micro-scale printed graphene patterns is developed, and the results are compared with the counterpart results obtained by the conventional heat treatment process carried out in a furnace. A continuous-wave Erbium fiber laser is used to enhance electrical properties of the aerosol-jet printed graphene patterns through removing solvents and a stabilizer polymer. The laser power and the process speed are optimized to effectively treat the printed patterns without compromising the quality of the graphene flakes. Furthermore, a heat transfer model is developed and its results are utilized to optimize the laser treatment process. It is found that the laser heat treatment process with a laser speed of 0.03 mm s-1, a laser beam diameter ~50 μm, and a laser power of 10 W results in pure graphene patterns with no excessive components. The ratio of D to G bands ({{I}\\text{D}}/{{I}\\text{G}}) in Raman graph of the laser treated pure graphene, which is an indicator of the level of the active defects in graphene structures, is 0.52. The laser treated pure graphene structures also have a C/O ratio and an electrical resistivity of ~4.5 and 0.022 Ω cm, respectively. These values are fairly comparable with the results of samples treated in a furnace. The results suggest that the laser processing has the capability of removing stabilizer polymers and solvents through a localized moving heat source, which is preferable for flexible electronics with low working temperature substrates.

  13. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Devices Using Additive-Subtractive Manufacturing Techniques: Application to Waste-Heat Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are well suited for waste-heat energy harvesting applications as opposed to primary energy generation. Commercially available thermoelectric modules are flat, inflexible and have limited sizes available. State-of-art manufacturing of TEG devices relies on assembling prefabricated parts with soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping. Furthermore, efforts to incorporate them onto curved surfaces such as exhaust pipes, pump housings, steam lines, mixing containers, reaction chambers, etc. require custom-built heat exchangers. This is costly and labor-intensive, in addition to presenting challenges in terms of space, thermal coupling, added weight and long-term reliability. Additive manufacturing technologies are beginning to address many of these issues by reducing part count in complex designs and the elimination of sub-assembly requirements. This work investigates the feasibility of utilizing such novel manufacturing routes for improving the manufacturing process of thermoelectric devices. Much of the research in thermoelectricity is primarily focused on improving thermoelectric material properties by developing of novel materials or finding ways to improve existing ones. Secondary to material development is improving the manufacturing process of TEGs to provide significant cost benefits. To improve the device fabrication process, this work explores additive manufacturing technologies to provide an integrated and scalable approach for TE device manufacturing directly onto engineering component surfaces. Additive manufacturing techniques like thermal spray and ink-dispenser printing are developed with the aim of improving the manufacturing process of TEGs. Subtractive manufacturing techniques like laser micromachining are also studied in detail. This includes the laser processing parameters for cutting the thermal spray materials efficiently by

  14. Establishing low-power operating limits for liquid metal heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Secary, J.; Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, M.D.

    1992-05-01

    Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point for long durations may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and hot returning to the evaporator section. Eventually sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort between the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate the phenomena. Experiments include both high temperature liquid metal and low temperature organic heat pipes. To date, a low temperature working fluid has been selected and its performance in a heat pipe validated. Additionally, a low-temperature heat pipe has been fabricated and is presently being tested.

  15. Establishing low-power operating limits for liquid metal heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secary, J.; Merrigan, M. A.; Keddy, M. D.

    Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point for long durations may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and returning hot to the evaporator section. Eventually, sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort between the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate the phenomena. Experiments include both high temperature liquid metal and low temperature organic heat pipes. To date, a low temperature working fluid has been selected and its performance in a heat pipe validated. Additionally, a low-temperature heat pipe has been fabricated and is presently being tested.

  16. Low-power communication with a photonic heat pump.

    PubMed

    Huang, Duanni; Santhanam, Parthiban; Ram, Rajeev J

    2014-12-15

    An optical communication channel is constructed using a heated thermo-electrically pumped, high efficiency infrared light-emitting diode (LED). In these devices, electro-luminescent cooling is observed, resulting in greater than unity (> 100%) efficiency in converting electrical power to optical power. The average amount of electrical energy required to generate a photon (4.3 meV) is much less than the optical energy in that photon (520 meV). Such a light source can serve as a test-bed for fundamental studies of energy-efficient bosonic communication channels. In this low energy consumption mode, we demonstrate data transmission at 3 kilobits per second (kbps) with only 120 picowatts of input electric power. Although the channel employs a mid-infrared source with limited quantum efficiency, a binary digit can be communicated using 40 femtojoules with a bit error rate of 3 x 10-3.

  17. Low-power communication with a photonic heat pump.

    PubMed

    Huang, Duanni; Santhanam, Parthiban; Ram, Rajeev J

    2014-12-15

    An optical communication channel is constructed using a heated thermo-electrically pumped, high efficiency infrared light-emitting diode (LED). In these devices, electro-luminescent cooling is observed, resulting in greater than unity (> 100%) efficiency in converting electrical power to optical power. The average amount of electrical energy required to generate a photon (4.3 meV) is much less than the optical energy in that photon (520 meV). Such a light source can serve as a test-bed for fundamental studies of energy-efficient bosonic communication channels. In this low energy consumption mode, we demonstrate data transmission at 3 kilobits per second (kbps) with only 120 picowatts of input electric power. Although the channel employs a mid-infrared source with limited quantum efficiency, a binary digit can be communicated using 40 femtojoules with a bit error rate of 3 x 10-3. PMID:25607478

  18. Additive Manufacturing for Cost Efficient Production of Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, Holly; Ross, Nicole

    2015-10-30

    An additive manufacture technique known as laminated object manufacturing (LOM) was used to fabricate compact ceramic heat exchanger prototypes. LOM uses precision CO2 laser cutting of ceramic green tapes, which are then precision stacked to build a 3D object with fine internal features. Modeling was used to develop prototype designs and predict the thermal response, stress, and efficiency in the ceramic heat exchangers. Build testing and materials analyses were used to provide feedback for the design selection. During this development process, laminated object manufacturing protocols were established. This included laser optimization, strategies for fine feature integrity, lamination fluid control, green handling, and firing profile. Three full size prototypes were fabricated using two different designs. One prototype was selected for performance testing. During testing, cross talk leakage prevented the application of a high pressure differential, however, the prototype was successful at withstanding the high temperature operating conditions (1300 °F). In addition, analysis showed that the bulk of the part did not have cracks or leakage issues. This led to the development of a module method for next generation LOM heat exchangers. A scale-up cost analysis showed that given a purpose built LOM system, these ceramic heat exchangers would be affordable for the applications.

  19. Modeled heating and surface erosion comparing motile (gas borne) and stationary (surface coating) inert particle additives

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1982-09-27

    The unsteady, non-similar, chemically reactive, turbulent boundary layer equations are modified for gas plus dispersed solid particle mixtures, for gas phase turbulent combustion reactions and for heterogeneous gas-solid surface erosive reactions. The exterior (ballistic core) edge boundary conditions for the solutions are modified to include dispersed particle influences on core propellant combustion-generated turbulence levels, combustion reactants and products, and reaction-induced, non-isentropic mixture states. The wall surface (in this study it is always steel) is considered either bare or coated with a fixed particle coating which is conceptually non-reactive, insulative, and non-ablative. Two families of solutions are compared. These correspond to: (1) consideration of gas-borne, free-slip, almost spontaneously mobile (motile) solid particle additives which influence the turbulent heat transfer at the uncoated steel surface and, in contrast, (2) consideration of particle-free, gas phase turbulent heat transfer to the insulated surface coated by stationary particles. Significant differences in erosive heat transfer are found in comparing the two families of solutions over a substantial range of interior ballistic flow conditions. The most effective influences on reducing erosive heat transfer appear to favor mobile, gas-borne particle additives.

  20. Model Scramjet Inlet Unstart Induced by Mass Addition and Heat Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Seong-Kyun; Baccarella, Damiano; McGann, Brendan; Liu, Qili; Wermer, Lydiy; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-11-01

    The inlet unstart phenomena in a model scramjet are investigated at an arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. The unstart induced by nitrogen or ethylene jets at low or high enthalpy Mach 4.5 freestream flow conditions are compared. The jet injection pressurizes the downstream flow by mass addition and flow blockage. In case of the ethylene jet injection, heat release from combustion increases the backpressure further. Time-resolved schlieren imaging is performed at the jet and the lip of the model inlet to visualize the flow features during unstart. High frequency pressure measurements are used to provide information on pressure fluctuation at the scramjet wall. In both of the mass and heat release driven unstart cases, it is observed that there are similar flow transient and quasi-steady behaviors of unstart shockwave system during the unstart processes. Combustion driven unstart induces severe oscillatory flow motions of the jet and the unstart shock at the lip of the scramjet inlet after the completion of the unstart process, while the unstarted flow induced by solely mass addition remains relatively steady. The discrepancies between the processes of mass and heat release driven unstart are explained by flow choking mechanism.

  1. Opportunities for Combined Heat and Power in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, Ken; Hedman, Bruce

    2009-03-01

    facilities involved, and the geographic distribution. (2) Data Center Energy Use Trends--a discussion of energy use and expected energy growth and the typical energy consumption and uses in data centers. (3) CHP Applicability--Potential configurations, CHP case studies, applicable equipment, heat recovery opportunities (cooling), cost and performance benchmarks, and power reliability benefits (4) CHP Drivers and Hurdles--evaluation of user benefits, social benefits, market structural issues and attitudes toward CHP, and regulatory hurdles. (5) CHP Paths to Market--Discussion of technical needs, education, strategic partnerships needed to promote CHP in the IT community.

  2. Micro-tubular flame-assisted fuel cells for micro-combined heat and power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milcarek, Ryan J.; Wang, Kang; Falkenstein-Smith, Ryan L.; Ahn, Jeongmin

    2016-02-01

    Currently the role of fuel cells in future power generation is being examined, tested and discussed. However, implementing systems is more difficult because of sealing challenges, slow start-up and complex thermal management and fuel processing. A novel furnace system with a flame-assisted fuel cell is proposed that combines the thermal management and fuel processing systems by utilizing fuel-rich combustion. In addition, the flame-assisted fuel cell furnace is a micro-combined heat and power system, which can produce electricity for homes or businesses, providing resilience during power disruption while still providing heat. A micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell achieves a significant performance of 430 mW cm-2 operating in a model fuel-rich exhaust stream.

  3. Densities of some molten fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Liquid densities were determined for a number of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications, using a procedure that consisted of measuring the loss of weight of an inert bob in the melt. The density apparatus was calibrated with pure LiF and NaF at different temperatures. Density data for safe binary and ternary fluoride salt eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds are presented. In addition, a comparison was made between the volumetric heat storage capacity of different salt mixtures.

  4. A review on augmentation of heat transfer in boiling using surfactants/additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Anil; Pise, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    Studies of heat transfer enhancement in boiling under various conditions and configurations have given different results. Understanding the boiling behaviour from these studies, literature is reviewed in terms of surface texture, heater geometry and orientation, experimental and numerical studies in presence of surfactant/additives. After understanding different behaviour in boiling, the effect of environment friendly surfactant is studied through literature review. Benchmarking of experimental procedure is done by experimenting and comparing some surfactants studied in literature.

  5. DEMETER Observations of Ionospheric Heating by Powerful VLF Transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, K. L.; Bell, T. F.; Piddyachiy, D.; Inan, U. S.; Parrot, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent DEMETER observations have shown that intense 19.8 kHz VLF signals from the powerful (1 MW) NWC transmitter in Australia can significantly heat the overlying ionosphere and produce significant changes in local electron density and temperature at 700 km altitude [Parrot et al., 2007]. These changes are accompanied by a unique plasma wave structure covering a 5 to 10 kHz band below the NWC signals. We extend the previous investigation to the powerful (1 MW) 24 kHz NAA VLF transmitter in Maine and show that similar heating effects take place in the ionosphere overlying NAA. However, the heating due to the NAA signals occurs at a much lower level than that due to the NWC signals. We show that this important difference arises because the ionospheric absorption rate for VLF waves depends upon the local inclination of the Earth's magnetic field. The magnetic inclination varies significantly between the locations of NWC and NAA, being approximately 45 and 67 degrees respectively. We also examine the plasma wave structure and the electron density and temperature near the conjugate point of NWC and show that although the plasma wave structure is very similar to the unique structure found over NWC, there are no significant perturbations of electron density or temperature near the conjugate point . This implies that the large scale changes in electron density observed over NWC do not extend along the Earth's magnetic field lines to the conjugate point.

  6. Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

    2008-06-20

    An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

  7. Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hampel, Viktor E.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

  8. An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hampel, V.E.

    1988-05-17

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

  9. Reducing Pumping Power in Hydronic Heating and Cooling Systems with Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, Kristoffer Jason

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are being used increasingly in a variety of thermal transfer and thermal storage applications. This thesis presents the results of a laboratory study into the feasibility of improving the performance of hydronic heating and cooling systems by adding microcapsules filled with a PCM to the water used as heat transport media in these systems. Microencapsulated PCMs (MPCMs) increase the heat carrying capacity of heat transport liquids by absorbing or releasing heat at a constant temperature through a change of phase. Three sequences of tests and their results are presented: 1) Thermal cycling tests conducted to determine the melting temperatures and extent of supercooling associated with the MPCMs tested. 2) Hydronic performance tests in which MPCM slurries were pumped through a fin-and-tube, air-to-liquid heat exchanger and their thermal transfer performance compared against that of ordinary water. 3) Mechanical stability tests in which MPCM slurries were pumped in a continuous loop in order to gauge the extent of rupture due to pumping. It is shown that slurries consisting of water and MPCMs ˜ 14-24 mum in diameter improve thermal performance and offer the potential for power savings in the form of reduced pumping requirements. In addition, it is shown that while slurries of MPCMs 2-5 mum in diameter appear to exhibit better mechanical stability than slurries of larger diameter MPCMs, the smaller MPCMs appear to reduce the thermal performance of air-to-liquid heat exchangers.

  10. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  11. Standby Rates for Combined Heat and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sedano, Richard; Selecky, James; Iverson, Kathryn; Al-Jabir, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Improvements in technology, low natural gas prices, and more flexible and positive attitudes in government and utilities are making distributed generation more viable. With more distributed generation, notably combined heat and power, comes an increase in the importance of standby rates, the cost of services utilities provide when customer generation is not operating or is insufficient to meet full load. This work looks at existing utility standby tariffs in five states. It uses these existing rates and terms to showcase practices that demonstrate a sound application of regulatory principles and ones that do not. The paper also addresses areas for improvement in standby rates.

  12. WORKING PARK-FUEL CELL COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Jones

    2003-09-01

    This report covers the aims and objectives of the project which was to design, install and operate a fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) system in Woking Park, the first fuel cell CHP system in the United Kingdom. The report also covers the benefits that were expected to accrue from the work in an understanding of the full technology procurement process (including planning, design, installation, operation and maintenance), the economic and environmental performance in comparison with both conventional UK fuel supply and conventional CHP and the commercial viability of fuel cell CHP energy supply in the new deregulated energy markets.

  13. Efficiency at maximum power output of linear irreversible Carnot-like heat engines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Tu, Z C

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency at maximum power output of linear irreversible Carnot-like heat engines is investigated based on the assumption that the rate of irreversible entropy production of the working substance in each "isothermal" process is a quadratic form of the heat exchange rate between the working substance and the reservoir. It is found that the maximum power output corresponds to minimizing the irreversible entropy production in two isothermal processes of the Carnot-like cycle, and that the efficiency at maximum power output has the form η(mP)=η(C)/(2-γη(C)), where η(C) is the Carnot efficiency, while γ depends on the heat transfer coefficients between the working substance and two reservoirs. The value of η(mP) is bounded between η(-)≡η(C)/2 and η(+)≡η(C)/(2-η(C)). These results are consistent with those obtained by Chen and Yan [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 3740 (1989)] based on the endoreversible assumption, those obtained by Esposito et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)] based on the low-dissipation assumption, and those obtained by Schmiedl and Seifert [Europhys. Lett. 81, 20003 (2008)] for stochastic heat engines which in fact also satisfy the low-dissipation assumption. Additionally, we find that the endoreversible assumption happens to hold for Carnot-like heat engines operating at the maximum power output based on our fundamental assumption, and that the Carnot-like heat engines that we focused on do not strictly satisfy the low-dissipation assumption, which implies that the low-dissipation assumption or our fundamental assumption is a sufficient but non-necessary condition for the validity of η(mP)=η(C)/(2-γη(C)) as well as the existence of two bounds, η(-)≡η(C)/2 and η(+)≡η(C)/(2-η(C)).

  14. Conversion of medium and low temperature heat to power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Johann; Wendland, Martin; Lai, Ngoc Anh

    2013-04-01

    Presently most electricity is produced in power plants which use high temperature heat supplied by coal, oil, gas or nuclear fission and Clausius-Rankine cycles (CRC) with water as working fluid (WF). On the other hand, geo-, solar-, ocean-, and biogenic-heat have medium and low temperatures. At these temperatures, however, the use of other WF and/or other cycles can yield higher efficiencies than those of the water-CRC. For an assessment of the efficiency we model systems which include the heat transfer to and from the WF and the cycle. Optimization criterion is the exergy efficiency defined as the ratio of the net power output to the incoming exergy flow of the heat carrier. First, for a better understanding we discuss some thermodynamic properties of the WFs: 1) the critical point parameters, 2) the shape of the vapour- liquid coexistence curve in the temperature vs entropy (T,s)-diagram which may be either bell-shaped or overhanging [1,2], and 3) the shape of sub- and supercritical isobars for pure fluids and fluid mixtures. Second, we show that the problems of a CRC with water at lower temperatures are 1) the shape of the T,s-diagram and 2) the exergy loss during heat transfer to the WF. The first problem can be overcome by using an organic working fluid in the CRC which then is called organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The second problem is reduced by supercritical organic Rankine cycles (sORC) [1,2], trilateral cycles (TLC) and the more general power-flash cycles (PFC) [2], and organic flash cycles (OFC) [3]. Next, selected results for systems with the above mentioned cycles will be presented. The heat carrier inlet temperatures THC range from 120°C to 350°C.The pure working fluids are water, refrigerants, alkanes, aromates and siloxanes and have to be selected to match with THC. It is found that TLC with water have the highest efficiencies but show very large volume flows at lower temperatures. Moreover, expansion machines for TLC and PFC are still under

  15. Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique “power panel” approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin “power panels” consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 °C and cold-side temperatures = 40 °C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

  16. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various

  17. Heat transfer and material flow during laser assisted multi-layer additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2014-09-28

    A three-dimensional, transient, heat transfer, and fluid flow model is developed for the laser assisted multilayer additive manufacturing process with coaxially fed austenitic stainless steel powder. Heat transfer between the laser beam and the powder particles is considered both during their flight between the nozzle and the growth surface and after they deposit on the surface. The geometry of the build layer obtained from independent experiments is compared with that obtained from the model. The spatial variation of melt geometry, cooling rate, and peak temperatures is examined in various layers. The computed cooling rates and solidification parameters are used to estimate the cell spacings and hardness in various layers of the structure. Good agreement is achieved between the computed geometry, cell spacings, and hardness with the corresponding independent experimental results.

  18. A 10-kW SiC Inverter with A Novel Printed Metal Power Module With Integrated Cooling Using Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Ayers, Curtis William; Campbell, Steven L; Wiles, Randy H; Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-01-01

    With efforts to reduce the cost, size, and thermal management systems for the power electronics drivetrain in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), wide band gap semiconductors including silicon carbide (SiC) have been identified as possibly being a partial solution. This paper focuses on the development of a 10-kW all SiC inverter using a high power density, integrated printed metal power module with integrated cooling using additive manufacturing techniques. This is the first ever heat sink printed for a power electronics application. About 50% of the inverter was built using additive manufacturing techniques.

  19. Effects of heat input on the low power Nd:YAG pulse laser conduction weldability of magnesium alloy AZ61

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Dong; Shen, Jun; Lai, Shiqiang; Chen, Jie; Xu, Nan; Liu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The effects of heat input on the low power Nd:YAG pulse laser conduction weldability of magnesium alloy AZ61 plates were investigated. The results show that for a hot-extruded AZ61 magnesium alloy plate laser conduction welding, the penetration depth and area of welds cross-section increased with an increase of the heat input. The microstructure of a band zone, which is located in the fusion zone (FZ) and close to the fusion boundary, evolved with an increase of the heat input. Moreover, an increase of the heat input increased the tendency of the formation of solidification cracking and liquation cracking. The porosities and average diameters of pores increased with an increase of the heat input but reduced sharply when a relatively large heat input was achieved. In addition, the degree of formation of craters increased linearly with an increase of the heat input.

  20. Work output and efficiency at maximum power of linear irreversible heat engines operating with a finite-sized heat source.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2014-05-01

    We formulate the work output and efficiency for linear irreversible heat engines working between a finite-sized hot heat source and an infinite-sized cold heat reservoir until the total system reaches the final thermal equilibrium state with a uniform temperature. We prove that when the heat engines operate at the maximum power under the tight-coupling condition without heat leakage the work output is just half of the exergy, which is known as the maximum available work extracted from a heat source. As a consequence, the corresponding efficiency is also half of its quasistatic counterpart.

  1. Work output and efficiency at maximum power of linear irreversible heat engines operating with a finite-sized heat source.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2014-05-01

    We formulate the work output and efficiency for linear irreversible heat engines working between a finite-sized hot heat source and an infinite-sized cold heat reservoir until the total system reaches the final thermal equilibrium state with a uniform temperature. We prove that when the heat engines operate at the maximum power under the tight-coupling condition without heat leakage the work output is just half of the exergy, which is known as the maximum available work extracted from a heat source. As a consequence, the corresponding efficiency is also half of its quasistatic counterpart. PMID:24856684

  2. Work Output and Efficiency at Maximum Power of Linear Irreversible Heat Engines Operating with a Finite-Sized Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2014-05-01

    We formulate the work output and efficiency for linear irreversible heat engines working between a finite-sized hot heat source and an infinite-sized cold heat reservoir until the total system reaches the final thermal equilibrium state with a uniform temperature. We prove that when the heat engines operate at the maximum power under the tight-coupling condition without heat leakage the work output is just half of the exergy, which is known as the maximum available work extracted from a heat source. As a consequence, the corresponding efficiency is also half of its quasistatic counterpart.

  3. Evaluation of heat-cured resin bases following the addition of denture teeth using a second heat cure.

    PubMed

    Polukoshko, K M; Brudvik, J S; Nicholls, J I; Smith, D E

    1992-04-01

    This study compared heat-cured acrylic resin denture baseplate distortions following a second heat cure used to add the denture teeth. The second heat cure was done with three different water-bath curing temperatures. The distortions were evaluated in three planes by use of a measuring microscope. Recorded distortions were not clinically significant.

  4. Synergies of wind power and electrified space heating: case study for Beijing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinyu; Lu, Xi; McElroy, Michael B; Nielsen, Chris P; Kang, Chongqing

    2014-01-01

    Demands for electricity and energy to supply heat are expected to expand by 71% and 47%, respectively, for Beijing in 2020 relative to 2009. If the additional electricity and heat are supplied solely by coal as is the current situation, annual emissions of CO2 may be expected to increase by 59.6% or 99 million tons over this interval. Assessed against this business as usual (BAU) background, the present study indicates that significant reductions in emissions could be realized using wind-generated electricity to provide a source of heat, employed either with heat pumps or with electric thermal storage (ETS) devices. Relative to BAU, reductions in CO2 with heat pumps assuming 20% wind penetration could be as large as 48.5% and could be obtained at a cost for abatement of as little as $15.6 per ton of avoided CO2. Even greater reductions, 64.5%, could be realized at a wind penetration level of 40% but at a higher cost, $29.4 per ton. Costs for reduction of CO2 using ETS systems are significantly higher, reflecting the relatively low efficiency for conversion of coal to power to heat.

  5. The Stirling alternative. Power systems, refrigerants and heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Reader, G.; Fauvel, O.R.; Bingham, E.R. )

    1993-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date reference on the technology, history, and practical applications of Stirling engines, including recent developments in the field and a convenient survey of the Stirling engine literature. The topics of the book include: fundamentals of Stirling technology, definition and terminology, thermodynamic laws and cycles: some elementary considerations, the Stirling cycle, practical regenerative cycle, theoretical aspects and computer simulation of Stirling machines, mechanical arrangements, control systems, heat exchangers, performance characteristics, working fluids, applications of Stirling machines, advantages of Stirling machines, disadvantages of Stirling machines, Stirling versus internal combustion engines, Stirling versus Rankine engines, applications for Stirling machines, Stirling power systems, the literature and sources of supply, the literature of Stirling engines, and the literature of cryocoolers.

  6. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Alfred J.; Kurzeja, Robert J.; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Bollinger, James S.; Pendergast, Malcolm M.

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q" from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation σ of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q" can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing σ. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q" and σ when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between σ and q" of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q" computed from a function of σ and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q" (0.84 and 0.89). Finally, this research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

  7. Use of a turboexpander in steam power units for heat energy recovery in heat supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, R. A.; Daminov, A. Z.; Solomin, I. N.; Futin, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    A method for raising the efficiency of a boiler plant by installing a unit operating by the organic Rankine cycle is presented. Such units allow one to generate electricity to cover the auxiliaries of a heat source at a heat-transfer fluid temperature of no more than 130°C. The results of commissioning tests of boilers revealed that their efficiency is maximized under a load that is close or corresponds to the nominal one. If this load is maintained constantly, excess heat energy is produced. This excess may be used to generate electric energy in a steam power unit with a turboexpander. A way to insert this unit into the flow diagram of a boiler plant is proposed. The results of analysis of turbine types (turboexpanders included) with various capacities are presented, and the optimum type for the proposed flow diagram is chosen. The methodology for the design of turboexpanders and compressors used in the oil and gas industry and their operational data were applied in the analysis of a turboexpander. The results of the thermogasdynamic analysis of a turboexpander and the engineered shape of an axial-radial impeller are presented. Halocarbon R245fa is chosen as the working medium based on its calorimetric properties.

  8. Investigation of Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger Designs for Fission Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, Barry; Robbie, Malcolm; Geng, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Fission surface power is an option for future Moon and Mars surface missions. High power nuclear reactor heated Stirling convertors are an option to provide reliable power for long duration outpost operations. This report investigates various design approaches for the liquid metal to acceptor heat exchange and clarifies the details used in the analysis.

  9. Ground heat flux and power sources of low-enthalpy geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Peter; Blum, Philipp; Rivera, Jaime A.

    2015-04-01

    Geothermal heat pumps commonly extract energy from the shallow ground at depths as low as approximately 400 m. Vertical borehole heat exchangers are often applied, which are seasonally operated for decades. During this lifetime, thermal anomalies are induced in the ground and surface-near aquifers, which often grow over the years and which alleviate the overall performance of the geothermal system. As basis for prediction and control of the evolving energy imbalance in the ground, focus is typically set on the ground temperatures. This is reflected in regulative temperature thresholds, and in temperature trends, which serve as indicators for renewability and sustainability. In our work, we examine the fundamental heat flux and power sources, as well as their temporal and spatial variability during geothermal heat pump operation. The underlying rationale is that for control of ground temperature evolution, knowledge of the primary heat sources is fundamental. This insight is also important to judge the validity of simplified modelling frameworks. For instance, we reveal that vertical heat flux from the surface dominates the basal heat flux towards a borehole. Both fluxes need to be accounted for as proper vertical boundary conditions in the model. Additionally, the role of horizontal groundwater advection is inspected. Moreover, by adopting the ground energy deficit and long-term replenishment as criteria for system sustainability, an uncommon perspective is adopted that is based on the primary parameter rather than induced local temperatures. In our synthetic study and dimensionless analysis, we demonstrate that time of ground energy recovery after system shutdown may be longer than what is expected from local temperature trends. In contrast, unrealistically long recovery periods and extreme thermal anomalies are predicted without account for vertical ground heat fluxes and only when the energy content of the geothermal reservoir is considered.

  10. Studies of geothermal power and process heat applications in St. Lucia and Guatemala

    SciTech Connect

    Altseimer, J.H.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Many countries have the potential to use geothermal energy for both power production and process heat applications. Two Los Alamos programs have studied the most effective use of geothermal energy in St. Lucia and Guatemala. The general objectives are (1) to reduce oil imports; (2) develop employment opportunities; and (3) make products more competitive. The initial St. Lucia studies emphasized power generation but a number of applications for the power plant's residual heat were also found and costs and systems have been determined. The costs of geothermal heat compare favorably with heat from other sources such as oil. In Guatemala, the development of the nation's first geothermal field is well advanced. Process heat applications and their coordination with power generation plants are being studied at Los Alamos. Guatemala has at least two fields that appear suitable for power and heat production. These fields are close to urban centers and to many potential heat applications.

  11. Exergy analysis of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell and organic Rankine cycle for cooling, heating and power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sulaiman, Fahad A.; Dincer, Ibrahim; Hamdullahpur, Feridun

    The study examines a novel system that combined a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for cooling, heating and power production (trigeneration) through exergy analysis. The system consists of an SOFC, an ORC, a heat exchanger and a single-effect absorption chiller. The system is modeled to produce a net electricity of around 500 kW. The study reveals that there is 3-25% gain on exergy efficiency when trigeneration is used compared with the power cycle only. Also, the study shows that as the current density of the SOFC increases, the exergy efficiencies of power cycle, cooling cogeneration, heating cogeneration and trigeneration decreases. In addition, it was shown that the effect of changing the turbine inlet pressure and ORC pump inlet temperature are insignificant on the exergy efficiencies of the power cycle, cooling cogeneration, heating cogeneration and trigeneration. Also, the study reveals that the significant sources of exergy destruction are the ORC evaporator, air heat exchanger at the SOFC inlet and heating process heat exchanger.

  12. Characterization of Steel-Ta Dissimilar Metal Builds Made Using Very High Power Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (VHP-UAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Niyanth; Norfolk, Mark; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing is a solid-state additive manufacturing technique that utilizes ultrasonic vibrations to bond metal tapes into near net-shaped components. The major advantage of this process is the ability to manufacture layered structures with dissimilar materials without any intermetallic formation. Majority of the published literature had focused only on the bond formation mechanism in Aluminum alloys. The current work pertains to explain the microstructure evolution during dissimilar joining of iron and tantalum using very high power ultrasonic additive manufacturing and characterization of the interfaces using electron back-scattered diffraction and Nano-indentation measurement. The results showed extensive grain refinement at the bonded interfaces of these metals. This phenomenon was attributed to continuous dynamic recrystallization process driven by the high strain rate plastic deformation and associated adiabatic heating that is well below 50 pct of melting point of both iron and Ta.

  13. Heat Transfer Study for HTS Power Transfer Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S.; Fesmire, J.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal losses are a key factor in the successful application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables. Existing concepts and prototypes rely on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) systems that are subject to large variations in actual performance. The small space available for the thermal insulation materials makes the application even more difficult because of bending considerations, mechanical loading, and the arrangement between the inner and outer piping. Each of these mechanical variables affects the heat leak rate. These factors of bending and spacing are examined in this study. Furthermore, a maintenance-free insulation system (high vacuum level for 20 years or longer) is a practical requirement. A thermal insulation system simulating a section of a flexible FITS power cable was constructed for test and evaluation on a research cryostat. This paper gives experimental data for the comparison of ideal MLI, MLI on rigid piping, and MLI between flexible piping. A section of insulated flexible piping was tested under cryogenic vacuum conditions including simulated bending and spacers.

  14. A new method for optimum heating of pressure components in supercritical steam power blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rząsa, Dariusz; Duda, Piotr

    2012-09-01

    One of the major concerns of the power energy industries is a proper operation of steam power blocks. Pressurized working medium and high temperature cause very high stresses in the construction elements such as collectors, separators or steam valves. They are exposed to sudden temperature and pressure changes that cause high stresses at certain points. Additionally, the cyclic character of loading causes material fatigue, known as low-cyclic fatigue, which may lead to the formation of fracture. Thus, methodologies offered by many companies should ensure reliable and safe operation of steam power blocks. The advanced numerical solutions for determining time-optimum medium temperature changes are presented. They are based on Levenberg-Marquardt and nonlinear programming by quadratic Lagrangian methods. The methods allow us to find parameters for start-up and shut-down operation that can reduce total stresses to limits governed by European regulations. Furthermore, the heating and cooling operations are conducted in a shortest time possible.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF NEW POWER CYCLES AND ADVANCED FALLING FILM HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Arsalan Razani; Kwang J. Kim

    2000-10-28

    The annual progress report for the period of October 1, 1999 to September 30, 2000 on DOE/UNM grant number DE-FG26-98FT40148 discusses the progress on both the theoretical analysis of advanced power cycles and the experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers. The previously developed computer program for the triple cycle, based on the air standard cycle assumption, was modified to include actual air composition (%77.48 N{sub 2}, %20.59 O{sub 2}, %1.9 H{sub 2}O, and %0.03 CO{sub 2}). The actual combustion products were used in exergy analysis of the triple cycle. The effect of steam injection into the combustion chamber on its irreversibility, and the irreversibility of the entire cycle, was evaluated. A more practical fuel inlet condition and a better position of the feedwater heater in the steam cycle were used in the modified cycle. The effect of pinch point and the temperature difference between the combustion products, as well as the steam in the heat recovery steam generator on irreversibility of the cycle were evaluated. Design, construction, and testing of the multitube horizontal falling film condenser facility were completed. Two effective heat transfer additives (2-ethyl-1-hexanol and alkyl amine) were identified and tested for steam condensation. The test results are included. The condenser was designed with twelve tubes in an array of three horizontals and four verticals, with a 2-inch horizontal and 1.5-inch vertical in-line pitch. By using effective additives, the condensation heat transfer rate can be augmented as much as 30%, as compared to a heat transfer that operated without additives under the same operating condition. When heat transfer additives function effectively, the condensate-droplets become more dispersed and have a smaller shape than those produced without additives. These droplets, unlike traditional turbulence, start at the top portion of the condenser tubes and cover most of the tubes. Such a flow behavior can

  16. Precipitation of sword bean proteins by heating and addition of magnesium chloride in a crude extract.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Kaho; Masuda, Tetsuya; Takenaka, Yasuyuki; Masui, Hironori; Tani, Fumito; Arii, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Sword bean (Canavalia gladiata) seeds are a traditional food in Asian countries. In this study, we aimed to determine the optimal methods for the precipitation of sword bean proteins useful for the food development. The soaking time for sword beans was determined by comparing it with that for soybeans. Sword bean proteins were extracted from dried seeds in distilled water using novel methods. We found that most proteins could be precipitated by heating the extract at more than 90 °C. Interestingly, adding magnesium chloride to the extract at lower temperatures induced specific precipitation of a single protein with a molecular weight of approximately 48 kDa. The molecular weight and N-terminal sequence of the precipitated protein was identical to that of canavalin. These data suggested that canavalin was precipitated by the addition of magnesium chloride to the extract. Our results provide important insights into the production of processed foods from sword bean.

  17. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2D: SPA supplemental power and heat rejection kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, R. L. (Editor); Smith, A. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The design and application of a supplementary power and heat rejection kit for the Spacelab are discussed. Two subsystems of electric power and thermal control were analyzed to define the requirements for the power and heat rejection kit (PHRK). Twelve exemplary experiments were defined and power timelines were developed. From these timeline, the experiment requirements for sustained power, peak power, and energy were determined. The electrical power subsystem of the PHRK will consist of two fuel cells, oxygen and hydrogen reactant tank assemblies, water storage tanks, plumbing, cabling, and inverters to convert the nominal 28 volt dc fuel cell output to ac power.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF NEW POWER CYCLES AND ADVANCED FALLING FILM HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Arsalan Razani; Kwang J. Kim

    2001-12-01

    The final report for the DOE/UNM grant number DE-FG26-98FT40148 discusses the accomplishments of both the theoretical analysis of advanced power cycles and experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers. This final report also includes the progress report for the third year (period of October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001). Four new cycles were studied and two cycles were analyzed in detail based on the second law of thermodynamics. The first cycle uses a triple combined cycle, which consists of a topping cycle (Brayton/gas), an intermediate cycle (Rankine/steam), and a bottoming cycle (Rankine/ammonia). This cycle can produce high efficiency and reduces the irreversibility of the Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSC) of conventional combined power cycles. The effect of important system parameters on the irreversibility distribution of all components in the cycle under reasonable practical constraints was evaluated. The second cycle is a combined cycle, which consists of a topping cycle (Brayton/gas) and a bottoming cycle (Rankine/ammonia) with integrated compressor inlet air cooling. This innovative cycle can produce high power and efficiency. This cycle is also analyzed and optimized based on the second the second law to obtain the irreversibility distribution of all components in the cycle. The results of the studies have been published in peer reviewed journals and ASME conference proceeding. Experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers was conducted to find effective additives for steam condensation. Four additives have been selected and tested in a horizontal tube steam condensation facility. It has been observed that heat transfer additives have been shown to be an effective way to increase the efficiency of conventional tube bundle condenser heat exchangers. This increased condensation rate is due to the creation of a disturbance in the liquid condensate surround the film. The heat transfer through such a film has

  19. Nonlinear feedback in a six-dimensional Lorenz model: impact of an additional heating term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.-W.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a six-dimensional Lorenz model (6DLM) is derived, based on a recent study using a five-dimensional (5-D) Lorenz model (LM), in order to examine the impact of an additional mode and its accompanying heating term on solution stability. The new mode added to improve the representation of the streamfunction is referred to as a secondary streamfunction mode, while the two additional modes, which appear in both the 6DLM and 5DLM but not in the original LM, are referred to as secondary temperature modes. Two energy conservation relationships of the 6DLM are first derived in the dissipationless limit. The impact of three additional modes on solution stability is examined by comparing numerical solutions and ensemble Lyapunov exponents of the 6DLM and 5DLM as well as the original LM. For the onset of chaos, the critical value of the normalized Rayleigh number (rc) is determined to be 41.1. The critical value is larger than that in the 3DLM (rc ~ 24.74), but slightly smaller than the one in the 5DLM (rc ~ 42.9). A stability analysis and numerical experiments obtained using generalized LMs, with or without simplifications, suggest the following: (1) negative nonlinear feedback in association with the secondary temperature modes, as first identified using the 5DLM, plays a dominant role in providing feedback for improving the solution's stability of the 6DLM, (2) the additional heating term in association with the secondary streamfunction mode may destabilize the solution, and (3) overall feedback due to the secondary streamfunction mode is much smaller than the feedback due to the secondary temperature modes; therefore, the critical Rayleigh number of the 6DLM is comparable to that of the 5DLM. The 5DLM and 6DLM collectively suggest different roles for small-scale processes (i.e., stabilization vs. destabilization), consistent with the following statement by Lorenz (1972): "If the flap of a butterfly's wings can be instrumental in generating a tornado, it can

  20. Nonlinear feedback in a six-dimensional Lorenz Model: impact of an additional heating term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.-W.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a six-dimensional Lorenz model (6DLM) is derived, based on a recent study using a five-dimensional (5-D) Lorenz model (LM), in order to examine the impact of an additional mode and its accompanying heating term on solution stability. The new mode added to improve the representation of the steamfunction is referred to as a secondary streamfunction mode, while the two additional modes, that appear in both the 6DLM and 5DLM but not in the original LM, are referred to as secondary temperature modes. Two energy conservation relationships of the 6DLM are first derived in the dissipationless limit. The impact of three additional modes on solution stability is examined by comparing numerical solutions and ensemble Lyapunov exponents of the 6DLM and 5DLM as well as the original LM. For the onset of chaos, the critical value of the normalized Rayleigh number (rc) is determined to be 41.1. The critical value is larger than that in the 3DLM (rc ~ 24.74), but slightly smaller than the one in the 5DLM (rc ~ 42.9). A stability analysis and numerical experiments obtained using generalized LMs, with or without simplifications, suggest the following: (1) negative nonlinear feedback in association with the secondary temperature modes, as first identified using the 5DLM, plays a dominant role in providing feedback for improving the solution's stability of the 6DLM, (2) the additional heating term in association with the secondary streamfunction mode may destabilize the solution, and (3) overall feedback due to the secondary streamfunction mode is much smaller than the feedback due to the secondary temperature modes; therefore, the critical Rayleigh number of the 6DLM is comparable to that of the 5DLM. The 5DLM and 6DLM collectively suggest different roles for small-scale processes (i.e., stabilization vs. destabilization), consistent with the following statement by Lorenz (1972): If the flap of a butterfly's wings can be instrumental in generating a tornado, it can

  1. Geothermal energy: clean power from the Earth's heat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Sass, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Societies in the 21st century require enormous amounts of energy to drive the machines of commerce and to sustain the lifestyles that many people have come to expect. Today, most of this energy is derived from oil, natural gas, and coal, supplemented by nuclear power. Local exceptions exist, but oil is by far the most common source of energy worldwide. Oil resources, however, are nonrenewable and concentrated in only a few places around the globe, creating uncertainty in long-term supply for many nations. At the time of the Middle East oil embargo of the 1970s, about a third of the United States oil supply was imported, mostly from that region. An interruption in the flow of this import disrupted nearly every citizen’s daily life, as well as the Nation’s economy. In response, the Federal Government launched substantial programs to accelerate development of means to increasingly harness “alternative energies”—primarily biomass, geothermal, solar, and wind. The new emphasis on simultaneously pursuing development of several sources of energy recognized the timeless wisdom found in the proverb of “not putting all eggs in one basket.” This book helps explain the role that geothermal resources can play in helping promote such diversity and in satisfying our Nation’s vast energy needs as we enter a new millennium. For centuries, people have enjoyed the benefits of geothermal energy available at hot springs, but it is only through technological advances made during the 20th century that we can tap this energy source in the subsurface and use it in a variety of ways, including the generation of electricity. Geothermal resources are simply exploitable concentrations of the Earth’s natural heat (thermal energy). The Earth is a bountiful source of thermal energy, continuously producing heat at depth, primarily by the decay of naturally occurring radioactive isotopes—principally of uranium, thorium, and potassium—that occur in small amounts in all rocks

  2. High power Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquinot, J.

    1988-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) powers of up to 17 MW have been coupled to JET limiter plasmas. The plasma stored energy has reached 7 MJ with 13 MW of RF in 5 MA discharges with Z/sub eff/ = 2. When I/sub p//B/sub /phi// = 1 MA/T the stored energy can be 50% greater than the Goldston L mode scaling. This is due to transient stabilisation of sawteeth (up to 3 s) and to a significant energy content in the minority particles accelerated by RF (up to 30% of the total stored energy). Central temperatures of T/sub e/ - 11 keV and T/sub i/ = 8 keV have been reached with RF alone. (He/sup 3/)D fusion experiments have given a 60 kW fusion yield (fusion rate of 2 /times/ 10/sup 16/ s/sup /minus/1/ in the form of energetic fast particles (14.7 MeV(H), 3.6 MeV(He/sup 4/)) in agreement with modelling. When transposing the same calculation to a (D)T scenario, Q is predicted to be between 0.l2 and 0.8 using plasma parameters already achieved. For the first time, a peaked density profile generated by pellet injection could be reheated and sustained by ICRF for 1.2 s. Electron heat transport in the central region is reduced by a factor 2 to 3. The fusion product n/sub io//tau//sub E/T/sub io/ reaches 2.2 /times/ 10/sup 20/ m/sup /minus/3//center dot/s/center dot/kev in 3 MA discharges which is a factor of 2.3 times larger than with normal density profile. 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. New Configurations of Micro Plate-Fin Heat Sink to Reduce Coolant Pumping Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The thermal resistance of heat exchangers has a strong influence on the electric power produced by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). In this work, a real TEG device is applied to three configurations of micro plate-fin heat sink. The distance between certain microchannels is varied to find the optimum heat sink configuration. The particular focus of this study is to reduce the coolant mass flow rate by considering the thermal resistances of the heat sinks and, thereby, to reduce the coolant pumping power in the system. The three-dimensional governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat transfer are solved using the finite-volume method for a wide range of pressure drop laminar flows along the heat sink. The temperature and the mass flow rate distribution in the heat sink are discussed. The results, which are in good agreement with previous computational studies, show that using suggested heat sink configurations reduces the coolant pumping power in the system.

  4. Geothermal energy: clean power from the Earth's heat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Sass, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Societies in the 21st century require enormous amounts of energy to drive the machines of commerce and to sustain the lifestyles that many people have come to expect. Today, most of this energy is derived from oil, natural gas, and coal, supplemented by nuclear power. Local exceptions exist, but oil is by far the most common source of energy worldwide. Oil resources, however, are nonrenewable and concentrated in only a few places around the globe, creating uncertainty in long-term supply for many nations. At the time of the Middle East oil embargo of the 1970s, about a third of the United States oil supply was imported, mostly from that region. An interruption in the flow of this import disrupted nearly every citizen’s daily life, as well as the Nation’s economy. In response, the Federal Government launched substantial programs to accelerate development of means to increasingly harness “alternative energies”—primarily biomass, geothermal, solar, and wind. The new emphasis on simultaneously pursuing development of several sources of energy recognized the timeless wisdom found in the proverb of “not putting all eggs in one basket.” This book helps explain the role that geothermal resources can play in helping promote such diversity and in satisfying our Nation’s vast energy needs as we enter a new millennium. For centuries, people have enjoyed the benefits of geothermal energy available at hot springs, but it is only through technological advances made during the 20th century that we can tap this energy source in the subsurface and use it in a variety of ways, including the generation of electricity. Geothermal resources are simply exploitable concentrations of the Earth’s natural heat (thermal energy). The Earth is a bountiful source of thermal energy, continuously producing heat at depth, primarily by the decay of naturally occurring radioactive isotopes—principally of uranium, thorium, and potassium—that occur in small amounts in all rocks

  5. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Sudhagar; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Togore, Sam; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  6. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  7. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  8. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  9. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  10. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  11. local alternative sources for cogeneration combined heat and power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agll, Abdulhakim Amer

    Global demand for energy continues to grow while countries around the globe race to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions by implementing policy measures and advancing technology. Sustainability has become an important issue in transportation and infrastructure development projects. While several agencies are trying to incorporate a range of sustainability measures in their goals and missions, only a few planning agencies have been able to implement these policies and they are far from perfect. The low rate of success in implementing sustainable policies is primarily due to incomplete understanding of the system and the interaction between various elements of the system. The conventional planning efforts focuses mainly on performance measures pertaining to the system and its impact on the environment but seldom on the social and economic impacts. The objective of this study is to use clean and alternative energy can be produced from many sources, and even use existing materials for energy generation. One such pathway is using wastewater, animal and organic waste, or landfills to create biogas for energy production. There are three tasks for this study. In topic one evaluated the energy saving that produced from combined hydrogen, heat, and power and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by using local sustainable energy at the Missouri S&T campus to reduce energy consumption and fossil fuel usage. Second topic aimed to estimate energy recovery and power generation from alternative energy source by using Rankin steam cycle from municipal solid waste at Benghazi-Libya. And the last task is in progress. The results for topics one and two have been presented.

  12. Corrosion and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Water Dispersed with Carboxylate Additives and Multi Walled Carbon Nano Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, Chellapilla V. K. N. S. N.; Srinivas, Vadapalli

    2016-02-01

    This paper summarizes a recent work on anti-corrosive properties and enhanced heat transfer properties of carboxylated water based nanofluids. Water mixed with sebacic acid as carboxylate additive found to be resistant to corrosion and suitable for automotive environment. The carboxylated water is dispersed with very low mass concentration of carbon nano tubes at 0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 %. The stability of nanofluids in terms of zeta potential is found to be good with carboxylated water compared to normal water. The heat transfer performance of nanofluids is carried out on an air cooled heat exchanger similar to an automotive radiator with incoming air velocities across radiator at 5, 10 and 15 m/s. The flow Reynolds number of water is in the range of 2500-6000 indicating developing flow regime. The corrosion resistance of nanofluids is found to be good indicating its suitability to automotive environment. There is a slight increase in viscosity and marginal decrease in the specific heat of nanofluids with addition of carboxylate as well as CNTs. Significant improvement is observed in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids dispersed with CNTs. During heat transfer experimentation, the inside heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient has also improved markedly. It is also found that the velocity of air and flow rate of coolant plays an important role in enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient.

  13. Additive impacts on particle emissions from heating low emitting cooking oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouei Torkmahalleh, M.; Zhao, Y.; Hopke, P. K.; Rossner, A.; Ferro, A. R.

    2013-08-01

    The effect of five additives, including table salt, sea salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and turmeric, on the emission of PM2.5 and ultrafine particles (UFP) from heated cooking oil (200 °C) were studied. One hundred milligrams of the additives were added individually to either canola or soybean oil without stirring. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt reduced the PM2.5 emission of canola oil by 86% (p < 0.001), 88% (p < 0.001), and 91% (p < 0.001), respectively. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt also decreased the total particle number emissions of canola oil by 45% (p = 0.003), 52% (p = 0.001), and 53% (p < 0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder showed no changes in the PM2.5 and total number emissions of canola oil. Table salt and sea salt, decreased the level of PM2.5 emissions from soybean oil by 47% (p < 0.001) and 77% (p < 0.001), respectively. No differences in the PM2.5 emissions were observed when other additives were added to soybean oil. Black pepper, sea salt, and table salt reduced the total particle number emissions from the soybean oil by 51%, 61% and 68% (p < 0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder had no effect on soybean oil with respect to total particle number emissions. Our results indicate that table salt, sea salt, and black pepper can be used to reduce the particle total number and PM2.5 emissions when cooking with oil.

  14. Heat-pipe development for the SPAR space-power system. [100 kW(e)

    SciTech Connect

    Ranken, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The SPAR space power system design is based on a high temperature fast spectrum nuclear reactor that furnishes heat to a thermoelectric conversion system to generate an electrical power output of 100 kW/sub (e)/. An important feature of this design is the use of alkali metal heat pipes to provide redundant, reliable, and low-loss heat transfer at high temperature. Three sets of heat pipes are used in the system. These include sodium/molybdenum heat pipes to transfer heat from the reactor core to the conversion system, potassium/niobium heat pipes to couple the conversion system to the radiator in a redundant manner, and potassium/titanium heat pipes to distribute rejected heat throughout the radiator surface. The designs of these units are discussed and fabrication methods and testing results are described. 12 figures.

  15. An examination of heat rate improvements due to waste heat integration in an oxycombustion pulverized coal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Joshua M.

    Oxyfuel, or oxycombustion, technology has been proposed as one carbon capture technology for coal-fired power plants. An oxycombustion plant would fire coal in an oxidizer consisting primarily of CO2, oxygen, and water vapor. Flue gas with high CO2 concentrations is produced and can be compressed for sequestration. Since this compression generates large amounts of heat, it was theorized that this heat could be utilized elsewhere in the plant. Process models of the oxycombustion boiler, steam cycle, and compressors were created in ASPEN Plus and Excel to test this hypothesis. Using these models, heat from compression stages was integrated to the flue gas recirculation heater, feedwater heaters, and to a fluidized bed coal dryer. All possible combinations of these heat sinks were examined, with improvements in coal flow rate, Qcoal, net power, and unit heat rate being noted. These improvements would help offset the large efficiency impacts inherent to oxycombustion technology.

  16. Testing of an impedance heating system for solar power tower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, J.E.; Kolb, W.J.

    1996-05-01

    A non-conventional type of heating system is being tested at Sandia National Laboratories for solar thermal power tower applications. In this system, called impedance heating, electric current flows directly through the pipe to maintain the desired temperature. The pipe becomes the resistor where the heat is generated. Impedance heating has many advantages over previously used mineral insulated (MI) heat trace. An impedance heating system should be much more reliable than heat trace cable since delicate junctions and cabling are not used and the main component, a transformer, is inherently reliable. A big advantage of impedance heating is the system can be sized to rapidly heat up the piping to provide rapid response times necessary in cyclic power plants such as solar power towers. In this paper, experimental results from testing an impedance heating system are compared to MI cable heat trace. We found impedance heating was able to heat piping rapidly and effectively. There were not significant stray currents and impedance heating did not affect instrumentation.

  17. Improved Differential Evolution for Combined Heat and Power Economic Dispatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, C.; Basu, M.; Panigrahi, C. K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an improved differential evolution to solve non-smooth non-convex combined heat and power economic dispatch (CHPED) problem. Valve-point loading and prohibited operating zones of conventional thermal generators are taken into account. Differential evolution (DE) exploits the differences of randomly sampled pairs of objective vectors for its mutation process. Consequently the variation between vectors will outfit the objective function toward the optimization process and therefore provides efficient global optimization capability. However, although DE is shown to be precise, fast as well as robust, its search efficiency will be impaired during solution process with fast descending diversity of population. This paper proposes Gaussian random variable instead of scaling factor which improves search efficiency. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been verified on four test systems. The results of the proposed approach are compared with those obtained by other evolutionary methods. It is found that the proposed improved differential evolution based approach is able to provide better solution.

  18. Advanced coal technologies in Czech heat and power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Noskievic, P.; Ochodek, T.

    1998-04-01

    Coal is the only domestic source of fossil fuel in the Czech Republic. The coal reserves are substantial and their share in total energy use is about 60%. Presently necessary steps in making coal utilisation more friendly towards the environment have been taken and fairly well established, and an interest to develop and build advanced coal units has been observed. One IGCC system has been put into operation, and circa 10 AFBC units are in operation or under construction. Preparatory steps have been taken in building an advanced combustion unit fuelled by pulverised coal and retrofit action is taking place in many heating plants. An actual experience has shown two basic problems: (1) Different characteristic of domestic lignite, especially high content of ash, cause problems applying well-tried foreign technologies and apparently a more focused attention shall have to be paid to the quality of coal combusted. (2) Low prices of lignite (regarding energy, lignite is four times cheaper then coal) do not oblige to increase efficiency of the standing equipment applying advanced technologies. It will be of high interest to observe the effect of the effort of the European Union to establish a kind of carbon tax. It could dramatically change the existing scene in clean coal power generation by the logical pressure to increase the efficiency of energy transformation. In like manner the gradual liberalisation of energy prices might have similar consequences and it is a warranted expectation that, up to now not the best, energy balance will improve in near future.

  19. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOEpatents

    Lambirth, Gene Richard

    2011-01-11

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

  20. Rapid heating of matter using high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Woosuk

    2015-11-05

    This report describes rapid heating technology with ion sources. LANL calculated the expected heating per atom and temperatures of the target materials, used alumium ion beams to heat gold and diamond, produced deuterium fusion plasmas and then measured the ion temperature at the time of the fusion reactions.

  1. Combined heat and power systems for commercial buildings: investigating cost, emissions, and primary energy reduction based on system components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Amanda D.

    Combined heat and power (CHP) systems produce electricity and useful heat from fuel. When power is produced near a building which consumes power, transmission losses are averted, and heat which is a byproduct of power production may be useful to the building. That thermal energy can be used for hot water or space heating, among other applications. This dissertation focuses on CHP systems using natural gas, a common fuel, and systems serving commercial buildings in the United States. First, the necessary price difference between purchased electricity and purchased fuel is analyzed in terms of the efficiencies of system components by comparing CHP with a conventional separate heat and power (SHP) configuration, where power is purchased from the electrical grid and heat is provided by a gas boiler. Similarly, the relationship between CDE due to electricity purchases and due to fuel purchases is analyzed as well as the relationship between primary energy conversion factors for electricity and fuel. The primary energy conversion factor indicates the quantity of source energy necessary to produce the energy purchased at the site. Next, greenhouse gas emissions are investigated for a variety of commercial buildings using CHP or SHP. The relationship between the magnitude of the reduction in emissions and the parameters of the CHP system is explored. The cost savings and reduction in primary energy consumption are evaluated for the same buildings. Finally, a CHP system is analyzed with the addition of a thermal energy storage (TES) component, which can store excess thermal energy and deliver it later if necessary. The potential for CHP with TES to reduce cost, emissions, and primary energy consumption is investigated for a variety of buildings. A case study is developed for one building for which TES does provide additional benefits over a CHP system alone, and the requirements for a water tank TES device are examined.

  2. Study of regeneration system of 300 MW power unit based on nondeaerating heat balance diagram at reduced load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, S. B.; Trifonov, N. N.; Sukhorukov, Yu. G.; Yurchenko, A. Yu.; Grigor'eva, E. B.; Snegin, I. P.; Zhivykh, D. A.; Medvedkin, A. V.; Ryabich, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    More than 30 power units of thermal power stations, based on the nondeaerating heat balance diagram, successfully operate in the former Soviet Union. Most of them are power units with a power of 300 MW, equipped with HTGZ and LMZ turbines. They operate according to a variable electric load curve characterized by deep reductions when undergoing night minimums. Additional extension of the range of power unit adjustment makes it possible to maintain the dispatch load curve and obtain profit for the electric power plant. The objective of this research is to carry out estimated and experimental processing of the operating regimes of the regeneration system of steam-turbine plants within the extended adjustment range and under the conditions when the constraints on the regeneration system and its equipment are removed. Constraints concerning the heat balance diagram that reduce the power unit efficiency when extending the adjustment range have been considered. Test results are presented for the nondeaerating heat balance diagram with the HTGZ turbine. Turbine pump and feed electric pump operation was studied at a power unit load of 120-300 MW. The reliability of feed pump operation is confirmed by a stable vibratory condition and the absence of cavitation noise and vibration at a frequency that characterizes the cavitation condition, as well as by oil temperature maintenance after bearings within normal limits. Cavitation performance of pumps in the studied range of their operation has been determined. Technical solutions are proposed on providing a profitable and stable operation of regeneration systems when extending the range of adjustment of power unit load. A nondeaerating diagram of high-pressure preheater (HPP) condensate discharge to the mixer. A regeneration system has been developed and studied on the operating power unit fitted with a deaeratorless thermal circuit of the system for removing the high-pressure preheater heating steam condensate to the mixer

  3. Combined heat and power generation with a HCPV system at 2000 suns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Filippo; Montagnino, Fabio M.; Salinari, Piero; Bonsignore, Gaetano; Milone, Sergio; Agnello, Simonpietro; Barbera, Marco; Gelardi, Franco M.; Sciortino, Luisa; Collura, Alfonso; Lo Cicero, Ugo; Cannas, Marco

    2015-09-01

    This work shows the development of an innovative solar CHP system for the combined production of heat and power based upon HCPV modules working at the high concentration level of 2000 suns. The solar radiation is concentrated on commercial InGaP/InGaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells designed for intensive work. The primary optics is a rectangular off-axis parabolic mirror while a secondary optic at the focus of the parabolic mirror is glued in optical contact with the cell. Each module consist of 2 axis tracker (Alt-Alt type) with 20 multijunction cells each one integrated with an active heat sink. The cell is connected to an active heat transfer system that allows to keep the cell at a high level of electrical efficiency (ηel > 30 %), bringing the heat transfer fluid (water and glycol) up to an output temperature of 90°C. Accordingly with the experimental data collected from the first 1 kWe prototype, the total amount of extracted thermal energy is above the 50% of the harvested solar radiation. That, in addition the electrical efficiency of the system contributes to reach an overall CHP efficiency of more than the 80%.

  4. Combined heat and power generation with a HCPV system at 2000 suns

    SciTech Connect

    Paredes, Filippo; Montagnino, Fabio M.; Milone, Sergio; Salinari, Piero; Agnello, Simonpietro; Gelardi, Franco M.; Sciortino, Luisa; Cannas, Marco; Bonsignore, Gaetano; Barbera, Marco; Collura, Alfonso; Lo Cicero, Ugo

    2015-09-28

    This work shows the development of an innovative solar CHP system for the combined production of heat and power based upon HCPV modules working at the high concentration level of 2000 suns. The solar radiation is concentrated on commercial InGaP/InGaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells designed for intensive work. The primary optics is a rectangular off-axis parabolic mirror while a secondary optic at the focus of the parabolic mirror is glued in optical contact with the cell. Each module consist of 2 axis tracker (Alt-Alt type) with 20 multijunction cells each one integrated with an active heat sink. The cell is connected to an active heat transfer system that allows to keep the cell at a high level of electrical efficiency (ηel > 30 %), bringing the heat transfer fluid (water and glycol) up to an output temperature of 90°C. Accordingly with the experimental data collected from the first 1 kWe prototype, the total amount of extracted thermal energy is above the 50% of the harvested solar radiation. That, in addition the electrical efficiency of the system contributes to reach an overall CHP efficiency of more than the 80%.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, MARIAH ENERGY CORPORATION HEAT PLUS POWER SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Greenhouse Gas Technology Center (GHG Center) has recently evaluated the performance of the Heat PlusPower(TM) System (Mariah CDP System), which integrates microturbine technology with a heat recovery system. Electric power is generated with a Capstone MicroTurbine(TM) Model ...

  6. Intensification of heat transfer in high-power laser diode bars by means of porous metal heat-sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Derzhavin, S. I.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Mashkovskiy, D. A.; Timoshkin, V. N.; Philonenko, V.

    1999-01-01

    To intensify a heat transfer in high-power emitters based on laser diode bars we propose the use of a heat sink from a porous permeable material cooled by a fluid flow [1-3]. The main advantage of this class of materials is the possibility of removing significant heat flows with compact heat sink. An analysis of the characteristic values of the thermal loads and their relations with the material and liquid parameters drawn from an one-dimensional model of stationary one-sided heat exchange shows the possibility of heat flow removal of more than 1.5 kW/cm 2 at room temperature in a liquid. Methods for improving the effectiveness of the strategy are considered.

  7. Electrical heating of soils using high efficiency electrode patterns and power phases

    DOEpatents

    Buettner, Harley M.

    1999-01-01

    Powerline-frequency electrical (joule) heating of soils using a high efficiency electrode configuration and power phase arrangement. The electrode configuration consists of several heating or current injection electrodes around the periphery of a volume of soil to be heated, all electrodes being connected to one phase of a multi-phase or a single-phase power system, and a return or extraction electrode or electrodes located inside the volume to be heated being connected to the remaining phases of the multi-phase power system or to the neutral side of the single-phase power source. This electrode configuration and power phase arrangement can be utilized anywhere where powerline frequency soil heating is applicable and thus has many potential uses including removal of volatile organic compounds such as gasoline and tricholorethylene (TCE) from contaminated areas.

  8. Advanced coal technologies in Czech heat and power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Noskievic, P. Ochodek, T.

    1998-07-01

    Coal is the only domestic source of fossil fuel in the Czech Republic. The coal reserves are substantial and their share in total energy use is about 60%. Presently, necessary steps in making coal utilization more friendly towards the environment have been taken and fairly well established, and an interest to develop and build advanced coal units has been observed. One IGCC system has been put into operation, and circa 10 AFBC units are in operation or under construction. preparatory steps have been taken in building an advanced combustion unit fueled by pulverized coal and retrofit action is taking place in many heating plants. An actual experience has shown two basic problems: (1) Different characteristic of domestic lignite, especially high content of ash, cause problems applying well-tried foreign technologies and apparently a more focused attention shall have to be paid to the quality of coal combusted. (2) Low prices of lignite (regarding energy, lignite is four times cheaper than coal) do not result in an increased efficiency of the standing equipment by applying advanced technologies. It will be of high interest to observe the effect of the effort of the European Union to establish a kind of carbon tax. It could dramatically change the existing scene in clean coal power generation by the logical pressure to increase the efficiency of energy transformation. In like manner the gradual liberalization of energy prices might have similar consequences and it is a warranted expectation that, up to now not the best, energy balance will improve in the near future.

  9. Electric Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles: Electric-Powered Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a new class of advanced nanomaterial called an electrical metal organic framework (EMOF) for EV heating and cooling systems. The EMOF would function similar to a conventional heat pump, which circulates heat or cold to the cabin as needed. However, by directly controlling the EMOF's properties with electricity, the PNNL design is expected to use much less energy than traditional heating and cooling systems. The EMOF-based heat pumps would be light, compact, efficient, and run using virtually no moving parts.

  10. Measured effects of retrofits -- a refrigerant oil additive and a condenser spray device -- on the cooling performance of a heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Sand, J.R.; Baxter, V.D.; Linkous, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    A 15-year old, 3-ton single package air-to-air heat pump was tested in laboratory environmental chambers simulating indoor and outdoor conditions. After documenting initial performance, the unit was retrofitted with a prototype condenser water-spray device and retested. Results at standard ARI cooling rating conditions (95 F outdoor dry bulb and 80/67 F indoor dry bulb/wet bulb temperatures) showed the capacity increased by about 7%, and the electric power demand dropped by about 8%, resulting in a steady-state EER increase of 17%. Suction and discharge pressures were reduced by 7 and 37 psi, respectively. A refrigerant oil additive formulated to enhance refrigerant-side heat transfer was added at a dose of one ounce per ton of rated capacity, and the unit was tested for several days at the same 95 F outdoor conditions and showed essentially no increase in capacity, and a slight 3% increase in steady-state EER. Adding more additive lowered the EER slightly. Suction and discharge pressures were essentially unchanged. The short-term testing showed that the condenser-spray device was effective in increasing the cooling capacity and lowering the electrical demand on an old and relatively inefficient heat pump, but the refrigerant additive had little effect on the cooling performance of the unit. Sprayer issues to be resolved include the effect of a sprayer on a new, high-efficiency air conditioner/heat pump, reliable long-term operation, and economics.

  11. Catching Fire: An Analysis of Maine's Combined Heat and Power Energy Incentive Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Joshua A.

    This study qualitatively reviews and analyzes Maine's state-level incentive policies and regulations to catalyze the development of renewably fueled Combined Heat and Power (CHP) facilities by utilizing a framework developed by Janet Sawin. The results of the analysis indicate that additional opportunities exist to promote additional renewable CHP plant development through both strengthening existing state policies and passing new legislation. Maine's Renewable Portfolio Standard and Production-Based Incentive pilot program could be expanded in scope and in their level of support for renewable CHP. New policies could be enacted to further accelerate renewable CHP development in the state, such as a Production Tax Credit (PTC) and the creation of a grant program for level 2 feasibility studies within the existing Public Benefits Fund (PBF), Efficiency Maine Trust.

  12. Maximum efficiency of low-dissipation heat engines at arbitrary power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubec, Viktor; Ryabov, Artem

    2016-07-01

    We investigate maximum efficiency at a given power for low-dissipation heat engines. Close to maximum power, the maximum gain in efficiency scales as a square root of relative loss in power and this scaling is universal for a broad class of systems. For low-dissipation engines, we calculate the maximum gain in efficiency for an arbitrary fixed power. We show that engines working close to maximum power can operate at considerably larger efficiency compared to the efficiency at maximum power. Furthermore, we introduce universal bounds on maximum efficiency at a given power for low-dissipation heat engines. These bounds represent direct generalization of the bounds on efficiency at maximum power obtained by Esposito et al (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 150603). We derive the bounds analytically in the regime close to maximum power and for small power values. For the intermediate regime we present strong numerical evidence for the validity of the bounds.

  13. Consideration of Thermoelectric Power Generation by Using Hot Spring Thermal Energy or Industrial Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Keiichi; Horikawa, Daisuke; Goto, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Today, we face some significant environmental and energy problems such as global warming, urban heat island, and the precarious balance of world oil supply and demand. However, we have not yet found a satisfactory solution to these problems. Waste heat recovery is considered to be one of the best solutions because it can improve energy efficiency by converting heat exhausted from plants and machinery to electric power. This technology would also prevent atmospheric temperature increases caused by waste heat, and decrease fossil fuel consumption by recovering heat energy, thus also reducing CO2 emissions. The system proposed in this research generates electric power by providing waste heat or unharnessed thermal energy to built-in thermoelectric modules that can convert heat into electric power. Waste heat can be recovered from many places, including machinery in industrial plants, piping in electric power plants, waste incineration plants, and so on. Some natural heat sources such as hot springs and solar heat can also be used for this thermoelectric generation system. The generated power is expected to be supplied to auxiliary machinery around the heat source, stored as an emergency power supply, and so on. The attributes of this system are (1) direct power generation using hot springs or waste heat; (2) 24-h stable power generation; (3) stand-alone power system with no noise and no vibration; and (4) easy maintenance attributed to its simple structure with no moving parts. In order to maximize energy use efficiency, the temperature difference between both sides of the thermoelectric (TE) modules built into the system need to be kept as large as possible. This means it is important to reduce thermal resistance between TE modules and heat source. Moreover, the system's efficiency greatly depends on the base temperature of the heat sources and the material of the system's TE modules. Therefore, in order to make this system practical and efficient, it is necessary to

  14. Power delivery and self-heating in nanoscale near field transducer for heat-assisted magnetic recording.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Traverso, Luis M; Xu, Xianfan

    2015-03-27

    To keep increasing the storage density in next-generation hard disk drives, heat-assisted magnetic recording is being developed where a nanoscale near field transducer (NFT) locally and temporally heats a sub-diffraction-limited region in the recording medium to reduce the magnetic coercivity. This allows the use of very small grain in the medium while still maintaining data thermal stability. Plasmonic nanostructures made of apertures or antennas are good candidates for NFTs because of their capability of subwavelength light manipulation in optical frequencies. The NFT must simultaneously deliver enough power to the recording medium with as small as possible incident laser power to reduce self-heating in the NFT, which could cause thermal expansion and materials failure that lead to degradation of the overall hard drive performance. In this work, we study the effect of optical properties on the power delivery efficiency of nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas, with the presence of a recording media stack. Heat dissipation and temperature rise in the NFT are also computed to investigate their dependence on materials' properties. The possibility of using alternative plasmonic materials for delivering higher power and/or reducing heating in NFTs is discussed.

  15. Power delivery and self-heating in nanoscale near field transducer for heat-assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2015-03-01

    To keep increasing the storage density in next-generation hard disk drives, heat-assisted magnetic recording is being developed where a nanoscale near field transducer (NFT) locally and temporally heats a sub-diffraction-limited region in the recording medium to reduce the magnetic coercivity. This allows the use of very small grain in the medium while still maintaining data thermal stability. Plasmonic nanostructures made of apertures or antennas are good candidates for NFTs because of their capability of subwavelength light manipulation in optical frequencies. The NFT must simultaneously deliver enough power to the recording medium with as small as possible incident laser power to reduce self-heating in the NFT, which could cause thermal expansion and materials failure that lead to degradation of the overall hard drive performance. In this work, we study the effect of optical properties on the power delivery efficiency of nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas, with the presence of a recording media stack. Heat dissipation and temperature rise in the NFT are also computed to investigate their dependence on materials’ properties. The possibility of using alternative plasmonic materials for delivering higher power and/or reducing heating in NFTs is discussed.

  16. Power delivery and self-heating in nanoscale near field transducer for heat-assisted magnetic recording.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Traverso, Luis M; Xu, Xianfan

    2015-03-27

    To keep increasing the storage density in next-generation hard disk drives, heat-assisted magnetic recording is being developed where a nanoscale near field transducer (NFT) locally and temporally heats a sub-diffraction-limited region in the recording medium to reduce the magnetic coercivity. This allows the use of very small grain in the medium while still maintaining data thermal stability. Plasmonic nanostructures made of apertures or antennas are good candidates for NFTs because of their capability of subwavelength light manipulation in optical frequencies. The NFT must simultaneously deliver enough power to the recording medium with as small as possible incident laser power to reduce self-heating in the NFT, which could cause thermal expansion and materials failure that lead to degradation of the overall hard drive performance. In this work, we study the effect of optical properties on the power delivery efficiency of nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas, with the presence of a recording media stack. Heat dissipation and temperature rise in the NFT are also computed to investigate their dependence on materials' properties. The possibility of using alternative plasmonic materials for delivering higher power and/or reducing heating in NFTs is discussed. PMID:25759907

  17. Quantity, Quality, and Availability of Waste Heat from United States Thermal Power Generation.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-07-21

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJ(th) of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.

  18. Quantity, Quality, and Availability of Waste Heat from United States Thermal Power Generation.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-07-21

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJ(th) of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040. PMID:26061407

  19. Overview of Heat Addition and Efficiency Predictions for an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Reid, Terry; Schifer, Nicholas; Briggs, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    Past methods of predicting net heat input needed to be validated. Validation effort pursued with several paths including improving model inputs, using test hardware to provide validation data, and validating high fidelity models. Validation test hardware provided direct measurement of net heat input for comparison to predicted values. Predicted value of net heat input was 1.7 percent less than measured value and initial calculations of measurement uncertainty were 2.1 percent (under review). Lessons learned during validation effort were incorporated into convertor modeling approach which improved predictions of convertor efficiency.

  20. Heat Pipe Powered Stirling Conversion for the Demonstration Using Flattop Fission (DUFF) Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Sanzi, James L.; Brace, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Design concepts for small Fission Power Systems (FPS) have shown that heat pipe cooled reactors provide a passive, redundant, and lower mass option to transfer heat from the fuel to the power conversion system, as opposed to pumped loop designs typically associated with larger FPS. Although many systems have been conceptually designed and a few making it to electrically heated testing, none have been coupled to a real nuclear reactor. A demonstration test named DUFF Demonstration Using Flattop Fission, was planned by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL) to use an existing criticality experiment named Flattop to provide the nuclear heat source. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center designed, built, and tested a heat pipe and power conversion system to couple to Flattop with the end goal of making electrical power. This paper will focus on the design and testing performed in preparation for the DUFF test.

  1. A transient heat pipe model for a multimegawatt space power application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1989-01-01

    The Argonne Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power generation system has been described previously. In a burst power generation mode, hundreds of megawatts of dc power would be generated for a finite time interval. An accompanying nuclear power generation system would be used to regenerate the spent reactants (hydrogen and oxygen) in this closed system for subsequent re-use. Although the Argonne space power supply was designed to be a closed system in terms of material effluents, it had to reject the waste heat from the fuel cells (which operate with approximately 70 percent conversion eficiency). The heat rejection method included multiple heat pipes operated in parallel to convey thermal energy from the fuel cell coolant for ultimate radiation to space. The transient behavior of these heat rejection heat pumps was not considered earlier. This paper addresses the problem, showing that the heat pipes as conceptually designed also satisfy the stringent transient power generation---heat rejection requirements of the multimegawatt power generation system.

  2. Improving the predictive accuracy of hurricane power outage forecasts using generalized additive models.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Ryong; Guikema, Seth D; Quiring, Steven M

    2009-10-01

    Electric power is a critical infrastructure service after hurricanes, and rapid restoration of electric power is important in order to minimize losses in the impacted areas. However, rapid restoration of electric power after a hurricane depends on obtaining the necessary resources, primarily repair crews and materials, before the hurricane makes landfall and then appropriately deploying these resources as soon as possible after the hurricane. This, in turn, depends on having sound estimates of both the overall severity of the storm and the relative risk of power outages in different areas. Past studies have developed statistical, regression-based approaches for estimating the number of power outages in advance of an approaching hurricane. However, these approaches have either not been applicable for future events or have had lower predictive accuracy than desired. This article shows that a different type of regression model, a generalized additive model (GAM), can outperform the types of models used previously. This is done by developing and validating a GAM based on power outage data during past hurricanes in the Gulf Coast region and comparing the results from this model to the previously used generalized linear models.

  3. The Power Transistor: A Module on Heat Transfer. Tech Physics Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    This module is intended to provide an understanding of the principles related to heat transfer. The objectives are designed to enable the learner to select and install a device for measuring the temperature of a power transistor, determine power ratings, measure the transient response for a power level and its final equilibrium temperature. Other…

  4. 78 FR 55117 - Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft Regulatory Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... COMMISSION Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft Regulatory Guide AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Nuclear Power Plants.'' This regulatory guide (RG) describes methods and procedures acceptable to the NRC staff that nuclear power plant facility licensees and applicants may use to implement general...

  5. Fabrication and testing of thermionic heat pipe modules for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner-Richardson, Kevin; Hartenstine, John R.; Ernst, Donald M.; Jacox, Michael G.

    Fabrication and testing of a preprototype thermionic heat pipe module (THPM), 1127A, successfully demonstrated the first cylindrical converter employing an emitter heat pipe for power input and a collector heat pipe for cooling. Dimensional requirements are established and maintained, and methods to gundrill refractory metal tubing of the required lengths are validated. Assembly, processing, and test procedures and equipment are established and debugged. Post mortem analysis is expected to elucidate the life-limiting corrosion mechanisms at work in the molybdenum/lithium emitter heat pipe. These results are expected to provide the growth and validation of technology necessary to launch fabrication of full-length, full-power THPMs.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Power Law Heating Functions for Quiescent Loops: Stability and Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, P. C.; Winter, H. D.; Munetsi-Mugomba, K.

    2007-12-01

    We present the numerical simulations of quiescent coronal loops with heating functions that are power law functions of pressure and temperature. These simulations are made using a time-dependent, 1D hydrodynamics code with heating functions that are treated as dynamic variables which are constantly re- evaluated during the loops' lifetimes. These numerical simulations provide a stability test for the analytical solutions formulated by Martens (2007, submitted) for the same heating functions. TRACE and XRT datasets are simulated to determine if present observables can provide adequate information to discriminate between power law heating functions.

  7. Low-power microwave-mediated heating for microchip-based PCR.

    PubMed

    Marchiarullo, Daniel J; Sklavounos, Angelique H; Oh, Kyudam; Poe, Brian L; Barker, N Scott; Landers, James P

    2013-09-01

    Microwave energy has been used to rapidly heat food and drinks for decades, in addition to assisting other chemical reactions. However, only recently has microwave energy been applied in microfluidic systems to heat solution in reaction chambers, in particular, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One of the difficulties in developing microwave-mediated heating on a microchip is the construction of the appropriate architecture for delivery of the energy to specific micro-areas on the microchip. This work employs commercially-available microwave components commonly used in the wireless communications industry to generate a microwave signal, and a microstrip transmission line to deliver the energy to a 1 μL reaction chamber fabricated in plastic microdevices. A model was developed to create transmission lines that would optimally transmit energy to the reaction chamber at a given frequency, minimizing energy usage while focusing microwave delivery to the target chamber. Two different temperature control methods were demonstrated, varying microwave power or frequency. This system was used to amplify a fragment of the lambda-phage genome, thereby demonstrating its potential for integration into a portable PCR system.

  8. Vertical channel free convection for a power law fluid with a constant heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, T.F. Jr.; Schneider, W.J.

    1984-08-08

    The development of free convection in a purely viscous non-newtonian fluid under the influence of a uniform wall heat flux is investigated. A finite difference solution is presented of the velocity and temperature profiles for the flow of an Ostwald-de Waele (power law) fluid between two symmetrically heated vertical plates. The flow, temperature and heat transfer characteristics of the channel are presented in a dimensionless manner as related to the generalized Grashof and Prandtl numbers and the fully developed flow range is established. The numerical solutions for the developing flow are shown to approach two classical asymptotes - fully developed duct free convection at low Rayleigh numbers and two independent vertical plates at high Rayleigh numbers. A comparison is made between the results of this theoretical investigation and previously published analytical and experimental work on newtonian and non-newtonian fluids. The results and their application to engineering problems are discussed. The changes caused by the addition of soluble substances to water cause significant variations in the mean flow between the plates and in the outlet temperature.

  9. Low-power microwave-mediated heating for microchip-based PCR.

    PubMed

    Marchiarullo, Daniel J; Sklavounos, Angelique H; Oh, Kyudam; Poe, Brian L; Barker, N Scott; Landers, James P

    2013-09-01

    Microwave energy has been used to rapidly heat food and drinks for decades, in addition to assisting other chemical reactions. However, only recently has microwave energy been applied in microfluidic systems to heat solution in reaction chambers, in particular, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One of the difficulties in developing microwave-mediated heating on a microchip is the construction of the appropriate architecture for delivery of the energy to specific micro-areas on the microchip. This work employs commercially-available microwave components commonly used in the wireless communications industry to generate a microwave signal, and a microstrip transmission line to deliver the energy to a 1 μL reaction chamber fabricated in plastic microdevices. A model was developed to create transmission lines that would optimally transmit energy to the reaction chamber at a given frequency, minimizing energy usage while focusing microwave delivery to the target chamber. Two different temperature control methods were demonstrated, varying microwave power or frequency. This system was used to amplify a fragment of the lambda-phage genome, thereby demonstrating its potential for integration into a portable PCR system. PMID:23843031

  10. Assessment of Rankine cycle heat engines for small solar power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meador, J.T.

    1983-11-01

    Performance evaluations of both ideal and actual Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) and Steam Rankine Cycles (SRC) are made for systems, either available or being developed, that may be candidates in Solar Total Energy Systems (STES). Many organic fluids and turbines (or expanders), especially designed for ORCs, are being used in various current development programs. Only a few representative ORCs are evaluated. Some of the SRCs used with relatively small commercially available steam expanders are also evaluated. Most of the near term development projects of a STES probably will be relatively small, dispersed power, community size installations; therefore the electrical power outputs included range from 200 kW to 10 MW, with maximum cycle temperatures of 482/sup 0/C (900/sup 0/F). Some basic Rankine cycle efficiencies, without recuperation, resuperheating or feedwater heating, are evaluated and compared to Carnot cycle efficiencies when operating between the same limiting temperatures. The thermodynamic processes of a Toluene-ORC and a SRC are studied, including both isentropic (ideal) and actual expansions. Some actual organic and steam Rankine cycle efficiencies are compared to the criterion curves. Some estimates are also make of the potential improvements in performance due to addition of a recuperative heat exchanger and feedwater heaters for the ORCs and the SRCs, respectively.

  11. Design of heat and power recovery systems for energy conservation in chemical plants

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenares Torrealba, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    The heat and power integration problem is formulated as a nonlinear programming (NLP) model using an optimality criterion as a design objective that includes the energy-capital trade-offs for the power cycles. The strategies utilize the Temperature Interval method and permit the efficient use of negative heat deficits to obtain lower cost designs. Also, a technique for the lumping of temperature intervals is developed, which often increases the efficiency of optimization without adversely affecting the solution. Initially, a NLP model is formulated for the integration of the heat engines and heat pumps with the process. The model permits an easy assessment of the alternatives for integration and the potential working fluids. Then, an algorithm is presented for the synthesis of cascade refrigeration systems, integrated with the process, with alternate working fluids, and optimized over a continuous range of operating temperatures. Finally, a nonlinear programming strategy is presented for the synthesis of utility systems that satisfy the heating and power demands of the process at 100 percent efficiency. The utility system is modeled as a cascade of heat engines that exchange heat with the process and among themselves. Mass exchange between the adjacent heat engines produces lower pressure designs and provides heat for the process over a broader range of temperatures for a given power demand. Through mass integration, it was discovered that simple Rankine cycles are adequate to generate the complex utility systems that characterize industrial practice. Process examples are presented to illustrate the utility of these models.

  12. How do we Reconcile the Heat Budget of the Core with the Power Requirements for the Geodynamo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffett, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    Regeneration of the magnetic field by convection in the core places demands on heat flow into the base of the mantle. If the heat flow is too low, thermal convection is shut off and the rate of generation of compositional buoyancy by solidification of the core becomes too low to sustain the geodynamo. Conversely, a large heat flow causes rapid growth of the inner core, so that convection prior to the appearance of the inner core must be sustained by thermal buoyancy alone. The attendant requirements on primordial heat become more severe as the age of the inner core decreases. Present-day estimates of temperature in the core suggest that the heat flow into the base of the mantle is 6 to 12 TW, which is sufficient to supply 1 to 2 TW of power to the geodynamo. However, when this range of heat flow is used in thermal history calculations we obtain a young inner-core age and an implausibly hot core temperature prior to 3 Ga. More reasonable thermal histories can be obtained using a lower heat flow if the power requirements for the geodynamo are substantially reduced (say 0.1 to 0.2 TW). On the other hand, a low heat flow appears to be incompatible with estimates of temperature in the core. There are two ways to reconcile the heat budget of the core with the power requirements for the geodynamo. First, we can add radiogenic heat sources to the core. These additional heat sources would slow the cooling of the core for a prescribed heat flow and extend the age of the inner core. Approximately 200 ppm of K in the core is sufficient to avoid unrealistic temperatures at early times. Alternatively, we can reduce heat loss from the core by accumulating radioactive isotopes into a layer that surrounds the core. Such a layer could form by segregating dense oceanic crust at the base of the mantle or by partitioning radioactive isotopes into a deep partial melt.

  13. Optimization of idealized ORC in domestic combined heat and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybiński, Witold; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2013-09-01

    Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is used, amongst the others, in geothermal facilities, in waste heat recovery or in domestic combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The paper presents optimization of an idealized ORC equivalent of the Carnot cycle with non-zero temperature difference in heat exchangers and with energy dissipation caused by the viscous fluid flow. In this analysis the amount of heat outgoing from the ORC is given. Such a case corresponds to the application of an ORC in domestic CHP. This assumption is different from the most of ORC models where the incoming amount of heat is given.

  14. The development of a solar-powered residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Efforts to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar power for residential heating and cooling are described. These efforts were concentrated on the analysis, design, and test of a full-scale demonstration system which is currently under construction at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama. The basic solar heating and cooling system under development utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating and water heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling.

  15. Applicability of advanced automotive heat engines to solar thermal power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Evans, D. G.; Alger, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The requirements of a solar thermal power system are reviewed and compared with the predicted characteristics of automobile engines under development. A good match is found in terms of power level and efficiency when the automobile engines, designed for maximum powers of 65-100 kW (87 to 133 hp) are operated to the nominal 20-40 kW electric output requirement of the solar thermal application. At these reduced power levels it appears that the automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines have the potential to deliver the 40+ percent efficiency goal of the solar thermal program.

  16. Membrane-based osmotic heat engine with organic solvent for enhanced power generation from low-grade heat.

    PubMed

    Shaulsky, Evyatar; Boo, Chanhee; Lin, Shihong; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-05-01

    We present a hybrid osmotic heat engine (OHE) system that uses draw solutions with an organic solvent for enhanced thermal separation efficiency. The hybrid OHE system produces sustainable energy by combining pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) as a power generation stage and membrane distillation (MD) utilizing low-grade heat as a separation stage. While previous OHE systems employed aqueous electrolyte draw solutions, using methanol as a solvent is advantageous because methanol is highly volatile and has a lower heat capacity and enthalpy of vaporization than water. Hence, the thermal separation efficiency of a draw solution with methanol would be higher than that of an aqueous draw solution. In this study, we evaluated the performance of LiCl-methanol as a potential draw solution for a PRO-MD hybrid OHE system. The membrane transport properties as well as performance with LiCl-methanol draw solution were evaluated using thin-film composite (TFC) PRO membranes and compared to the results obtained with a LiCl-water draw solution. Experimental PRO methanol flux and maximum projected power density of 47.1 L m(-2) h(-1) and 72.1 W m(-2), respectively, were achieved with a 3 M LiCl-methanol draw solution. The overall efficiency of the hybrid OHE system was modeled by coupling the mass and energy flows between the thermal separation (MD) and power generation (PRO) stages under conditions with and without heat recovery. The modeling results demonstrate higher OHE energy efficiency with the LiCl-methanol draw solution compared to that with the LiCl-water draw solution under practical operating conditions (i.e., heat recovery<90%). We discuss the implications of the results for converting low-grade heat to power. PMID:25839239

  17. Membrane-Based Osmotic Heat Engine with Organic Solvent for Enhanced Power Generation from Low-Grade Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Shaulsky, E; Boo, C; Lin, SH; Elimelech, M

    2015-05-05

    We present a hybrid osmotic heat engine (OHE) system that uses draw solutions with an organic solvent for enhanced thermal separation efficiency. The hybrid OHE system produces sustainable energy by combining pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) as a power generation stage and membrane distillation (MD) utilizing low-grade heat as a separation stage. While previous OHE systems employed aqueous electrolyte draw solutions, using methanol as a solvent is advantageous because methanol is highly volatile and has a lower heat capacity and enthalpy of vaporization than water. Hence, the thermal separation efficiency of a draw solution with methanol would be higher than that of an aqueous draw solution. In this study, we evaluated the performance of LiCl-methanol as a potential draw solution for a PRO-MD hybrid OHE system. The membrane transport properties as well as performance with LiCl methanol draw solution were evaluated using thin-film composite (TFC) PRO membranes and compared to the results obtained with a LiCl water draw solution. Experimental PRO methanol flux and maximum projected power density of 47.1 L m(-2) h(-1) and 72.1 W m(-2), respectively, were achieved with a 3 M LiCl-methanol draw solution. The overall efficiency of the hybrid OHE system was modeled by coupling the mass and energy flows between the thermal separation (MD) and power generation (PRO) stages under conditions with and without heat recovery. The modeling results demonstrate higher ORE energy efficiency with the LiCl methanol draw solution compared to that with the LiCl water draw solution under practical operating conditions (i.e., heat recovery <90%). We discuss the implications of the results for converting low-grade heat to power.

  18. Membrane-based osmotic heat engine with organic solvent for enhanced power generation from low-grade heat.

    PubMed

    Shaulsky, Evyatar; Boo, Chanhee; Lin, Shihong; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-05-01

    We present a hybrid osmotic heat engine (OHE) system that uses draw solutions with an organic solvent for enhanced thermal separation efficiency. The hybrid OHE system produces sustainable energy by combining pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) as a power generation stage and membrane distillation (MD) utilizing low-grade heat as a separation stage. While previous OHE systems employed aqueous electrolyte draw solutions, using methanol as a solvent is advantageous because methanol is highly volatile and has a lower heat capacity and enthalpy of vaporization than water. Hence, the thermal separation efficiency of a draw solution with methanol would be higher than that of an aqueous draw solution. In this study, we evaluated the performance of LiCl-methanol as a potential draw solution for a PRO-MD hybrid OHE system. The membrane transport properties as well as performance with LiCl-methanol draw solution were evaluated using thin-film composite (TFC) PRO membranes and compared to the results obtained with a LiCl-water draw solution. Experimental PRO methanol flux and maximum projected power density of 47.1 L m(-2) h(-1) and 72.1 W m(-2), respectively, were achieved with a 3 M LiCl-methanol draw solution. The overall efficiency of the hybrid OHE system was modeled by coupling the mass and energy flows between the thermal separation (MD) and power generation (PRO) stages under conditions with and without heat recovery. The modeling results demonstrate higher OHE energy efficiency with the LiCl-methanol draw solution compared to that with the LiCl-water draw solution under practical operating conditions (i.e., heat recovery<90%). We discuss the implications of the results for converting low-grade heat to power.

  19. Geographic information system (GIS) simulation of emergency power production from disaster debris in a combined heat and power (CHP) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryals, Christopher Shannon

    The objective of this study is to determine a predicted energy capacity of disaster debris for the production of emergency power using a combined heat and power (CHP) unit. A prediction simulation using geographic information systems (GIS) will use data from past storms to calculate an estimated amount of debris along with an estimated energy potential of said debris. Rather than the expense and burden of transporting woody debris such as downed trees and wood framing materials offsite, they can be processed (sorting and chipping) to provide an onsite energy source to provide power to emergency management facilities such as shelters in schools and hospitals. A CHP unit can simultaneously produce heat, cooling effects and electrical power using various biomass sources. This study surveys the quantity and composition of debris produced for a given classification of disaster and location. A comparison of power efficiency estimates for various disasters is conducted.

  20. Sandwich Core Heat-Pipe Radiator for Power and Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc; Sanzi, James; Locci, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation heat-pipe radiator technologies are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide advancements in heat-rejection systems for space power and propulsion systems. All spacecraft power and propulsion systems require their waste heat to be rejected to space in order to function at their desired design conditions. The thermal efficiency of these heat-rejection systems, balanced with structural requirements, directly affect the total mass of the system. Terrestrially, this technology could be used for thermal control of structural systems. One potential use is radiant heating systems for residential and commercial applications. The thin cross section and efficient heat transportability could easily be applied to flooring and wall structures that could evenly heat large surface areas. Using this heat-pipe technology, the evaporator of the radiators could be heated using any household heat source (electric, gas, etc.), which would vaporize the internal working fluid and carry the heat to the condenser sections (walls and/or floors). The temperature could be easily controlled, providing a comfortable and affordable living environment. Investigating the appropriate materials and working fluids is needed to determine this application's potential success and usage.

  1. Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Per F. Peterson

    2010-03-01

    This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

  2. Solar powered absorption cycle heat pump using phase change materials for energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Solar powered heating and cooling system with possible application to residential homes is described. Operating principles of system are defined and illustration of typical energy storage and exchange system is provided.

  3. Reactor Lithium Heat Pipes for HP-STMCs Space Reactor Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2004-02-01

    Design and performance analysis of the nuclear reactor's lithium heat pipes for a 110-kWe Heat Pipes-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters (HP-STMCs) Space Reactor Power system (SRPS) are presented. The evaporator length of the heat pipes is the same as the active core height (0.45 m) and the C-C finned condenser is of the same length as the STMC panels (1.5 m). The C-C finned condenser section is radiatively coupled to the collector shoes of the STMCs placed on both sides. The lengths of the adiabatic section, the values of the power throughput and the evaporator wall temperature depend on the radial location of the heat pipe in the reactor core and the number and dimensions of the potassium heat pipes in the heat rejection radiator. The reactor heat pipes have a total length that varies from 7.57 to 7.73 m, and a 0.2 mm thick Mo-14%Re wick with an average pore radius of 12 μm. The wick is separated from the Mo-14%Re wall by a 0.5 mm annulus filled with liquid lithium, to raise the prevailing capillary limit. The nominal evaporator (or reactor) temperature varies from 1513 to 1591 K and the thermal power of the reactor is 1.6 MW, which averages 12.7 kW for each of the 126 reactor heat pipes. The power throughput per heat pipe increase to a nominal 15.24 kW at the location of the peak power in the core and to 20.31 kW when an adjacent heat pipe fails. The prevailing capillary limit of the reactor heat pipes is 28.3 kW, providing a design margin >= 28%.

  4. Reactor Lithium Heat Pipes for HP-STMCs Space Reactor Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2004-02-04

    Design and performance analysis of the nuclear reactor's lithium heat pipes for a 110-kWe Heat Pipes-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters (HP-STMCs) Space Reactor Power system (SRPS) are presented. The evaporator length of the heat pipes is the same as the active core height (0.45 m) and the C-C finned condenser is of the same length as the STMC panels (1.5 m). The C-C finned condenser section is radiatively coupled to the collector shoes of the STMCs placed on both sides. The lengths of the adiabatic section, the values of the power throughput and the evaporator wall temperature depend on the radial location of the heat pipe in the reactor core and the number and dimensions of the potassium heat pipes in the heat rejection radiator. The reactor heat pipes have a total length that varies from 7.57 to 7.73 m, and a 0.2 mm thick Mo-14%Re wick with an average pore radius of 12 {mu}m. The wick is separated from the Mo-14%Re wall by a 0.5 mm annulus filled with liquid lithium, to raise the prevailing capillary limit. The nominal evaporator (or reactor) temperature varies from 1513 to 1591 K and the thermal power of the reactor is 1.6 MW, which averages 12.7 kW for each of the 126 reactor heat pipes. The power throughput per heat pipe increase to a nominal 15.24 kW at the location of the peak power in the core and to 20.31 kW when an adjacent heat pipe fails. The prevailing capillary limit of the reactor heat pipes is 28.3 kW, providing a design margin {>=} 28%.

  5. Heat pipe space nuclear reactor design assessment. Volume 2: Feasibility study of upgrading the SP-100 heat pipe space nuclear power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, M. S.; Seo, J. T.

    1985-08-01

    This report investigated the feasibility of upgrading the power of the Heat Pipe Space Nuclear Reactor (HPSNR) system design. The report has also discussed the four primary methods for power upgrading: Increasing the thermal power output to the reactor core, pulse-mode operation, improving the heat rejection, and improving the thermal-to-electric energy conversion.

  6. Performance and durability of high emittance heat receiver surfaces for solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Kim K.; Roig, David M.; Burke, Christopher A.; Shah, Dilipkumar R.

    1994-01-01

    Haynes 188, a cobalt-based superalloy, will be used to make thermal energy storage (TES) containment canisters for a 2 kW solar dynamic ground test demonstrator (SD GTD). Haynes 188 containment canisters with a high thermal emittance (epsilon) are desired for radiating heat away from local hot spots, improving the heating distribution, which will in turn improve canister service life. In addition to needing a high emittance, the surface needs to be durable in an elevated temperature, high vacuum environment for an extended time period. Thirty-five Haynes 188 samples were exposed to 14 different types of surface modification techniques for emittance and vacuum heat treatment (VHT) durability enhancement evaluation. Optical properties were obtained for the modified surfaces. Emittance enhanced samples were exposed to VHT for up to 2692 hours at 827 C and less than or equal to 10(exp -6) torr with integral thermal cycling. Optical properties were taken intermittently during exposure, and after final VHT exposure. The various surface modification treatments increased the emittance of pristine Haynes 188 from 0.11 up to 0.86. Seven different surface modification techniques were found to provide surfaces which met the SD GTD receiver VHT durability requirement. Of the 7 surface treatments, 2 were found to display excellent VHT durability: an alumina based (AB) coating and a zirconia based coating. The alumina based coating was chosen for the epsilon enhancement surface modification technique for the SD GTD receiver. Details of the performance and vacuum heat treatment durability of this coating and other Haynes 188 emittance surface modification techniques are discussed. Technology from this program will lead to successful demonstration of solar dynamic power for space applications, and has potential for application in other systems requiring high emittance surfaces.

  7. Additional ECR heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma via the absorption of satellite harmonics of the surface flute modes in a rippled magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, V. O.; Girka, I. O.

    2006-12-15

    A theoretical study is made of the possibility of additional heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma in confinement systems with a rippled magnetic field via the absorption of satellite harmonics of the surface flute modes with frequencies below the electron gyrofrequency in the local resonance region, {epsilon}{sub 1} (r{sub 1}) = [2{pi}c/({omega}L)]{sup 2}, where {epsilon}{sub 1} is the diagonal element of the plasma dielectric tensor in the hydrodynamic approximation, L is the period of a constant external rippled magnetic field, and the radical coordinate r{sub 1} determines the position of the local resonance. It is found that the high-frequency power absorbed near the local resonance is proportional to the square of the ripple amplitude of the external magnetic field. The mechanism proposed is shown to ensure the absorption of the energy of surface flute modes and, thereby, the heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma.

  8. Maximum efficiency of steady-state heat engines at arbitrary power.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, Artem; Holubec, Viktor

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the efficiency of a heat engine operating in a nonequilibrium steady state maintained by two heat reservoirs. Within the general framework of linear irreversible thermodynamics we derive a universal upper bound on the efficiency of the engine operating at arbitrary fixed power. Furthermore, we show that a slight decrease of the power below its maximal value can lead to a significant gain in efficiency. The presented analysis yields the exact expression for this gain and the corresponding upper bound.

  9. Aluminum heat sink enables power transistors to be mounted integrally with printed circuit board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaward, R. C.

    1967-01-01

    Power transistor is provided with an integral flat plate aluminum heat sink which mounts directly on a printed circuit board containing associated circuitry. Standoff spacers are used to attach the heat sink to the printed circuit board containing the remainder of the circuitry.

  10. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  11. High power laser heating of low absorption materials

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.; Talghader, J.; Ogloza, A.; Thomas, J.

    2014-09-28

    A model is presented and confirmed experimentally that explains the anomalous behavior observed in continuous wave (CW) excitation of thermally isolated optics. Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) high reflective optical thin film coatings of HfO₂ and SiO₂were prepared with a very low absorption, about 7 ppm, measured by photothermal common-path interferometry. When illuminated with a 17 kW CW laser for 30 s, the coatings survived peak irradiances of 13 MW/cm², on 500 μm diameter spot cross sections. The temperature profile of the optical surfaces was measured using a calibrated thermal imaging camera for illuminated spot sizes ranging from 500 μm to 5 mm; about the same peak temperatures were recorded regardless of spot size. This phenomenon is explained by solving the heat equation for an optic of finite dimensions and taking into account the non-idealities of the experiment. An analytical result is also derived showing the relationship between millisecond pulse to CW laser operation where (1) the heating is proportional to the laser irradiance (W/m²) for millisecond pulses, (2) the heating is proportional to the beam radius (W/m) for CW, and (3) the heating is proportional to W/m∙ tan⁻¹(√(t)/m) in the transition region between the two.

  12. Integration of Thermoelectric Generators and Wood Stove to Produce Heat, Hot Water, and Electrical Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, A. M.; Mazandarani, P.; Panahi, R.; Behsaz, H.; Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2013-07-01

    Traditional fire stoves are characterized by low efficiency. In this experimental study, the combustion chamber of the stove is augmented by two devices. An electric fan can increase the air-to-fuel ratio in order to increase the system's efficiency and decrease air pollution by providing complete combustion of wood. In addition, thermoelectric generators (TEGs) produce power that can be used to satisfy all basic needs. In this study, a water-based cooling system is designed to increase the efficiency of the TEGs and also produce hot water for residential use. Through a range of tests, an average of 7.9 W was achieved by a commercial TEG with substrate area of 56 mm × 56 mm, which can produce 14.7 W output power at the maximum matched load. The total power generated by the stove is 166 W. Also, in this study a reasonable ratio of fuel to time is described for residential use. The presented prototype is designed to fulfill the basic needs of domestic electricity, hot water, and essential heat for warming the room and cooking.

  13. Heat transfer in space power and propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.; Dunning, J. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    NASA's planned Space Station has projected power requirements in the 75-300 kW range; attention is presently given to the range of power system configurations thus far proposed. These are a silicon solar cell system incorporating regenerative fuel cell or battery storage, with a 10-year lifetime, a solar-dynamic power system with phase-change or regenerative fuel cell energy storage, and a combination of these two alternatives. A development status evaluation is also given for the propulsion systems that may be used by next-generation boosters. These include such novel airbreathing systems as turboramjets, air liquefaction cycle rockets, airturboramjet/rockets, and supersonic combustion ramjets.

  14. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium.

  15. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. PMID

  16. Air-Cooled Heat Exchanger for High-Temperature Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Lustbader, J.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2015-05-06

    This work demonstrates a direct air-cooled heat exchanger strategy for high-temperature power electronic devices with an application specific to automotive traction drive inverters. We present experimental heat dissipation and system pressure curves versus flow rate for baseline and optimized sub-module assemblies containing two ceramic resistance heaters that provide device heat fluxes. The maximum allowable junction temperature was set to 175 deg.C. Results were extrapolated to the inverter scale and combined with balance-of-inverter components to estimate inverter power density and specific power. The results exceeded the goal of 12 kW/L and 12 kW/kg for power density and specific power, respectively.

  17. Coated Particles Fuel Compact-General Purpose Heat Source for Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    Coated Particles Fuel Compacts (CPFC) have recently been shown to offer performance advantage for use in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) and design flexibility for integrating at high thermal efficiency with Stirling Engine converters, currently being considered for 100 We. Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (ARPS). The particles in the compact consist of 238PuO2 fuel kernels with 5-μm thick PyC inner coating and a strong ZrC outer coating, whose thickness depends on the maximum fuel temperature during reentry, the fuel kernel diameter, and the fraction of helium gas released from the kernels and fully contained by the ZrC coating. In addition to containing the helium generated by radioactive decay of 238Pu for up to 10 years before launch and 10-15 years mission lifetime, the kernels are intentionally sized (>= 300 μm in diameter) to prevent any adverse radiological effects on reentry. This paper investigates the advantage of replacing the four iridium-clad 238PuO2 fuel pellets, the two floating graphite membranes, and the two graphite impact shells in current State-Of-The-Art (SOA) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) with CPFC. The total mass, thermal power, and specific power of the CPFC-GPHS are calculated as functions of the helium release fraction from the fuel kernels and maximum fuel temperature during reentry from 1500 K to 2400 K. For the same total mass and volume as SOA GPHS, the generated thermal power by single-size particles CPFC-GPHS is 260 W at Beginning-Of-Mission (BOM), versus 231 W for the GPHS. For an additional 10% increase in total mass, the CPFC-GPHS could generate 340 W BOM; 48% higher than SOA GPHS. The corresponding specific thermal power is 214 W/kg, versus 160 W/kg for SOA GPHS; a 34% increase. Therefore, for the same thermal power, the CPFC-GPHS is lighter than SOA GPHS, while it uses the same amount of 238PuO2 fuel and same aeroshell. For the same helium release fraction and fuel temperature, binary-size particles CPFC-GPHS could

  18. High-power and steady-state operation of ICRF heating in the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Mutoh, T. Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ii, T.; Makino, R.; Nagaoka, K.; Nomura, G.; Shinya, T.

    2015-12-10

    Recent progress in an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating system and experiment results in a Large Helical Device (LHD) are reported. Three kinds of ICRF antenna pairs were installed in the LHD, and the operation power regimes were extended up to 4.5 MW; also, the steady-state operation was extended for more than 45 min in LHD at a MW power level. We studied ICRF heating physics in heliotron configuration using a Hand Shake type (HAS) antenna, Field Aligned Impedance Transforming (FAIT) antenna, and Poloidal Array (PA) antenna, and established the optimum minority-ion heating scenario in an LHD. The FAIT antenna having a novel impedance transformer inside the vacuum chamber could reduce the VSWR and successfully injected a higher power to plasma. We tested the PA antennas completely removing the Faraday-shield pipes to avoid breakdown and to increase the plasma coupling. The heating performance was almost the same as other antennas; however, the heating efficiency was degraded when the gap between the antenna and plasma surface was large. Using these three kinds of antennas, ICRF heating could contribute to raising the plasma beta with the second- and third-harmonic cyclotron heating mode, and also to raising the ion temperature as discharge cleaning tools. In 2014, steady-state operation plasma with a line-averaged electron density of 1.2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, ion and electron temperature of 2 keV, and plasma sustainment time of 48 min was achieved with ICH and ECH heating power of 1.2 MW for majority helium with minority hydrogen. In 2015, the higher-power steady-state operation with a heating power of up to 3 MW was tested with higher density of 3 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}.

  19. High-power and steady-state operation of ICRF heating in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutoh, T.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; , T., Ii; Makino, R.; Nagaoka, K.; Nomura, G.; Shinya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Recent progress in an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating system and experiment results in a Large Helical Device (LHD) are reported. Three kinds of ICRF antenna pairs were installed in the LHD, and the operation power regimes were extended up to 4.5 MW; also, the steady-state operation was extended for more than 45 min in LHD at a MW power level. We studied ICRF heating physics in heliotron configuration using a Hand Shake type (HAS) antenna, Field Aligned Impedance Transforming (FAIT) antenna, and Poloidal Array (PA) antenna, and established the optimum minority-ion heating scenario in an LHD. The FAIT antenna having a novel impedance transformer inside the vacuum chamber could reduce the VSWR and successfully injected a higher power to plasma. We tested the PA antennas completely removing the Faraday-shield pipes to avoid breakdown and to increase the plasma coupling. The heating performance was almost the same as other antennas; however, the heating efficiency was degraded when the gap between the antenna and plasma surface was large. Using these three kinds of antennas, ICRF heating could contribute to raising the plasma beta with the second- and third-harmonic cyclotron heating mode, and also to raising the ion temperature as discharge cleaning tools. In 2014, steady-state operation plasma with a line-averaged electron density of 1.2 × 1019 m-3, ion and electron temperature of 2 keV, and plasma sustainment time of 48 min was achieved with ICH and ECH heating power of 1.2 MW for majority helium with minority hydrogen. In 2015, the higher-power steady-state operation with a heating power of up to 3 MW was tested with higher density of 3 × 1019 m-3.

  20. Optimal welding parameters for very high power ultrasonic additive manufacturing of smart structures with aluminum 6061 matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, Paul J.; Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent solid state manufacturing process that combines ad- ditive joining of thin metal tapes with subtractive milling operations to generate near net shape metallic parts. Due to the minimal heating during the process, UAM is a proven method of embedding Ni-Ti, Fe-Ga, and PVDF to create active metal matrix composites. Recently, advances in the UAM process utilizing 9 kW very high power (VHP) welding has improved bonding properties, enabling joining of high strength materials previously unweldable with 1 kW low power UAM. Consequently, a design of experiments study was conducted to optimize welding conditions for aluminum 6061 components. This understanding is critical in the design of UAM parts containing smart materials. Build parameters, including weld force, weld speed, amplitude, and temperature were varied based on a Taguchi experimental design matrix and tested for me- chanical strength. Optimal weld parameters were identi ed with statistical methods including a generalized linear model for analysis of variance (ANOVA), mean e ects plots, and interaction e ects plots.

  1. Wood chip drying in connection with combined heat and power or solar energy in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Samuli; Holmberg, Henrik; Myllymaa, Tiina; Kontu, Kaisa; Syri, Sanna

    2014-12-01

    20% of the Finnish district heating (DH) power plant fuels are wood-based and the share is increasing. The wood fuel demand probably exceeds the potential supply in the future. The wood fuel drying with waste heat is one profitable opportunity to gain more wood fuel. If the drying energy can be produced with lower primary energy use than combusting the fuel directly, the drying potentially improves the system efficiency. In this study, the drying feasibility in the connection of a combined heat and power (CHP) system, possibly with solar collectors, is calculated. The wood fuel heating can be increased profitably by 6%, using the heat from CHP for drying only when the marginal cost of the heat is low enough, i.e. the electricity price is high enough and there is free capacity after the DH demand. Although the drying is profitable, a larger heat storage can also increase the annual result similarly. The best investment choice depends on the plant properties. Here the optimal system enables 20% DH production cost savings. Solar heat may be profitable, when the solar heat has a 2-3% share of the annual heat demand. However, the dryer or larger storage tank are more profitable investments.

  2. Sulfur Based Thermochemical Heat Storage for Baseload Concentrated Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    wong, bunsen

    2014-11-20

    This project investigates the engineering and economic feasibility of supplying baseload power using a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant integrated with sulfur based thermochemical heat storage. The technology stores high temperature solar heat in the chemical bonds of elemental sulfur. Energy is recovered as high temperature heat upon sulfur combustion. Extensive developmental and design work associated with sulfur dioxide (SO2) disproportionation and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) decomposition chemical reactions used in this technology had been carried out in the two completed phases of this project. The feasibility and economics of the proposed concept was demonstrated and determined.

  3. On introduction of artificial intelligence elements to heat power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dregalin, A. F.; Nazyrova, R. R.

    1993-10-01

    The basic problems of 'the thermodynamic intelligence' of personal computers have been outlined. The thermodynamic intellect of personal computers as a concept has been introduced to heat processes occurring in engines of flying vehicles. In particular, the thermodynamic intellect of computers is determined by the possibility of deriving formal relationships between thermodynamic functions. In chemical thermodynamics, a concept of a characteristic function has been introduced.

  4. Combined solar heat and power system with a latent heat storage - system simulations for an economic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Verena; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    Decentralized solar combined heat and power (CHP) systems can be economically feasible, especially when they have a thermal storage. In such systems, heat provided by solar thermal collectors is used to generate electricity and useful heat for e.g. industrial processes. For the supply of energy in times without solar irradiation, a thermal storage can be integrated. In this work, the performance of a solar CHP system using an active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger is investigated. Annual yield calculations are conducted in order to calculate annual energy gains and, based on them; economic assumptions are used to calculated economic numbers in order to assess the system performance. The energy savings of a solar system, compared to a system with a fossil fuel supply, are calculated. Then the net present value and the dynamic payback are calculated with these savings, the initial investment costs and the operational costs. By interpretation and comparison of these economic numbers, an optimum system design in terms of solar field size and storage size was determined. It has been shown that the utilization of such systems can be economical in remote areas without gas and grid connection. Optimal storage design parameters in terms of the temperature differences in the heat exchanger and the storage capacity have been determined which can further increase the net present value of such system.

  5. Heat-Rate Improvement Obtained by Retubing Power-Plant Condenser Enhanced Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-21

    A utility will only retube a condenser with enhanced tubes if the incremental cost of the enhanced tubes can be offset with reduced fuel costs. The reduced fuel cost is obtained for some units because of the higher heat-transfer coefficient of enhanced tubes. They lead to improved condenser performance measured by a lower condenser pressure and therefore a more efficient power plant. However, the higher haet-transfer coefficients do not always guarantee that enhanced tubes will be more cost effective. Other issues must be considered such as the cooling-water flow reduction due to the increased pressure drop, the low-pressure turbine heat-rate variation with backpressure, and the cooling-water pump and system characteristics. These and other parameters must be considered to calculate the efficiency improvement of the power plant as commonly measured by the quantity known as the heat rate. Knowing the heat-rate improvement, the fuel cost, and the incremental increase of the enhanced tubes from the supplier, the payback time can be determined. This program calculates the heat-rate improvement that can be obtained by retubing a power plant condenser with enhanced tubes of a particular type called Korodense LPD made by Wolverine Tube, Inc. The fuel savings are easily established knowing the heat-rate improvement. All electrical utilities are potential users because a condenser is used as the heat sink for every power plant.

  6. HTRATE; Heat-Rate Improvement Obtained by Retubing Power-Plant Condenser Enhanced Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1990-06-01

    A utility will only retube a condenser with enhanced tubes if the incremental cost of the enhanced tubes can be offset with reduced fuel costs. The reduced fuel cost is obtained for some units because of the higher heat-transfer coefficient of enhanced tubes. They lead to improved condenser performance measured by a lower condenser pressure and therefore a more efficient power plant. However, the higher haet-transfer coefficients do not always guarantee that enhanced tubes will be more cost effective. Other issues must be considered such as the cooling-water flow reduction due to the increased pressure drop, the low-pressure turbine heat-rate variation with backpressure, and the cooling-water pump and system characteristics. These and other parameters must be considered to calculate the efficiency improvement of the power plant as commonly measured by the quantity known as the heat rate. Knowing the heat-rate improvement, the fuel cost, and the incremental increase of the enhanced tubes from the supplier, the payback time can be determined. This program calculates the heat-rate improvement that can be obtained by retubing a power plant condenser with enhanced tubes of a particular type called Korodense LPD made by Wolverine Tube, Inc. The fuel savings are easily established knowing the heat-rate improvement. All electrical utilities are potential users because a condenser is used as the heat sink for every power plant.

  7. Heat-Rate Improvement Obtained by Retubing Power-Plant Condenser Enhanced Tubes

    1994-01-21

    A utility will only retube a condenser with enhanced tubes if the incremental cost of the enhanced tubes can be offset with reduced fuel costs. The reduced fuel cost is obtained for some units because of the higher heat-transfer coefficient of enhanced tubes. They lead to improved condenser performance measured by a lower condenser pressure and therefore a more efficient power plant. However, the higher haet-transfer coefficients do not always guarantee that enhanced tubes willmore » be more cost effective. Other issues must be considered such as the cooling-water flow reduction due to the increased pressure drop, the low-pressure turbine heat-rate variation with backpressure, and the cooling-water pump and system characteristics. These and other parameters must be considered to calculate the efficiency improvement of the power plant as commonly measured by the quantity known as the heat rate. Knowing the heat-rate improvement, the fuel cost, and the incremental increase of the enhanced tubes from the supplier, the payback time can be determined. This program calculates the heat-rate improvement that can be obtained by retubing a power plant condenser with enhanced tubes of a particular type called Korodense LPD made by Wolverine Tube, Inc. The fuel savings are easily established knowing the heat-rate improvement. All electrical utilities are potential users because a condenser is used as the heat sink for every power plant.« less

  8. Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

    2013-10-30

    Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative

  9. New heat exchanger concept for high-power diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonati, Guido; Hennig, Petra; Lorenzen, Dirk; Roellig, Ullrich; Schulz-Harder, Juergen; Exel, K.; Schmidt, Karsten; Meier, A.

    2003-03-01

    In order to achieve a thermally stable diode laser system based on high power diode laser bars, micro channel heat sinks are used to face the dissipated power with a density of 106 W/m2. Passively cooled diode lasers are either lower in power or facing higher junction temperatures. As a matter of principle the cooling with micro channel heat sinks requires a sealing between the heat sink itself and the system around. The leakage of this sealing, normally achieved by O-rings, can be reduced but never avoided. Sensible systems and extreme lifetime requirements, like in the telecom applications, already require passively cooled diode lasers with no water in the inner system boundaries. To achieve a minimized temperature shift in the junction, we developed a new copper based heat sink, spreading the dissipated heat in an optimised manner. Based on this, our further research shows that the higher temperature shift in a passive submount compared with active ones can be tolerated for a system, if the heat resistance to the external water heat exchanger is minimized. For applications either with or without the requirement of a thermo electric cooling element (TEC), we developed a technical solution for a heat exchanger, to keep water out of the inner system boundaries. The thermal resistance is low enough to run up to 12 passively cooled diode lasers on an regular ambient temperature and a minimum of junction temperature mismatch.

  10. Heat tolerant fungi and applied research: Addition to the previously treated group of strictly thermotolerant species.

    PubMed

    Mouchacca, Jean

    2007-12-01

    Heat tolerant fungi are organisms that may perform bioconversion processes and produce industrially important metabolites. They may either be obligate thermophiles or simple thermotolerants. The present document is the continuation of a critical note on thermotolerant fungi erroneously reported in the literature as possessing thermophilic attributes. Fifty strictly thermotolerant taxa are here considered. Some of their binomials have only recently been introduced in the scientific literature. The reported thermotolerant species are grouped according to broad taxonomic categories. The nomenclature of zygomycetous taxa and anamorphic fungi is straightforward, as usually only one binomial is available or only one state is produced in culture respectively. For Ascomycetes regularly producing in culture a conidial state, the name of the sexual state (teleomorph) should be used to designate the organism even when a binomial is available for the anamorph; this prevents the practice of interchangeably using the name of either states of the same fungus. When ascomycetous taxa produce the anamorph regularly and the teleomorph only under specific cultural conditions, the name of the anamorph could be preferentially selected. The goal is to introduce uniformity in name citations of fungi, particularly in the literature of applied research. Each species is reported under its taxonomically correct name, either the original binomial or the latest combined binomial after generic transfer(s). Known synonyms are also specified. Maximum efforts were undertaken to trace updated information on the taxonomic position of these fifty strict thermotolerant species. For each, information on the type material, morphological features distinguishing it from related members of the genus (and when necessary a generic taxonomic assessment) and, finally, salient ecological features including heat tolerance levels are given. For some information on their biotechnological use is also provided

  11. Thermal control of power supplies with electronic packaging techniques. [using low cost heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The integration of low-cost commercial heat pipes in the design of a NASA candidate standard modular power supply with a 350 watt output resulted in a 44% weight reduction. Part temperatures were also appreciably reduced, increasing the environmental capability of the unit. A complete 350- watt modular power converter was built and tested to evaluate thermal performance of the redesigned supply.

  12. Core fusion power gain and alpha heating in JET, TFTR, and ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budny, R. V.; Cordey, J. G.; TFTR Team; Contributors, JET

    2016-05-01

    Profiles of the ratio of fusion power and the auxiliary heating power q DT are calculated for the TFTR and JET discharges with the highest neutron emission rates, and are predicted for ITER. Core values above 1.3 for JET and 0.8 for TFTR are obtained. Values above 20 are predicted for ITER baseline plasmas.

  13. Combined heat and power for drinking water production

    SciTech Connect

    Chellini, R.

    1996-04-01

    ABB Kraftwerke AG, of Mannheim, Germany, is presently involved in two huge projects aimed at supplying electric power and drinking water in the Arabian Gulf. To limit fuel consumption as much as possible, electricity and water are produced in CHP plants. These plants are powered either by gas turbines equipped with HRSGs, or by conventional boilers feeding controlled extraction-condensing steam turbines. The selection of one of the two systems depends mainly on the type of fuel available (oil or natural gas), on the power/water loads through the year and other local factors. The gas turbine-based CHP systems can be setup in a shorter time and feature a slightly higher overall efficiency. The steam turbine solution, once the plant is commissioned, needs less maintenance. In the final analysis, operating costs of the two solutions are equivalent.

  14. Waste heat recovery options in a large gas-turbine combined power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upathumchard, Ularee

    This study focuses on power plant heat loss and how to utilize the waste heat in energy recovery systems in order to increase the overall power plant efficiency. The case study of this research is a 700-MW natural gas combined cycle power plant, located in a suburban area of Thailand. An analysis of the heat loss of the combustion process, power generation process, lubrication system, and cooling system has been conducted to evaluate waste heat recovery options. The design of the waste heat recovery options depends to the amount of heat loss from each system and its temperature. Feasible waste heat sources are combustion turbine (CT) room ventilation air and lubrication oil return from the power plant. The following options are being considered in this research: absorption chillers for cooling with working fluids Ammonia-Water and Water-Lithium Bromide (in comparison) and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) with working fluids R134a and R245fa. The absorption cycles are modeled in three different stages; single-effect, double-effect and half-effect. ORC models used are simple ORC as a baseline, ORC with internal regenerator, ORC two-phase flash expansion ORC and ORC with multiple heat sources. Thermodynamic models are generated and each system is simulated using Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to define the most suitable waste heat recovery options for the power plant. The result will be synthesized and evaluated with respect to exergy utilization efficiency referred as the Second Law effectiveness and net output capacity. Results of the models give recommendation to install a baseline ORC of R134a and a double-effect water-lithium bromide absorption chiller, driven by ventilation air from combustion turbine compartment. The two technologies yield reasonable economic payback periods of 4.6 years and 0.7 years, respectively. The fact that this selected power plant is in its early stage of operation allows both models to economically and effectively perform waste heat

  15. Solar power generation by use of Stirling engine and heat loss analysis of its cavity receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tassawar

    Since concentrated power generation by Stirling engine has the highest efficiency therefore efficient power generation by concentrated systems using a Stirling engine was a primary motive of this research. A 1 kW Stirling engine was used to generate solar power using a Fresnel lens as a concentrator. Before operating On-Sun test, engine's performance test was conducted by combustion test. Propane gas with air was used to provide input heat to the Stirling Engine and 350W power was generated with 14% efficiency of the engine. Two kinds of receivers were used for On-Sun test, first type was the Inconel tubes with trapped helium gas and the second one was the heat pipe. Heat pipe with sodium as a working fluid is considered the best approach to transfer the uniform heat from the receiver to the helium gas in the heater head of the engine. A Number of On-Sun experiments were performed to generate the power. A minimum 1kW input power was required to generate power from the Stirling engine but it was concluded that the available Fresnel lens was not enough to provide sufficient input to the Stirling engine and hence engine was lagged to generate the solar power. Later on, for a high energy input a Beam Down system was also used to concentrate the solar light on the heater head of the Stirling engine. Beam down solar system in Masdar City UAE, constructed in 2009 is a variation of central receiver plant with cassegrainian optics. Around 1.5kW heat input was achieved from the Beam Down System and it was predicted that the engine receiver at beam down has the significant heat losses of about 900W. These high heat losses were the major hurdles to get the operating temperature (973K) of the heat pipes; hence power could not be generated even during the Beam Down test. Experiments were also performed to find the most suitable Cavity Receiver configuration for maximum solar radiation utilizations by engine receiver. Dimensionless parameter aperture ration (AR=d/D) and aperture

  16. Source Distribution Method for Unsteady One-Dimensional Flows With Small Mass, Momentum, and Heat Addition and Small Area Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold

    1959-01-01

    A source distribution method is presented for obtaining flow perturbations due to small unsteady area variations, mass, momentum, and heat additions in a basic uniform (or piecewise uniform) one-dimensional flow. First, the perturbations due to an elemental area variation, mass, momentum, and heat addition are found. The general solution is then represented by a spatial and temporal distribution of these elemental (source) solutions. Emphasis is placed on discussing the physical nature of the flow phenomena. The method is illustrated by several examples. These include the determination of perturbations in basic flows consisting of (1) a shock propagating through a nonuniform tube, (2) a constant-velocity piston driving a shock, (3) ideal shock-tube flows, and (4) deflagrations initiated at a closed end. The method is particularly applicable for finding the perturbations due to relatively thin wall boundary layers.

  17. On the effect of BUM generation enhancement revealed using the scheme of additional heating of ionospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Erukhimov, L. M.; Komrakov, G. P.; Sergeev, E. N.; Thidé, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Wagner, L. S.; Goldstein, J. A.; Selcher, G.

    1997-05-01

    We present measured characteristics of the artificial ionospheric radio emission (AIRE), which were obtained experimentally using additional heating of the ionospheric F-region by O-polarized waves. It is shown that the observed enhancement of intensity of the broad upshifted maximum (BUM) of the AIRE can result from the influence of electrons accelerated in the plasma: esonance region on its generation. An empirical model of the phenomenon observed is developed. It is concluded from experimental results that the BUM has a complex structure and only one of its components produces the above emission enhancement. We show the possibility of using the AIRE in additional heating of ionospheric plasma for diagnostics of artificial ionospheric turbulence and investigation of the features of perturbation propagation along the geomagnetic field lines.

  18. Power enhancement of heat engines via correlated thermalization in a three-level "working fluid".

    PubMed

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Brumer, Paul; Kurizki, Gershon

    2015-09-23

    We explore means of maximizing the power output of a heat engine based on a periodically-driven quantum system that is constantly coupled to hot and cold baths. It is shown that the maximal power output of such a heat engine whose "working fluid" is a degenerate V-type three-level system is that generated by two independent two-level systems. Hence, level degeneracy is a thermodynamic resource that may effectively double the power output. The efficiency, however, is not affected. We find that coherence is not an essential asset in such multilevel-based heat engines. The existence of two thermalization pathways sharing a common ground state suffices for power enhancement.

  19. Estimation and harvesting of human heat power for wearable electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziurdzia, P.; Brzozowski, I.; Bratek, P.; Gelmuda, W.; Kos, A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the issue of self-powered wearable electronic devices that are capable of harvesting free available energy dissipated by the user in the form of human heat. The free energy source is intended to be used as a secondary power source supporting primary battery in a sensor bracelet. The main scope of the article is a presentation of the concept for a measuring setup used to quantitative estimation of heat power sources in different locations over the human body area. The crucial role in the measurements of the human heat plays a thermoelectric module working in the open circuit mode. The results obtained during practical tests are confronted with the requirements of the dedicated thermoelectric generator. A prototype design of a human warmth energy harvester with an ultra-low power DC-DC converter based on the LTC3108 circuit is analysed.

  20. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Fields, Paul R.

    1981-04-21

    An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  2. Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of VVER type reactors at long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of the spent nuclear fuel of VVER-1000 type reactors are calculated during storage time up to 300,000 y. Decay heat power of radioactive waste (radwaste) determines parameters of the heat removal system for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. Radiotoxicity determines the radiological hazard of radwaste after its leakage and penetration into the environment.

  3. How to produce personality neuroscience research with high statistical power and low additional cost.

    PubMed

    Mar, Raymond A; Spreng, R Nathan; Deyoung, Colin G

    2013-09-01

    Personality neuroscience involves examining relations between cognitive or behavioral variability and neural variables like brain structure and function. Such studies have uncovered a number of fascinating associations but require large samples, which are expensive to collect. Here, we propose a system that capitalizes on neuroimaging data commonly collected for separate purposes and combines it with new behavioral data to test novel hypotheses. Specifically, we suggest that groups of researchers compile a database of structural (i.e., anatomical) and resting-state functional scans produced for other task-based investigations and pair these data with contact information for the participants who contributed the data. This contact information can then be used to collect additional cognitive, behavioral, or individual-difference data that are then reassociated with the neuroimaging data for analysis. This would allow for novel hypotheses regarding brain-behavior relations to be tested on the basis of large sample sizes (with adequate statistical power) for low additional cost. This idea can be implemented at small scales at single institutions, among a group of collaborating researchers, or perhaps even within a single lab. It can also be implemented at a large scale across institutions, although doing so would entail a number of additional complications.

  4. Complex additive systems for Mn-Zn ferrites with low power loss

    SciTech Connect

    Töpfer, J. Angermann, A.

    2015-05-07

    Mn-Zn ferrites were prepared via an oxalate-based wet-chemical synthesis process. Nanocrystalline ferrite powders with particle size of 50 nm were sintered at 1150 °C with 500 ppm CaO and 100 ppm SiO{sub 2} as standard additives. A fine-grained, dense microstructure with grain size of 4–5 μm was obtained. Simultaneous addition of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ZrO{sub 2}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and SnO{sub 2} results low power losses, e.g., 65 mW/cm{sup 3} (500 kHz, 50 mT, 80 °C) and 55 mW/cm{sup 3} (1 MHz, 25 mT, 80 °C). Loss analysis shows that eddy current and residual losses were minimized through formation of insulating grain boundary phases, which is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Addition of SnO{sub 2} increases the ferrous ion concentration and affects anisotropy as reflected in permeability measurements μ(T)

  5. Power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory and probability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-03-01

    The finite-time thermodynamic method based on probability analysis can more accurately describe various performance parameters of thermodynamic systems. Based on the relation between optimal efficiency and power output of a generalized Carnot heat engine with a finite high-temperature heat reservoir (heat source) and an infinite low-temperature heat reservoir (heat sink) and with the only irreversibility of heat transfer, this paper studies the problem of power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory, puts forward a model of the coupling heat engine which can be run periodically and obtains the effects of the finite-time thermodynamic characteristics of the coupling relation between chemical reaction and heat engine on the power optimization. The results show that the first order reaction kinetics model can use fuel more effectively, and can provide heat engine with higher temperature heat source to increase the power output of the heat engine. Moreover, the power fluctuation bounds of the chemically driven heat engine are obtained by using the probability analysis method. The results may provide some guidelines for the character analysis and power optimization of the chemically driven heat engines.

  6. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    SciTech Connect

    Mago, Pedro; Newell, LeLe

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  7. Aerodynamic Heat-Power Engine Operating on a Closed Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.; Keller, D. C.

    1942-01-01

    Hot-air engines with dynamic compressors and turbines offer new prospects of success through utilization of units of high efficiencies and through the employment of modern materials of great strength at high temperature. Particular consideration is given to an aerodynamic prime mover operating on a closed circuit and heated externally. Increase of the pressure level of the circulating air permits a great increase of limit load of the unit. This also affords a possibility of regulation for which the internal efficiency of the unit changes but slightly. The effect of pressure and temperature losses is investigated. A general discussion is given of the experimental installation operating at the Escher Wyss plant in Zurich for a considerable time at high temperatures.

  8. Special considerations on operating a fuel cell power plant using natural gas with marginal heating value

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, L. Ng; Chien-Liang Lin; Ya-Tang Cheng

    1996-12-31

    In realizing new power generation technologies in Taiwan, a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant (model PC2513, ONSI Corporation) has been installed in the premises of the Power Research Institute of the Taiwan Power Company in Taipei County of Taiwan. The pipeline gas supplying to the site of this power plant has a high percentage of carbon dioxide and thus a slightly lower heating value than that specified by the manufacturer. Because of the lowering of heating value of input gas, the highest Output power from the power plant is understandably less than the rated power of 200 kW designed. Further, the transient response of the power plant as interrupted from the Grid is also affected. Since this gas is also the pipeline gas supplying to the heavily populated Taipei Municipal area, it is conceivable that the success of the operations of fuel cells using this fuel is of vital importance to the promotion of the use of this power generation technology in Taiwan. Hence, experiments were set up to assess the feasibility of this fuel cell power plant using the existing pipeline gas in this part of Taiwan where fuel cells would most likely find useful.

  9. Evaluating Thermoelectric Power Generation Device Performance Using a Rectangular Microchannel Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, a microchannel heat sink is applied to a thermoelectric power generation (TEG) device and compared with a traditional heat sink. The advantages and disadvantages of using each heat sink in a TEG device are evaluated. The microchannel hydraulic diameter is 5.33 × 10-4 m and that of the macrochannel is 2.13 × 10-3 m. Pressure drops and heat removed in the micro heat sink configuration are obtained for six different mass flow rates for the laminar and turbulent fluid flow regimes. By computationally applying a constant temperature difference between the hot and cold sides of the TEG, the fluid and thermal parameters are considered for both laminar and turbulent regimes in the channels. Furthermore, using the temperature difference through each TEG, the system efficiency is calculated. The results show that the microchannel heat sink gives a higher pressure drop, but the heat flow across the TEG device and the mass flow rate needed to provide the same generated power are less than for the macrochannel heat sink.

  10. The heat supply system for a self-contained dwelling house on the basis of a heat pump and wind power installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemekov, V. V.; Kharchenko, V. V.

    2013-03-01

    Matters concerned with setting up environmentally clean supply of heat to dwelling houses in the resort zone of the Russian Black Sea coast on the basis of air-water type heat pumps powered from wind power installations are discussed. The investigations were carried out as applied to the system supplying heat for an individual dwelling house with an area of around 300 m2 situated in the Tuapse city. The design heat load of the building's heating system is around 8.3 kW. The Viessmann Vitocal 300 AW pump is chosen as the main source of heat supply, and a 4-kW electric heater built into a storage tank is chosen as a standby source. The selected wind power installation (the EuroWind 10 unit) has a power capacity of 13 kWe.

  11. Analysis of closed cycle megawatt class space power systems with nuclear reactor heat sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.; Jones, B. I.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis and integration studies of multimegawatt nuclear power conversion systems for potential SDI applications is presented. A study is summarized which considered 3 separate types of power conversion systems for steady state power generation with a duty requirement of 1 yr at full power. The systems considered are based on the following conversion cycles: direct and indirect Brayton gas turbine, direct and indirect liquid metal Rankine, and in core thermionic. A complete mass analysis was performed for each system at power levels ranging from 1 to 25 MWe for both heat pipe and liquid droplet radiator options. In the modeling of common subsystems, reactor and shield calculations were based on multiparameter correlation and an in-house analysis for the heat rejection and other subsystems.

  12. Power conversion efficiency enhancement in OPV devices using spin 1/2 molecular additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basel, Tek; Vardeny, Valy; Yu, Luping

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the power conversion efficiency of bulk heterojunction OPV cells based on the low bandgap polymer PTB7, blend with C61-PCBM. We also employed the technique of photo-induced absorption, PA; electrical and magneto-PA (MPA) techniques to understand the details of the photocurrent generation process in this blend. We found that spin 1/2 molecular additives, such as Galvinoxyl (Gxl) radicals dramatically enhance the cell efficiency; we obtained 20% increase in photocurrent upon Gxl doping with 2% weight. We explain our finding by the ability of the spin 1/2 radicals to interfere with the known major loss mechanism in the cell due to recombination of charge transfer exciton at the D-A interface via triplet excitons in the polymer donors. Supported by National Science Foundation-Material Science & Engineering Center (NSF-MRSEC), University of Utah.

  13. High Temperature Water Heat Pipes Radiator for a Brayton Space Reactor Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2006-01-01

    A high temperature water heat pipes radiator design is developed for a space power system with a sectored gas-cooled reactor and three Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engines, for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and energy conversion and rejection. The CBC engines operate at turbine inlet and exit temperatures of 1144 K and 952 K. They have a net efficiency of 19.4% and each provides 30.5 kWe of net electrical power to the load. A He-Xe gas mixture serves as the turbine working fluid and cools the reactor core, entering at 904 K and exiting at 1149 K. Each CBC loop is coupled to a reactor sector, which is neutronically and thermally coupled, but hydraulically decoupled to the other two sectors, and to a NaK-78 secondary loop with two water heat pipes radiator panels. The segmented panels each consist of a forward fixed segment and two rear deployable segments, operating hydraulically in parallel. The deployed radiator has an effective surface area of 203 m2, and when the rear segments are folded, the stowed power system fits in the launch bay of the DELTA-IV Heavy launch vehicle. For enhanced reliability, the water heat pipes operate below 50% of their wicking limit; the sonic limit is not a concern because of the water, high vapor pressure at the temperatures of interest (384 - 491 K). The rejected power by the radiator peaks when the ratio of the lengths of evaporator sections of the longest and shortest heat pipes is the same as that of the major and minor widths of the segments. The shortest and hottest heat pipes in the rear segments operate at 491 K and 2.24 MPa, and each rejects 154 W. The longest heat pipes operate cooler (427 K and 0.52 MPa) and because they are 69% longer, reject more power (200 W each). The longest and hottest heat pipes in the forward segments reject the largest power (320 W each) while operating at ~ 46% of capillary limit. The vapor temperature and pressure in these heat pipes are 485 K and 1.97 MPa. By contrast, the

  14. High Temperature Water Heat Pipes Radiator for a Brayton Space Reactor Power System

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2006-01-20

    A high temperature water heat pipes radiator design is developed for a space power system with a sectored gas-cooled reactor and three Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engines, for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and energy conversion and rejection. The CBC engines operate at turbine inlet and exit temperatures of 1144 K and 952 K. They have a net efficiency of 19.4% and each provides 30.5 kWe of net electrical power to the load. A He-Xe gas mixture serves as the turbine working fluid and cools the reactor core, entering at 904 K and exiting at 1149 K. Each CBC loop is coupled to a reactor sector, which is neutronically and thermally coupled, but hydraulically decoupled to the other two sectors, and to a NaK-78 secondary loop with two water heat pipes radiator panels. The segmented panels each consist of a forward fixed segment and two rear deployable segments, operating hydraulically in parallel. The deployed radiator has an effective surface area of 203 m2, and when the rear segments are folded, the stowed power system fits in the launch bay of the DELTA-IV Heavy launch vehicle. For enhanced reliability, the water heat pipes operate below 50% of their wicking limit; the sonic limit is not a concern because of the water, high vapor pressure at the temperatures of interest (384 - 491 K). The rejected power by the radiator peaks when the ratio of the lengths of evaporator sections of the longest and shortest heat pipes is the same as that of the major and minor widths of the segments. The shortest and hottest heat pipes in the rear segments operate at 491 K and 2.24 MPa, and each rejects 154 W. The longest heat pipes operate cooler (427 K and 0.52 MPa) and because they are 69% longer, reject more power (200 W each). The longest and hottest heat pipes in the forward segments reject the largest power (320 W each) while operating at {approx} 46% of capillary limit. The vapor temperature and pressure in these heat pipes are 485 K and 1.97 MPa. By

  15. Prospects for using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.A.; Farrell, W.; Ma, Q.

    1997-09-01

    Third-generation, high-intensity, x-ray synchrotron radiation sources are capable of producing high heat-flux x-ray beams. In many applications finding ways to handle these powers is viewed as a burden. However, there are some technological applications where the deep penetration length of the x-rays may find beneficial uses as a volumetric heat source. In this paper the authors discuss the prospects for using high power x-rays for volumetric heating and report some recent experimental results. The particular applications they focus on are welding and surface heat treatment. The radiation source is an undulator at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Results of preliminary tests on aluminum, aluminum metal matrix composites, and steel will be presented.

  16. Study of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle for Low Grade Heat Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vidhi, Rachana; Goswami, Yogi D.; Chen, Huijuan; Stefanakos, Elias; Kuravi, Sarada; Sabau, Adrian S

    2011-01-01

    Research on supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles has been mainly focused on high temperature applications, such as Brayton cycle in a nuclear power plant. This paper conducts a comprehensive study on the feasibility of a CO2-based supercritical power cycle for low-grade heat conversion. Energy and exergy analyses of the cycle were conducted to discuss the obstacles as well as the potentials of using supercritical carbon dioxide as the working fluid for supercritical Rankine cycle, Carbon dioxide has desirable qualities such as low critical temperature, stability, little environmental impact and low cost. However, the low critical temperature might be a disadvantage for the condensation process. Comparison between a carbon dioxide-based supercritical Rankine cycle and an organic fluid-based supercritical Rankine cycle showed that the former needs higher pressure to achieve the same efficiency and a heat recovery system is necessary to desuperheat the turbine exhaust and pre-heat the pressure charged liquid.

  17. A Thermosyphon Titanium-Water Heat Pipe Design for a Lunar Surface Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, John; Semenov, Sergey

    2009-03-16

    A long titanium-water thermosyphon heat pipe was designed and tested in support of NASA's lunar surface power system. With a {delta}T of 11.6 C, a prototype has been shown to meet the temperature drop specification of 15 C at 400 W and 400 K. The heat pipe is designed to be embedded in a composite radiator panel to spread waste heat delivered by a circulating pumped loop. The major challenge was managing the fluid inventory to balance the conflicting requirements of power capacity and freeze-thaw tolerance. A unique hybrid wick was designed to achieve the required thermal performance and yet store all the working fluid during idle periods in a freeze-thaw tolerant fashion. A non-condensable gas charge was used to boost power capacity at lower operating temperatures. Eighteen prototypes will be built and tested.

  18. A Thermosyphon Titanium-Water Heat Pipe Design for a Lunar Surface Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, John; Semenov, Sergey

    2009-03-01

    A long titanium-water thermosyphon heat pipe was designed and tested in support of NASA's lunar surface power system. With a ΔT of 11.6 C, a prototype has been shown to meet the temperature drop specification of 15 C at 400 W and 400 K. The heat pipe is designed to be embedded in a composite radiator panel to spread waste heat delivered by a circulating pumped loop. The major challenge was managing the fluid inventory to balance the conflicting requirements of power capacity and freeze-thaw tolerance. A unique hybrid wick was designed to achieve the required thermal performance and yet store all the working fluid during idle periods in a freeze-thaw tolerant fashion. A non-condensable gas charge was used to boost power capacity at lower operating temperatures. Eighteen prototypes will be built and tested.

  19. Aerial thermography studies of power plant heated lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2000-01-26

    Remote sensing temperature measurements of water bodies is complicated by the temperature differences between the true surface or skin water and the bulk water below. Weather conditions control the reduction of the skin temperature relative to the bulk water temperature. Typical skin temperature depressions range from a few tenths of a degree Celsius to more than one degree. In this research project, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) used aerial thermography and surface-based meteorological and water temperature measurements to study a power plant cooling lake in South Carolina. Skin and bulk water temperatures were measured simultaneously for imagery calibration and to produce a database for modeling of skin temperature depressions as a function of weather and bulk water temperatures. This paper will present imagery that illustrates how the skin temperature depression was affected by different conditions in several locations on the lake and will present skin temperature modeling results.

  20. Solar tower power plant using a particle-heated steam generator: Modeling and parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Michael; Bartsch, Philipp; Pointner, Harald; Zunft, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the project HiTExStor II, a system model for the entire power plant consisting of volumetric air receiver, air-sand heat exchanger, sand storage system, steam generator and water-steam cycle was implemented in software "Ebsilon Professional". As a steam generator, the two technologies fluidized bed cooler and moving bed heat exchangers were considered. Physical models for the non-conventional power plant components as air- sand heat exchanger, fluidized bed coolers and moving bed heat exchanger had to be created and implemented in the simulation environment. Using the simulation model for the power plant, the individual components and subassemblies have been designed and the operating parameters were optimized in extensive parametric studies in terms of the essential degrees of freedom. The annual net electricity output for different systems was determined in annual performance calculations at a selected location (Huelva, Spain) using the optimized values for the studied parameters. The solution with moderate regenerative feed water heating has been found the most advantageous. Furthermore, the system with moving bed heat exchanger prevails over the system with fluidized bed cooler due to a 6 % higher net electricity yield.

  1. A review of heat stress and its management in the power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Waner, N.S.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of heat stress on plant operator performance is discussed. Sources of heat stress are reviewed, in particular, those unique to the Nuclear Power Industry. Measurement techniques correlating environmental conditions with physiological responses are covered, along with suggested assessment indices to establish criteria for worker health and safety. Available major countermeasures are described and include those categorized as, procedural, personal support systems, and plant betterment/engineering programs. Data, recommended standards, and industry practices are presented as viable guidelines along with references and information resources to assist the reader in establishing and implementing programs for managing heat stress.

  2. A numerical study of the performance of latent heat storage for solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, A. D.

    1985-12-01

    The structure and theoretical foundation of a simulation code for heat transfer and storage in an idealized storage module which forms part of a Brayton cycle solar power system are described. The underlying physical system is shown, and the advantages, drawbacks, and possible pitfalls of latent heat thermal energy storage are discussed. Some possible designs of a latent heat thermal energy storage module are examined. Preliminary results obtained by using analytical approximations which are crucial to 'homing in' on potential system configurations are reported and examined using the simulation code.

  3. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fic, Adam; Składzień, Jan; Gabriel, Michał

    2015-03-01

    Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle), which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle). The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  4. Light weight Heat-Sink, Based on Phase-Change-Material for a High powered - Time limited application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibovitz, Johnathan

    2002-01-01

    When designing components for an aerospace application, whether it is an aircraft, satellite, space station or a launcher - a major considered parameter is its weight . For a combat aircraft, an addition of such a lightweight Heat sink to a high power component, can extend significantly avionics performance at very high altitude - when cooling means are poor. When dealing with a satellite launcher, each pound saved from the launcher in favor of the satellite - may contribute, for instance, several months of satellite life. The solution presented in this paper deals with an electronic device producing high power, for limited time and requires relatively low temperature base plate. The requirements demand that a base plate temperature should not exceed 70°c while exposed to a heat- flux of about 1.5W/cm^2 from an electronic device, during approximately 14 minutes. The classical solution for this transient process requires an Aluminum block heat sink of about 1100 grams . The PCM based heat-sink gives the solution for this case with about 400 grams only with a compact package. It also includes an option for cooling the system by forced convection (and in principle by radiation), when those means of heat dissipation - are available. The work includes a thermal analysis for the Aluminum - PCM heat sink and a series of validation tests of a model. The paper presents results of the analysis and results of the tests, including comparison to the classical robust solution. A parametric performance envelope for customizing to other potential applications is presented as well.

  5. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  6. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Deichuli, P; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Korepanov, S; Mishagin, V; Smirnov, A; Sorokin, A; Stupishin, N

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  7. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  8. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with CombinedHeat and Power

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2009-08-15

    The addition of solar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP) and contribute to enhanced CO2 reduction. However, the interactions between solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO2 emissions and annual energy costs, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program. The objective is minimization of annual energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the California service territory of San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). Contrary to typical expectations, our results indicate that despite the high solar radiation in southern California, fossil based CHP units are dominant, even with forecast 2020 technology and costs. A CO2 pricing scheme would be needed to incent installation of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and no heat storage systems are adopted. This research also shows that photovoltaic (PV) arrays are favored by CO2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

  9. Efficiency, Power and Period of a model quantum heat engine working in a finite time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Mulugeta; Dima, Tolasa A.; Alemye, Mekuannent; Chegeno, Warga

    We take a spin-half quantum particle undergoing Carnot type cyclic process in a finite time assisted by two heat reservoirs and an external magnetic field. We find that the power of the heat engine is maximum at a particular period of the cyclic process and efficiency at the maximum power is at least half of the Carnot efficiency. We further apply the Omega-criterion for a figure of merit representing a compromise between useful power and lost power determining the corresponding efficiency for the optimization criterion to be at least three fourth of the Carnot efficiency. The authers are thankful to the International Science programme, IPS, Uppsala, Sweden for their support to our research lab.

  10. Anode power deposition in quasi-steady MPD arcs. [accelerator anode heat flux measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saber, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    The power deposited in the anode of a quasi-steady MPD accelerator has been measured directly by thermocouples attached to the inside surface of a shell anode which provide a local measurement of anode heat flux. The results over a range of arc currents from 5.5 to 44 kiloamperes and argon mass flows from 1 g/sec to 48 g/sec show that the fraction of the total input power deposited in the anode decreases drastically from 50% at an arc power of 200 kW to 10% at 20 MW, and that anode power is not uniformly deposited in the anode. A theoretical model of the anode heat transfer, including effects of anode work function, electron thermal energy, and anode sheath, can be brought into reasonable agreement with the measurements, provided the effective range of the conduction electrons from within the discharge plasma to the anode surface is properly acknowledged.

  11. Linear Fresnel Reflector based Solar Radiation Concentrator for Combined Heating and Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Aveek; Bernal, Eva; Seshadri, Satya; Mayer, Oliver; Greaves, Mikal

    2011-12-01

    We have designed and realized a test rig to characterize concentrated solar-based CHP (combined heat and power) generator. Cost benefit analysis has been used to compare alternate technologies, which can cogenerate electrical and thermal power. We have summarized the experimental setup and methods to characterize a concentrated solar thermal (CST) unit. In this paper, we demonstrate the performance data of a concentrated solar thermal system.

  12. Performance evaluation of adding ethanol production into an existing combined heat and power plant.

    PubMed

    Starfelt, F; Thorin, E; Dotzauer, E; Yan, J

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the configuration and performance of a polygeneration system are studied by modelling the integration of a lignocellulosic wood-to-ethanol process with an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant. Data from actual plants are applied to validate the simulation models. The integrated polygeneration system reaches a total efficiency of 50%, meeting the heating load in the district heating system. Excess heat from the ethanol production plant supplies 7.9 MW to the district heating system, accounting for 17.5% of the heat supply at full heating load. The simulation results show that the production of ethanol from woody biomass is more efficient when integrated with a CHP plant compared to a stand-alone production plant. The total biomass consumption is reduced by 13.9% while producing the same amounts of heat, electricity and ethanol fuel as in the stand-alone configurations. The results showed that another feature of the integrated polygeneration system is the longer annual operating period compared to existing cogeneration. Thus, the renewable electricity production is increased by 2.7% per year.

  13. Economics of power plant district and process heating in Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1981-04-01

    The economic feasibility of utilizing hot water from nuclear reactors to provide district heating for private residences in Richland, Washington, and space and process heating for nearby offices, part of the Hanford Reservation, and the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant is assessed. Specifically, the practicality of using hot water from the Washington Public Power Supply System's WNP-1 reactor, which is currently under construction on the Hanford Reservation, just north of the City of Richland is established. World-wide experience with district heating systems and the advantages of using these systems are described. The GEOCITY computer model used to calculate district heating costs is described and the assumptions upon which the costs are based are presented. District heating costs for the city of Richland, process heating costs for the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant, district heating costs for the Horn Rapids triangle area, and process heating costs for the 300 and 3000 areas are discussed. An economic analysis is discussed and institutional restraints are summarized. (MCW)

  14. Performance evaluation of adding ethanol production into an existing combined heat and power plant.

    PubMed

    Starfelt, F; Thorin, E; Dotzauer, E; Yan, J

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the configuration and performance of a polygeneration system are studied by modelling the integration of a lignocellulosic wood-to-ethanol process with an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant. Data from actual plants are applied to validate the simulation models. The integrated polygeneration system reaches a total efficiency of 50%, meeting the heating load in the district heating system. Excess heat from the ethanol production plant supplies 7.9 MW to the district heating system, accounting for 17.5% of the heat supply at full heating load. The simulation results show that the production of ethanol from woody biomass is more efficient when integrated with a CHP plant compared to a stand-alone production plant. The total biomass consumption is reduced by 13.9% while producing the same amounts of heat, electricity and ethanol fuel as in the stand-alone configurations. The results showed that another feature of the integrated polygeneration system is the longer annual operating period compared to existing cogeneration. Thus, the renewable electricity production is increased by 2.7% per year. PMID:19758800

  15. Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, CB

    2004-08-19

    Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the sequential production of two forms of useful energy from a single fuel source. In most CHP applications, chemical energy in fuel is converted to both mechanical and thermal energy. The mechanical energy is generally used to generate electricity, while the thermal energy or heat is used to produce steam, hot water, or hot air. Depending on the application, CHP is referred to by various names including Building Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP); Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHPB); Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power (CCHP); Integrated Energy Systems (IES), or Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The principal technical advantage of a CHP system is its ability to extract more useful energy from fuel compared to traditional energy systems such as conventional power plants that only generate electricity and industrial boiler systems that only produce steam or hot water for process applications. By using fuel energy for both power and heat production, CHP systems can be very energy efficient and have the potential to produce electricity below the price charged by the local power provider. Another important incentive for applying cogeneration technology is to reduce or eliminate dependency on the electrical grid. For some industrial processes, the consequences of losing power for even a short period of time are unacceptable. The primary objective of the guide is to present information needed to evaluate the viability of cogeneration for new or existing industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boiler installations and to make informed CHP equipment selection decisions. Information presented is meant to help boiler owners and operators understand the potential benefits derived from implementing a CHP project and recognize opportunities for successful application of cogeneration technology. Topics covered in the guide follow: (1) an overview of cogeneration technology with discussions about benefits

  16. Application of Annular Linear Induction Pumps Technology for Waste Heat Rejection and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Harold E.

    2005-03-16

    The U.S.-sponsored Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) program will require a light weight, efficient, and reliable power generation system capable of a 20+ year lifespan. This requirement has renewed interest in orbiter technological development. Sub-components of the orbiter system are the primary and secondary power conversion/heat rejection systems for both the proposed nuclear reactors and Brayton cycle heat engines. Brayton-cycle conversion technology has been identified as an excellent candidate for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) power conversion systems. The conversion/rejection systems for these components typically utilize pumped molten metal as the heat transfer medium. Electromagnetic (EM) Annular Linear Induction Pumps (ALIPs) are ideal for this purpose as they can operate at moderate to high efficiency, at elevated temperature, do not involve moving parts (solid-state; long life), and require no bearings or seals. A parametric study was performed to develop a suite of ALIP preliminary designs capable of providing specified pressure and mass flow rate ranges for the proposed NaK(78) Brayton-cycle heat rejection loop. A limited study was also performed for the proposed lithium-cooled nuclear reactor heat transport loops; however, the design of these units is still in its infancy. Both studies were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with the MHD Systems’ ALIP Design Code. The studies focused on designing ALIPs that displayed reasonably high efficiency and low source voltages as well as low mass and smallest geometric envelope.

  17. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the fullmore » FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.« less

  18. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the full FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.

  19. Analysis on heat loss characteristics of a 10 kV HTS power substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yuping; Dai, Shaotao; Song, Naihao; Zhang, Jingye; Gao, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Zhiqin; Zhou, Weiwei; Wei, Zhourong; Lin, Liangzhen; Xiao, Liye

    2014-09-01

    A 10 kV High Temperature Superconducting power substation (10 kV HTS substation), supported by Chinese State 863 projects, was developed and has been running to supply power for several factories for more than two years at an industrial park of Baiyin, Gansu province in Northwest China. The system of the 10 kV HTS substation compositions, including a HTS cable, a HTS transformer, a SFCL, and a SMES, are introduced. The SMES works at liquid helium temperature and the other three apparatus operates under liquid nitrogen condition. There are mainly four types of heat losses existing in each HTS apparatus of the 10 kV HTS substation, including AC loss, Joule heat loss, conductive heat, and leak-in heat from cryostat. A small quantity of AC loss still exists due to the harmonic component of the current when it carries DC for HTS apparatus. The principle and basis for analysis of the heat losses are introduced and the total heat loss of each apparatus are calculated or estimated, which agree well with the test result. The analysis and result presented are of importance for the design of the refrigeration system.

  20. Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings at Large University - Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    2013-05-29

    Texas A&M University is operating a high-efficiency combined heat and power (CHP) system at its district energy campus in College Station, Texas. Texas A&M received $10 million in U.S. Department of Energy funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 for this project. Private-sector cost share totaled $40 million.

  1. LPT. Low power test (TAN641) interior. Heating and ventilating pneumatic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Low power test (TAN-641) interior. Heating and ventilating pneumatic and electrical control panel. Contract nearly complete. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. Date: December 19, 1957. INEEL negative no. 57-6198 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Environmental Technology Verification Report: Climate Energy freewatt™ Micro-Combined Heat and Power System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA GHG Center collaborated with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to evaluate the performance of the Climate Energy freewatt Micro-Combined Heat and Power System. The system is a reciprocating internal combustion (IC) engine distributed e...

  3. Carbon Emissions Trading and Combined Heat and Power Strategies: Unintended Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tysseling, John C.; Vosevich, Mary; Boersma, Benjamin R.; Zumwalt, Jefferey A.

    2009-01-01

    Facility professionals continuously search for projects that reduce energy consumption and operating costs so as to directly benefit their bottom line. Many institutions nationwide have contemplated or made investments in combined heat and power (CHP) projects as a life-cycle strategy to minimize operating costs. However, recent sustainability and…

  4. Fuel-Flexible Microturbine and Gasifier System for Combined Heat and Power

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-01

    Capstone Turbine Corporation, in collaboration with the University of California – Irvine, Packer Engineering, and Argonne National Laboratory, will develop and demonstrate a prototype microturbine combined heat and power system fueled by synthesis gas and integrated with a biomass gasifier, enabling reduced fossil fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions.

  5. Cob biomass supply for combined heat and power and biofuel in the north central USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn (Zea mays L) cobs are being evaluated as a potential bioenergy feedstock for combined heat and power generation (CHP) and conversion into a biofuel. The objective of this study was to determine corn cob availability in north central United States (Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota) usin...

  6. Power module packaging with double sided planar interconnection and heat exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Zhenxian; Marlino, Laura D.; Ning, Puqi; Wang, Fei

    2015-05-26

    A double sided cooled power module package having a single phase leg topology includes two IGBT and two diode semiconductor dies. Each IGBT die is spaced apart from a diode semiconductor die, forming a switch unit. Two switch units are placed in a planar face-up and face-down configuration. A pair of DBC or other insulated metallic substrates is affixed to each side of the planar phase leg semiconductor dies to form a sandwich structure. Attachment layers are disposed on outer surfaces of the substrates and two heat exchangers are affixed to the substrates by rigid bond layers. The heat exchangers, made of copper or aluminum, have passages for carrying coolant. The power package is manufactured in a two-step assembly and heating process where direct bonds are formed for all bond layers by soldering, sintering, solid diffusion bonding or transient liquid diffusion bonding, with a specially designed jig and fixture.

  7. Studies on Effective Utilization of SOFC Exhaust Heat Using Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terayama, Takeshi; Nagata, Susumu; Tanaka, Yohei; Momma, Akihiko; Kato, Tohru; Kunii, Masaru; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2013-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being researched around the world. In Japan, a compact SOFC system with rated alternative current (AC) power of 700 W has become available on the market, since the base load electricity demand for a standard home is said to be less than 700 W AC. To improve the generating efficiency of SOFC systems in the 700-W class, we focused on thermoelectric generation (TEG) technology, since there are a lot of temperature gradients in the system. Analysis based on simulations indicated the possibility of introducing thermoelectric generation at the air preheater, steam generator, and exhaust outlet. Among these options, incorporating a TEG heat exchanger comprising multiple CoSb3/SiGe-based TEG modules into the air preheater had potential to produce additional output of 37.5 W and an improvement in generating efficiency from 46% to 48.5%. Furthermore, by introducing thermoelectric generation at the other two locations, an increase in maximum output of more than 50 W and generating efficiency of 50% can be anticipated.

  8. Preliminary design study of an alternate heat source assembly for a Brayton isotope power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strumpf, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a study of the preliminary design of an alternate heat source assembly (HSA) intended for use in the Brayton isotope power system (BIPS). The BIPS converts thermal energy emitted by a radioactive heat source into electrical energy by means of a closed Brayton cycle. A heat source heat exchanger configuration was selected and optimized. The design consists of a 10 turn helically wound Hastelloy X tube. Thermal analyses were performed for various operating conditions to ensure that post impact containment shell (PICS) temperatures remain within specified limits. These limits are essentially satisfied for all modes of operation except for the emergency cooling system for which the PICS temperatures are too high. Neon was found to be the best choice for a fill gas for auxiliary cooling system operation. Low cycle fatigue life, natural frequency, and dynamic loading requirements can be met with minor modifications to the existing HSA.

  9. Split-core heat-pipe reactors for out-of-pile thermionic power systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederauer, G.; Lantz, E.; Breitweiser, R.

    1971-01-01

    Description of the concept of splitting a heat-pipe reactor for out-of-core thermionics into two identical halves and using the resulting center gap for reactivity control. Short Li-W reactor heat pipes penetrate the axial reflectors and form a heat exchanger with long heat pipes which wind through the shield to the thermionic diodes. With one reactor half anchored to the shield, the other is attached to a long arm with a pivot behind the shield and swings through a small arc for reactivity control. A safety shim prevents large reactivity inputs, and a fueled control arm drive shaft acts as a power stabilizer. Reactors fueled with U-235C and with U-233C have been studied.-

  10. Waste-heat disposal from US Geothermal Power Plants: an update

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the more interesting and significant methods that are currently being studied in the US for reducing waste heat dissipation system costs and water consumption are: (1) allowing plant power output to vary with ambient conditions; (2) use of ammonia to transport waste heat from the turbine condenser to air-cooled coils; (3) development of a plastic-membrane type wet/dry tower; (4) marketing of steam turbines that can tolerate a wider range of back pressures: (5) use of circulating water storage to delay heat dissipation until more favorable ambient conditions exist; (6) development of tubes with enhanced heat transfer surfaces to reduce condenser capital costs; and (7) use of evaporative condensers to reduce costs in binary cycles. Many of these projects involve large-scale tests that are now fully installed and producing some preliminary data.

  11. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-11-16

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff

  12. Investigation of heat exchangers for energy conversion systems of megawatt-class space power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilmov, D. N.; Mamontov, Yu. N.; Skorohodov, A. S.; Smolyarov, V. A.; Filatov, N. I.

    2016-01-01

    The specifics of operation (high temperatures in excess of 1000 K and large pressure drops of several megapascals between "hot" and "cold" coolant paths) of heat exchangers in the closed circuit of a gasturbine power converter operating in accordance with the Brayton cycle with internal heat recovery are analyzed in the context of construction of space propulsion systems. The design of a heat-exchange matrix made from doubly convex stamped plates with a specific surface relief is proposed. This design offers the opportunity to construct heat exchangers with the required parameters (strength, rigidity, weight, and dimensions) for the given operating conditions. The diagram of the working area of a test bench is presented, and the experimental techniques are outlined. The results of experimental studies of heat exchange and flow regimes in the models of heat exchangers with matrices containing 50 and 300 plates for two pairs of coolants (gas-gas and gas-liquid) are detailed. A criterion equation for the Nusselt number in the range of Reynolds numbers from 200 to 20 000 is proposed. The coefficients of hydraulic resistance for each coolant path are determined as functions of the Reynolds number. It is noted that the pressure in the water path in the "gas-liquid" series of experiments remained almost constant. This suggests that no well-developed processes of vaporization occurred within this heat-exchange matrix design even when the temperature drop between gas and water was as large as tens or hundreds of degrees. The obtained results allow one to design flight heat exchangers for various space power plants.

  13. Accounting of the Power Balance for Neutral-beam-heated H-Mode Plasmas in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S.F. Paul; R. Maingi; V. Soukhanovskii; S.M. Kaye; H. Kugel; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-08-09

    A survey of the dependence of power balance on input power, shape, and plasma current was conducted for neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Measurements of heat to the divertor strike plates and divertor and core radiation were taken over a wide range of plasma conditions. The different conditions were obtained by inducing a L-mode to H-mode transition, changing the divertor configuration [lower single null (LSN) vs. double-null (DND)] and conducting a NBI power scan in H-mode. 60-70% of the net input power is accounted for in the LSN discharges with 20% of power lost as fast ions, 30-45% incident on the divertor plates, up to 10% radiated in the core, and about 12% radiated in the divertor. In contrast, the power accountability in DND is 85-90%. A comparison of DND and LSN data show that the remaining power in the LSN is likely to be directed to the upper divertor

  14. Radiator Heat Pipes with Carbon-Carbon Fins and Armor for Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed

    2005-02-01

    Technologies for Space Reactor Power Systems are being developed to enable future NASA's missions early next decade to explore the farthest planets in the solar system. The choices of the energy conversion technology for these power systems require radiator temperatures that span a wide range, from 350 K to 800 K. Heat pipes with carbon-carbon fins and armor are the preferred choice for these radiators because of inherent redundancy and efficient spreading and rejection of waste heat into space at a relatively small mass penalty. The performance results and specific masses of radiator heat pipes with cesium, rubidium, and potassium working fluids are presented and compared in this paper. The heat pipes operate at 40% of the prevailing operation limit (a design margin of 60%), typically the sonic and/or capillary limit. The thickness of the carbon-carbon fins is 0.5 mm but the width is varied, and the evaporator and condenser sections are 0.15 and 1.35 m long, respectively. The 400-mesh wick and the heat pipe thin metal wall are titanium, and the carbon-carbon armor (~ 2 mm-thick) provides both structural strength and protection against meteoroids impacts. The cross-section area of the D-shaped radiator heat pipes is optimized for minimum mass. Because of the low vapor pressure of potassium and its very high Figure-Of-Merit (FOM), radiator potassium heat pipes are the best performers at temperatures above 800 K, where the sonic limit is no longer an issue. On the other hand, rubidium heat pipes are limited by the sonic limit below 762 K and by the capillary limit at higher temperature. The transition temperature between these two limits for the cesium heat pipes occurs at a lower temperature of 724 K, since cesium has lower FOM than rubidium. The present results show that with a design margin of 60%, the cesium heat pipes radiator is best at 680-720 K, the rubidium heat pipes radiator is best at 720-800 K, while the potassium heat pipes radiator is the best

  15. Radiator Heat Pipes with Carbon-Carbon Fins and Armor for Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed

    2005-02-06

    Technologies for Space Reactor Power Systems are being developed to enable future NASA's missions early next decade to explore the farthest planets in the solar system. The choices of the energy conversion technology for these power systems require radiator temperatures that span a wide range, from 350 K to 800 K. Heat pipes with carbon-carbon fins and armor are the preferred choice for these radiators because of inherent redundancy and efficient spreading and rejection of waste heat into space at a relatively small mass penalty. The performance results and specific masses of radiator heat pipes with cesium, rubidium, and potassium working fluids are presented and compared in this paper. The heat pipes operate at 40% of the prevailing operation limit (a design margin of 60%), typically the sonic and/or capillary limit. The thickness of the carbon-carbon fins is 0.5 mm but the width is varied, and the evaporator and condenser sections are 0.15 and 1.35 m long, respectively. The 400-mesh wick and the heat pipe thin metal wall are titanium, and the carbon-carbon armor ({approx} 2 mm-thick) provides both structural strength and protection against meteoroids impacts. The cross-section area of the D-shaped radiator heat pipes is optimized for minimum mass. Because of the low vapor pressure of potassium and its very high Figure-Of-Merit (FOM), radiator potassium heat pipes are the best performers at temperatures above 800 K, where the sonic limit is no longer an issue. On the other hand, rubidium heat pipes are limited by the sonic limit below 762 K and by the capillary limit at higher temperature. The transition temperature between these two limits for the cesium heat pipes occurs at a lower temperature of 724 K, since cesium has lower FOM than rubidium. The present results show that with a design margin of 60%, the cesium heat pipes radiator is best at 680-720 K, the rubidium heat pipes radiator is best at 720-800 K, while the potassium heat pipes radiator is the best

  16. Effects of heat exposure in the absence of hyperthermia on power output during repeated cycling sprints

    PubMed Central

    Arimitsu, T; Yunoki, T; Kimura, T; Yamanaka, R; Yano, T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of heat exposure in the absence of hyperthermia on power output during repeated cycling sprints. Seven males performed four 10-s cycling sprints interspersed by 30 s of active recovery on a cycle ergometer in hot-dry and thermoneutral environments. Changes in rectal temperature were similar under the two ambient conditions. The mean 2-s power output over the 1st–4th sprints was significantly lower under the hot-dry condition than under the thermoneutral condition. The amplitude of the electromyogram was lower under the hot-dry condition than under the thermoneutral condition during the early phase (0–3 s) of each cycling sprint. No significant difference was observed for blood lactate concentration between the two ambient conditions. Power output at the onset of a cycling sprint during repeated cycling sprints is decreased due to heat exposure in the absence of hyperthermia. PMID:25729145

  17. Heat transfer analysis in an annular cone subjected to power law variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman Ahmed, N. J.; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Yunus Khan, T. M.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Athani, Abdulgaphur; Anjum Badruddin, Irfan

    2016-09-01

    Present study deals with the analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow behavior in an annular cone fixed with saturated porous medium. The inner surface of the cone is assumed to have power law variable wall temperature. The governing partial differential equations are solved using well known Finite Element Method (FEM). The coupled nonlinear differential equations are converted into the algebraic equations by using Galerkin method. A 3 noded triangular element is used to divide the porous domain into smaller segments. The effects of various geometrical parameters on the cone angle are presented. It is found that the effect of cone angle on the heat transfer characteristics and fluid flow behavior is considerably significant. The fluid moment is found to shift towards the upper side of cone with increase in the power law coefficient. The fluid velocity decreases with increase in the power law coefficient.

  18. Effects of Heat and Momentum Addition Inside and Outside the Compound Sonic Point of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Webb, G. M.; McKenzie, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the effect of heat and momentum addition to the solar wind for a model including the effects of Alfven waves and plasma pressure (proton plus electron pressure). The mass flux per unit area in 1D flow maximizes when the flow speed equals the compound sound speed, including the effects of the Alfven wave pressure. We discuss the analogue of the Laval nozzle for the solar wind flow, and the dependence of the effective nozzle area as a function of radial distance, and the relationship of the nozzle area to the momentum equation and the Mach number of the flow. An analysis is carried out of the effects of heat and momentum addition to the wind, using a thin slice approximation, which leads to Rankine Hugoniot relations for weak deflagrations and detonations (i.e. the combustion Hugoniot). The linearized Hugoniot is used to analyze the effects of small momentum and energy addition to the wind in the thin slice approximation. We obtain the fully nonlinear Rankine Hugoniot equation solutions. The analysis also holds in the presence of Alfven waves, in which the wave energy exchange equation yields the wave action flux conservation law when their contribution to the compound sound speed is taken into account. The effective polytropic index γgamma and flow speed relative to the compound flow speed ahead of the slice play crucial roles in determining whether local acceleration or deceleration results. Some results are at first sight unexpected since γgamma for Alfven waves ranges from -1/2 (in sub-Alfvenic flow) to 3/2 in super-Alfvenic flow.

  19. Conceptual Trade Study of General Purpose Heat Source Powered Stirling Converter Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turpin, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    This Technical Manual describes a parametric study of general purpose heat source (GPHS) powered Stirling converter configurations. This study was performed in support of MSFC s efforts to establish the capability to perform non-nuclear system level testing and integration of radioisotope power systems. Six different GPHS stack configurations at a total of three different power levels (80, 250, and 500 W(sub e) were analyzed. The thermal profiles of the integrated GPHS modules (for each configuration) were calculated to determine maximum temperatures for comparison to allowable material limits. Temperature profiles for off-nominal power conditions were also assessed in order to better understand how power demands from the Stirling engine impact the performance of a given configuration.

  20. Microwave heating power distribution in electron-cyclotron resonance processing plasmas, experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, S.R.; Eddy, C. Jr.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.; Slinker, S.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-12-31

    The authors are currently investigating the mechanisms of microwave power absorption in an ECR plasma. The microwave electric field is detected with an antenna at the end of a shielded co-ax cable, connected to a bolometer for power measurements. Initial measurements have been 1-D along the axis of the plasma chamber. Later, 3-D profiles will be made of the microwave heating power distribution. A comparison of the experimental results with the theoretical microwave absorption are presented. A ray tracing analysis of the propagating right hand wave are given, including both collisional and collisionless absorption. Mode conversion effects are studied to explain why most of the power is absorbed at the entry window, especially the L wave power.

  1. Balance-of-plant options for the Heat-Pipe Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Berte, M.; Capell, B.

    1997-09-01

    The Heat-Pipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term, low-cost space fission power system with the potential for utilizing various option for balance-of-plant options. The following options have been studied: a low-power thermoelectric design (14-kWe output), a small Brayton cycle system (60--75 kWe), and a large Brayton cycle system (250 kWe). These systems were analyzed on a preliminary basis, including mass, volume, and structure calculations. These analyses have shown that the HPS system can provide power outputs from 10--250 kWe with specific powers of {approximately} 14 W/kg for a 14-kWe model to {approximately} 100 W/kg for a 250-kWe model. The system designs considered in this study utilize a common component base to permit easy expansion and development.

  2. Space and Terrestrial Power System Integration Optimization Code BRMAPS for Gas Turbine Space Power Plants With Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    In view of the difficult times the US and global economies are experiencing today, funds for the development of advanced fission reactors nuclear power systems for space propulsion and planetary surface applications are currently not available. However, according to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 the U.S. needs to invest in developing fission reactor technology for ground based terrestrial power plants. Such plants would make a significant contribution toward drastic reduction of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions and associated global warming. To accomplish this goal the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project (NGNP) has been established by DOE under the Generation IV Nuclear Systems Initiative. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was designated as the lead in the development of VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) and HTGR (High Temperature Gas Reactor) technology to be integrated with MMW (multi-megawatt) helium gas turbine driven electric power AC generators. However, the advantages of transmitting power in high voltage DC form over large distances are also explored in the seminar lecture series. As an attractive alternate heat source the Liquid Fluoride Reactor (LFR), pioneered at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) in the mid 1960's, would offer much higher energy yields than current nuclear plants by using an inherently safe energy conversion scheme based on the Thorium --> U233 fuel cycle and a fission process with a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. The power plants are to be sized to meet electric power demand during peak periods and also for providing thermal energy for hydrogen (H2) production during "off peak" periods. This approach will both supply electric power by using environmentally clean nuclear heat which does not generate green house gases, and also provide a clean fuel H2 for the future, when, due to increased global demand and the decline in discovering new deposits, our supply of liquid fossil fuels will have been used up. This is

  3. Effect of collisional heat transfer in ICRF power modulation experiment on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; D'Inca, R.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, Vl. V.; Brambilla, M.; Schneider, P.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-12

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating experiments were performed in D-H plasmas at various H concentrations on ASDEX Upgrade. The rf power was modulated to measure the electron power deposition profile from electron temperature modulation. To minimize the contribution from indirect collisional heating and the effect of radial transport, the rf power was modulated at 50 Hz. However, peaking of electron temperature modulation was still observed around the hydrogen cyclotron resonance indicating collisional heating contribution. Time dependent simulation of the hydrogen distribution function was performed for the discharges, using the full-wave code AORSA (E.F. Jaeger, et al., Phys. Plasmas, Vol. 8, page 1573 (2001)) coupled to the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D (R.W. Harvey, et al., Proc. IAEA (1992)). In the present experimental conditions, it was found that modulation of the collisional heating was comparable to that of direct wave damping. Impact of radial transport was also analyzed and found to appreciably smear out the modulation profile and reduce the phase delay.

  4. Effect of collisional heat transfer in ICRF power modulation experiment on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; D'Inca, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, Vl. V.; Brambilla, M.; van Eester, D.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lerche, E. A.; Schneider, P.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating experiments were performed in D-H plasmas at various H concentrations on ASDEX Upgrade. The rf power was modulated to measure the electron power deposition profile from electron temperature modulation. To minimize the contribution from indirect collisional heating and the effect of radial transport, the rf power was modulated at 50 Hz. However, peaking of electron temperature modulation was still observed around the hydrogen cyclotron resonance indicating collisional heating contribution. Time dependent simulation of the hydrogen distribution function was performed for the discharges, using the full-wave code AORSA (E.F. Jaeger, et al., Phys. Plasmas, Vol. 8, page 1573 (2001)) coupled to the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D (R.W. Harvey, et al., Proc. IAEA (1992)). In the present experimental conditions, it was found that modulation of the collisional heating was comparable to that of direct wave damping. Impact of radial transport was also analyzed and found to appreciably smear out the modulation profile and reduce the phase delay.

  5. A Conceptual Design Study on the Application of Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Technology to the Solar Thermal Power Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Robertson, C. S.; Ehde, C. L.; Divakaruni, S. M.; Stacy, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    Alkali metal heat transfer technology was used in the development of conceptual designs for the transport and storage of sensible and latent heat thermal energy in distributed concentrator, solar Stirling power conversion systems at a power level of 15 kWe per unit. Both liquid metal pumped loop and heat pipe thermal transport were considered; system configurations included: (1) an integrated, focal mounted sodium heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with latent heat thermal energy storage; (2) a liquid sodium pumped loop with the latent heat storage, Stirling engine-generator, pump and valves located on the back side of the concentrator; and (3) similar pumped loops serving several concentrators with more centralized power conversion and storage. The focus mounted HPSR was most efficient, lightest and lowest in estimated cost. Design confirmation testing indicated satisfactory performance at all angles of inclination of the primary heat pipes to be used in the solar receiver.

  6. Design, development and testing of a solar-powered multi-family residential size prototype turbocompressor heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    A program described to design, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing of a prototype solar-powered Rankine cycle turbocompressor heat pump module for a multi-family residential building is presented. A solar system designed to use the turbocompressor heat pump module including all of the subsystems required and the various system operating modes is described in Section I. Section II includes the preliminary design analyses conducted to select the heat pump module components and operating features, working fluid, configuration, size and performance goals, and estimated performance levels in the cooling and heating modes. Section III provides a detailed description of the other subsystems and components required for a complete solar installation. Using realistic performance and cost characteristics for all subsystems, the seasonal performance of the UTC heat pump is described in various US locations. In addition, the estimated energy savings and an assessment of the economic viability of the solar system is presented in Section III. The detailed design of the heat pump module and the arrangement of components and controls selected to conduct the laboratory performance tests are described in Section IV. Section V provides a description of the special laboratory test facility, including the subsystems to simulate the collectors and storage tanks for building load and ambient conditions and the instrumentation, monitoring, and data acquisition equipment. The test results and sample computer analyses and comparisons with predicted performance levels are presented in Section VI. Various appendices provide supplementary and background information concerning working fluid selection (A), configuration selection (B), capacity control concepts (C), building models (D), computer programs used to determine component and system performance and total system economics (E), and weather data (F).

  7. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2016-03-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  8. A Comparison of Coolant Options for Brayton Power Conversion Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siamidis, John; Mason, Lee S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power applications. The Brayton Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Sodium potassium (NaK) and H2O are two coolant working fluids that have been investigated in the design of a pumped loop and heat pipe space HRS. In general NaK systems are high temperature (300 to 1000 K) low pressure systems, and H2O systems are low temperature (300 to 600 K) high pressure systems. NaK is an alkali metal with health and safety hazards that require special handling procedures. On the other hand, H2O is a common fluid, with no health hazards and no special handling procedures. This paper compares NaK and H2O for the HRS pumped loop coolant working fluid. A detailed Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) analytical model, HRS_Opt, was developed to evaluate the various HRS design parameters. It is capable of analyzing NaK or H2O coolant, parallel or series flow configurations, and numerous combinations of other key parameters (heat pipe spacing, diameter and radial flux, radiator facesheet thickness, fluid duct system pressure drop, system rejected power, etc.) of the HRS. This paper compares NaK against water for the HRS coolant working fluid with respect to the relative mass, performance, design and implementation issues between the two fluids.

  9. A Comparison of Coolant Options for Brayton Power Conversion Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Siamidis, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power applications. The Brayton Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Sodium potassium (NaK) and H2O are two coolant working fluids that have been investigated in the design of a pumped loop and heat pipe space HRS. In general NaK systems are high temperature (300 to 1000 K) low pressure systems, and H2O systems are low temperature (300 to 600 K) high pressure systems. NaK is an alkali metal with health and safety hazards that require special handling procedures. On the other hand, H2O is a common fluid, with no health hazards and no special handling procedures. This paper compares NaK and H20 for the HRS pumped loop coolant working fluid. A detailed Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) analytical model, HRS_Opt, was developed to evaluate the various HRS design parameters. It is capable of analyzing NaK or H2O coolant, parallel or series flow configurations, and numerous combinations of other key parameters (heat pipe spacing, diameter and radial flux, radiator facesheet thickness, fluid duct system pressure drop, system rejected power, etc.) of the HRS. This paper compares NaK against water for the HRS coolant working fluid with respect to the relative mass, performance, design and implementation issues between the two fluids.

  10. A Comparison of Coolant Options for Brayton Power Conversion Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siamidis, John; Mason, Lee

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power applications. The Brayton Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Sodium potassium (NaK) and H2O are two coolant working fluids that have been investigated in the design of a pumped loop and heat pipe space HRS. In general NaK systems are high temperature (300 to 1000 K) low pressure systems, and H2O systems are low temperature (300 to 600 K) high pressure systems. NaK is an alkali metal with health and safety hazards that require special handling procedures. On the other hand, H2O is a common fluid, with no health hazards and no special handling procedures. This paper compares NaK and H2O for the HRS pumped loop coolant working fluid. A detailed excel analytical model, HRS_Opt, was developed to evaluate the various HRS design parameters. It is capable of analyzing NaK or H2O coolant, parallel or series flow configurations, and numerous combinations of other key parameters (heat pipe spacing, diameter and radial flux, radiator facesheet thickness, fluid duct system pressure drop, system rejected power, etc.) of the HRS. This paper compares NaK against water for the HRS coolant working fluid with respect to the relative mass, performance, design and implementation issues between the two fluids.

  11. A Comparison of Coolant Options for Brayton Power Conversion Heat Rejection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Siamidis, John; Mason, Lee

    2006-01-20

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power applications. The Brayton Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Sodium potassium (NaK) and H2O are two coolant working fluids that have been investigated in the design of a pumped loop and heat pipe space HRS. In general NaK systems are high temperature (300 to 1000 K) low pressure systems, and H2O systems are low temperature (300 to 600 K) high pressure systems. NaK is an alkali metal with health and safety hazards that require special handling procedures. On the other hand, H2O is a common fluid, with no health hazards and no special handling procedures. This paper compares NaK and H2O for the HRS pumped loop coolant working fluid. A detailed excel analytical model, HRS{sub O}pt, was developed to evaluate the various HRS design parameters. It is capable of analyzing NaK or H2O coolant, parallel or series flow configurations, and numerous combinations of other key parameters (heat pipe spacing, diameter and radial flux, radiator facesheet thickness, fluid duct system pressure drop, system rejected power, etc.) of the HRS. This paper compares NaK against water for the HRS coolant working fluid with respect to the relative mass, performance, design and implementation issues between the two fluids.

  12. Electricity and combined heat and power from municipal solid waste; theoretically optimal investment decision time and emissions trading implications.

    PubMed

    Tolis, Athanasios; Rentizelas, Athanasios; Aravossis, Konstantin; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias

    2010-11-01

    Waste management has become a great social concern for modern societies. Landfill emissions have been identified among the major contributors of global warming and climate changes with significant impact in national economies. The energy industry constitutes an additional greenhouse gas emitter, while at the same time it is characterized by significant costs and uncertain fuel prices. The above implications have triggered different policies and measures worldwide to address the management of municipal solid wastes on the one hand and the impacts from energy production on the other. Emerging methods of energy recovery from waste may address both concerns simultaneously. In this work a comparative study of co-generation investments based on municipal solid waste is presented, focusing on the evolution of their economical performance over time. A real-options algorithm has been adopted investigating different options of energy recovery from waste: incineration, gasification and landfill biogas exploitation. The financial contributors are identified and the impact of greenhouse gas trading is analysed in terms of financial yields, considering landfilling as the baseline scenario. The results indicate an advantage of combined heat and power over solely electricity production. Gasification, has failed in some European installations. Incineration on the other hand, proves to be more attractive than the competing alternatives, mainly due to its higher power production efficiency, lower investment costs and lower emission rates. Although these characteristics may not drastically change over time, either immediate or irreversible investment decisions might be reconsidered under the current selling prices of heat, power and CO(2) allowances. PMID:20516003

  13. Electricity and combined heat and power from municipal solid waste; theoretically optimal investment decision time and emissions trading implications.

    PubMed

    Tolis, Athanasios; Rentizelas, Athanasios; Aravossis, Konstantin; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias

    2010-11-01

    Waste management has become a great social concern for modern societies. Landfill emissions have been identified among the major contributors of global warming and climate changes with significant impact in national economies. The energy industry constitutes an additional greenhouse gas emitter, while at the same time it is characterized by significant costs and uncertain fuel prices. The above implications have triggered different policies and measures worldwide to address the management of municipal solid wastes on the one hand and the impacts from energy production on the other. Emerging methods of energy recovery from waste may address both concerns simultaneously. In this work a comparative study of co-generation investments based on municipal solid waste is presented, focusing on the evolution of their economical performance over time. A real-options algorithm has been adopted investigating different options of energy recovery from waste: incineration, gasification and landfill biogas exploitation. The financial contributors are identified and the impact of greenhouse gas trading is analysed in terms of financial yields, considering landfilling as the baseline scenario. The results indicate an advantage of combined heat and power over solely electricity production. Gasification, has failed in some European installations. Incineration on the other hand, proves to be more attractive than the competing alternatives, mainly due to its higher power production efficiency, lower investment costs and lower emission rates. Although these characteristics may not drastically change over time, either immediate or irreversible investment decisions might be reconsidered under the current selling prices of heat, power and CO(2) allowances.

  14. Performance analysis of ORC power generation system with low-temperature waste heat of aluminum reduction cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqi; Zhou, Naijun; Jing, Guo

    Performance of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system to recover low-temperature waste heat from aluminum reduction cell was analyzed. The temperature of waste heat is 80°C-200°C and the flow rate is 3×105m3/h. The pinch temperature difference between waste heat and working fluids is 10°C. The results show that there is optimal evaporating temperature for maximum net power under the same pinch point. For heat source temperature range of 80°C-140°C and 150°C-170°C, the working fluid given biggest net power is R227ea and R236fa, respectively. When the temperature is higher than 180°C, R236ea generates the biggest net power. The variation of heat source temperature has important effect on net power. When the temperature decreases 10%, the net power will deviate 30% from the maximum value.

  15. Energy coupling and plume dynamics during high power laser heating of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. |

    1997-05-01

    High power laser heating of metals was studied utilizing experimental and numerical methods with an emphasis on the laser energy coupling with a target and on the dynamics of the laser generated vapor flow. Rigorous theoretical modeling of the heating, melting, and evaporation of metals due to laser radiation with a power density below the plasma shielding threshold was carried out. Experimentally, the probe beam deflection technique was utilized to measure the propagation of a laser induced shock wave. The effects of a cylindrical cavity in a metal surface on the laser energy coupling with a solid were investigated utilizing photothermal deflection measurements. A numerical calculation of target temperature and photothermal deflection was performed to compare with the measured results. Reflection of the heating laser beam inside the cavity was found to increase the photothermal deflection amplitude significantly and to enhance the overall energy coupling between a heating laser beam and a solid. Next, unsteady vaporization of metals due to nanosecond pulsed laser heating with an ambient gas at finite pressure was analyzed with a one dimensional thermal evaporation model for target heating and one dimensional compressible flow equations for inviscid fluid for the vapor flow. Lastly, the propagation of a shock wave during excimer laser heating of aluminum was measured with the probe beam deflection technique. The transit time of the shock wave was measured at the elevation of the probe beam above the target surface; these results were compared with the predicted behavior using ideal blast wave theory. The propagation of a gaseous material plume was also observed from the deflection of the probe beam at later times.

  16. Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of VVER type reactors at long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of the spent nuclear fuel of VVER-1000 type reactors are calculated during storage time up to 300,000 y. Decay heat power of radioactive waste (radwaste) determines parameters of the heat removal system for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. Radiotoxicity determines the radiological hazard of radwaste after its leakage and penetration into the environment. PMID:16381764

  17. 3kW Stirling engine for power and heat production

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, J.E.; Bovin, J.; Carlsen, H.

    1996-12-31

    A new 3 kW Beta type Stirling engine has been developed. The engine uses Natural gas as fuel, and it is designed for use as a small combined heat and power plant for single family houses. The electrical power is supplied to the grid. The engine is made as a hermetic device, where the crank mechanism and the alternator are built into a pressurized crank casing. The engine produce 3 kW of shaft power corresponding to 2.4 kW of electric power. The heat input is 10 kW corresponding to a shaft efficiency of 30%, and an electric efficiency of 24%. Helium at 8 MPa mean pressure is used as working gas. The crank mechanism is a combination of an upper- and lower yoke, each forming the half of a Ross mechanism. The upper yoke is linked to the displacer piston and the lower yoke is linked to the working piston. The design gives an approximately linear couple point curve, which eliminates guiding forces on the pistons and the need for X-heads. Grease lubricated needle and ball bearings are used in the kinematic crank mechanism. The burner includes an air preheater and a water jacket, which makes it possible to utilize nearly all of the heat from the combustion gases. The performance of the engine has been tested as a function of mean pressure and hot and cold temperature, and emissions and noise have been measured.

  18. Demonstration of a Martian Surface Power System Sodium Boiler Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Williams, Rube; Best, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    Texas A&M University designed, built, and tested a sodium boiler for Los Alamos National Laboratory. The boiler is a candidate subsystem for a 3 kWe Mars surface power reactor. A sodium boiler has been proposed to enhance transfer of thermal energy between the heat pipe cooled reactor core and the Stirling engine heater head. The heat transfer mechanism, and its efficiency, is important to the overall efficiency of the reactor power system. Uncertainty regarding the performance of the sodium heat exchanger, specifically boiling and condensing behavior, particularly in Martian gravity, led LANL to ask the Center for Space Power (CSP) at Texas A&M University to measure the effectiveness of such a device. Data included liquid and vapor sodium temperatures within the boiler, wall temperatures, and calorimetry data. Visualization of the sodium was provided by two quartz windows that allowed experimenters to see the sodium surface and the condensing head section. The boiler was tested to 1540 watts input power and 550 °C sodium pool temperature before braze failures caused experiment termination.

  19. Experimental study on high-power LEDs integrated with micro heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Cong-ming; Zhou, Chuan-peng; Luo, Yi; Hamidnia, Mohammad; Wang, Xiao-dong; You, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Micro heat pipe (MHP) is applied to implement the efficient heat transfer of light emitting diode (LED) device. The fabrication of MHP is based on micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) technique, 15 micro grooves were etched on one side of silicon (Si) substrate, which was then packaged with aluminum heat sink to form an MHP. On the other side of Si substrate, three LED chips were fixed by die bonding. Then experiments were performed to study the thermal performance of this LED device. The results show that the LED device with higher filling ratio is better when the input power is 1.0 W; with the increase of input power, the optimum filling ratio changes from 30% to 48%, and the time reaching stable state is reduced; when the input power is equal to 2.5 W, only the LED device with filling ratio of 48% can work normally. So integrating MHP into high-power LED device can implement the effective control of junction temperature.

  20. Integrated bioenergy complex for the production of power, heat and bio-ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Taviani, M.; Chiaramonti, D.; Tondi, G.; Grassi, G.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper an integrated bioenergy complex for the production of power, heat and bio-ethanol is presented. Ethanol, in fact, has been recognized as a high-quality transportation fuel. The reduction of petroleum consumption, especially for transport, is a strategic goal especially for those countries that already have or will experience an intensive industrial development in the next future. For these motivations, the production of bio-ethanol from Sweet Sorghum (which is now one of the most promising crop for this application in term of productivity, inputs demand, and flexibility) is of great interest in most of countries. The proposed integrated complex produces power, heat and bio-ethanol: the produced power and heat are partly used for bio-ethanol processing and biomass pre-treatment, partly to be sold to the market. This system has important innovations allowing a decentralized energy and ethanol production and creating new local jobs. The small power plant is based upon a steam cycle with an advanced low emission combustor, capable of burning different biomass resources with a modest decrease in the efficiency value. The Bioenergy Complex, suitable to satisfy the needs of a 3,000 inhabitants village, is composed by the following sub-systems: (1) Sweet Sorghum plantation (250 ha); the main products are: dry bagasse (approximately 3,900 Ton/year), grains (1,300 Ton/y) and sugar (1,850 Ton/y); (2) Cane crushing--sugar juice extraction system; (3) Sugar juice fermentation and distillation ethanol production (approx. 835 Ton/y); (4) Biomass pre-treatment components (grinding, drying, briquetting, storage, etc.); and (5) Cogeneration unit--the expansion unit is constituted by a last generation reciprocating steam engine, coupled with a 500 kWe alternator; the heat of the expanded flow is removed in the condenser, with an available thermal power of approximately 2,000 kWt.

  1. Harmonic Resonance in Power Transmission Systems due to the Addition of Shunt Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Hardik U.

    Shunt capacitors are often added in transmission networks at suitable locations to improve the voltage profile. In this thesis, the transmission system in Arizona is considered as a test bed. Many shunt capacitors already exist in the Arizona transmission system and more are planned to be added. Addition of these shunt capacitors may create resonance conditions in response to harmonic voltages and currents. Such resonance, if it occurs, may create problematic issues in the system. It is main objective of this thesis to identify potential problematic effects that could occur after placing new shunt capacitors at selected buses in the Arizona network. Part of the objective is to create a systematic plan for avoidance of resonance issues. For this study, a method of capacitance scan is proposed. The bus admittance matrix is used as a model of the networked transmission system. The calculations on the admittance matrix were done using Matlab. The test bed is the actual transmission system in Arizona; however, for proprietary reasons, bus names are masked in the thesis copy intended for the public domain. The admittance matrix was obtained from data using the PowerWorld Simulator after equivalencing the 2016 summer peak load (planning case). The full Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system data were used. The equivalencing procedure retains only the Arizona portion of the WECC. The capacitor scan results for single capacitor placement and multiple capacitor placement cases are presented. Problematic cases are identified in the form of 'forbidden response. The harmonic voltage impact of known sources of harmonics, mainly large scale HVDC sources, is also presented. Specific key results for the study indicated include: (1) The forbidden zones obtained as per the IEEE 519 standard indicates the bus 10 to be the most problematic bus. (2) The forbidden zones also indicate that switching values for the switched shunt capacitor (if used) at bus 3 should be

  2. Base-Bleed Effect on X-33 Aerospike Plume Induced Base-Heating Environment During Power-Pack Out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Tee-See; Droege, Alan; D'Agostino, Mark; Lee, Young-Ching; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A computational heat transfer methodology was developed to study the dual-engine linear aerospike plume induced base-heating environment during one power-pack out, in ascent flight. One power-pack out results in reduction of power levels for both engines. That, in turn, reduces the amount of base-bleed and changes the distribution of base-bleed on the two pillows. Hence, the concern of increased base-heating during power-pack out. The thermo-flowfield of the entire vehicle was computed. The computational methodology for the convective heating is based on a three-dimensional, finite-volume, viscous, chemically reacting, and pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. The computational methodology for the radiative heating is based on a three-dimensional, finite-volume, and spectral-line-based weighted-sum-of-gray-gases absorption computational radiation heat transfer formulation. A separate radiation model was used for diagnostic purposes. The computational methodology was systematically benchmarked. In this study, near-base radiative heat fluxes were computed and they compared well with those measured from an installed linear aerospike engine tests. The base-heating environment of 18 trajectory points selected from three power-pack out ascent scenarios was computed and is presented here. The power-pack out condition has the most impact on convective base-heating when it happens early in flight. The some of its impact comes from the asymmetric and reduced base-bleed.

  3. Treating waste water from heat and electrical power plants and state regional power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Beigel`drud, G.M.

    1995-03-01

    Water is often contaminated with oil and other petroleum products when used by local and regional power plants. This article outlines the various methods of treating oil contaminated water and removing emulsions. Coagulation and flocculation are commonly used methods of treatment, but there are other means including flotation and electrochemical methods. Ammonium nitrite was used to accelerates the oil removal with an electrochemical method, which was chosen as the most efficient path towards removal.

  4. Subcontract Report: Modular Combined Heat & Power System for Utica College: Design Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Greg

    2007-09-01

    Utica College, located in Utica New York, intends to install an on-site power/cogeneration facility. The energy facility is to be factory pre-assembled, or pre- assembled in modules, to the fullest extent possible, and ready to install and interconnect at the College with minimal time and engineering needs. External connections will be limited to fuel supply, electrical output, potable makeup water as required and cooling and heat recovery systems. The proposed facility will consist of 4 self-contained, modular Cummins 330kW engine generators with heat recovery systems and the only external connections will be fuel supply, electrical outputs and cooling and heat recovery systems. This project was eventually cancelled due to changing DOE budget priorities, but the project engineers produced this system design specification in hopes that it may be useful in future endeavors.

  5. Modification of hot cells for general purpose heat source assembly at the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carteret, B. A.

    1991-09-01

    Eight existing, unused hot cells currently are being modified for use in the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) to assemble Pu-238 fueled heat sources for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Four air atmosphere cells will be used for storage, decanning, and decontamination of the iridium-clad radioisotope fuel. The remaining four argon atmosphere cells will be used to assemble fuel and graphite components for production and packaging of general purpose heat source (GPHS) assembly modules, which provide heat to drive the thermoelectric conversion process in the generators. The hot cells will be equipped to perform remote and glovebox-type operations. They will provide shielding and contamination control measures to reduce worker radiation exposure to levels within current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Designs emphasize the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation protection policy.

  6. Modification of hot cells for general purpose heat source assembly at the radioisotope power systems facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carteret, Betty A.

    1992-01-01

    Eight existing, unused hot cells currently are being modified for use in the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) to assemble 238Pu-fueled heat sources for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Four air atmosphere cells will be used for storage, decanning, and decontamination of the iridium-clad radioisotope fuel. The remaining four argon atmosphere cells will be used to assemble fuel and graphite components for production and packaging of general purpose heat source (GPHS) assembly modules, which provide heat to drive the thermoelectric conversion process in the generators. The hot cells will be equipped to perform remote and glovebox-type operations. They will provide shielding and contamination control measures to reduce worker radiation exposure to levels within current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Designs emphasize the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation protection policy.

  7. Refinery chooses ORC to convert process waste heat to electric power

    SciTech Connect

    Makansi, J.

    1985-03-01

    The organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) waste-heat-recovery system is one of several concepts that DOE, energy-systems suppliers, and others have been developing to make use of low-level waste-heat streams at process and manufacturing plants. Now, several years after the oil crisis of the 1970s accelerated this development, one ORC system has found a home in the energy-intensive refining industry. Mobil Oil Corp has been generating electric power with an ORC system supplied by Turbonetics Energy Inc, a subsidiary of Mechanical Technology Inc (MTI), Latham, NY - at its Torrence (Calif) refinery complex for about nine months. Two modules, each rated at 1070 kW, recover heat from a 300F vapor product stream leaving a fluidcatalytic-cracking (FCC) unit. As a result, cooling duty on the existing overhead coolers has been reduced by about 70-million Btu/hr.

  8. Scale Resistant Heat Exchanger for Low Temperature Geothermal Binary Cycle Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Lance G.

    2014-11-18

    Phase 1 of the investigation of improvements to low temperature geothermal power systems was completed. The improvements considered were reduction of scaling in heat exchangers and a hermetic turbine generator (eliminating seals, seal system, gearbox, and lube oil system). A scaling test system with several experiments was designed and operated at Coso geothermal resource with brine having a high scaling potential. Several methods were investigated at the brine temperature of 235 ºF. One method, circulation of abradable balls through the brine passages, was found to substantially reduce scale deposits. The test heat exchanger was operated with brine outlet temperatures as low as 125 ºF, which enables increased heat input available to power conversion systems. For advanced low temperature cycles, such as the Variable Phase Cycle (VPC) or Kalina Cycle, the lower brine temperature will result in a 20-30% increase in power production from low temperature resources. A preliminary design of an abradable ball system (ABS) was done for the heat exchanger of the 1 megawatt VPC system at Coso resource. The ABS will be installed and demonstrated in Phase 2 of this project, increasing the power production above that possible with the present 175 ºF brine outlet limit. A hermetic turbine generator (TGH) was designed and manufacturing drawings produced. This unit will use the working fluid (R134a) to lubricate the bearings and cool the generator. The 200 kW turbine directly drives the generator, eliminating a gearbox and lube oil system. Elimination of external seals eliminates the potential of leakage of the refrigerant or hydrocarbon working fluids, resulting in environmental improvement. A similar design has been demonstrated by Energent in an ORC waste heat recovery system. The existing VPC power plant at Coso was modified to enable the “piggyback” demonstration of the TGH. The existing heat exchanger, pumps, and condenser will be operated to provide the required

  9. Process modelling of biomass conversion to biofuels with combined heat and power.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhishek; Shinde, Yogesh; Pareek, Vishnu; Zhang, Dongke

    2015-12-01

    A process model has been developed to study the pyrolysis of biomass to produce biofuel with heat and power generation. The gaseous and solid products were used to generate heat and electrical power, whereas the bio-oil was stored and supplied for other applications. The overall efficiency of the base case model was estimated for conversion of biomass into useable forms of bio-energy. It was found that the proposed design is not only significantly efficient but also potentially suitable for distributed operation of pyrolysis plants having centralised post processing facilities for production of other biofuels and chemicals. It was further determined that the bio-oil quality improved using a multi-stage condensation system. However, the recycling of flue gases coming from combustor instead of non-condensable gases in the pyrolyzer led to increase in the overall efficiency of the process with degradation of bio-oil quality. PMID:26402874

  10. Deposition of Hard Chrome Coating onto Heat Susceptible Substrates by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma spray requires relatively low power, which is lower than 1 kW in comparison to other plasma spraying method. Until now, we are able to deposit Cu and Hydroxyapatite coating onto heat susceptible substrate, CFRP which are difficult for conventional plasma spray due to the excessive heat input. In this paper, a hard chromium coating was deposited onto SUS304 and CFRP by a low power microwave plasma spray technique. By controlling the working gas flow rate and spraying distance, a hard chrome coating with thickness of approximately 30 μm was successfully deposited onto CFRP substrate with hardness of 1110 Hv0.05. Furthermore, the coating produced here is higher than that produced by hard chrome plating.

  11. Collective Thomson scattering of a high power electron cyclotron resonance heating beam in LHD (invited).

    PubMed

    Kubo, S; Nishiura, M; Tanaka, K; Shimozuma, T; Yoshimura, Y; Igami, H; Takahash, H; Mutoh, T; Tamura, N; Tatematsu, Y; Saito, T; Notake, T; Korsholm, S B; Meo, F; Nielsen, S K; Salewski, M; Stejner, M

    2010-10-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) system has been constructed at LHD making use of the high power electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system in Large Helical Device (LHD). The necessary features for CTS, high power probing beams and receiving beams, both with well defined Gaussian profile and with the fine controllability, are endowed in the ECRH system. The 32 channel radiometer with sharp notch filter at the front end is attached to the ECRH system transmission line as a CTS receiver. The validation of the CTS signal is performed by scanning the scattering volume. A new method to separate the CTS signal from background electron cyclotron emission is developed and applied to derive the bulk and high energy ion components for several combinations of neutral beam heated plasmas.

  12. Fayette Power Project-Waste Heat Aquaculture Feasibility Study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.C.; Ekstrom, J.

    1988-06-30

    The aquaculture industry in Texas is growing steadily and has potential for future development. The Waste Heat Aquaculture Feasibility Study for the Lower Colorado River Authority Fayette Power Plant is the culmination of a two year effort that includes detailed discussion and analysis on the viability of a commercial aquaculture operation at the Fayette Power Plant, with special consideration of impacts on plant operation and security, legal and permitting constraints, water rights and other pertinent issues. The study discusses opportunities for private investment, includes site development recommendations and provides preliminary development designs.

  13. Heating efficiency of high-power perpendicular neutral-beam injection in PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, M.

    1982-03-01

    The heating efficiency of high power (up to 7.2 MW) near-perpendicular neutral beam injection in the PDX tokamak is comparable to that of tangential injection in PLT. Collisionless plasmas with central ion temperatures up to 6.5 keV and central electron temperatures greater than 2.5 keV have been obtained. The plasma pressure, including the contribution from the beam particles, increases with increasing beam power and does not appear to saturate, although the parametric dependence of the energy confinement time is different from that observed in ohmic discharges.

  14. Value analysis of advanced heat rejection systems for geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bliem, C.; Zangrando, F.; Hassani, V.

    1996-12-31

    A computer model and a methodology has been developed to perform value analysis for small, low-temperature binary geothermal power plants. The value analysis method allows for incremental changes in the levelized energy cost (LEC) to be determined between a baseline plant and a modified plant. Thermodynamic cycle analyses and component sizing are carried out in the model followed by economic analysis which provides LEC results. The emphasis of the present work has been on evaluating different types of heat rejection systems.

  15. Comparative analysis of cooling systems for energy equipment of combined heat and power plants and nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, B. F.; Lazarev, M. V.; Ermakova, S. V.; Zisman, S. L.; Kaplanovich, L. S.; Svetushkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    In the 20th century, the thermal power engineering in this country was oriented toward oncethrough cooling systems. More than 50% of the CHPP and NPP capacities with once-through cooling systems put into operation before the 1990s were large-scale water consumers but with minimum irretrievable water consumption. In 1995, the Water Code of the Russian Federation was adopted in which restrictions on application of once-through cooling systems for newly designed combined heat and power plants (CHPPs) were introduced for the first time. A ban on application of once-through systems was imposed by the current Water Code of the Russian Federation (Federal law no. 74-FZ, Art. 60 Cl. 4) not only for new CHPPs but also for those to be modified. Clause 4 of Article 60 of the Water Code of the Russian Federation contravenes law no. 7-FZ "On Protection of the Environment" that has priority significance, since the water environment is only part of the natural environment and those articles of the Water Code of the Russian Federation that are related directly to electric power engineering, viz., Articles 46 and 62. In recent decades, the search for means to increase revenue charges and the economic pressure on the thermal power industry caused introduction by law of charges for use of water by cooling systems irrespective of the latter's impact on the water quality of the source, the environment, the economic efficiency of the power production, and the living conditions of the people. The long-range annual increase in the water use charges forces the power generating companies to switch transfer once-through service water supply installations to recirculating water supply systems and once-through-recirculating systems with multiple reuse of warm water, which drastically reduces the technical, economic, and ecological characteristic of the power plant operation and also results in increasing power rates for the population. This work comprehensively substantiates the demands of

  16. Irreversibilities and efficiency at maximum power of heat engines: the illustrative case of a thermoelectric generator.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2012-03-01

    Energy conversion efficiency at maximum output power, which embodies the essential characteristics of heat engines, is the main focus of the present work. The so-called Curzon and Ahlborn efficiency η(CA) is commonly believed to be an absolute reference for real heat engines; however, a different but general expression for the case of stochastic heat engines, η(SS), was recently found and then extended to low-dissipation engines. The discrepancy between η(CA) and η(SS) is here analyzed considering different irreversibility sources of heat engines, of both internal and external types. To this end, we choose a thermoelectric generator operating in the strong-coupling regime as a physical system to qualitatively and quantitatively study the impact of the nature of irreversibility on the efficiency at maximum output power. In the limit of pure external dissipation, we obtain η(CA), while η(SS) corresponds to the case of pure internal dissipation. A continuous transition between from one extreme to the other, which may be operated by tuning the different sources of irreversibility, also is evidenced.

  17. Improving the efficiency of high-power diode lasers using diamond heat sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Parashchuk, Valentin V; Baranov, V V; Telesh, E V; Mien, Vu Doan; Luc, Vu Van; Truong, Pham Van; Belyaeva, A K

    2010-06-23

    Using multifunctional ion beam and magnetron sputtering systems, we have developed chemical and vacuum techniques for producing metallic coatings firmly adherent to various surfaces, with application to copper and diamond heat sinks for diode lasers. Conditions have been optimised for mounting diode lasers and bars using the proposed metallisation processes, and significant improvements in the output parameters of the devices have been achieved. The power output of cw laser diodes on diamond heat sinks increases by up to a factor of 2, the linear (working) portion of their power-current characteristic becomes markedly broader, and their slope efficiency increases by a factor of 1.5 - 2 relative to that of lasers on copper heat spreaders. The use of diamond heat sinks extends the drive current range of pulsed diode bars by a factor of 2 - 3 and enables them to operate at more than one order of magnitude longer pump pulse durations (up to milliseconds) when the pulse repetition rate is at least 10 Hz. (lasers)

  18. Irreversibilities and efficiency at maximum power of heat engines: the illustrative case of a thermoelectric generator.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2012-03-01

    Energy conversion efficiency at maximum output power, which embodies the essential characteristics of heat engines, is the main focus of the present work. The so-called Curzon and Ahlborn efficiency η(CA) is commonly believed to be an absolute reference for real heat engines; however, a different but general expression for the case of stochastic heat engines, η(SS), was recently found and then extended to low-dissipation engines. The discrepancy between η(CA) and η(SS) is here analyzed considering different irreversibility sources of heat engines, of both internal and external types. To this end, we choose a thermoelectric generator operating in the strong-coupling regime as a physical system to qualitatively and quantitatively study the impact of the nature of irreversibility on the efficiency at maximum output power. In the limit of pure external dissipation, we obtain η(CA), while η(SS) corresponds to the case of pure internal dissipation. A continuous transition between from one extreme to the other, which may be operated by tuning the different sources of irreversibility, also is evidenced. PMID:22587047

  19. Effect of heating strategy on power consumption and performance of a pilot plant anaerobic digester.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Valle-Guadarrama, Salvador; Bombardiere, John; Domaschko, Max; Easter, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The effect of heating strategy on power consumption and performance of a pilot plant anaerobic digester treating chicken litter, under thermophilic conditions, has been studied. Heating strategy was evaluated using three different spans (0.2 degrees C, 0.6 degrees C, and 1.0 degree C) for triggering the temperature control system from target temperature (56.7 degrees C). The hydraulic retention time in the pilot plant digester was in the range of 32 to 37 days, varying the total solids concentration fed from 5% to 6%. The results showed that under the experimental conditions, heating was the most energy-demanding process with 95.5% of the energy used. Increments up to 7.5% and 3.8%, respectively, on mechanical and heating power consumption, were observed as the span, for triggering the temperature control system from target temperature, was increased. Under the experimental conditions studied here, an increment of 30.6% on the global biodigester performance index was observed when a span of 1.0 degree C was compared to the one of 0.2 degrees C.

  20. Design of isotope heat source for automatic modular dispersal during reentry, and its integration with heat exchangers of 6-kWe dynamic isotope power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, Alfred

    An account is given of the results of a design study for a single heat source dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) of about 30 kW(t), using the standard 250 W general purpose heat source modules previously devised for radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Attention is given to the scheme devised for holding the individual heat source modules together during launch, which automatically releases them during reentry to minimize their impact velocity. The heat source design also contains passive provisions against overheating, in case active cooling is lost.

  1. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    PubMed

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators.

  2. Combined Heat and Power Systems Technology Development and Demonstration 370 kW High Efficiency Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-10-14

    The C370 Program was awarded in October 2010 with the ambitious goal of designing and testing the most electrically efficient recuperated microturbine engine at a rated power of less than 500 kW. The aggressive targets for electrical efficiency, emission regulatory compliance, and the estimated price point make the system state-of-the-art for microturbine engine systems. These goals will be met by designing a two stage microturbine engine identified as the low pressure spool and high pressure spool that are based on derivative hardware of Capstone’s current commercially available engines. The development and testing of the engine occurred in two phases. Phase I focused on developing a higher power and more efficient engine, that would become the low pressure spool which is based on Capstone’s C200 (200kW) engine architecture. Phase II integrated the low pressure spool created in Phase I with the high pressure spool, which is based on Capstone’s C65 (65 kW) commercially available engine. Integration of the engines, based on preliminary research, would allow the dual spool engine to provide electrical power in excess of 370 kW, with electrical efficiency approaching 42%. If both of these targets were met coupled with the overall CHP target of 85% total combined heating and electrical efficiency California Air Resources Board (CARB) level emissions, and a price target of $600 per kW, the system would represent a step change in the currently available commercial generation technology. Phase I of the C370 program required the development of the C370 low pressure spool. The goal was to increase the C200 engine power by a minimum of 25% — 250 kW — and efficiency from 32% to 37%. These increases in the C200 engine output were imperative to meet the power requirements of the engine when both spools were integrated. An additional benefit of designing and testing the C370 low pressure spool was the possibility of developing a stand-alone product for possible

  3. Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A microgrid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The microgrid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, such as water and space heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the microgrid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean central station generation in California.

  4. Fabrication and testing of thermionic heat pipe modules for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenstine, John R.; Horner-Richardson, Kevin; Rhee, Hyop S.

    1993-01-01

    Thermacore, Inc. along with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing a Thermionic Heat Pipe Module (THPM) for use with small, Thermionic Space Nuclear Power Systems. The THPM concept is a core length, cylindrical thermionic diode with a near-isothermal heat pipe emitter sleeve coupled to reactor fuel by radiation, and a heat ipe collector which also forms the waste heat radiator. The design allows for independent, non-nuclear development and testing of the THPM hardware for later integration into the nucelar reactor. A hardward development program is currently underway to demonstrate key feasibility components and to fabricate and test prototype THPMs for application to the Small Externally-Fueled Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) concept. This paper describes the scope and status of the THPM development program at Thermacore. Design, fabrication and test results to date of the first of several half-length THPM design iterations are presented and future activities intended to incrementally develop the concept are discussed.

  5. Fabrication and testing of thermionic heat pipe modules for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstine, J.R.; Horner-Richardson, K. ); Rhee, H.S. )

    1993-01-20

    Thermacore, Inc. along with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing a Thermionic Heat Pipe Module (THPM) for use with small, Thermionic Space Nuclear Power Systems. The THPM concept is a core length, cylindrical thermionic diode with a near-isothermal heat pipe emitter sleeve coupled to reactor fuel by radiation, and a heat ipe collector which also forms the waste heat radiator. The design allows for independent, non-nuclear development and testing of the THPM hardware for later integration into the nucelar reactor. A hardward development program is currently underway to demonstrate key feasibility components and to fabricate and test prototype THPMs for application to the Small Externally-Fueled Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) concept. This paper describes the scope and status of the THPM development program at Thermacore. Design, fabrication and test results to date of the first of several half-length THPM design iterations are presented and future activities intended to incrementally develop the concept are discussed.

  6. Investigation of power values of PV rooftop systems based on heat gain reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenvidhya, Tanokkorn; Seapan, Manit; Parinya, Panom; Wiengmoon, Buntoon; Chenvidhya, Dhirayut; Songprakorp, Roongrojana; Limsakul, Chamnan; Sangpongsanont, Yaowanee; Tannil, Nittaya

    2015-09-01

    PV rooftop system can generally be installed to produce electricity for the domestic house, office, small enterprise as well as factory. Such a system has direct useful for reducing peak load, meanwhile it also provides shaded area on the roof and hence the heat gain into the building is reduced. This study aims to investigate the shading effect on reduction of heat transfer into the building. The 49 kWp of PV rooftop system has been installed on the deck of the office building located in the middle of Thailand where the latitude of 14 ° above the equator. The estimation of heat gain into the building due to the solar irradiation throughout a day for one year has been carried out, before and after the installation of the PV rooftop system. Then the Newton's law of cooling is applied to calculate the heat gain. The calculation and the measurement of the heat reduction are compared. Finally, the indirect benefit of the PV rooftop system installed is evaluated in terms of power value.

  7. PowerPoint Presentations: A Creative Addition to the Research Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Alan E.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that the requirement of a PowerPoint presentation as part of the research process would benefit students in the following ways: learning how to conduct research; starting their research project sooner; honing presentation and public speaking skills; improving cooperative and social skills; and enhancing technology skills. Outlines the…

  8. Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  9. Initial high-power testing of the ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) ECH (electron cyclotron heating) system

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a moderate aspect ratio torsatron that will utilize 53.2 GHz 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) to produce nearly current-free target plasmas suitable for subsequent heating by strong neutral beam injection. The initial configuration of the ECH system from the gyrotron to ATF consists of an optical arc detector, three bellows, a waveguide mode analyzer, two TiO/sub 2/ mode absorbers, two 90/sup 0/ miter bends, two waveguide pumpouts, an insulating break, a gate valve, and miscellaneous straight waveguide sections feeding a launcher radiating in the TE/sub 02/ mode. Later, a focusing Vlasov launcher will be added to beam the ECH power to the saddle point in ATF magnetic geometry for optimum power deposition. The ECH system has several unique features; namely, the entire ECH system is evacuated, the ECH system is broadband, forward power is monitored by a newly developed waveguide mode analyzer, phase correcting miter bends will be employed, and the ECH system will be capable of operating short pulse to cw. Initial high-power tests show that the overall system efficiency is 87%. The waveguide mode analyzer shows that the gyrotron mode output consists of 13% TE/sub 01/, 82.6% TE/sub 02/, 2.5% TE/sub 03/, and 1.9% TE/sub 04/. 4 refs.

  10. Optimal control of the power adiabatic stroke of an optomechanical heat engine.

    PubMed

    Bathaee, M; Bahrampour, A R

    2016-08-01

    We consider the power adiabatic stroke of the Otto optomechanical heat engine introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150602 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150602. We derive the maximum extractable work of both optomechanical normal modes in the minimum time while the system experiences quantum friction effects. We show that the total work done by the system in the power adiabatic stroke is optimized by a bang-bang control. The time duration of the power adiabatic stroke is of the order of the inverse of the effective optomechanical-coupling coefficient. The optimal phase-space trajectory of the Otto cycle for both optomechanical normal modes is also obtained. PMID:27627280

  11. Optimal control of the power adiabatic stroke of an optomechanical heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathaee, M.; Bahrampour, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the power adiabatic stroke of the Otto optomechanical heat engine introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150602 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150602. We derive the maximum extractable work of both optomechanical normal modes in the minimum time while the system experiences quantum friction effects. We show that the total work done by the system in the power adiabatic stroke is optimized by a bang-bang control. The time duration of the power adiabatic stroke is of the order of the inverse of the effective optomechanical-coupling coefficient. The optimal phase-space trajectory of the Otto cycle for both optomechanical normal modes is also obtained.

  12. Effect of additional heat treatment of 2024-T3 on the growth of fatigue crack in air and in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louwaard, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of ductility on the fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum alloys, fatigue tests were carried out on central notched specimens of 2024-T3 and 2024-T8 sheet material. The 2024-T8 material was obtained by an additional heat treatment applied on 2024-T3 (18 hours at 192 C), which increased the static yield strength from 43.6 to 48.9 kgf/sq mm. A change in the ultimate strength was not observed. Fatigue tests were carried out on both materials in humid air and in high vacuum. According to a new crack propagation model, crack extension is supported to be caused by a slip-related process and debonding triggered by the environment. This model predicts an effect of the ductility on the crack growth rate which should be smaller in vacuum than in humid air; however, this was not confirmed. In humid air the crack-growth rate in 2024-T8 was about 2 times faster than in 2024-T3, while in vacuum the ratio was about 2.5. Crack closure measurements gave no indications that crack closure played a significant role in both materials. Some speculative explanations are briefly discussed.

  13. Modelling and control synthesis of a micro-combined heat and power interface for a concentrating solar power system in off-grid rural power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinsloo, Gerro; Dobson, Robert; Brent, Alan; Mammoli, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar power co-generation systems have been identified as potential stand-alone solar energy supply solutions in remote rural energy applications. This study describes the modelling and synthesis of a combined heat and power Stirling CSP system in order to evaluate its potential performance in small off-grid rural village applications in Africa. This Stirling micro-Combined Heat and Power (micro-CHP) system has a 1 kW electric capacity, with 3 kW of thermal generation capacity which is produced as waste heat recovered from the solar power generation process. As part of the development of an intelligent microgrid control and distribution solution, the Trinum micro-CHP system and other co-generation systems are systematically being modelled on the TRNSYS simulation platform. This paper describes the modelling and simulation of the Trinum micro-CHP configuration on TRNSYS as part of the process to develop the control automation solution for the smart rural microgrid in which the Trinum will serve as a solar powerpack. The results present simulated performance outputs for the Trinum micro-CHP system for a number of remote rural locations in Africa computed from real-time TRNSYS solar irradiation and weather data (yearly, monthly, daily) for the relevant locations. The focus of this paper is on the parametric modelling of the Trinum Stirling micro-CHP system, with specific reference to this system as a TRNSYS functional block in the microgrid simulation. The model is used to forecast the solar energy harvesting potential of the Trinum micro-CHP unit at a number of remote rural sites in Africa.

  14. Residential Solar Combined Heat and Power Generation using Solar Thermoelectric Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, B.; Wagner, M.; Kunkle, C.; Watson, P.; Williams, R.; Donohoe, R.; Ugarte, K.; Wilmoth, R.; Chong, M. Zachary; Lee, H.

    2015-06-01

    Recent reports on improved efficiencies of solar thermoelectric generation (STEG) systems have generated interest in STEGs as a competitive power generation system. In this paper, the design of a combined cooling and power utilizing concentrated solar power is discussed. Solar radiation is concentrated into a receiver connected to thermoelectric modules, which are used as a topping cycle to generate power and high grade heat necessary to run an absorption chiller. Modeling of the overall system is discussed with experimental data to validate modeling results. A numerical modeling approach is presented which considers temperature variation of the source and sink temperatures and is used to maximize combined efficiency. A system is built with a demonstrated combined efficiency of 32% in actual working conditions with power generation of 3.1 W. Modeling results fell within 3% of the experimental results verifying the approach. An optimization study is performed on the mirror concentration ration and number of modules for thermal load matching and is shown to improve power generation to 26.8 W.

  15. Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator for Electrical Power Generation from Automotive Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    Filled skutterudites are state-of-the- art thermoelectric (TE) materials for electrical power generation from waste heat. They have suitable intrinsic transport properties as measured by the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = S^2σT/κ (S = Seebeck coefficient, σ = electrical conductivity, T = temperature, and κ = thermal conductivity) and good mechanical strength for operation at vehicle exhaust gas temperatures of >550 C. We have demonstrated TE electrical power generation on a production test vehicle equipped with a fully functional prototype TE generator (TEG). It was assembled with TE modules fabricated from filled skutterudites synthesized at GM. Our results and analysis show that improvement in total power generated can be achieved by enhanced thermal and electrical interfaces and contacts. A substantial T decrease along the exhaust gas flow results in a large variation of voltage, current, and power output for each TE module depending on its position in the module array. Total TEG output power depends directly on the position-dependent T profile via the temperature dependence of both ZT and Carnot efficiency. Total TEG power output also depends on how the modules are connected in parallel or series combinations because mismatch in output voltage and/or internal resistance among the modules degrades the performance of the entire array. Uniform T profiles and consistent TE module internal resistances improve overall TEG performance.

  16. Mathematical modelling of thin layer hot air drying of apricot with combined heat and power dryer.

    PubMed

    Faal, Saeed; Tavakoli, Teymor; Ghobadian, Barat

    2015-05-01

    In this study thermal energy of an engine was used to dry apricot. For this purpose, experiments were conducted on thin layer drying apricot with combined heat and power dryer, in a laboratory dryer. The drying experiments were carried out for four levels of engine output power (25 %, 50 %, 75 % and full load), producing temperatures of 50, 60, 70, and 80 ° C in drying chamber respectively. The air velocity in drying chamber was about 0.5 ± 0.05 m/s. Different mathematical models were evaluated to predict the behavior of apricot drying in a combined heat and power dryer. Conventional statistical equations namely modeling efficiency (EF), Root mean square error (RMSE) and chi-square (χ2) were also used to determine the most suitable model. Assessments indicated that the Logarithmic model considering the values of EF = 0.998746, χ 2 = 0.000120 and RMSE = 0.004772, shows the best treatment of drying apricot with combined heat and power dryer among eleven models were used in this study. The average values of effective diffusivity ranged 1.6260 × 10(-9) to 4.3612 × 10(-9) m2/s for drying apricot at air temperatures between 50 and 80 °C and at the air flow rate of 0.5 ± 0.05 m/s; the values of Deff increased with the increase of drying temperature the effective diffusivities in the second falling rate period were about eight times greater than that in the first falling rate period.

  17. Mathematical modelling of thin layer hot air drying of apricot with combined heat and power dryer.

    PubMed

    Faal, Saeed; Tavakoli, Teymor; Ghobadian, Barat

    2015-05-01

    In this study thermal energy of an engine was used to dry apricot. For this purpose, experiments were conducted on thin layer drying apricot with combined heat and power dryer, in a laboratory dryer. The drying experiments were carried out for four levels of engine output power (25 %, 50 %, 75 % and full load), producing temperatures of 50, 60, 70, and 80 ° C in drying chamber respectively. The air velocity in drying chamber was about 0.5 ± 0.05 m/s. Different mathematical models were evaluated to predict the behavior of apricot drying in a combined heat and power dryer. Conventional statistical equations namely modeling efficiency (EF), Root mean square error (RMSE) and chi-square (χ2) were also used to determine the most suitable model. Assessments indicated that the Logarithmic model considering the values of EF = 0.998746, χ 2 = 0.000120 and RMSE = 0.004772, shows the best treatment of drying apricot with combined heat and power dryer among eleven models were used in this study. The average values of effective diffusivity ranged 1.6260 × 10(-9) to 4.3612 × 10(-9) m2/s for drying apricot at air temperatures between 50 and 80 °C and at the air flow rate of 0.5 ± 0.05 m/s; the values of Deff increased with the increase of drying temperature the effective diffusivities in the second falling rate period were about eight times greater than that in the first falling rate period. PMID:25892795

  18. Performance Analysis of Potassium Heat Pipes Radiator for HP-STMCs Space Reactor Power System

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2004-02-04

    A detailed design and performance results of C-C finned, and armored potassium heat pipes radiator for a 110 kWe Heat Pipes-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters (HP-STMCs) Space Reactor Power system (SRPS) are presented. The radiator consists of two sections; each serves an equal number of STMCs and has 162 longitudinal potassium heat pipes with 0.508 mm thick C-C fins. The width of the C-C fins at the minor diameter of the radiator is almost zero, but increases with distance along the radiator to reach 3.7 cm at the radiator's major diameter. The radiator's heat pipes (OD = 2.42 cm in front and 3.03 cm in rear) have thin titanium (0.0762 mm thick) liners and wicks (0.20 mm thick with an effective pore radius of 12-16 {mu}m) and a 1.016 mm thick C-C wall. The wick is separated from the titanium liner by a 0.4 mm annulus filled with liquid potassium to increase the capillary limit. The outer surfaces of the heat pipes in the front and rear sections of the radiator are protected with a C-C armor that is 2.17 mm and 1.70 mm thick, respectively. The inside surface of the heat pipes in the front radiator is thermally insulated while the C-C finned condensers of the rear heat pipes are exposed, radiating into space through the rear opening of the radiator cavity. The heat pipes in both the front and the rear radiators have a 1.5 m long evaporator section and each dissipates 4.47 kW while operating at 43.6% of the prevailing sonic limit. The front and rear radiator sections are 5.29 m and 2.61 m long with outer surface area and mass of 47.1 m2 and 314.3 kg, and 39.9 m2 and 243.2 kg, respectively. The total radiator is 7.63 m long and has minor and major diameters of 1.48 m and 5.57 m, respectively, and a total surface area of 87 m2; however, the effective radiator area, after accounting for heat rejection through the rear of the radiator cavity, is 98.8 m2. The radiator's total mass including the C-C armor is 557.5 kg and the specific area and specific mass are 6

  19. Performance Analysis of Potassium Heat Pipes Radiator for HP-STMCs Space Reactor Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2004-02-01

    A detailed design and performance results of C-C finned, and armored potassium heat pipes radiator for a 110 kWe Heat Pipes-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters (HP-STMCs) Space Reactor Power system (SRPS) are presented. The radiator consists of two sections; each serves an equal number of STMCs and has 162 longitudinal potassium heat pipes with 0.508 mm thick C-C fins. The width of the C-C fins at the minor diameter of the radiator is almost zero, but increases with distance along the radiator to reach 3.7 cm at the radiator's major diameter. The radiator's heat pipes (OD = 2.42 cm in front and 3.03 cm in rear) have thin titanium (0.0762 mm thick) liners and wicks (0.20 mm thick with an effective pore radius of 12-16 μm) and a 1.016 mm thick C-C wall. The wick is separated from the titanium liner by a 0.4 mm annulus filled with liquid potassium to increase the capillary limit. The outer surfaces of the heat pipes in the front and rear sections of the radiator are protected with a C-C armor that is 2.17 mm and 1.70 mm thick, respectively. The inside surface of the heat pipes in the front radiator is thermally insulated while the C-C finned condensers of the rear heat pipes are exposed, radiating into space through the rear opening of the radiator cavity. The heat pipes in both the front and the rear radiators have a 1.5 m long evaporator section and each dissipates 4.47 kW while operating at 43.6% of the prevailing sonic limit. The front and rear radiator sections are 5.29 m and 2.61 m long with outer surface area and mass of 47.1 m2 and 314.3 kg, and 39.9 m2 and 243.2 kg, respectively. The total radiator is 7.63 m long and has minor and major diameters of 1.48 m and 5.57 m, respectively, and a total surface area of 87 m2; however, the effective radiator area, after accounting for heat rejection through the rear of the radiator cavity, is 98.8 m2. The radiator's total mass including the C-C armor is 557.5 kg and the specific area and specific mass are 6

  20. The effectiveness of power-generating complexes constructed on the basis of nuclear power plants combined with additional sources of energy determined taking risk factors into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Portyankin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of combining nuclear power plants equipped with water-cooled water-moderated power-generating reactors (VVER) with other sources of energy within unified power-generating complexes is analyzed. The use of such power-generating complexes makes it possible to achieve the necessary load pickup capability and flexibility in performing the mandatory selective primary and emergency control of load, as well as participation in passing the night minimums of electric load curves while retaining high values of the capacity utilization factor of the entire power-generating complex at higher levels of the steam-turbine part efficiency. Versions involving combined use of nuclear power plants with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units for generating electricity are considered. In view of the fact that hydrogen is an unsafe energy carrier, the use of which introduces additional elements of risk, a procedure for evaluating these risks under different conditions of implementing the fuel-and-hydrogen cycle at nuclear power plants is proposed. Risk accounting technique with the use of statistical data is considered, including the characteristics of hydrogen and gas pipelines, and the process pipelines equipment tightness loss occurrence rate. The expected intensities of fires and explosions at nuclear power plants fitted with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units are calculated. In estimating the damage inflicted by events (fires and explosions) occurred in nuclear power plant turbine buildings, the US statistical data were used. Conservative scenarios of fires and explosions of hydrogen-air mixtures in nuclear power plant turbine buildings are presented. Results from calculations of the introduced annual risk to the attained net annual profit ratio in commensurable versions are given. This ratio can be used in selecting projects characterized by the most technically attainable and socially acceptable safety.

  1. Simulation of High Power ICRF Wave Heating in the ITER Burning Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Barrett, R. F.; D'Azevedo, E. F.

    2007-11-01

    ITER relies on Ion-cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) power to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. To heat effectively, the waves must couple efficiently to the core plasma. Recent simulations using AORSA [1] on the 120 TF Cray XT-4 (Jaguar) at ORNL show that the waves propagate radially inward and are rapidly absorbed with little heating of the plasma edge. AORSA has achieved 87.5 trillion calculations per second (87.5 teraflops) on Jaguar, which is 73 percent of the system's theoretical peak. Three dimensional visualizations show ``hot spots'' near the antenna surface where the wave amplitude is high. AORSA simulations are also being used to study how to best use ICRF to drive plasma currents for optimizing ITER performance and pulse length. Results for Scenario 4 show a maximum current of 0.54 MA for 20 MW of power at 57 MHz. [1] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, E. D'Azevedo, et al., Phys. Plasmas. 8, 1573 (2001).

  2. Additive effect of heat on the UVB-induced tyrosinase activation and melanogenesis via ERK/p38/MITF pathway in human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei-Jie; Ma, Hui-Jun; Zhao, Guang; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Wen; Ma, Li-Juan; Lei, Xiao-Bing

    2014-08-01

    Heat is known as an environmental factor that causes significant skin pigmentation, but its effects on melanogenesis have been poorly studied. It has been shown that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is involved in ultraviolet B (UVB) and stress-induced melanogenesis in melanocytes. In this study, we investigated the effects of heat and UVB, on melanocyte melanogenesis, differentiation, and MAPK phosphorylation. The results showed that heat (1 h at 40 °C for 5 days) increased cell dendrites, enlarged cell bodies, and induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)/p38/MITF activation but did not influence melanogenesis of human epidermal melanocytes from skin phototype III. UVB irradiation (20 mJ/cm(2) for 5 days) induced melanogenesis and c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK)/p38/MITF/tyrosinase activation in melanocytes from skin phototype III. UVB combined with heat resulted in much more significant tyrosinase activation and melanogenesis as compared with UVB alone in melanocytes from skin phototype III. Furthermore, heat treatment and UVB irradiation induced JNK, ERK, and p38 activation but not melanogenic and morphological changes in melanocytes from skin phototype I. These findings suggested that heat promoted melanocyte differentiation, probably via heat-induced ERK/p38/MITF/activation. Furthermore, heat had an additive effect on the UVB-induced tyrosinase activation and melanogenesis. These results provide a new clue for dermatologists for the treatment of hypopigmented skin disease with heat combined with UVB irradiation.

  3. Energy-effective method for low-temperature deaeration of make-up water on the heating supply system of heat power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. I.; Pazushkina, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    The technology for low-temperature deaeration of make-up water of heating supply systems is developed that makes it possible to substantially enhance the energy efficiency of heat power plants (HPPs). As a desorbing agent for deaeration of make-up water of heating supply systems, it is proposed to use not steam or superheated water but a gas supplied to boiler burners. Natural gas supplied to steam boilers of HPPs has very low or often negative temperature after reducing devices. At the same time, it is virtually corrosive gas-free (oxygen and carbon dioxide) and, therefore, can be successfully used as the desorbing agent for water deaeration. These factors make it possible to perform deaeration of make-up water of heating supply systems at relatively low temperatures (10-30°C). Mixing of the cold deaerated make-up water with the return delivery water results in a significant decrease in the temperature the return delivery water before a lower delivery heater of a dual-purpose turbine plant, increase in the power output with the heat consumption, and, consequently, enhancement in the operation efficiency of the HPP. The article presents the calculation of the consumption of gas theoretically required for deaeration and reveals the evaluation of the energy efficiency of the technology for a typical energy unit of thermal power station. The mass transfer efficiency of the deaeration of the make-up water of heating supply systems is estimated for the case of using natural gas as the desorbing agent for which the specific gas consumption required theoretically for deaeration is calculated. It is shown that the consumption of natural gas used as fuel in boilers of HPPs is sufficient for the deaeration of any volumes of the make-up water of heating supply systems. The energy efficiency of the developed technology is evaluated for a typical heat power-generating unit of the HPP with a T-100-12.8 turbine. The calculation showed that the application of the new technology

  4. The heat dissipation model and desensitizing mechanism of the HMX/additive interfaces: a theoretical investigation based on linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) is a high-energy explosive with high sensitivity. The heat dissipation of the HMX/additive interface is a key issue in understanding the hot spot formation and desensitizing mechanism of mixture explosive. In this work, we derive new formulae to calculate the heat dissipation rate for a set of HMX/additive interfaces, and build a physical model to describe the energy dissipation time and distance in mixture explosive. Four kinds of additives are considered: 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, graphite, paraffin and fluoropolymers. At low strength loading, we prove that the heat dissipation rate is proportional to the square of frequency, and suggest a way to decrease the sensitivity of the explosive. At medium strength loading, the viscosity coefficient and friction coefficient of interface are calculated. The desensitizing abilities of additives to HMX are discussed systematically.

  5. Evaluation of Different Power of Near Addition in Two Different Multifocal Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Unsal, Ugur; Baser, Gonen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare near, intermediate, and distance vision and quality of vision, when refractive rotational multifocal intraocular lenses with 3.0 diopters or diffractive multifocal intraocular lenses with 2.5 diopters near addition are implanted. Methods. 41 eyes of 41 patients in whom rotational +3.0 diopters near addition IOLs were implanted and 30 eyes of 30 patients in whom diffractive +2.5 diopters near addition IOLs were implanted after cataract surgery were reviewed. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity, intermediate visual acuity, near visual acuity, and patient satisfaction were evaluated 6 months later. Results. The corrected and uncorrected distance visual acuity were the same between both groups (p = 0.50 and p = 0.509, resp.). The uncorrected intermediate and corrected intermediate and near vision acuities were better in the +2.5 near vision added intraocular lens implanted group (p = 0.049, p = 0.005, and p = 0.001, resp.) and the uncorrected near vision acuity was better in the +3.0 near vision added intraocular lens implanted group (p = 0.001). The patient satisfactions of both groups were similar. Conclusion. The +2.5 diopters near addition could be a better choice in younger patients with more distance and intermediate visual requirements (driving, outdoor activities), whereas the + 3.0 diopters should be considered for patients with more near vision correction (reading). PMID:27340560

  6. EXAMINING PLANNED U.S. POWER PLANT CAPACITY ADDITIONS IN THE CONTEXT OF CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Gale, J.; Kaya, Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper seeks to assess the degree to which the 471 planned fossil fired power plants announced to be built within the next decade in the continental U.S. are amenable to significant carbon dioxide emissions mitigation via carbon dioxide capture and disposal in geologic reservoirs. The combined generating capacity of these 471 planned plants is 320 GW. In particular, we seek to assess the looming ''carbon liability'' (i.e., the nearly 1 billion tons of CO2 these plants are likely to emit annually) that these power plants represent for their owners and for the nation as the U.S. begins to address climate change. Significant emission reductions will likely be brought about through the use of advanced technologies such as carbon capture and disposal. We find that less than half of these plants are located in the immediate vicinity of potentially suitable geologic carbon dioxide disposal reservoirs. The authors discuss the implications of this potential carbon liability that these plants may come to represent.

  7. Study of Using Solar Thermal Power for the Margarine Melting Heat Process.

    PubMed

    Sharaf Eldean, Mohamed A; Soliman, A M

    2015-04-01

    The heating process of melting margarine requires a vast amount of thermal energy due to its high melting point and the size of the reservoir it is contained in. Existing methods to heat margarine have a high hourly cost of production and use fossil fuels which have been shown to have a negative impact on the environment. Thus, we perform an analytical feasibility study of using solar thermal power as an alternative energy source for the margarine melting process. In this study, the efficiency and cost effectiveness of a parabolic trough collector (PTC) solar field are compared with that of a steam boiler. Different working fluids (water vapor and Therminol-VP1 heat transfer oil (HTO)) through the solar field are also investigated. The results reveal the total hourly cost ($/h) by the conventional configuration is much greater than the solar applications regardless of the type of working fluid. Moreover, the conventional configuration causes a negative impact to the environment by increasing the amount of CO2, CO, and NO2 by 117.4 kg/day, 184 kg/day, and 74.7 kg/day, respectively. Optimized period of melt and tank volume parameters at temperature differences not exceeding 25 °C are found to be 8-10 h and 100 m(3), respectively. The solar PTC operated with water and steam as the working fluid is recommended as a vital alternative for the margarine melting heating process. PMID:25349463

  8. Convection heat loss from cavity receiver in parabolic dish solar thermal power system: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shuang-Ying; Xiao, Lan; Li, You-Rong; Cao, Yiding

    2010-08-15

    The convection heat loss from cavity receiver in parabolic dish solar thermal power system can significantly reduce the efficiency and consequently the cost effectiveness of the system. It is important to assess this heat loss and subsequently improve the thermal performance of the receiver. This paper aims to present a comprehensive review and systematic summarization of the state of the art in the research and progress in this area. The efforts include the convection heat loss mechanism, experimental and numerical investigations on the cavity receivers with varied shapes that have been considered up to date, and the Nusselt number correlations developed for convection heat loss prediction as well as the wind effect. One of the most important features of this paper is that it has covered numerous cavity literatures encountered in various other engineering systems, such as those in electronic cooling devices and buildings. The studies related to those applications may provide valuable information for the solar receiver design, which may otherwise be ignored by a solar system designer. Finally, future development directions and the issues that need to be further investigated are also suggested. It is believed that this comprehensive review will be beneficial to the design, simulation, performance assessment and applications of the solar parabolic dish cavity receivers. (author)

  9. Study of Using Solar Thermal Power for the Margarine Melting Heat Process.

    PubMed

    Sharaf Eldean, Mohamed A; Soliman, A M

    2015-04-01

    The heating process of melting margarine requires a vast amount of thermal energy due to its high melting point and the size of the reservoir it is contained in. Existing methods to heat margarine have a high hourly cost of production and use fossil fuels which have been shown to have a negative impact on the environment. Thus, we perform an analytical feasibility study of using solar thermal power as an alternative energy source for the margarine melting process. In this study, the efficiency and cost effectiveness of a parabolic trough collector (PTC) solar field are compared with that of a steam boiler. Different working fluids (water vapor and Therminol-VP1 heat transfer oil (HTO)) through the solar field are also investigated. The results reveal the total hourly cost ($/h) by the conventional configuration is much greater than the solar applications regardless of the type of working fluid. Moreover, the conventional configuration causes a negative impact to the environment by increasing the amount of CO2, CO, and NO2 by 117.4 kg/day, 184 kg/day, and 74.7 kg/day, respectively. Optimized period of melt and tank volume parameters at temperature differences not exceeding 25 °C are found to be 8-10 h and 100 m(3), respectively. The solar PTC operated with water and steam as the working fluid is recommended as a vital alternative for the margarine melting heating process.

  10. Natural circulation decay heat removal from an SP-100, 550 kWe power system for a lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Xue, Huimin

    1992-01-01

    This research investigated the decay heat removal from the SP-100 reactor core of a 550-kWe power system for a lunar outpost by natural circulation of lithium coolant. A transient model that simulates the decay heat removal loop (DHRL) of the power system was developed and used to assess the system's decay heat removal capability. The effects of the surface area of the decay heat rejection radiator, the dimensions of the decay heat exchanger (DHE) flow duct, the elevation of the DHE, and the diameter of the rise and down pipes in the DHRL on the decay heat removal capability were examined. Also, to determine the applicability of test results at earth gravity to actual system performance on the lunar surface, the effect of the gravity constant (1 g and 1/6 g) on the thermal behavior of the system after shutdown was investigated.

  11. Natural convection characteristics of power-law fluids over a heated vertical plate of variable surface conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Erbas, S.; Ece, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    Fluids such as molten plastics, polymers, pulps, foodstuffs or slurries exhibit non-Newtonian fluid behavior and are increasingly used in various manufacturing and processing industries. Determination of the friction and heat transfer characteristics of non-Newtonian fluids over heated surfaces is important for the design of industrial equipment working with this type of fluids. Steady free convection laminar boundary-layer flow along a heated vertical plate immersed in a quiescent power-law fluid is investigated. Two heating modes are considered by assuming that either surface temperature or heat flux has a power-law variation. Similarity solutions of the boundary-layer equations are obtained numerically for both heating conditions. The skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are found to be higher in the prescribed temperature case for large Prandtl numbers and increase with the flow behavior index.

  12. Analysis of combined hydrogen, heat, and power as a bridge to a hydrogen transition.

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalik, M.; Stephan, C.

    2011-01-18

    Combined hydrogen, heat, and power (CHHP) technology is envisioned as a means to providing heat and electricity, generated on-site, to large end users, such as hospitals, hotels, and distribution centers, while simultaneously producing hydrogen as a by-product. The hydrogen can be stored for later conversion to electricity, used on-site (e.g., in forklifts), or dispensed to hydrogen-powered vehicles. Argonne has developed a complex-adaptive-system model, H2CAS, to simulate how vehicles and infrastructure can evolve in a transition to hydrogen. This study applies the H2CAS model to examine how CHHP technology can be used to aid the transition to hydrogen. It does not attempt to predict the future or provide one forecast of system development. Rather, the purpose of the model is to understand how the system works. The model uses a 50- by 100-mile rectangular grid of 1-square-mile cells centered on the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The major expressways are incorporated into the model, and local streets are considered to be ubiquitous, except where there are natural barriers. The model has two types of agents. Driver agents are characterized by a number of parameters: home and job locations, income, various types of 'personalities' reflective of marketing distinctions (e.g., innovators, early adopters), willingness to spend extra money on 'green' vehicles, etc. At the beginning of the simulations, almost all driver agents own conventional vehicles. They drive around the metropolitan area, commuting to and from work and traveling to various other destinations. As they do so, they observe the presence or absence of facilities selling hydrogen. If they find such facilities conveniently located along their routes, they are motivated to purchase a hydrogen-powered vehicle when it becomes time to replace their present vehicle. Conversely, if they find that they would be inconvenienced by having to purchase hydrogen earlier than necessary or if they become worried that they

  13. MHD thermosolutal marangoni convection heat and mass transport of power law fluid driven by temperature and concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Chengru; Zheng, Liancun; Ma, Lianxi

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermosolutal Marangoni convection heat and mass transfer of power-law fluids driven by a power law temperature and a power law concentration which is assumed that the surface tension varies linearly with both the temperature and concentration. Heat and mass transfer constitutive equation is proposed based on N-diffusion proposed by Philip and the abnormal convection-diffusion model proposed by Pascal in which we assume that the heat diffusion depends non-linearly on both the temperature and the temperature gradient and the mass diffusion depends non-linearly on both the concentration and the concentration gradient with modified Fourier heat conduction for power law fluid. The governing equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using suitable similarity transformations. Approximate analytical solution is obtained using homotopy analytical method (HAM). The transport characteristics of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are analyzed in detail.

  14. Design of Isotope Heat Source for Automatic Modular Dispersal During Reentry, and Its Integration with Heat Exchangers of 6-kWe Dynamic Isotope Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-01-01

    In late 1986 the Air Force Space Division (AF / SD) had expressed an interest in using a Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) of approximately 6-kWe to power the Boost Surveillance and Tacking System (BSTS) satellites. In support of that objective, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested Fairchild Space Company to perform a conceptual design study of the DIPS heat source and of its integration with the dynamic power conversion system, with particular emphasis on system safety. This paper describes the results of that study. The study resulted in a design for a single heat source of ~30-kWt, employing the standard 250-W General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules which DOE had previously developed and safety-tested for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTS's)

  15. Simulation and Feasibility Study on a ‘Renewable Energy House’ with a Geothermal Heat Pump-Powered Floor Heating System in Cold Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Masafumi; Akpan, Itoro; Endoh, Noboru

    An actual renewable energy house, equipped with a geothermal heat pump (GHP)-powered floor heating system was investigated and analyzed. Daily annual monitoring between February 2005 ˜ February 2006 and real-time continuous system monitoring within selected periods during the winter season between November 2006 ˜ January 2007, were carried out in order to establish the actual performance of the system. It emerged that the GHP-powered floor heating system is sufficient for space heating, with the maintenance of near-uniform room temperatures even during the coldest days in a very cold region like Hokkaido, Japan. About 37% average of the floor heat losses are recoverable and more than 50% of the ventilation heat losses are recovered due to various innovative energy-saving techniques built into the system. Annual heat loss from the house estimated by the numerical simulation showed good agreement with the measured annual thermal demand for room heating. The simulation also estimated that annual running costs and Green House Gas (GHG) emissions reductions of 47% and 49% respectively, can be realized with this system compared to an equivalent conventional system. A detailed cost analysis for the GHP-only system revealed that if the cost of fuel oil increases by about 50% from the current value of ¥80/L, then the payback period for a GHP-powered renewable energy system is about 14 years. This payback period reduces to about 10 years if 30% of the initial cost of the GHP-powered system is externally funded.

  16. Heat generation and neutron beam characteristics in a high power pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jerng, D.W.; Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    In the course of conceptual design of a high power pulsed spallation source, a Monte Carlo model was developed for heat generation and neutronics studies. In this paper, we present two sets of results. The first set of calculations was performed with a simple target model to investigate general characteristics of power distribution and neutron production with various proton energies ranging from 0.8 to 12 GeV. The second set was performed with a realistic target model including major components of the target system to provide basic parameters for engineering design of a high power pulsed spallation source. Calculated results generally confirm that higher proton energy provides and advantage in target cooling system requirements and yet somewhat lower neutron beam intensity as a counter effect. The heat generation in the systems surrounding the target was investigated in detail and found to have important variation with position and according to proton beam energy. Calculations of the neutron currents from the moderators showed that the neutron beam intensity from moderators in the front region of the target decreased fro higher proton energy while that from moderators in the back region of the target remained almost unchanged.

  17. Line-focus solar central power system, phase I. Subsystem experiment: receiver heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Slemmons, A J

    1980-04-01

    Wind-tunnel tests confirmed that heat losses due to natural convection are negligible in the line-focus, solar-powered receiver. Anomalies in the forced-convection tests prevented definitive conclusions regarding the more important forced convection. Flow-visualization tests using a water table show much lower velocities inside the receiver cavity than outside, supporting the supposition that the forced-heat transfer should be less than that from a standard exposed cylinder. Furthermore, the water-table tests showed ways to decrease the low velocities in the cavity should this be desired. Further wind-tunnel testing should be done to confirm estimates and to support advanced design. This testing can be done in standard wind tunnels since only the forced convection is of concern.

  18. Organic Rankine-cycle turbine power plant utilizing low temperature heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maizza, V.

    1980-03-01

    Utilizing and converting of existing low temperature and waste heat sources by the use of a high efficiency bottoming cycle is attractive and should be possible for many locations. This paper presents a theoretical study on possible combination of an organic Rankine-cycle turbine power plate with the heat pump supplied by waste energy sources. Energy requirements and system performances are analyzed using realistic design operating condition for a middle town. Some conversion systems employing working fluids other than water are being studied for the purpose of proposed application. Thermodynamic efficiencies, with respect to available resource, have been calculated by varying some system operating parameters at various reference temperature. With reference to proposed application equations and graphs are presented which interrelate the turbine operational parameters for some possible working fluids with computation results.

  19. High average power CW FELs (Free Electron Laser) for application to plasma heating: Designs and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bidwell, S.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Zhang, Z.X. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Freund, H.P. )

    1989-01-01

    A short period wiggler (period {approximately} 1 cm), sheet beam FEL has been proposed as a low-cost source of high average power (1 MW) millimeter-wave radiation for plasma heating and space-based radar applications. Recent calculation and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of this concept in such critical areas as rf wall heating, intercepted beam ( body'') current, and high voltage (0.5 - 1 MV) sheet beam generation and propagation. Results of preliminary low-gain sheet beam FEL oscillator experiments using a field emission diode and pulse line accelerator have verified that lasing occurs at the predicted FEL frequency. Measured start oscillation currents also appear consistent with theoretical estimates. Finally, we consider the possibilities of using a short-period, superconducting planar wiggler for improved beam confinement, as well as access to the high gain, strong pump Compton regime with its potential for highly efficient FEL operation.

  20. Municipal Development of Anaerobic Digestion/ Combined Heat and Power in Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Brenda

    With a commercial food waste ban going into effect in Massachusetts in October 2014, businesses, institutions, and municipalities are considering alternatives to landfills and incinerators for organic waste. Anaerobic digestion is one such alternative. Similar to composting, but in an environment devoid of oxygen, anaerobic digestion produces byproducts such as methane (which can be burned for heat or electricity) and liquid or solid digestate (which can be used as fertilizer, cattle bedding, and more). Thus, disposal of food waste and other organic materials can become a source of revenue rather than just an expense. Municipalities interested in developing anaerobic digestion/combined heat and power (AD/CHP) facilities have the benefit of desirable options for sites, such as landfill gas facilities and wastewater treatment plants, and potential feedstocks in source-separated residential or municipal food waste or wastewater. This thesis examines the opportunities and challenges for municipal development of AD/CHP facilities in Massachusetts.

  1. Heat Treatment With Beam Integrators Device For CO2 High Power Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botticelli, A.; Caneve, L.; Conserva, Dannille; Cruciani, Diego; Garifo, Luciano

    1989-03-01

    Reflective metallic optics for high power CO2 laser are very important in industrial application of laser surface modification processes (cladding, heat treatment, etc.). Copper wirrors fabricated by diamond turning method offer a very high reflectance in the IR spectral region. Usually, metallic mirrors are coated with protective films to preserve the surface from any kind of degradation. In the development of these optics, we have produced a system for heat treatment. Such a system uses a beam integrator convex mirror that divides the CO2 beam laser in several beams with a predetermined spot size. By a concave mirror all spots are overlapped on the surface which must be treated. In this way, it is possible to obtain a uniform intensity, distribution of radiation on the irradiated surface. Using different beam integrator convex mirrors, various spot sizes at the same focal distance can be achieved.

  2. Additional cooling and heating load improvements in seasonal performance modeling of room and central air conditioners and heat pumps. Topical report, Subtask 3. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-09

    The study focuses on improving the load modeling technique of Seasonal Performance Model (SPM) in order to estimate a more realistic load for seasonal analysis calculations on an hourly basis. A computer simulation program, Seasonal Performance Model Load (SPMLD), was used to calculate the cooling and heating loads for a typical residence in Caribou, Maine; Columbia, Missouri; and Fort Worth, Texas. The derivation of the SPMLD is described and changes made to improve cooling and heating load estimates are identified. (MCW)

  3. Mini-Brayton heat source assembly design study. Volume 1: Space shuttle mission. [feasibility of Brayton isotope power system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Conceptual design definitions of a heat source assembly for use in nominal 500 watt electrical (W(e)) 1200 W(e)and 2000 W(e) mini-Brayton isotope power systems are reported. The HSA is an independent package which maintains thermal and nuclear control of an isotope fueled heat source and transfers the thermal energy to a Brayton rotating unit turbine-alternator-compressor power conversion unit.

  4. Ion heating with high-power perpendicular neutral-beam injection in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, M.; Bitter, M.; Bol, K.; Brau, K.; Davis, S.; Dylla, F.; Eubank, H.; Finkenthal, M.; Fonck, R.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Hugill, J.; Johnson, D.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Mansfield, D.; Manos, D.; McGuire, K.; McCann, R.; McCune, D.; Mueller, D.; Okabayashi, M.; Owens, K.; Reusch, M.; Sauthoff, N.; Schilling, G.; Schmidt, G.; Sesnic, S.; Suckewer, S.; Tait, G.; Takahashi, H.; Tenney, F.; Yamazaki, K.

    1982-08-02

    Plasma heating by near-perpendicular injection of up to 7.2 MW of neutral-beam power has been studied in the PDX tokamak. Collisionless plasmas with central ion temperatures up to 6 keV have been obtained. The total plasma energy, which is dominated by contributions from beam and thermal ions, rises linearly with increasing beam power. The ion heating efficiency in PDX is comparable to that measured in PLT with tangential injection.

  5. Ion Heating with High-Power Perpendicular Neutral-Beam Injection in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, M.; Bitter, M.; Bol, K.; Brau, K.; Davis, S.; Dylla, F.; Eubank, H.; Finkenthal, M.; Fonck, R.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Hugill, J.; Johnson, D.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Mansfield, D.; Manos, D.; McGuire, K.; McCann, R.; McCune, D.; Mueller, D.; Okabayashi, M.; Owens, K.; Reusch, M.; Sauthoff, N.; Schilling, G.; Schmidt, G.; Sesnic, S.; Suckewer, S.; Tait, G.; Takahashi, H.; Tenney, F.; Yamazaki, K.

    1982-08-01

    Plasma heating by near-perpendicular injection of up to 7.2 MW of neutral-beam power has been studied in the PDX tokamak. Collisionless plasmas with centrla ion temperatures up to 6 keV have been obtained. The total plasma energy, which is dominated by contributions from beam and thermal ions, rises linearly with increasing beam power. The ion heating efficiency in PDX is comparable to the measured in the Princeton Large Torus with tangential injection.

  6. Experimental test of a supercritical helium heat exchanger dedicated to EUROTRANS 150 kW CW power coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souli, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Hammoudi, N.

    2010-05-01

    The coaxial power coupler needed for beta = 0.65 superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the proton beam. The estimated RF losses on the power coupler outer conductor in standing wave mode operation are 46 W. To remove these heat loads, a full scale copper coil heat exchanger brazed around the outer conductor was designed and tested using supercritical helium at T = 6 K as a coolant. Our main objective was to minimise the heat loads to cold extremity of SRF cavity maintained at 2 K or 4.2 K. A dedicated test facility named SUPERCRYLOOP was developed and successfully operated in order to measure the performance of the cold heat exchanger. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryomodule. After a short introduction, a brief discussion about the problem of power coupler cooling systems in different machines is made. After that, we describe the experimental set-up and test apparatus. Then, a heat exchanger thermal model will be developed with FEM code COSMOS/M to estimate the different heat transfer coefficients by comparison between numerical simulation results and experimental data in order to validate the design. Finally, thermo-hydraulic behavior of supercritical helium has been investigated as function of different parameters (inlet pressure, flow rate, heat loads).

  7. Efficiency at and near maximum power of low-dissipation heat engines.

    PubMed

    Holubec, Viktor; Ryabov, Artem

    2015-11-01

    A universality in optimization of trade-off between power and efficiency for low-dissipation Carnot cycles is presented. It is shown that any trade-off measure expressible in terms of efficiency and the ratio of power to its maximum value can be optimized independently of most details of the dynamics and of the coupling to thermal reservoirs. The result is demonstrated on two specific trade-off measures. The first one is designed for finding optimal efficiency for a given output power and clearly reveals diseconomy of engines working at maximum power. As the second example we derive universal lower and upper bounds on the efficiency at maximum trade-off given by the product of power and efficiency. The results are illustrated on a model of a diffusion-based heat engine. Such engines operate in the low-dissipation regime given that the used driving minimizes the work dissipated during the isothermal branches. The peculiarities of the corresponding optimization procedure are reviewed and thoroughly discussed. PMID:26651665

  8. Self-heating study of bulk acoustic wave resonators under high RF power.

    PubMed

    Ivira, Brice; Fillit, René-Yves; Ndagijimana, Fabien; Benech, Philippe; Parat, Guy; Ancey, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    The present work first provides an experimental technique to study self-heating of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators under high RF power in the gigahertz range. This study is specially focused on film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators processed onto silicon wafers and designed for wireless systems. Precisely, the reflection coefficient of a one-port device is measured while up to several watts are applied and power leads to electrical drifts of impedances. In the following, we describe how absorbed power can be determined from the incident one in real time. Therefore, an infrared camera held over the radio frequency micro electromechanical system (RF-MEMS) surface with an exceptional spatial resolution reaching up to 2 microm/pixels gives accurate temperature mapping of resonators after emissivity correction. From theoretical point of view, accurate three-dimensional (3-D) structures for finite-element modeling analyses are carried out to know the best materials and architectures to use for enhancing power handling. In both experimental and theoretical investigations, comparison is made between film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators. Thus, the trend in term of material, architecture, and size of device for power application such as in transmission path of a transceiver is clearly identified. PMID:18334320

  9. Efficiency at and near maximum power of low-dissipation heat engines.

    PubMed

    Holubec, Viktor; Ryabov, Artem

    2015-11-01

    A universality in optimization of trade-off between power and efficiency for low-dissipation Carnot cycles is presented. It is shown that any trade-off measure expressible in terms of efficiency and the ratio of power to its maximum value can be optimized independently of most details of the dynamics and of the coupling to thermal reservoirs. The result is demonstrated on two specific trade-off measures. The first one is designed for finding optimal efficiency for a given output power and clearly reveals diseconomy of engines working at maximum power. As the second example we derive universal lower and upper bounds on the efficiency at maximum trade-off given by the product of power and efficiency. The results are illustrated on a model of a diffusion-based heat engine. Such engines operate in the low-dissipation regime given that the used driving minimizes the work dissipated during the isothermal branches. The peculiarities of the corresponding optimization procedure are reviewed and thoroughly discussed.

  10. Efficiency at and near maximum power of low-dissipation heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubec, Viktor; Ryabov, Artem

    2015-11-01

    A universality in optimization of trade-off between power and efficiency for low-dissipation Carnot cycles is presented. It is shown that any trade-off measure expressible in terms of efficiency and the ratio of power to its maximum value can be optimized independently of most details of the dynamics and of the coupling to thermal reservoirs. The result is demonstrated on two specific trade-off measures. The first one is designed for finding optimal efficiency for a given output power and clearly reveals diseconomy of engines working at maximum power. As the second example we derive universal lower and upper bounds on the efficiency at maximum trade-off given by the product of power and efficiency. The results are illustrated on a model of a diffusion-based heat engine. Such engines operate in the low-dissipation regime given that the used driving minimizes the work dissipated during the isothermal branches. The peculiarities of the corresponding optimization procedure are reviewed and thoroughly discussed.

  11. Self-heating study of bulk acoustic wave resonators under high RF power.

    PubMed

    Ivira, Brice; Fillit, René-Yves; Ndagijimana, Fabien; Benech, Philippe; Parat, Guy; Ancey, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    The present work first provides an experimental technique to study self-heating of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators under high RF power in the gigahertz range. This study is specially focused on film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators processed onto silicon wafers and designed for wireless systems. Precisely, the reflection coefficient of a one-port device is measured while up to several watts are applied and power leads to electrical drifts of impedances. In the following, we describe how absorbed power can be determined from the incident one in real time. Therefore, an infrared camera held over the radio frequency micro electromechanical system (RF-MEMS) surface with an exceptional spatial resolution reaching up to 2 microm/pixels gives accurate temperature mapping of resonators after emissivity correction. From theoretical point of view, accurate three-dimensional (3-D) structures for finite-element modeling analyses are carried out to know the best materials and architectures to use for enhancing power handling. In both experimental and theoretical investigations, comparison is made between film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators. Thus, the trend in term of material, architecture, and size of device for power application such as in transmission path of a transceiver is clearly identified.

  12. Joule heating effects on MHD mixed convection of a Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet with power law heat flux: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, D. Harish; Narayana, P. V. Satya

    2016-08-01

    An analysis has been carried out to study the Joule heating effect on MHD heat transfer of an incompressible Jeffrey fluid due to a stretching porous sheet with power law heat flux and heat source. A constant magnetic field is applied normal to the stretching surface. The basic governing equations are reduced into the coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformations. The resulting equations are then solved numerically by shooting method with fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme. The effects of various physical parameters entering into the problem on dimensionless velocity and temperature distribution are discussed through graphs and tables. The results reveal that the momentum and thermal boundary layer thickness are significantly influenced by Deborah number (β), ratio of relaxation and retardation times parameter (λ), heat generation parameter (β*), Eckert number (Ec) and magnetic field parameter (M). A comparison with the previously published works shows excellent agreement.

  13. A geospatial comparison of distributed solar heat and power in Europe and the US.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Zack; Nyholm, Emil; Otanicar, Todd; Johnsson, Filip

    2014-01-01

    The global trends for the rapid growth of distributed solar heat and power in the last decade will likely continue as the levelized cost of production for these technologies continues to decline. To be able to compare the economic potential of solar technologies one must first quantify the types and amount of solar resource that each technology can utilize; second, estimate the technological performance potential based on that resource; and third, compare the costs of each technology across regions. In this analysis, we have performed the first two steps in this process. We use physical and empirically validated models of a total of 8 representative solar system types: non-tracking photovoltaics, 2d-tracking photovoltaics, high concentration photovoltaics, flat-plate thermal, evacuated tube thermal, concentrating trough thermal, concentrating solar combined heat and power, and hybrid concentrating photovoltaic/thermal. These models are integrated into a simulation that uses typical meteorological year weather data to create a yearly time series of heat and electricity production for each system over 12,846 locations in Europe and 1,020 locations in the United States. Through this simulation, systems composed of various permutations of collector-types and technologies can be compared geospatially and temporally in terms of their typical production in each location. For example, we see that silicon solar cells show a significant advantage in yearly electricity production over thin-film cells in the colder climatic regions, but that advantage is lessened in regions that have high average irradiance. In general, the results lead to the conclusion that comparing solar technologies across technology classes simply on cost per peak watt, as is usually done, misses these often significant regional differences in annual performance. These results have implications for both solar power development and energy systems modeling of future pathways of the electricity system. PMID

  14. A Geospatial Comparison of Distributed Solar Heat and Power in Europe and the US

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, Zack; Nyholm, Emil; Otanicar, Todd; Johnsson, Filip

    2014-01-01

    The global trends for the rapid growth of distributed solar heat and power in the last decade will likely continue as the levelized cost of production for these technologies continues to decline. To be able to compare the economic potential of solar technologies one must first quantify the types and amount of solar resource that each technology can utilize; second, estimate the technological performance potential based on that resource; and third, compare the costs of each technology across regions. In this analysis, we have performed the first two steps in this process. We use physical and empirically validated models of a total of 8 representative solar system types: non-tracking photovoltaics, 2d-tracking photovoltaics, high concentration photovoltaics, flat-plate thermal, evacuated tube thermal, concentrating trough thermal, concentrating solar combined heat and power, and hybrid concentrating photovoltaic/thermal. These models are integrated into a simulation that uses typical meteorological year weather data to create a yearly time series of heat and electricity production for each system over 12,846 locations in Europe and 1,020 locations in the United States. Through this simulation, systems composed of various permutations of collector-types and technologies can be compared geospatially and temporally in terms of their typical production in each location. For example, we see that silicon solar cells show a significant advantage in yearly electricity production over thin-film cells in the colder climatic regions, but that advantage is lessened in regions that have high average irradiance. In general, the results lead to the conclusion that comparing solar technologies across technology classes simply on cost per peak watt, as is usually done, misses these often significant regional differences in annual performance. These results have implications for both solar power development and energy systems modeling of future pathways of the electricity system. PMID

  15. A geospatial comparison of distributed solar heat and power in Europe and the US.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Zack; Nyholm, Emil; Otanicar, Todd; Johnsson, Filip

    2014-01-01

    The global trends for the rapid growth of distributed solar heat and power in the last decade will likely continue as the levelized cost of production for these technologies continues to decline. To be able to compare the economic potential of solar technologies one must first quantify the types and amount of solar resource that each technology can utilize; second, estimate the technological performance potential based on that resource; and third, compare the costs of each technology across regions. In this analysis, we have performed the first two steps in this process. We use physical and empirically validated models of a total of 8 representative solar system types: non-tracking photovoltaics, 2d-tracking photovoltaics, high concentration photovoltaics, flat-plate thermal, evacuated tube thermal, concentrating trough thermal, concentrating solar combined heat and power, and hybrid concentrating photovoltaic/thermal. These models are integrated into a simulation that uses typical meteorological year weather data to create a yearly time series of heat and electricity production for each system over 12,846 locations in Europe and 1,020 locations in the United States. Through this simulation, systems composed of various permutations of collector-types and technologies can be compared geospatially and temporally in terms of their typical production in each location. For example, we see that silicon solar cells show a significant advantage in yearly electricity production over thin-film cells in the colder climatic regions, but that advantage is lessened in regions that have high average irradiance. In general, the results lead to the conclusion that comparing solar technologies across technology classes simply on cost per peak watt, as is usually done, misses these often significant regional differences in annual performance. These results have implications for both solar power development and energy systems modeling of future pathways of the electricity system.

  16. Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-07-01

    In this report, an economic model of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) is developed. It covers progress on the DER project for the California Energy Commission (CEC) at Berkeley Lab during the period July 2001 through Dec 2002 in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. CERTS has developed a specific paradigm of distributed energy deployment, the CERTS Microgrid (as described in Lasseter et al. 2002). The primary goal of CERTS distributed generation research is to solve the technical problems required to make the CERTS Microgrid a viable technology, and Berkeley Lab's contribution is to direct the technical research proceeding at CERTS partner sites towards the most productive engineering problems. The work reported herein is somewhat more widely applicable, so it will be described within the context of a generic microgrid (mGrid). Current work focuses on the implementation of combined heat and power (CHP) capability. A mGrid as generically defined for this work is a semiautonomous grouping of generating sources and end-use electrical loads and heat sinks that share heat and power. Equipment is clustered and operated for the benefit of its owners. Although it can function independently of the traditional power system, or macrogrid, the mGrid is usually interconnected and exchanges energy and possibly ancillary services with the macrogrid. In contrast to the traditional centralized paradigm, the design, implementation, operation, and expansion of the mGrid is meant to optimize the overall energy system requirements of participating customers rather than the objectives and requirements of the macrogrid.

  17. Computer control of the high-voltage power supply for the DIII-D Electron Cyclotron Heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, D.D.; Kellman, D.H.

    1991-10-01

    The D3-D Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) high voltage power supply is controlled by a computer. Operational control is input via keyboard and mouse, and computer/power supply interface is accomplished with a Computer Assisted Monitoring and Control (CAMAC) system. User-friendly tools allow the design and layout of simulated control panels on the computer screen. Panel controls and indicators can be changed, added or deleted, and simple editing of user-specific processes can quickly modify control and fault logic. Databases can be defined, and control panel functions are easily referred to various data channels. User-specific processes are written and linked using Fortran, to manage control and data acquisition through CAMAC. The resulting control system has significant advantages over the hardware it emulates: changes in logic, layout, and function are quickly and easily incorporated; data storage, retrieval, and processing are flexible and simply accomplished, physical components subject to wear and degradation are minimized. In addition, the system can be expanded to multiplex control of several power supplied, each with its own database, through a single computer and console. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Combined Heat and Power: A Decade of Progress, A Vision for the Future

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-08-01

    Over the past 10 years, DOE has built a solid foundation for a robust CHP marketplace. We have aligned with key partners to produce innovative technologies and spearhead market-transforming projects. Our commercialization activities and Clean Energy Regional Application Centers have expanded CHP across the nation. More must be done to tap CHP’s full potential. Read more about DOE’s CHP Program in “Combined Heat and Power: A Decade of Progress, A Vision for the Future.”

  19. Fabrication of carbon-carbon heat pipes for space nuclear power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovang, Richard D.; Palamides, Thomas R.; Hunt, Maribeth E.

    1992-01-01

    Significant advancements have been made in the development of lightweight, high performance, carbon-carbon heat pipes for space nuclear power applications. The subject program has progressed through the concept definition and feasibility analysis stages to the current test article component fabrication and assembly phase. This concept utilizes a carbon-carbon tube with integrally woven fins as the primary structural element and radiative surface, Nb-1Zr liners to contain a potassium working fluid, and welded end caps and fill tubes. Various tests have been performed in the development of suitable liner bonding techniques and in the assessment of material stability.

  20. New integrated gas turbine CHP (combined heat and power) and incinerator plant.

    PubMed

    Briggs, R A; Yates, B

    1990-12-01

    Despite the complex nature of the project, the clients brief of a 14 month design and installation period was achieved within the approved budget of 2.5 million pounds. Early performance figures indicate that the scheme is on target to achieve the original payback of under four years. Queen Elizabeth Hospital: installation of integrated combined heat and power plant. Client: Central Birmingham Health Authority. Consulting Engineers/Project Managers: Yates, Edge and Partners. Architects: Temple Cox and Nichols. Structural Engineers: Peel and Fowler. Quantity Surveyor: West Midlands Regional Health Authority.

  1. 600 KWe Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Power Conversion System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    The events and accomplishments of the Sundstrand 600 KWe Organic Rankine Cycle Systems are described. The ORC systems are compatible with diesel engine power plants and the Crane Co. glazing furnaces as waste heat sources. Field site personnel continue to demonstrate their ability to maintain and operate ORC system hardware. The ORC programmable sequencers can be programmed via phone lines from Rockford. This was successfully demonstrated using the Crane system. The hours of operation continued to increase. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual reports.

  2. Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

    2007-07-31

    The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

  3. Theory of sublinear power dependence for microwave heating in some ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kenkre, V.M.; Kus, M.; Katz, J.D.

    1992-07-01

    A sublinear dependence of the microwave heating rate on the incident microwave power implying a saturation effect appears to have been observed recently. We present simple model calculations to address this observation on the basis of an idea of spatial confinement of the absorbing charges in grain boundary regions. Two natural lengths exist in this model: the spatial extent of the confining region, and the maximum distance an absorbing charge travels under the combined action of damping and of the oscillating microwave field. We suggest that a mismatch of these lengths results in the observed saturation, more generally, in the observed decrease in absorption efficiency.

  4. Theory of sublinear power dependence for microwave heating in some ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kenkre, V.M.; Kus, M. ); Katz, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    A sublinear dependence of the microwave heating rate on the incident microwave power implying a saturation effect appears to have been observed recently. We present simple model calculations to address this observation on the basis of an idea of spatial confinement of the absorbing charges in grain boundary regions. Two natural lengths exist in this model: the spatial extent of the confining region, and the maximum distance an absorbing charge travels under the combined action of damping and of the oscillating microwave field. We suggest that a mismatch of these lengths results in the observed saturation, more generally, in the observed decrease in absorption efficiency.

  5. Analysis of a passive heat sink for temperature stabilization of high-power LED bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvís, Eduardo; Bendaña, Ricardo; Michinel, Humberto; Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro; Paredes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a numerical analysis and experimental measurements of the temperature stabilization of high-power LED chips that we have obtained by employing an aluminum passive heat sink, designed to be used in a compact light bulb configuration. We demonstrate that our system keeps the temperature of the LED chip well-below 70° C yielding long-term operation of the device. Our simulations have been performed for a low-cost device ready to install in public streetlights. The experimental measurements performed in different configurations show a nice agreement with the numerical calculations.

  6. Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant based upon direct-contact closed-loop high-temperature heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Minkov, Vladimir; Petrick, Michael

    1988-01-05

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generating system in which ionized combustion gases with slag and seed are discharged from an MHD combustor and pressurized high temperature inlet air is introduced into the combustor for supporting fuel combustion at high temperatures necessary to ionize the combustion gases, and including a heat exchanger in the form of a continuous loop with a circulating heat transfer liquid such as copper oxide. The heat exchanger has an upper horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and the combustion gases to cool the gases and condense the slag which thereupon floats on the heat transfer liquid and can be removed from the channel, and a lower horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and pressurized air for preheating the inlet air. The system further includes a seed separator downstream of the heat exchanger.

  7. Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant based upon direct-contact closed-loop high-temperature heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Minkov, Vladimir; Petrick, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generating system in which ionized combustion gases with slag and seed are discharged from an MHD combustor and pressurized high temperature inlet air is introduced into the combustor for supporting fuel combustion at high temperatures necessary to ionize the combustion gases, and including a heat exchanger in the form of a continuous loop with a circulating heat transfer liquid such as copper oxide. The heat exchanger has an upper horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and the combustion gases to cool the gases and condense the slag which thereupon floats on the heat transfer liquid and can be removed from the channel, and a lower horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and pressurized air for preheating the inlet air. The system further includes a seed separator downstream of the heat exchanger.

  8. Open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic power plant based upon direct-contact closed-loop high-temperature heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, G.F.; Minkov, V.; Petrick, M.

    1981-11-02

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generating system is described in which ionized combustion gases with slag and seed are discharged from an MHD combustor and pressurized high temperature inlet air is introduced into the combustor for supporting fuel combustion at high temperatures necessary to ionize the combustion gases, and including a heat exchanger in the form of a continuous loop with a circulating heat transfer liquid such as copper oxide. The heat exchanger has an upper horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and the combustion gases to cool the gases and condense the slag which thereupon floats on the heat transfer liquid and can be removed from the channel, and a lower horizontal channel for providing direct contact between the heat transfer liquid and pressurized air for preheating the inlet air. The system further includes a seed separator downstream of the heat exchanger.

  9. Fourier, Gegenbauer and Jacobi Expansions for a Power-Law Fundamental Solution of the Polyharmonic Equation and Polyspherical Addition Theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohl, Howard S.

    2013-06-01

    We develop complex Jacobi, Gegenbauer and Chebyshev polynomial expansions for the kernels associated with power-law fundamental solutions of the polyharmonic equation on d-dimensional Euclidean space. From these series representations we derive Fourier expansions in certain rotationally-invariant coordinate systems and Gegenbauer polynomial expansions in Vilenkin's polyspherical coordinates. We compare both of these expansions to generate addition theorems for the azimuthal Fourier coefficients.

  10. Combined Heating and Power Using Microturbines in a Major Urban Hotel

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetser, Richard; Wagner, Timothy; Leslie, Neil; Stovall, Therese K

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a cooperative effort to install and operate a Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at a major hotel in San Francisco, CA. The packaged CHP System integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller was directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, and could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 Refrigeration Tons (RT) of chilled water at a 59oF (15oC) ambient temperature. For the year, the CHP efficiency was 54 percent. Significant lessons learned from this test and verification project are discussed as well as measured performance and economic considerations.

  11. A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W.

    2010-05-15

    A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

  12. Modeling of reciprocating internal combustion engines for power generation and heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a power generation and heat recovery model for reciprocating internal combustion engines (ICEs). The purpose of the proposed model is to provide realistic estimates of performance/efficiency maps for both electrical power output and useful thermal output for various capacities of engines for use in a preliminary CHP design/simulation process. The proposed model will serve as an alternative to constant engine efficiencies or empirical efficiency curves commonly used in the current literature for simulations of CHP systems. The engine performance/efficiency calculation algorithm has been coded to a publicly distributed FORTRAN Dynamic Link Library (DLL), and a user friendly tool has been developed using Visual Basic programming. Simulation results using the proposed model are validated against manufacturer’s technical data.

  13. The performance of solar thermal electric power systems employing small heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pons, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative analysis of small (10 to 100 KWe) heat engines for use with a solar thermal electric system employing the point-focusing, distributed receiver (PF-DR) concept. Stirling, Brayton, and Rankine cycle engines are evaluated for a nominal overall system power level of 1 MWe, although the concept is applicable to power levels up to at least 10 MWe. Multiple concentrators are electrically connected to achieve the desired plant output. Best performance is achieved with the Stirling engine, resulting in a system Levelized Busbar Energy Cost of just under 50 mills/kWH and a Capital Cost of $900/kW, based on the use of mass-produced components. Brayton and Rankine engines show somewhat less performance but are viable alternatives with particular benefits for special applications. All three engines show excellent performance for the small community application.

  14. Thermophotovoltaics for Combined Heat and Power Using Low NOx Gas Fired Radiant Tube Burners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis; Avery, James; Malfa, Enrico; Wuenning, Joachim G.; Kovacik, Gary; Astle, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Three new developments have now occurred, making economical TPV systems possible. The first development is the diffused junction GaSb cell that responds out to 1.8 microns producing over 1 W/cm2 electric, given a blackbody IR emitter temperature of 1250 C. This high power density along with a simple diffused junction cell makes an array cost of 0.50 per Watt possible. The second development is new IR emitters and filters that put 75% of the radiant energy in the cell convertible band. The third development is a set of commercially available ceramic radiant tube burners that operate at up to 1250 C. Herein, we present near term and longer term spectral control designs leading to a 1.5 kW TPV generator / furnace incorporating these new features. This TPV generator / furnace is designed to replace the residential furnace for combined heat and power for the home.

  15. High Conductivity Carbon-Carbon Heat Pipes for Light Weight Space Power System Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2008-01-01

    Based on prior successful fabrication and demonstration testing of a carbon-carbon heat pipe radiator element with integral fins this paper examines the hypothetical extension of the technology via substitution of high thermal conductivity composites which would permit increasing fin length while still maintaining high fin effectiveness. As a result the specific radiator mass could approach an ultimate asymptotic minimum value near 1.0 kg/m2, which is less than one fourth the value of present day satellite radiators. The implied mass savings would be even greater for high capacity space and planetary surface power systems, which may require radiator areas ranging from hundreds to thousands of square meters, depending on system power level.

  16. Thermal power and heat energy of cloud-to-ground lightning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuejuan; Yuan, Ping; Cen, Jianyong; Xue, Simin

    2016-07-01

    A cloud-to-ground lightning flash with nine return strokes has been recorded using a high speed slitless spectrograph and a system composed of a fast antenna and a slow antenna. Based on the spectral data and the synchronous electric field changes that were caused by the lightning, the electrical conductivity, the channel radii, the resistance per unit length, the peak current, the thermal power at the instant of peak current, and the heat energy per unit length during the first 5 μs in the discharge channel have all been calculated. The results indicate that the channel radii have linear relationships with the peak current. The thermal power at the peak current time increases with increasing resistance, but exponential decays with the square of the peak current.

  17. Constitutive relation for nonlinear response and universality of efficiency at maximum power for tight-coupling heat engines.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Shiqi; Tu, Z C

    2015-02-01

    We present a unified perspective on nonequilibrium heat engines by generalizing nonlinear irreversible thermodynamics. For tight-coupling heat engines, a generic constitutive relation for nonlinear response accurate up to the quadratic order is derived from the stalling condition and the symmetry argument. By applying this generic nonlinear constitutive relation to finite-time thermodynamics, we obtain the necessary and sufficient condition for the universality of efficiency at maximum power, which states that a tight-coupling heat engine takes the universal efficiency at maximum power up to the quadratic order if and only if either the engine symmetrically interacts with two heat reservoirs or the elementary thermal energy flowing through the engine matches the characteristic energy of the engine. Hence we solve the following paradox: On the one hand, the quadratic term in the universal efficiency at maximum power for tight-coupling heat engines turned out to be a consequence of symmetry [Esposito, Lindenberg, and Van den Broeck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 130602 (2009); Sheng and Tu, Phys. Rev. E 89, 012129 (2014)]; On the other hand, typical heat engines such as the Curzon-Ahlborn endoreversible heat engine [Curzon and Ahlborn, Am. J. Phys. 43, 22 (1975)] and the Feynman ratchet [Tu, J. Phys. A 41, 312003 (2008)] recover the universal efficiency at maximum power regardless of any symmetry.

  18. Constitutive relation for nonlinear response and universality of efficiency at maximum power for tight-coupling heat engines.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Shiqi; Tu, Z C

    2015-02-01

    We present a unified perspective on nonequilibrium heat engines by generalizing nonlinear irreversible thermodynamics. For tight-coupling heat engines, a generic constitutive relation for nonlinear response accurate up to the quadratic order is derived from the stalling condition and the symmetry argument. By applying this generic nonlinear constitutive relation to finite-time thermodynamics, we obtain the necessary and sufficient condition for the universality of efficiency at maximum power, which states that a tight-coupling heat engine takes the universal efficiency at maximum power up to the quadratic order if and only if either the engine symmetrically interacts with two heat reservoirs or the elementary thermal energy flowing through the engine matches the characteristic energy of the engine. Hence we solve the following paradox: On the one hand, the quadratic term in the universal efficiency at maximum power for tight-coupling heat engines turned out to be a consequence of symmetry [Esposito, Lindenberg, and Van den Broeck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 130602 (2009); Sheng and Tu, Phys. Rev. E 89, 012129 (2014)]; On the other hand, typical heat engines such as the Curzon-Ahlborn endoreversible heat engine [Curzon and Ahlborn, Am. J. Phys. 43, 22 (1975)] and the Feynman ratchet [Tu, J. Phys. A 41, 312003 (2008)] recover the universal efficiency at maximum power regardless of any symmetry. PMID:25768487

  19. Thermal power output determination of 2 MW heat source by using of thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubcik, Michal; Vician, Peter; Palacka, Matej

    2016-06-01

    Experiment is an operation or procedure carried out under controlled conditions in order to discover an unknown effect or law, to test or establish a hypothesis, or to illustrate a known law. The most important part of the experiment is to evaluate the measured values. Measurement accuracy depends on a number of factors. Deviations of instruments cannot eliminate or influence if it is neglect the possibility of using more precise measuring equipment. Another way for the most accurate results can be calibration. Calibration allows achieve measurement values with relatively high accuracy using less precision instruments. The paper deals about the problematic of thermal power measurement accuracy. Thermal power was measured on heat source with nominal thermal power 2 MW by using direct calorimetric method. There were used ultrasonic flow meter and type K thermocouples. Type K thermocouples are not very suitable for these applications because of their low precision. The paper presents the possibility of using calibrated thermocouples for the thermal power measurement with acceptable accuracy.

  20. CORONAL FOURIER POWER SPECTRA: IMPLICATIONS FOR CORONAL SEISMOLOGY AND CORONAL HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, J.; McAteer, R. T. J.; Inglis, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of regions of the solar corona are investigated using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å and 193 Å data. The coronal emission from the quiet Sun, coronal loop footprints, coronal moss, and from above a sunspot is studied. It is shown that the mean Fourier power spectra in these regions can be described by a power law at lower frequencies that tails to a flat spectrum at higher frequencies, plus a Gaussian-shaped contribution that varies depending on the region studied. This Fourier spectral shape is in contrast to the commonly held assumption that coronal time series are well described by the sum of a long timescale background trend plus Gaussian-distributed noise, with some specific locations also showing an oscillatory signal. The implications of the observed spectral shape on the fields of coronal seismology and the automated detection of oscillations in the corona are discussed. The power-law contribution to the shape of the Fourier power spectrum is interpreted as being due to the summation of a distribution of exponentially decaying emission events along the line of sight. This is consistent with the idea that the solar atmosphere is heated everywhere by small energy deposition events.