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Sample records for additional hono sources

  1. Impacts of Additional HONO Sources on Concentrations and Deposition of NOy in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; An, Junling; Kajino, Mizuo; Li, Jian; Qu, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Reactive nitrogen-containing compounds (NOy) are involved in many important chemical processes in the atmosphere, including aerosol formation as well as ozone (O3) production and destruction. As NOy deposition was increasing rapidly in China during 1980s ~ 2000s, great effort is urgently needed to reduce N deposition. HONO, an important component of NOy, is a significant precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH) that drives the formation of O3 and fine particles (PM2.5). Nevertheless, the detailed formation mechanisms of HONO and strength of its sources remain unclear. Unknown HONO sources and their potential impacts on air quality have gained extensive interests but to our current knowledge, the impact of HONO sources on regional-scale deposition of NOy has not been quantified up to date. The goal of this work is to evaluate the effects of the additional HONO sources on concentrations and deposition of individual NOy species as well as the NOy budget in the northern Chinese regions being affected by heavy pollution. Simulations of HONO contributions over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region (BTH) during summer and winter periods of 2007 using the fully coupled Weather Research and Forecasting /Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model are performed by including three additional HONO sources: 1) the reaction of photo-excited nitrogen dioxide (NO2*) with water vapor, 2) NO2 heterogeneous reaction at the aerosol surfaces, and 3) HONO emissions. The model results show that the three additional HONO sources produce a 20%~40% (> 100%) increase in monthly-mean OH concentrations in many urban areas in August (February), leading to a 10%~40% (10%~100%) variation in monthly-mean concentrations of NOx, nitrate and PAN, a 5%~10% (10%~40%) increase in the total dry deposition of NOy, and an enhancement of 1.4 Gg N (1.5 Gg N) in the total of dry and wet deposition of NOy over this region in August (February). These results suggest that the additional HONO sources aggravate regional-scale acid deposition

  2. Parameterization of HONO sources in Mega-Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guohui; Zhang, Renyi; Tie, Xuxie; Molina, Luisa

    2013-04-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) plays an important role in the photochemistry of the troposphere because the photolysis of HONO is a primary source of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the early morning. However, the formation or sources of HONO are still poorly understood in the troposphere; hence the representation of the HONO sources in chemical transport models (CTMs) has lack comprehensive consideration. In the present study, the observed HONO, NOx, and aerosols at an urban supersite T0 during the MCMA-2006 field campaign in Mexico City are used to interpret the HONO formation in association with the suggested HONO sources from literature. The HONO source parameterizations are proposed and incorporated into the WRF-CHEM model. Homogeneous sources of HONO include the reaction of NO with OH and excited NO2 with H2O. Four HONO heterogeneous sources are considered: NO2 reaction with semivolatile organics, NO2 reaction with freshly emitted soot, NO2 reaction on aerosol and ground surfaces. Four cases are used in the present study to evaluate the proposed HONO parameterizations during four field campaigns in which HONO measurements are available, including MCMA-2003 and MCMA-2006 (Mexico City Metropolitan Area, Mexico), MIRAGE-2009 (Shanghai, China), and SHARP (Houston, USA). The WRF-CHEM model with the proposed HONO parameterizations performs moderately well in reproducing the observed diurnal variation of HONO concentrations, showing that the HONO parameterizations in the study are reasonable and potentially useful in improving the HONO simulation in CTMs.

  3. Parameterization of HONO sources in Mega-Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zhang, R.; Tie, X.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-05-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) plays an important role in the photochemistry of the troposphere because the photolysis of HONO is a primary source of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the early morning. However, the formation or sources of HONO are still poorly understood in the troposphere and thence the representation of the HONO sources in chemical transport models (CTMs) is lack of comprehensive consideration. In the present study, the observed HONO, NOx, and aerosols at an urban supersite T0 during the MCMA-2006 field campaign in Mexico City are used to interpret the HONO formation in association with the suggested HONO sources from literature. The HONO source parameterizations are proposed and incorporated into the WRF-CHEM model. Homogeneous sources of HONO include the reaction of NO with OH and excited NO2 with H2O. Four HONO heterogeneous sources are considered: NO2 reaction with semivolatile organics, NO2 reaction with freshly emitted soot, NO2 reaction on aerosol and ground surfaces. Four cases are used in the present study to evaluate the proposed HONO parameterizations during four field campaigns in which HONO measurements are available, including MCMA-2003 and MCMA-2006 (Mexico City Metropolitan Area, Mexico), MIRAGE-2009 (Shanghai, China), and SHARP (Houston, USA). The WRF-CHEM model with the proposed HONO parameterizations performs moderately well in reproducing the observed diurnal variation of HONO concentrations, showing that the HONO parameterizations in the study are reasonable and potentially useful in improving the HONO simulation in CTMs.

  4. Missing gas-phase source of HONO inferred from Zeppelin measurements in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Rohrer, Franz; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Brauers, Theo; Häseler, Rolf; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Holland, Frank; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank N.; Lohse, Insa; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important trace gas in the atmosphere due to its contribution to the cycles of nitrogen oxides (NOX) and hydrogen oxides (HOX). In the past decades, ground-based observations of HONO around the world showed much higher daytime concentrations than can be explained by the known gas-phase chemistry (i.e., HONO + hν → OH + NO, HONO + OH → NO2 + H2O, OH + NO + M → HONO + M). Different light-dependent reactions on ground surfaces have been proposed as additional daytime HONO sources. However, due to lack of measurements, little is known about the concentrations of HONO and its sources in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) at higher altitudes above the earth's surface. The airship Zeppelin NT is an ideal platform to investigate the chemistry and dynamics of the PBL. During the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012 and 2013, HONO and its gas-phase sources and sinks were measured simultaneously on-board the airship Zeppelin NT, for the lowest 1 km of the PBL. In the upper part of the altitude range during morning hours, when the airmass is still isolated from processes at the earth's surface by the remaining nocturnal boundary layer, we find unexpectedly large concentrations of HONO which can neither be explained by heterogeneous reactions on aerosol and ground surfaces, nor by known gas-phase reactions. Our observations show evidence for an unknown gas-phase light-dependent HONO production which dominates the overall HONO formation in the lower troposphere. This new HONO source requires NOX and possibly OH or HO2 radicals. As a result, the general impact of HONO on the OH formation is likely overestimated.

  5. Impact of HONO sources on the performance of mesoscale air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, M.; Dabdub, D.; Chang, W. L.; Jorba, O.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) photolysis constitutes a primary source of OH in the early morning, which leads to changes in model gas-phase and particulate matter concentrations. However, state-of-the-art models of chemical mechanisms share a common representation of gas-phase chemistry leading to HONO that fails in reproducing the observed profiles. Hence, there is a growing interest in improving the definition of additional HONO sources within air quality models, i.e. direct emissions or heterogeneous reactions. In order to test their feasibility under atmospheric conditions, the WRF-ARW/HERMES/CMAQ modeling system is applied with high horizontal resolution (4 × 4 km2) to Spain for November 24-27, 2008. HONO modeled sources include: (1) direct emissions from on-road transport; NO2 hydrolysis on aerosol and ground surfaces, the latter with (2) kinetics depending exclusively on available surfaces for reaction and (3) refined kinetics considering also relative humidity dependence; and (4) photoenhanced NO2 reduction on ground surfaces. The DOMINO measurement campaign performed in El Arenosillo (Southern Spain) provides valuable HONO observations. Modeled HONO results are consistently below observations, even when the most effective scenario is assessed, corresponding to contributions of direct emissions and NO2 hydrolysis with the simplest kinetics parameterization. With the additional sources of HONO, PM2.5 predictions can be up to 14% larger in urban areas. Quantified impacts on secondary pollutants have to be taken as a low threshold, due to the proven underestimation of HONO levels. It is fundamental to improve HONO sources definition within air quality models, both for the scientific community and decision makers.

  6. Review of heterogeneous photochemical reactions of NOy on aerosol - A possible daytime source of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinzhu; Liu, Yongchun; Han, Chong; Ma, Qingxin; Liu, Chang; He, Hong

    2013-02-01

    As an important precursor of hydroxyl radical, nitrous acid (HONO) plays a key role in the chemistry of the lower atmosphere. Recent atmospheric measurements and model calculations show strong enhancement for HONO formation during daytime, while they are inconsistent with the known sources in the atmosphere, suggesting that current models are lacking important sources for HONO. In this article, heterogeneous photochemical reactions of nitric acid/nitrate anion and nitrogen oxide on various aerosols were reviewed and their potential contribution to HONO formation was also discussed. It is demonstrated that HONO can be formed by photochemical reaction on surfaces with deposited HNO3, by photocatalytic reaction of NO2 on TiO2 or TiO2-containing materials, and by photochemical reaction of NO2 on soot, humic acids or other photosensitized organic surfaces. Although significant uncertainties still exist in the exact mechanisms and the yield of HONO, these additional sources might explain daytime observations in the atmosphere.

  7. Impacts of an unknown daytime HONO source on the mixing ratio and budget of HONO, and hydroxyl, hydroperoxyl, and organic peroxy radicals, in the coastal regions of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; An, J.; Wang, F.; Li, Y.; Qu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Lin, J.

    2015-08-01

    Many field experiments have found high nitrous acid (HONO) mixing ratios in both urban and rural areas during daytime, but these high daytime HONO mixing ratios cannot be explained well by gas-phase production, HONO emissions, and nighttime hydrolysis conversion of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on aerosols, suggesting that an unknown daytime HONO source (Punknown) could exist. The formula Punknown ≈ 19.60[NO2] · J(NO2) was obtained using observed data from 13 field experiments across the globe. The three additional HONO sources (i.e., the Punknown, nighttime hydrolysis conversion of NO2 on aerosols, and HONO emissions) were coupled into the WRF-Chem model (Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry) to assess the Punknown impacts on the concentrations and budgets of HONO and peroxy (hydroxyl, hydroperoxyl, and organic peroxy) radicals (ROx) (= OH + HO2 + RO2) in the coastal regions of China. Results indicated that the additional HONO sources produced a significant improvement in HONO and OH simulations, particularly in the daytime. High daytime average Punknown values were found in the coastal regions of China, with a maximum of 2.5 ppb h-1 in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. The Punknown produced a 60-250 % increase of OH, HO2, and RO2 near the ground in the major cities of the coastal regions of China, and a 5-48 % increase of OH, HO2, and RO2 in the daytime meridional-mean mixing ratios within 1000 m above the ground. When the three additional HONO sources were included, the photolysis of HONO was the second most important source in the OH production rate in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou before 10:00 LST with a maximum of 3.72 ppb h-1 and a corresponding Punknown contribution of 3.06 ppb h-1 in Beijing, whereas the reaction of HO2 + NO (nitric oxide) was dominant after 10:00 LST with a maximum of 9.38 ppb h-1 and a corresponding Punknown contribution of 7.23 ppb h-1 in Beijing. The whole ROx cycle was accelerated by the three additional HONO

  8. Detailed budget analysis of HONO in central London reveals a missing daytime source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. D.; Whalley, L. K.; Heard, D. E.; Stone, D.; Dunmore, R. E.; Hamilton, J. F.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Laufs, S.; Kleffmann, J.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of HONO were carried out at an urban background site near central London as part of the Clean air for London (ClearfLo) project in summer 2012. Data were collected from 22 July to 18 August 2014, with peak values of up to 1.8 ppbV at night and non-zero values of between 0.2 and 0.6 ppbV seen during the day. A wide range of other gas phase, aerosol, radiation, and meteorological measurements were made concurrently at the same site, allowing a detailed analysis of the chemistry to be carried out. The peak HONO/NOx ratio of 0.04 is seen at ˜ 02:00 UTC, with the presence of a second, daytime, peak in HONO/NOx of similar magnitude to the night-time peak, suggesting a significant secondary daytime HONO source. A photostationary state calculation of HONO involving formation from the reaction of OH and NO and loss from photolysis, reaction with OH, and dry deposition shows a significant underestimation during the day, with calculated values being close to 0, compared to the measurement average of 0.4 ppbV at midday. The addition of further HONO sources from the literature, including dark conversion of NO2 on surfaces, direct emission, photolysis of ortho-substituted nitrophenols, the postulated formation from the reaction of HO2 × H2O with NO2, photolysis of adsorbed HNO3 on ground and aerosols, and HONO produced by photosensitized conversion of NO2 on the surface increases the daytime modelled HONO to 0.1 ppbV, still leaving a significant missing daytime source. The missing HONO is plotted against a series of parameters including NO2 and OH reactivity (used as a proxy for organic material), with little correlation seen. Much better correlation is observed with the product of these species with j(NO2), in particular NO2 and the product of NO2 with OH reactivity. This suggests the missing HONO source is in some way related to NO2 and also requires sunlight. Increasing the photosensitized surface conversion rate of NO2 by a factor of 10 to a mean daytime first

  9. Missing gas-phase source of HONO inferred from Zeppelin measurements in the troposphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Rohrer, Franz; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Brauers, Theo; Häseler, Rolf; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Holland, Frank; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank N; Lohse, Insa; Lu, Keding; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wolfe, Glenn M; Mentel, Thomas F; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-04-18

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) is an important precursor of tropospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH). OH is responsible for atmospheric self-cleansing and controls the concentrations of greenhouse gases like methane and ozone. Due to lack of measurements, vertical distributions of HONO and its sources in the troposphere remain unclear. Here, we present a set of observations of HONO and its budget made onboard a Zeppelin airship. In a sunlit layer separated from Earth's surface processes by temperature inversion, we found high HONO concentrations providing evidence for a strong gas-phase source of HONO consuming nitrogen oxides and potentially hydrogen oxide radicals. The observed properties of this production process suggest that the generally assumed impact of HONO on the abundance of OH in the troposphere is substantially overestimated. PMID:24744373

  10. Missing gas-phase source of HONO inferred from Zeppelin measurements in the troposphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Rohrer, Franz; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Brauers, Theo; Häseler, Rolf; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Holland, Frank; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank N; Lohse, Insa; Lu, Keding; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wolfe, Glenn M; Mentel, Thomas F; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-04-18

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) is an important precursor of tropospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH). OH is responsible for atmospheric self-cleansing and controls the concentrations of greenhouse gases like methane and ozone. Due to lack of measurements, vertical distributions of HONO and its sources in the troposphere remain unclear. Here, we present a set of observations of HONO and its budget made onboard a Zeppelin airship. In a sunlit layer separated from Earth's surface processes by temperature inversion, we found high HONO concentrations providing evidence for a strong gas-phase source of HONO consuming nitrogen oxides and potentially hydrogen oxide radicals. The observed properties of this production process suggest that the generally assumed impact of HONO on the abundance of OH in the troposphere is substantially overestimated.

  11. Potential sources of nitrous acid (HONO) and their impacts on ozone: A WRF-Chem study in a polluted subtropical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Junyu; Xu, Zheng; Lv, Mengyao

    2016-04-01

    Current chemical transport models commonly undersimulate the atmospheric concentration of nitrous acid (HONO), which plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry, due to the lack or inappropriate representations of some sources in the models. In the present study, we parameterized up-to-date HONO sources into a state-of-the-art three-dimensional chemical transport model (Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry: WRF-Chem). These sources included (1) heterogeneous reactions on ground surfaces with the photoenhanced effect on HONO production, (2) photoenhanced reactions on aerosol surfaces, (3) direct vehicle and vessel emissions, (4) potential conversion of NO2 at the ocean surface, and (5) emissions from soil bacteria. The revised WRF-Chem was applied to explore the sources of the high HONO concentrations (0.45-2.71 ppb) observed at a suburban site located within complex land types (with artificial land covers, ocean, and forests) in Hong Kong. With the addition of these sources, the revised model substantially reproduced the observed HONO levels. The heterogeneous conversions of NO2 on ground surfaces dominated HONO sources contributing about 42% to the observed HONO mixing ratios, with emissions from soil bacterial contributing around 29%, followed by the oceanic source (~9%), photochemical formation via NO and OH (~6%), conversion on aerosol surfaces (~3%), and traffic emissions (~2%). The results suggest that HONO sources in suburban areas could be more complex and diverse than those in urban or rural areas and that the bacterial and/or ocean processes need to be considered in HONO production in forested and/or coastal areas. Sensitivity tests showed that the simulated HONO was sensitive to the uptake coefficient of NO2 on the surfaces. Incorporation of the aforementioned HONO sources significantly improved the simulations of ozone, resulting in increases of ground-level ozone concentrations by 6-12% over urban areas in Hong Kong and

  12. Photoenhanced uptakes of NO2 by indoor surfaces: A new HONO source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorovski, S.; Bartolomei, V.; Soergel, M.; Gomez Alvarez, E.; Zetzsch, C.; Wortham, H.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is a known household pollutant that can lead to human respiratory tract irritation. HONO acts as the nitrosating agent, e.g. by the formation of the so-called third-hand smoke after wall reactions of HONO with nicotine (1). HONO can be generated indoors directly during combustion processes or indirectly via heterogeneous NO2 reactions with adsorbed water on diverse surfaces (2). Recently a new source was identified as another path of HONO formation in the troposphere (3). Namely, the light-induced heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with adsorbed organics (known as photosensitizers) on various surfaces such as roads, buildings, rocks or plants leads to enhanced HONO production. The detected values of HONO indoors vary in the range between 2 and 25 parts per billion (ppb). However, like outdoors, the processes leading to HONO formation indoors are not completely understood (4). Indoor photolysis radiation sources include exterior sunlight (λ>350 nm) that enters typically through the windows and indoor illumination sources, i.e., rare gas/mercury fluorescent light bulbs and tungsten and tungsten/halogen light bulbs among others. The present work is showing the importance of indoor sources of HONO recently identified or postulated. We have tested a number of common household chemical agents commonly used for cleaning purposes or coatings of domestic surfaces to better identify different indoor HONO sources. We used a heterogeneous flow tube technique to test the HONO production potentials of these household chemical agents under different experimental conditions, namely with and without light and at different relative humidity levels and different NO2 concentrations. We report uptake kinetics measurements of the heterogeneous reaction of gas phase NO2 with lacquer and paint coated on the walls of the reactor. The flow tube was irradiated with four near-ultraviolet (UV) emitting lamps (range of wavelengths 300-420nm). We observed that the heterogeneous

  13. Observation of HONO in Changzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yanping; Chen, Jun; Lou, Shengrong

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) is one of the sources of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals, which has an important influence on the increase of atmospheric oxidation. In addition to the first emission and the homogeneous reaction of OH+NO in the gas phase, the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on various surfaces is considered to be the source of HONO. During the period of observation in the Yangtze River Delta on June 2015, we apply the LOng Path Absorption Photometer (LOPAP) to measure the HONO concentration at Changzhou site. With the information of NOX, aerosol physics, properties and meteorological conditions obtained from the same period, we analyzed the source of HONO at night. In the case of June 4th, 5th, and 15th at night, the concentration of HONO reached the highest value during the observation period ~3.0 ppb. Except for these three days, HONO mean concentration generally in about 1-2 ppb, the HONO/NO2 range during the period of observation is 0.32%~10.9%, within the domestic and foreign observation in the clean zone values, the average of values is 4.23%, within the general scope of 0.5% ~ 5%. The results between HONO concentration and PM10 and PM2.5 at night show uncorrelated coefficient of R=0.186 and R=0.2108 respectively. The source apportionment showed high contribution from local combustion process of fossil fuels during the observation period and the heterogeneous reaction on the surface of the aerosol at night needs further study.

  14. A comparison of measured HONO uptake and release with calculated source strengths in a heterogeneous forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sörgel, M.; Trebs, I.; Wu, D.; Held, A.

    2015-08-01

    Vertical mixing ratio profiles of nitrous acid (HONO) were measured in a clearing and on the forest floor in a rural forest environment. For the forest floor, HONO was found to predominantly deposit, whereas for the clearing, net deposition dominated only during nighttime and net emissions were observed during daytime. For selected days, net fluxes of HONO were calculated from the measured profiles using the aerodynamic gradient method. The emission fluxes were in the range of 0.02 to 0.07 nmol m-2 s-1 and thus were in the lower range of previous observations. These fluxes were compared to the strengths of postulated HONO sources. Laboratory measurements of different soil samples from both sites revealed an upper limit for soil biogenic HONO emission fluxes of 0.025 nmol m-2 s-1. HONO formation by light-induced NO2 conversion was calculated to be below 0.03 nmol m-2 s-1 for the investigated days, which is comparable to the potential soil fluxes. Due to light saturation at low irradiance, this reaction pathway was largely found to be independent of light intensity, i.e. it was only dependent on ambient NO2. We used three different approaches based on measured leaf nitrate loadings for calculating HONO formation from HNO3 photolysis. While the first two approaches based on empirical HONO formation rates yielded values in the same order of magnitude as the estimated fluxes, the third approach based on available kinetic data of the postulated pathway failed to produce noticeable amounts of HONO. Estimates based on reported cross sections of adsorbed HNO3 indicate that the lifetime of adsorbed HNO3 was only about 15 min, which would imply a substantial renoxification. Although the photolysis of HNO3 was significantly enhanced at the surface, the subsequent light-induced conversion of the photolysis product NO2 did not produce considerable amounts of HONO. Consequently, this reaction might occur via an alternative mechanism. By explicitly calculating HONO formation based

  15. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE. Response to Comment on "Missing gas-phase source of HONO inferred from Zeppelin measurements in the troposphere".

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Rohrer, Franz; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Brauers, Theo; Häseler, Rolf; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Holland, Frank; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank N; Lohse, Insa; Lu, Keding; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wolfe, Glenn M; Mentel, Thomas F; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2015-06-19

    Ye et al. have determined a maximum nitrous acid (HONO) yield of 3% for the reaction HO2·H2O + NO2, which is much lower than the yield used in our work. This finding, however, does not affect our main result that HONO in the investigated Po Valley region is mainly from a gas-phase source that consumes nitrogen oxides.

  16. Combustion Processes Indoors: a Source of High OH Radical Concentrations Through the Photolysis of Hono

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolomei, V.; Gomez Alvarez, E.; Glor, M.; Gligorovski, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Quivet, E.; Strekowski, R.; Zetzsch, C.; Held, A. B.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) is one of the most important oxidant species in the atmosphere controlling its self-oxidizing capacity. The main sources of OH radicals are photolysis of ozone and photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO), among the others. In the indoor air, the ozonolysis of alkenes has been suggested as the main OH formation pathway. The possibility for OH formation through photolytic pathways in the indoor environment has been, up to now, ignored (Gómez Alvarez et al., 2012). Models and indirect measurements to the present time predicted concentrations of OH radicals in the order of 104 -105 cm-3. Recently, by direct measurements we have detected high OH radical concentrations of 1.8 106 cm-3 in a classroom in Marseille and we demonstrated that its main source is the photolysis of HONO (Gómez Alvarez et al., 2013). The concentrations of HONO are quite high indoors, reaching levels in the order of a few tens of ppbV (Gómez Alvarez et al., 2013). This is mainly due to 1) direct combustion sources and 2) heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on the numerous surfaces present in the indoor environment. HONO levels of 30 ppb were measured in a previous campaign carried out in Bayreuth in July 2012 as direct emissions from the combustion of a candle. The combination between so high concentrations of HONO and higher than expected light transmissions indoors (or indoor artificial lighting) could have a significant impact on the OH concentrations indoors which could feasibly become considerably higher than we measured in our school campaign (Gomez Alvarez et al., 2013). In order to evaluate these upper limits under combustion conditions in the indoor environment, we have carried out a campaign in the LOTASC chamber (Bayreuth, Germany). For this aim, the exhaust fumes from the burning of a commonly used domestic candle have been introduced in the chamber. The chamber was irradiated under well research indoor lighting conditions. A thorough characterization of light intensities

  17. Daytime HONO vertical gradients during SHARP 2009 in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. W.; Tsai, C.; Lefer, B.; Haman, C.; Grossberg, N.; Brune, W. H.; Ren, X.; Luke, W.; Stutz, J.

    2012-01-01

    photolytic HONO source. [HONO]/[NO2] ratios also showed a clear diurnal profile, with maxima of 2-3% around noon. PSS calculations show that this behavior cannot be explained by the proposed gas-phase reaction of photoexcited NO2 (NO2*) or any other gas-phase or aerosol photolytic process occurring at similar or longer wavelengths than that of HONO photolysis. HONO formation by aerosol nitrate photolysis in the UV also seems to be unlikely. Pnorm correlated better with solar irradiance (average R2 = 0.85/0.87 for visible/UV) than with actinic flux (R2 = 0.76) on the four sunny days, clearly pointing to HONO being formed at the ground rather than on the aerosol or in the gas-phase. In addition, the observed [HONO]/[NO2] diurnal variation can be explained if the formation of HONO depends on solar irradiance, but not if it depends on the actinic flux. The vertical mixing ratio profiles, together with the stronger correlation with solar irradiance, support the idea that photolytically enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion on the ground was the dominant source of HONO in Houston.

  18. The Primary and Recycling Sources of OH During the NACHTT-2011 Campaign: HONO as an Important OH Primary Source in the Wintertime

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; VandenBoer, Trevor; Young, Cora; Riedel, Theran; Thornton, Joel A.; Swarthout, Bob; Sive, B.; Lerner, Brian M.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Roberts, James M.; Guenther, Alex B.; Wagner, Nicholas; Dube, William P.; Williams, Eric; Brown, Steve

    2014-06-10

    We present OH observation results during the NACHTT-11 field campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Weld County, Colorado. The observed OH levels during the daytime (at noon) were ~ 2.7 × 106 molecules cm-3 at the ground level (2 m above ground level, AGL). HONO and ozone photolysis were the two dominant photochemical OH production pathways during the field campaign. However, alkene ozonolysis, found an important source for OH by two previous winter season OH observations, was a minor contribution to OH primary production (~5 %). To evaluate recycling sources of OH from HO2 and RO2, an observation constrained University of Washington Chemical Mechanism (UWCM) box model is employed to simulated ambient OH levels with different model scenarios. For the base run without constraining observed HONO, the model simulated OH significantly underestimates the observed OH level (20.8 times in the morning and 7.2 times in the daytime). This indicates that the known HONO sources incorporated in the UWCM model cannot explain the observed HONO level. Once HONO is constrained by the observation, the discrepancy between observation and model simulation improves (5.1 times in the morning and 2.1 times in the daytime) but still out of the measurement uncertainty range (35 %). We explore two possible reasons for the observed unexplainably high wintertime OH levels. First, potential roles of Cl atoms produce organic peroxy radicals from the reactions between Cl atmos and alkane compounds. However, the Cl levels during the observation period are estimated very low (~ 103 atoms cm-3) to explain the enhanced OH levels. Second, Impacts of higher HONO levels on the ground was evaluated. Strong HONO gradient towards ground was observed especially during the early morning (6 am to 8 am) was observed and the lowest level available for the HONO observation during the campaign is 5 m AGL. Once we assume the twice of the observed HONO levels averaged between 5 m to 15 m at 2 m AGL

  19. Evaluating emissions of HCHO, HONO, NO2, and SO2 from point sources using portable Imaging DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikelnaya, O.; Tsai, C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Fu, D.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J. H.; Stutz, J.

    2011-12-01

    Our ability to quantitatively describe urban air pollution to a large extent depends on an accurate understanding of anthropogenic emissions. In areas with a high density of individual point sources of pollution, such as petrochemical facilities with multiple flares or regions with active commercial ship traffic, this is particularly challenging as access to facilities and ships is often restricted. Direct formaldehyde emissions from flares may play an important role for ozone chemistry, acting as an initial radical precursor and enhancing the degradation of co-emitted hydrocarbons. HONO is also recognized as an important OH source throughout the day. However, very little is known about direct HCHO and HONO emissions. Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (I-DOAS), a relatively new remote sensing technique, provides an opportunity to investigate emissions from these sources from a distance, making this technique attractive for fence-line monitoring. In this presentation, we will describe I-DOAS measurements during the FLAIR campaign in the spring/summer of 2009. We performed measurements outside of various industrial facilities in the larger Houston area as well as in the Houston Ship Channel to visualize and quantify the emissions of HCHO, NO2, HONO, and SO2 from flares of petrochemical facilities and ship smoke stacks. We will present the column density images of pollutant plumes as well as fluxes from individual flares calculated from I-DOAS observations. Fluxes from individual flares and smoke stacks determined from the I-DOAS measurements vary widely in time and by the emission sources. We will also present HONO/NOx ratios in ship smoke stacks derived from the combination of I-DOAS and in-situ measurements, and discuss other trace gas ratios in plumes derived from the I-DOAS observations. Finally, we will show images of HCHO, NO2 and SO2 plumes from control burn forest fires observed in November of 2009 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Maria

  20. On the interpretation of in situ HONO observations via photochemical steady state.

    PubMed

    Crilley, Leigh R; Kramer, Louisa; Pope, Francis D; Whalley, Lisa K; Cryer, Danny R; Heard, Dwayne E; Lee, James D; Reed, Christopher; Bloss, William J

    2016-07-18

    A substantial body of recent literature has shown that boundary layer HONO levels are higher than can be explained by simple, established gas-phase chemistry, to an extent that implies that additional HONO sources represent a major, or the dominant, precursor to OH radicals in such environments. This conclusion may be reached by analysis of point observations of (for example) OH, NO and HONO, alongside photochemical parameters; however both NO and HONO have non-negligible atmospheric lifetimes, so these approaches may be problematic if substantial spatial heterogeneity exists. We report a new dataset of HONO, NOx and HOx observations recorded at an urban background location, which support the existence of additional HONO sources as determined elsewhere. We qualitatively evaluate the possible impacts of local heterogeneity using a series of idealised numerical model simulations, building upon the work of Lee et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 2013, DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020341). The simulations illustrate the time required for photostationary state approaches to yield accurate results following substantial perturbations in the HOx/NOx/NOy chemistry, and the scope for bias to an inferred HONO source from NOx and VOC emissions in either a positive or negative sense, depending upon the air mass age following emission. To assess the extent to which these impacts may be present in actual measurements, we present exploratory spatially resolved measurements of HONO and NOx abundance obtained using a mobile instrumented laboratory. Measurements of the spatial variability of HONO in urban, suburban and rural environments show pronounced changes in abundance are found in proximity to major roads within urban areas, indicating that photo-stationary steady state (PSS) analyses in such areas are likely to be problematic. The measurements also show areas of very homogeneous HONO and NOx abundance in rural, and some suburban, regions, where the PSS approach is likely to be valid. Implications

  1. HONO fluxes from soil surfaces: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianming; Sörgel, Matthias; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cheng, Yafang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) contributes up to 80% of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) radicals and is also linked to health risks through reactions with tobacco smoke forming carcinogens. Field and modeling results suggested a large unknown HONO source in the troposphere during daytime. By measuring near ground HONO mixing ratio, up to 30% of HONO can be released from forest, rural and urban ground as well as snow surfaces. This source has been proposed to heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on humic acid surfaces or nitric acid photolysis. Laboratory studies showed that HONO emissions from bulk soil samples can reach 258 ng m-2 s-1 (in term of nitrogen), which corresponding to 1.1 × 1012 molecules cm-2 s-1and ˜ 100 times higher than most of the field studies, as measured by a dynamic chamber system. The potential mechanisms for soil HONO emissions include chemical equilibrium of acid-base reaction and gas-liquid partitioning between soil nitrite and HONO, but the positive correlation of HONO fluxes with pH (largest at neutral and slightly alkaline) points to the dominance of the formation process by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In general soil surface acidity, nitrite concentration and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria mainly regulate the HONO release from soil. A recent study showed that biological soil crusts in drylands can also emit large quantities of HONO and NO, corresponding to ˜20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. Due to large concentrations of microorganisms in biological soil crusts, particularly high HONO and NO emissions were measured after wetting events. Considering large areas of arid and arable lands as well as peatlands, up to 70% of global soils are able to emitting HONO. However, the discrepancy between large soil HONO emissions measured in lab and low contributions of HONO flux from ground surfaces in field as well as the role of microorganisms should be further investigated.

  2. HONO fluxes from soil surfaces: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianming; Sörgel, Matthias; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cheng, Yafang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) contributes up to 80% of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) radicals and is also linked to health risks through reactions with tobacco smoke forming carcinogens. Field and modeling results suggested a large unknown HONO source in the troposphere during daytime. By measuring near ground HONO mixing ratio, up to 30% of HONO can be released from forest, rural and urban ground as well as snow surfaces. This source has been proposed to heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on humic acid surfaces or nitric acid photolysis. Laboratory studies showed that HONO emissions from bulk soil samples can reach 258 ng m‑2 s‑1 (in term of nitrogen), which corresponding to 1.1 × 1012 molecules cm‑2 s‑1and ˜ 100 times higher than most of the field studies, as measured by a dynamic chamber system. The potential mechanisms for soil HONO emissions include chemical equilibrium of acid-base reaction and gas-liquid partitioning between soil nitrite and HONO, but the positive correlation of HONO fluxes with pH (largest at neutral and slightly alkaline) points to the dominance of the formation process by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In general soil surface acidity, nitrite concentration and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria mainly regulate the HONO release from soil. A recent study showed that biological soil crusts in drylands can also emit large quantities of HONO and NO, corresponding to ˜20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. Due to large concentrations of microorganisms in biological soil crusts, particularly high HONO and NO emissions were measured after wetting events. Considering large areas of arid and arable lands as well as peatlands, up to 70% of global soils are able to emitting HONO. However, the discrepancy between large soil HONO emissions measured in lab and low contributions of HONO flux from ground surfaces in field as well as the role of microorganisms should be further investigated.

  3. Nitrous acid (HONO) observations during the Uintah Basin Wintertime Ozone Studies (UBWOS) and the Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emission, and Reactivity (WINTER) study: sources, measurements interferences, and implications beyond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Alvarez, S. L.; Bates, T. S.; Brown, S. S.; Edwards, P.; Flynn, J. H., III; De Gouw, J. A.; Johnson, J. E.; Lee, B. H.; Lefer, B. L.; Liggio, J.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Quinn, P.; Stutz, J.; Thornton, J. A.; Tsai, J. Y.; Wentzell, J. J. B.; Wild, R. J.; Yuan, B.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted HONO as a strong daytime source of OH radicals though a general lack of consensus exists with respect to the sources and overall impact of HONO photolysis on daytime radical budgets. Improvements in atmospheric HOx and NOx budgets, and therefore daytime HONO constraints, are necessary to improve air quality control strategies in adversely affected regions. In this presentation HONO measurements made using multiple collocated instruments during the UBWOS 2013 and 2014 field studies will be discussed. These results suggest that our ability to measure HONO is heavily dependent on our understanding of sampling artifacts, measurement interferences, and background determinations. We also present mid-latitude tropospheric observations of HO2NO2, as high as 1.5 ppbv, that coincide with the observed maxima in daytime HONO. These coinciding observations of both HONO and HO2NO2 will be presented with a particular emphasis on potential vertical gradients, surface chemistry, and daytime budgets. Results of this work may be relevant to interpretation of HONO observations in a range of environments from clean arctic to relatively polluted urban summertime regions. Measurements of HONO from the Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emission, and Reactivity (WINTER) project in 2015 will be shown for comparison.

  4. Heterogeneous Reactivity of NO2 with Photocatalytic Paints: A Possible Source of Nitrous Acid (HONO) in the Indoor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorovski, S.; Bartolomei, V.; Gandolfo, A.; Gomez Alvarez, E.; Kleffmann, J.; Wortham, H.

    2014-12-01

    There is an increasing concern about the indoor air environment, where we spend most of our time. Common methods of improving indoor air quality include controlling pollution sources, increasing ventilation rates or using air purifiers. Photocatalytic remediation technology was suggested as a new possibility to eliminate indoor air pollutants instead of just diluting or disposing them. In the present study, heterogeneous reactions of NO2 were studied on photocatalytic paints containing different size and quantity of TiO2. The heterogeneous reactions were conducted in a photo reactor under simulated atmospheric conditions. The flat pyrex rectangular plates covered with the paint were inserted into the reactor. These plates have been sprayed with the photocatalytic paints at our industrial partner's (ALLIOS) facilities using a high precision procedure that allowed the application of a thin layer of a given thickness of the paint. This allows a homogeneous coverage of the surface with the paint and an accurate determination of the exact amount of paint exposed to gaseous NO2. We demonstrate that the indoor photocatalytic paints which contain TiO2 can substantially reduce the concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). We show that the efficiency of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) removal increase with the quantity of TiO2 in the range 0 - 7 %. The geometric uptake coefficients increase from 5 · 10-6 to 1.6 · 10-5 under light irradiation of the paints. On the other hand, during the reactions of NO2 with this paint (7 % of TiO2) nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO) are formed. Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important harmful indoor pollutant and its photolysis leads to the formation of highly reactive OH radicals (Gomez Alvarez et al., 2013). Maximum conversion efficiencies of NO2to HONO and NO of 15 % and 33 % were observed at 30 % RH, respectively. Thus, the quantity of TiO2 embedded in the paint is an important parameter regarding the nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2

  5. Observation and modelling of ambient nitrous acid (HONO) at a rural site (Wangdu) in the North China Plain in summer 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuhan; Lu, Keding; Li, Xin; Dong, Huabin; Ye, Nini; Tan, Zhaofeng; Wu, Yusheng; Zeng, Liming; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Hofzumahaus, Andrease; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Wahner, Andrease; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-04-01

    Significant missing daytime HONO sources were determined in many places worldwide from urban to rural conditions. In recent field campaigns performed in Chinese megacity regions such as Pearl River Delta, Yangtze River Delta and North China Plain, strong missing HONO sources were also determined and possible explanations including photoenhanced heterogeneous conversion of NO2, photolysis of particulate nitrate, soil emission, and emission from biomass burning. In the present work, we performed in situ measurements of ambient HONO concentration at a rural site (Wangdu) in North China Plain in summer 2014. The observed HONO concentration ranges from tens ppt to 5 ppb. The relations between observed HONO concentration and nitrogen oxide, aerosol and gas-phase chemistry are discussed with statistical methods. Moreover, we use an observational constrained box model to explore the possible roles of the state of art HONO production mechanisms. In addition, after the day of fertilization, we observed a daytime HONO peak around noon time which was distinct from other days by the HONO/NO2 ratio. We believe this peak is a strong indication of soil HONO emission since our site was located in center of a large wheat field. Compared to other days, this increased HONO concentration contributes significantly to the OH production around noontime.

  6. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE. Comment on "Missing gas-phase source of HONO inferred from Zeppelin measurements in the troposphere".

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunxiang; Zhou, Xianliang; Pu, Dennis; Stutz, Jochen; Festa, James; Spolaor, Max; Cantrell, Christopher; Mauldin, Roy L; Weinheimer, Andrew; Haggerty, Julie

    2015-06-19

    Li et al. (Reports, 18 April 2014, p. 292) proposed a unity nitrous acid (HONO) yield for reaction between nitrogen dioxide and the hydroperoxyl-water complex and suggested a substantial overestimation in HONO photolysis contribution to hydroxyl radical budget. Based on airborne observations of all parameters in this chemical system, we have determined an upper-limit HONO yield of 0.03 for the reaction.

  7. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE. Comment on "Missing gas-phase source of HONO inferred from Zeppelin measurements in the troposphere".

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunxiang; Zhou, Xianliang; Pu, Dennis; Stutz, Jochen; Festa, James; Spolaor, Max; Cantrell, Christopher; Mauldin, Roy L; Weinheimer, Andrew; Haggerty, Julie

    2015-06-19

    Li et al. (Reports, 18 April 2014, p. 292) proposed a unity nitrous acid (HONO) yield for reaction between nitrogen dioxide and the hydroperoxyl-water complex and suggested a substantial overestimation in HONO photolysis contribution to hydroxyl radical budget. Based on airborne observations of all parameters in this chemical system, we have determined an upper-limit HONO yield of 0.03 for the reaction. PMID:26089507

  8. Comment on “Missing gas-phase source of HONO inferred from Zeppelin measurements in the troposphere”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chunxiang; Zhou, Xianliang; Pu, Dennis; Stutz, Jochen; Festa, James; Spolaor, Max; Cantrell, Christopher; Mauldin, Roy L.; Weinheimer, Andrew; Haggerty, Julie

    2015-06-01

    Li et al. (Reports, 18 April 2014, p. 292) proposed a unity nitrous acid (HONO) yield for reaction between nitrogen dioxide and the hydroperoxyl-water complex and suggested a substantial overestimation in HONO photolysis contribution to hydroxyl radical budget. Based on airborne observations of all parameters in this chemical system, we have determined an upper-limit HONO yield of 0.03 for the reaction.

  9. Modeling of daytime HONO vertical gradients during SHARP 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. W.; Tsai, C.; Lefer, B.; Grossberg, N.; Stutz, J.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) acts as a major precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the urban atmospheric boundary layer in the morning and throughout the day. Despite its importance, HONO formation mechanisms are not yet completely understood. It is generally accepted that conversion of NO2 on surfaces in the presence of water is responsible for the formation of HONO in the nocturnal boundary layer, although the type of surface on which the mechanism occurs is still under debate. Recent observations of higher than expected daytime HONO concentrations in both urban and rural areas indicate the presence of unknown daytime HONO source(s). Various formation pathways in the gas phase, and on aerosol and ground surfaces have been proposed to explain the presence of daytime HONO. However, it is unclear which mechanism dominates and, in the cases of heterogeneous mechanisms, on which surfaces they occur. Vertical concentration profiles of HONO and its precursors can help in identifying the dominant HONO formation pathways. In this study, daytime HONO and NO2 vertical profiles, measured in three different height intervals (20-70, 70-130, and 130-300 m) in Houston, TX, during the 2009 Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP) are analyzed using a one-dimensional (1-D) chemistry and transport model. Model results with various HONO formation pathways suggested in the literature are compared to the the daytime HONO and HONO/NO2 ratios observed during SHARP. The best agreement of HONO and HONO/NO2 ratios between model and observations is achieved by including both a photolytic source of HONO at the ground and on the aerosol. Model sensitivity studies show that the observed diurnal variations of the HONO/NO2 ratio are not reproduced by the model if there is only a photolytic HONO source on aerosol or in the gas phase from NO2* + H2O. Further analysis of the formation and loss pathways of HONO shows a vertical dependence of HONO chemistry during the day. Photolytic HONO

  10. Modeling of daytime HONO vertical gradients during SHARP 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. W.; Tsai, C.; Lefer, B.; Grossberg, N.; Stutz, J.

    2012-10-01

    Nitrous Acid (HONO) acts as a major precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the urban atmospheric boundary layer in the morning and throughout the day. Despite its importance, HONO formation mechanisms are not yet completely understood. It is generally accepted that conversion of NO2 on surfaces in the presence of water is responsible for the formation of HONO in the nocturnal boundary layer, although the type of surface on which the mechanism occurs is still under debate. Recent observations of higher than expected daytime HONO concentrations in both urban and rural areas indicate the presence of unknown daytime HONO source(s). Various formation pathways in the gas-phase and on aerosol and ground surfaces have been proposed to explain the presence of daytime HONO. However, it is unclear which mechanism dominates and, in the cases of heterogeneous mechanisms, on which surfaces they occur. Vertical concentration profiles of HONO and its precursors can help in identifying the dominant HONO formation pathways. In this study, daytime HONO and NO2 vertical profiles, measured in three different height intervals (20-70 m, 70-130 m and 130-300 m) in Houston, TX during the 2009 Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP) are analyzed using a one-dimensional (1-D) chemistry and transport model. Model results with various HONO formation pathways suggested in the literature are compared to the the daytime HONO and HONO/NO2 ratios observed during SHARP. The best agreement of HONO and HONO/NO2 ratios between model and observations is achieved by including both a photolytic source of HONO at the ground and on the aerosol. Model sensitivity studies show that the observed diurnal variations of HONO/NO2 ratio are not reproduced by the model if there is only a photolytic HONO source on aerosol or in the gas-phase from NO2* + H2O. Further analysis of the formation and loss pathways of HONO shows a vertical dependence of HONO chemistry during the day. Photolytic HONO

  11. Nocturnal Measurements of HONO by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtal, P.; McLaren, R.

    2011-12-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was used to quantify the concentration of HONO, NO2 and SO2 in the nocturnal urban atmosphere at York University over a period of one year. These measurements form a comprehensive HONO data set, including a large range of temperatures, relative humidity, surface conditions (snow, water, dry, etc.) and NO2 concentrations. Laboratory studies and observations within the nocturnal boundary layer reported in the literature suggest heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surface adsorbed water as the major nighttime source of HONO. HONO formation and photolysis is believed to represent a major source term in the hydroxyl radical budget in polluted continental regions. Currently, most air quality models tend to significantly underpredict HONO, caused by the lack of understanding of HONO formation processes and the parameters that affect its concentration. Recently, we reported nocturnal pseudo steady states (PSS) of HONO in an aqueous marine environment and a conceptual model for HONO formation on aqueous surfaces was proposed. The data set collected at York University is being analyzed with a view towards further understanding the nighttime HONO formation mechanism and testing several hypotheses: 1) A HONO PSS can exist during certain times at night in an urban area in which the HONO concentration is independent of NO2, given the surface contains sufficient water coverage and is saturated with nitrogen containing precursors; 2) The concentration of HONO is positively correlated with temperature during periods where a PSS exists; 3) Different conversion efficiencies of NO2 to HONO exist on dry, wet and snow surfaces; 4) HONO formation has a NO2 order dependence between 0 and 2nd order, dependant on NO2 concentration, relative humidity, etc. The data set will be presented along with statistical analysis that sheds new light on the source of HONO in urban areas at night.

  12. Heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol surfaces: A possible source of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröske, R.; Kleffmann, J.; Wiesen, P.

    2003-05-01

    The heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on different secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was investigated with the focus on a possible formation of nitrous acid (HONO). In one set of experiments different organic aerosols were produced in the reactions of O3 with alpha-pinene, limonene or catechol and OH radicals with toluene or limonene, respectively. The aerosols were sampled on filters and exposed to humidified NO2 mixtures under atmospheric conditions. The estimated upper limits for the uptake coefficients of NO2 and the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 -> HONO are in the range of 10-6 and 10-7, respectively. The integrated HONO formation for 1 h reaction time was <1013 cm-2 geometrical surface and <1017 g-1 particle mass. In a second set of experiments the conversion of NO2 into HONO in the presence of organic particles was carried out in an aerosol flow tube under atmospheric conditions. In this case the aerosols were produced in the reaction of O3 with beta-pinene, limonene or catechol, respectively. The upper limits for the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 -> HONO were in the range of 7 x 10-7 - 9 x 10-6. The results from the present study show that heterogeneous formation of nitrous acid on secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is unimportant for the atmosphere.

  13. Heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol surfaces: A possible source of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröske, R.; Kleffmann, J.; Wiesen, P.

    2003-02-01

    The heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on different secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was investigated with the focus on a possible formation of nitrous acid (HONO). In one set of experiments different organic aerosols were produced in the reactions of O3 with α-pinene, limonene or catechol and OH radicals with toluene or limonene, respectively. The aerosols were sampled on filters and exposed to humidified NO2 mixtures under atmospheric conditions. The estimated upper limits for the uptake coefficients of NO2 and the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 →HONO are in the range of 10-6 and 10-7, respectively. The integrated HONO formation for 1 h reaction time was <1013 cm-2 geometrical surface and <1017 g-1 particle mass. In a second set of experiments the conversion of NO2 into HONO in the presence of organic particles was carried out in an aerosol flow tube under atmospheric conditions. In this case the aerosols were produced in the reaction of O3 with β-pinene, limonene or catechol, respectively. The upper limits for the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 → HONO were in the range of 7×10-7 -9×10-6. The results from the present study show that heterogeneous formation of nitrous acid on secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is unimportant for the atmosphere.

  14. Significance of semivolatile diesel exhaust organics for secondary HONO formation.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, Lukas; Arens, Frank; Baltensperger, Urs; Gäggeler, Heinz W; Ammann, Markus

    2002-02-15

    The atmospheric origin of nitrous acid (HONO) is largely unknown despite its estimated importance as an OH source during daytime due to its rapid photolysis. Recently, primary HONO contained in automobile exhaust as well as secondary HONO formation on soot particles have been invoked as possible HONO sources, but none of them is able to account for the observed HONO to NOx ratios of up to 0.04 in the atmosphere. In this paper, we show that semivolatile and/or water-soluble species contained in diesel exhaust are significantly involved in secondary HONO formation. These species are not associated with soot when the exhaust exits the tailpipe. To quantify these species and to assess the reaction kinetics leading to HONO, experiments were performed in which filtered but hot diesel exhaust gas interacted with a glass surface as well as a water film mimicking dry and wet surfaces to which exhaust might be exposed. A fraction of 0.023 of the NOx emitted was heterogeneously converted to HONO, which is at least three times more than the primary HONO emissions by diesel engines and a fraction of 50 larger than HONO formed on diesel soot particles that do not contain the semivolatile organics.

  15. Evidence for a snowpack biological source of NOx and HONO to the Arctic boundary layer in Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, A.; Domine, F.; Esposito, G.; Morin, S.; Nardino, M.; Montagnoli, M.; Erbland, J.; Savarino, J.; Beine, H.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO + NO2) and HONO are among the most reactive species in the polar boundary layer. About a decade ago, the discovery of photochemical production of NOx and HONO in the polar snowpack forced us to consider the role of snowpack emissions to understand the composition of the polar boundary layer. Here we present evidence that NOx and HONO can be emitted by the snowpack to the polar boundary layer in the absence of sunlight. NOx and HONO fluxes were measured at Ny Alesund, Svalbard (79∘N) from mid February (no sunlight) to late April (24 h sunlight). Values were mostly positive (i.e. species transferred from snow to atmosphere) and up to 800 and 120 nmol m-2 h-1, respectively, with the highest values observed in the near absence of sunlight. Mineral ions in surface snow were also analyzed continuously, and snow chemistry data led us to suspect that bacteria were involved in those emissions. The measurements of nitrate isotopic data (δ15N and Δ17O) confirmed that a large fraction of nitrate in most snow layers was not of atmospheric origin, and our interpretation is that is was produced from ammonium by nitrifying bacteria. NO2- is an intermediate in nitrification, and can lead to NO emission by bacteria. NO can be rapidly oxidized to NO2 by ozone in the snowpack. Physical release of HONO from NO2- by the snow also takes place. We therefore suggest that microbial activity in cold snowpacks can lead to the release of significant amounts of reactive species, and deserves consideration in the understanding of polar boundary chemistry and of polar snow chemistry.

  16. Daytime formation of HONO measured close to the surface: Indication for a light driven process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sörgel, M.; Held, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    The photolysis of HONO is an important primary OH radical source. The OH radical is the most important oxidizing agent, the so called "detergent" of the atmosphere. HONO formation pathways are still unclear (e.g. Sörgel et al., 2011). Nevertheless, the main pathways are believed to be heterogeneous. Thus, the surface is proposed to be a major source. Furthermore, soil emissions of HONO due to microbiological activity in soil (Su et al., 2011) have been proposed and have to be distinguished from the proposed photochemical sources. Therefore, we measured gradients of HONO, NO, NO2 and O3 close to the surface (0.1 to 1.6 m above ground) at the forest floor and on a clearing. We used an automated, programmable moving inlet to measure at 3 or 5 heights between 0.1 m and 1.6 m above the ground. HONO, O3, NO and NO2 were measured simultaneously. HONO was measured with a long path absorption photometer (LOPAP), O3 by UV absorption and NO and NO2 by chemiluminescence with photolytic conversion of NO2. The time resolution of an individual LOPAP measurement was 3 min, and a full profile was measured within 30 min. Additionally, profiles of temperature and relative humidity as well as leaf wetness and j(NO2) were measured. Measurements were conducted at the forest floor and on a clearing at the Waldstein field site of the University of Bayreuth in the Fichtelgebirge Mountains in south-east Germany. Preliminary results are presented. For example, during the day the highest values were often measured close to the ground at the clearing, indicating emission of HONO at the surface. This also indicates that the daytime formation of HONO is heterogeneous or the emissions are due to microbiological activity (Su et al., 2011). During the night, the lowest values were often measured at the surface indicating deposition. Thus, HONO emissions as well as HONO deposition have been observed. The profile data will be analyzed with respect to light intensity, NO2 availability, atmospheric

  17. Measurements of Nitrous Acid (HONO) in an Indiana Forest by Laser Photofragmentation/Laser-induced Flourescence (LP/LIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottorff, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Lew, M.; Sigler, P. S. R.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is an important oxidant in the atmosphere. Reactions of OH with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) initiate a series of reactions that can lead to the production of ozone and secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. An accurate understanding of the major sources of OH is important to develop accurate models of atmospheric chemistry. Nocturnal nitrous acid (HONO) is an important radical resevoir species and releases OH upon photolysis the next morning. Recent studies have indicated higher than expected mixing ratios of HONO during the daytime, suggesting that the production mechanisms of HONO are not fully understood. Additional ambient HONO measurements are necessary to improve our knowledge of the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Measurements of HONO were made during summer 2015 using a Laser Photofragmentation/Laser-induced flourescence (LP/LIF) instrument as part of the Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC). This campaign took place in a forested area in the Indiana Research and Teaching Preserve (IURTP) near the Bloomington Campus. In LP/LIF, ambient air is drawn through a 0.035" diameter inlet and expands into a cell held at ~5 torr . HONO within the sampled air mass is photo-fragmented by laser emision at 355 nm and resulting OH fragments are subsequently detected by laser-induced fluorescence at 308 nm. In this presentation the development of the LP/LIF insturment will be discussed and preliminary measurements and model comparisons from the campaign will be presented.

  18. [Monitoring and analysis of vertical profile of atmospheric HONO, NO2 in boundary layer of Beijing].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-Wu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Fang, Jing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Dou, Ke; Qin, Min; Si, Fu-Qi

    2011-04-01

    Based on the scanning differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system, field measurement of vertical profiles of HONO and NO2 was performed continuously from Aug. 27, 2007 to Sep. 4, 2007 in Chaoyang District of Beijing, and their vertical profiles were analyzed. Based on the acquired data, the typical vertical variation characteristics of HONO, NO2 and the ratio HONO/NO2 were discussed, and the possible formation sources of HONO were studied. The results indicated that the decrease of HONO with height was faster than the decrease of NO2. The study found good correlation between NO2 and HONO, as well as between the ratio HONO/NO2 and vapor, respectively. Therefore, the authors' conclusion is that HONO was formed by heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surfaces or near ground and then transported to higher altitudes. PMID:21714264

  19. Investigations on HONO formation from photolysis of adsorbed HNO3 on quartz glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Laufs, Sebastian; Kleffmann, Jörg

    2016-04-14

    During the last few decades, nitrous acid (HONO) has attracted significant attention as a major source of the OH radical, the detergent of the atmosphere. However, the different daytime sources identified in the laboratory are still the subject of controversial discussion. In the present study, one of these postulated HONO sources, the heterogeneous photolysis of nitric acid (HNO3), was studied on quartz glass surfaces in a photo flow-reactor under atmospherically relevant conditions. In contrast to other investigations, a very low HNO3 photolysis frequency for HONO formation of J(HNO3→ HONO) = 2.4 × 10(-7) s(-1) (0° SZA, 50% r.h.) was determined. If these results can be translated to atmospheric surfaces, HNO3 photolysis cannot explain the significant HONO levels in the daytime atmosphere. In addition, it is demonstrated that even the small measured yields of HONO did not result from the direct photolysis of HNO3 but rather from the consecutive heterogeneous conversion of the primary photolysis product NO2 on the humid surfaces. The secondary NO2 conversion was not photo-enhanced on pure quartz glass surfaces in good agreement with former studies. A photolysis frequency for the primary reaction product NO2 of J(HNO3→ NO2) = 1.1 × 10(-6) s(-1) has been calculated (0° SZA, 50% r.h.), which indicates that renoxification by photolysis of adsorbed HNO3 on non-reactive surfaces is also a minor process in the atmosphere. PMID:26997156

  20. An Atmospheric Constraint on the NO2 Dependence of Daytime Near-Surface Nitrous Acid (HONO).

    PubMed

    Pusede, Sally E; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Murphy, Jennifer G; Markovic, Milos Z; Young, Cora J; Veres, Patrick R; Roberts, James M; Washenfelder, Rebecca A; Brown, Steven S; Ren, Xinrong; Tsai, Catalina; Stutz, Jochen; Brune, William H; Browne, Eleanor C; Wooldridge, Paul J; Graham, Ashley R; Weber, Robin; Goldstein, Allen H; Dusanter, Sebastien; Griffith, Stephen M; Stevens, Philip S; Lefer, Barry L; Cohen, Ronald C

    2015-11-01

    Recent observations suggest a large and unknown daytime source of nitrous acid (HONO) to the atmosphere. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed, many of which involve chemistry that reduces nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on some time scale. To examine the NO2 dependence of the daytime HONO source, we compare weekday and weekend measurements of NO2 and HONO in two U.S. cities. We find that daytime HONO does not increase proportionally to increases in same-day NO2, i.e., the local NO2 concentration at that time and several hours earlier. We discuss various published HONO formation pathways in the context of this constraint.

  1. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of cis-Nitrous Acid Anion (cis-HONO(-)).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Allan M; Lehman, Julia H; McCoy, Anne B; Lineberger, W Carl

    2016-03-17

    We report photoelectron spectra of cis-HONO(-) formed from an association reaction of OH(-) and NO in a pulsed, plasma-entrainment ion source. The experimental data are assigned to the cis-HONO(-) isomer, which is predicted to be the global minimum on the anion potential energy surface. We do not find evidence for a significant contribution from trans-HONO(-). Electron photodetachment of cis-HONO(-) with 1613, 1064, 532, 355, and 301 nm photons accesses the ground X̃ (1)A' (S0) and excited ã (3)A″ (T1) states of neutral HONO. The photoelectron spectrum resulting from detachment forming cis-HONO (S0) exhibits a long vibrational progression, dominated by overtones and combination bands involving the central O-N stretching and ONO bending vibrations. This indicates that there is a significant change in the central O-N bond length between cis-HONO(-) and cis-HONO (S0). The electron affinity (EA) of cis-HONO is determined to be 0.356(8) eV. We also report the dissociation energy (D0) of cis-HONO(-), forming OH(-) + NO, as 0.594(9) eV, which is a factor of 4 decrease in the central O-N bond strength compared to neutral cis-HONO. The T1 state of cis-HONO is shown to be ∼2.3 eV higher in energy than cis-HONO (S0). Electron photodetachment to form cis-HONO (T1) accesses a transition state along the HO-NO bond dissociation coordinate. The resulting photoelectron spectrum exhibits broad peaks spaced by the terminal N═O stretching frequency. Electronic structure calculations and photoelectron spectrum simulations reported here show very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26886478

  2. Photo-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) on protein surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusel, Hannah; Elshorbany, Yasin; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Selzle, Kathrin; Lelieveld, Jos; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2014-05-01

    The study of nitrous acid (HONO) is of great interest, as the photolysis of HONO leads to the OH radical, which is the most important oxidant in the troposphere. HONO is directly emitted by combustion of fossil fuel and from soil biogenic nitrite (Su et al., 2011), and can also be formed by gas phase reactions of NO and OH and heterogeneous reactions of NO2. Previous atmospheric measurements have shown unexpectedly high HONO concentrations during daytime. Measured mixing ratios were about one order of magnitude higher than model simulations (Kleffmann et al. 2005, Vogel et al. 2003). The additional daytime source of HONO might be attributed to the photolysis of adsorbed nitric acid or heterogeneous photochemistry of NO2 on organic substrates, such as humic acids or polyphenolic compounds (Stemmler et al., 2006), or indirectly through nitration of phenols and subsequent photolysis of nitrophenols (Sosedova et al., 2011, Bejan et al., 2006). An important reactive surface for the heterogeneous formation of HONO could involve proteins, which are ubiquitous in the environment. They are part of coarse biological aerosol particles like pollen grains, fine particles (fragments of pollen, microorganism, plant debris) and dissolved in rainwater, soil and road dust (Miguel et al. 1999). In this project a thin film of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein with 67 kDa and 21 tyrosine residues per molecule, is irradiated and exposed to nitrogen dioxide in humidified nitrogen. The formation of HONO is measured with long path absorption photometry (LOPAP). The generated HONO is in the range of 100 to 1100 ppt depending on light intensity, NO2 concentration and film thickness. Light induced HONO formation on protein surfaces is stable over the 20-hours experiment of irradiation and exposure. On the other hand, light activated proteins reacting with NO2 form nitrated proteins, as detected by liquid chromatography (LC-DAD). Our experiments on tetranitromethane (TNM) nitrated

  3. HONO emission and production determined from airborne measurements over the Southeast U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Brown, S. S.; Min, K.-E.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Veres, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    The sources and distribution of tropospheric nitrous acid (HONO) were examined using airborne measurements over the Southeast U.S. during the Southeast Nexus Experiment in June and July 2013. HONO was measured once per second using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer on the NOAA WP-3D aircraft to assess sources that affect HONO abundance throughout the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The aircraft flew at altitudes between 0.12 and 6.4 km above ground level on 18 research flights that were conducted both day and night, sampling emissions from urban and power plant sources that were transported in the PBL. At night, HONO mixing ratios were greatest in plumes from agricultural burning, where they exceeded 4 ppbv and accounted for 2-14% of the reactive nitrogen emitted by the fires. The HONO to carbon monoxide ratio in these plumes from flaming stage fires ranged from 0.13 to 0.52%. Direct HONO emissions from coal-fired power plants were quantified using measurements at night, when HONO loss by photolysis was absent. These direct emissions were often correlated with total reactive nitrogen with enhancement ratios that ranged from 0 to 0.4%. HONO enhancements in power plant plumes measured during the day were compared with a Lagrangian plume dispersion model, showing that HONO produced solely from the gas phase reaction of OH with NO explained the observations. Outside of recently emitted plumes from known combustion sources, HONO mixing ratios measured several hundred meters above ground level were indistinguishable from zero within the 15 parts per trillion by volume measurement uncertainty. The results reported here do not support the existence of a ubiquitous unknown HONO source that produces significant HONO concentrations in the lower troposphere.

  4. Understanding the mechanism behind the nitrous acid (HONO) emissions from the northern soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Hem Raj; Siljanen, Henri MP; Biasi, Christina; Maljanen, Marja

    2016-04-01

    The interest of the flux of nitrous acid (HONO) from soils has recently increased. HONO is an important source of the oxidant OH- radical in the troposphere and thus results a reduction of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the atmosphere. Soils have been recently found to be potential sources of HONO as these emissions are linked to other nitrogen cycle processes, especially presence of nitrite in soils. Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been suggested as possible yet substantial sources of HONO. Along with soil pH, other physical properties such as C:N, nitrogen availability, soil moisture and temperature may effect HONO emissions. Our preliminary results demonstrate that drained acidic peatlands with a low C:N produces higher NO, N2O and HONO emissions compared to those in pristine peatlands and upland forest soils. This study will identify the hotspots and the process involved in HONO emissions in northern ecosystems. Along with HONO, we will examine the emissions of NO and N2O to quantify the related N-gases emitted. These results will add a new piece of information in our knowledge of the nitrogen cycle. Soil samples will be collected from several boreal and arctic sites in Finland, Sweden and Russia. In the laboratory, soil samples will be manipulated based on previously described soil physical properties. This will be followed by labelling experiment coupled with selective nitrification inhibitor experiment in the soils. Our first hypothesis is that northern ecosystems are sources of HONO. Second, is that the soil properties (C:N ratio, moisture, N-availability, pH) regulate the magnitude of HONO emissions from northern soils. Third is that the first step of nitrification (ammonium oxidation) is the main pathway to produce HONO. This study will show that the northern ecosystems could be sources of HONO and therefore increasing the oxidizing capacity of the lower atmosphere.

  5. Daytime aircraft HONO Measurements over water surface during NOMASS Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, C.; Pu, D.; Zhou, X.; Stutz, J.; Mauldin, R.; Cantrell, C. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Haggerty, J. A.; Campos, T. L.; Guenther, A. B.; Kaser, L.; Jensen, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The NOMDASS (Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distributions, Sources and Sinks) study is an NSF sponsored airborne experiment, integrating 3 PI-initiated projects: the NAAMEX (The North American Airborne Mercury Experiment), the SOAS (Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study), and the TROPHONO (TROPospheric HONO) projects. During the NOMDASS field campaign from June 1 to July 15, 2013, based in Smyrna, TN, HONO was measured onboard NCAR's C-130 research aircraft in 19 research flights. In order to study in situ HONO production (i.e., volume production) within air masses, four research flights were designed and conducted over open waters to eliminate potential HONO contributions from ground surface sources. In the 2 inflow flights over the Atlantic Ocean off of the Carolina coast, up to 15 ppt HONO was observed in the clean marine boundary layer (MBL). To sustain the observed levels of HONO, a significant in situ HONO source, at a rate of ~60 ppt hr-1, must exist. Since the NOx mixing ratio was very low, ~ 40 ppt, NOx is unlikely to be a significant HONO precursor in the clean MBL. On the other hand, significant levels of particular nitrate were observed, up to 50 ppt. Photolysis of particulate nitrate may be a significant or even a major HONO source and may be an important re-NOx-ification pathway in this clean and low-NOx marine environment. In a flight over the Gulf of Mexico off of Houston, up to 40 ppt HONO was observed in the Houston plume; in a flight over Lake Michigan, up to 60 ppt HONO was observed in the Chicago plume. At elevated concentrations in urban plumes, HONO may be a significant OH precursor and may play an important role in the photochemical evolution of urban plume.

  6. The Role of Iron-Bearing Minerals in NO2 to HONO Conversion on Soil Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Mulu A; Bish, David L; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Engelhard, Mark H; Raff, Jonathan D

    2016-08-16

    Nitrous acid (HONO) accumulates in the nocturnal boundary layer where it is an important source of daytime hydroxyl radicals. Although there is clear evidence for the involvement of heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on surfaces as a source of HONO, mechanisms remain poorly understood. We used coated-wall flow tube measurements of NO2 reactivity on environmentally relevant surfaces (Fe (hydr)oxides, clay minerals, and soil from Arizona and the Saharan Desert) and detailed mineralogical characterization of substrates to show that reduction of NO2 by Fe-bearing minerals in soil can be a more important source of HONO than the putative NO2 hydrolysis mechanism. The magnitude of NO2-to-HONO conversion depends on the amount of Fe(2+) present in substrates and soil surface acidity. Studies examining the dependence of HONO flux on substrate pH revealed that HONO is formed at soil pH < 5 from the reaction between NO2 and Fe(2+)(aq) present in thin films of water coating the surface, whereas in the range of pH 5-8 HONO stems from reaction of NO2 with structural iron or surface complexed Fe(2+) followed by protonation of nitrite via surface Fe-OH2(+) groups. Reduction of NO2 on ubiquitous Fe-bearing minerals in soil may explain HONO accumulation in the nocturnal boundary layer and the enhanced [HONO]/[NO2] ratios observed during dust storms in urban areas. PMID:27409359

  7. HONO measurement by differential photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Chris; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Crilley, Leigh R.; Kramer, Louisa J.; Bloss, William J.; Seakins, Paul W.; Lee, James D.; Carpenter, Lucy J.

    2016-06-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) has been quantitatively measured in situ by differential photolysis at 385 and 395 nm, and subsequent detection as nitric oxide (NO) by the chemiluminescence reaction with ozone (O3). The technique has been evaluated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to provide a direct HONO measurement in a simulation chamber and compared side by side with a long absorption path optical photometer (LOPAP) in the field. The NO-O3 chemiluminescence technique is robust, well characterized, and capable of sampling at low pressure, whilst solid-state converter technology allows for unattended in situ HONO measurements in combination with fast time resolution and response.

  8. The relationship between nighttime formation of gaseous HONO and nocturnal stability in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, Robert; Wojtal, Patryk; Taylor, Peter

    2014-05-01

    nocturnal mixing suggest that the steady-state may result from an equilibrium between a surface reservoir source of HONO, reminiscent of those observed in the polluted marine boundary layer at night (Wojtal et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 3243-3261, 2011).

  9. Urban measurements of atmospheric nitrous acid: A caveat on the interpretation of the HONO photostationary state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Wood, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Lefer, B. L.; Luke, W. T.; Brune, W. H.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Munger, J. W.

    2013-11-01

    studies infer the existence of an "unknown" daytime HONO source based on the assumption that HONO is at photostationary state (PSS). Secondary HONO production rate as high as 1.1 ppb hr-1 can be estimated from this approach, based on measurements made during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors campaign in May of 2009. We argue, however, that the PSS assumption might not have been valid because the transport time from nearby NOx emission sources to the measurement site was likely less than the time required for HONO in vehicle exhaust to reach PSS. Using a chemical box model, we demonstrate that there is initially net HONO formation as high levels of NO in exhaust react with ambient OH. Net production is followed by a period of net HONO loss dominated by photolysis that is sustained for several minutes to hours depending on time of day. The presence of relatively fresh exhaust in sampled air can partially, if not fully, account for the observed measurement PSS discrepancy. We also show that a large fraction of the observed nighttime increase in HONO/NOx ratio is explained by NO2 oxidation. These results do not rule out the existence of an unexplained secondary HONO source but suggest that great care must be exercised when applying the PSS method to quantify its strength.

  10. Impact of updated traffic emissions on HONO mixing ratios simulated for urban site in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czader, B. H.; Choi, Y.; Li, X.; Alvarez, S.; Lefer, B.

    2015-02-01

    Recent measurements in Houston show that HONO traffic emissions are 1.7% of NOx emissions, which is about twice the previously estimated value of 0.8% based on tunnel measurements in 2001. The 0.8% value is widely used to estimate mobile emissions of HONO for air quality modeling applications. This study applies the newly estimated HONO / NOx ratio in the WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ modeling system and estimates the impact of higher HONO traffic emissions on its mixing ratios. Since applied emission inventory resulted in overestimates of NOx mixing ratios and because HONO emissions and chemical formation depend on the magnitude of NOx, thus, before proceeding with HONO emission modifications emissions of NOx were adjusted to reflect current emission trends. The modeled mixing ratios of NOx were evaluated against measured data from a number of sites in the Houston area. Overall, the NOx mean value dropped from 11.11 ppbv in the base case to 7.59 ppbv in the NOx-adjusted case becoming much closer to the observed mean of 7.76 ppbv. The index of agreement (IOA) is improved in the reduced NOx case (0.71 vs. 0.75) and the absolute mean error (AME) is lowered from 6.76 to 4.94. The modeled mixing ratios of HONO were evaluated against the actual observed values attained at the Moody Tower in Houston. The model could not reproduce the morning HONO peaks when the low HONO / NOx ratio of 0.008 was used to estimate HONO emissions. Doubling HONO emissions from mobile sources resulted in higher mixing ratios, and the mean value increased from 0.30 to 0.41 ppbv becoming closer to the observed mean concentrations of 0.69 but still low; AME was slightly reduced from 0.46 to 0.43. IOA for simulation that used the 2001 emission values is 0.63 while for simulation with higher HONO emission it increased to 0.70. Increased HONO emissions from mobile sources resulted in a 14% increase in OH during morning time at the location of the Moody Tower and 3% when averaged over an urban area. The increase

  11. Simultaneous measurements of HONO and NO2 at a rural site in Northern China by IBBCEAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Min; Duan, Jun; Fang, Wu; Hu, Renzi; Lu, Xue; Shen, Lanlan; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    HONO arose the interests for its photolysis is an important source of OH radical. However, its source, especially the daytime source is still unclear. With high primary pollutants and aerosol concentrations, the characteristics of air pollutions in China can be expected to be sometimes quite different from the one observed in developed countries. HONO shows high level not only in urban areas but also in rural areas in China. The temporal behavior of HONO and NO2 was investigated at a rural site in Wangdu, Hebei Province, China, by using incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) during the CAREBEIJING-NCP Campaign from June 26th to July 9th 2014. The concentrations of HONO and NO2 measured by IBBCEAS were compared with a LOPAP (Long Path Absorption Photometer) instrument and a commercial NOx analyzer (Thermo 42i), and the results showed the well correlations for the correlation coefficient (R2) of HONO and NO2 were up to 0.878 and 0.989, respectively. During the measurements, the daytime rapid variations of HONO were found. The peak values of HONO at around noon even unexpected exceed 3ppb and the unknown daytime HONO source strength (PM) reached up to 14 ppb/h, while the concentrations of NO2 were very low (< 5ppb) and the peaks of HONO/NO2 even exceed 100%, which were different from the previous field observations. The possible formations were discussed in this paper, the so high value of daytime HONO could not be explained by the known direct emissions or reactions related to NO2 and might come from soils much possible or the other unknown sources.

  12. Impact of updated traffic emissions on HONO mixing ratios simulated for urban site in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czader, B. H.; Choi, Y.; Li, X.; Alvarez, S.; Lefer, B.

    2014-08-01

    Recent measurements in Houston show that HONO traffic emissions are 1.7% of NOx emissions which is about twice the previously estimated value of 0.8% based on tunnel measurements in 2001. The 0.8% value is widely used to estimate mobile emissions of HONO for air quality modeling applications. This study applies the newly estimated HONO/NOx ratio in the WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ modeling system and estimates the impact of higher HONO traffic emissions on its mixing ratios. Since applied emission inventory resulted in overestimates of NOx mixing ratios and because HONO emissions and chemical formation depends on the magnitude of NOx, thus, before proceeding with HONO emission modifications emissions of NOx were adjusted to reflect current emission trends. The modeled mixing ratios of NOx were evaluated against measured data from a number of sites in the Houston area. Overall, the NOx mean value dropped from 11.11 ppbv in the base case to 7.59 ppbv in the NOx adjusted case becoming much closer to the observed mean of 7.76 ppbv. The Index of Agreement (IOA) is improved in the reduced NOx case (0.71 vs. 0.75) and the Absolute Mean Error (AME) is lowered from 6.76 to 4.94. The modeled mixing ratios of HONO were evaluated against the actual observed values attained at the Moody Tower in Houston. The model could not reproduce the morning HONO peaks when the low HONO/NOx ratio of 0.008 was used to estimate HONO emissions. Doubling HONO emissions from mobile sources resulted in higher mixing ratios, the mean value increased from 0.30 to 0.41 ppbv becoming closer to the observed mean concentrations of 0.69 but still low; AME was slightly reduced from 0.46 to 0.43. IOA for simulation that used the 2001 emission values is 0.63 while for simulation with higher HONO emission it increased to 0.70. Increased HONO emissions impacted OH mixing ratio, up to about 6% increase was found during morning and mid-day hours. The impact on ozone is marginal. This study results sheds light on the

  13. Tropospheric HONO Distribution and Chemistry in the Southeastern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Ye, C.; Pu, D.; Stutz, J.; Festa, J.; Spolaor, M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Campos, T. L.; Haggerty, J. A.; Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, L.; Guenther, A. B.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Jensen, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    During the NOMADSS field campaign, nitrous acid (HONO) and particulate nitrate (pNO3) was measured on NCAR C-130 research aircraft during five research flights over the Southeast U.S. Aerosol samples were also collected on Teflon filters for the determination of pNO3 photolysis rate constants in the laboratory. Daytime HONO concentrations range from low ppt in free troposphere to 10-20 ppt in the boundary layer in the background air masses, to up to 40 ppt in the industrial and urban plumes. While daytime HONO sink is well defined, dominated by its photolysis, daytime sources vary in different types of air masses: pNO3 photolysis appears to be the major HONO source in the background terrestrial air masses in both the boundary layer and the free troposphere. With an average pNO3 photolysis rate constant of (2.8±1.7)×10-4 s-1, p-NO3 photolysis becomes to be an effective pathway to recycle HNO3 to NOx in the troposphere, with HONO as a dominant intermediate product. Within the high-NOx industrial plumes encountered, HONO is predominantly produced by secondary formation processes involving NOx as the precursor. Away from ground surface, no significant nighttime HONO accumulation exists in the background terrestrial air mass.

  14. Atmospheric HONO and NO2 measurement based on a broadband cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Zha, Qiaozhi; Chen, Weidong; Xu, Zheng; Wang, Tao; He, Xingdao

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is a key component in tropospheric oxidant chemistry due to its contribution to the cycles of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and hydrogen oxides (HOx). Though numerous laboratory, field, and modeling studies were performed to explain the observed HONO concentrations in the atmosphere, the knowledge of atmospheric HONO chemistry is still not well understood and sometimes controversial [1]. Accurate measurements of HONO and its precursors with high precision should aid in understanding the HONO chemistry. In this paper we report on the measurements of HONO and NO2 concentrations at a suburban site of Tung Chung in Hong Kong during a field intercomparison campaign using a broadband cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer. 1σ detection limits of 0.3 ppbv for HONO and 1 ppbv for NO2 were achieved with an optimum acquisition time of 120 s. The measured HONO and NO2 concentrations were compared with the data from commercial HONO (LOPAP) and NO2 (NOX-analyzer) measurement instrument. Typical diurnal pattern of HONO have been observed and the potential formation sources have been analyzed [2]. Acknowledgements The supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41265011), Educational Commission of Jiangxi Province of China (No.GJJ14548) and Environment and Conservation Fund of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (No. 7/2009). The support of the IRENI program of the Région Nord-Pas de Calaisn, is acknowledged. References [1] W. Chen, R. Maamary, X. Cui, T. Wu, E. Fertein, D. Dewaele, F. Cazier, Q. Zha, Z. Xu, T. Wang, Y. Wang, W. Zhang, X. Gao, W. Liu, F. Dong, 'Photonic Sensing of Environmental Gaseous Nitrous Acid (HONO): Opportunities and Challenges' in The Wonder of Nanotechnology: Quantum Optoelectronic Devices and Applications, M. Razeghi. L. Esaki, and K. von Klitzing, Eds., SPIE Press, Bellingham, WA, 2013, pp. 693-737 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, 'Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV

  15. Formation of indoor nitrous acid (HONO) by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions with white wall paint.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Vincent; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Alvarez, Elena Gómez; Gandolfo, Adrien; Strekowski, Rafal; Quivet, Etienne; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2) represents an oxidant that is present in relatively high concentrations in various indoor settings. Remarkably increased NO2 levels up to 1.5 ppm are associated with homes using gas stoves. The heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with adsorbed water on surfaces lead to the generation of nitrous acid (HONO). Here, we present a HONO source induced by heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with selected indoor paint surfaces in the presence of light (300 nm<λ<400 nm). We demonstrate that the formation of HONO is much more pronounced at elevated relative humidity. In the presence of light (5.5 W m(-2)), an increase of HONO production rate of up to 8.6·10(9) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) was observed at [NO2]=60 ppb and 50% relative humidity (RH). At higher light intensity of 10.6 (W m(-2)), the HONO production rate increased to 2.1·10(10) molecules cm(-2) s(-1). A high NO2 to HONO conversion yield of up to 84% was observed. This result strongly suggests that a light-driven process of indoor HONO production is operational. This work highlights the potential of paint surfaces to generate HONO within indoor environments by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions.

  16. High HONO concentrations in aged biomass burning plumes in NOMADSS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, C.; Zhou, X.; Stutz, J.; Festa, J.; Guenther, A. B.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Campos, T. L.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Jensen, J. B.; Haggerty, J. A.; Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, L.

    2014-12-01

    More than a dozen of aged biomass burning plumes (BBPs) from various sources in free troposphere were encountered during the aircraft-based NOMADSS (Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distributions, Sources and Sinks) field campaign from June 1 to July 15, 2013. HCN and CO were used as tracers to identify the BBPs; the ratio of n-butane to propane was used to determine the photochemical age of the BBPs, which was ranging from 5 to 15 days. Significant enhancement in HONO concentration, by 5-56 ppt, was observed with elevated NOx and particulate nitrate concentrations in these BBPs comparing to background air mass. High HONO/NOx ratio up to 0.5 suppresses the importance of NOx as HONO precursors. Further HONO and NOx budget analysis reveals that photo-recycling of particulate nitrate in plumes to NOx was the main chemical source of NOx with HONO as an intermediate. An implication of this recycling NOx source on O3 formation is demonstrated in the correlation of O3 and NOx in aged plumes.

  17. Global and Regional Impacts of HONO on the Chemical Composition of Clouds and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elshorbany, Y. F.; Crutzen, P. J.; Steil, B.; Pozzer, A.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, realistic simulation of nitrous acid (HONO) based on the HONO / NOx ratio of 0.02 was found to have a significant impact on the global budgets of HOx (OH + HO2) and gas phase oxidation products in polluted regions, especially in winter when other photolytic sources are of minor importance. It has been reported that chemistry-transport models underestimate sulphate concentrations, mostly during winter. Here we show that simulating realistic HONO levels can significantly enhance aerosol sulphate (S(VI)) due to the increased formation of H2SO4. Even though in-cloud aqueous phase oxidation of dissolved SO2 (S(IV)) is the main source of S(VI), it appears that HONO related enhancement of H2O2 does not significantly affect sulphate because of the predominantly S(IV) limited conditions, except over eastern Asia. Nitrate is also increased via enhanced gaseous HNO3 formation and N2O5 hydrolysis on aerosol particles. Ammonium nitrate is enhanced in ammonia-rich regions but not under ammonia-limited conditions. Furthermore, particle number concentrations are also higher, accompanied by the transfer from hydrophobic to hydrophilic aerosol modes. This implies a significant impact on the particle lifetime and cloud nucleating properties. The HONO induced enhancements of all species studied are relatively strong in winter though negligible in summer. Simulating realistic HONO levels is found to improve the model measurement agreement of sulphate aerosols, most apparent over the US. Our results underscore the importance of HONO for the atmospheric oxidizing capacity and corroborate the central role of cloud chemical processing in S(IV) formation

  18. Global and Regional Impacts of HONO on the Chemical Composition of Clouds and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elshorbany, Y. F.; Crutzen, P. J.; Steil, B.; Pozzer, A.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, realistic simulation of nitrous acid (HONO) based on the HONO/NO(sub x) ratio of 0.02 was found to have a significant impact on the global budgets of HO(sub x) (OH + HO2) and gas phase oxidation products in polluted regions, especially in winter when other photolytic sources are of minor importance. It has been reported that chemistry-transport models underestimate sulphate concentrations, mostly during winter. Here we show that simulating realistic HONO levels can significantly enhance aerosol sulphate (S(VI)) due to the increased formation of H2SO4. Even though in-cloud aqueous phase oxidation of dissolved SO2 (S(IV)) is the main source of S(VI), it appears that HONO related enhancement of H2O2 does not significantly affect sulphate because of the predominantly S(IV) limited conditions, except over eastern Asia. Nitrate is also increased via enhanced gaseous HNO3 formation and N2O5 hydrolysis on aerosol particles. Ammonium nitrate is enhanced in ammonia-rich regions but not under ammonia-limited conditions. Furthermore, particle number concentrations are also higher, accompanied by the transfer from hydrophobic to hydrophilic aerosol modes. This implies a significant impact on the particle lifetime and cloud nucleating properties. The HONO induced enhancements of all species studied are relatively strong in winter though negligible in summer. Simulating realistic HONO levels is found to improve the model measurement agreement of sulphate aerosols, most apparent over the US. Our results underscore the importance of HONO for the atmospheric oxidizing capacity and corroborate the central role of cloud chemical processing in S(IV) formation.

  19. The Exchange of Soil Nitrite and Atmospheric HONO: a Missing Process in the Nitrogen Cycle and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Oswald, Robert; Behrendt, Thomas; Trebs, Ivonne; Meixner, Franz X.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (OH) are a key species in atmospheric photochemistry. In the lower atmosphere, up to ~30% of the primary OH radical production is attributed to the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO), and field observations suggest a large missing source of HONO. The dominant sources of N(III) in soil, however, are biological nitrification and denitrification processes, which produce nitrite ions from ammonium (by nitrifying microbes) as well as from nitrate (by denitrifying microbes). We show that soil nitrite can release HONO and explain the reported strength and diurnal variation of the missing source. We also show that the soil-atmosphere exchange of N(III), though not considered in the N cycle, might result in significant amount of reactive nitrogen emission (comparable to soil NO emissions). Fertilized soils with low pH appear to be particularly strong sources of HONO and OH. Thus, agricultural activities and land-use changes may strongly influence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Because of the widespread occurrence of nitrite-producing microbes and increasing N and acid deposition, the release of HONO from soil may also be important in natural environments, including forests and boreal regions. In view of the potentially large impact on atmospheric chemistry and global environmental change, we recommend further studies of HONO release from soil nitrite and related processes in the biogeochemical cycling of N in both agricultural and natural environments. Reference: Su, H., Cheng, Y., et al., Soil Nitrite as a Source of Atmospheric HONO and OH Radicals, Science, 333, 1616-1618, 10.1126/science.1207687, 2011. Su, H., et al., The Exchange of Soil Nitrite and Atmospheric HONO: A Missing Process in the Nitrogen Cycle and Atmospheric Chemistry, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security, Springer Netherlands, 93-99, 2013.

  20. [Observational study of atmospheric HONO in summer of Beijing].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-Wu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Dou, Ke; Liu, Shi-Sheng; Si, Fu-Qi; Li, Su-Wen; Qin, Min

    2009-06-15

    The concentration of HONO, NO2, O3 and other atmospheric pollutants were observed continuously by using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) from 2007-08-14 to 2007-08-24 in Beijing, China. Diurnal variation characteristics of HONO and NO2 were analyzed. The HONO levels originated from the nocturnal direct emission were discussed. And the correlation between the heterogeneous formation of HONO and its related factors (BC, RH, and so on) was studied. The results showed that HONO had two peaks at about 01:00 and 06:00, respectively, while two peaks of NO2 concentrations appeared at about 01:00 and 07:00. The highest HONO(em)/HONO ratio of 31.3% was observed at about 20:00 between 19:00 to 07:00, and the average ratio was 15%. Good correlation of HONO(corr)/NO2 ratio with BC and RH at night was obtained. The correlation suggested that heterogeneous NO2 to HONO conversion processes may occur on BC surfaces by reaction with absorption water, and the average nighttime conversion frequency from NO2 into HONO (HONO/NO2) was calculated about 0.8% x h(-1). At the same time, the results showed that heterogeneous formation of HONO was increased with RH and inhibited at RH > 80%, and the hypothesis was further supported by detailed analysis of selected case. PMID:19662832

  1. Simultaneous measurements of HONO below and above a spruce forest canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sörgel, M.; Trebs, I.; Moravek, A.; Hens, K.; Zetzsch, C.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrous Acid (HONO) plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry because it is easily photolyzed and contributes to OH, the most important oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. Understanding sources and sinks of HONO (especially during daytime) leads to a better estimation of OH-budget. We have performed simultaneous HONO measurements in and above a tall spruce forest canopy using two long path absorption photometers (LOPAPs) at a field site located in the Fichtelgebirge mountains in northeastern Bavaria, Germany (50°09'N, 11°52'E, 775m above sea level). The LOPAP is a wet chemical instrument actively correcting for interferences (Kleffmann et al., 2002). Measurements were made simultaneously with the devices from 13-25 Sep 2007 on a tower (z = 24.25m, above canopy) and in the trunk space (z = 0.48m close to the forest floor). To determine the instrument precisions, both instruments were operated side-by-side in the trunk space at z = 1m, enabling the validation of observed mixing ratio differences in and above the canopy. At HONO levels ranging from 30 ppt to 220 ppt, the two LOPAP instruments agreed within 10% under dry conditions. Both instruments were operating without temperature control under field conditions including rainy, foggy and dry clear sky periods with large temperature variations (5 - 20 °C). Several other micrometeorological and chemical quantities were measured aiming to investigate the coupling between soil, canopy and atmospheric boundary layer. The measured HONO mixing ratios showed typical diel cycles with higher values during nighttime, especially during dry periods. During wet conditions, mixing ratios were significantly lower. Average mixing ratios measured with the LOPAP instruments ranged from 40 ppt to 80 ppt during the day and from 80 ppt to 150 ppt during the night with a higher variability during nighttime, but were found to be independent of NO2 mixing ratios. The average HONO/NO2 ratios are 0.03 both in and above canopy, which

  2. Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Zha, Qiaozhi; Chen, Weidong; Xu, Zheng; Wang, Tao; He, Xingdao

    2014-10-01

    An optical analytical instrument based on light emitting diode (LED) incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (LED-IBBCEAS) was developed for simultaneous measurements of HONO and NO2 in ambient air. Detection limits (for signal-to-noise ratio, SNR = 2) of 0.6 ppbv for HONO and 2 ppbv for NO2 were achieved with an optimum acquisition time of 120 s. Field intercomparison campaign at a suburban site of Tung Chung in Hong Kong was carried out. Daytime and nighttime concentrations of HONO and NO2 were recorded and compared with data from a long path absorption photometer (LOPAP) and a NOx analyzer equipped with a blue light converter. The test of such a LED-IBBCEAS setup by the measurement intercomparison with the well established HONO and NO2 measurement instruments, for the first time, in a real atmospheric environment, demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed technique for the measurement of environmental HONO and NO2 concentrations in a manner that is free of chemical and spectral interference. During the measurement period from 12:32 on May 12th to 12:32 on May 14th, 2012, the quantitative assessments from these techniques showed well agreed data. High temporal correlations of HONO with NOx and CO were observed, and possible formation sources of HONO are discussed. Occasional inconsistencies in the quantitative assessment of HONO were observed during the in-field campaign. The problems encountered by the IBBCEAS technique applied to field observation and the further improvements are discussed.

  3. HONO and Inorganic Fine Particle Composition in Typical Monsoon Region with Intensive Anthropogenic Emission: In-situ Observations and Source Identification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Nie, W.; Ding, A.; Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Yangtze River Delta (YRD) is one of the most typical monsoon area with probably the most largest population intensity in the world. With sharply economic development and the large anthropogenic emissions, fine particle pollution have been one of the major air quality problem and may further have impact on the climate system. Though a lot of control policy (sulfur emission have been decreasing from 2007) have been conducted in the region, studies showed the sulfate in fine particles still take major fraction as the nitrate from nitrogen oxides increased significantly. In this study, the role of inorganic chemical compositions in fine particles was investigated with two years in-situ observation. Sulfate and Nitrate contribute to fine particle mass equally in general, but sulfate contributes more during summer and nitrate played more important role in winter. Using lagrangian dispersion backward modeling and source contribution clustering method, the impact of airmass coming from different source region (industrial, dust, biogenic emissions, etc) on fine particle inorganic compositions were discussed. Furthermore, we found two unique cases showing in-situ implications for sulfate formation by nitrogen dioxide oxidation mechanisms. It was showed that the mixing of anthropogenic pollutants with long-range transported mineral dust and biomass burning plume would enhance the sulfate formation by different chemistry mechanisms. This study focus on the complex aspects of fine particle formation in airmasses from different source regions: . It highlights the effect of NOx in enhancing the atmospheric oxidization capacity and indicates a potentially very important impact of increasing NOx on air pollution formation and regional climate change in East Asia.

  4. Intercomparison of Nitrous Acid (HONO) Measurement Techniques during SHARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, J. P.; Meng, Q.; Dibb, J. E.; Lefer, B. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Ren, X.; Stutz, J.; Zhang, R.

    2010-12-01

    HONO is regarded as a potentially important radical precursor in a number of diverse environments ranging from polar to semi-tropical. As part of the SHARP (Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors), time series of HONO were obtained by five different measurement techniques. Techniques used were long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), long-path absorption photometry (LoPAP), mist chamber (MC), quantum cascade laser and ionization detection-chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Various combinations of techniques were in operation during the whole period from 15 April through 31 May 2009 with a common measurement period extending from 16 to 28 May. All instruments recorded a similar diurnal pattern of HONO concentrations with higher mean values from the in-situ techniques than either the low- or mid-path DOAS. The largest differences among techniques were found during the afternoon with measurements from the in-situ techniques higher than either the low- or mid-path DOAS. Principal components analysis using measurements of trace species was used to identify possible sources of interference in the chemical measurements. Two major components were identified: one associated with primary, mainly traffic related pollutants and the other with photochemical species. The afternoon differences between DOAS and MC and the U Miami LoPAP were found to be most strongly associated with the photochemical component. The results for comparison between DOAS and MC are in accord with those found previously during August-September 2006. All instruments showed some association between measurement differences and the primary component. Further details and associations with air coming from different areas of the Houston airshed will also be presented.

  5. Direct measurements of HONO and NO2 by tunable infrared differential absorption spectroscopy; Results from two field campaigns sampling aircraft exhaust and ambient urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Santoni, G.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important source of hydroxyl radicals (OH), the main oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. However, gaseous HONO has historically proven difficult to measure accurately and to date there is no standard technique. We describe a new instrument capable of high-frequency measurements of HONO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) mixing ratios by tunable infrared differential absorption spectrometry. Mid-infrared light from two continuous-wave mode quantum cascade lasers traverse a 210 m path through a multi-pass astigmatic cell at reduced pressures for the direct detection of HONO (1660 cm-1) and NO2 (1604 cm-1). We achieve an absorbance precision less than 3×10-6 Hz-1 in one second, which translates to detection limits (S/N=3) of 300 and 30 ppt for HONO and NO2, respectively, in one second. Both lasers and the detector are thermoelectrically cooled, facilitating long-term unattended measurements. We also report preliminary results from two field campaigns; the Alternative Aviation Fuels Experiment (AAFEX) and the Study of Houston Air Radical Precursors (SHARP). At AAFEX, HONO emission ratios relative to CO2 and NOy observed in commercial aircraft exhaust are larger than in most other combustion sources and likely to play a significant role in regional HOx chemistry. Preliminary analysis from the SHARP campaign shows good agreement in HONO and NO2 levels between various measurement techniques.

  6. Development of an activated carbon filter to remove NO2 and HONO in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Young; Park, Chan Jung; Kim, Ki Yeong; Son, Youn-Suk; Kang, Choong-Min; Wolfson, Jack M; Jung, In-Ha; Lee, Sung-Joo; Koutrakis, Petros

    2015-05-30

    To obtain the optimum removal efficiency of NO2 and HONO by coated activated carbon (ACs), the influencing factors, including the loading rate, metal and non-metal precursors, and mixture ratios, were investigated. The NOx removal efficiency (RE) for K, with the same loading (1.0 wt.%), was generally higher than for those loaded with Cu or Mn. The RE of NO2 was also higher when KOH was used as the K precursor, compared to other K precursors (KI, KNO3, and KMnO4). In addition, the REs by the ACs loaded with K were approximately 38-55% higher than those by uncoated ACs. Overall, the REs (above 95%) of HONO and NOx with 3% KOH were the highest of the coated AC filters that were tested. Additionally, the REs of NOx and HONO using a mixing ratio of 6 (2.5% PABA (p-aminobenzoic acid)+6% H3PO4):4 (3% KOH) were the highest of all the coatings tested (both metal and non-metal). The results of this study show that AC loaded with various coatings has the potential to effectively reduce NO2 and HONO levels in indoor air.

  7. Development of an activated carbon filter to remove NO2 and HONO in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Young; Park, Chan Jung; Kim, Ki Yeong; Son, Youn-Suk; Kang, Choong-Min; Wolfson, Jack M; Jung, In-Ha; Lee, Sung-Joo; Koutrakis, Petros

    2015-05-30

    To obtain the optimum removal efficiency of NO2 and HONO by coated activated carbon (ACs), the influencing factors, including the loading rate, metal and non-metal precursors, and mixture ratios, were investigated. The NOx removal efficiency (RE) for K, with the same loading (1.0 wt.%), was generally higher than for those loaded with Cu or Mn. The RE of NO2 was also higher when KOH was used as the K precursor, compared to other K precursors (KI, KNO3, and KMnO4). In addition, the REs by the ACs loaded with K were approximately 38-55% higher than those by uncoated ACs. Overall, the REs (above 95%) of HONO and NOx with 3% KOH were the highest of the coated AC filters that were tested. Additionally, the REs of NOx and HONO using a mixing ratio of 6 (2.5% PABA (p-aminobenzoic acid)+6% H3PO4):4 (3% KOH) were the highest of all the coatings tested (both metal and non-metal). The results of this study show that AC loaded with various coatings has the potential to effectively reduce NO2 and HONO levels in indoor air. PMID:25725340

  8. Evaluation of nitrous acid sources and sinks in urban outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Elliott T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Steiner, Allison L.; Dibb, Jack; Scheuer, Eric; Gong, Longwen; Rutter, Andrew P.; Cevik, Basak K.; Kim, Saewung; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James

    2016-02-01

    Intensive air quality measurements made from June 22-25, 2011 in the outflow of the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) metropolitan area are used to evaluate nitrous acid (HONO) sources and sinks. A two-layer box model was developed to assess the ability of established and recently identified HONO sources and sinks to reproduce observations of HONO mixing ratios. A baseline model scenario includes sources and sinks established in the literature and is compared to scenarios including three recently identified sources: volatile organic compound-mediated conversion of nitric acid to HONO (S1), biotic emission from the ground (S2), and re-emission from a surface nitrite reservoir (S3). For all mechanisms, ranges of parametric values span lower- and upper-limit values. Model outcomes for 'likely' estimates of sources and sinks generally show under-prediction of HONO observations, implying the need to evaluate additional sources and variability in estimates of parameterizations, particularly during daylight hours. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to model scenarios constructed with sources S1-S3 added independently and in combination, generally showing improved model outcomes. Adding sources S2 and S3 (scenario S2/S3) appears to best replicate observed HONO, as determined by the model coefficient of determination and residual sum of squared errors (r2 = 0.55 ± 0.03, SSE = 4.6 × 106 ± 7.6 × 105 ppt2). In scenario S2/S3, source S2 is shown to account for 25% and 6.7% of the nighttime and daytime budget, respectively, while source S3 accounts for 19% and 11% of the nighttime and daytime budget, respectively. However, despite improved model fit, there remains significant underestimation of daytime HONO; on average, a 0.15 ppt/s unknown daytime HONO source, or 67% of the total daytime source, is needed to bring scenario S2/S3 into agreement with observation. Estimates of 'best fit' parameterizations across lower to upper-limit values results in a moderate reduction of the unknown

  9. Development of a continuous-wave quantum cascade laser instrument for atmospheric measurements of HONO near 1255 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weidong; Fertein, Eric; Liu, Wenqing; Zhang, Yujun; Dong, Fengzhong

    2010-05-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO), as an important hydroxyl (OH) free radical source in the atmosphere by photolysis at dawn, plays a very important role in the atmospheric chemistry of irradiated mixtures of VOC and NOx. It is also an important precursor for OH radicals in simulation chambers. Concentration measurement of atmospheric HONO requires high sensitivity, good temporal and spatial resolution. Tunable diode laser spectrometry (TDLS) provides advantage in terms of sensitivity (due to the laser source) and spatial resolution (due to point sampling) in comparison with the currently used spectroscopic instruments (FTIR and DOAS). In this paper, we report on the development of a TDLS instrument for atmospheric HONO detection, based on a continuous wave, room temperature operation quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at about 1254.7 cm-1 at 20 °C with an output power of up to 35 mW. Experimental details will be presented and discussed.

  10. Effect of Coatings on the Uptake Rate and HONO Yield in Heterogeneous Reaction of Soot with NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Quiñones, M.; Khalizov, A. F.; Zhang, R.

    2009-12-01

    Heterogeneous reaction of nitrogen dioxide on carbon soot aerosols has been suggested as a possible source of nighttime nitrous acid (HONO) in atmosphere boundary layer. Available laboratory data show significant variability in the measured reaction probabilities and HONO yields, making it difficult to asses the atmospheric significance of this process. Moreover, little is known of how aging of soot aerosol through internal mixing with other atmospheric trace constituents will affect the heterogeneous reactivity and HONO production. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 on fresh and aged soot films leading to HONO formation was studied through a series of kinetic uptake experiments and HONO yield measurements. Soot samples were prepared by incomplete combustion of propane and kerosene fuels under lean and rich flame conditions. Experiments were performed in a low-pressure, fast-flow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), using atmospheric-level NO2 concentrations. Heterogeneous uptake coefficients, γ(geom) and γ(BET), were calculated using geometric and internal BET soot surface areas, respectively. The uptake coefficient and the HONO yield depend on the type of fuel and combustion regime and are the highest for soot samples prepared using rich kerosene flame. Although, the internal surface area of soot measured by BET method is a factor of 50 to 500 larger than the geometric surface area, only the top soot layers are involved in heterogeneous reaction with NO2 as follows from the observed weak dependence of γ(geom) and decrease in γ(BET) with increasing sample mass. Heating the soot samples before exposure to NO2 increases the BET surface area, the HONO yield, and the NO2 uptake coefficient due to the removal of the organic fraction from the soot backbone that unblocks active sites and makes them accessible for physical adsorption and chemical reactions. Our results support the oxidation-reduction mechanism involving

  11. Intercomparison of HONO SCDs and profiles from MAX-DOAS observations during the MAD-CAT campaign and comparison to chemical model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Wagner, Thomas; Xie, Pinhua; Remmers, Julia; Li, Ang; Lampel, Johannes; Friess, Udo; Peters, Enno; Wittrock, Folkard; Richter, Andreas; Hilboll, Andreas; Volkamer, Rainer; Ortega, Ivan; Hendrick, Francois; Van Roozendael, Michel; Ma, Jianzhong; Jin, Junli; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2015-04-01

    In order to promote the development of the passive DOAS technique and to improve the retrieval algorithms of trace gases and aerosols the Multi Axis DOAS - Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) was held at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany from June to October 2013. MAX-DOAS (Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instruments of various designs recorded UV-visible spectra of scattered sunlight at different elevation and azimuth angles. We present intercomparison results for slant column densities (SCDs) of nitrous acid (HONO) retrieved during this campaign by several research groups. Data analysis was performed in two steps, starting with the preferred settings of the individual groups, followed by an analysis using common retrieval settings. In general good agreement of the resulting HONO SCD sets was found. Furthermore, we performed various sensitivity analyses to improve and evaluate the uncertainties in the HONO SCD retrieval, such as the influence of the wavelength dependence of the NO2 air mass factor, the selection of the wavelength interval of the retrieval, the choice of the Fraunhofer reference spectrum, or the offset correction. Finally we compared the results from different kinds of inversion algorithms for the vertical profiles of trace gases and aerosols. The derived HONO profiles, VMR near surface and tropospheric vertical column densities are compared with each other and with the results of regional chemical model simulations. We found a high HONO VMR near surface of about 200 ppt, which is much higher than the typical daytime VMR of lower than 10 ppt at the early noon (around 9:30 local time), probably indicating a strong source of HONO. The strong vertical gradient in the profile of HONO VMR probably indicates the HONO source is close to the surface.

  12. Observations of nitrous acid (HONO) and peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) made during the 2013 and 2014 Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Alvarez, S. L.; Brown, S. S.; Burkholder, J. B.; De Gouw, J. A.; Edwards, P. M.; Lefer, B. L.; Liggio, J.; Min, K. E.; Stutz, J.; Tsai, J. Y.; Colosimo, S. F.; Wentzell, J. J. B.; Wild, R. J.; Yuan, B.; Flynn, J. H., III

    2014-12-01

    HONO is frequently observed to be the main OH source in the early morning, with more recent urban measurements showing significant rates of daytime production. Quantifying the impact of HONO as a source of daytime oxidant is crucial to forming a more explicit understanding of tropospheric ozone formation. In this work, ambient observations of HONO were made during the 2013 and 2014 Uintah Basin Wintertime Ozone Study (UBWOS) at a field site in Utah using various analytical techniques including chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and long path absorption photometry (LOPAP). Observations of HONO and HO2NO2 will be presented and compared to model results using a chemical box model applying explicit MCM chemistry to describe an ozone formation event observed during the 2013 wintertime season. Strong inversions leading to a build-up of many primary and secondary pollutants as well as low temperatures drove daytime HO2NO2 observations as high as 1.5 ppbv during the 2013 study. The potential of these high HO2NO2 concentrations as an interference to the various HONO measurements techniques will be discussed. Daytime HONO observations will be presented and analyzed with respect to coinciding vertical gradients, sampling artifacts, and potential instrumental interferences.

  13. HONO Formation from Heterogeneous Photochemistry of Nitrogen Oxides on Urban Grime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baergen, A.; Donaldson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple field studies have indicated that there is an important unknown fixed, near-ground, photochemical source of HONO. We will discuss the photochemical production of HONO from urban grime, surface films that form on impervious surfaces in an urban environment, as a possible process contributing to this source. In a field study carried out in Fall 2014, we measured decreased nitrate in urban grime samples that were exposed to direct sunlight, compared to those that were shielded. These measurements support previous laboratory experiments showing a fast photochemical loss of nitrate from collected urban grime upon illumination with simulated sunlight. Using Incoherent Broad-Band Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) to quantify the gas phase products, we show that HONO(g) is a product of urban grime photochemistry, demonstrating the ability of grime photochemistry to re-activate surface nitrate. This chemistry does not occur on dry samples; we will discuss the relative humidity (RH) dependence in the context of our measurements of water uptake onto grime samples made using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM).

  14. Intercomparison of field measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) during the SHARP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, J. P.; Dibb, J.; Lee, B. H.; Rappenglück, B.; Wood, E. C.; Levy, M.; Zhang, R.-Y.; Lefer, B.; Ren, X.-R.; Stutz, J.; Tsai, C.; Ackermann, L.; Golovko, J.; Herndon, S. C.; Oakes, M.; Meng, Q.-Y.; Munger, J. W.; Zahniser, M.; Zheng, J.

    2014-05-01

    Because of the importance of HONO as a radical reservoir, consistent and accurate measurements of its concentration are needed. As part of SHARP (Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors), time series of HONO were obtained by six different measurement techniques on the roof of the Moody Tower at the University of Houston. Techniques used were long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), stripping coil-visible absorption photometry (SC-AP), long path absorption photometry (LOPAP®), mist chamber/ion chromatography (MC-IC), quantum cascade-tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (QC-TILDAS), and ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (ID-CIMS). Various combinations of techniques were in operation from 15 April through 31 May 2009. All instruments recorded a similar diurnal pattern of HONO concentrations with higher median and mean values during the night than during the day. Highest values were observed in the final 2 weeks of the campaign. Inlets for the MC-IC, SC-AP, and QC-TILDAS were collocated and agreed most closely with each other based on several measures. Largest differences between pairs of measurements were evident during the day for concentrations < ~100 parts per trillion (ppt). Above ~ 200 ppt, concentrations from the SC-AP, MC-IC, and QC-TILDAS converged to within about 20%, with slightly larger discrepancies when DOAS was considered. During the first 2 weeks, HONO measured by ID-CIMS agreed with these techniques, but ID-CIMS reported higher values during the afternoon and evening of the final 4 weeks, possibly from interference from unknown sources. A number of factors, including building related sources, likely affected measured concentrations.

  15. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    SciTech Connect

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24

    dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads

  16. Impacts of an unknown daytime nitrous acid source on its daytime concentration and budget, as well as those of hydroxyl, hydroperoxyl, and organic peroxy radicals, in the coastal regions of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; An, J.; Wang, F.; Li, Y.; Qu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Lin, J.

    2015-01-01

    Many field experiments have found high nitrous acid (HONO) mixing ratios in both urban and rural areas during daytime, but these high daytime HONO mixing ratios cannot be explained well by gas-phase production, suggesting that an unknown daytime HONO source (Punknown) could exist. The formula Punknown ≈ 19.60 × NO2 × J(NO2) was obtained using observed data from 13 field experiments across the globe. The additional HONO sources (i.e. the Punknown, HONO emissions, and nighttime hydrolysis conversion of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on aerosols) were coupled into the WRF-Chem model (Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry) to assess the Punknown impacts on the concentrations and budgets of HONO and peroxy (hydroxyl, hydroperoxyl, and organic peroxy) radicals (ROx) (= OH + HO2 + RO2) in the coastal regions of China. Results indicated that the additional HONO sources produced a significant improvement in HONO and OH simulations, particularly in the daytime. Elevated daytime-mean Punknown values were found in the coastal regions of China, with a maximum of 2.5 ppb h-1 in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. The Punknown produced a 60-250% increase of OH, HO2 and RO2 near the ground in the major cities of the coastal regions of China, and a 5-48% increase of OH, HO2 and RO2 in the daytime meridional-mean mixing ratios within 1000 m above the ground. When the additional HONO sources were included, the photolysis of HONO was dominated in the OH production rate in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou before 10:00 LST with a maximum of 10.01 [7.26 due to the Punknown] ppb h-1 in Beijing, whereas the reaction of HO2 + NO (nitric oxide) was dominated after 10:00 LST with a maximum of 9.38 [7.23] ppb h-1 in Beijing. The whole ROx cycle was accelerated by the additional HONO sources, especially the Punknown. The OH production rate was enhanced by 0.67 [0.64] to 4.32 [3.86] ppb h-1 via the reaction of HO2 + NO, and by 0.85 [0.69] to 4.11 [3.61] ppb h-1 via the

  17. The Evolution of Hono Emissions In An Aircraft Engine Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Yam, C. K.; Han, S.; Lukachko, S. P.; Waitz, I. A.; Wormhoudt, J.; Brown, R. C.; Zhang, J.; Clague, A. R.; Brundish, K. D.

    Measurements and chemical kinetic modeling of NOy species have been performed for exhaust species passing through an aircraft engine turbine. The measurements of NO, NO2, and HONO were made at the exit of a combustor in a sector test rig and at the engine exit of the DERA (QinetiQ) TRACE engine using the same combustor technology. Simulations of the fluid flow and chemistry through the post combustor sections of the engine were made using the CNEWT code. Significant increases in HONO concentrations are observed in the measurements and are corroborated by the numerical simulations, with the latter indicating that OH driven oxidation of NO is the primary HONO chemical production mechanism. Reasonable quantitative agreement between the measurements and model at the combustor exit was achieved, despite significant uncertainties in model initialization of radical species.

  18. Intramolecular vibrational energy relaxation in nitrous acid (HONO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botan, Virgiliu; Hamm, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Intramolecular vibrational energy relaxation (IVR) in nitrous acid (HONO) is studied with the help of ultrafast two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. In a previous paper [V. Botan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 234511 (2006)], it has been observed that trans-HONO cools through a cascade of overtones of one specific mode after pumping the OH stretch vibration. We had suggested that this cooling mode is the ONO bend vibration. Furthermore, molecules that have initially been excited by the OH stretch vibration of cis-HONO and then underwent isomerization follow the same relaxation pathway. In the present study, we extend the investigation of IVR of cis- and trans-HONO to the N=O stretch and HON bend spectral regions, finding further evidence that the bottleneck of trans cooling is indeed the ONO bend vibration. In combination with information on the anharmonic coupling constants of different modes, the energy relaxation dynamics preceding this cooling cascade can also be followed in unprecedented detail.

  19. Influence of biomass burning plumes on HONO chemistry in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, W.; Ding, A. J.; Xie, Y. N.; Xu, Z.; Mao, H.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Zheng, L. F.; Qi, X. M.; Huang, X.; Yang, X.-Q.; Sun, J. N.; Herrmann, E.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Fu, C. B.

    2015-02-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) plays a key role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the budget of hydroxyl radical (OH). In this study, a two-month measurement of HONO and related quantities were analyzed during a biomass burning season in 2012 at a suburban site in the western Yangtze River delta, eastern China. An overall high HONO concentration with the mean value of 0.76 ppbv (0.01 ppbv to 5.95 ppbv) was observed. During biomass burning (BB) periods, both HONO concentration and HONO/NO2 ratio were enhanced significantly (more than a factor of 2, p < 0.01) compared with non-biomass burning (non-BB) periods. A correlation analysis showed that the HONO in BB plumes was more correlated with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) than that with potassium (a tracer of BB). Estimation by the method of potassium tracing suggests a maximum contribution of 17 ± 12% from BB emission to the observed HONO concentrations, and the other over 80% of the observed nighttime HONO concentrations during BB periods were secondarily produced by the heterogeneous conversion of NO2. The NO2-to-HONO conversion rate (CHONO) in BB plumes was almost twice as that in non-BB plumes (0.0062 hr-1 vs. 0.0032 hr-1). Given that the residence time of the BB air masses was lower than that of non-BB air masses, these results suggest BB aerosols have higher NO2 conversion potentials to form HONO than non-BB aerosols. A further analysis based on comparing the surface area at similar particle mass levels and HONO/NO2 ratios at similar surface area levels suggested larger specific surface areas and higher NO2 conversion efficiencies of BB aerosols. A mixed plume of BB and anthropogenic fossil fuel (FF) emissions was observed on 10 June with even higher HONO concentrations and HONO/NO2 ratios. The strong HONO production potential (high HONO/NO2 to PM2.5 ratio) was accompanied with a high sulfate concentration in this plume, suggesting a promotion of mixed aerosols to the HONO formation. In summary, our study suggests an

  20. Percolation model with an additional source of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    The ranges of transmission of the mobiles in a mobile ad hoc network are not uniform in reality. They are affected by the temperature fluctuation in air, obstruction due to the solid objects, even the humidity difference in the environment, etc. How the varying range of transmission of the individual active elements affects the global connectivity in the network may be an important practical question to ask. Here a model of percolation phenomena, with an additional source of disorder, is introduced for a theoretical understanding of this problem. As in ordinary percolation, sites of a square lattice are occupied randomly with probability p . Each occupied site is then assigned a circular disk of random value R for its radius. A bond is defined to be occupied if and only if the radii R1 and R2 of the disks centered at the ends satisfy a certain predefined condition. In a very general formulation, one divides the R1-R2 plane into two regions by an arbitrary closed curve. One defines a point within one region as representing an occupied bond; otherwise it is a vacant bond. The study of three different rules under this general formulation indicates that the percolation threshold always varies continuously. This threshold has two limiting values, one is pc(sq) , the percolation threshold for the ordinary site percolation on the square lattice, and the other is unity. The approach of the percolation threshold to its limiting values are characterized by two exponents. In a special case, all lattice sites are occupied by disks of random radii R ∈{0 ,R0} and a percolation transition is observed with R0 as the control variable, similar to the site occupation probability.

  1. Percolation model with an additional source of disorder.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S S

    2016-06-01

    The ranges of transmission of the mobiles in a mobile ad hoc network are not uniform in reality. They are affected by the temperature fluctuation in air, obstruction due to the solid objects, even the humidity difference in the environment, etc. How the varying range of transmission of the individual active elements affects the global connectivity in the network may be an important practical question to ask. Here a model of percolation phenomena, with an additional source of disorder, is introduced for a theoretical understanding of this problem. As in ordinary percolation, sites of a square lattice are occupied randomly with probability p. Each occupied site is then assigned a circular disk of random value R for its radius. A bond is defined to be occupied if and only if the radii R_{1} and R_{2} of the disks centered at the ends satisfy a certain predefined condition. In a very general formulation, one divides the R_{1}-R_{2} plane into two regions by an arbitrary closed curve. One defines a point within one region as representing an occupied bond; otherwise it is a vacant bond. The study of three different rules under this general formulation indicates that the percolation threshold always varies continuously. This threshold has two limiting values, one is p_{c}(sq), the percolation threshold for the ordinary site percolation on the square lattice, and the other is unity. The approach of the percolation threshold to its limiting values are characterized by two exponents. In a special case, all lattice sites are occupied by disks of random radii R∈{0,R_{0}} and a percolation transition is observed with R_{0} as the control variable, similar to the site occupation probability.

  2. Percolation model with an additional source of disorder.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S S

    2016-06-01

    The ranges of transmission of the mobiles in a mobile ad hoc network are not uniform in reality. They are affected by the temperature fluctuation in air, obstruction due to the solid objects, even the humidity difference in the environment, etc. How the varying range of transmission of the individual active elements affects the global connectivity in the network may be an important practical question to ask. Here a model of percolation phenomena, with an additional source of disorder, is introduced for a theoretical understanding of this problem. As in ordinary percolation, sites of a square lattice are occupied randomly with probability p. Each occupied site is then assigned a circular disk of random value R for its radius. A bond is defined to be occupied if and only if the radii R_{1} and R_{2} of the disks centered at the ends satisfy a certain predefined condition. In a very general formulation, one divides the R_{1}-R_{2} plane into two regions by an arbitrary closed curve. One defines a point within one region as representing an occupied bond; otherwise it is a vacant bond. The study of three different rules under this general formulation indicates that the percolation threshold always varies continuously. This threshold has two limiting values, one is p_{c}(sq), the percolation threshold for the ordinary site percolation on the square lattice, and the other is unity. The approach of the percolation threshold to its limiting values are characterized by two exponents. In a special case, all lattice sites are occupied by disks of random radii R∈{0,R_{0}} and a percolation transition is observed with R_{0} as the control variable, similar to the site occupation probability. PMID:27415234

  3. Measurement of HONO, HNCO, and Other Inorganic Acids by Negative-ion Proton-Transfer Chemical-Ionization Mass Spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS):Application to Biomass Burning Emissions.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, James M.; Veres, Patrick; Warneke, Carsten; Neuman, Andrew; Washenfelder, Rebecca; Brown, Steven; Baasandroj, Munkhbayar; Burkholder, James; Burling, Ian; Johnson, Timothy J.; Yokelson, Robert L.; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2010-07-23

    A negative-ion proton transfer chemical ionization mass spectrometric technique (NI-PT-CIMS), using acetate as the reagent ion, was applied to the measurement of volatile inorganic acids of atmospheric interest: hydrochloric (HCl), nitrous (HONO) nitric (HNO3), and isocyanic (HNCO) acids. Gas phase calibrations through the sampling inlet showed the method to be intrinsically sensitive (6-16 cts/pptv), but prone to inlet effects for HNO3 and HCl. The ion chemistry was found to be insensitive to water vapor concentrations, in agreement with previous studies of carboxylic acids. The inlet equilibration times for HNCO and HONO were 2 to 4 seconds, allowing for measurement in biomass burning studies. Several potential interferences in HONO measurements were examined: decomposition of HNO3•NO3- clusters within the CIMS, and NO2-water production on inlet surfaces, and were quite minor (>_1%, 3.3%, respectively). The detection limits of the method were limited by the instrument backgrounds in the ion source and flow tube, and were estimated to range between 16 and 50 pptv (parts per trillion by volume). The comparison of HONO measured by CIMS and by in situ FTIR showed good correlation and agreement to within 17%. The method provided rapid and accurate measurements of HNCO and HONO in controlled biomass burning studies, and suggest both as products of biomass burning.

  4. Measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) in urban area of Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Bernard, François; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Grosselin, Benoît; Zhou, Bin; Zheng, Jun; Liang, Peng; Zhang, Yujie; Ye, Xingnan; Daële, Véronique; Mu, Yujing; Zhang, Renyi; Chen, Jianmin; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2016-03-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO), as a precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH), plays an important role in the photochemistry of the troposphere, especially in the polluted urban atmosphere. A field campaign was conducted to measure atmospheric HONO concentration and that of other pollutants (such as NO2 and particle mass concentration) in the autumn of 2009 at Shanghai urban areas. HONO mixing ratios were simultaneously measured by three different techniques: long path absorption photometer (LOPAP), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). The measurements showed that the mixing ratios of HONO were highly variable and depended strongly on meteorological parameters. The HONO levels ranged from 0.5 to 7 ppb with maximum values during early morning and minimum levels during late afternoon. The three instruments reproduced consistent diurnal pattern of HONO concentrations with higher concentration during the night compared to the daylight hours. Comparison of HONOLOPAP/HONOCIMS ratios during daytime and nighttime periods exhibited a non-systematic disagreement of 0.93 and 1.16, respectively. This would indicate different chemical compositions of sampled air for the LOPAP and the CIMS instruments during daytime and nighttime periods, which have possibly affected measurements. Mean HONO concentration reported by LOPAP was 33 % higher than by DOAS on the whole period with no significant difference between daytime and nighttime periods. This revealed a systematic deviation from both instruments. The present data provides complementary information of HONO ambient levels in the atmosphere of Shanghai urban areas. PMID:26590058

  5. Intercomparison of field measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) during the SHARP Campaign

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the importance of HONO as a radical reservoir, consistent and accurate measurements of its concentration are needed. As part of the SHARP (Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors), time series of HONO were obtained by five different measurement techniques on th...

  6. Biological soil crusts emit large amounts of NO and HONO affecting the nitrogen cycle in drylands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, Alexandra; Wu, Dianming; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J.; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Dryland systems currently cover ˜40% of the world's land surface and are still expanding as a consequence of human impact and global change. In contrast to that, information on their role in global biochemical processes is limited, probably induced by the presumption that their sparse vegetation cover plays a negligible role in global balances. However, spaces between the sparse shrubs are not bare, but soils are mostly covered by biological soil crusts (biocrusts). These biocrust communities belong to the oldest life forms, resulting from an assembly between soil particles and cyanobacteria, lichens, bryophytes, and algae plus heterotrophic organisms in varying proportions. Depending on the dominating organism group, cyanobacteria-, lichen-, and bryophyte-dominated biocrusts are distinguished. Besides their ability to restrict soil erosion they fix atmospheric carbon and nitrogen, and by doing this they serve as a nutrient source in strongly depleted dryland ecosystems. In this study we show that a fraction of the nitrogen fixed by biocrusts is metabolized and subsequently returned to the atmosphere in the form of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). These gases affect the radical formation and oxidizing capacity within the troposphere, thus being of particular interest to atmospheric chemistry. Laboratory measurements using dynamic chamber systems showed that dark cyanobacteria-dominated crusts emitted the largest amounts of NO and HONO, being ˜20 times higher than trace gas fluxes of nearby bare soil. We showed that these nitrogen emissions have a biogenic origin, as emissions of formerly strongly emitting samples almost completely ceased after sterilization. By combining laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data we made a best estimate of global annual emissions amounting to ˜1.1 Tg of NO-N and ˜0.6 Tg of HONO-N from biocrusts. This sum of 1.7 Tg of reactive nitrogen emissions equals ˜20% of the soil release under natural vegetation according

  7. Slice imaging of nitric acid photodissociation: The O({sup 1}D) + HONO channel

    SciTech Connect

    Herath, Nuradhika; Everhart, Stephanie C.; Suits, Arthur G.; Vasyuntinskii, Oleg S.

    2011-01-21

    We report an imaging study of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) photodissociation near 204 nm with detection of O({sup 1}D), one of the major decomposition products in this region. The images show structure reflecting the vibrational distribution of the HONO coproduct and significant angular anisotropy that varies with recoil speed. The images also show substantial alignment of the O({sup 1}D) orbital, which is analyzed using an approximate treatment that reveals that the polarization is dominated by incoherent, high order contributions. The results offer additional insight into the dynamics of the dissociation of nitric acid through the S{sub 3} (2 {sup 1}A{sup '}) excited state, resolving an inconsistency in previously reported angular distributions, and pointing the way to future studies of the angular momentum polarization.

  8. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bettina; Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-12-15

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth's nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a(-1) of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a(-1) of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate.

  9. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bettina; Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-12-15

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth's nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a(-1) of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a(-1) of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate. PMID:26621714

  10. Biological soil crusts accelerate the nitrogen cycle through large NO and HONO emissions in drylands

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dianming; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J.; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen species have a strong influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate, tightly coupling the Earth’s nitrogen cycle with microbial activity in the biosphere. Their sources, however, are not well constrained, especially in dryland regions accounting for a major fraction of the global land surface. Here, we show that biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are emitters of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). Largest fluxes are obtained by dark cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts, being ∼20 times higher than those of neighboring uncrusted soils. Based on laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data, we obtain a best estimate of ∼1.7 Tg per year for the global emission of reactive nitrogen from biocrusts (1.1 Tg a−1 of NO-N and 0.6 Tg a−1 of HONO-N), corresponding to ∼20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. On continental scales, emissions are highest in Africa and South America and lowest in Europe. Our results suggest that dryland emissions of reactive nitrogen are largely driven by biocrusts rather than the underlying soil. They help to explain enigmatic discrepancies between measurement and modeling approaches of global reactive nitrogen emissions. As the emissions of biocrusts strongly depend on precipitation events, climate change affecting the distribution and frequency of precipitation may have a strong impact on terrestrial emissions of reactive nitrogen and related climate feedback effects. Because biocrusts also account for a large fraction of global terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation, their impacts should be further quantified and included in regional and global models of air chemistry, biogeochemistry, and climate. PMID:26621714

  11. Additional muon calculations for the SLC positron source

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; McCall, R.C.

    1985-04-23

    This note is an update to the muon calculations presented in CN-221 and takes into account: (1) a more complete muon production and transport model, including an estimate of wide angle production based on experimental data, (2) additional earth shielding that will be added on top and both sides of the 2/3 tunnel areas, and (3) a detailed analysis of the earth profile as it pertains to shielding in the direction of the SLAC site boundary. The highest annual dose at the SLAC boundary is found to be 13 mrem/year (4000 hours of operation at 50 kW), and this occurs at a horizontal angle of 0 degrees and a vertical angle of 3.6 degrees relative to the incident beam direction. Although the shielding criteria is 10 mrem/year at the site boundary, the radiation transport model becomes somewhat conservative at large distances from the shield, which should bring the 13 mrem/year number actually well below the criteria. This point is also about 28 feet above the roadway. Extension of this line may strike the ground in the Christmas tree farm beyond the SLAC boundary but there will be additional attenuation due to distance. We do not recommend that any additional shielding be added at this time. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Measurements of HONO, NO, NOy and SO2 in aircraft exhaust plumes at cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkat, T.; Voigt, C.; Arnold, F.; Schlager, H.; Kleffmann, J.; Aufmhoff, H.; Schäuble, D.; Schaefer, M.; Schumann, U.

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of gaseous nitrogen and sulfur oxide emissions in young aircraft exhaust plumes give insight into chemical oxidation processes inside aircraft engines. Particularly, the OH-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) from nitrogen oxide (NO) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from sulfur dioxide (SO2) inside the turbine which is highly uncertain, need detailed analysis to address the climate impact of aviation. We report on airborne in situ measurements at cruise altitudes of HONO, NO, NOy, and SO2 in 9 wakes of 8 different types of modern jet airliners, including for the first time also an A380. Measurements of HONO and SO2 were made with an ITCIMS (Ion Trap Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer) using a new ion-reaction scheme involving SF5- reagent ions. The measured molar ratios HONO/NO and HONO/NOy with averages of 0.038 ± 0.010 and 0.027 ± 0.005 were found to decrease systematically with increasing NOx emission-index (EI NOx). We calculate an average EI HONO of 0.31 ± 0.12 g NO2 kg-1. Using reliable measurements of HONO and NOy, which are less adhesive than H2SO4 to the inlet walls, we derive the OH-induced conversion fraction of fuel sulfur to sulfuric acid $\\varepsilon$ with an average of 2.2 ± 0.5 %. $\\varepsilon$ also tends to decrease with increasing EI NOx, consistent with earlier model simulations. The lowest HONO/NO, HONO/NOy and $\\varepsilon$ was observed for the largest passenger aircraft A380.

  13. Observation of nighttime nitrous acid (HONO) formation at a non-urban site during PRIDE-PRD2004 in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hang; Cheng, Ya Fang; Cheng, Peng; Zhang, Yuan Hang; Dong, Shuofei; Zeng, Li Min; Wang, Xuesong; Slanina, Jacob; Shao, Min; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    Though the importance of HONO as an OH precursor has been recognized for years, its chemical formation pathway is still not well understood. This inhibited the simulations of HONO and observation-based formation rates provided an alternative for the air quality models. However, HONO formation rate derived from certain period may be significantly influenced by uncertainties in transport and emission processes. In this study the use of large sample and scaling methods were recommended in the calculation of HONO formation rate. During the Program of Regional Integrated Experiments of Air Quality over Pear River Delta (PRIDE-PRD2004), good correlations between HONO and NO2 were found supporting the involvement of NO2 in HONO formation. An average NO2-to-HONO nighttime conversion rate CHONO of 1.6%h-1 was derived at a non-urban site Xinken. This conversion rate was comparable to other field measurements and could not be explained by gas phase reactions only. If assumed that HONO was formed only on the ground surface, the observed conversion rate could be explained by the reactions of NO2 on ground surfaces only if three deposited NO2 lead to one HONO released. The emission factor of HONO and its sampling interferences during the measurements were also evaluated in this article.

  14. Light-induced nitrous acid (HONO) production from NO2 heterogeneous reactions on household chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Bassil, Sabina; Bartolomei, Vincent; Coulomb, Bruno; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-10-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) can be generated in various indoor environments directly during combustion processes or indirectly via heterogeneous NO2 reactions with water adsorbed layers on diverse surfaces. Indoors not only the concentrations of NO2 are higher but the surface to volume (S/V) ratios are larger and therefore the potential of HONO production is significantly elevated compared to outdoors. It has been claimed that the UV solar light is largely attenuated indoors. Here, we show that solar light (λ > 340 nm) penetrates indoors and can influence the heterogeneous reactions of gas-phase NO2 with various household surfaces. The NO2 to HONO conversion mediated by light on surfaces covered with domestic chemicals has been determined at atmospherically relevant conditions i.e. 50 ppb NO2 and 50% RH. The formation rates of HONO were enhanced in presence of light for all the studied surfaces and are determined in the following order: 1.3·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for borosilicate glass, 1.7·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for bathroom cleaner, 1.0·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 on alkaline detergent (floor cleaner), 1.3·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for white wall paint and 2.7·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for lacquer. These results highlight the potential of household chemicals, used for cleaning purposes to generate HONO indoors through light-enhanced NO2 heterogeneous reactions. The results obtained have been applied to predict the timely evolution of HONO in a real indoor environment using a dynamic mass balance model. A steady state mixing ratio of HONO has been estimated at 1.6 ppb assuming a contribution from glass, paint and lacquer and considering the photolysis of HONO as the most important loss process.

  15. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  16. An online monitoring system for atmospheric nitrous acid (HONO) based on stripping coil and ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Cheng, Yafang; Lu, Keding; Su, Hang; Yang, Qiang; Zou, Yikan; Zhao, Yanran; Dong, Huabing; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2013-05-01

    A new instrument for measuring atmospheric nitrous acid (HONO) was developed, consisting of a double-wall glass stripping coil sampler coupled with ion chromatography (SC-IC). SC-IC is featured by small size (50 x 35 x 25 cm) and modular construction, including three independent parts: the sampling unit, the transfer and supporting unit, and the detection unit. High collection efficiency (> 99%) was achieved with 25 micromol/L Na2CO3 as absorption solution even in the presence of highly acidic compounds. This instrument has a detection limit of 8 pptv at 15 min time resolution, with a measurement uncertainty of 7%. Potential interferences from NO(x), NO2+SO2, NO2+VOCs, HONO+O3, HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrite (PAN) and particle nitrite were quantified in laboratory studies and were found to be insignificant under typical atmospheric conditions. Within the framework of the 3C-STAR project, inter-comparison between the SC-IC and LOPAP (long path liquid absorption photometer) was conducted at a rural site in the Pearl River Delta. Good agreement was achieved between the two instruments over three weeks. Both instruments determined a clear diurnal profile of ambient HONO concentrations from 0.1 to 2.5 ppbv. However, deviations were found for low ambient HONO concentrations (i.e. < 0.3 ppbv), which cannot be explained by previous investigated interference species. To accurately determine the HONO budget under illuminated conditions, more intercomparison of HONO measurement techniques is still needed in future studies, especially at low HONO concentrations.

  17. Heterogeneous Chemistry of HONO on Liquid Sulfuric Acid: A New Mechanism of Chlorine Activation on Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of nitrous acid (HONO) on liquid sulfuric acid (H2SO4) Was investigated at conditions that prevail in the stratosphere. The measured uptake coefficient (gamma) of HONO on H2SO4 increased with increasing acid content, ranging from 0.03 for 65 wt % to about 0.1 for 74 wt %. In the aqueous phase, HONO underwent irreversible reaction with H2SO4 to form nitrosylsulfuric acid (NO(+)HSO4(-). At temperatures below 230 K, NO(+)HSO4(-) was observed to be stable and accumulated in concentrated solutions (less than 70 wt % H2SO4) but was unstable and quickly regenerated HONO in dilute solutions (less than 70 wt %). HCl reacted with HONO dissolved in sulfuric acid, releasing gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). The reaction probability between HCl and HONO varied from 0.01 to 0.02 for 60-72 wt % H2SO4. In the stratosphere, ClNO photodissociates rapidly to yield atomic chlorine, which catalytically destroys ozone. Analysis of the laboratory data reveals that the reaction of HCl with HONO on sulfate aerosols can affect stratospheric ozone balance during elevated sulfuric acid loadings after volcanic eruptions or due to emissions from the projected high-speed civil transport (HSCT). The present results may have important implications on the assessment of environmental acceptability of HSCT.

  18. Resolving the HONO formation mechanism in the ionosphere via ab initio molecular dynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    He, Rongxing; Li, Lei; Zhong, Jie; Zhu, Chongqin; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-04-26

    Solar emission produces copious nitrosonium ions (NO(+)) in the D layer of the ionosphere, 60 to 90 km above the Earth's surface. NO(+) is believed to transfer its charge to water clusters in that region, leading to the formation of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) and protonated water cluster. The dynamics of this reaction at the ionospheric temperature (200-220 K) and the associated mechanistic details are largely unknown. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and transition-state search, key structures of the water hydrates-tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 and pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5-are identified and shown to be responsible for HONO formation in the ionosphere. The critical tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 exhibits a chain-like structure through which all of the lowest-energy isomers must go. However, most lowest-energy isomers of pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5 can be converted to the HONO-containing product, encountering very low barriers, via a chain-like or a three-armed, star-like structure. Although these structures are not the global minima, at 220 K, most lowest-energy NO(+)(H2O)4 and NO(+)(H2O)5 isomers tend to channel through these highly populated isomers toward HONO formation.

  19. Resolving the HONO formation mechanism in the ionosphere via ab initio molecular dynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    He, Rongxing; Li, Lei; Zhong, Jie; Zhu, Chongqin; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-04-26

    Solar emission produces copious nitrosonium ions (NO(+)) in the D layer of the ionosphere, 60 to 90 km above the Earth's surface. NO(+) is believed to transfer its charge to water clusters in that region, leading to the formation of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) and protonated water cluster. The dynamics of this reaction at the ionospheric temperature (200-220 K) and the associated mechanistic details are largely unknown. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and transition-state search, key structures of the water hydrates-tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 and pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5-are identified and shown to be responsible for HONO formation in the ionosphere. The critical tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 exhibits a chain-like structure through which all of the lowest-energy isomers must go. However, most lowest-energy isomers of pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5 can be converted to the HONO-containing product, encountering very low barriers, via a chain-like or a three-armed, star-like structure. Although these structures are not the global minima, at 220 K, most lowest-energy NO(+)(H2O)4 and NO(+)(H2O)5 isomers tend to channel through these highly populated isomers toward HONO formation. PMID:27071120

  20. A new instrument to measure gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Heland, J; Kleefmann, J; Kurtenbach, R; Wiesen, P

    2001-08-01

    A new in situ instrument (LOPAP: long path absorption photometer) to measure gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) using wet chemical sampling and photometric detection has been developed. This instrument is aimed to overcome the known problems with current HONO measurement techniques and was designed to be a cheap, sensitive, compact, and continuouslyworking HONO monitorfor ambient air measurements in the troposphere or for measurements of higher concentrations e.g. in smog chambers, in exhaust gases, and in indoor environments. Laboratory investigations were carried outto characterize the instrument components with respect to collection efficiency, optimum dye formation, optimum detection, and interfering species. Detection limits ranging from approximately 3 to 50 pptV have been obtained with response times from 4 to 1.5 min, respectively, using different instrument parameters. The accuracy of the measurements is in the range between +/-(10-15)%. The validation of the instrument was performed in the laboratory for HONO concentrations of 3 and 30 ppbV using ion chromatography and with a DOAS (differential optical absorption spectrometer) instrument in a large outdoor smog chamber in the range from 0.1 to 20 ppbV. The deviations were well within the errors of the measurements; however, when comparing the data with the DOAS instrument systematically higher values were found with the LOPAP instrument. PMID:11506004

  1. Laboratory Study of the Diffusivity of NOx and HONO in Snow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbrat, M.; Pinzer, B.; Huthwelker, T.; Schneebeli, M.; Ammann, M.

    2008-12-01

    The migration of NOx and HONO through the air/snow interface was experimentally investigated using a unique combination of techniques namely, X-ray micro-tomography and nitrogen oxides labeled with the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N in a snow diffusion chamber. The experimental set up allows blowing a gas mixture containing NO, NO2 or HONO into the headspace over a snow sample to mimic low wind air/snow interactions. The overall loss into the snow can be determined using a chemiluminescence detector at the outlet of the headspace. The concentration of HONO entering the headspace is moreover monitored by a long path absorption photometer (LOPAP). The migration of the labeled nitrogen oxide molecules along the snow sample can be observed by two γ-detectors, which can move along the sample during the experiment. The snow used for the experiment was produced artificially in a specially designed snow maker. The micro structure of the artificially produce snow is measured and visualized by micro-tomography and is identical to natural snow. For the experiment presented here, two types of snow were used, fresh snow and rounded snow. The rounded snow was obtained from a fresh snow sample which was kept during more than a month at -~10°C to allow for isothermal metamorphism. For NO and NO2 the observed profiles were consistent with gas phase diffusion through the open volume of the snow without any significant interaction with the ice surface, e.g. through heterogeneous hydrolysis of NO2. In the case of HONO, the strong interaction with the ice led to a reduced penetration of the molecules into the snow sample. The observed temperature dependence of the depth of penetration and of the apparent Henry constant, i.e., the ratio gas phase to snow phase of HONO and the clear difference seen between the different snow samples is a strong indication that bulk diffusion in the ice phase is the dominant process involved in the migration and that it takes place mainly into grain

  2. Photolysis of nitrous acid as a primary source of OH radicals indoors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Alvarez, E.; Amedro, D.; Afif, C.; Gligorovski, S.; Schoemacker, C.; Fittschen, C. M.; Doussin, J.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere controlling its self- oxidizing capacity. The main sources of OH radicals are the photolysis of ozone and the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO). Due to the attenuation of solar radiation in the indoor environment, the possibility of OH formation through photolytic pathways indoors has been, up to now, ignored. We present the first direct measurement of OH radicals in the indoor environment. To the present moment, only indirect measurements based on the follow-up of different tracers or model studies had been carried out. The measurements were carried out between July, 19 and July, 30, 2011 in a classroom of 170 m3 with two large windows, oriented northwest. The effect of different concentrations of NO2 and RH were tested for their effect on the generation of HONO. In order to measure the generation of OH radicals under different light intensities, the experiments were performed at three different periods during the day, corresponding to different light intensity levels: 1) (11 a.m. to 15.00 p.m.), 2) (15.00 p.m. to 19.00 p.m.) and 3) (21.00 p.m. to 00:30 a.m.). A pool of state-of-the-art analytical instrumentation was deployed to tackle the objectives set. We measured OH radical concentrations of up to 1.8 106 cm-3 in the indoor environment (Gomez Alvarez et al., 2013). We also show that photolysis is an important source of OH radicals indoors under certain conditions, i.e. direct solar irradiation inside the room. HONO was the most probable precursor, considering the different sources leading to OH formation by photolysis. Additionally, the OH concentrations were found to follow a linear dependence with J(HONO) [HONO]. This was also supported by employing a simple quasi-photostationary state model (PSS) on the OH radical budget. These findings force a change in our understanding of indoor air quality as the reactivity linked to OH would involve formation of secondary species through chemical

  3. Exploring the nitrous acid (HONO) formation mechanism in winter Beijing: direct emissions and heterogeneous production in urban and suburban areas.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shengrui; Hou, Siqi; Zhang, Ying; Chu, Biwu; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Zhao, Pusheng; Ge, Maofa

    2016-07-18

    Continuous measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) were performed from December 12 to December 22, 2015 in both urban and suburban areas of Beijing to study the formation mechanism of HONO. The measurement campaign in both sites included a clean-haze-clean transformation process. HONO concentrations showed similar variations in the two sites, while they were always higher in the urban area. Moreover, correlations of HONO with NOx, NO2, NO, PM2.5 and relative humidity (RH) were studied to explore possible HONO formation pathways, and the contributions of direct emissions, heterogeneous reactions, and homogeneous reactions were also calculated. This showed that HONO in urban and suburban areas underwent totally different formation procedures, which were affected by meteorological conditions, PM2.5 concentrations, direct emissions, homogeneous reactions and heterogeneous reactions. PM2.5 concentrations and RH would influence the NO2 conversion efficiency. Heterogeneous reactions of NO2 were more efficient in suburban areas and in clean periods while direct emissions and homogeneous reactions contributed more in urban areas and in polluted periods when the concentrations of NOx and NO were at a high level. PMID:27081740

  4. Development of a new Laser Photofragmentation/Fluorescent Assay by Gas Expansion (LP/FAGE) technique for the quantification of tropospheric nitrous acid (HONO) at low parts-per-trillion mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, L. H.; Lew, M.; Bottorff, B.; Berke, A.; Raff, J. D.; Stevens, P. S.; Dusanter, S.

    2013-12-01

    Determining the full oxidative capacity of the atmosphere is vital to understanding the production of secondary pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosols and for regulating the lifetime of pollutants leading to climate change. The hydroxyl radical is the primary oxidant of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the troposphere. Nocturnal nitrous acid (HONO) is an important radical reservoir species and releases OH upon photolysis the next morning. In addition, recent studies have indicated higher than expected mixing ratios of HONO in the daytime. As daytime HONO mixing ratios usually maximize at only a couple hundred part-per-trillion, it is important to have a technique that is accurate, sensitive, and precise. Here we outline an instrumental technique called Laser Photofragmention/Fluorescent Assay by Gas Expansion (LP/FAGE). Ambient air is drawn through an inlet composed of a 1' diameter metal disk with a 0.025' cylindrically bored hole where it undergoes expansion into a cell held at ~3 torr. Fiber coupled laser emission (YILF: 355 nm, 2.2 W) induces photofragmentation of HONO to OH and NO whereby the OH is quantified by the FAGE technique using a fiber coupled 308 nm (6 mW) laser emission. The 355 nm and 308 nm emission are single pass, collinear, and separated only by the time delay of the pulses. To differentiate ambient OH from HONO-generated-OH, a shutter is used to block the 355 nm laser emission for a given period of time. Fluorescence from OH vs. fluorescence from interfering species can be differentiated by scanning on and off a specific rovibronic feature in the OH absorbance spectra. In this presentation we outline the instrumental technique, including its calibration in which effluent from an HCl permeation device is humidified and passed over a bed of sodium nitrate coated glass beads. The calibrator output is varied from 1 to several tens of parts-per-billions (ppb) and is detected using a chemiluminescence NOx analyzer. The

  5. Impact of isoprene and HONO chemistry on ozone and OVOC formation in a semirural South Korean forest

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Saewung; Kim, So-Young; Lee, Meehye; Shim, Heeyoun; Wolfe, Glenn; Guenther, Alex B.; He, Amy; Hong, Youdeog; Han, Jinseok

    2014-01-01

    Rapid urbanization and economic development in East Asia in past decades has led to photochemical air pollution problems such as excess photochemical ozone and aerosol formation. Asian megacities such as Seoul, Tokyo, Shanghai, Gangzhou, and Beijing are surrounded by densely forested areas and recent research has consistently demonstrated the importance of biogenic volatile organic compounds from vegetation in determining oxidation capacity in the suburban Asian megacity regions. Uncertainties in constraining tropospheric oxidation capacity, dominated by hydroxyl radical concentrations, undermine our ability to assess regional photochemical air pollution problems. We present an observational dataset of CO, NOX, SO2, ozone, HONO, and VOCs (anthropogenic and biogenic) from Taehwa Research Forest (TRF) near the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA) in early June 2012. The data show that TRF is influenced both by aged pollution and fresh BVOC emissions. With the dataset, we diagnose HOx (OH, HO2, and RO2) distributions calculated with the University of Washington Chemical Box Model (UWCM v 2.1). Uncertainty from unconstrained HONO sources and radical recycling processes highlighted in recent studies is examined using multiple model simulations with different model constraints. The results suggest that 1) different model simulation scenarios cause systematic differences in HOX distributions especially OH levels (up to 2.5 times) and 2) radical destruction (HO2+HO2 or HO2+RO2) could be more efficient than radical recycling (HO2+NO) especially in the afternoon. Implications of the uncertainties in radical chemistry are discussed with respect to ozone-VOC-NOX sensitivity and oxidation product formation rates. Overall, the VOC limited regime in ozone photochemistry is predicted but the degree of sensitivity can significantly vary depending on the model scenarios. The model results also suggest that RO2 levels are positively correlated with OVOCs production that is not routinely

  6. Impact of isoprene and HONO chemistry on ozone and OVOC formation in a semirural South Korean forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Kim, S.-Y.; Lee, M.; Shim, H.; Wolfe, G. M.; Guenther, A. B.; He, A.; Hong, Y.; Han, J.

    2015-04-01

    Rapid urbanization and economic development in East Asia in past decades has led to photochemical air pollution problems such as excess photochemical ozone and aerosol formation. Asian megacities such as Seoul, Tokyo, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Beijing are surrounded by densely forested areas, and recent research has consistently demonstrated the importance of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from vegetation in determining oxidation capacity in the suburban Asian megacity regions. Uncertainties in constraining tropospheric oxidation capacity, dominated by hydroxyl radical, undermine our ability to assess regional photochemical air pollution problems. We present an observational data set of CO, NOx, SO2, ozone, HONO, and VOCs (anthropogenic and biogenic) from Taehwa research forest (TRF) near the Seoul metropolitan area in early June 2012. The data show that TRF is influenced both by aged pollution and fresh biogenic volatile organic compound emissions. With the data set, we diagnose HOx (OH, HO2, and RO2) distributions calculated using the University of Washington chemical box model (UWCM v2.1) with near-explicit VOC oxidation mechanisms from MCM v3.2 (Master Chemical Mechanism). Uncertainty from unconstrained HONO sources and radical recycling processes highlighted in recent studies is examined using multiple model simulations with different model constraints. The results suggest that (1) different model simulation scenarios cause systematic differences in HOx distributions, especially OH levels (up to 2.5 times), and (2) radical destruction (HO2 + HO2 or HO2 + RO2) could be more efficient than radical recycling (RO2 + NO), especially in the afternoon. Implications of the uncertainties in radical chemistry are discussed with respect to ozone-VOC-NOx sensitivity and VOC oxidation product formation rates. Overall, the NOx limited regime is assessed except for the morning hours (8 a.m. to 12 p.m. local standard time), but the degree of sensitivity can

  7. Impact of isoprene and HONO chemistry on ozone and OVOC formation in a semirural South Korean forest

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, S.; Kim, S. -Y.; Lee, M.; Shim, H.; Wolfe, G. M.; Guenther, A. B.; He, A.; Hong, Y.; Han, J.

    2015-04-29

    Rapid urbanization and economic development in East Asia in past decades has led to photochemical air pollution problems such as excess photochemical ozone and aerosol formation. Asian megacities such as Seoul, Tokyo, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Beijing are surrounded by densely forested areas, and recent research has consistently demonstrated the importance of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from vegetation in determining oxidation capacity in the suburban Asian megacity regions. Uncertainties in constraining tropospheric oxidation capacity, dominated by hydroxyl radical, undermine our ability to assess regional photochemical air pollution problems. We present an observational data set of CO, NOx, SO2, ozone, HONO,more » and VOCs (anthropogenic and biogenic) from Taehwa research forest (TRF) near the Seoul metropolitan area in early June 2012. The data show that TRF is influenced both by aged pollution and fresh biogenic volatile organic compound emissions. With the data set, we diagnose HOx (OH, HO2, and RO2) distributions calculated using the University of Washington chemical box model (UWCM v2.1) with near-explicit VOC oxidation mechanisms from MCM v3.2 (Master Chemical Mechanism). Uncertainty from unconstrained HONO sources and radical recycling processes highlighted in recent studies is examined using multiple model simulations with different model constraints. The results suggest that (1) different model simulation scenarios cause systematic differences in HOx distributions, especially OH levels (up to 2.5 times), and (2) radical destruction (HO2 + HO2 or HO2 + RO2) could be more efficient than radical recycling (RO2 + NO), especially in the afternoon. Implications of the uncertainties in radical chemistry are discussed with respect to ozone–VOC–NOx sensitivity and VOC oxidation product formation rates. Overall, the NOx limited regime is assessed except for the morning hours (8 a.m. to 12 p.m. local standard time), but the degree of sensitivity

  8. Impact of isoprene and HONO chemistry on ozone and OVOC formation in a semirural South Korean forest

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Kim, S. -Y.; Lee, M.; Shim, H.; Wolfe, G. M.; Guenther, A. B.; He, A.; Hong, Y.; Han, J.

    2015-04-29

    Rapid urbanization and economic development in East Asia in past decades has led to photochemical air pollution problems such as excess photochemical ozone and aerosol formation. Asian megacities such as Seoul, Tokyo, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Beijing are surrounded by densely forested areas, and recent research has consistently demonstrated the importance of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from vegetation in determining oxidation capacity in the suburban Asian megacity regions. Uncertainties in constraining tropospheric oxidation capacity, dominated by hydroxyl radical, undermine our ability to assess regional photochemical air pollution problems. We present an observational data set of CO, NOx, SO2, ozone, HONO, and VOCs (anthropogenic and biogenic) from Taehwa research forest (TRF) near the Seoul metropolitan area in early June 2012. The data show that TRF is influenced both by aged pollution and fresh biogenic volatile organic compound emissions. With the data set, we diagnose HOx (OH, HO2, and RO2) distributions calculated using the University of Washington chemical box model (UWCM v2.1) with near-explicit VOC oxidation mechanisms from MCM v3.2 (Master Chemical Mechanism). Uncertainty from unconstrained HONO sources and radical recycling processes highlighted in recent studies is examined using multiple model simulations with different model constraints. The results suggest that (1) different model simulation scenarios cause systematic differences in HOx distributions, especially OH levels (up to 2.5 times), and (2) radical destruction (HO2 + HO2 or HO2 + RO2) could be more efficient than radical recycling (RO2 + NO), especially in the afternoon. Implications of the uncertainties in radical chemistry are discussed with respect to ozone–VOC–NOx sensitivity and VOC oxidation product

  9. Evidence for an Additional Heat Source in the Warm Ionized Medium of Galaxies.

    PubMed

    Reynolds; Haffner; Tufte

    1999-11-01

    Spatial variations of the [S ii]/Halpha and [N ii]/Halpha line intensity ratios observed in the gaseous halo of the Milky Way and other galaxies are inconsistent with pure photoionization models. They appear to require a supplemental heating mechanism that increases the electron temperature at low densities, ne. This would imply that in addition to photoionization, which has a heating rate per unit volume proportional to n2e, there is another source of heat with a rate per unit volume proportional to a lower power of ne. One possible mechanism is the dissipation of interstellar plasma turbulence, which, according to Minter & Spangler, heats the ionized interstellar medium in the Milky Way at a rate of approximately 1x10-25ne ergs cm-3 s-1. If such a source were present, it would dominate over photoionization heating in regions where ne less, similar0.1 cm-3, producing the observed increases in the [S ii]/Halpha and [N ii]/Halpha intensity ratios at large distances from the galactic midplane as well as accounting for the constancy of [S ii]/[N ii], which is not explained by pure photoionization. Other supplemental heating sources, such as magnetic reconnection, cosmic rays, or photoelectric emission from small grains, could also account for these observations, provided they supply approximately 10-5 ergs s-1 per square centimeter of the Galactic disk to the warm ionized medium.

  10. Accelerated Source-Encoding Full-Waveform Inversion with Additional Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, C.; Fichtner, A.; Ulbrich, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a flexible framework of Newton-type methods for constrained full-waveform inversion in the time domain. Our main goal is (1) to incorporate additional prior knowledge by using general constraints on the model parameters and (2) to reduce the computational costs of solving the inverse problem by tailoring source-encoding strategies to Newton-type methods.In particular, we apply the Moreau-Yosida regularization to handle the constraints and use a continuation strategy to adjust the regularization parameter. Furthermore, we propose a semismooth Newton method with a trust-region globalization that relies on second-order adjoints to compute the Newton system with a matrix-free preconditioned conjugate gradient solver. The costs of conventional FWI approaches scale proportionally with the number of seismic sources. Here, source-encoding strategies that trigger different sources simultaneously have been proven to be a successful tool to trade a small loss of information for huge savings of computational time to solve the inverse problem. This is particularly interesting for our setting as one iteration of Newton's methods using the full Hessian is considerably more expensive than quasi-Newton methods like L-BFGS. To this end, we discuss a sample average approximation model that is accelerated by using inexact Hessian information based on mini-batches of the samples. Furthermore, we compare its performance with stochastic descent schemes. Here, the classical stochastic gradient method is accelerated by an L-BFGS preconditioner and moreover, the stability of this stochastic preconditioner is enhanced by using the Hessian instead of only gradient information.Numerical results are presented for problems in geophysical exploration on reservoir-scale.

  11. Fast in-situ measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO) and nitrous acid (HONO) in northern Chinese plane during CAREBEIJING - NCP2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K. E.; Dube, W. P.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Langford, A. O.; Brown, S. S.; Broch, S.; Fuchs, H.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Hu, M.; Huey, L. G.; Kubik, K.; Li, X.; Liu, X.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Shao, M.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Tan, Z.; Zhu, T.; Wahner, A.; Wang, B.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern China Plain has experienced visibility degradation and detrimental health impacts due to aerosol and photochemical pollution. To examine these air quality issues, CAREBEIJING-NCP2014 (Care Beijing - Northern China Plain 2014) was held in WangDu, Hebei province, China from 6 June to 15 July 2014. We deployed our newly developed instrument, ACES (Airborne Cavity Enhanced Spectrometer), for high time resolution in-situ measurement of glyoxal (CHOCHO), nitrous acid (HONO) and other trace gases (NO2, H2O) to investigate mechanisms of oxidation processes and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The in situ measurements of CHOCHO provide observational constraints on secondary organic aerosol formation and oxidation processes, since this molecule has been proposed to play a crucial role in forming aerosol due to its high water solubility, isomerization, and abundant production from the oxidation of many different volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A box model analysis incorporating secondary glyoxal sources from VOC oxidation and sinks to OH reaction, photolysis and heterogeneous uptake will be used to determine a budget and potential for SOA formation. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21190052), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDB05010500) and the U.S. National Science Foundation Atmospheric (AGS-1405805).

  12. Two years of MAXDOAS measurements of NO2, HONO, SO2 and HCHO at SORPES station in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Nan; Ding, Aijun; Van Roozendael, Michel; Hendrick, Francois; Shen, Yicheng; Valks, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region includes the mega-city Shanghai and the well-industrialized and urbanized areas of Zhejiang Province and Jiangsu Province, with over ten large cities, such as Hangzhou, Suzhou and Nanjing. Covering only 2% land area, this region produces over 20% of China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) which makes it the most densely populated region and one of the most polluted regions in China. In the YRD region, knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of the source and transport of air pollutants because only few measurement studies have been conducted. This work presents two years measurements of air pollutants including NO2, HONO, SO2, HCHO and CHOCHO at a regional back-ground site, the Station for Observing Regional Processes of the Earth System (SORPES), in the western part of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) in eastern China. A retrieval algorithm, based on an on-line implementation of the radiative transfer code LIDORT and the optimal estimation technique, has been used to provide information on trace gases vertical profiles and vertical column densities (VCDs). The seasonal and diurnal cycles of trace gases have been studies and compared with in situ measurements. The retrieved tropospheric NO2, HCHO and SO2 VCDs were compared to satellite measurements, while the NO2 and SO2 near surface concentrations (0-200 m layer) were compared to measurements from in situ instruments at SORPES.

  13. Styrofoam Debris as a Source of Hazardous Additives for Marine Organisms.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi; Shim, Won Joon; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee

    2016-05-17

    There is growing concern over plastic debris and their fragments as a carrier for hazardous substances in marine ecosystem. The present study was conducted to provide field evidence for the transfer of plastic-associated chemicals to marine organisms. Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), brominated flame retardants, were recently detected in expanded polystyrene (styrofoam) marine debris. We hypothesized that if styrofoam debris acts as a source of the additives in the marine environment, organisms inhabiting such debris might be directly influenced by them. Here we investigated the characteristics of HBCD accumulation by mussels inhabiting styrofoam. For comparison, mussels inhabiting different substrates, such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE), metal, and rock, were also studied. The high HBCD levels up to 5160 ng/g lipid weight and the γ-HBCD dominated isomeric profiles in mussels inhabiting styrofoam strongly supports the transfer of HBCDs from styrofoam substrate to mussels. Furthermore, microsized styrofoam particles were identified inside mussels, probably originating from their substrates.

  14. Styrofoam Debris as a Source of Hazardous Additives for Marine Organisms.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi; Shim, Won Joon; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee

    2016-05-17

    There is growing concern over plastic debris and their fragments as a carrier for hazardous substances in marine ecosystem. The present study was conducted to provide field evidence for the transfer of plastic-associated chemicals to marine organisms. Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), brominated flame retardants, were recently detected in expanded polystyrene (styrofoam) marine debris. We hypothesized that if styrofoam debris acts as a source of the additives in the marine environment, organisms inhabiting such debris might be directly influenced by them. Here we investigated the characteristics of HBCD accumulation by mussels inhabiting styrofoam. For comparison, mussels inhabiting different substrates, such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE), metal, and rock, were also studied. The high HBCD levels up to 5160 ng/g lipid weight and the γ-HBCD dominated isomeric profiles in mussels inhabiting styrofoam strongly supports the transfer of HBCDs from styrofoam substrate to mussels. Furthermore, microsized styrofoam particles were identified inside mussels, probably originating from their substrates. PMID:27100560

  15. Measuring Outcomes in Mental Health Services for Older People: An Evaluation of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Elderly People (HoNOS65+)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Susan B.; Croucher, Matthew J.; Beveridge, John

    2010-01-01

    The Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) family of measures is routinely used in mental health services in the New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom. However, the psychometric properties of the HoNOS65+ for elderly people have not been extensively evaluated. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity, reliability, and…

  16. Aqueous-phase story of isoprene - A mini-review and reaction with HONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudziński, Krzysztof J.; Szmigielski, Rafał; Kuznietsova, Inna; Wach, Paulina; Staszek, Dorota

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene is a major biogenic hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere and a well-recognized player in atmospheric chemistry, formation of secondary organic aerosol and air quality. Most of the scientific work on isoprene has focused on the gas-phase and smog chamber processing while direct aqueous chemistry has escaped the major attention because physical solubility of isoprene in water is low. Therefore, this work recollects the results of genuine research carried on atmospherically relevant aqueous-phase transformations of isoprene. It clearly shows that isoprene dissolves in water and reacts in aqueous solutions with common atmospheric oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, ozone, hydroxyl radicals, sulfate radicals and sulfite radicals. The reactions take place in the bulk of solutions or on the gas-liquid interfaces and often are acid-catalyzed and/or enhanced by light. The review is appended by an experimental study of the aqueous-phase reaction of isoprene with nitrous acid (HONO). The decay of isoprene and formation of new products are demonstrated. The tentative chemical mechanism of the reaction is suggested, which starts with slow decomposition of HONO to NO2 and NO. The aqueous chemistry of isoprene explains the formation of a few tropospheric components identified by scientists yet considered of unknown origin. The reaction of isoprene with sulfate radicals explains formation of the MW 182 organosulfate found in ambient aerosol and rainwater while the reaction of isoprene with HONO explains formation of the MW 129 and MW 229 nitroorganic compounds identified in rainwater. Thus, aqueous transformations of isoprene should not be neglected without evidence but rather considered and evaluated in modeling of atmospheric chemical processes even if alternative and apparently dominant heterogeneous pathways of isoprene transformation, dry or wet, are demonstrated.

  17. Measurement of nitrous acid (HONO) by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Maamary, Rabih; Gao, Xiaoming; Sigrist, Markus W.; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm-1 was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ~40 mm3) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by simultaneous measurements of direct HONO absorption spectra in a 109.5 m multipass cell using a distributed feedback (DBF) QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL @ SNR=1) of 66 ppbv HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6×10-8 cm-1.W/Hz1/2. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding minimum detected absorption coefficient (SNR=1) is ~1.1×10-7 cm-1 (MDL: ~3 ppbv) in 1 s and ~1.1×10-8 cm-1 (MDL~330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power. Acknowledgements The authors acknowledge financial supports from the CaPPA project (ANR-10-LABX-005) and the CPER CLIMIBIO program. References H. Yi, R. Maamary, X. Gao, M. W. Sigrist, E. Fertein, W. Chen, "Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy", Appl. Phys. Lett. 106 (2015) 101109

  18. The CERN antiproton source: Controls aspects of the additional collector ring and fast sampling devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chohan, V.

    1990-08-01

    The upgrade of the CERN antiproton source, meant to gain an order of magnitude in antiproton flux, required the construction of an additional ring to complement the existing antiproton accumulator (AA) and an entire rebuild of the target zone. The AA also needed major modifications to handle the increased flux and perform purely as an accumulator, preceded by collection in the collector ring (AC). The upgrade, known as the ACOL (antiproton collector) project, was approved under strict time and budgetary constraints and the existing AA control system, based on the Proton Synchrotron (PS) Divisional norms of CAMAC and Norsk-Data computers, had to be extended in the light of this. The limited (9 months) installation period for the whole upgrade meant that substantial preparatory and planning activities had to be carried out during the normal running of the AA. Advantage was taken of the upgrade to improve and consolidate the AA. Some aspects of the control system related to this upgrade are discussed together with the integration of new applications and instrumentation. The overall machine installation and running-in was carried out within the defined milestones and the project has now achieved the physics design goals.

  19. Elite sport is not an additional source of distress for adolescents with high stress levels.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Brand, Serge

    2011-04-01

    This study examined whether participation in elite sport interacts with stress in decreasing or increasing symptoms of depression and anxiety among adolescents, and further, whether the interplay between participation in high-performance sport and stress is related to the perceived quality of sleep. 434 adolescents (278 girls, 156 boys; age: M = 17.2 yr.) from 15 "Swiss Olympic Sport Classes" and 9 conventional classes answered a questionnaire and completed a 7-day sleep log. Analyses of covariance showed that heightened stress was related to more depressive symptoms and higher scores for trait-anxiety. Moreover, those classified as having poor sleep by a median split cutoff reported higher levels of depressive symptoms. No significant (multivariate) main effects were found for high-performance sport athletes. Similarly, no significant two- or three-way interaction effects were found. These results caution against exaggerated expectations concerning sport participation as a stress buffer. Nevertheless, participation in high-performance sport was not found to be an additional source of distress for adolescents who reported high stress levels despite prior research that has pointed toward such a relationship.

  20. Solar neutrinos and the influences of opacity, thermal instability, additional neutrino sources, and a central black hole on solar models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.; Ezer, D.

    1972-01-01

    Significant quantities that affect the internal structure of the sun are examined for factors that reduce the temperature near the sun's center. The four factors discussed are: opacity, central black hole, thermal instability, and additional neutrino sources.

  1. A method for the measurement of atmospheric HONO based on DNPH derivatization and HPLC analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Qiao, H.; Deng, G.; Civerolo, K.

    1999-10-15

    A simple measurement technique was developed for atmospheric HONO based on aqueous scrubbing using a coil sampler followed by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis. Quantitative sampling efficiency was obtained using a 1 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, as the scrubbing solution at a gas sampling flow rate of 2 L min{sup {minus}1} and a liquid flow rate of 0.24 mL min{sup {minus}1}. Derivation of the scrubbed nitrous acid by DNPH was fast and was completed within 5 min in a derivatization medium containing 300 {micro}M DNPH and 8 mM HCI at 45 C. The azide derivative was separated from DNPH reagent and carbonyl derivatives by reverse-phase HPLC and was detected with an UV detector at 309 nm. The detection limit is {le}5 pptv and may be lowered to 1 pptv with further DNPH purification. Interferences from NO, NO{sub 2} PAN, O{sub 3}, HNO{sub 3}, and HCHO were studied and found to be negligible. Ambient HONO concentration was measured simultaneously in downtown Albany, NY, by this method and by an ion chromatographic technique after sampling using a fritted bubbler. The results, from 70 pptv during the day to 1.7 ppbv in the early morning, were in very good agreement from the two techniques, within {+-} 20%.

  2. NitroMAC: An instrument for the measurement of HONO and intercomparison with a long-path absorption photometer.

    PubMed

    Afif, Charbel; Jambert, Corinne; Michoud, Vincent; Colomb, Aurélie; Eyglunent, Gregory; Borbon, Agnès; Daële, Véronique; Doussin, Jean-François; Perros, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    NitroMAC (French acronym for continuous atmospheric measurements of nitrogenous compounds) is an instrument which has been developed for the semi-continuous measurement of atmospheric nitrous acid (HONO). This instrument relies on wet chemical sampling and detection using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-visible absorption at 540 nm. Sampling proceeds by dissolution of gaseous HONO in a phosphate buffer solution followed by derivatization with sulfanilamide/N-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine. The performance of this instrument was found to be as follows: a detection limit of around 3 ppt with measurement uncertainty of 10% over an analysis time of 10 min. Intercomparison was made between the instrument and a long-path absorption photometer (LOPAP) during two experiments in different environments. First, air was sampled in a smog chamber with concentrations up to 18 ppb of nitrous acid. NitroMAC and LOPAP measurements showed very good agreement. Then, in a second experiment, ambient air with HONO concentrations below 250 ppt was sampled. While NitroMAC showed its capability of measuring HONO in moderate and highly polluted environments, the intercomparison results in ambient air highlighted that corrections must be made for minor interferences when low concentrations are measured. PMID:26969550

  3. Key role of pH in the photochemical conversion of NO2 to HONO on humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chong; Yang, Wangjin; Wu, Qianqian; Yang, He; Xue, Xiangxin

    2016-10-01

    The heterogeneous photochemical reactions of NO2 with humic acid (HA) were performed using a flow tube reactor coupled to a NOx analyzer. The effects of the pH on the uptake coefficient (γ) of NO2 and HONO and NO yields were investigated in detail. With increasing the pH in the range of 2-12, γ was almost constant with an average value of (4.21 ± 0.46) × 10-6, whereas the HONO yield and NO yield linearly decreased from (81.07 ± 4.07)% and (10.35 ± 3.86)% to (13.87 ± 9.15)% and (1.51 ± 0.94)%, respectively. According to the characterization of HA compositions and possible reaction paths, it can be concluded that the pH may influence the transfer of protons and the equilibrium of HONO with NO2- by varying the contents of carboxyl and phenol groups in HA, which should primarily contribute to the change in the HONO yield with the pH.

  4. Impacts of carbon source addition on denitrification and phosphorus uptake in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2013-01-01

    In this study, simultaneous denitrification and phosphorus (P) removal were investigated in batch tests using nitrified mixed liquor and secondary wastewater influent from a full-scale treatment plant and different levels of acetate and propionate as supplemental carbon sources. Without supplemental carbon source, denitrification occurred at low rate and P release and P uptake was negatively affected (i.e., P removal of only 59.7%). When acetate and propionate were supplied, denitrification and P release occurred simultaneously under anoxic conditions. For acetate and propionate at a C/N stoichiometric ratio of 7.6, P release was negatively affected by denitrification. For acetate, the percent P removal and denitrification were very similar for C/N ratios of 22 (5X stoichiometric) and 59 (10X stoichiometric). For propionate, both percent P removal and denitrification deteriorated for C/N ratios of 22 (5X stoichiometric) and 45 (10X stoichiometric). It was observed that carbon source added in excess to stoichiometric ratio was consumed in the aerobic zone, but P was not taken up. This implies that PAO bacteria may utilize the excess carbon source in the aerobic zone rather than their polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) reserves, thereby promoting deterioration of the system.

  5. Synchrotron photoionization measurements of combustion intermediates: the photoionization efficiency of HONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Cool, Terrill A.; Nakajima, Koichi

    2004-08-01

    The HONO radical has recently been observed by photoionization mass spectrometry in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen flames doped with NO 2. The photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectrum has been measured between 10.83 and 11.63 eV. A Franck-Condon simulation using calculated geometries and force constants of the cation and neutral, and including the effects of Duschinsky rotation, is presented to describe the PIE as a function of photon energy. The simulated PIE is used as a fitting function to estimate the adiabatic ionization potential from the experimental data. The apparent ionization threshold of (10.97 ± 0.03) eV is in excellent agreement with calculated values and is consistent with published bracketing determinations of the proton affinity of NO 2.

  6. Quasi-classical trajectory simulations of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution in HONO2 and DONO2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Lohr, Lawrence L; Barker, John R

    2005-05-01

    By use of an analytic potential energy surface developed in this work for nitric acid, the quasi-classical trajectory method was used to simulate intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR). A method was developed for monitoring the average vibrational energy in the OH (or OD) mode that uses the mean-square displacement of the bond length calculated during the trajectories. This method is effective for both rotating and nonrotating molecules. The calculated IVR time constant for HONO(2) decreases exponentially with increasing excitation energy, is almost independent of rotational temperature, and is in excellent agreement with the experimental determination (Bingemann, D.; Gorman, M. P.; King, A. M.; Crim, F. F. J. Chem.Phys. 1997, 107, 661). In DONO(2), the IVR time constants show more complicated behavior with increasing excitation energy, apparently due to 2:1 Fermi-resonance coupling with lower frequency modes. This effect should be measurable in experiments.

  7. Investigation of effective line intensities of trans-HONO near 1255 cm-1 using continuous-wave quantum cascade laser spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaojuan; Dong, Fengzhong; Sigrist, Markus W.; Zhang, Zhirong; Wu, Bian; Xia, Hua; Pang, Tao; Sun, Pengshuai; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong

    2016-10-01

    Effective line intensities of P branch transitions of trans-nitrous acid (HONO) in the ν3 H-O-N bending mode near 1255 cm-1 have been determined by scaling measured HONO absorption intensities by continuous-wave quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy to reference values. Gaseous HONO samples were synthetized in the laboratory using the reaction of H2SO4 and NaNO2 solutions and the heterogeneous formation on surfaces in the presence of ambient water vapor and NO2 gas in a sealed gas sampling bag. The quantification of HONO was performed using a denuder associated with a NOx analyzer. Observed absorption line strengths for the trans conformer are found to be by a factor of approximately 1.17 higher than previously reported line strengths.

  8. A radio/optical reference frame. 5: Additional source positions in the mid-latitude southern hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; De Vegt, C.; Zacharias, N.; Ma, C.; Fey, A. L.; Johnston, K. J.; Hindsley, R.; Hughes, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We report new accurate radio position measurements for 30 sources, preliminary positions for two sources, improved radio postions for nine additional sources which had limited previous observations, and optical positions and optical-radio differences for six of the radio sources. The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations are part of the continuing effort to establish a global radio reference frame of about 400 compact, flat spectrum sources, which are evenly distributed across the sky. The observations were made using Mark III data format in four separate sessions in 1988-89 with radio telescopes at Tidbinbilla, Australia, Kauai, USA, and Kashima, Japan. We observed a total of 54 sources, including ten calibrators and three which were undetected. The 32 new source positions bring the total number in the radio reference frame catalog to 319 (172 northern and 147 southern) and fill in the zone -25 deg greater than delta greater than -45 deg which, prior to this list, had the lowest source density. The VLBI positions have an average formal precision of less than 1 mas, although unknown radio structure effects of about 1-2 mas may be present. The six new optical postion measurements are part of the program to obtain positions of the optical counterparts of the radio reference frame source and to map accurately the optical on to the radio reference frames. The optical measurements were obtained from United States Naval Observatory (USNO) Black Birch astrograph plates and source plates from the AAT, and Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 4 m, and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Schmidt. The optical positions have an average precision of 0.07 sec, mostly due to the zero point error when adjusted to the FK5 optical frame using the IRS catalog. To date we have measured optical positions for 46 sources.

  9. Wood decomposition in Amazonian hydropower reservoirs: An additional source of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, Gwenaël; Parize, Marcelo; Pérez, Marcela A. P.; Filizola, Naziano

    2013-07-01

    Amazonian hydroelectric reservoirs produce abundant carbon dioxide and methane from large quantities of flooded biomass that decompose anaerobically underwater. Emissions are extreme the first years after impounding and progressively decrease with time. To date, only water-to-air fluxes have been considered in these estimates. Here, we investigate in two Amazonian reservoirs (Balbina and Petit Saut) the fate of above water standing dead trees, by combining a qualitative analysis of wood state and density through time and a quantitative analysis of the biomass initially flooded. Dead wood was much more decomposed in the Balbina reservoir 23 years after flooding than in the Petit Saut reservoir 10 years after flooding. Termites apparently played a major role in wood decomposition, occurring mainly above water, and resulting in a complete conversion of this carbon biomass into CO2 and CH4 at a timescale much shorter than reservoir operation. The analysis of pre-impounding wood biomass reveals that above-water decomposition in Amazonian reservoirs is a large, previously unrecognized source of carbon emissions to the atmosphere, representing 26-45% of the total reservoir flux integrated over 100 years. Accounting for both below- and above-water fluxes, we could estimate that each km2 of Amazonian forest converted to reservoir would emit over 140 Gg CO2-eq in 100 years. Hydropower plants in the Amazon should thus generate 0.25-0.4 MW h per km2 flooded area to produce lower greenhouse gas emissions than gas power plants. They also have the disadvantage to emit most of their greenhouse gases the earliest years of operation.

  10. Source Distribution Method for Unsteady One-Dimensional Flows With Small Mass, Momentum, and Heat Addition and Small Area Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold

    1959-01-01

    A source distribution method is presented for obtaining flow perturbations due to small unsteady area variations, mass, momentum, and heat additions in a basic uniform (or piecewise uniform) one-dimensional flow. First, the perturbations due to an elemental area variation, mass, momentum, and heat addition are found. The general solution is then represented by a spatial and temporal distribution of these elemental (source) solutions. Emphasis is placed on discussing the physical nature of the flow phenomena. The method is illustrated by several examples. These include the determination of perturbations in basic flows consisting of (1) a shock propagating through a nonuniform tube, (2) a constant-velocity piston driving a shock, (3) ideal shock-tube flows, and (4) deflagrations initiated at a closed end. The method is particularly applicable for finding the perturbations due to relatively thin wall boundary layers.

  11. [Study on degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with different additional carbon sources in aged contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Yin, Chun-Qin; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Fang; Wang, Cong-Ying

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted with different additional carbon sources (such as: glucose, DL-malic acid, citrate, urea and ammonium acetate) to elucidate the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aged contaminated soil under an indoor simulation experiment. The results showed that the quantity of CO2 emission in different additional carbon sources treatments was obviously much more than that of check treatment in the first week, and the quantity of CO2 emission in DL-malic acid treatment was the largest. The average CO2 production decreased in an order urea > glucose approximately citrate approximately DL-malic acid approximately ammonium acetate > check. Meanwhile, the amount of volatized PAHs in applied carbon sources treatments was significantly less than that in check treatment. The amount of three volatized PAHs decreased in an order phenanthrene > fluoranthene > benzo(b)fluoranthene. Compared with the check treatment, the average degradation rates of the three PAHs were significantly augmented in the supplied carbon sources treatments, in which rates of the three PAHs were much higher in DL-malic acid and urea treatments than those in other treatments. The largest proportion of residual was benzo(b)fluoranthene (from 72% to 81%) among three PAHs compounds, followed by fluoranthene (from 53% to 70% ) and phenanthrene (from 27% to 44%).

  12. Effect of SO2 concentration on SOA formation in a photorreactor from a mixture of anthropogenic hydrocarbons and HONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Vivanco, Marta; Santiago, Manuel; García Diego, Cristina; Borrás, Esther; Ródenas, Milagros; Martínez-Tarifa, Adela

    2010-05-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is an important urban atmospheric pollutant, mainly produced by the combustion of fossil fuels containing sulfur. In the atmosphere, SO2 can react with OH radicals to form sulfuric acid, which can condense to form acidic aerosol. Sulfuric acid particles act as an acid catalyst for some heterogeneous carbonyl reactions like hydration, polymerization or acetals formation, which may lead to a large increase on SOA mass. In order to evaluate the effect of the SO2 concentration on SOA formation, 3 experiments were performed during the campaign carried out by CIEMAT on the EUPHORE facility (CEAM, Valencia, Spain) during June- July 2008. The objective of the campaign was to evaluate the effect of different experimental conditions on SOA formation from the photooxidation of some anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs using HONO as oxidant. Experiment on 6/17/08 was selected as base case (no SO2 was introduced) and experiments 6/26/08 and 7/1/08 were selected as high SO2 (2600 ug/m3) and low SO2 (60 ug/m3) concentration experiments respectively. In the three experiments a mixture of toluene, 1,3,5-TMB (trimethylbenzene), o-xylene and octane was selected as the parent VOCs. Single and coupled to mass spectroscopy gas cromatography (GC and GC/MS), as well as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to measure the initial VOCs and oxidant concentrations decay and the formation of gas phase oxidation products through the experiments. Aerosol size distribution and concentration were measured with SMPS (scanning mobility particle sizer) and TEOM (tapered element oscillating monitor) respectively. In addition, analysis of the organic and inorganic aerosol content was also performed via filter sampling followed by GC/MS and ionic chromatography (for organic and inrganic content respectively). Comparing the filters collected in the three experiments, clearly the largest mass aerosol formation is observed

  13. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source. PMID:26783836

  14. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source.

  15. Effect of substrate particle size and additional nitrogen source on production of lignocellulolytic enzymes by Pleurotus ostreatus strains.

    PubMed

    Membrillo, Isabel; Sánchez, Carmen; Meneses, Marcos; Favela, Ernesto; Loera, Octavio

    2008-11-01

    Two strains of Pleurotus ostreatus (IE-8 and CP-50) were grown on defined medium added with wheat straw extract (WSE). Mycelia from these cultures were used as an inoculum for solid fermentation using sugar cane bagasse (C:N=142). This substrate was used separately either as a mixture of heterogeneous particle sizes (average size 2.9 mm) or as batches with two different particle sizes (0.92 mm and 1.68 mm). Protein enrichment and production of lignocellulolytic enzymes on each particle size was compared. The effect of ammonium sulphate (AS) addition was also analyzed (modified C:N=20), this compound favored higher levels of protein content. Strain CP-50 showed the highest increase of protein content (48% on particle size of 1.68 mm) when compared to media with no additional N source. However, strain IE-8 produced the highest levels of all enzymes: xylanases (5.79 IU/g dry wt on heterogeneous particles) and cellulases (0.18 IU/g dry wt on smallest particles), both without the addition of AS. The highest laccase activity (0.040 IU/g dry wt) was obtained on particles of 1.68 mm in the presence of AS. Since effect of particle size and addition AS was different for each strain, these criteria should be considered for diverse biotechnological applications.

  16. 2-Hydroxy-4-methylselenobutanoic acid induces additional tissue selenium enrichment in broiler chickens compared with other selenium sources.

    PubMed

    Briens, Mickaël; Mercier, Yves; Rouffineau, Friedrich; Mercerand, Frédéric; Geraert, Pierre-André

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in broiler chickens to compare the effect of different Se sources on Se tissue enrichment: sodium selenite (SS), seleno-yeast (SY), and a new organic Se source (SO) containing 2-hydroxy-4-methylselenobutanoic acid (HMSeBA) as an active substance. For each experiment, treatments differed only in source or dose of Se additive. Relative efficiency was compared by plasma and tissue [muscle (pectoralis major) and liver] total Se concentrations. The first experiment compared Se sources (SS, SY, and SO) at different concentrations (mg of Se/kg of feed; SS-0.3; SY-0.1 and -0.3; SO-0.1 and -0.3; and a negative control, 0) in broilers between 0 and 42 d of age. Plasma, liver, and muscle Se concentrations were improved by all Se sources at both d 21 and 42 compared with the negative control group. Between Se sources, minor differences were observed for plasma and liver results, whereas a significant dose effect was observed from 0.1 to 0.3 mg of Se/kg of feed (P < 0.05) for each source. Muscle Se concentrations were improved such as SO > SY > SS (P < 0.05). Moreover, the relative muscle Se enrichment comparison, using linear regression slope ratio, indicated an average of 1.48-fold (95% CI 1.38, 1.58) higher Se deposition in muscle for SO compared with SY. In the second experiment, excessive dietary doses of 5 mg of Se/kg of feed from SS and SO showed a lower deleterious effect of SO on BW and feed intake in comparison with standard Se doses (P < 0.05). Seleno amino acid measurements conducted on different tissues of animals fed SO at 0.5 mg/kg of feed showed that HMSeBA is fully converted into selenomethionine and selenocysteine. These results of both experiments demonstrate the higher relative bioavailability of SO compared with SS and SY as determined through tissue Se enrichment.

  17. Experimental investigations of the swirling flow in the conical diffuser using flow-feedback control technique with additional energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tǎnasǎ, C.; Bosioc, A. I.; Susan-Resiga, R. F.; Muntean, S.

    2012-11-01

    The previous experimental and numerical investigations of decelerated swirling flows in conical diffusers have demonstrated that water injection along to the axis mitigates the pressure fluctuations associated to the precessing vortex rope [1]. However, for swirling flows similar to Francis turbines operated at partial discharge, the water jet becomes effective when the jet discharge is larger than 10% from the turbine discharge, leading to large volumetric losses when the jet is supplied from upstream the runner. As a result, it was introduced a new approach for supplying the jet by using a fraction of the discharge collected downstream the conical diffuser [2]. This is called flow-feedback control technique (FFCT) and it was investigated experimentally in order to assess its capability [3]. The FFCT approach not requires additional energy to supply the jet. Consequently, the turbine efficiency is not diminished due to the volumetric losses injected even if around 10% of the main flow is used. However, the equivalent amplitude of the pressure pulsations associated to the vortex rope decreases with 30% if 10% jet discharge is applied [3]. Using 12% water jet discharge from upstream then the equivalent amplitude of the pressure pulsations is mitigated with 70% according to Bosioc et al. [4]. In our case, an extra 2% jet discharge is required in order to obtain similar results with FFCT. This extra discharge is provided using an additional energy source. Therefore, the paper presents experimental investigation performed with FFCT with additional energy source. The experimental results obtained with this technique are compared against FFCT and the swirling flow with vortex rope, respectively.

  18. Effect of carbon source addition on toluene biodegradation by an Escherichia coli DH5alpha transconjugant harboring the TOL plasmid.

    PubMed

    Ikuma, Kaoru; Gunsch, Claudia

    2010-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of plasmids is a naturally occurring phenomenon which could be manipulated for bioremediation applications. Specifically, HGT may prove useful to enhance bioremediation through genetic bioaugmentation. However, because the transfer of a plasmid between donor and recipient cells does not always result in useful functional phenotypes, the conditions under which HGT events result in enhanced degradative capabilities must first be elucidated. The objective of this study was to determine if the addition of alternate carbon substrates could improve toluene degradation in Escherichia coli DH5alpha transconjugants. The addition of glucose (0.5-5 g/L) and Luria-Bertani (LB) broth (10-100%) resulted in enhanced toluene degradation. On average, the toluene degradation rate increased 14.1 (+/-2.1)-fold in the presence of glucose while the maximum increase was 18.4 (+/-1.7)-fold in the presence of 25% LB broth. Gene expression of xyl genes was upregulated in the presence of glucose but not LB broth, which implies different inducing mechanisms by the two types of alternate carbon source. The increased toluene degradation by the addition of glucose or LB broth was persistent over the short-term, suggesting the pulse amendment of an alternative carbon source may be helpful in bioremediation. While the effects of recipient genome GC content and other conditions must still be examined, our results suggest that changes in environmental conditions such as alternate substrate availability may significantly improve the functionality of the transferred phenotypes in HGT and therefore may be an important parameter for genetic bioaugmentation optimization.

  19. Xylem-Transported Glucose as an Additional Carbon Source for Leaf Isoprene Formation in Quercus Robur L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, M.; Kreuzwieser, J.; Schnitzler, J.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.; Rennenberg, H.

    2003-04-01

    Isoprene is emitted from mature, photosynthesizing leaves of many plant species, particularly of trees. Current interest in understanding the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling isoprene formation is caused by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) thereby generating oxidizing agents such as ozone and organic peroxides. Ozone causes significant deterioration in air quality and can pose threats to human health therefore its control is a major goal in Europe and the United States. In recent years, much progress has been made in elucidating the pathways of isoprene biosynthesis. Nevertheless the regulatory mechanisms controlling isoprene emission are not completely understood. Light and temperature appear to be the main factors controlling short-term variations in isoprene emission. Exposure of plants to C-13 labeled carbon dioxide showed instantaneous assimilated carbon is the primary carbon source for isoprene formation. However, variations in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes, which cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may exist contributing to isoprene emissions. The aim of the present study was to test whether xylem-transported carbohydrates act as additional sources for isoprene biosynthesis. For this purpose, [U-C-13] alpha-D-glucose was fed to photosynthesizing leaves via the xylem of Quercus robur L. seedlings and the incorporation of glucose derived C-13 into emitted isoprene was monitored in real time using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). A rapid incorporation of C-13 from xylem-fed glucose into single (mass 70) and double (mass 71) C-13 labeled isoprene molecules was observed after a lag phase of approximately 5 to 10 minutes. This incorporation was temperature dependent and was highest (up to 13% C-13 of total carbon emitted as isoprene) at the temperature optimum of

  20. Xylem-transported Glucose as an Additional Carbon Source for Leaf Isoprene Formation in Quercus Robur L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, M.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.; Kreuzwieser, J.; Rennenberg, H.; Schnitzler, J.

    2002-12-01

    Isoprene is emitted from mature, photosynthesizing leaves of many plant species, particularly of trees. Current interest in understanding the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling isoprene formation is caused by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) thereby generating oxidizing agents such as ozone and organic peroxides. Ozone causes significant deterioration in air quality and can pose threats to human health therefore its control is a major goal in Europe and the United States. In recent years, much progress has been made in elucidating the pathways of isoprene biosynthesis. Nevertheless the regulatory mechanisms controlling isoprene emission are not completely understood. Light and temperature appear to be the main factors controlling short-term variations in isoprene emission. Exposure of plants to 13CO2 showed instantaneous assimilated carbon is the primary carbon source for isoprene formation. However, variations in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes, which cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may exist contributing to isoprene emissions. The aim of the present study was to test whether xylem-transported carbohydrates act as additional sources for isoprene biosynthesis. For this purpose, [U-13C]α-D-glucose was fed to photosynthesizing leaves via the xylem of {Quercus} {robur} L. seedlings and the incorporation of glucose derived 13C into emitted isoprene was monitored in real time using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). A rapid incorporation of 13C from xylem-fed glucose into single (mass 70) and double (mass 71) 13C-labeled isoprene molecules was observed after a lag phase of approximately 5 to 10 minutes. This incorporation was temperature dependent and was highest (up to 13 % 13C of total carbon emitted as isoprene) at the temperature optimum of isoprene emission (40 - 42

  1. Addition of a Worm Leachate as Source of Humic Substances in the Drinking Water of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rosales, S.; de L. Angeles, M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the growth performance, the apparent ileal digestibility of nitrogen and energy, the retention of nutrients and the apparent metabolizable energy corrected to zero nitrogen retention (AMEn) in broiler chickens supplemented with increasing doses of a worm leachate (WL) as a source of humic substances (HS) in the drinking water. In Exp. 1, 140 male broilers were penned individually and assigned to four WL levels (0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%) mixed in the drinking water from 21 to 49 days of age. Water was offered in plastic bottles tied to the cage. In Exp. 2, 600 male broilers from 21 to 49 days of age housed in floor pens were assigned to three levels of WL (0%, 10%, and 20%) mixed in the drinking water. The WL was mixed with tap water in plastic containers connected by plastic tubing to bell drinkers. The results of both experiments were subjected to analysis of variance and polynomial contrasts. In Exp. 1, the daily water consumption was similar among treatments but the consumption of humic, fulvic, and total humic acids increased linearly (p<0.01) as the WL increased in the drinking water. The feed conversion (p<0.01) and the ileal digestibility of energy, the excretion of dry matter and energy, the retention of dry matter, ash and nitrogen and the AMEn showed quadratic responses (p<0.05) relative to the WL levels in drinking water. In Exp. 2, the increasing level of WL in the drinking water had quadratic effects on the final body weight, daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio (p<0.05). The addition of WL as a source of HS in the drinking water had beneficial effects on the growth performance, ileal digestibility of energy, the retention of nutrients as well on the AMEn in broiler chickens; the best results were observed when the WL was mixed at levels of 20% to 30% in the drinking water. PMID:25557817

  2. Addition of a worm leachate as source of humic substances in the drinking water of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Rosales, S; de L Angeles, M

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the growth performance, the apparent ileal digestibility of nitrogen and energy, the retention of nutrients and the apparent metabolizable energy corrected to zero nitrogen retention (AMEn) in broiler chickens supplemented with increasing doses of a worm leachate (WL) as a source of humic substances (HS) in the drinking water. In Exp. 1, 140 male broilers were penned individually and assigned to four WL levels (0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%) mixed in the drinking water from 21 to 49 days of age. Water was offered in plastic bottles tied to the cage. In Exp. 2, 600 male broilers from 21 to 49 days of age housed in floor pens were assigned to three levels of WL (0%, 10%, and 20%) mixed in the drinking water. The WL was mixed with tap water in plastic containers connected by plastic tubing to bell drinkers. The results of both experiments were subjected to analysis of variance and polynomial contrasts. In Exp. 1, the daily water consumption was similar among treatments but the consumption of humic, fulvic, and total humic acids increased linearly (p<0.01) as the WL increased in the drinking water. The feed conversion (p<0.01) and the ileal digestibility of energy, the excretion of dry matter and energy, the retention of dry matter, ash and nitrogen and the AMEn showed quadratic responses (p<0.05) relative to the WL levels in drinking water. In Exp. 2, the increasing level of WL in the drinking water had quadratic effects on the final body weight, daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio (p<0.05). The addition of WL as a source of HS in the drinking water had beneficial effects on the growth performance, ileal digestibility of energy, the retention of nutrients as well on the AMEn in broiler chickens; the best results were observed when the WL was mixed at levels of 20% to 30% in the drinking water.

  3. Ab initio and quantum chemical topology studies on the isomerization of HONO to HNO2. Effect of the basis set in QCT.

    PubMed

    Berski, Slawomir; Latajka, Zdzislaw; Gordon, Agnieszka J

    2010-11-15

    The article focus on the isomerization of nitrous acid HONO to hydrogen nitryl HNO(2). Density functional (B3LYP) and MP2 methods, and a wide variety of basis sets, have been chosen to investigate the mechanism of this reaction. The results clearly show that there are two possible paths: 1) Uncatalysed isomerisation, trans-HONO --> HNO(2), involving 1,2-hydrogen shift and characterized by a large energetic barrier 49.7 divided by 58.9 kcal/mol, 2) Catalysed double hydrogen transfer process, trans-HONO + cis-HONO --> HNO(2) + cis-HONO, which displays a significantly lower energetic barrier in a range of 11.6 divided by 18.9 kcal/mol. Topological analysis of the Electron Localization Function (ELF) shows that the hydrogen transfer for both studied reactions takes place through the formation of a 'dressed' proton along the reaction path. Use of a wide variety of basis sets demonstrates a clear basis set dependence on the ELF topology of HNO(2). Less saturated basis sets yield two lone pair basins, V(1)(N), V(2)(N), whereas more saturated ones (for example aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ) do not indicate a lone pair on the nitrogen atom. Topological analysis of the Electron Localizability Indication (ELI-D) at the CASSCF (12,10) confirms these findings, showing the existence of the lone pair basins but with decreasing populations as the basis set becomes more saturated (0.35e for the cc-pVDZ basis set to 0.06e for the aug-cc-pVTZ). This confirms that the choice of basis set not only can influence the value of the electron population at the particular atom, but can also lead to different ELF topology.

  4. 26 CFR 31.6001-5 - Additional records in connection with collection of income tax at source on wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... collection of income tax at source on wages. 31.6001-5 Section 31.6001-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Administrative Provisions of Special Application...

  5. 26 CFR 31.6001-5 - Additional records in connection with collection of income tax at source on wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... collection of income tax at source on wages. 31.6001-5 Section 31.6001-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Administrative Provisions of Special Application...

  6. 77 FR 12226 - Sadex Corp.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed... regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of electron beam and x-ray sources for irradiation of... use of electron beam and x- ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry feed...

  7. Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Appendices. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This document contains appendices regarding a reprint on a field scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as a oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition.

  8. Airborne measurements of nitrous acid and its budget in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Häseler, Rolf; Brauers, Theo; Rohrer, Franz; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Holland, Frank; Lohse, Insa; Tillmann, Ralf; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important trace gas in the atmosphere due to its contribution to the cycles of nitrogen oxides (NOX) and hydrogen oxides (HOX). In the past decades, most HONO observations were performed at ground level, and only a few HONO gradient measurements were reported for the lowest 100 m of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). In most field measurements, it is found that the ambient HONO concentrations cannot be explained by the known gas-phase chemistry alone. Additional HONO production is needed, and heterogeneous production at ground and on aerosol surfaces was proposed. Within the framework of PEGASOS, an instrument for ambient HONO measurement using the LOPAP technique was setup together with instruments measuring HOX radicals, NOX, photolysis frequencies, and other parameters on board the airship Zeppelin NT. During two field campaigns in the Netherlands and in Italy, HONO and its gas phase sources and sinks were measured continuously in each flight, covering the altitude range from ground to 1 km. The measured daytime HONO mixing ratios ranged from 50 ppt to 1.2 ppb with an average value of 140 ppt. While a strong HONO gradient was found in early morning hours, it was vanishing with the breakup of the nocturnal boundary layer. Elevated HONO to NOX ratios were observed at higher altitudes, indicating an enhanced HONO production. HONO simulations using a 1-D model indicate that the HONO production at higher altitudes cannot be explained by known processes, neither by gas-phase reactions nor by vertical mixing of HONO produced at ground surface. Therefore, in addition to the current knowledge of the atmospheric HONO budget, other HONO formation pathways are need to explain the field observations.

  9. Kinetics and bioenergetics of Spirulina platensis cultivation by fed-batch addition of urea as nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Sassano, Carlos E N; Carvalho, João C M; Gioielli, Luiz A; Sato, Sunao; Torre, Paolo; Converti, Attilio

    2004-03-01

    The cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis was cultivated in bench-scale miniponds on bicarbonate/carbonate solutions using urea as nitrogen source. To minimize limitation and inhibition phenomena, urea was supplied semicontinuously using exponentially increasing feeding rates. The average growth rates obtained alternately varying the total mass of urea added per unit reactor volume (275 < mT < 725 mg/L) and the total feeding time (9 < tT < 15 d) clearly evidenced nitrogen limitation for mT< 500 mg/L and excess nitrogen inhibition above this threshold. The time behavior of the specific growth rate at variable urea feeding patterns allowed estimation of the time-dependent Gibbs energy dissipation for cell growth under the actual depletion conditions of fed-batch cultivations. Comparison of the yield of growth on Gibbs energy obtained using either urea or KNO3 pointed to the preference of S. platensis for the former nitrogen source, likely owing to more favorable bioenergetic conditions. PMID:15007182

  10. Recent Additions in the Modeling Capabilities of an Open-Source Wave Energy Converter Design Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, N.; Lawson, M.; Yu, Y. H.

    2015-04-20

    WEC-Sim is a midfidelity numerical tool for modeling wave energy conversion devices. The code uses the MATLAB SimMechanics package to solve multibody dynamics and models wave interactions using hydrodynamic coefficients derived from frequency-domain boundary-element methods. This paper presents the new modeling features introduced in the latest release of WEC-Sim. The first feature discussed conversion of the fluid memory kernel to a state-space form. This enhancement offers a substantial computational benefit after the hydrodynamic body-to-body coefficients are introduced and the number of interactions increases exponentially with each additional body. Additional features include the ability to calculate the wave-excitation forces based on the instantaneous incident wave angle, allowing the device to weathervane, as well as import a user-defined wave elevation time series. A review of the hydrodynamic theory for each feature is provided and the successful implementation is verified using test cases.

  11. Flatbed scanners as a source of imaging. Brightness assessment and additives determination in a nickel electroplating bath.

    PubMed

    Vidal, M; Amigo, J M; Bro, R; Ostra, M; Ubide, C; Zuriarrain, J

    2011-05-23

    Desktop flatbed scanners are very well-known devices that can provide digitized information of flat surfaces. They are practically present in most laboratories as a part of the computer support. Several quality levels can be found in the market, but all of them can be considered as tools with a high performance and low cost. The present paper shows how the information obtained with a scanner, from a flat surface, can be used with fine results for exploratory and quantitative purposes through image analysis. It provides cheap analytical measurements for assessment of quality parameters of coated metallic surfaces and monitoring of electrochemical coating bath lives. The samples used were steel sheets nickel-plated in an electrodeposition bath. The quality of the final deposit depends on the bath conditions and, especially, on the concentration of the additives in the bath. Some additives become degraded with the bath life and so is the quality of the plate finish. Analysis of the scanner images can be used to follow the evolution of the metal deposit and the concentration of additives in the bath. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to find significant differences in the coating of sheets, to find directions of maximum variability and to identify odd samples. The results found are favorably compared with those obtained by means of specular reflectance (SR), which is here used as a reference technique. Also the concentration of additives SPB and SA-1 along a nickel bath life can be followed using image data handled with algorithms such as partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector regression (SVR). The quantitative results obtained with these and other algorithms are compared. All this opens new qualitative and quantitative possibilities to flatbed scanners.

  12. In situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction of tobermorite formation in autoclaved aerated concrete: Influence of silica source reactivity and Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kunio; Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sato, Masugu

    2011-05-15

    The hydrothermal formation of tobermorite during the processing of autoclaved aerated concrete was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly developed autoclave cell and a photon-counting pixel array detector were used. To investigate the effects of the silica source, reactive quartz from chert and less-reactive quartz from quartz sand were used as starting materials. The effect of Al addition on tobermorite formation was also studied. In all cases, C-S-H, hydroxylellestadite and katoite were clearly observed as intermediates. Acceleration of tobermorite formation by Al addition was clearly observed. However, Al addition did not affect the dissolution rate of quartz. Two pathways, via C-S-H and katoite, were also observed in the Al-containing system. These results suggest that the structure of initially formed C-S-H is important for the subsequent tobermorite formation reactions.

  13. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Gonzalez, Rosalinda; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Tang, Jianwu; Chao, Wei Chun; Crusius, John; Bratton, John; Green, Adrian; Shelton, James

    2011-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N2O, CH4, and CO2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N2O, CH4 and respiratory CO2fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m−2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N2O and CH4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N2O in July 2009 averaged −33 μmol N2O m−2 day−1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 μmol N2O m−2 day−1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N2O and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N2O and CH4 fluxes observed, exceeded half

  14. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Gonzalez, R.; Kroeger, K.D.; Tang, J.; Chao, W.C.; Crusius, J.; Bratton, J.; Green, A.; Shelton, J.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N2O, CH4, and CO2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N2O, CH4 and respiratory CO2 fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m-2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N2O and CH4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N2O in July 2009 averaged -33 ??mol N2O m-2 day-1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 ??mol N2O m-2 day-1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N2O and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N2O and CH4 fluxes observed, exceeded half the magnitude of typical

  15. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Gonzalez, Rosalinda; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Tang, Jianwu; Chao, Wei Chun; Crusius, John; Bratton, John; Green, Adrian; Shelton, James

    2011-08-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N 2O, CH 4, and CO 2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N 2O, CH 4 and respiratory CO 2 fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO 3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m -2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N 2O and CH 4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N 2O in July 2009 averaged -33 μmol N 2O m -2 day -1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N 2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH 4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N 2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 μmol N 2O m -2 day -1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N 2O and CH 4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N 2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N 2O and CH 4 fluxes observed, exceeded half

  16. Development of wide band gap p- a-SiOxCy:H using additional trimethylboron as carbon source gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Won; Sichanugrist, Porponth; Janthong, Bancha; Khan, Muhammad Ajmal; Niikura, Chisato; Konagai, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    We report p-type a-SiOxCy:H thin films which were fabricated by introducing additional Trimethylboron (TMB, B(CH3)3) doping gas into conventional standard p-type a-SiOx:H films. The TMB addition into the condition of p-a-SiOx:H improved optical bandgap from 2.14 to 2.20 eV without deterioration of electrical conductivity, which is promising for p-type window layer of thin film solar cells. The suggested p-a-SiOxCy:H films were applied in amorphous silicon solar cells and we found an increase of quantum efficiency at short wavelength regions due to wide bandgap of the new p-layer, and thus efficiency improvement from 10.4 to 10.7% was demonstrated in a-Si:H solar cell by employing the p-a-SiOxCy:H film. In case of a-SiOx:H cell, high open circuit voltage of 1.01 V was confirmed by using the suggested the p-a-SiOxCy:H film as a window layer. This new p-layer can be highly promising as a wide bandgap window layer to improve the performance of thin film silicon solar cells. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Nocturnal Vertical Gradients of O3, NO2, NO3, HONO, HCHO, and SO2 in Los Angeles, CA, during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, J.; Pikelnaya, O.; Hurlock, S. C.; Wong, K.; Cheung, R.; Haman, C. L.; Lefer, B. L.; Stutz, J.

    2010-12-01

    Nocturnal chemistry, through the conversion and removal of air pollutants, plays an important role in determining the initial condition for photochemistry during the following day. In the stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) the interplay between suppressed vertical mixing and surface emissions of NOx and VOCs can result in pronounced vertical trace gas profiles. The resulting altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry makes the interpretation of ground observations challenging. In particular, the quantification of the nocturnal loss of NOx, due to NO3 and N2O5 chemistry, requires observations throughout the entire vertical extent of the NBL. The formation of daytime radical precursors, such as HONO, is also altitude dependent. An accurate assessment of their impact on daytime chemistry requires measurements of their profiles during the night and morning. Here we present observations from the CalNex-LA experiment, which took place from May 15 to June 15, 2010 on the east side of the Los Angeles Basin, CA. A Long-Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (LP-DOAS) was set up on the roof of the Millikan library (265 m asl, 35m agl) on the campus of the California Institute of Technology. Four retroreflector arrays were mounted about 5 -7 km North-East of the instrument at 310m, 353m, 487m and 788 m asl. The vertical profiles of NO3, HONO, NO2, O3, HCHO, and SO2 were retrieved at altitude intervals of 35-78m, 78-121m, 121-255m and 255-556m above the ground. During many nights vertical gradients were observed, with elevated NO2 and HONO concentrations near the surface and larger ozone and NO3 concentrations aloft. Simultaneous ceilometer observations of the NBL structure show the impact of meteorology on the vertical trace gas distributions. We will discuss the consequences of trace gases gradients on the nocturnal NOx budget.

  18. Solid sampling determination of lithium and sodium additives in microsamples of yttrium oxyorthosilicate by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laczai, Nikoletta; Kovács, László; Péter, Ágnes; Bencs, László

    2016-03-01

    Solid sampling high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS-GFAAS) methods were developed and studied for the fast and sensitive quantitation of Li and Na additives in microsamples of cerium-doped yttrium oxyorthosilicate (Y2SiO5:Ce) scintillator materials. The methods were optimized for solid samples by studying a set of GFAAS conditions (i.e., the sample mass, sensitivity of the analytical lines, and graphite furnace heating programs). Powdered samples in the mass range of 0.099-0.422 mg were dispensed onto graphite sample insertion boats, weighed and analyzed. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized by the use of single-element standard solutions of Li and Na (acidified with 0.144 mol/L HNO3) at the Li I 610.353 nm and Na I 285.3013 nm analytical lines. For calibration purposes, the method of standard addition with Li and Na solutions was applied. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibration graphs were not worse than 0.9678. The limit of detection for oxyorthosilicate samples was 20 μg/g and 80 μg/g for Li and Na, respectively. The alkaline content of the solid samples were found to be in the range of 0.89 and 8.4 mg/g, respectively. The accuracy of the results was verified by means of analyzing certified reference samples, using methods of standard (solution) addition calibration.

  19. Reliability and Validity of the HoNOS-LD and HoNOS in a Sample of Individuals with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability and Severe Emotional and Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke; Didden, Robert; Veltkamp, Eline; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, psychometric properties of the Health of the Nation Outcome scales (HoNOS) and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for People with Learning Disabilities (HoNOS-LD) were investigated in a sample (n = 79) of (young) adults with mild to borderline intellectual disability (ID) and severe behavior and mental health problems who were…

  20. Anharmonic Calculation of the Structure, Vibrational Frequencies, and Intensities of the NH3···cis-HONO and NH3···cis-DONO Complexes.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, V P; Buturlimova, M V; Tokhadze, K G

    2016-08-25

    The geometrical parameters, the frequencies, and absolute intensities for transitions between vibrational states of NH3···cis-HONO and NH3···cis-DONO hydrogen-bonded complexes are calculated using the approach earlier tested in calculations of isolated molecules of nitrous acid and the NH3···trans-HONO and NH3··trans-DONO complexes. Vibrational wave functions and energy values of the complexes are derived from variational solutions of anharmonic equations in one to four dimensions. The equilibrium nuclear configuration and potential energy surfaces are calculated by the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ method with the basis set superposition error taken into account. Comparison of the obtained results with the analogous data calculated in the same approximation for isolated cis- and trans-HONO (DONO) molecules and the NH3···trans-HONO (DONO) complexes provides information about the changes in the spectroscopic and geometrical parameters of nitrous acid upon cis-trans transition, H/D substitution, and H-bond formation. PMID:27472262

  1. Increasing fermentation efficiency at high sugar concentrations by supplementing an additional source of nitrogen during the exponential phase of the tequila fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Arrizon, Javier; Gschaedler, Anne

    2002-11-01

    In the tequila industry, fermentation is traditionally achieved at sugar concentrations ranging from 50 to 100 g x L(-1). In this work, the behaviour of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (isolated from the juices of the Agave tequilana Weber blue variety) during the agave juice fermentation is compared at different sugar concentrations to determine if it is feasible for the industry to run fermentation at higher sugar concentrations. Fermentation efficiency is shown to be higher (above 90%) at a high concentration of initial sugar (170 g x L(-1)) when an additional source of nitrogen (a mixture of amino acids and ammonium sulphate, different than a grape must nitrogen composition) is added during the exponential growth phase. PMID:12556124

  2. Complexes of HNO₃ and NO₃¯ with NO₂ and N₂O₄, and their potential role in atmospheric HONO formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboures, Michael A.; Raff, Jonathan D.; Miller, Y.; Phillips, Leon F.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.; Gerber, Robert B.

    2008-08-11

    Calculations were performed to determine the structures, energetics, and spectroscopy of the atmospherically relevant complexes (HNO₃)•(NO₂), (HNO₃)•(N₂O₄), (NO₃¯)•(NO₂), and (NO₃¯)•(N₂O₄). The binding energies indicate that three of the four complexes are quite stable, with the most stable (NO₃¯)•(N₂O₄) possessing binding energy of almost -14 kcal mol¯¹. Vibrational frequencies were calculated for use in detecting the complexes by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. An ATR-FTIR experiment showed features at 1632 and 1602 cm¯¹ that are attributed to NO₂ complexed to NO₃¯ and HNO₃, respectively. The electronic states of (HNO₃)•(N₂O₄) and (NO₃¯)•( N₂O₄) were investigated using an excited state method and it was determined that both complexes possess one low-lying excited state that is accessible through absorption of visible radiation. Evidence for the existence of (NO₃¯)•( N₂O₄) was obtained from UV/vis absorption spectra of N₂O₄ in concentrated HNO₃, which show a band at 320 nm that is blue shifted by 20 nm relative to what is observed for N₂O₄ dissolved in organic solvents. Finally, hydrogen transfer reactions within the (HNO₃)•(NO₂) and (HNO₃)•( N₂O₄) complexes leading to the formation of HONO, were investigated. In both systems the calculated potential profiles rule out a thermal mechanism, but indicate the reaction could take place following the absorption of visible radiation. We propose that these complexes are potentially important in the thermal and photochemical production of HONO observed in previous laboratory and field studies.

  3. Effect of high-pressure/temperature (HP/T) treatments of in-package food on additive migration from conventional and bio-sourced materials.

    PubMed

    Mauricio-Iglesias, M; Jansana, S; Peyron, S; Gontard, N; Guillard, V

    2010-01-01

    Migration was assessed during and after two high-pressure/temperature (HP/T) treatments intended for a pasteurization (800 MPa for 5 min, from 20 to 40 degrees C) and a sterilization treatment (800 MPa for 5 min, from 90 to 115 degrees C) and were compared with conventional pasteurization and sterilization, respectively. The specific migration of actual packaging additives used as antioxidants and ultraviolet light absorbers (Irganox 1076, Uvitex OB) was investigated in a number of food-packaging systems combining one synthetic common packaging (LLDPE) and a bio-sourced one (PLA) in contact with the four food-simulating liquids defined by European Commission regulations. After standard HP/T processing, migration kinetics was followed during the service life of the packaging material using Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) spectroscopy. LLDPE withstood the high-pressure sterilization, whereas it melted during the conventional sterilization. No difference was observed on migration from LLDPE for both treatments. In the case of PLA, migration of Uvitex OB was very low or not detectable for all the cases studied. PMID:19809898

  4. Effect of high-pressure/temperature (HP/T) treatments of in-package food on additive migration from conventional and bio-sourced materials.

    PubMed

    Mauricio-Iglesias, M; Jansana, S; Peyron, S; Gontard, N; Guillard, V

    2010-01-01

    Migration was assessed during and after two high-pressure/temperature (HP/T) treatments intended for a pasteurization (800 MPa for 5 min, from 20 to 40 degrees C) and a sterilization treatment (800 MPa for 5 min, from 90 to 115 degrees C) and were compared with conventional pasteurization and sterilization, respectively. The specific migration of actual packaging additives used as antioxidants and ultraviolet light absorbers (Irganox 1076, Uvitex OB) was investigated in a number of food-packaging systems combining one synthetic common packaging (LLDPE) and a bio-sourced one (PLA) in contact with the four food-simulating liquids defined by European Commission regulations. After standard HP/T processing, migration kinetics was followed during the service life of the packaging material using Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) spectroscopy. LLDPE withstood the high-pressure sterilization, whereas it melted during the conventional sterilization. No difference was observed on migration from LLDPE for both treatments. In the case of PLA, migration of Uvitex OB was very low or not detectable for all the cases studied.

  5. Combustion Processes as a Source of High Levels of Indoor Hydroxyl Radicals through the Photolysis of Nitrous Acid.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, V; Gomez Alvarez, E; Wittmer, J; Tlili, S; Strekowski, R; Temime-Roussel, B; Quivet, E; Wortham, H; Zetzsch, C; Kleffmann, J; Gligorovski, S

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (OH) are known to control the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere but their influence on reactivity within indoor environments is believed to be of little importance. Atmospheric direct sources of OH include the photolysis of ozone and nitrous acid (HONO) and the ozonolysis of alkenes. It has been argued that the ultraviolet light fraction of the solar spectrum is largely attenuated within indoor environments, thus, limiting the extent of photolytic OH sources. Conversely, the ozonolysis of alkenes has been suggested as the main pathway of OH formation within indoor settings. According to this hypothesis the indoor OH radical concentrations span in the range of only 10(4) to 10(5) cm(-3). However, recent direct OH radical measurements within a school classroom yielded OH radical peak values at moderate light intensity measured at evenings of 1.8 × 10(6) cm(-3) that were attributed to the photolysis of HONO. In this work, we report results from chamber experiments irradiated with varying light intensities in order to mimic realistic indoor lighting conditions. The exhaust of a burning candle was introduced in the chamber as a typical indoor source causing a sharp peak of HONO, but also of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The photolysis of HONO yields peak OH concentration values, that for the range of indoors lightning conditions were estimated in the range 5.7 ×· 10(6) to 1.6 × 10(7) cm(-3). Excellent agreement exists between OH levels determined by a chemical clock and those calculated by a simple PSS model. These findings suggest that significant OH reactivity takes place at our dwellings and the consequences of this reactivity-that is, formation of secondary oxidants-ought to be studied hereafter. PMID:25942056

  6. Estimating PM2.5 Concentrations in Xi'an City Using a Generalized Additive Model with Multi-Source Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yong-Ze; Yang, Hong-Lei; Peng, Jun-Huan; Song, Yi-Rong; Sun, Qian; Li, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) represents a severe environmental problem and is of negative impact on human health. Xi'an City, with a population of 6.5 million, is among the highest concentrations of PM2.5 in China. In 2013, in total, there were 191 days in Xi’an City on which PM2.5 concentrations were greater than 100 μg/m3. Recently, a few studies have explored the potential causes of high PM2.5 concentration using remote sensing data such as the MODIS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) product. Linear regression is a commonly used method to find statistical relationships among PM2.5 concentrations and other pollutants, including CO, NO2, SO2, and O3, which can be indicative of emission sources. The relationships of these variables, however, are usually complicated and non-linear. Therefore, a generalized additive model (GAM) is used to estimate the statistical relationships between potential variables and PM2.5 concentrations. This model contains linear functions of SO2 and CO, univariate smoothing non-linear functions of NO2, O3, AOT and temperature, and bivariate smoothing non-linear functions of location and wind variables. The model can explain 69.50% of PM2.5 concentrations, with R2 = 0.691, which improves the result of a stepwise linear regression (R2 = 0.582) by 18.73%. The two most significant variables, CO concentration and AOT, represent 20.65% and 19.54% of the deviance, respectively, while the three other gas-phase concentrations, SO2, NO2, and O3 account for 10.88% of the total deviance. These results show that in Xi'an City, the traffic and other industrial emissions are the primary source of PM2.5. Temperature, location, and wind variables also non-linearly related with PM2.5. PMID:26540446

  7. Estimating PM2.5 Concentrations in Xi'an City Using a Generalized Additive Model with Multi-Source Monitoring Data.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Ze; Yang, Hong-Lei; Peng, Jun-Huan; Song, Yi-Rong; Sun, Qian; Li, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) represents a severe environmental problem and is of negative impact on human health. Xi'an City, with a population of 6.5 million, is among the highest concentrations of PM2.5 in China. In 2013, in total, there were 191 days in Xi'an City on which PM2.5 concentrations were greater than 100 μg/m3. Recently, a few studies have explored the potential causes of high PM2.5 concentration using remote sensing data such as the MODIS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) product. Linear regression is a commonly used method to find statistical relationships among PM2.5 concentrations and other pollutants, including CO, NO2, SO2, and O3, which can be indicative of emission sources. The relationships of these variables, however, are usually complicated and non-linear. Therefore, a generalized additive model (GAM) is used to estimate the statistical relationships between potential variables and PM2.5 concentrations. This model contains linear functions of SO2 and CO, univariate smoothing non-linear functions of NO2, O3, AOT and temperature, and bivariate smoothing non-linear functions of location and wind variables. The model can explain 69.50% of PM2.5 concentrations, with R2 = 0.691, which improves the result of a stepwise linear regression (R2 = 0.582) by 18.73%. The two most significant variables, CO concentration and AOT, represent 20.65% and 19.54% of the deviance, respectively, while the three other gas-phase concentrations, SO2, NO2, and O3 account for 10.88% of the total deviance. These results show that in Xi'an City, the traffic and other industrial emissions are the primary source of PM2.5. Temperature, location, and wind variables also non-linearly related with PM2.5. PMID:26540446

  8. Photooxidation of Ammonia on TiO2 Surfaces as a Source of Nitrogen Oxides in the Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raff, J.; Kebede, M. A.; Scharko, N. K.; Donaldson, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia is an important air pollutant in urban and rural areas alike, whose main fate is dry and wet deposition to surfaces. While reactions with OH radical in the gas phase are slow, our work shows that photochemical uptake of ammonia onto surfaces containing semiconductor minerals such as TiO2 is efficient and yields significant amounts of gas phase NO2, NO, and HONO. A coated wall flow tube coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) and a chemiluminescence analyzer was used to study the product yields of HONO and NOx under atmospherically relevant conditions, while diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to elucidate the mechanism of ammonia photooxidation on anatase surfaces. Our results show that photochemical processing of ammonia is likely a source of reactive oxides of nitrogen in urban areas where surfaces commonly contain TiO2, and in areas impacted by mineral dust and ammonia emissions.

  9. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Simon K G; Andreatta, Matthew E; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or "missing heritability". Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations.

  10. The effectiveness of power-generating complexes constructed on the basis of nuclear power plants combined with additional sources of energy determined taking risk factors into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Portyankin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of combining nuclear power plants equipped with water-cooled water-moderated power-generating reactors (VVER) with other sources of energy within unified power-generating complexes is analyzed. The use of such power-generating complexes makes it possible to achieve the necessary load pickup capability and flexibility in performing the mandatory selective primary and emergency control of load, as well as participation in passing the night minimums of electric load curves while retaining high values of the capacity utilization factor of the entire power-generating complex at higher levels of the steam-turbine part efficiency. Versions involving combined use of nuclear power plants with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units for generating electricity are considered. In view of the fact that hydrogen is an unsafe energy carrier, the use of which introduces additional elements of risk, a procedure for evaluating these risks under different conditions of implementing the fuel-and-hydrogen cycle at nuclear power plants is proposed. Risk accounting technique with the use of statistical data is considered, including the characteristics of hydrogen and gas pipelines, and the process pipelines equipment tightness loss occurrence rate. The expected intensities of fires and explosions at nuclear power plants fitted with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units are calculated. In estimating the damage inflicted by events (fires and explosions) occurred in nuclear power plant turbine buildings, the US statistical data were used. Conservative scenarios of fires and explosions of hydrogen-air mixtures in nuclear power plant turbine buildings are presented. Results from calculations of the introduced annual risk to the attained net annual profit ratio in commensurable versions are given. This ratio can be used in selecting projects characterized by the most technically attainable and socially acceptable safety.

  11. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  12. Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Luan

    1995-10-06

    This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.

  13. The contribution of soil biogenic NO and HONO emissions from a managed hyperarid ecosystem to the regional NOx emissions during growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, Buhalqem; Meixner, Franz X.; Behrendt, Thomas; Badawy, Moawad; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    A study was carried out to understand the contributions of soil biogenic NO emissions from managed (fertilized and irrigated) hyperarid ecosystems in NW China to the regional NOx emissions during the growing season. Soil biogenic net potential NO fluxes were quantified by laboratory incubation of soil samples from the three dominating ecosystems (desert, cotton, and grape fields). Regional biogenic NO emissions were calculated bottom-up hourly for the entire growing season (April-September 2010) by considering corresponding land use, hourly data of soil temperature, gravimetric soil moisture, and fertilizer enhancement factors. The regional HONO emissions were estimated using the ratio of the optimum condition ((FN,opt(HONO) to FN,opt (NO)). Regional anthropogenic NOx emissions were calculated bottom-up from annual statistical data provided by regional and local government bureaus which have been downscaled to monthly value. Regional top-down emission estimates of NOx were derived on the monthly basis from satellite observations (OMI) of tropospheric vertical NO2 column densities and prescribed values of the tropospheric NOx lifetime. In order to compare the top-down and bottom-up emission estimates, all emission estimates were expressed in terms of mass of atomic nitrogen. Consequently, monthly top-down NOx emissions (total) were compared with monthly bottom-up NOx emissions (biogenic + anthropogenic) for the time of the satellite overpass (around 13:00 LT) with the consideration of the diurnal cycle of bottom-up estimates. Annual variation in total Tohsun Oasis NOx emissions is characterized by a strong peak in winter (December-February) and a secondary peak in summer (June-August). During summer, soil biogenic emissions were from equal to double that of related anthropogenic emissions, and grape soils were the main contributor to soil biogenic emissions, followed by cotton soils, while emissions from the desert were negligible. The top-down and bottom

  14. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  15. Vertical columns of NO2, HONO, HCHO, CHOCHO and aerosol extinction: diurnal and seasonal variations in context of CalNex and CARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Coburn, S.; Oetjen, H.; Sinreich, R.; Thalman, R. M.; Waxman, E.; Volkamer, R.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from two ground-based University of Colorado Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU-MAX-DOAS) instruments that were deployed during the CALNEX and CARES 2010 field campaigns. Ground based CU-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried out through Dec 2010, and measured vertical column abundances of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrous acid (HONO), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), and aerosol extinction, which is determined indirectly from observing the oxygen dimers (O4). The measurements were acquired on the top of Millikan library at Caltech, Pasadena, CA, at the Fontana Arrows site located 60 Km east of Caltech, and for a limited period also downwind of Sacramento at T1 site during CARES. In the South Coast Air Basin, the MAX-DOAS instruments at both sites collected an extended time series of use to test satellites, and atmospheric chemistry models. We determine the state of the planetary boundary layer by comparing the columns observations with in-situ sensors, and place the CALNEX and CARES measurements intensive into seasonal context.

  16. Effects of Macroscopic Pattern Density and O2 Addition on Chamber Stability during Silicon Nitride Layer Etching in UNITY II-IEM Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Woon Suck; Kim, Kil Ho; Kim, Jong Il; Lee, Joon Hyun; Won, Yong Sik; Choi, Seon Ho; Hwang, Chung Ho; Lee, Dai Hoon

    2002-04-01

    Effects of the wafer level pattern density on chamber particle generation during silicon nitride (Si3N4) layer etching have been studied in the medium density plasma source, UNITY II-IEM. It was found that the macroscopic pattern density of the etched layer strongly affects the etching environment and subsequently affects the chamber stability. The abrupt change in the macroscopic pattern density of the etched layer, especially when the pattern density is lowered, can sometimes results in the hazardous chamber particle generation. Experiments were performed in order to cope with the chamber particle generation induced by the macroscopic pattern density variation. Controlling the F/C ratio within the plasma by varying the amount of feeding O2 gas was proven to be an efficient way to prevent the occurrence of the chamber particles. Based on our experimental results, the mechanism for the chamber particle generation and that for the reduction will be discussed.

  17. Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    Soil venting is effective for the physical removal of volatile hydrocarbons from unsaturated soils, and is also effective as a source of oxygen for biological degradation of the volatile and non-volatile fractions of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil. Treatment of soil venting off-gas is expensive, constituting a minimum of 50% of soil venting remediation costs. In this research, methods for enhancing biodegradation through soil venting were investigated, with the goal of eliminating the need for expensive off-gas treatment. A seven-month field investigation was conducted at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), Florida, where past jet fuel storage had resulted in contamination of a sandy soil. The contaminated area was dewatered to maintain approximately 1.6 meters of unsaturated soil. Soil hydrocarbon concentrations ranged from 30 to 23,000 mg/kg. Contaminated and uncontaminated test plots were vented for 188 days. Venting was interrupted five times during operation to allow for measurement of biological activity (CO{sub 2} production and O{sub 2} consumption) under varying moisture and nutrient conditions.

  18. Superconducting Properties of MgB2 with Addition of Other AlB2-type Diborides and Carbon Sources, Prepared Using High Energy Ball Milling and HIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Durval; Silva, Lucas B. S. da; Metzner, Vivian C. V.; Hellstrom, Eric E.

    In the present work it is described the production of MgB2 samples by using the mixture of MgB2 with other diborides, (TaB2, VB2, and AlB2) which have the same C32 hexagonal structure as the MgB2, and simultaneous addition with the diborides and SiC, that contribute with C, to replace B in the crystalline structure of the matrix. As an important result, the critical current density (Jc) was improved at low magnetic fields when just the diborides are added. However, when SiC is added simultaneously with the diborides, the result is the improvement of Jc at high fields. The critical temperature (Tc) was maintained high.

  19. Potential biofuel additive from renewable sources--Kinetic study of formation of butyl acetate by heterogeneously catalyzed transesterification of ethyl acetate with butanol.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sami H; Al-Rashed, Osama; Azeez, Fadhel A; Merchant, Sabiha Q

    2011-11-01

    Butyl acetate holds great potential as a sustainable biofuel additive. Heterogeneously catalyzed transesterification of biobutanol and bioethylacetate can produce butyl acetate. This route is eco-friendly and offers several advantages over the commonly used Fischer Esterification. The Amberlite IR 120- and Amberlyst 15-catalyzed transesterification is studied in a batch reactor over a range of catalyst loading (6-12 wt.%), alcohol to ester feed ratio (1:3 to 3:1), and temperature (303.15-333.15K). A butanol mole fraction of 0.2 in the feed is found to be optimum. Amberlite IR 120 promotes faster kinetics under these conditions. The transesterifications studied are slightly exothermic. The moles of solvent sorbed per gram of catalyst decreases (ethanol>butanol>ethyl acetate>butyl acetate) with decrease in solubility parameter. The dual site models, the Langmuir Hinshelwood and Popken models, are the most successful in correlating the kinetics over Amberlite IR 120 and Amberlyst 15, respectively.

  20. Kilogram-scale production of SnO(2) yolk-shell powders by a spray-drying process using dextrin as carbon source and drying additive.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Ho; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-05-01

    A simple and general method for the large-scale production of yolk-shell powders with various compositions by a spray-drying process is reported. Metal salt/dextrin composite powders with a spherical and dense structure were obtained by spray drying and transformed into yolk-shell powders by simple combustion in air. Dextrin plays a key role in the preparation of precursor powders for fabricating yolk-shell powders by spray drying. Droplets containing metal salts and dextrin show good drying characteristics even in a severe environment of high humidity. Sucrose, glucose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone are widely used as carbon sources in the preparation of metal oxide/carbon composite powders; however, they are not appropriate for large-scale spray-drying processes because of their caramelization properties and adherence to the surface of the spray dryer. SnO2 yolk-shell powders were studied as the first target material in the spray-drying process. Combustion of tin oxalate/dextrin composite powders at 600 °C in air produced single-shelled SnO2 yolk-shell powders with the configuration SnO2 @void@SnO2 . The SnO2 yolk-shell powders prepared by the simple spray-drying process showed superior electrochemical properties, even at high current densities. The discharge capacities of the SnO2 yolk-shell powders at a current density of 2000 mA g(-1) were 645 and 570 mA h g(-1) for the second and 100th cycles, respectively; the corresponding capacity retention measured for the second cycle was 88 %.

  1. Response of fumaric Acid addition on methanogenesis, rumen fermentation, and dry matter degradability in diets containing wheat straw and sorghum or berseem as roughage source.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, S K; Pandey, Poonam; Goel, Navneet

    2012-01-01

    An in vitro incubation system was used to evaluate effect of supplementation of fumaric acid at 0, 5, 10, and 15 mM concentration in high-, medium-, and low-fiber wheat straw containing total mixed diets with sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) and berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.) on rumen fermentation, methane production, and gas kinetics parameters. Three types of diets were prepared with different roughage and concentrate ratio (80 : 20, 50 : 50, and 20 : 80) by taking the representative samples. The roughage part composed of wheat straw (70 parts) and sorghum (30 parts) or berseem (30 parts) and the concentrate part composed of maize (33%), GNC (21%), mustard cake (12%), wheat bran (20%), deoiled rice bran (11%), mineral mixture (2%), and salt (1%). Fumaric acid was added in incubation medium to achieve final concentration of 0, 5, 10, and 15 mM. All the treatment combinations were arranged in 4 × 3 factorial designs with three replicates. It was concluded from the study that fumaric acid addition (5-15 mM) in diets varying in roughage to concentrate ratio significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced the methane production without affecting dry matter digestibility and maximum reduction was noticed at 5 mM concentration.

  2. Voyager 1/UVS measurements of the backscattered solar Lyman-alpha emission at the distant heliosphere: unknown source of additional emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katushkina, Olga; Alexashov, Dmitry; Sandel, Bill R.; Izmodenov, Vladislav; Quemerais, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Voyager 1/UVS has been performing measurements of the backscattered solar Lyman-alpha intensities for more than 35 years at distances 5-130 AU from the Sun. Backscattered Lyman-alpha emission depends on the interstellar hydrogen distribution in the solar wind / LISM interaction region. Therefore, measurement of the Lyman-alpha intensities is a tool for remote sensing of the hydrogen parameters at the heliospheric boundary. It is interesting to study dependence of the Lyman-alpha intensities on distance from the Sun. Namely, the Voyager 1 data show decrease of intensity (after correction for the solar flux variations) from 5 to 90 AU (1979-2003), then almost constant intensity between 90 and 115 AU (2003-2011), and decrease of intensity again at 115-130 AU (2011-2014). We perform numerical modeling and an analysis of the data by using our kinetic-MHD heliospheric model (Izmodenov & Alexashov, 2015) and the radiative transfer code (Quemerais, 2000). It is shown that the data obtained up to 90 AU (before 2003) can be fitted by the model quite well. After that the model predicts decrease of intensity, while the data show almost constant values. This behavior can be explained by addition to the model some portion of isotropic "extraheliospheric" Lyman-alpha emission, which does not scattered in the heliosphere and does not depend on the solar Lyman-alpha flux.

  3. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  4. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  5. Additional food folate derived exclusively from natural sources improves folate status in young women with the MTHFR 677 CC or TT genotype.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jean; Yang, Tai Li; Urrutia, Tania F; Li, Rui; Perry, Cydne A; Hata, Hiroko; Cogger, Edward A; Moriarty, David J; Caudill, Marie A

    2006-11-01

    The effectiveness of additional food folate in improving folate status in humans is uncertain particularly in people with the common genetic variant (677 C-->T) in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. To examine the effect of a doubling of food folate consumption on folate status response variables, women (n=32; 18-46 years) with the MTHFR 677 CC or TT genotype consumed either 400 (n=15; 7 CC and 8 TT) or 800 (n=17; 8 CC and 9 TT) microg/day of dietary folate equivalents (DFE) derived exclusively from naturally occurring food folate for 12 weeks. A repeated measures two-factor ANOVA was used to examine the effect of the dietary treatment, the MTHFR C677T genotype and their interactions on serum folate, RBC folate and plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) during the last 3 weeks of the study. Consumption of 800 microg DFE/day resulted in serum folate concentrations that were 67% (P=.005) higher than consumption of 400 microg DFE/day (18.6+/-2.9 vs. 31.0+/-2.7 nmol/L, respectively) and RBC folate concentrations that were 33% (P=.001) higher (1172+/-75 vs. 1559+/-70 nmol/L, respectively). Serum folate (P=.065) and RBC folate (P=.022) concentrations were lower and plasma tHcy was higher (P=.039) in women with the MTHFR 677 TT genotype relative to the CC genotype. However, no genotype by dietary treatment interaction was detected. These data suggest that a doubling of food folate intake will lead to marked improvements in folate status in women with the MTHFR 677 CC or TT genotype.

  6. NGSI student activities in open source information analysis in support of the training program of the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the additional protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M Analisa; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, Marisa N; Boyer, Brian D; Stevens, Rebecca S

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 a joint team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consisting of specialists in training of IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S. Doe laboratories for the entry into force of the Additional Protocol. As a major part of the support of the activity, LANL summer interns provided open source information analysis to the LANL-BNL mock inspection team. They were a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's (NGSI) summer intern program aimed at producing the next generation of safeguards specialists. This paper describes how they used open source information to 'backstop' the LANL-BNL team's effort to construct meaningful Additional Protocol Complementary Access training scenarios for each of the three DOE laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. The addition of ground wheat straw as a fiber source in the gestation diet of sows and the effect on sow and litter performance for three successive parities.

    PubMed

    Veum, T L; Crenshaw, J D; Crenshaw, T D; Cromwell, G L; Easter, R A; Ewan, R C; Nelssen, J L; Miller, E R; Pettigrew, J E; Ellersieck, M R

    2009-03-01

    A regional experiment was conducted at 8 experiment stations, with a total of 320 sows initially, to evaluate the efficacy of adding 13.35% ground wheat straw to a corn-soybean meal gestation diet for 3 successive gestation-lactation (reproductive) cycles compared with sows fed a control diet without straw. A total of 708 litters were farrowed over 3 reproductive cycles. The basal gestation diet intake averaged 1.95 kg daily for both treatments, plus 0.30 kg of straw daily for sows fed the diet containing ground wheat straw (total intake of 2.25 kg/d). During lactation, all sows on both gestation treatments were fed ad libitum the standard lactation diet used at each station. Response criteria were sow farrowing and rebreeding percentages, culling factors and culling rate, weaning-to-estrus interval, sow BW and backfat measurements at several time points, and litter size and total litter weight at birth and weaning. Averaged over 3 reproductive cycles, sows fed the diet containing wheat straw farrowed and weaned 0.51 more pigs per litter (P addition of 13.35% ground wheat straw to the gestation diet improved sow and litter performance, with increases in litter size and total litter weight at birth and weaning compared with control sows and litters.

  8. Effects of different fibre sources and fat addition on cholesterol and cholesterol-related lipids in blood serum, bile and body tissues of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, M; Hanneken, H; Wittmann, M; Gerdemann, M M; Machmuller, A

    2002-04-01

    Knowledge is limited on the efficacy of hindgut-fermentable dietary fibre to reduce blood, bile and body tissue cholesterol levels. In three experiments with growing pigs the effects of different kinds and levels of bacterially fermentable fibre (BFS) on cholesterol metabolism were examined. Various diets calculated to have similar contents of metabolizable energy were supplied for complete fattening periods. In the first experiment, a stepwise increase from 12 to 20% BFS was performed by supplementing diets with fermentable fibre from sugar beet pulp (modelling hemicelluloses and pectin). Beet pulp, rye bran (modelling cellulose) and citrus pulp (pectin) were offered either independently or in a mixture in the second experiment. These diets were opposed to rations characterized in carbohydrate type by starch either mostly non-resistant (cassava) or partly resistant (maize) to small intestinal digestion. The third experiment was planned to explore the interactions of BFS from citrus pulp with fat either through additional coconut oil/palm kernel oil blend or full-fat soybeans. In all experiments the increase of the BFS content was associated with a constant (cellulose) or decreasing (hemicelluloses, pectin) dietary proportion of non-digestible fibre. In experiment 1 an inverse dose-response relationship between BFS content and cholesterol in blood serum and adipose tissue as well as bile acid concentration in bile was noted while muscle cholesterol did not respond. In experiment 2 the ingredients characterized by cellulose and hemicelluloses/pectin reduced cholesterol-related traits relative to the low-BFS-high-starch controls whereas, except in adipose tissue cholesterol content, the pectinous ingredient had the opposite effect. However, the changes in serum cholesterol mainly affected HDL and not LDL cholesterol. Adipose tissue cholesterol also was slightly lower with partly resistant starch compared to non-resistant starch in the diet. Experiment 3 showed that

  9. Discovery of a Plains Caldera Complex and Extinct Lava Lake in Arabia Terra, Mars: Implications for the Discovery of Additional Highland Volcanic Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob; Michalski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Several irregularly shaped topographic depressions occur near the dichotomy boundary in northern Arabia Terra, Mars. The geomorphology of these features suggests that they formed by collapse, opposed to meteor impact. At least one depression (approx.55 by 85 km) displays geologic features indicating a complex, multi-stage collapse history. Features within and around the collapse structure indicate volcanic processes. The complex occurs within Hesperian ridged plains of likely volcanic origin and displays no crater rim or evidence for ejecta. Instead the depression consists of a series of circumferential graben and down-dropped blocks which also display upper surfaces similar to ridged plain lavas. Large blocks within the depression are tilted towards the crater center, and display graben that appear to have originally been linked with circumferential graben outside of the complex related to earlier collapse events. A nearly 700 m high mound exists along a graben within the complex that might be a vent. The deepest depression displays two sets of nearly continuous terraces, which we interpret as high-stands of a drained lava lake. These features appear similar to the black ledge described during the Kilauea Iki eruption in 1959. A lacustrine origin for the terraces seems unlikely because of the paucity of channels found in or around the depression that could be linked to aqueous surface processes. In addition, there is no obvious evidence for lacustrine sediments within the basin. Together with the presence of significant faulting that is indicative of collapse we conclude that this crater complex represents a large caldera formed in the Late Noachian to Early Hesperian. Other linear and irregular depressions in the region also might be linked to ancient volcanism. If that hypothesis is correct, it suggests that northern Arabia Terra could contain a large, previously unrecognized highland igneous province. Evacuation of magma via explosive and effusive activity

  10. Ultrafast laser control of vibrational dynamics for a two-dimensional model of HONO 2 in the ground electronic state: separation of conformers, control of the bond length, selective preparation of the discrete and the continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppel, M.; Paramonov, G. K.

    1998-06-01

    Selective excitation of the vibrational bound and the continuum states, controlled by subpicosecond infrared (IR) laser pulses, is simulated within the Schrödinger wave function formalism for a two-dimensional model of the HONO 2 molecule in the ground electronic state. State-selective excitation of the OH bond is achieved by single optimal laser pulses, with the probability being 97% for the bound states and more than 91% for the resonances. Stable, long-living continuum states are prepared with more than 96% probability by two optimal laser pulses, with the expectation energy of the molecule being well above the dissociation threshold of the ON single bond, and its life-time being at least 100 ps. The length of the ON single bond can be controlled selectively: stretching and contraction by about 45% of its equilibrium length are demonstrated. Laser separation of spatial conformers of HONO 2 in inhomogeneous conditions occurring on an anisotropic surface or created by a direct current (DC) electric field is analysed. The relative yields of target conformers may be very high, ranging from 10 to 10 8, and the absolute yields of up to 40% and more are calculated.

  11. Combined Flux Chamber and Genomics Approach Links Nitrous Acid Emissions to Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in Urban and Agricultural Soil.

    PubMed

    Scharko, Nicole K; Schütte, Ursel M E; Berke, Andrew E; Banina, Lauren; Peel, Hannah R; Donaldson, Melissa A; Hemmerich, Chris; White, Jeffrey R; Raff, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is a photochemical source of hydroxyl radical and nitric oxide in the atmosphere that stems from abiotic and biogenic processes, including the activity of ammonia-oxidizing soil microbes. HONO fluxes were measured from agricultural and urban soil in mesocosm studies aimed at characterizing biogenic sources and linking them to indigenous microbial consortia. Fluxes of HONO from agricultural and urban soil were suppressed by addition of a nitrification inhibitor and enhanced by amendment with ammonium (NH4(+)), with peaks at 19 and 8 ng m(-2) s(-1), respectively. In addition, both agricultural and urban soils were observed to convert (15)NH4(+) to HO(15)NO. Genomic surveys of soil samples revealed that 1.5-6% of total expressed 16S rRNA sequences detected belonged to known ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea. Peak fluxes of HONO were directly related to the abundance of ammonia-oxidizer sequences, which in turn depended on soil pH. Peak HONO fluxes under fertilized conditions are comparable in magnitude to fluxes reported during field campaigns. The results suggest that biogenic HONO emissions will be important in soil environments that exhibit high nitrification rates (e.g., agricultural soil) although the widespread occurrence of ammonia oxidizers implies that biogenic HONO emissions are also possible in the urban and remote environment.

  12. Measurements of gas phase acids in diesel exhaust: a relevant source of HNCO?

    PubMed

    Wentzell, Jeremy J B; Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Vlasenko, A; Staebler, Ralf; Lu, Gang; Poitras, Marie-Josée; Chan, Tak; Brook, Jeffrey R

    2013-07-16

    Gas-phase acids in light duty diesel (LDD) vehicle exhaust were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Fuel based emission factors (EF) and NOx ratios for these species were determined under differing steady state engine operating conditions. The derived HONO and HNO3 EFs agree well with literature values, with HONO being the single most important acidic emission. Of particular importance is the quantification of the EF for the toxic species, isocyanic acid (HNCO). The emission factors for HNCO ranged from 0.69 to 3.96 mg kgfuel(-1), and were significantly higher than previous biomass burning emission estimates. Further ambient urban measurements of HNCO demonstrated a clear relationship with the known traffic markers of benzene and toluene, demonstrating for the first time that urban commuter traffic is a source of HNCO. Estimates based upon the HNCO-benzene relationship indicate that upward of 23 tonnes of HNCO are released annually from commuter traffic in the Greater Toronto Area, far exceeding the amount possible from LDD alone. Nationally, 250 to 770 tonnes of HNCO may be emitted annually from on-road vehicles, likely representing the dominant source of exposure in urban areas, and with emissions comparable to that of biomass burning. PMID:23781923

  13. Liquid chromatography coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and post-column addition of metal salt solutions as a powerful tool for the metabolic profiling of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Adriana M; Rodriguez, M Alejandra; Gagliano, M Laura; Bertinetti, Brenda V; Godeas, Alicia M; Cabrera, Gabriela M

    2016-03-25

    Fusarium oxysporum L11 is a non-pathogenic soil-borne fungal strain that yielded an extract that showed antifungal activity against phytopathogens. In this study, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (API-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of the metabolites from the extract. The employed sources were electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Post-column addition of metal solutions of Ca, Cu and Zn(II) was also tested using ESI. A total of 137 compounds were identified or tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals, suggested molecular formulae and MS/MS analysis with previously reported data. Some compounds were isolated and identified by NMR. The extract was rich in cyclic peptides like cyclosporins, diketopiperazines and sansalvamides, most of which were new, and are reported here for the first time. The use of post-column addition of metals resulted in a useful strategy for the discrimination of compound classes since specific adducts were observed for the different compound families. This technique also allowed the screening for compounds with metal binding properties. Thus, the applied methodology is a useful choice for the metabolic profiling of extracts and also for the selection of metabolites with potential biological activities related to interactions with metal ions.

  14. Liquid chromatography coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and post-column addition of metal salt solutions as a powerful tool for the metabolic profiling of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Adriana M; Rodriguez, M Alejandra; Gagliano, M Laura; Bertinetti, Brenda V; Godeas, Alicia M; Cabrera, Gabriela M

    2016-03-25

    Fusarium oxysporum L11 is a non-pathogenic soil-borne fungal strain that yielded an extract that showed antifungal activity against phytopathogens. In this study, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (API-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of the metabolites from the extract. The employed sources were electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Post-column addition of metal solutions of Ca, Cu and Zn(II) was also tested using ESI. A total of 137 compounds were identified or tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals, suggested molecular formulae and MS/MS analysis with previously reported data. Some compounds were isolated and identified by NMR. The extract was rich in cyclic peptides like cyclosporins, diketopiperazines and sansalvamides, most of which were new, and are reported here for the first time. The use of post-column addition of metals resulted in a useful strategy for the discrimination of compound classes since specific adducts were observed for the different compound families. This technique also allowed the screening for compounds with metal binding properties. Thus, the applied methodology is a useful choice for the metabolic profiling of extracts and also for the selection of metabolites with potential biological activities related to interactions with metal ions. PMID:26655791

  15. Measurements of NO/sub 2/, HONO, NO/sub 3/, NCHO, PAH, nitroarenes, and particulate mutagenic activities during the carbonaceous-species-methods comparison study. Final report, 9 July 1986-30 July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, R.; Winer, A.M.

    1988-02-01

    The ambient concentrations of NO/sub 2/, HONO and HCHO were measured by long-pathlength differential optical absorption spectroscopy. Ambient concentrations of HNO/sub 3/, NH/sub 3/ and HCHO were measured by long-pathlength Fourier infrared-absorption spectroscopy. Significant concentrations of these pollutants were observed. Ambient air samples were analyzed for mutagenicity and gas- and particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitroarenes. The mutagen densities obtained were consistent with those measured previously in the South Coast Air Basin. The following PAH and nitroarenes were observed and quantified: naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, biphenyl, acenaphthene, acenaphthylene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, dibenzothiophene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz(a)anthracene, chrysene/triphenylene, benzo(a)pyrene, 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene, 3-nitrobiphenyl, 2-, 3- and 8-nitrofluoranthrene, and 1- and 2-nitropyrene.

  16. Effect of protein source and protease addition on performance, blood metabolites and nutrient digestibility of turkeys fed on low-protein diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch.

    PubMed

    Shahir, M H; Rahimi, R; Taheri, H R; Heidariniya, A; Baradaran, N; Asadi Kermani, Z

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a monocomponent protease and dietary inclusion of canola meal (CM) and poultry by-product meal (PBM) on growth performance, carcass characteristics and blood metabolites of turkeys fed on low crude protein (CP) diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch. Experimental treatments included control, maize-soybean meal diet including 258.3 g/kg CP; negative control 1 (NC1), maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg); NC2, control diet (CP, 258.3 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg); NC3, maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg). Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets were created by addition of protease enzyme (30 000 units/kg of diet) to the NC1 and NC3 diets, respectively. The NC3 group had lower body weight gain (BWG) compared to those fed on the control diet, and no improvement with enzyme addition (NC3 + P) was achieved. The protease addition to the NC1 diet (NC1 + P) improved BWG to the level of the control diet. The NC1 group had higher feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to the control and NC3 + P, but protease addition to the NC1 diet improved FCR. Protease addition to the low CP diets resulted in higher nitrogen (N) retention than in the control and NC2 groups. Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets increased apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of CP compared to the control group. It was concluded that addition of CM (up to 80 g/kg) and PBM (up to 80 g/kg) to turkey diets had no negative effect on growth performance from 28 to 55 d of age. The NC1 + P group achieved the BWG of the control group which was partially due to increases in N retention and AID of CP, but the NC3 + P group failed to recover the growth losses. This difference implies that the efficacy of the protease may depend upon the protein source in the ration. PMID:27074290

  17. Volatile organic compound conversion by ozone, hydroxyl radicals, and nitrate radicals in residential indoor air: Magnitudes and impacts of oxidant sources

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Michael S.; Wells, J. Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Indoor chemistry may be initiated by reactions of ozone (O3), the hydroxyl radical (OH), or the nitrate radical (NO3) with volatile organic compounds (VOC). The principal indoor source of O3 is air exchange, while OH and NO3 formation are considered as primarily from O3 reactions with alkenes and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), respectively. Herein, we used time-averaged models for residences to predict O3, OH, and NO3 concentrations and their impacts on conversion of typical residential VOC profiles, within a Monte Carlo framework that varied inputs probabilistically. We accounted for established oxidant sources, as well as explored the importance of two newly realized indoor sources: (i) the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO) indoors to generate OH and (ii) the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI) with NO2 to generate NO3. We found total VOC conversion to be dominated by reactions both with O3, which almost solely reacted with d-limonene, and also with OH, which reacted with d-limonene, other terpenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and aromatics. VOC oxidation rates increased with air exchange, outdoor O3, NO2 and d-limonene sources, and indoor photolysis rates; and they decreased with O3 deposition and nitric oxide (NO) sources. Photolysis was a strong OH formation mechanism for high NO, NO2, and HONO settings, but SCI/NO2 reactions weakly generated NO3 except for only a few cases. PMID:26855604

  18. Volatile organic compound conversion by ozone, hydroxyl radicals, and nitrate radicals in residential indoor air: Magnitudes and impacts of oxidant sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, Michael S.; Wells, J. Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Indoor chemistry may be initiated by reactions of ozone (O3), the hydroxyl radical (OH), or the nitrate radical (NO3) with volatile organic compounds (VOC). The principal indoor source of O3 is air exchange, while OH and NO3 formation are considered as primarily from O3 reactions with alkenes and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), respectively. Herein, we used time-averaged models for residences to predict O3, OH, and NO3 concentrations and their impacts on conversion of typical residential VOC profiles, within a Monte Carlo framework that varied inputs probabilistically. We accounted for established oxidant sources, as well as explored the importance of two newly realized indoor sources: (i) the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO) indoors to generate OH and (ii) the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI) with NO2 to generate NO3. We found total VOC conversion to be dominated by reactions both with O3, which almost solely reacted with D-limonene, and also with OH, which reacted with D-limonene, other terpenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and aromatics. VOC oxidation rates increased with air exchange, outdoor O3, NO2 and D-limonene sources, and indoor photolysis rates; and they decreased with O3 deposition and nitric oxide (NO) sources. Photolysis was a strong OH formation mechanism for high NO, NO2, and HONO settings, but SCI/NO2 reactions weakly generated NO3 except for only a few cases.

  19. Strong enhancement of high-field critical current properties and irreversibility field of MgB2 superconducting wires by coronene active carbon source addition via the new B powder carbon-coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shu Jun; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi; Chao Zhang, Yun; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    We report an effective carbon-containing additive, coronene (C24H12), for MgB2 superconducting wires. We used B powder coated with C24H12 to fabricate MgB2 wires using the powder-in-tube (PIT) and internal Mg diffusion (IMD) processes. The in-field critical current properties are strongly enhanced for both PIT- and IMD-processed MgB2 wires. For PIT MgB2 wires, a critical current density (Jc) value of 1.8 × 104 A cm-2 is obtained at 4.2 K and 10 T. For IMD MgB2 wires, we obtained a Jc of 1.07 × 105 A cm-2 and an engineering Jc (Je) of 1.12 × 104 A cm-2 at 4.2 K and 10 T. These Jc and Je values are similar to the highest values reported for MgB2 wires thus far. Furthermore, the irreversibility field, Birr, determined with a current density criterion of 100 A cm-2, is strongly enhanced to 25 T at 4.2 K, which is also the highest value reported for MgB2 superconducting wires thus far. Coronene is an active carbon source for MgB2 superconducting wires because (1) coronene has a high carbon content (96 wt%) with a small amount of hydrogen (impurity), (2) the decomposition temperature for coronene is near the reaction temperature between Mg and B, and (3) uniform dispersion of coronene on the B surface can be obtained due to the melting point of coronene being lower than the decomposition temperature. Carbon substitution for B caused by the coronene active carbon source is mainly responsible for the high field critical current properties and the high Birr obtained in this work.

  20. Evaluation of the Relative Importance of Radical Sources in Determining the Regional Tropospheric Oxidation Capacity in the Seoul Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, D.; Sanchez, D.; Blake, D. R.; Kim, D. S.; Lee, G.; Lee, M.; Jung, J.; Ahn, J.; Cho, G.; Guenther, A. B.; Kim, S.

    2015-12-01

    We will discuss oxidation capacity in the boundary layer of the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA) by analyzing a comprehensive field observational datasets of trace gases, radicals, and radical precursors. Two intensive field observations will be discussed. From mid-May to mid-June of 2015, we conducted a field observation in the middle of Seoul, representing a region with high anthropogenic emissions and photochemistry near the source region. We deployed an identical suite of instrumentation (i.e., CO, NOX, O3, SO2, VOCs, ClNO2, HONO, and PANs) at Taehwa Research Forest (TRF), ~ 50 km from the center of Seoul in early September of 2015. The site has been characterized as an ideal region in probing roles of biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) in a moderately polluted regional background. Therefore, the comparisons between two datasets will allow us to assess regional oxidation capacity of a megacity surrounded by forests, which is a typical set-up in the East Asian region. The main focus of the discussion was to investigate the following: (i) relative impact of nighttime radical reservoirs (i.e., HONO and ClNO2) in the morning radical budget in the urban and suburban environments and (ii) relative importance of unconstrained primary and recycling (e.g., BVOC oxidation) OH production at the isoprene dominated TRF region. An observationally constrained box model with detailed VOC chemical oxidation schemes (e.g., MCM) will be used for the comprehensive evaluations.

  1. Summertime formaldehyde observations in New York City: Ambient levels, sources and its contribution to HOx radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu Chi; Schwab, James J.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.; Bae, Min-Suk; Chen, Wei-Nai; Sun, Yele; Zhang, Qi; Hung, Hui-Ming; Perry, Jacqueline

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of ambient formaldehyde (HCHO), related gases and particulate matter were carried out from the SUNY Albany mobile platform at the Queens College site in New York City (NYC) from 15 July to 3 August 2009. Ambient HCHO was measured using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) trace gas detector. HCHO concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 7.5 ppb with a mean value of 2.2 ± 1.1 ppb. Daily HCHO peaks were nearly always found between 1100 EST (Eastern Standard Time) and noontime throughout the sampling period. HCHO correlated strongly with NOx and black carbon during the traffic rush hours, but around noontime HCHO correlated much better with total oxidants (Ox = O3 + NO2). Using the diurnal pattern of HCHO/BC ratios, we estimated that 70% of HCHO present between 1200 EST to 1500 EST was produced by photochemical reactions. Sources of photochemically produced HCHO were calculated using measured concentrations of hydrocarbons, their reaction kinetics with OH radicals, and HCHO yields. These calculations indicated that isoprene oxidation was the dominant source of HCHO for this period at this site, responsible for 44%, followed by methane (25%) and propene (18%). To assess the impact of HCHO as a radical source, the HOx production rates from HCHO, HONO, O3 photolysis, and alkenes +O3 were calculated as well. Daily averaged HOx production rates from HONO, HCHO, O3 photolysis and alkenes +O3 were 8.6 × 106, 2.3 × 106, 1.7 × 106, 2.1 × 105 molecules cm-3 s-1, respectively, contributing 67, 18, 13 and 2% to the overall daily HOx radical budget from these precursors.

  2. Missing OH source in a suburban environment near Beijing: observed and modelled OH and HO2 concentrations in summer 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K. D.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Fuchs, H.; Hu, M.; Häseler, R.; Kita, K.; Kondo, Y.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Oebel, A.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L. M.; Wahner, A.; Zhu, T.; Zhang, Y. H.; Rohrer, F.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of ambient OH and HO2 radicals were performed by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) during CAREBeijing2006 (Campaigns of Air Quality Research in Beijing and Surrounding Region 2006) at the suburban site Yufa in the south of Beijing in summer 2006. On most days, local air chemistry was influenced by aged air pollution that was advected by a slow, almost stagnant wind from southern regions. Observed daily maxima of OH and HO2* were in the range of (4-17) × 106 cm-3 and (2-24) × 108 cm-3, respectively. During daytime, OH reactivities were generally high (10-30 s-1) and mainly contributed by VOCs and their oxidation products. The comparison of modelled and measured HOx concentrations reveals a systematic underprediction of OH as a function of NO. A large discrepancy of a factor 2.6 is found at the lowest NO concentration encountered (0.1 ppb), whereas the discrepancy becomes insignificant above 1 ppb NO. This study extends similar observations from the Pearl-River Delta (PRD) in South China to a more urban environment. The OH discrepancy at Yufa can be resolved, if NO-independent additional OH recycling is assumed in the model. The postulated Leuven Isoprene Mechanism (LIM) has the potential to explain the gap between modelled and measured OH at Beijing taking into account conservative error estimates, but still lacks experimental confirmation. This and the hereby unresolved discrepancy at PRD suggest that other VOCs besides isoprene might be involved in the required, additional OH recycling. Fast primary production of ROx radicals up to 7 ppb h-1 was determined at Beijing which was dominated by the photolysis of O3, HONO, HCHO, and dicarbonyls. For a special case, 20 August, when the plume of Beijing city was encountered, a missing primary HOx source (≈ 3 ppb h-1) was determined under high NOx conditions similar to other urban areas like Mexico city. CAREBeijing2006 emphasizes the important role of OVOCs as a radical source and sink, and the need for

  3. Missing OH source in a suburban environment near Beijing: observed and modelled OH and HO2 concentrations in summer 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K. D.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Fuchs, H.; Hu, M.; Häseler, R.; Kita, K.; Kondo, Y.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Oebel, A.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L. M.; Wahner, A.; Zhu, T.; Zhang, Y. H.; Rohrer, F.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of ambient OH and HO2 radicals were performed by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) during CAREBeijing2006 (Campaigns of Air Quality Research in Beijing and Surrounding Region 2006) at the suburban site Yufa in the south of Beijing in summer 2006. On most days, local air chemistry was influenced by aged air pollution that was advected by a slow, almost stagnant wind from southern regions. Observed daily concentration maxima were in the range of (4-17) × 106 cm-3 for OH and (2-24) × 108 cm-3 for HO2 (including an estimated interference of 25% from RO2). During daytime, OH reactivities were generally high (10-30 s-1) and mainly contributed by observed VOCs and their calculated oxidation products. The comparison of modelled and measured HOx concentrations reveals a systematic underprediction of OH as a function of NO. A large discrepancy of a factor 2.6 is found at the lowest NO concentration encountered (0.1 ppb), whereas the discrepancy becomes insignificant above 1 ppb NO. This study extends similar observations from the Pearl-River Delta (PRD) in South China to a more urban environment. The OH discrepancy at Yufa can be resolved, if NO-independent additional OH recycling is assumed in the model. The postulated Leuven Isoprene Mechanism (LIM) has the potential to explain the gap between modelled and measured OH at Beijing taking into account conservative error estimates, but lacks experimental confirmation. This and the hereby unresolved discrepancy at PRD suggest that other VOCs besides isoprene might be involved in the required, additional OH recycling. Fast primary production of ROx radicals up to 7 ppb h-1 was determined at Beijing which was dominated by the photolysis of O3, HONO, HCHO, and dicarbonyls. For a special case, 20 August, when the plume of Beijing city was encountered, a missing primary HOx source (about 3 ppb h-1) was determined under high NOx conditions similar to other urban areas like Mexico City. CAREBeijing2006 emphasizes the

  4. Photochemistry at interfaces: a source of radicals impacting on aerosol formation and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, C.; D'anna, B.; Monge, M.; Dupart, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent findings confirm the presence of light absorbing organic material (HULIS, biomass burning particles, PAHs) in atmospheric aerosols... but also at the air/ocean interface. The presence of such light absorbing material allows photosensitised processes to occur. The latter may be sources of radicals in the troposphere that may alter its oxidation capacity (as for instance through the formation of HONO) or change the pathways leading to particle formation and ageing. We will exemplify such processes by presenting new data on the generation of radicals from dust particles or at the air/sea interface leading to particle formation in presence of SO2. These are recent findings that are questioning our current understanding of tropospheric photochemistry.

  5. Dietary fiber for dogs: II. Iso-total dietary fiber (TDF) additions of divergent fiber sources to dog diets and their effects on nutrient intake, digestibility, metabolizable energy and digesta mean retention time.

    PubMed

    Fahey, G C; Merchen, N R; Corbin, J E; Hamilton, A K; Serbe, K A; Hirakawa, D A

    1990-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine widely divergent fiber sources for their efficacy as ingredients in a meat-based dog diet and to determine the effects of these fibers on fecal excretion responses and mean retention time of marked fiber in the gastrointestinal tract of the dog. Fiber sources tested included beet pulp (BP), tomato pomace (TP), peanut hulls (PH), wheat bran (WB) and alkaline hydrogen peroxide-treated wheat straw (AHPWS). Diets were isonitrogenous (5.3% N) and iso-total dietary fiber (TDF; 12.5%). Thirty female English Pointers (five/treatment) were used in the experiment. Intakes of DM and OM were similar among treatments. The highest intakes of ether extract (EE) occurred on the TP, PH and WB treatments. Dogs fed PH ingested the most crude fiber (23.6 g/d), NDF (53.5 g/d), ADF (34.3 g/d) and TDF (59.7 g/d). Digestibilities of DM and OM for all fiber treatments were lower than the control (87.6 vs 81.8% for DM; 90.2 vs 85.4% for OM), but values were similar among fiber sources. The highest EE and N digestibilities occurred on the control and AHPWS treatments. No differences were noted among exogenous fiber-containing treatments in fiber component digestibility. Digestible energy and ME values generally were similar among treatments. Among fiber sources, BP resulted in the greatest amount of wet feces excreted (270 g/d) and the lowest fecal DM (30.3%). No differences among fiber sources were noted in frequency of defecation or mean retention time. Iso-TDF diets (containing, on average, 12.5% TDF) appear to be utilized similarly, regardless of the diversity in sources of fiber tested.

  6. Release of nitrous acid and nitrogen dioxide from nitrate photolysis in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Scharko, Nicole K; Berke, Andrew E; Raff, Jonathan D

    2014-10-21

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) is an abundant component of aerosols, boundary layer surface films, and surface water. Photolysis of NO3(-) leads to NO2 and HONO, both of which play important roles in tropospheric ozone and OH production. Field and laboratory studies suggest that NO3¯ photochemistry is a more important source of HONO than once thought, although a mechanistic understanding of the variables controlling this process is lacking. We present results of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy measurements of NO2 and HONO emitted during photodegradation of aqueous NO3(-) under acidic conditions. Nitrous acid is formed in higher quantities at pH 2-4 than expected based on consideration of primary photochemical channels alone. Both experimental and modeled results indicate that the additional HONO is not due to enhanced NO3(-) absorption cross sections or effective quantum yields, but rather to secondary reactions of NO2 in solution. We find that NO2 is more efficiently hydrolyzed in solution when it is generated in situ during NO3(-) photolysis than for the heterogeneous system where mass transfer of gaseous NO2 into bulk solution is prohibitively slow. The presence of nonchromophoric OH scavengers that are naturally present in the environment increases HONO production 4-fold, and therefore play an important role in enhancing daytime HONO formation from NO3(-) photochemistry.

  7. Novel tracer method to measure isotopic labeled gas-phase nitrous acid (HO15NO) in biogeochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianming; Kampf, Christopher J; Pöschl, Ulrich; Oswald, Robert; Cui, Junfang; Ermel, Michael; Hu, Chunsheng; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2014-07-15

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO), the protonated form of nitrite, contributes up to ∼60% to the primary formation of hydroxyl radical (OH), which is a key oxidant in the degradation of most air pollutants. Field measurements and modeling studies indicate a large unknown source of HONO during daytime. Here, we developed a new tracer method based on gas-phase stripping-derivatization coupled to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to measure the 15N relative exceedance, ψ(15N), of HONO in the gas-phase. Gaseous HONO is quantitatively collected and transferred to an azo dye, purified by solid phase extraction (SPE), and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In the optimal working range of ψ(15N)=0.2-0.5, the relative standard deviation of ψ(15N) is <4%. The optimum pH and solvents for extraction by SPE and potential interferences are discussed. The method was applied to measure HO15NO emissions from soil in a dynamic chamber with and without spiking 15) labeled urea. The identification of HO15NO from soil with 15N urea addition confirmed biogenic emissions of HONO from soil. The method enables a new approach of studying the formation pathways of HONO and its role for atmospheric chemistry (e.g., ozone formation) and environmental tracer studies on the formation and conversion of gaseous HONO or aqueous NO2- as part of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, e.g., in the investigation of fertilization effects on soil HONO emissions and microbiological conversion of NO2- in the hydrosphere.

  8. Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection permit application for air contaminant source: SRC-I demonstration plant, Newman, Kentucky. Supplement I. [Additional information on 38 items requested by KY/DNREP

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Jr., John F.

    1981-02-13

    In response to a letter from KY/DNREP, January 19, 1981, ICRC and DOE have prepared the enclosed supplement to the Kentucky Department for Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Permit Application for Air Contaminant Source for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Each of the 38 comments contained in the letter has been addressed in accordance with the discussions held in Frankfort on January 28, 1981, among representatives of KY/DNREP, EPA Region IV, US DOE, and ICRC. The questions raised involve requests for detailed information on the performance and reliability of proprietary equipment, back-up methods, monitoring plans for various pollutants, composition of wastes to flares, emissions estimates from particular operations, origin of baseline information, mathematical models, storage tanks, dusts, etc. (LTN)

  9. Formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from a refinery process for zinc oxide used in feed additives: a source of dioxin contamination in Chilean pork.

    PubMed

    Kim, Meekyung; Kim, Dong-Gyu; Choi, Si-Weon; Guerrero, Pedro; Norambuena, Julio; Chung, Gab-Soo

    2011-02-01

    The Republic of Korea found dioxin at concentrations exceeding the Korean maximum residue limit (MRL) in pork (2 pg TEQ g(-1) fat) imported from Chile in June 2008. Korea and Chile collaborated and investigated to find out the sources of contamination. An isotope dilution method and high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HR-GC/MS) were used for the analysis of PCDD/Fs. PCDD/Fs were found from 2.17 to 36.7 pg TEQ g(-1) fat from Chilean pork. 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF, 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDF, 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDF, and 2,3,4,6,7,8-HxCDF were found as the major congeners in pork samples. 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF showed the highest concentration and contributed about 30% among the congeners in most of the samples. 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDD, OCDD, 2,3,7,8-TCDF, 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF, 1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDF, and OCDF were not detected or exist at background levels in the less contaminated samples. Remarkably high concentrations of PCDD/Fs were found in samples of zinc oxide (17147 pg TEQ g(-1)), zinc oxide based premix (6673 pg TEQ g(-1)), and the residue crust (800 pg TEQ g(-1)) in a mixing chamber in the feed mill. From the results of various investigations, this case concluded that zinc oxide in the feed was the major source of the dioxin contamination in pork. The dioxins were formed from a metal refinery process to collect zinc oxide.

  10. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  11. Bioprocessing of “Hair Waste” by Paecilomyces lilacinus as a Source of a Bleach-Stable, Alkaline, and Thermostable Keratinase with Potential Application as a Laundry Detergent Additive: Characterization and Wash Performance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavello, Ivana A.; Hours, Roque A.; Cavalitto, Sebastián F.

    2012-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus (Thom) Samson LPS 876, a locally isolated fungal strain, was grown on minimal mineral medium containing “hair waste,” a residue from the hair-saving unhairing process, and produced a protease with keratinolytic activity. This enzyme was biochemically characterized. The optimum reaction conditions, determined with a response surface methodology, were 60°C and pH 6.0. It was remarkably stable in a wide range of pHs and temperatures. Addition of Ca2+, Mg2+, or sorbitol was found to be effective in increasing thermal stability of the protease. PMSF and Hg2+ inhibited the proteolytic activity indicating the presence of a thiol-dependent serine protease. It showed high stability toward surfactants, bleaching agents, and solvents. It was also compatible with commercial detergents (7 mg/mL) such as Ariel, Skip, Drive, and Ace, retaining more than 70% of its proteolytic activity in all detergents after 1 h of incubation at 40°C. Wash performance analysis revealed that this protease could effectively remove blood stains. From these properties, this enzyme may be considered as a potential candidate for future use in biotechnological processes, as well as in the formulation of laundry detergents. PMID:23365760

  12. Bioprocessing of "Hair Waste" by Paecilomyces lilacinus as a Source of a Bleach-Stable, Alkaline, and Thermostable Keratinase with Potential Application as a Laundry Detergent Additive: Characterization and Wash Performance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cavello, Ivana A; Hours, Roque A; Cavalitto, Sebastián F

    2012-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus (Thom) Samson LPS 876, a locally isolated fungal strain, was grown on minimal mineral medium containing "hair waste," a residue from the hair-saving unhairing process, and produced a protease with keratinolytic activity. This enzyme was biochemically characterized. The optimum reaction conditions, determined with a response surface methodology, were 60°C and pH 6.0. It was remarkably stable in a wide range of pHs and temperatures. Addition of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), or sorbitol was found to be effective in increasing thermal stability of the protease. PMSF and Hg(2+) inhibited the proteolytic activity indicating the presence of a thiol-dependent serine protease. It showed high stability toward surfactants, bleaching agents, and solvents. It was also compatible with commercial detergents (7 mg/mL) such as Ariel, Skip, Drive, and Ace, retaining more than 70% of its proteolytic activity in all detergents after 1 h of incubation at 40°C. Wash performance analysis revealed that this protease could effectively remove blood stains. From these properties, this enzyme may be considered as a potential candidate for future use in biotechnological processes, as well as in the formulation of laundry detergents.

  13. Bioprocessing of "Hair Waste" by Paecilomyces lilacinus as a Source of a Bleach-Stable, Alkaline, and Thermostable Keratinase with Potential Application as a Laundry Detergent Additive: Characterization and Wash Performance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cavello, Ivana A; Hours, Roque A; Cavalitto, Sebastián F

    2012-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus (Thom) Samson LPS 876, a locally isolated fungal strain, was grown on minimal mineral medium containing "hair waste," a residue from the hair-saving unhairing process, and produced a protease with keratinolytic activity. This enzyme was biochemically characterized. The optimum reaction conditions, determined with a response surface methodology, were 60°C and pH 6.0. It was remarkably stable in a wide range of pHs and temperatures. Addition of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), or sorbitol was found to be effective in increasing thermal stability of the protease. PMSF and Hg(2+) inhibited the proteolytic activity indicating the presence of a thiol-dependent serine protease. It showed high stability toward surfactants, bleaching agents, and solvents. It was also compatible with commercial detergents (7 mg/mL) such as Ariel, Skip, Drive, and Ace, retaining more than 70% of its proteolytic activity in all detergents after 1 h of incubation at 40°C. Wash performance analysis revealed that this protease could effectively remove blood stains. From these properties, this enzyme may be considered as a potential candidate for future use in biotechnological processes, as well as in the formulation of laundry detergents. PMID:23365760

  14. Clinical effects of sulphite additives.

    PubMed

    Vally, H; Misso, N L A; Madan, V

    2009-11-01

    Sulphites are widely used as preservative and antioxidant additives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Topical, oral or parenteral exposure to sulphites has been reported to induce a range of adverse clinical effects in sensitive individuals, ranging from dermatitis, urticaria, flushing, hypotension, abdominal pain and diarrhoea to life-threatening anaphylactic and asthmatic reactions. Exposure to the sulphites arises mainly from the consumption of foods and drinks that contain these additives; however, exposure may also occur through the use of pharmaceutical products, as well as in occupational settings. While contact sensitivity to sulphite additives in topical medications is increasingly being recognized, skin reactions also occur after ingestion of or parenteral exposure to sulphites. Most studies report a 3-10% prevalence of sulphite sensitivity among asthmatic subjects following ingestion of these additives. However, the severity of these reactions varies, and steroid-dependent asthmatics, those with marked airway hyperresponsiveness, and children with chronic asthma, appear to be at greater risk. In addition to episodic and acute symptoms, sulphites may also contribute to chronic skin and respiratory symptoms. To date, the mechanisms underlying sulphite sensitivity remain unclear, although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed. Physicians should be aware of the range of clinical manifestations of sulphite sensitivity, as well as the potential sources of exposure. Minor modifications to diet or behaviour lead to excellent clinical outcomes for sulphite-sensitive individuals.

  15. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  16. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  17. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  18. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  19. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  20. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  1. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  2. 17 CFR 38.1201 - Additional sources for compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... designing a futures contract, the designated contract market should conduct market research so that the... contract markets should derive a quantitative estimate of the deliverable supplies for the delivery...

  3. 10 CFR 1.3 - Sources of additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .../cfr/. Final opinions made in the adjudication of cases are published in “Nuclear Regulatory Commission... public inspection and copying for a fee at the NRC Public Document Room, One White Flint North,...

  4. 10 CFR 1.3 - Sources of additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .../cfr/. Final opinions made in the adjudication of cases are published in “Nuclear Regulatory Commission... public inspection and copying for a fee at the NRC Public Document Room, One White Flint North,...

  5. 10 CFR 1.3 - Sources of additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .../cfr/. Final opinions made in the adjudication of cases are published in “Nuclear Regulatory Commission... public inspection and copying for a fee at the NRC Public Document Room, One White Flint North,...

  6. 10 CFR 1.3 - Sources of additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .../cfr/. Final opinions made in the adjudication of cases are published in “Nuclear Regulatory Commission... public inspection and copying for a fee at the NRC Public Document Room, One White Flint North,...

  7. 10 CFR 1.3 - Sources of additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .../cfr/. Final opinions made in the adjudication of cases are published in “Nuclear Regulatory Commission... public inspection and copying for a fee at the NRC Public Document Room, One White Flint North,...

  8. TLSpy: An Open-Source Addition to Terrestrial Lidar Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frechette, J. D.; Weissmann, G. S.; Wawrzyniec, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial lidar scanners (TLS) that capture three dimensional (3D) geometry with cm scale precision present many new opportunities in the Earth Sciences and related fields. However, the lack of domain specific tools impedes full and efficient utilization of the information contained in these datasets. Most processing and analysis is performed using a variety of manufacturing, surveying, airborne lidar, and GIS software. Although much overlap exists, inevitably some needs are not addressed by these applications. TLSpy provides a plugin driven framework with 3D visualization capabilities that encourages researchers to fill these gaps. The goal is to free researchers from the intellectual overhead imposed by user and data interface design, enabling rapid development of TLS specific processing and analysis algorithms. We present two plugins as examples of problems that TLSpy is being applied to. The first plugin corrects for the strong influence of target orientation on TLS measured reflectance intensities. It calculates the distribution of incidence angles and intensities in an input scan and assists the user in fitting a reflectance model to the distribution. The model is then used to normalize input intensities, minimizing the impact of surface orientation and simplifying the extraction of quantitative data from reflectance measurements. Although reasonable default models can be determined the large number of factors influencing reflectance values require that the plugin be designed for maximum flexibility, allowing the user to adjust all model parameters and define new reflectance models as needed. The second plugin helps eliminate multipath reflections from water surfaces. Characterized by a lower intensity mirror image of the subaerial bank appearing below the water surface, these reflections are a common problem in scans containing water. These erroneous reflections can be removed by manually selecting points that lie on the waterline, fitting a plane to the points, and deleting points below that plane. This plugin simplifies the process by automatically identifying waterline points using characteristic changes in geometry and intensity. Automatic identification is often faster and more reliable than manual identification, however, manual control is retained as a fallback for degenerate cases.

  9. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  10. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  11. Emission Sources and Chemical Composition of the Atmosphere of a Mega-city in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, L.; Farhana, B. K.; Ghauri, B. M.

    2007-05-01

    . HONO and NH3 concentrations of up to 25 and 117 ppb were observed. A strong diurnal pattern was evident in the concentration of elemental and organic carbon which was perhaps controlled by variation in mixing heights. We used HYSPLIT4 air trajectories, intercomponent relationships and meteorological observations to explain the sources and the impacts of fog chemistry and mixing heights on atmospheric processing of the chemical constituents. Aerosols collected on this campaign were found to carry the signatures of emissions from Afghanistan, North and Central Pakistan, North India in addition to the local pollution sources. Statistical analysis suggests emissions from coal and oil combustion, industrial processes, building construction sites and biomass burning as the primary emission sources. Carbonaceous aerosols contributed about 69% of the PM2.5 mass. Findings of our study will improve the understanding of the critical roles and interactions between chemical composition and size of atmospheric particles, atmospheric boundary layer and meteorological phenomena that manipulate the chemistry of an urban atmosphere. The results should play a vital role in any strategy to regulate emissions and improve air quality in the region.

  12. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  13. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  14. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  15. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  16. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  17. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  18. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system.

  19. The Oxidant Production over Antarctic Land and its Export (OPALE) project: An overview of data collected in summer 2011-2012 at Concordia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukui, Alexandre; Legrand, Michel; Frey, Markus; Preunkert, Susanne; Savarino, Joel; Gallée, Hubert; Vicars, William; Gil Roca, Jaime; Jourdain, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    inter-play between the NOx snow emission rates and boundary layer dynamics. The major radical primary sources at Concordia are represented by the photolysis of HONO, and HCHO. The main net losses of radicals are their reactions with NO2 and cross radical reactions. It is found, however, that these results are inconsistent with radical observations leading to about 2 times overestimation of RO2 and OH levels. At the same time, neglecting the OH production from HONO results in about 2 times underestimation of radical levels and to explain the radical observations in this case an additional OH source equivalent to about 20% of measured HONO photolysis is required. Assuming that HONO at Concordia originates from snow emissions whose the emission strength was evaluated from lab experiments done by irradiating surface collected at Concordia, model calculations suggest that HONO levels about 20% of measured are consistent with those calculated from radical measurements. We suggest that an explanation for the found overestimation of radical production could be an overestimation of measured HONO, which may originate from the interference from HO2NO2 affecting HONO measurements by LOPAP. Even with 5 times reduced HONO levels, the HONO photolysis represents the major primary radical source at Dome C accounting for about 40% of primary radical production. Presented in this work analysis of the OH and RO2 budget may be significantly biased by inconsistency of the mechanism based on the available observations with observed NO2/NO ratios. Further studies of NOx, HONO and radical chemistry at Antarctic Plateau are therefore strongly needed with specific efforts dedicated to increase the reliability of measurements (especially HONO) under polar conditions.

  20. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  1. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  2. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  3. Sarks as additional fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Frampton, Paul H.; Jack Ng, Y.; Nishino, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Osamu

    1991-03-01

    An extension of the standard model is proposed. The gauge group is SU(2) X ⊗ SU(3) C ⊗ SU(2) S ⊗ U(1) Q, where all gauge symmetries are unbroken. The colour and electric charge are combined with SU(2) S which becomes strongly coupled at approximately 500 GeV and binds preons to form fermionic and vector bound states. The usual quarks and leptons are singlets under SU(2) X but additional fermions, called sarks. transform under it and the electroweak group. The present model explains why no more than three light quark-lepton families can exist. Neutral sark baryons, called narks, are candidates for the cosmological dark matter having the characteristics designed for WIMPS. Further phenomenological implications of sarks are analyzed i including electron-positron annihilation. Z 0 decay, flavor-changing neutral currents. baryon-number non-conservation, sarkonium and the neutron electric dipole moment.

  4. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  5. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  6. THE CHANDRA SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, Francis A.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G.; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger M.; Harbo, Peter N.; He Xiangqun; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Davis, John E.; Houck, John C.; Hall, Diane M.

    2010-07-15

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents {approx}<30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources, so that users can perform detailed further analysis using existing tools. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1{sigma} uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of {approx}<1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics, derived from the observations in which the source is detected. In addition to these traditional catalog elements, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra from each observation

  7. COMBUSTION AREA SOURCES: DATA SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report identifies, documents, and evaluates data sources for stationary area source emissions, including solid waste and agricultural burning. Area source emissions of particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, reactive volatile organic compounds, and carbon mon...

  8. Polarized electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Polarized electron sources for high energy accelerators took a significant step forward with the introduction of a new laser-driven photocathode source for the SLC in 1992. With an electron beam polarization of >80% and with {approximately}99% uptime during continuous operation, this source is a key factor in the success of the current SLC high-energy physics program. The SLC source performance is used to illustrate both the capabilities and the limitations of solid-state sources. The beam requirements for future colliders are similar to that of the SLC with the addition in most cases of multiple-bunch operation. A design for the next generation accelerator source that can improve the operational characteristics and at least minimize some of the inherent limitations of present sources is presented. Finally, the possibilities for producing highly polarized electron beams for high-duty-factor accelerators are discussed.

  9. 40 CFR 412.47 - Additional measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... STANDARDS CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFO) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Swine, Poultry, and Veal Calves § 412.47 Additional measures. (a) Each CAFO subject to this subpart must implement the requirements of § 412.37(a). (b) Each CAFO subject to this subpart must comply with the...

  10. 40 CFR 412.47 - Additional measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STANDARDS CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFO) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Swine, Poultry, and Veal Calves § 412.47 Additional measures. (a) Each CAFO subject to this subpart must implement the requirements of § 412.37(a). (b) Each CAFO subject to this subpart must comply with the...

  11. 40 CFR 412.47 - Additional measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STANDARDS CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFO) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Swine, Poultry, and Veal Calves § 412.47 Additional measures. (a) Each CAFO subject to this subpart must implement the requirements of § 412.37(a). (b) Each CAFO subject to this subpart must comply with the...

  12. 33 CFR 214.4 - Additional authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of clean drinking water, on such terms as he determines to be advisable, to any locality which he finds is confronted with a source of contaminated drinking water causing or likely to cause a... DEFENSE EMERGENCY SUPPLIES OF DRINKING WATER § 214.4 Additional authority. Section 82(2), Pub. L....

  13. 33 CFR 214.4 - Additional authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE EMERGENCY SUPPLIES OF DRINKING WATER § 214.4 Additional authority. Section 82(2), Pub. L. 93-251... of clean drinking water, on such terms as he determines to be advisable, to any locality which he finds is confronted with a source of contaminated drinking water causing or likely to cause...

  14. 33 CFR 214.4 - Additional authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DEFENSE EMERGENCY SUPPLIES OF DRINKING WATER § 214.4 Additional authority. Section 82(2), Pub. L. 93-251... of clean drinking water, on such terms as he determines to be advisable, to any locality which he finds is confronted with a source of contaminated drinking water causing or likely to cause...

  15. 33 CFR 214.4 - Additional authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DEFENSE EMERGENCY SUPPLIES OF DRINKING WATER § 214.4 Additional authority. Section 82(2), Pub. L. 93-251... of clean drinking water, on such terms as he determines to be advisable, to any locality which he finds is confronted with a source of contaminated drinking water causing or likely to cause...

  16. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  17. Magnolol and honokiol exert a synergistic anti-tumor effect through autophagy and apoptosis in human glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Chen; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Huang, Hua-Yin; Chen, Jang-Yi; Chen, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor associated with a high mortality rate. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effects of honokiol (Hono) and magnolol (Mag), extracted from Magnolia officinalis, on cytotoxicity and inhibition of human GBM tumor progression in cellular and animal models. In comparison with Hono or Mag alone, co-treatment with Hono and Mag (Hono-Mag) decreased cyclin A, D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 2, 4, 6 significantly, leading to cell cycle arrest in U87MG and LN229 human glioma cells. In addition, phosphorylated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K), p-Akt, and Ki67 were decreased after Hono-Mag treatment, showing proliferation inhibition. Hono-Mag treatment also reduced p-p38 and p-JNK but elevated p-ERK expression. Besides, Hono-Mag treatment induced autophagy and intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Both ERK and autophagy inhibitors enhanced Hono-Mag-induced apoptosis in LN229 cells, indicating a rescuer role of ERK. In human GBM orthotopic xenograft model, the Hono-Mag treatment inhibited the tumor progression and induced apoptosis more efficiently than Temozolomide, Hono, or Mag group. In conclusion, the Hono-Mag exerts a synergistic anti-tumor effect by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy and apoptosis in human GBM cells. The Hono-Mag may be applied as an adjuvant therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of GBM treatment. PMID:27074557

  18. The Chandra Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, F. A.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Anderson, C. S.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Evans, J. D.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E. C.; Gibbs, D. G., II; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R. M.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Kashyap, V. L.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Mossman, A. E.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Rots, A. H.; Siemiginowska, A.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; Van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2010-03-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public ACIS imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents < 30". The catalog (1) provides access to estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources with good scientific fidelity; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1σ uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of < 1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics. In addition, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra. Support for development of the CSC is provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under contract NAS 8-03060.

  19. Nonpoint Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, F. X.

    1978-01-01

    Presented a literature review of nonpoint source effects on water quality and pollution covering: (1) water quality effects; (2) watershed studies; (3) nonpoint source models; and nonpoint source controls. A list of 122 references published in 1976 and 1977 is also presented. (HM)

  20. Observations of Radical Precursors during TexAQS II: Findings and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaguer, E. P.; Lefer, B. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Pinto, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    The Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC) sponsored and helped organize significant components of the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS II). Some of the TERC-sponsored experiments, most notably those associated with the TexAQS II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) sited on top of the Moody Tower at the University of Houston, found evidence for the importance of short-lived radical sources such as formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrous acid (HONO) in increasing ozone productivity. During TRAMP, daytime HCHO pulses as large as 32 ppb were observed and attributed to industrial activities upwind in the Houston Ship Channel (HSC), and HCHO peaks as large as 52 ppb were detected by in-situ surface monitors in the HSC. In addition, an instrumented Piper Aztec aircraft observed plumes of apparent primary formaldehyde in flares from petrochemical facilities in the HSC. In one such combustion plume, depleted of ozone by large NOx emissions, the Piper Aztec measured an HCHO-to-CO ratio three times that of mobile sources. HCHO from uncounted primary sources or ozonolysis of underestimated olefin emissions could significantly increase ozone productivity in Houston beyond previous expectations. Simulations with the CAMx model show that additional emissions of HCHO from industrial flares can increase peak ozone in Houston by up to 30 ppb, depending on conditions in the planetary boundary layer. Other findings from TexAQS II include significant concentrations of HONO throughout the day, well in excess of current air quality model predictions, with large nocturnal vertical gradients indicating a surface or near-surface source of HONO, and large concentrations of night-time radicals (~30 ppt HO2). Additional HONO sources could increase daytime ozone by more than 10 ppb. Improving the representation of primary and secondary HCHO and HONO in air quality models could enhance the effectiveness of simulated control strategies, and thus make ozone attainment

  1. Microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  2. Nonpoint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Selzer, L.

    1994-12-31

    Nonpoint source pollution remains the most pervasive water quality issue faced today. Unlike pollution from point sources, nonpoint source pollution is diffuse both in terms of its origin and the manner in which it enters ground and surface waters. It results from a great variety of human activities that take place over a wide geographic area perhaps many hundreds or even thousands of acres. And unlike pollutants from point sources--which enter the environment at well-defined locations and in relatively even, continuous discharges--pollutants from nonpoint sources usually find their way into surface and ground waters in sudden surges associated with rainfall, thunderstorms, or snowmelt. The author discusses some of the most significant sources of nonpoint source pollution.

  3. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  4. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOEpatents

    Harwell, Lane D.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Greene, Donald L.; Pressly, Gary A.

    2000-11-07

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  5. A dynamic infrared source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persky, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    A system is described that can be used for testing infrared focal plane cameras in situations where conventional blackbody sources are deficient. The system uses readily available components, electronics, and software. It can provide either a wide area or a point source of infrared flux that can be programmed to follow a prescribed temporal profile at higher rates than available from commercial blackbody sources and with excellent repeatability. Additionally, the system provides flux without suffering from the temporal noise characteristic of commercial, wide area, flat sheet sources that results from turbulence in front of the blackbody. The system consists of commercially available, rapid rise time infrared radiators, either coupled to an integrating sphere for broad area flux, or used individually with a pinhole and collimator as a point source. A programmable voltage supply provides the power versus time profile at frequencies to several Hertz. Transfer from a standard blackbody calibrates the flux levels. This article provides a description, testing results, and application examples.

  6. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  7. Nuclear electric power sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements on radioactive commercial p-n junction silicon cells show that these units are capable of delivering several hundred microwatts per curie of Am-241 alpha source, indicating their usefulness in such electronic devices as hearing aids, heart pacemakers, electronic watches, delay timers and nuclear dosimeter chargers. It is concluded that the Am-241 sources are superior to the beta sources used previously, because of higher alpha specific ionization and simultaneous production of low energy photons which are easily converted into photoelectrons for additional power.

  8. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Martina, E.F.

    1958-04-22

    An improved ion source particularly adapted to provide an intense beam of ions with minimum neutral molecule egress from the source is described. The ion source structure includes means for establishing an oscillating electron discharge, including an apertured cathode at one end of the discharge. The egress of ions from the source is in a pencil like beam. This desirable form of withdrawal of the ions from the plasma created by the discharge is achieved by shaping the field at the aperture of the cathode. A tubular insulator is extended into the plasma from the aperture and in cooperation with the electric fields at the cathode end of the discharge focuses the ions from the source,

  9. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  10. [Patch-testing methods: additional specialised or additional series].

    PubMed

    Cleenewerck, M-B

    2009-01-01

    The tests in the European standard battery must occasionally be supplemented by specialised or additional batteries, particularly where the contact allergy is thought to be of occupational origin. These additional batteries cover all allergens associated with various professional activities (hairdressing, baking, dentistry, printing, etc.) and with different classes of materials and chemical products (glue, plastic, rubber...). These additional tests may also include personal items used by patients on a daily basis such as cosmetics, shoes, plants, textiles and so on.

  11. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  12. Light Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Research on food growth for long duration spacecraft has resulted in a light source for growing plants indoors known as Qbeam, a solid state light source consisting of a control unit and lamp. The light source, manufactured by Quantum Devices, Inc., is not very hot, although it generates high intensity radiation. When Ron Ignatius, an industrial partner of WCSAR, realized that terrestrial plant research lighting was not energy efficient enough for space use, he and WCSAR began to experiment with light emitting diodes. A line of LED products was developed, and QDI was formed to market the technology. An LED-based cancer treatment device is currently under development.

  13. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives (including flavouring agents) and contaminants, assessments of intake, and the establishment and revision of specifications for food additives. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and intake data on various specific food additives (alpha-amylase from Bacillus lichenformis containing a genetically engineered alpha-amylase gene from B. licheniformis, annatto extracts, curcumin, diacetyl and fatty acid esters of glycerol, D-tagatose, laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila expressed in Aspergillus oryzae, mixed xylanase, beta-glucanase enzyme preparation produced by a strain of Humicola insolens, neotame, polyvinyl alcohol, quillaia extracts and xylanase from Thermomyces lanuginosus expressed in Fusarium venenatum), flavouring agents, a nutritional source of iron (ferrous glycinate, processed with citric acid), a disinfectant for drinking-water (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) and contaminants (cadmium and methylmercury). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives, recommendations on the flavouring agents considered, and tolerable intakes of the contaminants considered, changes in the status of specifications and further information requested or desired. PMID:15354533

  14. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives (including flavouring agents) and contaminants, assessments of intake, and the establishment and revision of specifications for food additives. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and intake data on various specific food additives (alpha-amylase from Bacillus lichenformis containing a genetically engineered alpha-amylase gene from B. licheniformis, annatto extracts, curcumin, diacetyl and fatty acid esters of glycerol, D-tagatose, laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila expressed in Aspergillus oryzae, mixed xylanase, beta-glucanase enzyme preparation produced by a strain of Humicola insolens, neotame, polyvinyl alcohol, quillaia extracts and xylanase from Thermomyces lanuginosus expressed in Fusarium venenatum), flavouring agents, a nutritional source of iron (ferrous glycinate, processed with citric acid), a disinfectant for drinking-water (sodium dichloroisocyanurate) and contaminants (cadmium and methylmercury). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives, recommendations on the flavouring agents considered, and tolerable intakes of the contaminants considered, changes in the status of specifications and further information requested or desired.

  15. Miniature Radioisotope Power Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed miniature power source generates electricity for years from heat developed in small radioisotope unit without addition of fuel or dependence on sunlight. Called powerstick, is relatively inexpensive, lightweight, and rugged. Supplies power to small vehicles or scientific instruments in remote locations on Earth or in outer space. Envisioned uses include Mars miniature rovers and monitoring equipment for toxic or nuclear storage sites.

  16. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  17. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  18. Enantioselective Michael addition of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-02-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry.

  19. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  20. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  1. Soil surface acidity plays a determining role in the atmospheric-terrestrial exchange of nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Melissa A; Bish, David L; Raff, Jonathan D

    2014-12-30

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important hydroxyl (OH) radical source that is formed on both ground and aerosol surfaces in the well-mixed boundary layer. Recent studies report the release of HONO from nonacidic soils, although it is unclear how soil that is more basic than the pKa of HONO (∼ 3) is capable of protonating soil nitrite to serve as an atmospheric HONO source. Here, we used a coated-wall flow tube and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to study the pH dependence of HONO uptake onto agricultural soil and model substrates under atmospherically relevant conditions (1 atm and 30% relative humidity). Experiments measuring the evolution of HONO from pH-adjusted surfaces treated with nitrite and potentiometric titrations of the substrates show, to our knowledge for the first time, that surface acidity rather than bulk aqueous pH determines HONO uptake and desorption efficiency on soil, in a process controlled by amphoteric aluminum and iron (hydr)oxides present. The results have important implications for predicting when soil nitrite, whether microbially derived or atmospherically deposited, will act as a net source or sink of atmospheric HONO. This process represents an unrecognized mechanism of HONO release from soil that will contribute to HONO emissions throughout the day.

  2. Soil surface acidity plays a determining role in the atmospheric-terrestrial exchange of nitrous acid

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Melissa A.; Bish, David L.; Raff, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important hydroxyl (OH) radical source that is formed on both ground and aerosol surfaces in the well-mixed boundary layer. Recent studies report the release of HONO from nonacidic soils, although it is unclear how soil that is more basic than the pKa of HONO (∼3) is capable of protonating soil nitrite to serve as an atmospheric HONO source. Here, we used a coated-wall flow tube and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to study the pH dependence of HONO uptake onto agricultural soil and model substrates under atmospherically relevant conditions (1 atm and 30% relative humidity). Experiments measuring the evolution of HONO from pH-adjusted surfaces treated with nitrite and potentiometric titrations of the substrates show, to our knowledge for the first time, that surface acidity rather than bulk aqueous pH determines HONO uptake and desorption efficiency on soil, in a process controlled by amphoteric aluminum and iron (hydr)oxides present. The results have important implications for predicting when soil nitrite, whether microbially derived or atmospherically deposited, will act as a net source or sink of atmospheric HONO. This process represents an unrecognized mechanism of HONO release from soil that will contribute to HONO emissions throughout the day. PMID:25512517

  3. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Leland, W.T.

    1960-01-01

    The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

  4. Crowd Sourcing.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has contributed new words and slang to our daily vernacular. A few terms, such as tweeting, texting, sexting, blogging, and googling, have become common in most vocabularies and in many languages, and are now included in the dictionary. A new buzzword making the rounds in industry is crowd sourcing, which involves outsourcing an activity, task, or problem by sending it to people or groups outside a business or a practice. Crowd sourcing allows doctors and practices to tap the wisdom of many instead of relying only on the few members of their close-knit group. This article defines "crowd sourcing," offers examples, and explains how to get started with this approach that can increase your ability to finish a task or solve problems that you don't have the time or expertise to accomplish.

  5. Crowd Sourcing.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has contributed new words and slang to our daily vernacular. A few terms, such as tweeting, texting, sexting, blogging, and googling, have become common in most vocabularies and in many languages, and are now included in the dictionary. A new buzzword making the rounds in industry is crowd sourcing, which involves outsourcing an activity, task, or problem by sending it to people or groups outside a business or a practice. Crowd sourcing allows doctors and practices to tap the wisdom of many instead of relying only on the few members of their close-knit group. This article defines "crowd sourcing," offers examples, and explains how to get started with this approach that can increase your ability to finish a task or solve problems that you don't have the time or expertise to accomplish. PMID:27039640

  6. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  7. RADIATION SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Brucer, M.H.

    1958-04-15

    A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

  8. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

    1959-01-13

    A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

  9. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  10. Embedding Sensors During Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sbriglia, Lexey Raylene

    2015-08-10

    This PowerPoint presentation had the following headings: Fused deposition modeling (FDM); Open source 3D printing; Objectives; Vibration analysis; Equipment; Design; Material choices; Failure causes, such as tension, bubbling; Potential solutions; Simulations; Embedding the sensors; LabView programming; Alternate data acquisition; Problem and proposed solution; and, Conclusions

  11. Teebi hypertelorism syndrome: additional cases.

    PubMed

    Machado-Paula, Ligiane Alves; Guion-Almeida, Maria Leine

    2003-03-01

    We report on two unrelated Brazilian boys who have craniofacial and digital anomalies resembling those reported with Teebi hypertelorism syndrome. Additional features such as cleft lip and palate, large uvula, atypical chin and abnormal scapulae were observed.

  12. Superluminal sources.

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, R C

    1995-01-01

    Predictions for the apparent velocity statistics under simple beaming models are presented and compared to the observations. The potential applications for tests of unification models and for cosmology (source counts, measurements of the Hubble constant H0 and the deceleration parameter q0) are discussed. First results from a large homogeneous survey are presented. The data do not show compelling evidence for the existence of intrinsically different populations of galaxies, BL Lacertae objects, or quasars. Apparent velocities betaapp in the range 1-5 h-1, where h = H0/100 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 megaparsec (Mpc) = 3.09 x 10(22) m], occur with roughly equal frequency; higher values, up to betaapp = 10 h-1, are rather more scarce than appeared to be the case from earlier work, which evidently concentrated on sources that are not representative of the general population. The betaapp distribution suggests that there might be a skewed distribution of Lorentz factors over the sample, with a peak at gammab approximately 2 h-1 and a tail up to at least gammab approximately 10 h-1. There appears to be a clearly rising upper envelope to the betaapp distribution when plotted as a function of observed 5-GHz luminosity; a combination of source counts and the apparent velocity statistics in a larger sample could provide much insight into the properties of radio jet sources. PMID:11607604

  13. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  14. [Trends in the utilization of food additives].

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Viktória; Bánáti, Diána

    2013-11-17

    The frequent media reports on food additives weakened consumers' trust in food producers and food control authorities as well. Furthermore, consumers' uncertainty is also raised by the fact that they obtain their information from inadequate, mistrustful sources and, therefore, consumers might avoid the consumption of certain foodstuffs. While food producers may react by replacing artificial components by natural ones, they try to emphasize the favourable characteristics of their products. The authors describe the main trends and efforts related to food additives. On the basis of the overview it can be concluded that - besides taking into consideration consumers' needs - product development and research directions are promising. Food producers' efforts may help to restore consumer confidence and trust and they may help them to have informed choice. PMID:24212041

  15. [Trends in the utilization of food additives].

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Viktória; Bánáti, Diána

    2013-11-17

    The frequent media reports on food additives weakened consumers' trust in food producers and food control authorities as well. Furthermore, consumers' uncertainty is also raised by the fact that they obtain their information from inadequate, mistrustful sources and, therefore, consumers might avoid the consumption of certain foodstuffs. While food producers may react by replacing artificial components by natural ones, they try to emphasize the favourable characteristics of their products. The authors describe the main trends and efforts related to food additives. On the basis of the overview it can be concluded that - besides taking into consideration consumers' needs - product development and research directions are promising. Food producers' efforts may help to restore consumer confidence and trust and they may help them to have informed choice.

  16. Food additives and preschool children.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Danika M; McNulty, Breige A; Nugent, Anne P; Gibney, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Food additives have been used throughout history to perform specific functions in foods. A comprehensive framework of legislation is in place within Europe to control the use of additives in the food supply and ensure they pose no risk to human health. Further to this, exposure assessments are regularly carried out to monitor population intakes and verify that intakes are not above acceptable levels (acceptable daily intakes). Young children may have a higher dietary exposure to chemicals than adults due to a combination of rapid growth rates and distinct food intake patterns. For this reason, exposure assessments are particularly important in this age group. The paper will review the use of additives and exposure assessment methods and examine factors that affect dietary exposure by young children. One of the most widely investigated unfavourable health effects associated with food additive intake in preschool-aged children are suggested adverse behavioural effects. Research that has examined this relationship has reported a variety of responses, with many noting an increase in hyperactivity as reported by parents but not when assessed using objective examiners. This review has examined the experimental approaches used in such studies and suggests that efforts are needed to standardise objective methods of measuring behaviour in preschool children. Further to this, a more holistic approach to examining food additive intakes by preschool children is advisable, where overall exposure is considered rather than focusing solely on behavioural effects and possibly examining intakes of food additives other than food colours.

  17. Extension of the standard addition method by blank addition.

    PubMed

    Steliopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Standard addition involves adding varying amounts of the analyte to sample portions of fixed mass or fixed volume and submitting those portions to the sample preparation procedure. After measuring the final extract solutions, the observed signals are linearly regressed on the spiked amounts. The original unknown amount is estimated by the opposite of the abscissa intercept of the fitted straight line [1]. A limitation of this method is that only data points with abscissa values equal to and greater than zero are available so that there is no information on whether linearity holds below the spiking level zero. An approach to overcome this limitation is introduced.•Standard addition is combined with blank addition.•Blank addition means that defined mixtures of blank matrix and sample material are subjected to sample preparation to give final extract solutions.•Equations are presented to estimate the original unknown amount and to calculate the 1-2α confidence interval about this estimate using the combined data set.

  18. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  19. Extension of the standard addition method by blank addition

    PubMed Central

    Steliopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Standard addition involves adding varying amounts of the analyte to sample portions of fixed mass or fixed volume and submitting those portions to the sample preparation procedure. After measuring the final extract solutions, the observed signals are linearly regressed on the spiked amounts. The original unknown amount is estimated by the opposite of the abscissa intercept of the fitted straight line [1]. A limitation of this method is that only data points with abscissa values equal to and greater than zero are available so that there is no information on whether linearity holds below the spiking level zero. An approach to overcome this limitation is introduced.•Standard addition is combined with blank addition.•Blank addition means that defined mixtures of blank matrix and sample material are subjected to sample preparation to give final extract solutions.•Equations are presented to estimate the original unknown amount and to calculate the 1-2α confidence interval about this estimate using the combined data set. PMID:26844210

  20. Observation of atmospheric nitrous acid with DOAS in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Min; Xie, Pin-Hua; Liu, Wen-Qing; Li, Ang; Dou, Ke; Fang, Wu; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Wei-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in Beijing City have been performed by means of a developed differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system based on photodiode array (PDA), during the autumn of 2004. HONO and NO2 were simultaneously identified by their characteristic absorption bands in the spectral region between 337 nm and 372 nm with high sensibility and time resolution. The concentrations of HONO exhibit obviously diurnal variation with a nocturnal maximum and a daytime minimum. The highest HONO value up to 11.8 microg/m3 was observed during the night of 2/3 September. Possible sources of the observed HONO were discussed. Good correlation to NO2 indicates that NO2 is a main source component. The measurement also shows direct emission of HONO is an important source in strongly polluted urban area. PMID:20050551

  1. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  2. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting.

  3. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  4. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  5. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  6. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  7. 48 CFR 13.102 - Source list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Source list. 13.102... AND CONTRACT TYPES SIMPLIFIED ACQUISITION PROCEDURES Procedures 13.102 Source list. (a) Contracting... as their primary sources of vendor information. Offices maintaining additional vendor source files...

  8. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-07-19

    An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

  9. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-04-14

    This patent deals with calutrons and more particularly to an arrangement therein whereby charged bottles in a calutron source unit may be replaced without admitting atmospheric air to the calutron vacuum chamber. As described, an ion unit is disposed within a vacuum tank and has a reservoir open toward a wall of the tank. A spike projects from thc source into the reservoir. When a charge bottle is placed in the reservoir, the spike breaks a frangible seal on the bottle. After the contents of the bottle are expended the bottle may be withdrawn and replaced with another charge bottle by a varuum lock arrangement in conjunction with an arm for manipulating the bottle.

  10. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  11. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W. M.

    1959-04-14

    This patent deals with calutrons and more particularly to an arrangement therein whereby charged bottles in a calutron source unit may be replaced without admitting atmospheric air to the calutron vacuum chamber. As described, an ion unit is disposed within a vacuum tank and has a reservoir open toward a wall of the tank. A spike projects from the source into the reservoir. When a charge bottle is placed in the reservoir, the spike breaks a frangible seal on the bottle. After the contents of the bottle are expended the bottle may be withdrawn and replaced with another charge bottle by a vacuum lock arrangement in conjunction with an arm for manipulating the bottle.

  12. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  13. Postmarketing surveillance of food additives.

    PubMed

    Butchko, H H; Tschanz, C; Kotsonis, F N

    1994-08-01

    Postmarketing surveillance of consumption and of anecdotal reports of adverse health effects has been recognized by a number of regulatory authorities as a potentially useful method to provide further assurance of the safety of new food additives. Surveillance of consumption is used to estimate more reliably actual consumption levels relative to the acceptable daily intake of a food additive. Surveillance of anecdotal reports of adverse health effects is used to determine the presence of infrequent idiosyncratic responses that may not be predictable from premarket evaluations. The high-intensity sweetner, aspartame, is a food additive that has been the subject of extensive evaluation during the postmarketing period and is thus used as an example to discuss postmarketing surveillance.

  14. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  15. Lubricating additive for drilling muds

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, A.; Brois, S. J.; Brownawell, D. W.; Walker, T. O.

    1985-01-01

    Aqueous drilling fluids containing a minor amount of an additive composition featuring oxazolines of C/sub 1/-C/sub 30/ alkylthioglycolic acid. Such fluids are especially useful where reduced torque drilling fluids are needed. Another embodiment of this invention relates to a method of drilling utilizing the above-described fluids.

  16. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  17. Promoting Additive Acculturation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    A study focusing on 113 ninth graders of Mexican descent indicates that most students and their parents adhere to a strategy of additive acculturation (incorporating skills of the new culture and language), but that the school curriculum and general school climate devalue Mexican culture. (SLD)

  18. Individualized Additional Instruction for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Ken

    2010-01-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the…

  19. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  20. Tinkertoy Color-Addition Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joe L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple home-built device, using an overhead projector, for use in demonstrations of the addition of various combinations of red, green, and blue light. Useful in connection with discussions of color, color vision, or color television. (JRH)

  1. Additional Financial Resources for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Ben C.

    This paper discusses the continuing need for additional educational funds and suggests that the only way to gain these funds is through concerted and persistent political efforts by supporters of education at both the federal and state levels. The author first points out that for many reasons declining enrollment may not decrease operating costs…

  2. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  3. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  4. Cherenkov Source for PMT Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ at UC Berkeley Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    My research is focused on building a deployable source for PMT calibrations in the SNO+ detector. I work for the SNO+ group at UC Berkeley headed by Gabriel Orebi Gann. SNO+ is an addition to the SNO project, and its main goal is to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be monitored by over 9500 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In order to characterize the PMTs, several calibration sources are being constructed. One of which, the Cherenkov Source, will provide a well-understood source of non-isotropic light for calibrating the detector response. My goal is to design and construct multiple aspects of the Cherenkov Source. However, there are multiple questions that arose with its design. How do we keep the scintillation light inside the Cherenkov source so it does not contaminate calibration? How do we properly build the Cherenkov source: a hollow acrylic sphere with a neck? Can we maintain a clean source throughout these processes? These are some of the problems I have been working on, and will continue to work on, until the deployment of the source. Additionally, I have worked to accurately simulate the physics inside the source, mainly the energy deposition of alphas.

  5. Food additives and contaminants. An update.

    PubMed

    Newberne, P M; Conner, M W

    1986-10-15

    Food additives continue to be a source of benefits to the consuming public but there are also perceived risks. Concern for the latter in the last decade has produced a society afflicted with cancer phobia. The intentional additives including sugars, salt, corn syrup, and dextrose make up 90% of the direct additives. These, along with a limited number of familiar items make up a large proportion of the remainder of the additives. Such common ingredients as nitrates and nitrites, solanine, cyanogenetic compounds, arsenic, etc., are unavoidably consumed in the diet and with little if any evidence for public health consequences. Major concern on the part of the public in recent years has been focused on man-made chemicals which are intentionally added to foods to enhance flavors and acceptability, nutrient value, shelf life and increased availability. These include food colors, nonnutritive and low-nutrient sweeteners, (saccharin, cyclamate, aspartame); antioxidants; and nitrites. Contaminants, sometimes incorrectly included in lists of food additives, present the greatest potential threat to public health. Such contaminants as mycotoxins, nitrosamines, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, among others, provide a continuing challenge to our regulatory agencies and to public health authorities. Evidence to date indicate that these responsible for food safety are doing an admirable job, and as a society, our food supply has never been better, or safer, and, as a population, we have never been healthier. Aside from contaminants, major concerns relate to an excess of good food and to obesity. These comments should not be taken to infer that we should relax our concern and surveillance; instead more concern and surveillance should be exerted toward those uncontrolled substances such as natural plant products and alleged natural nutrients, roots, herbs, etc., which are given much credit for positive health effects, without meeting the high standards of our

  6. Food additives and contaminants. An update.

    PubMed

    Newberne, P M; Conner, M W

    1986-10-15

    Food additives continue to be a source of benefits to the consuming public but there are also perceived risks. Concern for the latter in the last decade has produced a society afflicted with cancer phobia. The intentional additives including sugars, salt, corn syrup, and dextrose make up 90% of the direct additives. These, along with a limited number of familiar items make up a large proportion of the remainder of the additives. Such common ingredients as nitrates and nitrites, solanine, cyanogenetic compounds, arsenic, etc., are unavoidably consumed in the diet and with little if any evidence for public health consequences. Major concern on the part of the public in recent years has been focused on man-made chemicals which are intentionally added to foods to enhance flavors and acceptability, nutrient value, shelf life and increased availability. These include food colors, nonnutritive and low-nutrient sweeteners, (saccharin, cyclamate, aspartame); antioxidants; and nitrites. Contaminants, sometimes incorrectly included in lists of food additives, present the greatest potential threat to public health. Such contaminants as mycotoxins, nitrosamines, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, among others, provide a continuing challenge to our regulatory agencies and to public health authorities. Evidence to date indicate that these responsible for food safety are doing an admirable job, and as a society, our food supply has never been better, or safer, and, as a population, we have never been healthier. Aside from contaminants, major concerns relate to an excess of good food and to obesity. These comments should not be taken to infer that we should relax our concern and surveillance; instead more concern and surveillance should be exerted toward those uncontrolled substances such as natural plant products and alleged natural nutrients, roots, herbs, etc., which are given much credit for positive health effects, without meeting the high standards of our

  7. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  8. Additive-free digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Freire, Sergio L S; Tanner, Brendan

    2013-07-16

    Digital microfluidics, a technique for manipulation of droplets, is becoming increasingly important for the development of miniaturized platforms for laboratory processes. Despite the enthusiasm, droplet motion is frequently hindered by the desorption of proteins or other analytes to surfaces. Current approaches to minimize this unwanted surface fouling involve the addition of extra species to the droplet or its surroundings, which might be problematic depending on the droplet content. Here, a new strategy is introduced to move droplets containing cells and other analytes on solid substrates, without extra moieties; in particular, droplets with bovine serum albumin could be moved at a concentration 2000 times higher than previously reported (without additives). This capability is achieved by using a soot-based superamphiphobic surface combined with a new device geometry, which favors droplet rolling. Contrasting with electrowetting, wetting forces are not required for droplet motion.

  9. Additive concentrates for distillate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, A.; Lewtas, K.

    1985-08-27

    An additive concentrate for incorporation into wax containing petroleum fuel oil compositions to improve low temperature flow properties comprising an oil solution containing: 3% to 90 wt. % of a C30-C300 oil-soluble nitrogen compound wax crystal growth inhibitor having at least one straight C8-C40 alkyl chain and partial esters, and at least one mole per mole of an organic acid capable of hydrogen bonding to improve the solubility in the oil.

  10. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  11. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  12. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  13. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  14. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  15. The Mozart Effect: Additional Data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R.

    2002-04-01

    After the review of the Mozart effect was published in this journal (Hughes JR. Epilepsy Behav 2001;2:369-417), additional data from the music of Haydn and Liszt have been analyzed that may account for the decrease in seizure activity originally reported during Mozart music. Even with these added data Mozart music continued to score significantly higher than the selections from the other six composers in one of the important characteristics of this music, namely, the repetition of the melody. However Haydn's values were second highest among Mozart, J. S. Bach, Wagner, Beethoven, Chopin, and Liszt.

  16. Impact of nitrous acid photolysis on the total hydroxyl radical budget during the Limitation of Oxidant Production/Pianura Padana Produzione di Ozono study in Milan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicke, B.; Platt, U.; Stutz, J.

    2002-11-01

    The photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO) in the early morning hours is believed to be a significant source of hydroxyl radicals (OH), the most important daytime oxidizing species. Although the importance of this mechanism has been recognized for many years, no accurate experimental quantification is available. Here we present measurements of HONO, NO2, SO2, O3 and HCHO by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) during the Limitation of Oxidant Production/Pianura Padana Produzione di Ozono (LOOP/PIPAPO) study in May-June 1998 in Milan, Italy. The concentration of NO and J(NO2)/J(HONO) were simultaneously monitored by in situ monitors. The photolysis frequencies of HCHO and O3 were determined with a radiative transfer model. High nocturnal HONO mixing ratios of up to 4.4 ppb were regularly observed. Elevated daytime HONO levels during cloudy periods show that the formation of HONO proceeds after sunrise and therefore also represents a source of hydroxyl radicals throughout the day. Averaged over 24 hours, HCHO photolysis is the most important source of OH in Milan, followed by either ozone or HONO photolysis. Our observations indicate that on certain days the OH production from HONO can be even more important than that from ozone photolysis. The diurnal variation of the different OH formation mechanisms shows that HONO photolysis is by far the most important source in the early hours of the morning, and can be as large as and even surpass the total OH production at noon.

  17. Denitrification with carbon addition--kinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Dold, P; Takács, I; Mokhayeri, Y; Nichols, A; Hinojosa, J; Riffat, R; Bott, C; Bailey, W; Murthy, S

    2008-05-01

    The Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant (Washington, D.C.) uses methanol as an external carbon source in a postdenitrification process, to achieve low effluent total nitrogen concentrations. This becomes more difficult in winter, at lower mixed liquor temperatures and higher flows, as a consequence of the kinetic behavior of the methanol-utilizing heterotrophs. The paper reports on an experimental batch test study conducted on Blue Plains postdenitrification sludge to investigate (1) the maximum specific growth rate of methanol-utilizing heterotrophs (Mu(METH)); (2) the temperature dependency of the growth rate; and (3) the efficacy of alternate substrates (ethanol, acetate, and sugar). A limited number of tests were conducted on sludge from two other treatment plants with methanol addition. PMID:18605381

  18. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  19. Fuel Additives: Canada bans MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Sissell, K.

    1997-04-16

    The Canadian Senate voted late last week to ban use of the manganese-based fuel additive MMT, produced only in the US by Ethyl. MMT, which has been sold in Canada for the past 20 years and accounts for about half of Ethyl`s Canadian sales, has been criticized by environmentalists, who have raised public health concerns, and automakers, who say it harms emission control systems. {open_quotes}Canada`s vote is a great victory for public health and the environment,{close_quotes} says Environmental Defense Fund executive director Fred Krupp. {open_quotes}The US should move swiftly to follow suit and suspend sales of MMT until adequate toxicity testing on the additive is completed.{close_quotes} EPA had refused to approve MMT for sale because of health concerns but was compelled to do so by a December 1995 court ruling. Ethyl asserts the ban violates Canada`s obligations under Nafta and says it will file a damage claim with the Nafta arbitration panel.

  20. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  1. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  2. SIPSEY WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mineral surveys the Sipsey Wilderness and additions are deemed to have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Although limestone, shale, and sandstone resources that occur in the area are physically suitable for a variety of uses, similar materials are available outside the area closer to transportation routes and potential markets. A small amount of coal has been identified in the area, occurring as nonpersistent beds less than 28 in. thick. Oil and (or) natural gas resources may be present if suitable structural traps exist in the subsurface. Therefore, the area has a probable oil and gas potential. Small amounts of asphaltic sandstone and limestone, commonly referred to as tar sands, may also occur in the subsurface. 5 refs.

  3. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  4. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate.

  5. Radiation source

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

  6. Surface texture measurement for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Andrew; Giusca, Claudiu L.; Macaulay, Gavin D.; Roerig, Felix; Hoebel, Matthias; Leach, Richard K.; Tomita, Ben; Milne, Katherine A.

    2015-06-01

    The surface texture of additively manufactured metallic surfaces made by powder bed methods is affected by a number of factors, including the powder’s particle size distribution, the effect of the heat source, the thickness of the printed layers, the angle of the surface relative to the horizontal build bed and the effect of any post processing/finishing. The aim of the research reported here is to understand the way these surfaces should be measured in order to characterise them. In published research to date, the surface texture is generally reported as an Ra value, measured across the lay. The appropriateness of this method for such surfaces is investigated here. A preliminary investigation was carried out on two additive manufacturing processes—selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM)—focusing on the effect of build angle and post processing. The surfaces were measured using both tactile and optical methods and a range of profile and areal parameters were reported. Test coupons were manufactured at four angles relative to the horizontal plane of the powder bed using both SLM and EBM. The effect of lay—caused by the layered nature of the manufacturing process—was investigated, as was the required sample area for optical measurements. The surfaces were also measured before and after grit blasting.

  7. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  8. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  9. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  10. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting.

  11. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting. PMID:25500631

  12. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts.

  13. Sources of tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.E.; Easterly, C.E.

    1980-12-01

    A review of tritium sources is presented. The tritium production and release rates are discussed for light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and molten salt breeder reactors (MSBRs). In addition, release rates are discussed for tritium production facilities, fuel reprocessing plants, weapons detonations, and fusion reactors. A discussion of the chemical form of the release is included. The energy producing facilities are ranked in order of increasing tritium production and release. The ranking is: HTGRs, LWRs, LMFBRs, MSBRs, and HWRs. The majority of tritium has been released in the form of tritiated water.

  14. 28 CFR 4.4 - Supporting affidavit; additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 § 4.4 Supporting affidavit; additional information. (a... together with any other person and the amount and source of all income during the immediately preceding five calendar years plus income to date of application. (12) Any other information which the...

  15. Benefits of additives application during combustion of phytomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacka, Matej; Vician, Peter; Holubčík, Michal; Jandačka, Jozef

    2016-06-01

    Phytomass, particularly wheat straw as a source of energy has countless benefits, but it has many problems in its direct burn too. The worst problem is the ash flow temperature. The aim of study was to analyze and reduce the problems of the wheat straw combustion. The experiment was conducted under realistic conditions. In this paper was implemented analysis of ash features with and without adding additives into the wheat straw. Selected samples were laboratory processed and examined. The result of the work was the impact of additional additives for ash features.

  16. Capillary discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, III, Howard Albert

    2003-11-25

    Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

  17. 40 CFR 141.711 - Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... survey or an equivalent source water assessment that after a system completed the monitoring conducted... lead to increased contamination of the source water by Cryptosporidium, the system must take actions specified by the State to address the contamination. These actions may include additional source...

  18. 40 CFR 141.711 - Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... survey or an equivalent source water assessment that after a system completed the monitoring conducted... lead to increased contamination of the source water by Cryptosporidium, the system must take actions specified by the State to address the contamination. These actions may include additional source...

  19. 40 CFR 141.711 - Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... survey or an equivalent source water assessment that after a system completed the monitoring conducted... lead to increased contamination of the source water by Cryptosporidium, the system must take actions specified by the State to address the contamination. These actions may include additional source...

  20. 40 CFR 141.711 - Filtered system additional Cryptosporidium treatment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... survey or an equivalent source water assessment that after a system completed the monitoring conducted... lead to increased contamination of the source water by Cryptosporidium, the system must take actions specified by the State to address the contamination. These actions may include additional source...

  1. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  2. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  3. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  4. Automatic pneumatic source-control system for positioning gamma and neutron calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, G.F.

    1980-10-17

    A microcomputer-based source-control system was developed to move gamma and neutron calibration sources into position for sample irradiation. In addition to monitoring interlocks and system status, the computer calculates for gamma sources the time required for a requested exposure at a specified distance. All system use data is stored, and monthly reports are generated.

  5. Diversity employment and recruitment sources

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Effective human resources management has been identified as one of four critical success factors in the Department of Energy Strategic Plan. The Plan states relative to this factor: ``The Department seeks greater alignment of resources with agency priorities and increased diversification of the workforce, including gender, ethnicity, age, and skills. This diversification will bring new thinking and perspectives that heretofore have not had a voice in departmental decision-making.`` This Guide has been developed as a key tool to assist Department of Energy management and administrative staff in achieving Goal 2 of this critical success factor, which is to ``Ensure a diverse and talented workforce.`` There are numerous sources from which to recruit minorities, women and persons with disabilities. Applying creativity and proactive effort, using traditional and non-traditional approaches, and reaching out to various professional, academic and social communities will increase the reservoir of qualified candidates from which to make selections. In addition, outreach initiatives will undoubtedly yield further benefits such as a richer cultural understanding and diversity awareness. The resource listings presented in this Guide are offered to encourage active participation in the diversity recruitment process. This Guide contains resource listings by state for organizations in the following categories: (1) African American Recruitment Sources; (2) Asian American/Pacific Islander Recruitment Sources; (3) Hispanic Recruitment Sources; (4) Native American/Alaskan Native Recruitment Sources; (5) Persons with Disabilities Recruitment Sources; and (6) Women Recruitment Sources.

  6. How cigarette additives are used to mask environmental tobacco smoke

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, G.; Wayne, G.; Lymperis, D.; Doherty, M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To understand the tobacco industry's research on and use of cigarette additives that alter the perception of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS).
DATA SOURCES—Internal documents from four websites maintained by the major US tobacco manufacturers and company patents pertaining to the use of ETS altering additives obtained from the US Patent and Trademark Office online database.
STUDY SELECTION—Electronic searches of the four industry websites and the US patent database were conducted using keywords to identify relevant data.
DATA EXTRACTION—Industry documents and patents obtained using an exploratory snowball sampling method were reviewed and grouped into four general categories according to whether the additive(s) described affected ETS visibility, odour, irritation, or emissions. Accuracy of isolated findings was validated through cross comparison of the data sources.
DATA SYNTHESIS—Results of this preliminary study provide evidence that tobacco manufacturers have conducted extensive research on the use of chemical additives to reduce, mask, or otherwise alter the visibility, odour, irritation, or emission of ETS.
CONCLUSIONS—Findings suggest that the tobacco industry uses additives to reduce the perception of ETS. To protect the public, appropriate regulation of tobacco additives should be mandated.


Keywords: environmental tobacco smoke; tobacco industry; additives; masking PMID:10982572

  7. Perovskite photonic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Brandon R.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-05-01

    The field of solution-processed semiconductors has made great strides; however, it has yet to enable electrically driven lasers. To achieve this goal, improved materials are required that combine efficient (>50% quantum yield) radiative recombination under high injection, large and balanced charge-carrier mobilities in excess of 10 cm2 V-1 s-1, free-carrier densities greater than 1017 cm-3 and gain coefficients exceeding 104 cm-1. Solid-state perovskites are -- in addition to galvanizing the field of solar electricity -- showing great promise in photonic sources, and may be the answer to realizing solution-cast laser diodes. Here, we discuss the properties of perovskites that benefit light emission, review recent progress in perovskite electroluminescent diodes and optically pumped lasers, and examine the remaining challenges in achieving continuous-wave and electrically driven lasing.

  8. Infrared source cross-index, first edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-04-01

    The Infrared Source Cross-Index is a listing of correlated infrared source names (and positions) for astronomical objects observed at 1-1000 microns. The source names have been obtained from the database of the first edition of the Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO: NASA RP 1118), covering observations published through l982. Additional identifications were located by correlating these names with identifications contained in other machine-readable astronomical catalogs in the NASA National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). There are some 80,000 different source names in the Cross-Index, corresponding to over 27,000 unique infrared sources.

  9. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, Herman

    2003-07-09

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, microfabrication, archaeometry and medical diagnostics. These rings span electron energies from a few hundred MeV to 8 GeV. Several facilities serve 2000 or more users on 30-60 simultaneously operational experimental stations. The largest rings are more than 1 km in circumference, cost about US$1B to build and have annual budgets of about US$100M. This growth is due to the remarkable properties of synchrotron radiation, including its high intensity, brightness and stability; wide spectral range extending from the infra-red to hard x-rays; variable polarization; pulsed time structure; and high vacuum environment. The ever-expanding user community and the increasing number of applications are fueling a continued growth in the number of facilities around the world. In the past few years new types of light sources have been proposed based on linear accelerators. Linac-based sources now being pursued include the free-electron laser (FEL) and energy recovery linac (ERL

  10. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Seifi, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews published data on the mechanical properties of additively manufactured metallic materials. The additive manufacturing techniques utilized to generate samples covered in this review include powder bed fusion (e.g., EBM, SLM, DMLS) and directed energy deposition (e.g., LENS, EBF3). Although only a limited number of metallic alloy systems are currently available for additive manufacturing (e.g., Ti-6Al-4V, TiAl, stainless steel, Inconel 625/718, and Al-Si-10Mg), the bulk of the published mechanical properties information has been generated on Ti-6Al-4V. However, summary tables for published mechanical properties and/or key figures are included for each of the alloys listed above, grouped by the additive technique used to generate the data. Published values for mechanical properties obtained from hardness, tension/compression, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth, and high cycle fatigue are included for as-built, heat-treated, and/or HIP conditions, when available. The effects of test orientation/build direction on properties, when available, are also provided, along with discussion of the potential source(s) (e.g., texture, microstructure changes, defects) of anisotropy in properties. Recommendations for additional work are also provided.

  11. Managing residential sources of indoor air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, B.A.; Sparks, L.E.

    1994-12-31

    Sources of indoor air pollutants in residential environments can be managed to reduce occupant exposures. Techniques for managing indoor air pollution sources include: source elimination, substitution, modification, and pretreatment, and altering the amount, location, or time of use. Intelligent source management requires knowledge of the source`s emission characteristics, including chemical composition, emission rates, and decay rates. In addition, knowledge of outdoor air exchange rates, heating/air-conditioning duct flow rates, and kitchen/batch exhaust fan flow rates is needed to determine pollutant concentrations. Indoor air quality (IAQ) models use this information and occupant activity patterns to determine instantaneous and/or cumulative individual exposure. This paper describes a number of residential scenarios for various indoor air pollution VOC sources, several air flow conditions, and typical occupant activity patterns. IAQ model predictions of occupant exposures for these scenarios are given for selected source management options.

  12. Problems with packaged sources in foreign countries

    SciTech Connect

    Abeyta, Cristy L; Matzke, James L; Zarling, John; Tompkin, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP), which is administered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), removes excess, unwanted, abandoned, or orphan radioactive sealed sources that pose a potential threat to national security, public health, and safety. In total, GTRI/OSRP has been able to recover more than 25,000 excess and unwanted sealed sources from over 825 sites. In addition to transuranic sources, the GTRI/OSRP mission now includes recovery of beta/gamma emitting sources, which are of concern to both the U.S. government and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This paper provides a synopsis of cooperative efforts in foreign countries to remove excess and unwanted sealed sources by discussing three topical areas: (1) The Regional Partnership with the International Atomic Energy Agency; (2) Challenges in repatriating sealed sources; and (3) Options for repatriating sealed sources.

  13. Decision-Making, Science and Gasoline Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. W.; Small, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    Methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a gasoline additive to serve two major purposes. The first use was as an octane-enhancer to replace organic lead, beginning in 1979. The second use, which began about 1992, was as a oxygenated additive to meet requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Generally, the amount of MTBE used for octane enhancement was lower than that required to meet CAAA requirements. An unintended consequence of MTBE use has been widespread groundwater contamination. The decision to use certain amounts of MTBE or other chemcials as gasoline additives is the outcome of economic, regulatory, policy, political, and scientific considerations. Decision makers ask questions such as "How do ground water impacts change with changing MTBE content? How many wells would be impacted? and What are the associated costs?" These are best answered through scientific inquiry, but many different approaches could be developed. Decision criteria include time, money, comprehensiveness, and complexity of the approach. Because results must be communicated to a non-technical audience, there is a trade off between the complexity of the approach and the ability to convince economists, lawyers and policy makers that results make sense. The question on MTBE content posed above was investigated using transport models, a release scenario and gasoline composition. Because of the inability of transport models to predict future concentrations, an approach was chosen to base comparative assessment on a calibrated model. By taking this approach, "generic" modeling with arbitrarily selected parameters was avoided and the validity of the simulation results rests upon relatively small extrapolations from the original calibrated models. A set of simulations was performed that assumed 3% (octane enhancement) and 11% (CAAA) MTBE in gasoline. The results were that ground water concentrations would be reduced in proportion to the reduction of MTBE in the fuel

  14. Septic tank additive impacts on microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Hoover, M T; Clark, G H; Gumpertz, M; Wollum, A G; Cobb, C; Strock, J

    2008-01-01

    Environmental health specialists, other onsite wastewater professionals, scientists, and homeowners have questioned the effectiveness of septic tank additives. This paper describes an independent, third-party, field scale, research study of the effects of three liquid bacterial septic tank additives and a control (no additive) on septic tank microbial populations. Microbial populations were measured quarterly in a field study for 12 months in 48 full-size, functioning septic tanks. Bacterial populations in the 48 septic tanks were statistically analyzed with a mixed linear model. Additive effects were assessed for three septic tank maintenance levels (low, intermediate, and high). Dunnett's t-test for tank bacteria (alpha = .05) indicated that none of the treatments were significantly different, overall, from the control at the statistical level tested. In addition, the additives had no significant effects on septic tank bacterial populations at any of the septic tank maintenance levels. Additional controlled, field-based research iswarranted, however, to address additional additives and experimental conditions.

  15. 75 FR 19945 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 2/12/2010 (75 FR 6869-6870) and 2/19/2010 (75 FR 7450-7451), the Committee for..., FORT CARSON, CO. Deletions On 2/12/2010 (75 FR 6869-6870 and 2/19/2010 (75 FR 7450-7451), the Committee..., Internal Revenue Services, 5100 River Road, Schiller Park, IL. NPAs: ServiceSource, Inc., Alexandria,...

  16. A single-source precursor approach to solution processed indium arsenide thin films† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Table listing selected bond lengths and angles for InAs precursor complex. Cross-sectional SEM of InAs thin film. XPS depth profile spectra of InAs thin film. Valence band XPS of InAs thin film and standard. CCDC 1477895. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c6tc02293f Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Peter; Sathasivam, Sanjayan; Williamson, Benjamin A. D.; Pugh, David; Bawaked, Salem M.; Basahel, Sulaiman N.; Obaid, Abdullah Y.; Scanlon, David O.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of the novel single-source precursor, [{(MeInAstBu)3}2(Me2InAs(tBu)H)2] and the subsequent first report of aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition of InAs thin films. Owing to the use of the single-source precursor, highly crystalline and stoichiometric films were grown at a relatively low deposition temperature of 450 °C. Core level XPS depth profiling studies showed some partial oxidation of the film surface, however this was self-limiting and disappeared on etch profiles. Valence band XPS analysis matched well with the simulated density of state spectrum. Hall effect measurements performed on the films showed that the films were n-type with promising resistivity (3.6 × 10–3 Ω cm) and carrier mobility (410 cm2 V–1 s–1) values despite growth on amorphous glass substrates. PMID:27774150

  17. Energy source for comet outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patashnick, H.; Schuerman, D. W.; Rupprecht, G.

    1974-01-01

    Development of a mechanism explaining the internal source of energy of comet outbursts. A mechanism is proposed which automatically provides a source of particulate matter which creates a huge surface area which contains a substantial percentage of amorphous ice, so that the phase transition of the amorphous ice to a cubic structure provides a release of energy which may be responsible for the outbursts observed in many comets. In addition, the volume into which the transition can propagate is estimated for a spherical comet with a radius of 5 km.

  18. Online bibliographic sources in hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Havener, W. Michael

    2001-01-01

    Traditional commercial bibliographic databases and indexes provide some access to hydrology materials produced by the government; however, these sources do not provide comprehensive coverage of relevant hydrologic publications. This paper discusses bibliographic information available from the federal government and state geological surveys, water resources agencies, and depositories. In addition to information in these databases, the paper describes the scope, styles of citing, subject terminology, and the ways these information sources are currently being searched, formally and informally, by hydrologists. Information available from the federal and state agencies and from the state depositories might be missed by limiting searches to commercially distributed databases.

  19. Monitoring the source monitoring.

    PubMed

    Luna, Karlos; Martín-Luengo, Beatriz

    2013-11-01

    The hypothesis that the retrieval of correct source memory cues, those leading to a correct source attribution, increases confidence, whereas the retrieval of incorrect source memory cues, those leading to a source misattribution, decreases confidence was tested. Four predictions were derived from this hypothesis: (1) confidence should be higher for correct than incorrect source attribution except; (2) when no source cues are retrieved; (3) only the source misattributions inferred from the retrieval of incorrect source cues will be rated with low confidence; and (4) the number of source cues retrieved, either correct or incorrect, will affect the confidence in the source attributions. To test these predictions, participants read two narratives from two witnesses to a bank robbery, a customer and a teller. Then, participants completed a source monitoring test with four alternatives, customer, teller, both, or neither, and rated their confidence in their source attribution. Results supported the first three predictions, but they also suggested that the number of correct source monitoring cues retrieved did not play a role in the monitoring of the accuracy of the source attributions. Attributions made from the recovery of incorrect source cues could be tagged as dubious or uncertain, thus leading to lowered confidence irrespective of the number of incorrect source cues or whether another correct source cue was also recovered. This research has potential applications for eyewitness memory because it shows that confidence can be an indicator of the accuracy of a source attribution. PMID:23553316

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  1. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  2. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  3. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  4. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  5. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  6. [Safety of food additives in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ito, Sumio

    2011-01-01

    Recently, many accidents relating to food happened in Japan. The consumer's distrust for food, food companies, and the administration is increasing. The consumer especially has an extreme refusal feeling for chemicals such as food additives and agricultural chemicals, and begins to request agricultural chemical-free vegetables and food additive-free food. Food companies also state no agricultural chemicals and no food additives to correspond with consumers' request and aim at differentiating. The food additive is that the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare specifies the one that person's health might not be ruined by providing for Food Sanitation Law Article 10 in our country. The standard for food additives and standard for use of food additives are provided according to regulations of Food Sanitation Law Article 11. Therefore, it is thought that the food additive used is safe now. Then, it reports on the procedure and the safety examination, etc. in our country for designation for food additive this time.

  7. 42 CFR 412.115 - Additional payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Payment Systems § 412.115 Additional payments. (a) Bad debts. An additional payment is made to each hospital in accordance with § 413.89 of this chapter for bad debts attributable to deductible...

  8. 42 CFR 412.115 - Additional payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Payment Systems § 412.115 Additional payments. (a) Bad debts. An additional payment is made to each hospital in accordance with § 413.89 of this chapter for bad debts attributable to deductible...

  9. 42 CFR 412.115 - Additional payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Payment Systems § 412.115 Additional payments. (a) Bad debts. An additional payment is made to each hospital in accordance with § 413.89 of this chapter for bad debts attributable to deductible...

  10. Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cavestri, R.C.

    1997-07-01

    Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

  11. NONPOINT SOURCES AND WATER QUALITY TRADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of nonpoint sources (NPS) of nutrients may reduce discharge levels more cost effectively than can additional controls on point sources (PS); water quality trading (WQT), where a PS buys nutrient or sediment reductions from an NPS, may be an alternative means for the PS...

  12. American Folklore: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibbee, Jo

    1989-01-01

    This annotated bibliography represents a core collection of reference sources on American folklore. In addition to general references, genre specific reference sources are listed in the following areas: folk narrative; folk music; customary folklore; material culture; ethnic and regional bibliographies; and applied folklore. (39 references) (CLB)

  13. Source identification and trends in concentrations of gaseous and fine particulate principal species in Seoul, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Choong-Min; Kang, Byung-Wook; Lee, Hak Sung

    2006-07-01

    Ambient measurements were made using two sets of annular denuder system during the four seasons (April 2001 to February 2002) and were then compared with the results during the period of 1996-1997 to estimate the trends and seasonal variations in concentrations of gaseous and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) principal species. Annual averages of gaseous HNO3 and NH3 increased by 11% and 6%, respectively, compared with those of the previous study, whereas HONO and SO2 decreased by 11% and 136%, respectively. The PM2.5 concentration decreased by -17%, 35% for SO4(2-), and 29% for NH4+, whereas NO3- increased by 21%. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were 12.8 and 5.98 microg/m(-3), accounting for -26 and 12% of PM2.5 concentration, respectively. The species studied accounted for 84% of PM2.5 concentration, ranging from 76% in winter to 97% in summer. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis was used to identify possible source areas affecting air pollution levels at a receptor site in Seoul. High possible source areas in concentrations of PM2.5, NO3-, SO4(2-), NH4+, and K+ were coastal cities of Liaoning province (possibly emissions from oil-fired boilers on ocean liners and fishing vessels and industrial emissions), inland areas of Heibei/Shandong provinces (the highest density areas of agricultural production and population) in China, and typical port cities (Mokpo, Yeosu, and Busan) of South Korea. In the PSCF map for OC, high possible source areas were also coastal cities of Liaoning province and inland areas of Heibei/Shandong provinces in China. In contrast, high possible source areas of EC were highlighted in the south of the Yellow Sea, indicating possible emissions from oil-fired boilers on large ships between South Korea and Southeast Asia. In summary, the PSCF results may suggest that air pollution levels in Seoul are affected considerably by long-range transport from external areas, such as the coastal zone in China and other

  14. 17 CFR 230.408 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional information. 230... RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General Requirements § 230.408 Additional information. (a) In addition to the information expressly required to be included in a registration statement,...

  15. 17 CFR 230.408 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional information. 230... RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General Requirements § 230.408 Additional information. (a) In addition to the information expressly required to be included in a registration statement,...

  16. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional information. 25.111 Section 25.111... Applications and Licenses General Application Filing Requirements § 25.111 Additional information. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any time additional information concerning any application, or...

  17. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The... activity to submit additional information....

  18. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional information. 25.111 Section 25.111... Applications and Licenses General Application Filing Requirements § 25.111 Additional information. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any time additional information concerning any application, or...

  19. 10 CFR 725.13 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional information. 725.13 Section 725.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Applications § 725.13 Additional information. The... and before the termination of the permit, require additional information in order to enable the...

  20. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional information. 25.111 Section 25.111... Applications and Licenses General Application Filing Requirements § 25.111 Additional information. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any time additional information concerning any application, or...

  1. 20 CFR 802.215 - Additional briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional briefs. 802.215 Section 802.215 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview Procedures Initial Processing § 802.215 Additional briefs. Additional briefs may be filed or ordered in...

  2. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition...

  3. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition...

  4. 77 FR 53180 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/15/2012 (77 FR 35942-35944) and 6/29/2012 (77 FR 38775-38776), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase from People who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  5. 76 FR 35415 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 4/29/2011 (76 FR 23998), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  6. 78 FR 9386 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/30/2012 (77 FR 71400-71401), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  7. 77 FR 31335 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On March 16, 2012 (77 FR 15736) and March 23, 2012 (77 FR 17035), the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  8. 76 FR 19751 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 1/28/2011 (76 FR 5142-5143), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  9. 75 FR 4784 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/16/2009 (74 FR 58949-58950), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  10. 76 FR 23997 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 2/25/2011 (76 FR 10571), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  11. 75 FR 22745 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 10/23/2009 (74 FR 54783-54784) and 3/5/2010 (75 FR 10223-10224), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  12. 77 FR 71400 - Procurement List, Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 8/24/2012 (77 FR 51522-51523) and 10/5/2012 (77 FR 60969), the Committee... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List, Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  13. 75 FR 72815 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/4/2010 (75 FR 31768-31769) and 10/1/2010 (75 FR 60739-60740), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  14. 77 FR 59595 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 7/9/2012 (77 FR 40344-40345) and 7/20/2012 (77 FR 42701-42702), the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  15. 77 FR 34025 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... INFORMATION: ] Addition On 4/132012 (77 FR 22289-22290), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  16. 78 FR 2378 - Procurement List, Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/9/2012 (77 FR 67343-67344), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List, Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  17. 76 FR 54741 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 7/8/2011 (76 FR 40342-40343), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  18. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  19. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  20. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  1. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  2. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  3. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  4. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  5. 7 CFR 1944.686 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.686 Section 1944.686...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.686 Additional grants. An additional HPG grant may be made when the grantee has achieved or nearly achieved the goals established...

  6. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  7. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  8. 7 CFR 1944.686 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.686 Section 1944.686...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.686 Additional grants. An additional HPG grant may be made when the grantee has achieved or nearly achieved the goals established...

  9. 24 CFR 964.410 - Additional definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Additional definitions. 964.410... Additional definitions. The following additional definitions apply to this subpart only: Directly assisted... assisted by a public housing agency; (2) Whose name appears on the lease; and (3) Is eighteen years of...

  10. 24 CFR 964.410 - Additional definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Additional definitions. 964.410... Additional definitions. The following additional definitions apply to this subpart only: Directly assisted... assisted by a public housing agency; (2) Whose name appears on the lease; and (3) Is eighteen years of...

  11. 24 CFR 964.410 - Additional definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional definitions. 964.410... Additional definitions. The following additional definitions apply to this subpart only: Directly assisted... assisted by a public housing agency; (2) Whose name appears on the lease; and (3) Is eighteen years of...

  12. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition to those established in...

  13. 44 CFR 6.81 - Additional copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional copies. 6.81... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Fees § 6.81 Additional copies. A reasonable number of additional copies shall be provided for the applicable fee to a requestor who...

  14. 75 FR 18651 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Additional Sources of Fluorinated GHGs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ..., and be free of any defects or viruses. Docket: All documents in the docket are listed in the http..., 2009 and published in the Federal Register on October 30, 2009 (74 FR 56260). The Final MRR, which... in the initial proposed rule (74 FR 16448, April 10, 2009), CAA section 114(a)(1) authorizes...

  15. 75 FR 74773 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Additional Sources of Fluorinated GHGs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... Manufacturing......... General Stationary Fuel Combustion. Fluorinated Gas Production........ General Stationary Fuel Combustion Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases. Electrical Equipment Use General Stationary Fuel Combustion. Imports and Exports of Fluorinated Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse GHGs Inside...

  16. The Linguistic Landscape as an Additional Source of Input in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cenoz, Jasone; Gorter, Durk

    2008-01-01

    In this article we explore the role that the linguistic landscape, in the sense of all the written language in the public space, can have in second language acquisition (SLA). The linguistic landscape has symbolic and informative functions and it is multimodal, because it combines visual and printed texts, and multilingual, because it uses several…

  17. 36 CFR 1290.3 - Sources of assassination records and additional records and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION JFK ASSASSINATION RECORDS GUIDANCE FOR INTERPRETATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION RECORDS COLLECTION ACT OF 1992 (JFK ACT) §...

  18. 36 CFR 1290.3 - Sources of assassination records and additional records and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION JFK ASSASSINATION RECORDS GUIDANCE FOR INTERPRETATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION RECORDS COLLECTION ACT OF 1992 (JFK ACT) §...

  19. 36 CFR 1290.3 - Sources of assassination records and additional records and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION JFK ASSASSINATION RECORDS GUIDANCE FOR INTERPRETATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION RECORDS COLLECTION ACT OF 1992 (JFK ACT) §...

  20. Temporal dark adaptation to spatially complex backgrounds: effect of an additional light source.

    PubMed

    Stokkermans, M G M; Heynderickx, I E J

    2014-07-01

    Visual adaptation (and especially dark adaptation) has been studied extensively in the past, however, mainly addressing adaptation to fully dark backgrounds. At this stage, it is unclear whether these results are not too simple to be applied to complex situations, such as predicting adaptation of a motorist driving at night. To fill this gap we set up a study investigating how spatially complex backgrounds influence temporal dark adaptation. Our results showed that dark adaptation to spatially complex backgrounds leads to much longer adaptation times than dark adaptation to spatially uniform backgrounds. We conclude therefore that the adaptation models based on past studies overestimate the visual system's sensitivity to detect luminance variations in spatially complex environments. Our results also showed large variations in adaptation times when varying the degree of spatial complexity of the background. Hence, we may conclude that it is important to take into account models that are based on spatially complex backgrounds when predicting dark adaptation for complex environments.

  1. 76 FR 36339 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Additional Sources of Fluorinated GHGs: Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Regulations EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency FR Federal Register GHG greenhouse gas mm millimeters...: Electronics Manufacturing of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule on December 1, 2010 (75 FR 74774). This subpart... Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) and, therefore, not subject to review under Executive...

  2. Mobile hard substrata - An additional biodiversity source in a high latitude shallow subtidal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazy, Piotr; Kuklinski, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    This study demonstrates the importance of a hard mobile substratum (hermit crab shells) for Arctic biodiversity. Based on previous observations from other geographic regions we hypothesized that this niche at high latitudes would support a higher biodiversity of epifauna than might be predicted from similar substrata. We test whether the hermit crab epifauna is specific to that substratum providing unique biodiversity components to the local community. From four study sites in Isfjorden (78°N), West Spitsbergen and two study sites in Northern Norway (69°N) we collected approximately 50 each of hermit crabs, gastropods and pebbles, of visually similar surface area using SCUBA diving. Hermit crab shells were colonized by a larger number of epifaunal species than either gastropods or pebbles, even when they were of a larger size. Among 87 taxa found on all the three substrata, 22 occurred only on hermit crab shells. Except for two study sites hermit crab shells also supported more individuals. This study shows that the contribution of shells carried by hermit crabs to high-latitude, shallow-subtidal diversity is higher than might be predicted by their surface area alone and that hermit crabs modify, maintain and create a unique habitat. This is the result of a number of factors interacting positively on the presence of epifauna including shell surface heterogeneity and the complex influence of the crab host.

  3. Addition of dietary fiber sources to shakes reduces postprandial glycemia and alters food intake.

    PubMed

    Galvão Cândido, Flávia; Silva Ton, Winder Tadeu; Gonçalves Alfenas, Rita de Cássia

    2014-09-15

    Introducción: Obesidad y diabetes de tipo 2 pueden ser controlados por alimentos capaces de modular la ingesta de alimentos y la glucemia. Objetivos: Se investigó si la adición de alimentos fuentes de fibra o fasolamina a batidos puede controlar la ingesta de alimentos y reducir la glucemia posprandial. Métodos: Estudio aleatorizado, simple ciego, de diseño cruzado (ingesta de alimentos:n=22; glucemia:n=10). Cinco batidos con cantidades similares de macronutrientes (C - control batido, SA - salvado de avena batido, L - linaza batido, FB - extracto de frijol blanco batido y PI - harina de plátano no maduro batido) fueron consumidos en cinco días no consecutivos. Las participantes registraron la ingesta de alimentos en las 24 horas subsiguientes. La glucosa en sangre se midió a 0 (inmediatamente antes), 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 y 120 minutos después de la ingestión de cada batido y se calcularon las áreas incrementales bajo las curvas (AIBC). Resultados: En comparación a C, hubo un aumento significativo en la ingesta de fibra después de que el consumo de SA(+17,9g), SL(+19,1g), y PI(+12,6g), y en la grasa después del consumo de SA(+25,4g). Se encontró una reducción no significativa de la ingesta diaria de energía en L (1524kJ, P=0,10) en comparación con C. Hubo una reducción del 43% en el AIBC (P=0,03) en respuesta al consumo PI. Conclusiones: Harina de plátano no maduro reduce la respuesta glucémica posprandial de batidos casi a la mitad. El efecto de salvado de avena y linaza en la ingesta de alimentos requiere mayor investigación en estudios a largo plazo.

  4. 36 CFR 1290.3 - Sources of assassination records and additional records and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... service with a government agency, office, or entity; (f) Persons, including individuals and corporations... Government; (b) Agencies, offices, and entities of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of state and local governments; (c) Record repositories and archives of Federal, state, and local...

  5. 36 CFR 1290.3 - Sources of assassination records and additional records and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... service with a government agency, office, or entity; (f) Persons, including individuals and corporations... Government; (b) Agencies, offices, and entities of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of state and local governments; (c) Record repositories and archives of Federal, state, and local...

  6. 40 CFR 427.86 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Asbestos Textiles Subcategory § 427.86 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  7. 40 CFR 408.276 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Oyster Processing Subcategory § 408.276 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  8. 40 CFR 408.276 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Oyster Processing Subcategory § 408.276 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  9. 40 CFR 408.276 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Oyster Processing Subcategory § 408.276 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  10. 40 CFR 408.276 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Oyster Processing Subcategory § 408.276 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  11. 40 CFR 408.276 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Oyster Processing Subcategory § 408.276 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  12. 40 CFR 443.16 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard...) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.16 Pretreatment standards for new sources....

  13. 40 CFR 443.16 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard...) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.16 Pretreatment standards for new sources....

  14. 40 CFR 417.54 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Distillation Subcategory § 417.54 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source subject...

  15. 40 CFR 417.54 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Distillation Subcategory § 417.54 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source subject...

  16. 40 CFR 417.54 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Distillation Subcategory § 417.54 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source subject...

  17. 40 CFR 417.54 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Distillation Subcategory § 417.54 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source subject...

  18. 40 CFR 417.54 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Distillation Subcategory § 417.54 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source subject...

  19. 21 CFR 640.22 - Collection of source material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Platelets § 640.22 Collection of source material. (a) Whole blood used as the source of Platelets shall be collected as prescribed in § 640.4....

  20. 21 CFR 640.22 - Collection of source material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Platelets § 640.22 Collection of source material. (a) Whole blood used as the source of Platelets shall be collected as prescribed in § 640.4....

  1. 21 CFR 640.22 - Collection of source material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Platelets § 640.22 Collection of source material. (a) Whole blood used as the source of Platelets shall be collected as prescribed in § 640.4....

  2. 21 CFR 640.22 - Collection of source material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Platelets § 640.22 Collection of source material. (a) Whole blood used as the source of Platelets shall be collected as prescribed in § 640.4....

  3. 40 CFR 407.14 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.14 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source... works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes...

  4. 40 CFR 407.14 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.14 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source... works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes...

  5. 40 CFR 407.14 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.14 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source... works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes...

  6. 40 CFR 407.14 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.14 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source... works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes...

  7. 40 CFR 407.14 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Apple Juice Subcategory § 407.14 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source... works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes...

  8. 40 CFR 408.166 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.166 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  9. 40 CFR 408.196 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.196 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  10. 40 CFR 408.176 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.176 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  11. 40 CFR 408.166 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.166 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  12. 40 CFR 408.176 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.176 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  13. 40 CFR 408.196 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.196 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  14. 40 CFR 408.176 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.176 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  15. 40 CFR 408.166 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.166 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  16. 40 CFR 408.166 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.166 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  17. 40 CFR 408.196 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.196 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  18. 40 CFR 408.196 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.196 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  19. 40 CFR 408.176 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.176 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  20. 40 CFR 408.176 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.176 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  1. 40 CFR 408.196 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.196 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  2. 40 CFR 408.166 - Pretreatment standards for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the quantity or... Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.166 Pretreatment standards for new sources. Any new source subject...

  3. 40 CFR 443.26 - Pretreatment standard for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard...) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.26 Pretreatment standard for new sources....

  4. 40 CFR 443.26 - Pretreatment standard for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard...) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.26 Pretreatment standard for new sources....

  5. 40 CFR 443.26 - Pretreatment standard for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard...) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.26 Pretreatment standard for new sources....

  6. 40 CFR 443.26 - Pretreatment standard for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard...) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.26 Pretreatment standard for new sources....

  7. 40 CFR 443.26 - Pretreatment standard for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard...) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Concrete Subcategory § 443.26 Pretreatment standard for new sources....

  8. Source apportionment with site specific source profiles.

    PubMed

    Glover, D M; Hopke, P K; Vermette, S J; Landsberger, S; D'Auben, D R

    1991-03-01

    A receptor modeling study was performed to identify and apportion the sources of PM10 mass in Granite City, Illinois, an area of historic TSP nonattainment. Samples of the ambient aerosol were collected using a dichotomous sampler. Each sample was analyzed by x-ray fluorescence and instrumental neutron activation analysis. To begin the study, a factor analysis was performed. Two different chemical mass balance (CMB) analyses were then made. The first CMB analysis used only source profiles available from the literature while the second included twelve source profiles developed from dust samples collected in Granite City. Both CMB analyses used 20 of the 33 analyzed elements since many of the source profiles in the literature did not include the other thirteen elements. The results from both sets of CMB analyses were grouped by the predominate wind direction at the site during the time each sample was taken to identify the direction of each source relative to the sampler. It was found that regional sources were the primary contributors to the fine fraction while the coarse fraction was composed of material from local industries. These sources were generally the ones identified during the Regional Air Pollution Study previously conducted in the area. However, the emission profiles from these sources were observed to have changed between the studies. It was also found that the use of the locally generated profiles greatly improved the results of the CMB analysis.

  9. Compact portable electric power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.N.; Holcomb, D.E.; Munro, J.K.; Oakes, L.C.; Matson, M.J.

    1997-02-01

    This report provides an overview of recent advances in portable electric power source (PEPS) technology and an assessment of emerging PEPS technologies that may meet US Special Operations Command`s (SOCOM) needs in the next 1--2- and 3--5-year time frames. The assessment was performed through a literature search and interviews with experts in various laboratories and companies. Nineteen PEPS technologies were reviewed and characterized as (1) PEPSs that meet SOCOM requirements; (2) PEPSs that could fulfill requirements for special field conditions and locations; (3) potentially high-payoff sources that require additional R and D; and (4) sources unlikely to meet present SOCOM requirements. 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. LISA source confusion

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, Jeff; Cornish, Neil J.

    2004-10-15

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna will detect thousands of gravitational wave sources. Many of these sources will be overlapping in the sense that their signals will have a nonzero cross correlation. Such overlaps lead to source confusion, which adversely affects how well we can extract information about the individual sources. Here we study how source confusion impacts parameter estimation for galactic compact binaries, with emphasis on the effects of the number of overlaping sources, the time of observation, the gravitational wave frequencies of the sources, and the degree of the signal correlations. Our main findings are that the parameter resolution decays exponentially with the number of overlapping sources and superexponentially with the degree of cross correlation. We also find that an extended mission lifetime is key to disentangling the source confusion as the parameter resolution for overlapping sources improves much faster than the usual square root of the observation time.

  11. Anomaly metrics to differentiate threat sources from benign sources in primary vehicle screening.

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Israel Dov; Mengesha, Wondwosen

    2011-09-01

    Discrimination of benign sources from threat sources at Port of Entries (POE) is of a great importance in efficient screening of cargo and vehicles using Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM). Currently RPM's ability to distinguish these radiological sources is seriously hampered by the energy resolution of the deployed RPMs. As naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are ubiquitous in commerce, false alarms are problematic as they require additional resources in secondary inspection in addition to impacts on commerce. To increase the sensitivity of such detection systems without increasing false alarm rates, alarm metrics need to incorporate the ability to distinguish benign and threat sources. Principal component analysis (PCA) and clustering technique were implemented in the present study. Such techniques were investigated for their potential to lower false alarm rates and/or increase sensitivity to weaker threat sources without loss of specificity. Results of the investigation demonstrated improved sensitivity and specificity in discriminating benign sources from threat sources.

  12. Modeling Frequency Comb Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Yuan, Jinhui; Kang, Zhe; Li, Qian; Wai, P. K. A.

    2016-06-01

    Frequency comb sources have revolutionized metrology and spectroscopy and found applications in many fields. Stable, low-cost, high-quality frequency comb sources are important to these applications. Modeling of the frequency comb sources will help the understanding of the operation mechanism and optimization of the design of such sources. In this paper,we review the theoretical models used and recent progress of the modeling of frequency comb sources.

  13. 78 FR 77105 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... Defense, National Geospatial- Intelligence Agency, Arnold, MO Barry S. Lineback, Director, Business... Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, NGA Campus West, 3200 S 2nd Street, St. Louis, MO NPAs: ServiceSource,...

  14. Cincinnati Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-03-04

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) to demonstrate Big Area Additive Manufacturing which increases the speed of the additive manufacturing (AM) process by over 1000X, increases the size of parts by over 10X and shows a cost reduction of over 100X. ORNL worked with CI to transition the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology from a proof-of-principle (TRL 2-3) demonstration to a prototype product stage (TRL 7-8).

  15. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  16. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  17. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  18. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  19. 42 CFR 57.217 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.217 Additional conditions. The Secretary may with respect to any agreement entered into...

  20. Allergic and immunologic reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, Fatih; Doguc, Duygu Kumbul

    2013-08-01

    For centuries, food additives have been used for flavouring, colouring and extension of the useful shelf life of food, as well as the promotion of food safety. During the last 20 years, the studies implicating the additives contained in foods and medicine as a causative factor of allergic reactions have been proliferated considerably. In this review, we aimed to overview all of the food additives which were approved to consume in EU and find out how common and serious allergic reactions come into existence following the consuming of food additives.