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  1. Goal-directed and transfer-cue-elicited drug-seeking are dissociated by pharmacotherapy: evidence for independent additive controllers.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Lee

    2012-07-01

    According to contemporary learning theory, drug-seeking behavior reflects the summation of 2 dissociable controllers. Whereas goal-directed drug-seeking is determined by the expected current incentive value of the drug, stimulus-elicited drug-seeking is determined by the expected probability of the drug independently of its current incentive value, and these 2 controllers contribute additively to observed drug-seeking. One applied prediction of this model is that smoking cessation pharmacotherapies selectively attenuate tonic but not cue-elicited craving because they downgrade the expected incentive value of the drug but leave expected probability intact. To test this, the current study examined whether nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) nasal spray would modify goal-directed tobacco choice in a human outcome devaluation procedure, but leave cue-elicited tobacco choice in a Pavlovian to instrumental transfer (PIT) procedure intact. Smokers (N= 96) first underwent concurrent choice training in which 2 responses earned tobacco or chocolate points, respectively. Participants then ingested either NRT nasal spray (1 mg) or chocolate (147 g) to devalue 1 outcome. Concurrent choice was then tested again in extinction to measure goal-directed control of choice, and in a PIT test to measure the extent to which tobacco and chocolate stimuli enhanced choice of the same outcome. It was found that NRT modified tobacco choice in the extinction test but not the extent to which the tobacco stimulus enhanced choice of the tobacco outcome in the PIT test. This dissociation suggests that the propensity to engage in drug-seeking is determined independently by the expected value and probability of the drug, and that pharmacotherapy has partial efficacy because it selectively effects expected drug value.

  2. Field Independence: Reviewing the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Carol; Richardson, John T. E.; Waring, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: The construct of ?eld independence (FI) remains one of the most widely cited notions in research on cognitive style and on learning and instruction more generally. However, a great deal of confusion continues to exist around the de?nition of FI, its measurement, and the interpretation of research results, all of which have served to…

  3. Evidence for an Independent Syndrome of Hyperactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trites, R. L.; Laprade, K.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a factor analysis of the Conners Teacher Rating Scales for over 9,000 children provided preliminary evidence that hyperactivity and an aggressive conduct disorder can exist independently in children. (RH)

  4. Depression and Pain: Independent and Additive Relationships to Anger Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Naval Health Research Center Depression and Pain : Independent and Additive Relationships to Anger Expression Marcus K. Taylor Gerald E...AND SUBTITLE Depression and Pain : Independent and Additive Relationships to Anger Expression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...expression are understudied. OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to examine the independent and additive relationships of depression and pain to anger

  5. Evidence for two independent domestications of cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, R T; MacHugh, D E; Bradley, D G; Sharp, P M; Cunningham, P

    1994-01-01

    The origin and taxonomic status of domesticated cattle are controversial. Zebu and taurine breeds are differentiated primarily by the presence or absence of a hump and have been recognized as separate species (Bos indicus and Bos taurus). However, the most widely held view is that both types of cattle derive from a single domestication event 8000-10,000 years ago. We have examined mtDNA sequences from representatives of six European (taurine) breeds, three Indian (zebu) breeds, and four African (three zebu, one taurine) breeds. Similar levels of average sequence divergence were observed among animals within each of the major continental groups: 0.41% (European), 0.38% (African), and 0.42% (Indian). However, the sequences fell into two very distinct geographic lineages that do not correspond with the taurine-zebu dichotomy: all European and African breeds are in one lineage, and all Indian breeds are in the other. There was little indication of breed clustering within either lineage. Application of a molecular clock suggests that the two major mtDNA clades diverged at least 200,000, and possibly as much as 1 million, years ago. This relatively large divergence is interpreted most simply as evidence for two separate domestication events, presumably of different subspecies of the aurochs, Bos primigenius. The clustering of all African zebu mtDNA sequences within the taurine lineage is attributed to ancestral crossbreeding with the earlier B. taurus inhabitants of the continent. Images PMID:8146187

  6. ADHD and dyscalculia: Evidence for independent familial transmission.

    PubMed

    Monuteaux, Michael C; Faraone, Stephen V; Herzig, Kathleen; Navsaria, Neha; Biederman, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The familial relationship between dyscalculia and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was assessed. We conducted a familial risk analysis using probands with and without ADHD of both genders and their first-degree relatives. Participants were assessed with structured diagnostic interviews and a cognitive test battery. We found elevated rates of ADHD in relatives of both ADHD proband groups, regardless of dyscalculia status, and elevated rates of dyscalculia in relatives of probands with dyscalculia, irrespective of ADHD status. There was no evidence for cosegregation or assortative mating. Our findings support the hypothesis that ADHD and dyscalculia are independently transmitted in families and are etiologically distinct. These results reinforce the current nosological approach to these disorders and underscore the need for separate identification and treatment strategies for children with both conditions.

  7. Is there evidence for additional neutrino species from cosmology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Verde, Licia

    2013-04-01

    It has been suggested that recent cosmological and flavor-oscillation data favor the existence of additional neutrino species beyond the three predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. We apply Bayesian model selection to determine whether there is indeed any evidence from current cosmological datasets for the standard cosmological model to be extended to include additional neutrino flavors. The datasets employed include cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization and lensing power spectra, and measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale and the Hubble constant. We also consider other extensions to the standard neutrino model, such as massive neutrinos, and possible degeneracies with other cosmological parameters. The Bayesian evidence indicates that current cosmological data do not require any non-standard neutrino properties.

  8. 10 CFR 431.174 - Additional requirements applicable to Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional requirements applicable to Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants. 431.174 Section 431.174 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Provisions...

  9. 10 CFR 431.175 - Additional requirements applicable to non-Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... represented value of energy usage is no less than the greater of the mean of the sample, or the upper 95... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional requirements applicable to non-Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants. 431.175 Section 431.175 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  10. ERP Evidence of Hemispheric Independence in Visual Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemrodov, Dan; Harpaz, Yuval; Javitt, Daniel C.; Lavidor, Michal

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the capability of the left hemisphere (LH) and the right hemisphere (RH) to perform a visual recognition task independently as formulated by the Direct Access Model (Fernandino, Iacoboni, & Zaidel, 2007). Healthy native Hebrew speakers were asked to categorize nouns and non-words (created from nouns by transposing two middle…

  11. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  12. Evidence for Multiple Mediator Complexes in Yeast Independently Recruited by Activated Heat Shock Factor

    PubMed Central

    Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Moustafa, Yara W.; Chowdhary, Surabhi; Kainth, Amoldeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is an evolutionarily conserved coactivator complex essential for RNA polymerase II transcription. Although it has been generally assumed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator is a stable trimodular complex, its structural state in vivo remains unclear. Using the “anchor away” (AA) technique to conditionally deplete select subunits within Mediator and its reversibly associated Cdk8 kinase module (CKM), we provide evidence that Mediator's tail module is highly dynamic and that a subcomplex consisting of Med2, Med3, and Med15 can be independently recruited to the regulatory regions of heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1)-activated genes. Fluorescence microscopy of a scaffold subunit (Med14)-anchored strain confirmed parallel cytoplasmic sequestration of core subunits located outside the tail triad. In addition, and contrary to current models, we provide evidence that Hsf1 can recruit the CKM independently of core Mediator and that core Mediator has a role in regulating postinitiation events. Collectively, our results suggest that yeast Mediator is not monolithic but potentially has a dynamic complexity heretofore unappreciated. Multiple species, including CKM-Mediator, the 21-subunit core complex, the Med2-Med3-Med15 tail triad, and the four-subunit CKM, can be independently recruited by activated Hsf1 to its target genes in AA strains. PMID:27185874

  13. Sex Roles and Eating Disorders: Evidence for Two Independent Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdue, Lauren

    Because such eating disorders as anorexia and bulimia have been found to be more common in women than in men, much recent research on these disorders has examined their relationship to gender roles. Some evidence exists supporting the existence of two types of eating disorders; one associated with stereotypically feminine concerns, the other…

  14. Evidence for an independent third Usutu virus introduction into Germany.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Ute; Fast, Christine; Eiden, Martin; Bock, Sabine; Schulze, Christoph; Hoeper, Dirk; Ochs, Andreas; Schlieben, Patricia; Keller, Markus; Zielke, Dorothee E; Luehken, Renke; Cadar, Daniel; Walther, Doreen; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Groschup, Martin H

    2016-08-30

    Usutu virus (USUV) is an arbovirus within the genus flavivirus, which was first introduced to Southern Europe approximately twenty years ago causing epizootics among wild and captive birds. In Germany USUV was initially discovered in wild birds, mainly Common blackbirds (Turdus merula), in the Upper Rhine valley in southwest of the country in 2011 and has not spread much northwards since. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the still ongoing USUV epidemic is caused by two different USUV strains, USUV-Germany belonging to the USUV Europe 3 lineage and USUV-Bonn belonging to the USUV Africa 3 lineage. The two strains were introduced independently. In August 2015 a new USUV strain, named USUV-Berlin, was isolated in Vero cells from two carcasses of juvenile Great grey owls (Strix nebulosa) kept in the Zoological Garden Berlin, which had suffered from a hyperacute fatal systemic infection. Both owls carried high USUV genome loads. Full-length USUV genomes sequences were determined and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a close relationship with a Spanish mosquito-derived sequence from 2006. Immunohistochemical antigen detection in organ samples of the owls showed the typical USUV infection patterns. According to the phylogenetic analysis, USUV-Berlin belongs to the Africa 2 lineage, and can thus be distinguished from the other strains circulating in Germany. Repeated findings of different USUV strains suggest more frequent introductions into Central Europe and a higher mobility of this virus than assumed to date.

  15. Evidence for a Cultural Influence on Field-Independence in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Hwan Cui; Milne, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Field-independence, or weak central coherence, is a recognised phenotype of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). There is also evidence of cultural variation in this perceptual style, as neurotypical individuals from Western nations are more field-independent than neurotypical individuals from East-Asian nations. The majority of research on perceptual…

  16. Independent and additive effects of glutamic acid and methionine on yeast longevity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    It is established that glucose restriction extends yeast chronological and replicative lifespan, but little is known about the influence of amino acids on yeast lifespan, although some amino acids were reported to delay aging in rodents. Here we show that amino acid composition greatly alters yeast chronological lifespan. We found that non-essential amino acids (to yeast) methionine and glutamic acid had the most significant impact on yeast chronological lifespan extension, restriction of methionine and/or increase of glutamic acid led to longevity that was not the result of low acetic acid production and acidification in aging media. Remarkably, low methionine, high glutamic acid and glucose restriction additively and independently extended yeast lifespan, which could not be further extended by buffering the medium (pH 6.0). Our preliminary findings using yeasts with gene deletion demonstrate that glutamic acid addition, methionine and glucose restriction prompt yeast longevity through distinct mechanisms. This study may help to fill a gap in yeast model for the fast developing view that nutrient balance is a critical factor to extend lifespan.

  17. Independent and Additive Effects of Glutamic Acid and Methionine on Yeast Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    It is established that glucose restriction extends yeast chronological and replicative lifespan, but little is known about the influence of amino acids on yeast lifespan, although some amino acids were reported to delay aging in rodents. Here we show that amino acid composition greatly alters yeast chronological lifespan. We found that non-essential amino acids (to yeast) methionine and glutamic acid had the most significant impact on yeast chronological lifespan extension, restriction of methionine and/or increase of glutamic acid led to longevity that was not the result of low acetic acid production and acidification in aging media. Remarkably, low methionine, high glutamic acid and glucose restriction additively and independently extended yeast lifespan, which could not be further extended by buffering the medium (pH 6.0). Our preliminary findings using yeasts with gene deletion demonstrate that glutamic acid addition, methionine and glucose restriction prompt yeast longevity through distinct mechanisms. This study may help to fill a gap in yeast model for the fast developing view that nutrient balance is a critical factor to extend lifespan. PMID:24244480

  18. The Use of Additional GPS Frequencies to Independently Determine Tropospheric Water Vapor Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.M.; Feng, D.; Flittner, D. E.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the currently employed L1 and L2 GPS/MET frequencies (1.2 - 1.6) Ghz) do not allow for the separation of water vapor and density (or temperature) from active microwave occultation measurements in regions of the troposphere warmer than 240 K Therefore, additional information must be used, from other types of measurements and weather analyses, to recover water vapor (and temperature) profiles. Thus in data sparse regions, these inferred profiles can be subject to larger errors than would result in data rich regions. The use of properly selected additional GPS frequencies enables a direct, independent measurement of the absorption associated with the water vapor profile, which may then be used in the standard GPS/MET retrievals to obtain a more accurate determination of atmospheric temperature throughout the water vapor layer. This study looks at the use of microwave crosslinks in the region of the 22 Ghz water vapor absorption line for this purpose. An added advantage of using 22 Ghz frequencies is that they are only negligibly affected by the ionosphere in contrast to the large effect at the GPS frequencies. The retrieval algorithm uses both amplitude and phase measurements to obtain profiles of atmospheric pressure, temperature and water water vapor pressure with a vertical resolution of 1 km or better. This technique also provides the cloud liquid water content along the ray path, which is in itself an important element in climate monitoring. Advantages of this method include the ability to make measurements in the presence of clouds and the use of techniques and technology proven through the GPS/MET experiment and several of NASA's planetary exploration missions. Simulations demonstrating this method will be presented for both clear and cloudy sky conditions.

  19. Schizophrenia risk variants modulate white matter volume across the psychosis spectrum: Evidence from two independent cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Lancaster, Thomas M.; Knöchel, Christian; Stäblein, Michael; Storchak, Helena; Reinke, Britta; Jurcoane, Alina; Kniep, Jonathan; Prvulovic, David; Mantripragada, Kiran; Tansey, Katherine E.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Linden, David E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Polygenic risk scores, based on risk variants identified in genome-wide-association-studies (GWAS), explain a considerable portion of the heritability for schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). However, little is known about the combined effects of these variants, although polygenic neuroimaging has developed into a powerful tool of translational neuroscience. In this study, we used genome wide significant SZ risk variants to test the predictive capacity of the polygenic model and explored potential associations with white matter volume, a key candidate in imaging phenotype for psychotic disorders. By calculating the combined additive schizophrenia risk of seven SNPs (significant hits from a recent schizophrenia GWAS study), we show that increased additive genetic risk for SZ was associated with reduced white matter volume in a group of participants (n = 94) consisting of healthy individuals, SZ first-degree relatives, SZ patients and BD patients. This effect was also seen in a second independent sample of healthy individuals (n = 89). We suggest that a moderate portion of variance (~4%) of white matter volume can be explained by the seven hits from the recent schizophrenia GWAS. These results provide evidence for associations between cumulative genetic risk for schizophrenia and intermediate neuroimaging phenotypes in models of psychosis. Our work contributes to a growing body of literature suggesting that polygenic risk may help to explain white matter alterations associated with familial risk for psychosis. PMID:25844328

  20. Additional role of O-acetylserine as a sulfur status-independent regulator during plant growth.

    PubMed

    Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Klie, Sebastian; Caldana, Camila; Degenkolbe, Thomas; Willmitzer, Lothar; Hoefgen, Rainer

    2012-05-01

    O-acetylserine (OAS) is one of the most prominent metabolites whose levels are altered upon sulfur starvation. However, its putative role as a signaling molecule in higher plants is controversial. This paper provides further evidence that OAS is a signaling molecule, based on computational analysis of time-series experiments and on studies of transgenic plants conditionally displaying increased OAS levels. Transcripts whose levels correlated with the transient and specific increase in OAS levels observed in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants 5-10 min after transfer to darkness and with diurnal oscillation of the OAS content, showing a characteristic peak during the night, were identified. Induction of a serine-O-acetyltransferase gene (SERAT) in transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing the genes under the control of an inducible promoter resulted in a specific time-dependent increase in OAS levels. Monitoring the transcriptome response at time points at which no changes in sulfur-related metabolites except OAS were observed and correlating this with the light/dark transition and diurnal experiments resulted in identification of six genes whose expression was highly correlated with that of OAS (adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase 3, sulfur-deficiency-induced 1, sulfur-deficiency-induced 2, low-sulfur-induced 1, serine hydroxymethyltransferase 7 and ChaC-like protein). These data suggest that OAS displays a signalling function leading to changes in transcript levels of a specific gene set irrespective of the sulfur status of the plant. Additionally, a role for OAS in a specific part of the sulfate response can be deduced.

  1. Brief Report: An Independent Replication and Extension of Psychometric Evidence Supporting the Theory of Mind Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Kathryn J.; Coggins, Truman E.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an independent replication and extension of psychometric evidence supporting the "Theory of Mind Inventory" ("ToMI"). Parents of 20 children with ASD (4; 1-6; 7 years; months) and 20 with typical development (3; 1-6; 5), rated their child's theory of mind abilities in everyday situations. Other parent report…

  2. Further evidence for microtubule-independent dimerization of TPPP/p25

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, J.; Szénási, T.; Szunyogh, S.; Szabó, A.; Lehotzky, A.; Ovádi, J.

    2017-01-01

    Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Protein (TPPP/p25) is a brain-specific disordered protein that modulates the dynamics and stability of the microtubule network by its assembly promoting, cross-linking and acetylation enhancing activities. In normal brain it is expressed primarily in differentiated oligodendrocytes; however, at pathological conditions it is enriched in inclusions of both neurons and oligodendrocytes characteristic for Parkinson’s disease and multiple system atrophy, respectively. The objective of this paper is to highlight a critical point of a recently published Skoufias’s paper in which the crucial role of the microtubules in TPPP/p25 dimerization leading to microtubule bundling was suggested. However, our previous and present data provide evidence for the microtubule-independent dimerization of TPPP/p25 and its stabilization by disulphide bridges. In addition, our bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments revealed the dimerization ability of both the full length and the terminal-free (CORE) TPPP/p25 forms, however, while TPPP/p25 aligned along the bundled microtubule network, the associated CORE segments distributed mostly homogeneously within the cytosol. Now, we identified a molecular model from the possible ones suggested in the Skoufias’s paper that could be responsible for stabilization of the microtubule network in the course of the oligodendrocyte differentiation, consequently in the constitution of the myelin sheath. PMID:28074911

  3. The independence of expression and identity in face-processing: evidence from neuropsychological case studies

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Sarah; Bennetts, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The processing of facial identity and facial expression have traditionally been seen as independent—a hypothesis that has largely been informed by a key double dissociation between neurological patients with a deficit in facial identity recognition but not facial expression recognition, and those with the reverse pattern of impairment. The independence hypothesis is also reflected in more recent anatomical models of face-processing, although these theories permit some interaction between the two processes. Given that much of the traditional patient-based evidence has been criticized, a review of more recent case reports that are accompanied by neuroimaging data is timely. Further, the performance of individuals with developmental face-processing deficits has recently been considered with regard to the independence debate. This paper reviews evidence from both acquired and developmental disorders, identifying methodological and theoretical strengths and caveats in these reports, and highlighting pertinent avenues for future research. PMID:26106348

  4. Nitrogen addition and warming independently influence the belowground micro-food web in a temperate steppe.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Bai, Huahua; Liang, Wenju; Xia, Jianyang; Wan, Shiqiang; van der Putten, Wim H

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition are known to influence ecosystem structure and functioning. However, our understanding of the interactive effect of these global changes on ecosystem functioning is relatively limited, especially when it concerns the responses of soils and soil organisms. We conducted a field experiment to study the interactive effects of warming and N addition on soil food web. The experiment was established in 2006 in a temperate steppe in northern China. After three to four years (2009-2010), we found that N addition positively affected microbial biomass and negatively influenced trophic group and ecological indices of soil nematodes. However, the warming effects were less obvious, only fungal PLFA showed a decreasing trend under warming. Interestingly, the influence of N addition did not depend on warming. Structural equation modeling analysis suggested that the direct pathway between N addition and soil food web components were more important than the indirect connections through alterations in soil abiotic characters or plant growth. Nitrogen enrichment also affected the soil nematode community indirectly through changes in soil pH and PLFA. We conclude that experimental warming influenced soil food web components of the temperate steppe less than N addition, and there was little influence of warming on N addition effects under these experimental conditions.

  5. Nitrogen Addition and Warming Independently Influence the Belowground Micro-Food Web in a Temperate Steppe

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Bai, Huahua; Liang, Wenju; Xia, Jianyang; Wan, Shiqiang; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition are known to influence ecosystem structure and functioning. However, our understanding of the interactive effect of these global changes on ecosystem functioning is relatively limited, especially when it concerns the responses of soils and soil organisms. We conducted a field experiment to study the interactive effects of warming and N addition on soil food web. The experiment was established in 2006 in a temperate steppe in northern China. After three to four years (2009–2010), we found that N addition positively affected microbial biomass and negatively influenced trophic group and ecological indices of soil nematodes. However, the warming effects were less obvious, only fungal PLFA showed a decreasing trend under warming. Interestingly, the influence of N addition did not depend on warming. Structural equation modeling analysis suggested that the direct pathway between N addition and soil food web components were more important than the indirect connections through alterations in soil abiotic characters or plant growth. Nitrogen enrichment also affected the soil nematode community indirectly through changes in soil pH and PLFA. We conclude that experimental warming influenced soil food web components of the temperate steppe less than N addition, and there was little influence of warming on N addition effects under these experimental conditions. PMID:23544140

  6. In Vivo Evidence that N-Oleoylglycine Acts Independently of Its Conversion to Oleamide

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Shalini; Driscoll, William J.; Elliot, Brenda M.; Faraday, Martha M.; Grunberg, Neil E.; Mueller, Gregory P.

    2006-01-01

    Oleamide (cis-9-octadecenamide) is a member of an emerging class of lipid-signaling molecules, the primary fatty acid amides. A growing body of evidence indicates that oleamide mediates fundamental neurochemical processes including sleep, thermoregulation, and nociception. Nevertheless, the mechanism for oleamide biosynthesis remains unknown. The leading hypothesis holds that oleamide is synthesized from oleoylglycine via the actions of the peptide amidating enzyme, peptidylglycine alpha amidating monooxygenase (PAM). The present study investigated this hypothesis using pharmacologic treatments, physiologic assessments, and measurements of serum oleamide levels using a newly development enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Oleamide and oleoylglycine both induced profound hypothermia and decreased locomotion, over equivalent dose ranges and time courses, whereas, closely related compounds, stearamide and oleic acid, were essentially without effect. While the biologic actions of oleamide and oleoylglycine were equivalent, the two compounds differed dramatically with respect to their effects on serum levels of oleamide. Oleamide administration (80 mg/kg) elevated blood-borne oleamide by eight-fold, whereas, the same dose of oleoylglycine had no effect on circulating oleamide levels. In addition, pretreatment with the established PAM inhibitor, disulfiram, produced modest reductions in the hypothermic responses to both oleoylglycine and oleamide, suggesting that the effects of disulfiram were not mediated through inhibition of PAM and a resulting decrease in the formation of oleamide from oleoylglycine. Collectively, these findings raise the possibilities that: (1) oleoylglycine possesses biologic activity that is independent of its conversion to oleamide, and (2) the increased availability of oleoylglycine as a potential substrate does not drive the biosynthesis of oleamide. PMID:17085322

  7. Evidence for differential effects of reduced and oxidised nitrogen deposition on vegetation independent of nitrogen load.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Leon J L; Jones, Laurence; Sheppard, Lucy J; Smart, Simon M; Bobbink, Roland; Dise, Nancy B; Ashmore, Mike R

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition impacts natural and semi-natural ecosystems globally. The responses of vegetation to N deposition may, however, differ strongly between habitats and may be mediated by the form of N. Although much attention has been focused on the impact of total N deposition, the effects of reduced and oxidised N, independent of the total N deposition, have received less attention. In this paper, we present new analyses of national monitoring data in the UK to provide an extensive evaluation of whether there are differences in the effects of reduced and oxidised N deposition across eight habitat types (acid, calcareous and mesotrophic grasslands, upland and lowland heaths, bogs and mires, base-rich mires, woodlands). We analysed data from 6860 plots in the British Countryside Survey 2007 for effects of total N deposition and N form on species richness, Ellenberg N values and grass:forb ratio. Our results provide clear evidence that N deposition affects species richness in all habitats except base-rich mires, after factoring out correlated explanatory variables (climate and sulphur deposition). In addition, the form of N in deposition appears important for the biodiversity of grasslands and woodlands but not mires and heaths. Ellenberg N increased more in relation to NHx deposition than NOy deposition in all but one habitat type. Relationships between species richness and N form were habitat-specific: acid and mesotrophic grasslands appear more sensitive to NHx deposition while calcareous grasslands and woodlands appeared more responsive to NOy deposition. These relationships are likely driven by the preferences of the component plant species for oxidised or reduced forms of N, rather than by soil acidification.

  8. Developing Independent Listening Skills for English as an Additional Language Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picard, Michelle; Velautham, Lalitha

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an action research project to develop online, self-access listening resources mirroring the authentic academic contexts experienced by graduate university students. Current listening materials for English as an Additional Language (EAL) students mainly use Standard American English or Standard British pronunciation, and far…

  9. Genomic evidence for independent origins of beta-like globin genes in monotremes and therian mammals.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Juan C; Hoffmann, Federico G; Storz, Jay F

    2008-02-05

    Phylogenetic reconstructions of the beta-globin gene family in vertebrates have revealed that developmentally regulated systems of hemoglobin synthesis have been reinvented multiple times in independent lineages. For example, the functional differentiation of embryonic and adult beta-like globin genes occurred independently in birds and mammals. In both taxa, the embryonic beta-globin gene is exclusively expressed in primitive erythroid cells derived from the yolk sac. However, the "epsilon-globin" gene in birds is not orthologous to the epsilon-globin gene in mammals, because they are independently derived from lineage-specific duplications of a proto beta-globin gene. Here, we report evidence that the early and late expressed beta-like globin genes in monotremes and therian mammals (marsupials and placental mammals) are the products of independent duplications of a proto beta-globin gene in each of these two lineages. Results of our analysis of genomic sequence data from a large number of vertebrate taxa, including sequence from the recently completed platypus genome, reveal that the epsilon- and beta-globin genes of therian mammals arose via duplication of a proto beta-globin gene after the therian/monotreme split. Our analysis of genomic sequence from the platypus also revealed the presence of a duplicate pair of beta-like globin genes that originated via duplication of a proto beta-globin gene in the monotreme lineage. This discovery provides evidence that, in different lineages of mammals, descendent copies of the same proto beta-globin gene may have been independently neofunctionalized to perform physiological tasks associated with oxygen uptake and storage during embryonic development.

  10. On the Status of Cue Independence as a Criterion for Memory Inhibition: Evidence against the Covert Blocking Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Peter D.; Anderson, Michael C.; Gómez-Ariza, Carlos J.; Bajo, M. Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Retrieving memories can impair recall of other related traces. Items affected by this retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) are often less accessible when tested with independent probes, a characteristic known as cue independence. Cue independence has been interpreted as evidence for inhibitory mechanisms that suppress competing items during…

  11. Cue-independent forgetting by intentional suppression - Evidence for inhibition as the mechanism of intentional forgetting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Cao, Zhijun; Zhu, Zijian; Cai, Huaqian; Wu, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    People are able to intentionally forget unwanted memories through voluntary suppression, as revealed by the Think/No-think (TNT) paradigm. However, the nature of intentional forgetting is controversial. Findings that forgetting is independent of retrieval cues suggest that inhibitory control underlies intentional forgetting, but this result is also in line with an interference account. To resolve this controversy, we have directly contrasted the cue-independent characteristic of suppression versus interference. A double-cue paradigm was used, in which two different cues were associated with the same target during initial memory formation. Only one cue-target association received further interference/suppression training. In the test phase, when both cues were used to retrieve the target, we found that interference caused memory impairment that was restricted to the trained cue-target association, while suppression induced forgetting that generalized to the independent cue-target association. Therefore, the effect of suppression differs from that of interference. The cue-independent forgetting by voluntary suppression indicates that the target memory itself is inhibited, providing evidence that the underlying mechanism of suppression-induced forgetting is inhibitory control.

  12. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  13. Birth order and sexual orientation in men: evidence for two independent interactions.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Anthony F; Liu, Jian

    2006-11-01

    Birth order is correlated with male sexual orientation, but the reason(s) for this relationship is unclear. In the present study, data from a Canadian sample of homosexual and heterosexual men (N=604) were used to present evidence of two independent birth order interactions--one with height and the other with parental age--predicting sexual orientation in men. If these findings prove reliable, it raises the possibility that different aetiological factors underlie the birth order/sexual orientation relationship in men.

  14. The genome sequence of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) and evidence for independent domestication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Muhua; Yu, Yeisoo; Haberer, Georg; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Fan, Chuanzhu; Goicoechea, Jose Luis; Zuccolo, Andrea; Song, Xiang; Kudrna, Dave; Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Cossu, Rosa Maria; Maldonado, Carlos; Chen, Jinfeng; Lee, Seunghee; Sisneros, Nick; de Baynast, Kristi; Golser, Wolfgang; Wissotski, Marina; Kim, Woojin; Sanchez, Paul; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noelle; Sanni, Kayode; Long, Manyuan; Carney, Judith; Panaud, Olivier; Wicker, Thomas; Machado, Carlos A; Chen, Mingsheng; Mayer, Klaus F X; Rounsley, Steve; Wing, Rod A

    2014-09-01

    The cultivation of rice in Africa dates back more than 3,000 years. Interestingly, African rice is not of the same origin as Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.) but rather is an entirely different species (i.e., Oryza glaberrima Steud.). Here we present a high-quality assembly and annotation of the O. glaberrima genome and detailed analyses of its evolutionary history of domestication and selection. Population genomics analyses of 20 O. glaberrima and 94 Oryza barthii accessions support the hypothesis that O. glaberrima was domesticated in a single region along the Niger river as opposed to noncentric domestication events across Africa. We detected evidence for artificial selection at a genome-wide scale, as well as with a set of O. glaberrima genes orthologous to O. sativa genes that are known to be associated with domestication, thus indicating convergent yet independent selection of a common set of genes during two geographically and culturally distinct domestication processes.

  15. Brief Report: An Independent Replication and Extension of Psychometric Evidence Supporting the Theory of Mind Inventory.

    PubMed

    Greenslade, Kathryn J; Coggins, Truman E

    2016-08-01

    This study presents an independent replication and extension of psychometric evidence supporting the Theory of Mind Inventory (ToMI). Parents of 20 children with ASD (4; 1-6; 7 years; months) and 20 with typical development (3; 1-6; 5), rated their child's theory of mind abilities in everyday situations. Other parent report and child behavioral assessments included the Social Responsiveness Scale-2, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-2, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-4, and Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Preschool, 2. Results revealed high internal consistency, expected developmental changes in children with typical development, expected group differences between children with and without ASD, and strong correlations with other measures of social and communication abilities. The ToMI demonstrates strong psychometrics, suggesting considerable utility in identifying theory of mind deficits in children with ASD.

  16. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  17. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  18. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  19. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  20. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  1. 30 CFR 210.206 - Will I need to submit additional documents or evidence to MMS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Will I need to submit additional documents or evidence to MMS? 210.206 Section 210.206 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT FORMS AND REPORTS Production and Royalty Reports-Solid Minerals §...

  2. Additions are biased by operands: evidence from repeated versus different operands.

    PubMed

    Charras, Pom; Molina, Enrique; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2014-03-01

    Recent evidence led to the conclusion that addition problems are biased towards overestimation, regardless of whether information is conveyed by symbolic or non-symbolic stimuli (the Operational Momentum effect). The present study focuses on the role of operands in the overestimation of addition problems. Based on the tie effect, and on recent evidence that the nature of operands biases addition problems towards an underestimation when operands are repeated, but towards an overestimation when different, we aim here to further elucidate the contribution of operands to addition problems. Experiment 1 replicates the underestimation of repeated-operand additions and overestimation of different-operand additions, with large numbers (around 50), and explores whether these effects also apply to small operand additions (around 10). Experiment 2 further explores the overestimation of different-operand additions by investigating the roles of operand order and numerical distance between operands. The results show that both factors have an impact on the overestimation size, but are not crucial for overestimation to occur. The results are discussed in terms of arithmetic strategies, spatial organization of numbers and magnitude representation.

  3. Evidence of Repeated and Independent Saltational Evolution in a Peculiar Genus of Sphinx Moths (Proserpinus: Sphingidae)

    PubMed Central

    Rubinoff, Daniel; Le Roux, Johannes J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Saltational evolution in which a particular lineage undergoes relatively rapid, significant, and unparalleled change as compared with its closest relatives is rarely invoked as an alternative model to the dominant paradigm of gradualistic evolution. Identifying saltational events is an important first-step in assessing the importance of this discontinuous model in generating evolutionary novelty. We offer evidence for three independent instances of saltational evolution in a charismatic moth genus with only eight species. Methodology/Principal Findings Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian search criteria offered congruent, well supported phylogenies based on 1,965 base pairs of DNA sequence using the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit I, and the nuclear genes elongation factor-1 alpha and wingless. Using a comparative methods approach, we examined three taxa exhibiting novelty in the form of Batesian mimicry, host plant shift, and dramatic physiological differences in light of the phylogenetic data. All three traits appear to have evolved relatively rapidly and independently in three different species of Proserpinus. Each saltational species exhibits a markedly different and discrete example of discontinuous trait evolution while remaining canalized for other typical traits shared by the rest of the genus. All three saltational taxa show insignificantly different levels of overall genetic change as compared with their congeners, implying that their divergence is targeted to particular traits and not genome-wide. Conclusions/Significance Such rapid evolution of novel traits in individual species suggests that the pace of evolution can be quick, dramatic, and isolated—even on the species level. These results may be applicable to other groups in which specific taxa have generated pronounced evolutionary novelty. Genetic mechanisms and methods for assessing such relatively rapid changes are postulated. PMID:19107205

  4. Evidence of Autoinducer-Dependent and -Independent Heterogeneous Gene Expression in Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Jessica; Krysciak, Dagmar; Schorn, Andrea; Dahlke, Renate I.; Soonvald, Liina; Müller, Johannes; Hense, Burkhard A.; Schwarzfischer, Michael; Sauter, Margret; Schmeisser, Christel

    2014-01-01

    Populations of genetically identical Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234 cells differ significantly in their expression profiles of autoinducer (AI)-dependent and AI-independent genes. Promoter fusions of the NGR234 AI synthase genes traI and ngrI showed high levels of phenotypic heterogeneity during growth in TY medium on a single-cell level. However, adding very high concentrations of N-(3-oxooctanoyl-)-l-homoserine lactone resulted in a more homogeneous expression profile. Similarly, the lack of internally synthesized AIs in the background of the NGR234-ΔtraI or the NGR234-ΔngrI mutant resulted in a highly homogenous expression of the corresponding promoter fusions in the population. Expression studies with reporter fusions of the promoter regions of the quorum-quenching genes dlhR and qsdR1 and the type IV pilus gene cluster located on pNGR234b suggested that factors other than AI molecules affect NGR234 phenotypic heterogeneity. Further studies with root exudates and developing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings provide the first evidence that plant root exudates have strong effects on the heterogeneity of AI synthase and quorum-quenching genes in NGR234. Therefore, plant-released octopine appears to play a key role in modulation of heterogeneous gene expression. PMID:25002427

  5. Efficiently and Effectively Evaluating Public Service Announcements: Additional Evidence for the Utility of Perceived Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Bigsby, Elisabeth; Cappella, Joseph N; Seitz, Holli H

    2013-03-01

    Recent research has made significant progress identifying measures of the perceived effectiveness (PE) of persuasive messages and providing evidence of a causal link from PE to actual effectiveness (AE). This article provides additional evidence of the utility of PE through unique analysis and consideration of another dimension of PE important to understanding the PE-AE association. Current smokers (N =1,139) watched four randomly selected anti-smoking Public Service Announcements (PSAs). PE scores aggregated by message were used instead of individual PE scores to create a summed total, minimizing the likelihood that PE perceptions are consequences of an individual's intention to quit, supporting instead the PE→AE order. Linear regression analyses provide evidence of PE's positive and significant influence on smoking cessation-related behavioral intentions.

  6. Efficiently and Effectively Evaluating Public Service Announcements: Additional Evidence for the Utility of Perceived Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bigsby, Elisabeth; Cappella, Joseph N.; Seitz, Holli H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has made significant progress identifying measures of the perceived effectiveness (PE) of persuasive messages and providing evidence of a causal link from PE to actual effectiveness (AE). This article provides additional evidence of the utility of PE through unique analysis and consideration of another dimension of PE important to understanding the PE-AE association. Current smokers (N =1,139) watched four randomly selected anti-smoking Public Service Announcements (PSAs). PE scores aggregated by message were used instead of individual PE scores to create a summed total, minimizing the likelihood that PE perceptions are consequences of an individual’s intention to quit, supporting instead the PE→AE order. Linear regression analyses provide evidence of PE’s positive and significant influence on smoking cessation-related behavioral intentions. PMID:25568588

  7. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome – additional functional evidence and expanding the clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Koenighofer, Martin; Hung, Christina Y.; McCauley, Jacob L.; Dallman, Julia; Back, Emma J.; Mihalek, Ivana; Gripp, Karen W.; Sol-Church, Katia; Rusconi, Paolo; Zhang, Zhaiyi; Shi, Geng-Xian; Andres, Douglas A.; Bodamer, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    RASopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of conditions caused by mutations in one of sixteen proteins in the RAS-MAPK pathway. Recently, mutations in RIT1 were identified as a novel cause for Noonan syndrome. Here we provide additional functional evidence for a causal role of RIT1 mutations and expand the associated phenotypic spectrum. We identified two de novo missense variants p.Met90Ile and, p.Ala57Gly. Both variants resulted in increased MEK-ERK signaling compared to wild-type, underscoring gain-of-function as the primary functional mechanism. Introduction of p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly into zebrafish embryos reproduced not only aspects of the human phenotype but also revealed abnormalities of eye development, emphasizing the importance of RIT1 for spatial and temporal organization of the growing organism. In addition, we observed severe lymphedema of the lower extremity and genitalia in one patient. We provide additional evidence for a causal relationship between pathogenic mutations in RIT1, increased RAS-MAPK/MEK-ERK signaling and the clinical phenotype. The mutant RIT1 protein may possess reduced GTPase activity or a diminished ability to interact with cellular GTPase activating proteins, however the precise mechanism remains unknown. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to expand and includes lymphedema of the lower extremities in addition to nuchal hygroma. PMID:25959749

  8. Thermal annealing of SiC nanoparticles induces SWNT nucleation: evidence for a catalyst-independent VSS mechanism.

    PubMed

    Page, Alister J; Chandrakumar, K R S; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-09-14

    Density-functional tight-binding molecular dynamics (DFTB/MD) methods were employed to demonstrate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation resulting from thermal annealing of SiC nanoparticles. SWNT nucleation in this case is preceded by a change of the SiC structure from a crystalline one, to one in which silicon and carbon are segregated. This structural transformation ultimately resulted in the formation of extended polyyne chains on the SiC nanoparticle surface. These polyyne chains subsequently coalesced, forming an extended sp(2)-hybridized carbon cap on the SiC nanoparticle. The kinetics of this process were enhanced significantly at higher temperatures (2500 K), compared to lower temperatures (1200 K) and so directly correlated to the surface premelting behavior of the nanoparticle structure. Analysis of the SiC nanoparticle Lindemann index between 1000 and 3000 K indicated that SWNT nucleation at temperatures below 2600 K occurred in the solid, or quasi-solid, phase. Thus, the traditional vapor-liquid-solid mechanism of SWNT growth does not apply in the case of SiC nanoparticles. Instead, we propose that this example of SWNT nucleation constitutes evidence of a vapor-solid-solid process. This conclusion complements our recent observations regarding SWNT nucleation on SiO(2) nanoparticles (A. J. Page, K. R. S. Chandrakumar, S. Irle and K. Morokuma, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 621-628). In addition, similarities between the atomistic SWNT nucleation mechanisms on SiC and SiO(2) catalysts provide the first evidence of a catalyst-independent SWNT nucleation mechanism with respect to 'non-traditional' SWNT catalyst species.

  9. Evidence of thermal additivity during short laser pulses in an in vitro retinal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Michael L.; Tijerina, Amanda J.; Dyer, Phillip N.; Oian, Chad A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Rickman, John M.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Clark, Clifton D.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2015-03-01

    Laser damage thresholds were determined for exposure to 2.5-ms 532-nm pulses in an established in vitro retinal model. Single and multiple pulses (10, 100, 1000) were delivered to the cultured cells at three different pulse repetition frequency (PRF) values, and overt damage (membrane breach) was scored 1 hr post laser exposure. Trends in the damage data within and across the PRF range identified significant thermal additivity as PRF was increased, as evidenced by drastically reduced threshold values (< 40% of single-pulse value). Microthermography data that were collected in real time during each exposure also provided evidence of thermal additivity between successive laser pulses. Using thermal profiles simulated at high temporal resolution, damage threshold values were predicted by an in-house computational model. Our simulated ED50 value for a single 2.5-ms pulse was in very good agreement with experimental results, but ED50 predictions for multiple-pulse trains will require more refinement.

  10. Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Skypala, Isabel J; Williams, M; Reeves, L; Meyer, R; Venter, C

    2015-01-01

    Although there is considerable literature pertaining to IgE and non IgE-mediated food allergy, there is a paucity of information on non-immune mediated reactions to foods, other than metabolic disorders such as lactose intolerance. Food additives and naturally occurring 'food chemicals' have long been reported as having the potential to provoke symptoms in those who are more sensitive to their effects. Diets low in 'food chemicals' gained prominence in the 1970s and 1980s, and their popularity remains, although the evidence of their efficacy is very limited. This review focuses on the available evidence for the role and likely adverse effects of both added and natural 'food chemicals' including benzoate, sulphite, monosodium glutamate, vaso-active or biogenic amines and salicylate. Studies assessing the efficacy of the restriction of these substances in the diet have mainly been undertaken in adults, but the paper will also touch on the use of such diets in children. The difficulty of reviewing the available evidence is that few of the studies have been controlled and, for many, considerable time has elapsed since their publication. Meanwhile dietary patterns and habits have changed hugely in the interim, so the conclusions may not be relevant for our current dietary norms. The conclusion of the review is that there may be some benefit in the removal of an additive or a group of foods high in natural food chemicals from the diet for a limited period for certain individuals, providing the diagnostic pathway is followed and the foods are reintroduced back into the diet to assess for the efficacy of removal. However diets involving the removal of multiple additives and food chemicals have the very great potential to lead to nutritional deficiency especially in the paediatric population. Any dietary intervention, whether for the purposes of diagnosis or management of food allergy or food intolerance, should be adapted to the individual's dietary habits and a suitably

  11. Concordant species delimitation from multiple independent evidence: A case study with the Pachytriton brevipes complex (Caudata: Salamandridae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunke; Murphy, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data are widely used to delimit species. However, owing to its strict maternal inheritance in most species, mtDNA tracks female dispersion and dispersal only. The accuracy of mtDNA-derived species delimitation is often not explicitly tested using other independent evidence, such as nuclear DNA (nDNA) data, morphological data, or ecological data. Because species are independent evolutionary lineages that can form testable hypotheses, we present a multi-evidence case study on species delimitation that combines statistical approaches with spatially explicit ecological analysis. Montane salamanders of the Pachytriton brevipes complex (Salamandridae) from southeastern China exhibit conservative morphology and variable color patterning that impede species diagnosis. Recent studies proposed splitting P. brevipes into four species based on deep mtDNA divergence but also found discordance between mtDNA and nDNA trees. In this study, we test evolutionary independence of these hypothesized species lineages using two coalescent-based Bayesian methods (Bayes factor and BP&P). Despite significant conflict between mtDNA gene tree and the species phylogeny, the results reinforce the inference of at least four species in the complex as opposed to the one species recognized for over 130 years. Correlative ecological niche modeling and statistical analysis of environmental data indicate that suitable habitats for each species are isolated by incompatible intervening lowland regions, so the likelihood of gene flow among species is very low, which means species lineages should maintain their evolutionary independence. We demonstrate that concordance among independent evidence confirms species status, which forms the basis for accurate assessment of regional biodiversity.

  12. Evidence that Additions of Grignard Reagents to Aliphatic Aldehydes Do Not Involve Single-Electron-Transfer Processes.

    PubMed

    Otte, Douglas A L; Woerpel, K A

    2015-08-07

    Addition of allylmagnesium reagents to an aliphatic aldehyde bearing a radical clock gave only addition products and no evidence of ring-opened products that would suggest single-electron-transfer reactions. The analogous Barbier reaction also did not provide evidence for a single-electron-transfer mechanism in the addition step. Other Grignard reagents (methyl-, vinyl-, t-Bu-, and triphenylmethylmagnesium halides) also do not appear to add to an alkyl aldehyde by a single-electron-transfer mechanism.

  13. Evidence for an additional ligand, distinct from B7, for the CTLA-4 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Razi-Wolf, Z; Galvin, F; Gray, G; Reiser, H

    1993-01-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes requires the recognition of peptide-major histocompatibility complex complexes and costimulatory signals provided by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The best-characterized costimulatory molecule to date is the B7 antigen, a member of the immunoglobulin family that binds two receptors, CD28 and CTLA-4, expressed on the T-cell surface. Using the anti-mouse B7 (mB7) monoclonal antibody (mAb) 16-10A1, which we recently developed, we found that mB7 is indeed an important costimulatory ligand for the antigen-specific activation of murine T cells by B lymphocytes. Three lines of evidence suggest, however, the existence of at least one additional ligand for the CTLA-4 receptor. First, a soluble fusion protein of human CTLA-4 and the IgG1 Fc region, termed CTLA4Ig, blocks better than the anti-mB7 mAb the allogeneic stimulation of T cells by unfractionated splenic APCs. Second, saturating amounts of anti-mB7 mAb do not significantly block binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated CTLA4Ig to activated splenic APCs. Furthermore, CTLA4Ig but not the anti-mB7 mAb reacts with the M12 and M12.C3 cell lines. The identification of an additional ligand for CTLA-4 may have applications to the treatment of autoimmune disease and transplant-associated disorders. PMID:7504299

  14. Evidence for an Independent 26-s Microseismic Source near the Vanuatu Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Ni, Sidao

    2014-09-01

    The 26 s peak in the ambient seismic noise spectrum is persistently excited and observed at stations globally. Using noise cross-correlation functions (NCFs), the location suggests that the source could be situated in the Gulf of Guinea and Fiji Basin. However, the Fiji Basin was proposed to be the mirror site (near antipode) of the Gulf of Guinea source instead of an independent source, assuming that the surface waves more efficiently propagate along the major-arc paths of oceanic movements. To investigate the propagation of the Rayleigh waves along continental and oceanic paths, we analyzed the surface wave data recorded from an earthquake near the Gulf of Guinea and found that Rayleigh waves travel along continental minor-arc paths more efficiently than along oceanic major-arc paths. We then located the source in the western Pacific Ocean from group velocities measured with earthquake data by using the travel time misfit in NCFs after calibration and concluded that the source is in the Vanuatu Islands. Moreover, the temporal variation of the 26 s microseismic peak observed in the western Pacific seismic stations is very different from that in stations near the Gulf of Guinea, which suggests that they are excited by independent sources. Therefore, the Vanuatu source should be an independent microseismic source. As it is close to volcanoes in the Vanuatu islands, the Pacific 26 s microseismic source might be excited by magmatic processes, which are also responsible for very-long-period volcanic tremors.

  15. Inhibitory effects of thought substitution in the think/no-think task: evidence from independent cues.

    PubMed

    del Prete, Francesco; Hanczakowski, Maciej; Bajo, Maria Teresa; Mazzoni, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    When people try not to think about a certain item, they can accomplish this goal by using a thought substitution strategy and think about something else. Research conducted with the think/no-think (TNT) paradigm indicates that such strategy leads subsequently to forgetting the information participants tried not to think about. The present study pursued two goals. First, it investigated the mechanism of forgetting due to thought substitution, contrasting the hypothesis by which forgetting is due to blocking caused by substitutes with the hypothesis that forgetting is due to inhibition (using an independent cue methodology). Second, a boundary condition for forgetting due to thought substitution was examined by creating conditions under which the generation of appropriate substitutes would be impaired. In two experiments, participants completed a TNT task under thought substitution instructions in which either words or pseudo-words were used as original cues and memory was assessed with original and independent cues. The results revealed forgetting in both original and independent cue tests, supporting the inhibitory account of thought substitution, but only when cues were words, and not when they were non-words, pointing to the ineffectiveness of a thought substitution strategy when original cues lack semantic content.

  16. No evidence that chronic nitrogen additions increase photosynthesis in mature sugar maple forests.

    PubMed

    Talhelm, A F; Pregitzer, K S; Burton, A J

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can increase forest growth. Because N deposition commonly increases foliar N concentrations, it is thought that this increase in forest growth is a consequence of enhanced leaf-level photosynthesis. However, tests of this mechanism have been infrequent, and increases in photosynthesis have not been consistently observed in mature forests subject to chronic N deposition. In four mature northern hardwood forests in the north-central United States, chronic N additions (30 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) as NaNO3 for 14 years) have increased aboveground growth but have not affected canopy leaf biomass or leaf area index. In order to understand the mechanism behind the increases in growth, we hypothesized that the NO3(-) additions increased foliar N concentrations and leaf-level photosynthesis in the dominant species in these forests (sugar maple, Acer saccharum). The NO3(-) additions significantly increased foliar N. However, there was no significant difference between the ambient and +NO3(-) treatments in two seasons (2006-2007) of instantaneous measurements of photosynthesis from either canopy towers or excised branches. In measurements on excised branches, photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (micromol CO2 s(-1) g(-1) N) was significantly decreased (-13%) by NO3(-) additions. Furthermore, we found no consistent NO3(-) effect across all sites in either current foliage or leaf litter collected annually throughout the study (1993-2007) and analyzed for delta 13C and delta 18O, isotopes that can be used together to integrate changes in photosynthesis over time. We observed a small but significant NO3(-) effect on the average area and mass of individual leaves from the excised branches, but these differences varied by site and were countered by changes in leaf number. These photosynthesis and leaf area data together suggest that NO3(-) additions have not stimulated photosynthesis. There is no evidence that nutrient deficiencies have developed at

  17. The Independence of James Rest's Components of Morality: Evidence from a Professional Ethics Curriculum Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Di; Bebeau, Muriel J.

    2013-01-01

    Rest's hypothesis that the components of morality (i.e., sensitivity, reasoning, motivation, and implementation) are distinct from one another was tested using evidence from a dental ethics curriculum that uses well-validated measures of each component. Archival data from five cohorts ("n" = 385) included the following: (1) transcribed…

  18. Animate and Inanimate Objects in Human Visual Cortex: Evidence for Task-Independent Category Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggett, Alison J.; Pritchard, Iwan C.; Downing, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence from neuropsychology suggests that the distinction between animate and inanimate kinds is fundamental to human cognition. Previous neuroimaging studies have reported that viewing animate objects activates ventrolateral visual brain regions, whereas inanimate objects activate ventromedial regions. However, these studies have typically…

  19. Re-Examining Evidence for the Use of Independent Relational Representations during Conceptual Combination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagne, Christina L.; Spalding, Thomas L.; Ji, Hongbo

    2005-01-01

    In a recent study of conceptual combination, Estes (2003) presented evidence for the priming of relational information in the absence of shared constituents between the prime and target (e.g., "pancake spatula" was interpreted more quickly following "bacon tongs" than following "city riots"). He argued that these data support the view that…

  20. Engaging Evidence: How Independent Colleges and Universities Use Data to Improve Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Postsecondary institutions are under increasing scrutiny to provide evidence of student learning. Despite efforts to increase the number and frequency of assessments of student learning, many colleges and universities need help to make good use of assessment results for the improvement of teaching and learning. To address this need, in February…

  1. Independent evidence for an association between general cognitive ability and a genetic locus for educational attainment.

    PubMed

    Trampush, Joey W; Lencz, Todd; Knowles, Emma; Davies, Gail; Guha, Saurav; Pe'er, Itsik; Liewald, David C; Starr, John M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Melle, Ingrid; Sundet, Kjetil; Christoforou, Andrea; Reinvang, Ivar; Mukherjee, Semanti; DeRosse, Pamela; Lundervold, Astri; Steen, Vidar M; John, Majnu; Espeseth, Thomas; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G; Giegling, Ina; Konte, Bettina; Ikeda, Masashi; Roussos, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella; Burdick, Katherine E; Payton, Antony; Ollier, William; Horan, Mike; Scult, Matthew; Dickinson, Dwight; Straub, Richard E; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek; Corvin, Aiden; Gill, Michael; Hariri, Ahmad; Weinberger, Daniel R; Pendleton, Neil; Iwata, Nakao; Darvasi, Ariel; Bitsios, Panos; Rujescu, Dan; Lahti, Jari; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Keller, Matthew C; Andreassen, Ole A; Deary, Ian J; Glahn, David C; Malhotra, Anil K

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive deficits and reduced educational achievement are common in psychiatric illness; understanding the genetic basis of cognitive and educational deficits may be informative about the etiology of psychiatric disorders. A recent, large genome-wide association study (GWAS) reported a genome-wide significant locus for years of education, which subsequently demonstrated association to general cognitive ability ("g") in overlapping cohorts. The current study was designed to test whether GWAS hits for educational attainment are involved in general cognitive ability in an independent, large-scale collection of cohorts. Using cohorts in the Cognitive Genomics Consortium (COGENT; up to 20,495 healthy individuals), we examined the relationship between g and variants associated with educational attainment. We next conducted meta-analyses with 24,189 individuals with neurocognitive data from the educational attainment studies, and then with 53,188 largely independent individuals from a recent GWAS of cognition. A SNP (rs1906252) located at chromosome 6q16.1, previously associated with years of schooling, was significantly associated with g (P = 1.47 × 10(-4) ) in COGENT. The first joint analysis of 43,381 non-overlapping individuals for this a priori-designated locus was strongly significant (P = 4.94 × 10(-7) ), and the second joint analysis of 68,159 non-overlapping individuals was even more robust (P = 1.65 × 10(-9) ). These results provide independent replication, in a large-scale dataset, of a genetic locus associated with cognitive function and education. As sample sizes grow, cognitive GWAS will identify increasing numbers of associated loci, as has been accomplished in other polygenic quantitative traits, which may be relevant to psychiatric illness.

  2. Independent Evidence for an Association between General Cognitive Ability and a Genetic Locus for Educational Attainment

    PubMed Central

    Trampush, Joey W.; Lencz, Todd; Knowles, Emma; Davies, Gail; Guha, Saurav; Pe’er, Itsik; Liewald, David C.; Starr, John M.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Melle, Ingrid; Sundet, Kjetil; Christoforou, Andrea; Reinvang, Ivar; Mukherjee, Semanti; DeRosse, Pamela; Lundervold, Astri; Steen, Vidar M.; John, Majnu; Espeseth, Thomas; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G.; Giegling, Ina; Konte, Bettina; Ikeda, Masashi; Roussos, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella; Burdick, Katherine E.; Payton, Antony; Ollier, William; Horan, Mike; Scult, Matthew; Dickinson, Dwight; Straub, Richard E.; Donohoe, Gary; Morris, Derek; Corvin, Aiden; Gill, Michael; Hariri, Ahmad; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Pendleton, Neil; Iwata, Nakao; Darvasi, Ariel; Bitsios, Panos; Rujescu, Dan; Lahti, Jari; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Keller, Matthew C.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Deary, Ian J.; Glahn, David C.; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits and reduced educational achievement are common in psychiatric illness; understanding the genetic basis of cognitive and educational deficits may be informative about the etiology of psychiatric disorders. A recent, large genomewide association study (GWAS) reported a genome-wide significant locus for years of education, which subsequently demonstrated association to general cognitive ability (“g”) in overlapping cohorts. The current study was designed to test whether GWAS hits for educational attainment are involved in general cognitive ability in an independent, large-scale collection of cohorts. Using cohorts in the Cognitive Genomics Consortium (COGENT; up to 20,495 healthy individuals), we examined the relationship between g and variants associated with educational attainment. We next conducted meta-analyses with 24,189 individuals with neurocognitive data from the educational attainment studies, and then with 53,188 largely independent individuals from a recent GWAS of cognition. A SNP (rs1906252) located at chromosome 6q16.1, previously associated with years of schooling, was significantly associated with g (P = 1.47×10−4) in COGENT. The first joint analysis of 43,381 non-overlapping individuals for this a priori-designated locus was strongly significant (P = 4.94×10−7), and the second joint analysis of 68,159 non-overlapping individuals was even more robust (P = 1.65×10−9). These results provide independent replication, in a large-scale dataset, of a genetic locus associated with cognitive function and education. As sample sizes grow, cognitive GWAS will identify increasing numbers of associated loci, as has been accomplished in other polygenic quantitative traits, which may be relevant to psychiatric illness. PMID:25951819

  3. Maturation of poultry G-I microbiome during 42d of growth is independent of organic acid feed additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry remains a major source of foodborne infections in the U.S. and globally. A variety of additives with presumed anti-microbial and/or growth-promoting effects are commonly added to poultry feed, yet the effects of these additives on the ecology of the gastro-intestinal microbial community (th...

  4. Genetic evidence for an additional function of phage T4 gene 32 protein: interaction with ligase.

    PubMed

    Mosig, G; Breschkin, A M

    1975-04-01

    Gene 32 of bacteriophage T4 is essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In an attempt to clarify the role of the corresponding gene product, we have looked for mutations that specifically inactivate one but not all of its functions and for compensating suppressor mutations in other genes. Here we describe a gene 32 ts mutant that does not produce progeny, but in contrast to an am mutant investigated by others, is capable of some primary and secondary DNA replication and of forming "joint" recombinational intermediates after infection of Escherichia coli B at the restrictive temperature. However, parental and progeny DNA strands are not ligated to covalently linked "recombinant" molecules, and single strands of vegetative DNA do not exceed unit length. Progeny production as well as capacity for covalent linkage in this gene 32 ts mutant are partially restored by additional rII mutations. Suppression by rII depends on functioning host ligase [EC 6.5.1.2; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming, NMN-forming)]. This gene 32 ts mutation (unlike some others) in turn suppresses the characteristic plaque morphology of rII mutants. We conclude that gene 32 protein, in addition to its role in DNA replication and in the formation of "joint" recombinational intermediates, interacts with T4 ligase [EC 6.5.1.1; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming)] when recombining DNA strands are covalently linked. The protein of the mutant that we describe here is mainly defective in this interaction, thus inactivating T4 ligase in recombination. Suppressing rII mutations facilitate substitution of host ligase. There is suggestive evidence that these interactions occur at the membrane.

  5. Evidence for several independent genetic variants affecting lipoprotein (a) cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wensheng; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Keping; Wang, Hong; Gerhard, Glenn S; Still, Christopher D; Chu, Xin; Yang, Rongze; Parihar, Ankita; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Pollin, Toni I; Angles-Cano, Eduardo; Quon, Michael J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Shuldiner, Alan R; Fu, Mao

    2015-04-15

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related events that is under strong genetic control (heritability = 0.68-0.98). However, causal mutations and functional validation of biological pathways modulating Lp(a) metabolism are lacking. We performed a genome-wide association scan to identify genetic variants associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol levels in the Old Order Amish. We confirmed a previously known locus on chromosome 6q25-26 and found Lp(a) levels also to be significantly associated with a SNP near the APOA5-APOA4-APOC3-APOA1 gene cluster on chromosome 11q23 linked in the Amish to the APOC3 R19X null mutation. On 6q locus, we detected associations of Lp(a)-cholesterol with 118 common variants (P = 5 × 10(-8) to 3.91 × 10(-19)) spanning a ∼5.3 Mb region that included the LPA gene. To further elucidate variation within LPA, we sequenced LPA and identified two variants most strongly associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol, rs3798220 (P = 1.07 × 10(-14)) and rs10455872 (P = 1.85 × 10(-12)). We also measured copy numbers of kringle IV-2 (KIV-2) in LPA using qPCR. KIV-2 numbers were significantly associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol (P = 2.28 × 10(-9)). Conditional analyses revealed that rs3798220 and rs10455872 were associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol levels independent of each other and KIV-2 copy number. Furthermore, we determined for the first time that levels of LPA mRNA were higher in the carriers than non-carriers of rs10455872 (P = 0.0001) and were not different between carriers and non-carriers of rs3798220. Protein levels of apo(a) were higher in the carriers than non-carriers of both rs10455872 and rs3798220. In summary, we identified multiple independent genetic determinants for Lp(a)-cholesterol. These findings provide new insights into Lp(a) regulation.

  6. Evidence for several independent genetic variants affecting lipoprotein (a) cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wensheng; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Keping; Wang, Hong; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Still, Christopher D.; Chu, Xin; Yang, Rongze; Parihar, Ankita; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Pollin, Toni I.; Angles-Cano, Eduardo; Quon, Michael J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Fu, Mao

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related events that is under strong genetic control (heritability = 0.68–0.98). However, causal mutations and functional validation of biological pathways modulating Lp(a) metabolism are lacking. We performed a genome-wide association scan to identify genetic variants associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol levels in the Old Order Amish. We confirmed a previously known locus on chromosome 6q25-26 and found Lp(a) levels also to be significantly associated with a SNP near the APOA5–APOA4–APOC3–APOA1 gene cluster on chromosome 11q23 linked in the Amish to the APOC3 R19X null mutation. On 6q locus, we detected associations of Lp(a)-cholesterol with 118 common variants (P = 5 × 10−8 to 3.91 × 10−19) spanning a ∼5.3 Mb region that included the LPA gene. To further elucidate variation within LPA, we sequenced LPA and identified two variants most strongly associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol, rs3798220 (P = 1.07 × 10−14) and rs10455872 (P = 1.85 × 10−12). We also measured copy numbers of kringle IV-2 (KIV-2) in LPA using qPCR. KIV-2 numbers were significantly associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol (P = 2.28 × 10−9). Conditional analyses revealed that rs3798220 and rs10455872 were associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol levels independent of each other and KIV-2 copy number. Furthermore, we determined for the first time that levels of LPA mRNA were higher in the carriers than non-carriers of rs10455872 (P = 0.0001) and were not different between carriers and non-carriers of rs3798220. Protein levels of apo(a) were higher in the carriers than non-carriers of both rs10455872 and rs3798220. In summary, we identified multiple independent genetic determinants for Lp(a)-cholesterol. These findings provide new insights into Lp(a) regulation. PMID:25575512

  7. Independent effects of personality and sex on self-estimated intelligence: evidence from Austria.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Stefan; Kastner, Cornelia K; Voracek, Martin; von Stumm, Sophie; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Furnham, Adrian

    2010-10-01

    The effects of sex and personality traits on self-estimates of intelligence were examined in a sample of 302 Austrian adults (143 men, 159 women). Confirming previous research, men had higher self-estimates of logical and spatial abilities than did women, and these differences were partly explained in terms of women's higher Neuroticism scores. Neuroticism (negatively) and Openness (positively) accounted significantly for variances in self-estimates of spatial and logical intelligence. However, sex had stronger direct and indirect effects on self-estimates of intelligence. Sex and personality effects appear to be largely independent. Thus, being male, emotionally stable, and open to new experiences is likely to result in higher self-estimates of spatial and logical abilities.

  8. Evidence for Two Independent Factors that Modify Brain Networks to Meet Task Goals.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Caterina; Laumann, Timothy O; Gordon, Evan M; Adeyemo, Babatunde; Petersen, Steven E

    2016-10-25

    Humans easily and flexibly complete a wide variety of tasks. To accomplish this feat, the brain appears to subtly adjust stable brain networks. Here, we investigate what regional factors underlie these modifications, asking whether networks are either altered at (1) regions activated by a given task or (2) hubs that interconnect different networks. We used fMRI "functional connectivity" (FC) to compare networks during rest and three distinct tasks requiring semantic judgments, mental rotation, and visual coherence. We found that network modifications during these tasks were independently associated with both regional activation and network hubs. Furthermore, active and hub regions were associated with distinct patterns of network modification (differing in their localization, topography of FC changes, and variability across tasks), with activated hubs exhibiting patterns consistent with task control. These findings indicate that task goals modify brain networks through two separate processes linked to local brain function and network hubs.

  9. Motor resonance in left- and right-handers: evidence for effector-independent motor representations

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Begliomini, Chiara; Castiello, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    The idea of motor resonance was born at the time that it was demonstrated that cortical and spinal pathways of the motor system are specifically activated during both action-observation and execution. What is not known is if the human action observation-execution matching system simulates actions through motor representations specifically attuned to the laterality of the observed effectors (i.e., effector-dependent representations) or through abstract motor representations unconnected to the observed effector (i.e., effector-independent representations). To answer that question we need to know how the information necessary for motor resonance is represented or integrated within the representation of an effector. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-induced motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were thus recorded from the dominant and non-dominant hands of left- and right-handed participants while they observed a left- or a right-handed model grasping an object. The anatomical correspondence between the effector being observed and the observer's effector classically reported in the literature was confirmed by the MEP response in the dominant hand of participants observing models with their same hand preference. This effect was found in both left- as well as in right-handers. When a broader spectrum of options, such as actions performed by a model with a different hand preference, was instead considered, that correspondence disappeared. Motor resonance was noted in the observer's dominant effector regardless of the laterality of the hand being observed. This would indicate that there is a more sophisticated mechanism which works to convert someone else's pattern of movement into the observer's optimal motor commands and that effector-independent representations specifically modulate motor resonance. PMID:23408666

  10. MODEL-INDEPENDENT EVIDENCE FOR DARK ENERGY EVOLUTION FROM BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A. E-mail: arman@apctp.org

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh {sup 2} from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh {sup 2} ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  11. Model-independent Evidence for Dark Energy Evolution from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s-1 Mpc-1 at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh 2 from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh 2 ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω0m h 2 for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω0m h 2 = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  12. Genetic code deviations in the ciliates: evidence for multiple and independent events.

    PubMed Central

    Tourancheau, A B; Tsao, N; Klobutcher, L A; Pearlman, R E; Adoutte, A

    1995-01-01

    In several species of ciliates, the universal stop codons UAA and UAG are translated into glutamine, while in the euplotids, the glutamine codon usage is normal, but UGA appears to be translated as cysteine. Because the emerging position of this monophyletic group in the eukaryotic lineage is relatively late, this deviant genetic code represents a derived state of the universal code. The question is therefore raised as to how these changes arose within the evolutionary pathways of the phylum. Here, we have investigated the presence of stop codons in alpha tubulin and/or phosphoglycerate kinase gene coding sequences from diverse species of ciliates scattered over the phylogenetic tree constructed from 28S rRNA sequences. In our data set, when deviations occur they correspond to in frame UAA and UAG coding for glutamine. By combining these new data with those previously reported, we show that (i) utilization of UAA and UAG codons occurs to different extents between, but also within, the different classes of ciliates and (ii) the resulting phylogenetic pattern of deviations from the universal code cannot be accounted for by a scenario involving a single transition to the unusual code. Thus, contrary to expectations, deviations from the universal genetic code have arisen independently several times within the phylum. PMID:7621837

  13. Evidence that Aurora B is implicated in spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vernieri, Claudio; Villa, Fabrizio; Ciliberto, Andrea; Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-04-20

    Fidelity of chromosome segregation is ensured by a tension-dependent error correction system that prevents stabilization of incorrect chromosome-microtubule attachments. Unattached or incorrectly attached chromosomes also activate the spindle assembly checkpoint, thus delaying mitotic exit until all chromosomes are bioriented. The Aurora B kinase is widely recognized as a component of error correction. Conversely, its role in the checkpoint is controversial. Here, we report an analysis of the role of Aurora B in the spindle checkpoint under conditions believed to uncouple the effects of Aurora B inhibition on the checkpoint from those on error correction. Partial inhibition of several checkpoint and kinetochore components, including Mps1 and Ndc80, strongly synergizes with inhibition of Aurora B activity and dramatically affects the ability of cells to arrest in mitosis in the presence of spindle poisons. Thus, Aurora B might contribute to spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction. Our results support a model in which Aurora B is at the apex of a signalling pyramid whose sensory apparatus promotes the concomitant activation of error correction and checkpoint signalling pathways.

  14. Independent representation of parts and the relations between them: evidence from integrative agnosia.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Marlene; Peterson, Mary A; Moscovitch, Morris; Suzuki, Satoru

    2006-10-01

    Whether objects are represented as a collection of parts whose relations are coded independently remains a topic of ongoing discussion among theorists in the domain of shape perception. S. M., an individual with integrative agnosia, and neurologically intact ("normal") individuals learned initially to identify 4 target objects constructed of 2 simple volumetric parts. At test, the targets were mixed with distractors, some of which could be discriminated from the targets on the basis of a mismatching part, whereas the rest could be discriminated only on the basis of the altered spatial arrangements of parts. S. M. learned to identify the target objects, although at a rate slower than that of the normal participants. At test, he correctly rejected distractors on the basis of mismatching parts but was profoundly impaired at rejecting distractors made of the same local components but with mismatching spatial arrangements. These results suggest that encoding the spatial arrangements of parts of an object requires a mechanism that is different from that required for encoding the shape of individual parts, with the former selectively compromised in integrative agnosia.

  15. Readers select a comprehension mode independent of pronoun: Evidence from fMRI during narrative comprehension.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Franziska; Hagoort, Peter; Willems, Roel M

    2017-04-06

    Perspective is a crucial feature for communicating about events. Yet it is unclear how linguistically encoded perspective relates to cognitive perspective taking. Here, we tested the effect of perspective taking with short literary stories. Participants listened to stories with 1st or 3rd person pronouns referring to the protagonist, while undergoing fMRI. When comparing action events with 1st and 3rd person pronouns, we found no evidence for a neural dissociation depending on the pronoun. A split sample approach based on the self-reported experience of perspective taking revealed 3 comprehension preferences. One group showed a strong 1st person preference, another a strong 3rd person preference, while a third group engaged in 1st and 3rd person perspective taking simultaneously. Comparing brain activations of the groups revealed different neural networks. Our results suggest that comprehension is perspective dependent, but not on the perspective suggested by the text, but on the reader's (situational) preference.

  16. Independent and additive contributions of postvictory testosterone and social experience to the development of the winner effect.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Oyegbile, Temitayo O; Marler, Catherine A

    2011-09-01

    The processes through which salient social experiences influence future behavior are not well understood. Winning fights, for example, can increase the odds of future victory, yet little is known about the internal mechanisms that underlie such winner effects. Here, we use the territorial California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) to investigate how the effects of postvictory testosterone (T) release and winning experience individually mediate positive changes in future winning ability and antagonistic behavior. Male mice were castrated and implanted with T capsules to maintain basal levels of this hormone. We found that males form a robust winner effect if they win three separate territorial disputes and experience a single T surge roughly 45 min after each encounter. Meanwhile, males exhibit only an intermediate winner effect if they either 1) acquire three previous wins but do not experience a change in postvictory T or 2) acquire no previous wins but experience three separate T pulses. The results indicate that the effect of postvictory T must be coupled with that of winning experience to trigger the maximum positive shift in winning ability, which highlights the importance of social context in the development of the winner effect. At the same time, however, postvictory T and winning experience are each capable of increasing future winning ability independently, and this finding suggests that these two factors drive plasticity in antagonistic behavior via distinct mechanistic channels. More broadly, our data offer insight into the possible ways in which various species might be able to adjust their behavioral repertoire in response to social interactions through mechanisms that are unlinked from the effects of gonadal steroid action.

  17. Neural mechanisms of emotion regulation: Evidence for two independent prefrontal-subcortical pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Tor D.; Davidson, Matthew L.; Hughes, Brent L.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2008-01-01

    Although prefrontal cortex has been implicated in the cognitive regulation of emotion, the cortical-subcortical interactions that mediate this ability remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we identified a right ventrolateral prefrontal region (vlPFC) whose activity correlated with reduced negative emotional experience during cognitive reappraisal of aversive images. We then applied a novel pathway-mapping analysis on subcortical regions to locate mediators of the association between vlPFC activity and reappraisal success (i.e. reductions in reported emotion). Results identified two separable pathways that together explained ~50% of the reported variance in self-reported emotion: 1) a path through nucleus accumbens that predicted greater reappraisal success, and 2) a path through ventral amygdala that predicted reduced reappraisal success (i.e., more negative emotion). These results provide direct evidence that vlPFC is involved in both the generation and regulation of emotion through different subcortical pathways, suggesting a general role for this region in appraisal processes. PMID:18817740

  18. The effector independent nature of motor imagery: Evidence from rTMS induced inhibition to the primary motor cortices.

    PubMed

    Kraeutner, Sarah N; Ingram, Tony G J; Boe, Shaun G

    2017-03-01

    Motor imagery (MI), the mental rehearsal of movement, facilitates learning by driving brain activation similar to that of physical practice (PP). However, a growing body of evidence suggests that learning via MI relies more on effector independent as opposed to effector dependent encoding. One approach to probing the nature of MI based learning is to study the primary motor cortex (MC), a brain region known to be critical to effector dependent encoding, but whose involvement in MI is debatable. The current study sought to inform on the nature of MI-based learning by examining the extent to which participants could learn via MI following inhibition of the MC using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Forty-seven participants completed an MI-based implicit sequence learning paradigm after receiving inhibitory TMS to the contralateral or ipsilateral MC (TMS groups), or with the coil angled away from the scalp (Sham). The extent to which participants learned was assessed via reaction time differences (dRT) and effect sizes between repeated and random sequences. Similar dRT values and moderate effect sizes were observed across all groups, providing evidence that inhibition of the MC did not disrupt MI-based learning. As the MC is critical to effector dependent encoding, the current findings suggest that MI-based learning does not rely on effector dependent encoding and unlike PP, is more effector independent in nature. Ultimately, these results inform on the nature of MI-based learning.

  19. Evidence for the involvement of apoptosis-inducing factor-mediated caspase-independent neuronal death in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenfeng; Mechawar, Naguib; Krantic, Slavica; Quirion, Rémi

    2010-05-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms in neuronal cell death in Alzheimer disease (AD). The apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a mitochondrial oxido-reductase originally characterized as a mediator of caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD). In this postmortem study, we investigated the distribution of AIF and its possible morphological association with pathological features in the hippocampus, as well as entorhinal and medial gyrus of temporal cortices of late stage AD, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and control subjects. In comparison with controls, a significant increase in neuronal AIF immunoreactivity (AIF-ir) was observed in the hippocampus and the superficial layers of entorhinal and medial gyrus of temporal cortices in AD--but not DLB--samples. AIF-ir in neuronal nuclei was also significantly more widespread in AD compared with control and DLB samples. Furthermore, AIF-ir was found to be colocalized with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in AD brains. Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was seen between nuclear AIF-ir and Braak stage in CA1 of the hippocampus as well as in entorhinal and temporal cortices in AD samples. These data show for the first time: (1) the nuclear localization of AIF in the AD brain and (2) its colocalization with NFTs, suggesting a possible involvement of AIF-mediated caspase-independent PCD, at least in the late stage of this neuropathology.

  20. Two Independent Mechanisms for Motion-In-Depth Perception: Evidence from Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    Nefs, Harold T.; O'Hare, Louise; Harris, Julie M.

    2010-01-01

    Our forward-facing eyes allow us the advantage of binocular visual information: using the tiny differences between right and left eye views to learn about depth and location in three dimensions. Our visual systems also contain specialized mechanisms to detect motion-in-depth from binocular vision, but the nature of these mechanisms remains controversial. Binocular motion-in-depth perception could theoretically be based on first detecting binocular disparity and then monitoring how it changes over time. The alternative is to monitor the motion in the right and left eye separately and then compare these motion signals. Here we used an individual differences approach to test whether the two sources of information are processed via dissociated mechanisms, and to measure the relative importance of those mechanisms. Our results suggest the existence of two distinct mechanisms, each contributing to the perception of motion-in-depth in most observers. Additionally, for the first time, we demonstrate the relative prevalence of the two mechanisms within a normal population. In general, visual systems appear to rely mostly on the mechanism sensitive to changing binocular disparity, but perception of motion-in-depth is augmented by the presence of a less sensitive mechanism that uses interocular velocity differences. Occasionally, we find observers with the opposite pattern of sensitivity. More generally this work showcases the power of the individual differences approach in studying the functional organization of cognitive systems. PMID:21833221

  1. Autologous temporomandibular joint reconstruction independent of exogenous additives: a proof-of-concept study for guided self-generation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiao; Herrler, Tanja; Han, Dong; Liu, Kai; Huang, Rulin; Guba, Markus; Dai, Chuanchang; Li, Qingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Joint defects are complex and difficult to reconstruct. By exploiting the body’s own regenerative capacity, we aimed to individually generate anatomically precise neo-tissue constructs for autologous joint reconstruction without using any exogenous additives. In a goat model, CT scans of the mandibular condyle including articular surface and a large portion of the ascending ramus were processed using computer-aided design and manufacturing. A corresponding hydroxylapatite negative mold was printed in 3D and temporarily embedded into the transition zone of costal periosteum and perichondrium. A demineralized bone matrix scaffold implanted on the contralateral side served as control. Neo-tissue constructs obtained by guided self-generation exhibited accurate configuration, robust vascularization, biomechanical stability, and function. After autologous replacement surgery, the constructs showed stable results with similar anatomical, histological, and functional findings compared to native controls. Further studies are required to assess long-term outcome and possible extensions to other further applications. The absence of exogenous cells, growth factors, and scaffolds may facilitate clinical translation of this approach. PMID:27892493

  2. Clonazepam responsive opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome: additional evidence in favour of fastigial nucleus disinhibition hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Vimal Kumar; Chandra, Satish; Verma, Ritu; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2010-05-01

    Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome seen in 50% of children with neuroblastoma. Neural generator of opsoclonus and myoclonus is not known but evidences suggest the role of fastigial nucleus disinhibition from the loss of function of inhibitory (GABAergic) Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. We present a child with paraneoplastic opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome who responded well to clonazepam. Response to clonazepam is an evidence for the involvement of GABAergic neural circuits in the genesis of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome and is in agreement with fastigial nucleus disinhibition hypothesis.

  3. Additional Evidence for the Accuracy of Biographical Data: Long-Term Retest and Observer Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Garnett Stokes; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated accuracy of responses to biodata questionnaire using a test-retest design and informed external observers for verification. Responses from 237 subjects and 200 observers provided evidence that many responses to biodata questionnaire were accurate. Assessed sources of inaccuracy, including social desirability effects, and noted…

  4. Independent walking as a major skill for the development of anticipatory postural control: evidence from adjustments to predictable perturbations.

    PubMed

    Cignetti, Fabien; Zedka, Milan; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Assaiante, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Although there is suggestive evidence that a link exists between independent walking and the ability to establish anticipatory strategy to stabilize posture, the extent to which this skill facilitates the development of anticipatory postural control remains largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of independent walking on the infants' ability to anticipate predictable external perturbations. Non-walking infants, walking infants and adults were sitting on a platform that produced continuous rotation in the frontal plane. Surface electromyography (EMG) of neck and lower back muscles and the positions of markers located on the platform, the upper body and the head were recorded. Results from cross-correlation analysis between rectified and filtered EMGs and platform movement indicated that although muscle activation already occurred before platform movement in non-walking infants, only walking infants demonstrated an adult-like ability for anticipation. Moreover, results from further cross-correlation analysis between segmental angular displacement and platform movement together with measures of balance control at the end-points of rotation of the platform evidenced two sorts of behaviour. The adults behaved as a non-rigid non-inverted pendulum, rather stabilizing head in space, while both the walking and non-walking infants followed the platform, behaving as a rigid inverted pendulum. These results suggest that the acquisition of independent walking plays a role in the development of anticipatory postural control, likely improving the internal model for the sensorimotor control of posture. However, despite such improvement, integrating the dynamics of an external object, here the platform, within the model to maintain balance still remains challenging in infants.

  5. Independent Walking as a Major Skill for the Development of Anticipatory Postural Control: Evidence from Adjustments to Predictable Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Cignetti, Fabien; Zedka, Milan; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Assaiante, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Although there is suggestive evidence that a link exists between independent walking and the ability to establish anticipatory strategy to stabilize posture, the extent to which this skill facilitates the development of anticipatory postural control remains largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of independent walking on the infants’ ability to anticipate predictable external perturbations. Non-walking infants, walking infants and adults were sitting on a platform that produced continuous rotation in the frontal plane. Surface electromyography (EMG) of neck and lower back muscles and the positions of markers located on the platform, the upper body and the head were recorded. Results from cross-correlation analysis between rectified and filtered EMGs and platform movement indicated that although muscle activation already occurred before platform movement in non-walking infants, only walking infants demonstrated an adult-like ability for anticipation. Moreover, results from further cross-correlation analysis between segmental angular displacement and platform movement together with measures of balance control at the end-points of rotation of the platform evidenced two sorts of behaviour. The adults behaved as a non-rigid non-inverted pendulum, rather stabilizing head in space, while both the walking and non-walking infants followed the platform, behaving as a rigid inverted pendulum. These results suggest that the acquisition of independent walking plays a role in the development of anticipatory postural control, likely improving the internal model for the sensorimotor control of posture. However, despite such improvement, integrating the dynamics of an external object, here the platform, within the model to maintain balance still remains challenging in infants. PMID:23409171

  6. Molecular evidence for a thymus-independent partial T cell development in a FOXN1-/- athymic human fetus.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Anna; Panico, Luigi; Gorrese, Marisa; Bianchino, Gabriella; Barone, Maria V; Grieco, Vitina; Vitiello, Laura; D'Assante, Roberta; Romano, Rosa; Palamaro, Loredana; Scalia, Giulia; Vecchio, Luigi Del; Pignata, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The thymus is the primary organ able to support T cell ontogeny, abrogated in FOXN1(-/-) human athymia. Although evidence indicates that in animal models T lymphocytes may differentiate at extrathymic sites, whether this process is really thymus-independent has still to be clarified. In an athymic FOXN1(-/-) fetus, in which we previously described a total blockage of CD4(+) and partial blockage of CD8(+) cell development, we investigated whether intestine could play a role as extrathymic site of T-lymphopoiesis in humans. We document the presence of few extrathymically developed T lymphocytes and the presence in the intestine of CD3(+) and CD8(+), but not of CD4(+) cells, a few of them exhibiting a CD45RA(+) naïve phenotype. The expression of CD3εεpTα, RAG1 and RAG2 transcripts in the intestine and TCR gene rearrangement was also documented, thus indicating that in humans the partial T cell ontogeny occurring at extrathymic sites is a thymus- and FOXN1-independent process.

  7. Object categorisation, object naming, and viewpoint independence in visual remembering: evidence from young children's drawings of a novel object.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter; Gavin Bremner, J; Smart, Laura; Pitt, Tracy; Apsey, Denise

    2008-01-01

    A simple object-drawing task confirms a three-way association between object categorisation, viewpoint independence, and longer-term visual remembering. Young children (5- to 7-year-olds) drew a familiar object or a novel object, immediately after it had been hidden from view or on the following day. Both objects were shown from a full range of viewpoints or from just two viewpoints, from neither of which would either object normally be drawn after unrestricted viewing. When drawing from short-term memory after restricted viewing, both objects were most likely to be depicted from a seen viewpoint. When drawing from longer-term memory after restricted viewing, the novel object continued to be drawn from a seen viewpoint, but the mug was now most likely to be drawn from a preferred viewpoint from which it had not been seen. Naming the novel object with a novel count noun ("Look at this. This is a dax"), to signal that it belonged to an object category, resulted in it being drawn in the same way as the familiar object. The results concur with other evidence indicating that short-term and longer-term visual remembering are differentially associated with viewpoint-dependent representations of individual objects and viewpoint independent representations of object categories, respectively.

  8. Evidence That Certain Waste Tank Headspace Vapor Samples Were Contaminated by Semivolatile Polymer Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-09

    Vapor samples collected from the headspaces of the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks in 1994 and 1995 using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) were reported to contain trace levels of phthalates, antioxidants, and certain other industrial chemicals that did not have a logical origin in the waste. This report examines the evidence these chemicals were sampling artifacts (contamination) and identifies the chemicals reported as headspace constituents that may instead have been contaminants. Specific recommendations are given regarding the marking of certain chemicals as suspect on the basis they were sampling manifold contaminants.

  9. Ammonium catalyzed cyclitive additions: evidence for a cation-π interaction with alkynes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Edith; St Germain, Elijah; Cosme, Patrick; Maity, Pradip; Terentis, Andrew C; Lepore, Salvatore D

    2016-02-07

    The addition of carbamate nitrogen to a non-conjugated carbon-carbon triple bond is catalyzed by an ammonium salt leading to a cyclic product. Studies in homogeneous systems suggest that the ammonium agent facilitates nitrogen-carbon bond formation through a cation-π interaction with the alkyne unit that, for the first time, is directly observed by Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Ammonium Catalyzed Cyclitive Additions: Evidence for a Cation-π Interaction with Alkynes†

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Edith; St.Germain, Elijah; Cosme, Patrick; Maity, Pradip; Terentis, Andrew C.; Lepore, Salvatore D.

    2016-01-01

    The addition of carbamate nitrogen to a non-conjugated carbon-carbon triple bond is catalyzed by an ammonium salt leading to a cyclic product. Studies in homogeneous systems suggest that the ammonium agent facilitates nitrogen-carbon bond formation through a cation-π interaction with the alkyne unit that, for the first time, is directly observed by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26728333

  11. Additional Validity Evidence and Across-Group Equivalency of the "HOPE Teacher Rating Scale"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Scott J.; Gentry, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The "HOPE Scale" was developed to identify academic and social components of giftedness and talent in elementary-aged students with particular attention to students from low-income and/or culturally diverse families. Based on previous findings, additional research was conducted on revisions made to the "HOPE Scale". Items were…

  12. Additional Evidence against Shared Environmental Contributions to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Problems

    PubMed Central

    Burt, S. Alexandra; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Klump, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis (Burt, 2009) indicated that shared environmental influences (C) do not contribute to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Unfortunately, the meta-analysis relied almost exclusively on classical twin studies. Although useful in many ways, some of the assumptions of the classical twin model (e.g., dominant genetic and shared environmental influences do not simultaneously influence the phenotype) can artifactually decrease estimates of C. There is thus a need to confirm that dominant genetic influences are not suppressing estimates of C on ADHD. The current study sought to do just this via the use of a nuclear twin family model, which allows researchers to simultaneously model and estimate dominant genetic and shared environmental influences. We examined two independent samples of child twins: 312 pairs from the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR) and 854 pairs from the PrEschool Twin Study in Sweden (PETSS). Shared environmental influences were found to be statistically indistinguishable from zero and accounted for less than 5% of the variance. We conclude that the presence of dominant genetic influences does not account for the absence of C on ADHD. PMID:22566176

  13. Is the additional greenhouse effect already evident in the current climate?

    PubMed

    Raschke, E

    2001-11-01

    Several greenhouse gases, which are in part or entirely produced by human activities, have accumulated in the atmosphere since approximately the middle of the 19th century. They are assumed to have an additional greenhouse effect causing a further increase of atmospheric temperatures near the ground and a decrease in the layers above approximately 15 km altitude. The currently observed near-surface warming over nearly the entire globe is already considered by a large fraction of our society to be result of this additional greenhouse effect. Complete justification of this assumption is, however, not yet possible, because there are still too many unknowns in our knowledge of participating processes and in our modeling capabilities.

  14. Integrated fuzzy concentration addition-independent action (IFCA-IA) model outperforms two-stage prediction (TSP) for predicting mixture toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuang; Chen, Jingwen; Huang, Liping; Wang, Ying; Cai, Xiyun; Qiao, Xianliang; Dong, Yuying

    2009-02-01

    Mixture toxicities were determined for 12 industrial organic chemicals bearing four different modes of toxic action (MOAs) to Vibrio fischeri, to compare the predictability of the integrated fuzzy concentration addition-independent action (IFCA-IA) model and the two-stage prediction (TSP) model. Three mixtures were designed: The first and second mixtures were based on the ratios of each component at the 1% and 50% effect concentrations (EC(1) and EC(50)), respectively; and the third mixture contained an equimolar ratio of individual components. For the EC(1), EC(50) and equimolar ratio, prediction errors from the IFCA-IA model at the 50% experimental mixture effects were 0.3%, 6% and 0.6%, respectively; while for the TSP model, the corresponding errors were 2.8%, 19% and 24%, respectively. Thus, the IFCA-IA model performed better than the TSP model. The IFCA-IA model calculated two weight coefficients from the molecular structural descriptors, which weigh the relation between concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) through the fuzzy membership functions. Thus, MOAs are not pre-requisites for mixture toxicity prediction by the IFCA-IA approach, implying the practicability of this method in toxicity assessment of mixtures.

  15. Processing of multi-digit additions in high math-anxious individuals: psychophysiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Peña, María Isabel; Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the time course of neural processing of multi-digit additions in high- (HMA) and low-math anxious (LMA) individuals. Seventeen HMA and 17 LMA individuals were presented with two-digit additions and were asked to perform a verification task. Behavioral data showed that HMA individuals were slower and more error prone than their LMA peers, and that incorrect solutions were solved more slowly and less accurately than correct ones. Moreover, HMA individuals tended to need more time and commit more errors when having to verify incorrect solutions than correct ones. ERPs time-locked to the presentation of the addends (calculation phase) and to the presentation of the proposed solution (verification phase) were also analyzed. In both phases, a P2 component of larger amplitude was found for HMA individuals than for their LMA peers. Because the P2 component is considered to be a biomarker of the mobilization of attentional resources toward emotionally negative stimuli, these results suggest that HMA individuals may have invested more attentional resources both when processing the addends (calculation phase) and when they had to report whether the proposed solution was correct or not (verification phase), as compared to their LMA peers. Moreover, in the verification phase, LMA individuals showed a larger late positive component (LPC) for incorrect solutions at parietal electrodes than their HMA counterparts. The smaller LPC shown by HMA individuals when verifying incorrect solutions suggests that these solutions may have been appeared more plausible to them than to their LMA counterparts. PMID:26347705

  16. Violence against children: further evidence suggesting a relationship between burns, scalds, and the additional injuries.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Dragana; Krohn, Julia; Larson, Mandi; Lambe, Andrea; Püschel, Klaus; Kurth, Henrike

    2010-01-01

    Up to 22 % of all child maltreatment cases involve non-accidental burns or scalds. In the time period of 2000 until 2007, 20 children with non-accidental burns and scalds in conjunction with other mechanisms of injury were examined at children's hospitals in Hamburg and at the Institute of Legal Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, by experts in forensic medicine. The fact that these children presented with additional injuries due to blunt and sharp force and sometimes had signs of neglect emphasize the urgent need for a multidisciplinary cooperation between pediatricians and forensic medical experts to ensure the early identification and prevention of child maltreatment. A new approach for Germany, enforcing mandatory child well-being examinations is discussed.

  17. Evidence for an additional uppermost geological unit in the Medusae Fossae Formation, Equatorial Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Samantha; Balme, Matt; Hagermann, Axel

    2013-04-01

    The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is a geological formation comprising three geological units (members) spread across five principal outcrops. The MFF dominates roughly a quarter of the longitudinal extent of the equatorial region of Mars, extending east-west across a distance of ~ 5,500 km between the southern Elysium Planitia and the Tharsis region. The nature of these materials is often referred to as enigmatic, as their exact origin remains unknown. Harrison et al. (Icarus, 2010) presented new observations of outlying occurrences of MFF materials on the southern highlands, atop the dichotomy boundary. They presented two hypotheses to explain these observation: 1) the MFF had a much larger pre-erosional extent than previously thought or 2) these materials had initially been eroded from the main outcrops of the formation, then transported southward by wind and subsequently reworked. A subsequent extension of this work provided evidence for an even larger extent of outlying MFF materials, particularly around and south of the easternmost portions of the MFF. Here we present these new outlier data, together with new textural classification and facies mapping of this region of the MFF. These data show that MFF outlier textures, whilst external to the main MFF outcrops in many places, are also found superposing large areas of the "main" MFF formations. These data support the first of the two working hypotheses presented, but also suggest that these so-called outlying materials represent a previously unmapped, stratigraphically uppermost unit of the Medusae Fossae Formation. We also suggest that, based upon our own morphometric study of yardangs across members and analogue studies by de Silva et al. (Icarus, 2010), these represent a less indurated material than other units of the formation. In the overall context of the origins of the MFF, we find that our data are consistent with the Medusae Fossae materials being a large-scale ignimbrite complex, perhaps with

  18. Geochemical evidence for airborne dust additions to soils in Channel Islands National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Johnson, D.L.; Reheis, M.; Beann, J.; Skipp, G.; Fisher, E.; Jones, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that dust plays important roles in climate change, biogeochemical cycles, nutrient supply to ecosystems, and soil formation. In Channel Islands National Park, California, soils are clay-rich Vertisols or Alfisols and Mollisols with vertic properties. The soils are overlain by silt-rich mantles that contrast sharply with the underlying clay-rich horizons. Silt mantles contain minerals that are rare or absent in the volcanic rocks that dominate these islands. Immobile trace elements (Sc-Th-La and Ta-Nd-Cr) and rare-earth elements show that the basalt and andesite on the islands have a composition intermediate between upper-continental crust and oceanic crust. In contrast, the silt fractions and, to a lesser extent, clay fractions of the silt mantle have compositions closer to average upper-continental crust and very similar to Mojave Desert dust. Island shelves, exposed during the last glacial period, could have provided a source of eolian sediment for the silt mantles, but this is not supported by mineralogical data. We hypothesize that a more likely source for the silt-rich mantles is airborne dust from mainland California and Baja California, either from the Mojave Desert or from the continental shelf during glacial low stands of sea. Although average winds are from the northwest in coastal California, easterly winds occur numerous times of the year when "Santa Ana" conditions prevail, caused by a high-pressure cell centered over the Great Basin. The eolian silt mantles constitute an important medium of plant growth and provide evidence that abundant eolian silt and clay may be delivered to the eastern Pacific Ocean from inland desert sources. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  19. The transformer genes in the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi provide new evidence for duplications independent of complementary sex determination.

    PubMed

    Jia, L-Y; Xiao, J-H; Xiong, T-L; Niu, L-M; Huang, D-W

    2016-06-01

    Transformer (tra) is the key gene that turns on the sex-determination cascade in Drosophila melanogaster and in some other insects. The honeybee Apis mellifera has two duplicates of tra, one of which (complementary sex determiner, csd) is the primary signal for complementary sex-determination (CSD), regulating the other duplicate (feminizer). Two tra duplicates have been found in some other hymenopteran species, resulting in the assumption that a single ancestral duplication of tra took place in the Hymenoptera. Here, we searched for tra homologues and pseudogenes in the Hymenoptera, focusing on five newly published hymenopteran genomes. We found three tra copies in the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi. Further evolutionary and expression analyses also showed that the two duplicates (Csoltra-B and Csoltra-C) are under positive selection, and have female-specific expression, suggesting possible sex-related functions. Moreover, Aculeata species exhibit many pseudogenes generated by lineage-specific duplications. We conclude that phylogenetic reconstruction and pseudogene screening provide novel evidence supporting the hypothesis of independent duplications rather an ancestral origin of multiple tra paralogues in the Hymenoptera. The case of C. solmsi is the first example of a non-CSD species with duplicated tra, contrary to the previous assumption that derived tra paralogues function as the CSD locus.

  20. No Serological Evidence that Harbour Porpoises Are Additional Hosts of Influenza B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Bodewes, Rogier; van de Bildt, Marco W. G.; van Elk, Cornelis E.; Bunskoek, Paulien E.; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Smits, Saskia L.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses circulate among humans causing epidemics almost annually. While various hosts for influenza A viruses exist, influenza B viruses have been detected only in humans and seals. However, recurrent infections of seals in Dutch coastal waters with influenza B viruses that are antigenetically distinct from influenza B viruses circulating among humans suggest that influenza B viruses have been introduced into this seal population by another, non-human, host. Harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are sympatric with seals in these waters and are also occasionally in close contact with humans after stranding and subsequent rehabilitation. In addition, virus attachment studies demonstrated that influenza B viruses can bind to cells of the respiratory tract of these animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that harbour porpoises might be a reservoir of influenza B viruses. In the present study, an unique set of serum samples from 79 harbour porpoises, stranded alive on the Dutch coast between 2003 and 2013, was tested for the presence of antibodies against influenza B viruses by use of the hemagglutination inhibition test and for antibodies against influenza A viruses by use of a competitive influenza A nucleoprotein ELISA. No antibodies were detected against either virus, suggesting that influenza A and B virus infections of harbour porpoises in Dutch coastal waters are not common, which was supported by statistical analysis of the dataset. PMID:24551217

  1. Evidence for an Additional Heat Source in the Warm Ionized Medium of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, R. J.; Haffner, L. M.; Tufte, S. L.

    1999-11-01

    Spatial variations of the [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα line intensity ratios observed in the gaseous halo of the Milky Way and other galaxies are inconsistent with pure photoionization models. They appear to require a supplemental heating mechanism that increases the electron temperature at low densities, ne. This would imply that in addition to photoionization, which has a heating rate per unit volume proportional to n2e, there is another source of heat with a rate per unit volume proportional to a lower power of ne. One possible mechanism is the dissipation of interstellar plasma turbulence, which, according to Minter & Spangler, heats the ionized interstellar medium in the Milky Way at a rate of ~1×10-25ne ergs cm-3 s-1. If such a source were present, it would dominate over photoionization heating in regions where ne<~0.1 cm-3, producing the observed increases in the [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα intensity ratios at large distances from the galactic midplane as well as accounting for the constancy of [S II]/[N II], which is not explained by pure photoionization. Other supplemental heating sources, such as magnetic reconnection, cosmic rays, or photoelectric emission from small grains, could also account for these observations, provided they supply ~10-5 ergs s-1 per square centimeter of the Galactic disk to the warm ionized medium.

  2. An independent event of Neolithic cattle domestication on the South-eastern Balkans: evidence from prehistoric aurochs and cattle populations.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Peter; Spassov, Nikolai; Iliev, Nikolai; Radoslavov, Georgi

    2015-12-29

    Neolithic/Chalcolithic livestock domestication is an important issue for understanding the mode of life and economics of ancient human communities. The Balkans appears to be a crucial point for clarifying the socio-economical interrelations between the Oldest Middle Eastern/Anatolian and newly formed cultures in Europe. Two main hypotheses regarding the early history of cattle domestication, from their ancestor - the aurochs, have been discussed: multipoint domestication centers or single point origin and subsequent worldwide dissemination. In this study, we provide molecular data about the Balkan aurochs for the first time as well as additional information for the Neolithic/Chalcolithic cattle populations in this geographic location. A total of seventeen samples from different ancient settlements were analyzed according to D-loop control region. The results did not show different genetic profile of wild and domestic populations. All haplotypes were found to belong to the basic macro-haplogroup T. The majority of specimens (n = 14) were defined to form a new Balkan-specific T6 haplogroup. Only two of the ancient samples analyzed were assigned to the T3 haplotype predominating in Europe. We attempt to throw new light on the earliest cattle domestication events in Europe, thus, the results presented are discussed in two directions: (a) The possibility of local independent domestication processes in Neolithic South-Eastern Europe; (b) The single point domestication in the Middle East and subsequent cattle dissemination in Europe. Our data does not exclude the possibility for independent domestication events followed by a second wave of parallel dissemination of cattle herds via the Mediterranean route.

  3. Molecular scale evidence of new particle formation via sequential addition of HIO3

    PubMed Central

    Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Jokinen, Tuija; Henschel, Henning; Junninen, Heikki; Kontkanen, Jenni; Richters, Stefanie; Kangasluoma, Juha; Franchin, Alessandro; Peräkylä, Otso; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ehn, Mikael; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kurten, Theo; Berndt, Torsten; Petäjä, Tuukka; Worsnop, Douglas; Ceburnis, Darius; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku; O’Dowd, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation and subsequent cluster growth leads to the formation of new aerosol particles in the atmosphere1. Nucleation of sulphuric acid and organic vapours is thought to be responsible for new particle formation over continents1,2 while iodine oxide vapours have been implicated in particle formation over coastal regions3–7. Molecular clustering pathways involved in atmospheric particle formation have been elucidated in controlled laboratory studies of chemically simple systems2,8–10. But no direct molecular-level observations of nucleation in atmospheric field conditions involving either sulphuric acid, organic or iodine oxide vapours have been reported to date11. Here we report field data from Mace Head, Ireland and supporting data from northern Greenland and Queen Maud Land, Antarctica that allow for the identification of the molecular steps involved in new particle formation in an iodine-rich, coastal atmospheric environment. We find that the formation and initial growth process is almost exclusively driven by iodine oxoacids and iodine oxide vapours with average resulting cluster O:I ratios of 2.4. Based on the high O:I ratio, together with observed high concentrations of iodic acid, HIO3, we suggest that cluster formation primarily proceeds by sequential addition of iodic acid HIO3, followed by intra-cluster restructuring to I2O5 and recycling of water in the atmosphere or upon drying. Overall, our study provides ambient atmospheric molecular-level observations of nucleation, supporting the previously suggested role of iodine containing species in new particle formation3–7, 12–18, and identifies the key nucleating compound. PMID:27580030

  4. Molecular-scale evidence of aerosol particle formation via sequential addition of HIO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Jokinen, Tuija; Henschel, Henning; Junninen, Heikki; Kontkanen, Jenni; Richters, Stefanie; Kangasluoma, Juha; Franchin, Alessandro; Peräkylä, Otso; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ehn, Mikael; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kurten, Theo; Berndt, Torsten; Petäjä, Tuukka; Worsnop, Douglas; Ceburnis, Darius; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku; O'Dowd, Colin

    2016-09-01

    Homogeneous nucleation and subsequent cluster growth leads to the formation of new aerosol particles in the atmosphere. The nucleation of sulfuric acid and organic vapours is thought to be responsible for the formation of new particles over continents, whereas iodine oxide vapours have been implicated in particle formation over coastal regions. The molecular clustering pathways that are involved in atmospheric particle formation have been elucidated in controlled laboratory studies of chemically simple systems, but direct molecular-level observations of nucleation in atmospheric field conditions that involve sulfuric acid, organic or iodine oxide vapours have yet to be reported. Here we present field data from Mace Head, Ireland, and supporting data from northern Greenland and Queen Maud Land, Antarctica, that enable us to identify the molecular steps involved in new particle formation in an iodine-rich, coastal atmospheric environment. We find that the formation and initial growth process is almost exclusively driven by iodine oxoacids and iodine oxide vapours, with average oxygen-to-iodine ratios of 2.4 found in the clusters. On the basis of this high ratio, together with the high concentrations of iodic acid (HIO3) observed, we suggest that cluster formation primarily proceeds by sequential addition of HIO3, followed by intracluster restructuring to I2O5 and recycling of water either in the atmosphere or on dehydration. Our study provides ambient atmospheric molecular-level observations of nucleation, supporting the previously suggested role of iodine-containing species in the formation of new aerosol particles, and identifies the key nucleating compound.

  5. Molecular-scale evidence of aerosol particle formation via sequential addition of HIO3.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Jokinen, Tuija; Henschel, Henning; Junninen, Heikki; Kontkanen, Jenni; Richters, Stefanie; Kangasluoma, Juha; Franchin, Alessandro; Peräkylä, Otso; Rissanen, Matti P; Ehn, Mikael; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kurten, Theo; Berndt, Torsten; Petäjä, Tuukka; Worsnop, Douglas; Ceburnis, Darius; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku; O'Dowd, Colin

    2016-09-22

    Homogeneous nucleation and subsequent cluster growth leads to the formation of new aerosol particles in the atmosphere. The nucleation of sulfuric acid and organic vapours is thought to be responsible for the formation of new particles over continents, whereas iodine oxide vapours have been implicated in particle formation over coastal regions. The molecular clustering pathways that are involved in atmospheric particle formation have been elucidated in controlled laboratory studies of chemically simple systems, but direct molecular-level observations of nucleation in atmospheric field conditions that involve sulfuric acid, organic or iodine oxide vapours have yet to be reported. Here we present field data from Mace Head, Ireland, and supporting data from northern Greenland and Queen Maud Land, Antarctica, that enable us to identify the molecular steps involved in new particle formation in an iodine-rich, coastal atmospheric environment. We find that the formation and initial growth process is almost exclusively driven by iodine oxoacids and iodine oxide vapours, with average oxygen-to-iodine ratios of 2.4 found in the clusters. On the basis of this high ratio, together with the high concentrations of iodic acid (HIO3) observed, we suggest that cluster formation primarily proceeds by sequential addition of HIO3, followed by intracluster restructuring to I2O5 and recycling of water either in the atmosphere or on dehydration. Our study provides ambient atmospheric molecular-level observations of nucleation, supporting the previously suggested role of iodine-containing species in the formation of new aerosol particles, and identifies the key nucleating compound.

  6. A conservative method of testing whether combination analgesics produce additive or synergistic effects using evidence from acute pain and migraine.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A; Derry, C J; Derry, S; Straube, S; McQuay, H J

    2012-04-01

    Fixed-dose combination analgesics are used widely, and available both on prescription and over-the-counter. Combination drugs should provide more analgesia than with any single drug in the combination, but there is no evidence in humans about whether oral combinations have just additive effects, or are synergistic or even subadditive. We suggest that the measured result for the combination would be the summation of the absolute benefit increase (effect of active drug minus effect of placebo) of each component of a combination if effects were (merely) additive, and greater than the sum of the absolute benefits if they were synergistic. We tested measured effects of combination analgesics against the sum of the absolute benefits in acute pain and migraine using meta-analysis where individual components and combinations were tested against placebo in the same trials, and verified the result with meta-analyses where individual components and combinations were tested against placebo in different trials. Results showed that expected numbers needed to treat (NNT) for additive effects were generally within the 95% confidence interval of measured NNTs. This was true for combinations of paracetamol plus ibuprofen and paracetamol plus opioids in acute pain, and naproxen plus sumatriptan in migraine, but not where efficacy was very low or very high, nor combinations of paracetamol plus dextropropoxyphene. There was no evidence of synergy, defined as supra-additive effects.

  7. Apology in the criminal justice setting: evidence for including apology as an additional component in the legal system.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Carrie J

    2002-01-01

    The criminal justice system has reached unprecedented scope in the United States, with over 6.4 million people under some type of supervision. Remedies that have the potential to reduce this number are continually being sought. This article analyzes an innovative strategy currently being reconsidered in criminal justice: the apology. Despite a legal system that only sporadically acknowledges it, evidence for the use of apology is supported by social science research, current criminal justice theories, case law, and empirical studies. Social psychological, sociological and socio-legal studies pinpoint the elements and function of apology, what makes apologies effective, and concerns about apology if it were implemented in the criminal justice system. Theoretical evidence is examined (including restorative justice, therapeutic jurisprudence, crime, shame, and reintegration) to explore the process of apology in the criminal justice context. Attribution theory and social conduct theory are used to explain the apology process specifically for victims and offenders. A brief examination of case law reveals that though apology has no formal place in criminal law, it has surfaced recently under the federal sentencing guidelines. Finally, empirical evidence in criminal justice settings reveals that offenders want to apologize and victims desire an apology. Moreover, by directly addressing the harmful act, apology may be the link to reduced recidivism for offenders, as well as empowerment for victims. This evidence combined suggests that apology is worthy of further study as a potentially valuable addition to the criminal justice process.

  8. Evidence for susceptibility genes to familial Wilms tumour in addition to WT1, FWT1 and FWT2

    PubMed Central

    Rapley, E A; Barfoot, R; Bonaïti-Pellié, C; Chompret, A; Foulkes, W; Perusinghe, N; Reeve, A; Royer-Pokora, B; Schumacher, V; Shelling, A; Skeen, J; Tourreil, S de; Weirich, A; Pritchard-Jones, K; Stratton, M R; Rahman, N

    2000-01-01

    Three loci have been implicated in familial Wilms tumour: WT1 located on chromosome 11p13, FWT1 on 17q12-q21, and FWT2 on 19q13. Two out of 19 Wilms tumour families evaluated showed strong evidence against linkage at all three loci. Both of these families contained at least three cases of Wilms tumour indicating that they were highly likely to be due to genetic susceptibility and therefore that one or more additional familial Wilms tumour susceptibility genes remain to be found. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901367

  9. STAT4 Associates with SLE Through Two Independent Effects that Correlate with Gene Expression and Act Additively with IRF5 to Increase Risk

    PubMed Central

    Abelson, Anna-Karin; Delgado-Vega, Angélica M.; Kozyrev, Sergey V.; Sánchez, Elena; Velázquez-Cruz, Rafael; Eriksson, Niclas; Wojcik, Jerome; Reddy, Prasad Linga; Lima, Guadalupe; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Migliaresi, Sergio; Baca, Vicente; Orozco, Lorena; Witte, Torsten; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Abderrahim, Hadi; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Gutiérrez, Carmen; Suárez, Ana; González-Escribano, Maria Francisca; Martin, Javier; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To confirm and define the genetic association of STAT4 and systemic lupus erythematosus, investigate the possibility of correlations with differential splicing and/or expression levels, and genetic interaction with IRF5. Methods 30 tag SNPs were genotyped in an independent set of Spanish cases and controls. SNPs surviving correction for multiple tests were genotyped in 5 new sets of cases and controls for replication. STAT4 cDNA was analyzed by 5’-RACE PCR and sequencing. Expression levels were measured by quantitative PCR. Results In the fine-mapping, four SNPs were significant after correction for multiple testing, with rs3821236 and rs3024866 as the strongest signals, followed by the previously associated rs7574865, and by rs1467199. Association was replicated in all cohorts. After conditional regression analyses, two major independent signals represented by SNPs rs3821236 and rs7574865, remained significant across the sets. These SNPs belong to separate haplotype blocks. High levels of STAT4 expression correlated with SNPs rs3821236, rs3024866 (both in the same haplotype block) and rs7574865 but not with other SNPs. We also detected transcription of alternative tissue-specific exons 1, indicating presence of tissue-specific promoters of potential importance in the expression of STAT4. No interaction with associated SNPs of IRF5 was observed using regression analysis. Conclusions These data confirm STAT4 as a susceptibility gene for SLE and suggest the presence of at least two functional variants affecting levels of STAT4. Our results also indicate that both genes STAT4 and IRF5 act additively to increase risk for SLE. PMID:19019891

  10. Induction of neuronal apoptosis by camptothecin, an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase-I: evidence for cell cycle-independent toxicity

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Camptothecin is an S-phase-specific anticancer agent that inhibits the activity of the enzyme DNA topoisomerase-I (topo-I). Irreversible DNA double-strand breaks are produced during DNA synthesis in the presence of camptothecin, suggesting that this agent should not be toxic to nondividing cells, such as neurons. Unexpectedly, camptothecin induced significant, dose-dependent cell death of postmitotic rat cortical neurons in vitro; astrocytes were more resistant. Aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha, did not prevent camptothecin-induced neuronal death, while death was prevented by actinomycin D and 5,6- dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl benzimidazole as well as cycloheximide and anisomycin, inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis, respectively. Camptothecin-induced neuronal death was apoptotic, as characterized by chromatin condensation, cytoplasmic shrinking, plasma membrane blebbing, and fragmentation of neurites. DNA fragmentation was also confirmed by the use of the in situ DNA end labeling assay. In addition, aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of the apoptotic endonuclease, partially protected against camptothecin-induced neuronal death. The toxicity of stereoisomers of a camptothecin analogue was stereospecific, demonstrating that toxicity was a result of inhibition of topo-I. The difference in sensitivity to camptothecin between neurons and astrocytes correlated with their transcriptional activity and level of topo-I protein expression. These data indicate important roles for topo-I in postmitotic neurons and suggest that topo-I inhibitors can induce apoptosis independent of DNA synthesis. We suggest a model based on transcriptionally mediated DNA damage, a novel mechanism of action of topo-I poisons. PMID:8707853

  11. Plant Functional Diversity Can Be Independent of Species Diversity: Observations Based on the Impact of 4-Yrs of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions in an Alpine Meadow.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Cheng, Ji-Min; Yu, Kai-Liang; Epstein, Howard E; Guo, Liang; Jing, Guang-Hua; Zhao, Jie; Du, Guo-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have widely documented the decrease in species diversity in response to addition of nutrients, however functional diversity is often independent from species diversity. In this study, we conducted a field experiment to examine the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization ((NH4)2 HPO4) at 0, 15, 30 and 60 g m-2 yr-1 (F0, F15, F30 and F60) after 4 years of continuous fertilization on functional diversity and species diversity, and its relationship with productivity in an alpine meadow community on the Tibetan Plateau. To this purpose, three community-weighted mean trait values (specific leaf area, SLA; mature plant height, MPH; and seed size, SS) for 30 common species in each fertilization level were determined; three components of functional diversity (functional richness, FRic; functional evenness, FEve; and Rao's index of quadratic entropy, FRao) were quantified. Our results showed that: (i) species diversity sharply decreased, but functional diversity remained stable with fertilization; (ii) community-weighted mean traits (SLA and MPH) had a significant increase along the fertilization level; (iii) aboveground biomass was not correlated with functional diversity, but it was significantly correlated with species diversity and MPH. Our results suggest that decreases in species diversity due to fertilization do not result in corresponding changes in functional diversity. Functional identity of species may be more important than functional diversity in influencing aboveground productivity in this alpine meadow community, and our results also support the mass ratio hypothesis; that is, the traits of the dominant species influenced the community biomass production.

  12. Plant Functional Diversity Can Be Independent of Species Diversity: Observations Based on the Impact of 4-Yrs of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions in an Alpine Meadow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Cheng, Ji-Min; Yu, Kai-Liang; Epstein, Howard E.; Guo, Liang; Jing, Guang-Hua; Zhao, Jie; Du, Guo-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have widely documented the decrease in species diversity in response to addition of nutrients, however functional diversity is often independent from species diversity. In this study, we conducted a field experiment to examine the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization ((NH4)2 HPO4) at 0, 15, 30 and 60 g m-2 yr-1 (F0, F15, F30 and F60) after 4 years of continuous fertilization on functional diversity and species diversity, and its relationship with productivity in an alpine meadow community on the Tibetan Plateau. To this purpose, three community-weighted mean trait values (specific leaf area, SLA; mature plant height, MPH; and seed size, SS) for 30 common species in each fertilization level were determined; three components of functional diversity (functional richness, FRic; functional evenness, FEve; and Rao’s index of quadratic entropy, FRao) were quantified. Our results showed that: (i) species diversity sharply decreased, but functional diversity remained stable with fertilization; (ii) community-weighted mean traits (SLA and MPH) had a significant increase along the fertilization level; (iii) aboveground biomass was not correlated with functional diversity, but it was significantly correlated with species diversity and MPH. Our results suggest that decreases in species diversity due to fertilization do not result in corresponding changes in functional diversity. Functional identity of species may be more important than functional diversity in influencing aboveground productivity in this alpine meadow community, and our results also support the mass ratio hypothesis; that is, the traits of the dominant species influenced the community biomass production. PMID:26295345

  13. Evidence that protons can be the active catalysts in Lewis acid mediated hetero-Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Tobias C; Yu, Jin-Quan; Spencer, Jonathan B

    2004-01-23

    The mechanism of Lewis acid catalysed hetero-Michael addition reactions of weakly basic nucleophiles to alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones was investigated. Protons, rather than metal ions, were identified as the active catalysts. Other mechanisms have been ruled out by analyses of side products and of stoichiometric enone-catalyst mixtures and by the use of radical inhibitors. No evidence for the involvement of pi-olefin-metal complexes or for carbonyl-metal-ion interactions was obtained. The reactions did not proceed in the presence of the non-coordinating base 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine. An excellent correlation of catalytic activities with cation hydrolysis constants was obtained. Different reactivities of mono- and dicarbonyl substrates have been rationalised. A (1)H NMR probe for the assessment of proton generation was established and Lewis acids have been classified according to their propensity to hydrolyse in organic solvents. Brønsted acid-catalysed conjugate addition reactions of nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and carbon nucleophiles are developed and implications for asymmetric Lewis acid catalysis are discussed.

  14. Computational, structural, and kinetic evidence that Vibrio vulnificus FrsA is not a cofactor-independent pyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kellett, Whitney F; Brunk, Elizabeth; Desai, Bijoy J; Fedorov, Alexander A; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Richards, Nigel G J

    2013-03-19

    The fermentation-respiration switch (FrsA) protein in Vibrio vulnificus was recently reported to catalyze the cofactor-independent decarboxylation of pyruvate. We now report quantum mechanical/molecular mechenical calculations that examine the energetics of C-C bond cleavage for a pyruvate molecule bound within the putative active site of FrsA. These calculations suggest that the barrier to C-C bond cleavage in the bound substrate is 28 kcal/mol, which is similar to that estimated for the uncatalyzed decarboxylation of pyruvate in water at 25 °C. In agreement with the theoretical predictions, no pyruvate decarboxylase activity was detected for recombinant FrsA protein that could be crystallized and structurally characterized. These results suggest that the functional annotation of FrsA as a cofactor-independent pyruvate decarboxylase is incorrect.

  15. Computational, Structural and Kinetic Evidence that Vibrio vulnificus FrsA is not a Cofactor-Independent Pyruvate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Kellett, Whitney F.; Brunk, Elizabeth; Desai, Bijoy J.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The fermentation-respiration switch (FrsA) protein in Vibrio vulnificus was recently reported to catalyze the cofactor-independent decarboxylation of pyruvate. We now report QM/MM calculations that examine the energetics of C-C bond cleavage for a pyruvate molecule bound within the putative active site of FrsA. These calculations suggest that the barrier to C-C bond cleavage in the bound substrate is 28 kcal/mol, which is similar to that estimated for the uncatalyzed decarboxylation of pyruvate in water at 25 °C. In agreement with the theoretical predictions, no pyruvate decarboxylase activity was detected for recombinant FrsA protein that could be crystallized and structurally characterized. These results suggest that the functional annotation of FrsA as a cofactor-independent pyruvate decarboxylase is incorrect. PMID:23452154

  16. Implicit Memory Is Independent from IQ and Age but Not from Etiology: Evidence from Down and Williams Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicari, S.; Verucci, L.; Carlesimo, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In the last few years, experimental data have been reported on differences in implicit memory processes of genetically distinct groups of individuals with Intellectual Disability (ID). These evidences are relevant for the more general debate on supposed asynchrony of cognitive maturation in children with abnormal brain development.…

  17. Transit Timing Variation Measurements of WASP-12b and Qatar-1b: No Evidence Of Additional Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2017-02-01

    WASP-12b and Qatar-1b are transiting hot Jupiters for which previous works have suggested the presence of transit timing variations (TTVs) indicative of additional bodies in these systems—an Earth-mass planet in WASP-12 and a brown-dwarf mass object in Qatar-1. Here, we present 23 new WASP-12b and 18 new Qatar-1b complete (or nearly complete) transit observations. We perform global system fits to all of our light curves for each system, as well as RV and stellar spectroscopic parameters from the literature. The global fits provide refined system parameters and uncertainties for each system, including precise transit center times for each transit. The transit model residuals of the combined and five minute binned light curves have an rms of 183 and 255 parts per million (ppm) for WASP-12b and Qatar-1b, respectively. Most of the WASP-12b system parameter values from this work are consistent with values from previous studies, but have ∼40%–50% smaller uncertainties. Most of the Qatar-1b system parameter values and uncertainties from this work are consistent with values recently reported in the literature. We find no convincing evidence for sinusoidal TTVs with a semi-amplitude of more than ∼35 and ∼25 s in the WASP-12b and Qatar-1b systems, respectively.

  18. Predictors of victim disclosure in child sexual abuse: Additional evidence from a sample of incarcerated adult sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Benoit; Wortley, Richard

    2015-05-01

    The under-reporting of child sexual abuse by victims is a serious problem that may prolong the suffering of victims and leave perpetrators free to continue offending. Yet empirical evidence indicates that victim disclosure rates are low. In this study, we perform regression analysis with a sample of 369 adult child sexual offenders to examine potential predictors of victim disclosure. Specifically, we extend the range of previously examined potential predictors of victim disclosure and investigate interaction effects in order to better capture under which circumstances victim disclosure is more likely. The current study differs from previous studies in that it examines the impact of victim and offense variables on victim disclosure from the perspective of the offender. In line with previous studies, we found that disclosure increased with the age of the victim and if penetration had occurred. In addition, we found that disclosure increased when the victim came from a non-dysfunctional family and resisted the abuse. The presence of an interaction effect highlighted the impact of the situation on victim disclosure. This effect indicated that as victims get older, they are more likely to disclose the abuse when they are not living with the offender at the time of abuse, but less likely to do so when they are living with the offender at the time of abuse. These findings are discussed in relation to previous studies and the need to facilitate victim disclosure.

  19. Modality independence of order coding in working memory: Evidence from cross-modal order interference at recall.

    PubMed

    Vandierendonck, André

    2016-01-01

    Working memory researchers do not agree on whether order in serial recall is encoded by dedicated modality-specific systems or by a more general modality-independent system. Although previous research supports the existence of autonomous modality-specific systems, it has been shown that serial recognition memory is prone to cross-modal order interference by concurrent tasks. The present study used a serial recall task, which was performed in a single-task condition and in a dual-task condition with an embedded memory task in the retention interval. The modality of the serial task was either verbal or visuospatial, and the embedded tasks were in the other modality and required either serial or item recall. Care was taken to avoid modality overlaps during presentation and recall. In Experiment 1, visuospatial but not verbal serial recall was more impaired when the embedded task was an order than when it was an item task. Using a more difficult verbal serial recall task, verbal serial recall was also more impaired by another order recall task in Experiment 2. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis of modality-independent order coding. The implications for views on short-term recall and the multicomponent view of working memory are discussed.

  20. Evidence of Rapidly Warming Rivers in the UK from an Extensive Additive Modelling Study at the National Scale Using R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    River water temperature data exhibit non-linear behaviour over the past 50 or so years. Standard techniques for identifying and quantifying trends have centred around the use of linear regression and Mann-Kendall and Thiel-Sen procedures. Observational data from UK rivers suggest that temperatures are far more variable then assumed under these statistical models. In a national-scale assessment of the response of riverine systems to global climatic change, an additive model framework was employed to model patterns in water temperatures from a large database of temporal observational data. Models were developed using R, which allowed for the deployment of cutting-edge additive modelling techniques to describe trends at 2773 sites across England and Wales, UK. At a subset of sites, additive models were used to model long-term trends, trends within seasons and the long-term variation in the seasonal pattern of water temperatures. Changes in water temperature have important consequences for aquatic ecology, with some species being particularly sensitive even to small shifts in temperature during some or all of their lifecycle. While there are many studies reporting increasing regional and global air temperatures, evidence for changes in river water temperature has thus far been site specific and/or from sites heavily influenced by human activities that could themselves lead to warming. Here I present selected results from a national-scale assessment of changing river water temperatures, covering the whole of England and Wales, comprising data from 2,773 locations. Positive trends in water temperature were observed at 86% of sites. At a subset of sites, seasonal trend models were developed, which showed that 90% of locations demonstrated statistically significant increases in water temperature during Autumn and Winter periods. Multivariate smoothers, that allow for within-year and longer-term trend interactions in time, suggest that periods of warmer waters now extend

  1. Evidence that the multifunctional polypeptides of vertebrate and fungal fatty acid synthases have arisen by independent gene fusion events.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, A D; Goldring, J P; Hardie, D G

    1983-10-17

    The enoyl reductase (NADPH binding site) of rabbit mammary fatty acid synthase has been radioactively labelled using pyridoxal phosphate and sodium [3H]borohydride. Using this method we have been able to add this site to the four sites whose location has already been mapped within the multifunctional polypeptide chain of the protein. The results show that the enoyl reductase lies between the 3-oxoacylsynthase and the acyl carrier. This confirms that the active sites occur in a different order on the single multifunctional polypeptide of vertebrate fatty acid synthase and the two multifunctional polypeptides of fungal fatty acid synthase, and suggests that these two systems have arisen by independent gene fusion events.

  2. Frequency of independent origins of viviparity among caecilians (Gymnophiona): evidence from the first 'live-bearing' Asian amphibian.

    PubMed

    Gower, D J; Giri, V; Dharne, M S; Shouche, Y S

    2008-09-01

    Viviparity is reported for Gegeneophis seshachari (Gymnophiona: Caeciliidae) from a gravid female containing four oviductal foetuses. The oviducts are highly vascularized and contain patches of thickened, layered tissue similar to foetal gut contents. Gegeneophis seshachari probably resemble other viviparous caecilians in having foetuses that ingest thickened oviduct lining using specialized deciduous teeth. This is the first report of viviparity in Asian amphibians and Indo-Seychellean caeciliids. Gegeneophis is the only caecilian genus known to include oviparous and viviparous species, and G. seshachari is the smallest known viviparous caecilian. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences supports assignment of G. seshachari to a monophyletic Gegeneophis. Character optimization indicates that viviparity has evolved independently at least four times within Gymnophiona--a rate of incidence relative to the number of extant species that is higher than for other vertebrate groups except squamate reptiles. Our findings strengthen the proposal that caecilian reproduction demands further attention.

  3. Equatorial plasma fountain and its effects over three locations: Evidence for an additional layer, the F3 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Bailey, G. J.; Abdu, M. A.; Oyama, K. I.; Richards, P. G.; MacDougall, J.; Batista, I. S.

    1997-02-01

    The equatorial plasma fountain and equatorial anomaly in the ionospheres over Jicamarca (77°W), Trivandrum (77°E), and Fortaleza (38°W) are presented using the Sheffield University plasmasphere-ionosphere model under magnetically quiet equinoctial conditions at high solar activity. The daytime plasma fountain and its effects in the regions outside the fountain lead to the formation of an additional layer, the F3 layer, at latitudes within about plus or minus 10° of the magnetic equator in each ionosphere. The maximum plasma concentration of the F3 layer, which occurs at about 550 km altitude, becomes greater than that of the F2 layer for a short period of time before noon when the vertical E×B drift is large. Within the F3 layer the plasma temperature decreases by as much as 100 K. The ionograms recorded at Fortaleza on January 15, 1995, provide observational evidence for the development and decay of an F3 layer before noon. The neutral wind, which causes large north-south asymmetries in the plasma fountain in each ionosphere during both daytime and nighttime, becomes least effective during the prereversal strengthening of the upward drift. During this time the plasma fountain is symmetrical with respect to the magnetic equator and rises to over 1200 km altitude at the equator, with accompanying plasma density depletions in the bottomside of the underlying F region. The north-south asymmetries of the equatorial plasma fountain and equatorial anomaly are more strongly dependent upon the displacement of the geomagnetic and geographic equators (Jicamarca and Trivandrum) than on the magnetic declination angle (Fortaleza).

  4. Evidence from vergence eye movements that disparities defined by luminance and contrast are sensed by independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rambold, Holger A; Sheliga, Boris M; Miles, Frederick A

    2010-12-29

    We recorded the initial disparity vergence responses (DVRs) elicited by 1-D sinusoidal gratings differing in phase at the two eyes by 1/4 wavelength and defined by luminance modulation (LM) or contrast modulation (CM) of dynamic binary noise. Both LM and CM stimuli elicited DVRs, but those to CM had longer latency (on average by ∼20 ms). DVRs showed sigmoidal dependence on depth of modulation, with higher thresholds for CM than for LM. With both LM and CM stimuli, fixing the modulation at one eye well above threshold rendered the DVR hypersensitive to low-level modulation at the other eye (dichoptic facilitation). Disparities defined by LM at one eye and CM at the other generated weak DVRs in the "wrong" direction, consistent with mediation entirely by distortion products associated with the CM stimulus. These (reversed) DVRs could be nulled by adding LM to the CM stimulus (in phase), and the greater the depth of the CM, the greater the added LM required for nulling, exactly as predicted by a simple compressive non-linearity. We conclude that disparities defined by LM and by CM are sensed by independent cortical mechanisms, at least for the purposes of generating short-latency vergence eye movements to disparity steps.

  5. On the selection of words and oral motor responses: evidence of a response-independent fronto-parietal network.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pascale; Gracco, Vincent L

    2010-01-01

    Several brain areas including the medial and lateral premotor areas, and the prefrontal cortex, are thought to be involved in response selection. It is unclear, however, what the specific contribution of each of these areas is. It is also unclear whether the response selection process operates independent of response modality or whether a number of specialized processes are recruited depending on the behaviour of interest. In the present study, the neural substrates for different response selection modes (volitional and stimulus-driven) were compared, using sparse-sampling functional magnetic resonance imaging, for two different response modalities: words and comparable oral motor gestures. Results demonstrate that response selection relies on a network of prefrontal, premotor and parietal areas, with the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) at the core of the process. Overall, this network is sensitive to the manner in which responses are selected, despite the absence of a medio-lateral axis, as was suggested by Goldberg (1985). In contrast, this network shows little sensitivity to the modality of the response, suggesting of a domain-general selection process. Theoretical implications of these results are discussed.

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by CPA47 cells - Evidence for a divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Chen, Y. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is rapidly cleared and degraded in vivo. Nonguanylate-cyclase receptors (C-ANPR) and a metalloproteinase, neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) (NEP 24.11), are thought to be responsible for its metabolism. We investigated the mechanisms of ANP degradation by an endothelial-derived cell line, CPA47. CPA47 cells degraded 88 percent of 125I-ANP after 1 h at 37 degrees C as determined by HPLC. Medium preconditioned by these cells degraded 41 percent of the 125I-ANP, and this activity was inhibited by a divalent cation chelator, EDTA. Furthermore, a cell-surface proteolytic activity degraded 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA when receptor-mediated endocytosis was inhibited either by low temperature (4 degrees C) or by hyperosmolarity at 37 degrees C. The metalloproteinase, NEP 24.11, is unlikely to be the cell-surface peptidase because 125I-ANP is degraded by CPA47 cells at 4 degrees C in the presence of 5 mM EDTA. These data indicate that CPA47 cells can degrade ANP by a novel divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity.

  7. Independence of long-term contextual memory and short-term perceptual hypotheses: Evidence from contextual cueing of interrupted search.

    PubMed

    Schlagbauer, Bernhard; Mink, Maurice; Müller, Hermann J; Geyer, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Observers are able to resume an interrupted search trial faster relative to responding to a new, unseen display. This finding of rapid resumption is attributed to short-term perceptual hypotheses generated on the current look and confirmed upon subsequent looks at the same display. It has been suggested that the contents of perceptual hypotheses are similar to those of other forms of memory acquired long-term through repeated exposure to the same search displays over the course of several trials, that is, the memory supporting "contextual cueing." In three experiments, we investigated the relationship between short-term perceptual hypotheses and long-term contextual memory. The results indicated that long-term, contextual memory of repeated displays neither affected the generation nor the confirmation of short-term perceptual hypotheses for these displays. Furthermore, the analysis of eye movements suggests that long-term memory provides an initial benefit in guiding attention to the target, whereas in subsequent looks guidance is entirely based on short-term perceptual hypotheses. Overall, the results reveal a picture of both long- and short-term memory contributing to reliable performance gains in interrupted search, while exerting their effects in an independent manner.

  8. The suffix priming effect: Further evidence for an early morpho-orthographic segmentation process independent of its semantic content.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Miguel; Illera, Víctor; Sainz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the results of a masked lexical decision experiment in which we explore the morphological parsing of Spanish suffixed or pseudosuffixed words through the suffix priming effect. Priming the bases or pseudobases with their suffixed or pseudosuffixed forms is the standard process in experiments aimed at understanding the processes underlying morphological parsing in visual word recognition with masked priming lexical decision (e.g., darkness-DARK; corner-CORN). We, however, compare the effect of suffix priming on the lexical decision of suffixed (ero-JORNALERO) and pseudosuffixed words (ero-CORDERO), as well as the effect of orthographic priming on nonsuffixed words (eba-PRUEBA). The results show that in the case of suffixed and pseudosuffixed words, related primes (ero-JORNALERO; ero-CORDERO) significantly accelerated response latencies in comparison to unrelated primes (ista-JORNALERO; ura-CORDERO), while for simple words there was no facilitation from the orthographically related prime in comparison to the unrelated prime (eba-PRUEBA; afo-PRUEBA). These results are consistent with the so-called morpho-orthographic segmentation process in the course of visual word recognition, which might also be independent of orthographic and purely semantic factors. Our results also support the view that morphological parsing takes place regardless of whether a stem is present in a word. These results complement findings from studies dealing with CORNER- and BROTHEL-like stimuli.

  9. Cytology and molecular phylogenetics of Monoblepharidomycetes provide evidence for multiple independent origins of the hyphal habit in the Fungi.

    PubMed

    Dee, Jaclyn M; Mollicone, Marilyn; Longcore, Joyce E; Roberson, Robert W; Berbee, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of filamentous hyphae underlies an astounding diversity of fungal form and function. We studied the cellular structure and evolutionary origins of the filamentous form in the Monoblepharidomycetes (Chytridiomycota), an early-diverging fungal lineage that displays an exceptional range of body types, from crescent-shaped single cells to sprawling hyphae. To do so, we combined light and transmission electron microscopic analyses of hyphal cytoplasm with molecular phylogenetic reconstructions. Hyphae of Monoblepharidomycetes lack a complex aggregation of secretory vesicles at the hyphal apex (i.e. Spitzenkörper), have centrosomes as primary microtubule organizing centers and have stacked Golgi cisternae instead of tubular/fenestrated Golgi equivalents. The cytoplasmic distribution of actin in Monoblepharidomycetes is comparable to the arrangement observed previously in other filamentous fungi. To discern the origins of Monoblepharidomycetes hyphae, we inferred a phylogeny of the fungi based on 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA sequence data with maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. We focused sampling on Monoblepharidomycetes to infer intergeneric relationships within the class and determined 78 new sequences. Analyses showed class Monoblepharidomycetes to be monophyletic and nested within Chytridiomycota. Hyphal Monoblepharidomycetes formed a clade sister to the genera without hyphae, Harpochytrium and Oedogoniomyces. A likelihood ancestral state reconstruction indicated that hyphae arose independently within the Monoblepharidomycetes lineage and in at least two other lineages. Cytological differences among monoblepharidalean and other fungal hyphae are consistent with these convergent origins.

  10. Mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes in Archean sediments: strong evidence for an anoxic Archean atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, A A; Kasting, J F

    2002-01-01

    Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of sulfur isotopes has been reported in sediments of Archean and Early Proterozoic Age (> 2.3 Ga) but not in younger rocks. The only fractionation mechanism that is consistent with the data on all four sulfur isotopes involves atmospheric photochemical reactions such as SO2 photolysis. We have used a one-dimensional photochemical model to investigate how the isotopic fractionation produced during SO2 photolysis would have been transferred to other gaseous and particulate sulfur-bearing species in both low-O2 and high-O2 atmospheres. We show that in atmospheres with O2 concentrations < 10(-5) times the present atmospheric level (PAL), sulfur would have been removed from the atmosphere in a variety of different oxidation states, each of which would have had its own distinct isotopic signature. By contrast, in atmospheres with O2 concentrations > or = 10(-5) PAL, all sulfur-bearing species would have passed through the oceanic sulfate reservoir before being incorporated into sediments, so any signature of MIF would have been lost. We conclude that the atmospheric O2 concentration must have been < 10(-5) PAL prior to 2.3 Ga.

  11. Origins of task-specific sensory-independent organization in the visual and auditory brain: neuroscience evidence, open questions and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Heimler, Benedetta; Striem-Amit, Ella; Amedi, Amir

    2015-12-01

    Evidence of task-specific sensory-independent (TSSI) plasticity from blind and deaf populations has led to a better understanding of brain organization. However, the principles determining the origins of this plasticity remain unclear. We review recent data suggesting that a combination of the connectivity bias and sensitivity to task-distinctive features might account for TSSI plasticity in the sensory cortices as a whole, from the higher-order occipital/temporal cortices to the primary sensory cortices. We discuss current theories and evidence, open questions and related predictions. Finally, given the rapid progress in visual and auditory restoration techniques, we address the crucial need to develop effective rehabilitation approaches for sensory recovery.

  12. Evidence for conjugated linoleic acid-induced embryonic mortality that is independent of egg storage conditions and changes in egg relative fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Leone, V A; Stransky, D L; Aydin, R; Cook, M E

    2009-09-01

    Three experiments were performed to determine the effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on embryonic development in the absence of vitelline membrane disruption. In experiment 1, when eggs from control and CLA (0.5%)-fed hens were stored at 21 or 15 degrees C for 48 h, mineral movement between the yolk and albumen was not observed (with the exception of Mg and Na). Also, it was found that CLA-induced changes in yolk fatty acid content (e.g., increased saturated fatty acids and CLA) had begun to change after 5 d of feeding hens CLA, and no differences were detected in fatty acid composition after 14 d. In experiment 2, the hatchability of eggs incubated directly after oviposition or stored 24 h at 21 or 15 degrees C was determined from hens fed control or 0.5% CLA diets. Regardless of storage conditions, CLA reduced hatchability. These data showed that CLA elicits negative effects on hatchability independent of vitelline membrane disruption or egg storage condition. In experiment 3, eggs were collected from hens fed 0 or 1% CLA daily for 3 wk, stored at 21 degrees C for 24 h, and incubated. Not only did CLA decrease hatchability, the data showed as the days of CLA feeding increased, the days of survival during incubation decreased. Average days of embryonic survival during incubation for the CLA group diminished to 18.0, 13.4, and 6.3 d for wk 1, 2, and 3 of CLA feeding, respectively, and control remained at 20.6, 20.8, and 19.8 for the 3 wk. These studies suggested that without the disruption of the vitelline membrane, hatchability and embryonic days of survival were significantly reduced by maternal CLA feeding in comparison to control-fed hens. Evidence that embryos die earlier the longer the hens are fed CLA, even though no additional changes in the fatty acid content of eggs were found, suggested that factors other than storage and egg yolk fatty acid composition played a role in CLA-induced embryonic mortality.

  13. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    with different polarity. As shown by the spin labeling ESR experiment, molecules modeling SDZ were promptly bound to non-hydrolysable network of soil organic matter only via the aromatic amines that was accompanied by a prompt enlargement of humic particles binding aromatic amines, whereas binding of decomposition products of SDZ to humic acids of soil via the aliphatic amines was not observable. The ESR spectra obviously showed a single-phase process of covalent binding of the aromatic amines. Repeated washouts of labeled soil samples using distil water and ultrafiltration through the membrane of 5000 MWCO PES confirmed irreversible binding of the aromatic amines, and showed that via the aliphatic amines, binding of SDZ or decomposition products of SDZ to soil might also occur but reversibly and only to small soil molecules, which don't enter into the composition of non-hydrolysable part of soil organic matter. SL ESR experiments of different soils at the presence of Laccase highlighted that covalent binding of the aromatic amines to humic particles occurred in the specific hydrophobic areas of soil found as depleted in oxygen. All measured data evidenced that first, SDZ might be decomposed that allowed for measuring the same change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic matter influenced by both aromatic and aliphatic amines as in the experiment of the interaction of soil with SDZ. Second, a decomposition product of SDZ with the aromatic amine might be bound to non-hydrolysable parts of soil organic matter under specific anaerobic conditions only via 1,4 - nucleophilic addition, Michael-type addition. Gulkowska, A., Thalmann, B., D., Hollender, J., & Krauss, M. (2014). Chemosphere, 107, 366 - 372. Müller, T., Rosendahl, I., Focks, A., Siemens, J., Klasmeier, J., & Matthies. (2013). Environmental Pollution, 172,180 - 185. Nowak, K.M., Miltner, A., Gehre, M., Schaeffer, A., & Kaestner, M. (2011). Environmental Science & Technology 45, 999 - 1006. Weber, E.J., Spidle

  14. Integrating critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry across a four-year dental curriculum: a model for independent learning.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Teresa A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Handoo, Nidhi; Solow, Catherine M; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Finkelstein, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Introducing critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) content into an established dental curriculum can be a difficult and challenging process. Over the past three years, the University of Iowa College of Dentistry has developed and implemented a progressive four-year integrated critical thinking and EBD curriculum. The objective of this article is to describe the development and implementation process to make it available as a model for other dental schools contemplating introduction of critical thinking and EBD into their curricula. The newly designed curriculum built upon an existing problem-based learning foundation, which introduces critical thinking and the scientific literature in the D1 year, in order to expose students to the rationale and resources for practicing EBD in the D2 and D3 years and provide opportunities to practice critical thinking and apply the EBD five-step process in the D2, D3, and D4 years. All curricular content is online, and D3 and D4 EBD activities are integrated within existing clinical responsibilities. The curricular content, student resources, and student activities are described.

  15. Evidence-based intervention against bullying and cyberbullying: Evaluation of the NoTrap! program in two independent trials.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Benedetta E; Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia

    2016-01-01

    The NoTrap! (Noncadiamointrappola!) program is a school-based intervention, which utilizes a peer-led approach to prevent and combat both traditional bullying and cyberbullying. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the third Edition of the program in accordance with the recent criteria for evidence-based interventions. Towards this aim, two quasi-experimental trials involving adolescents (age M = 14.91, SD = .98) attending their first year at different high schools were conducted. In Trial 1 (control group, n = 171; experimental group, n = 451), latent growth curve models for data from pre-, middle- and post-tests showed that intervention significantly predicted change over time in all the target variables (victimization, bullying, cybervictimization, and cyberbullying). Specifically, target variables were stable for the control group but decreased significantly over time for the experimental group. Long-term effects at the follow up 6 months later were also found. In Trial 2 (control group, n = 227; experimental group, n = 234), the moderating effect of gender was examined and there was a reported decrease in bullying and cyberbullying over time (pre- and post-test) in the experimental group but not the control group, and this decrease was similar for boys and girls.

  16. The Agoudal (High Atlas Mountains, Morocco) Shattered Limestone: Petrographical and Geochemical Studies and Additional Evidence of Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kerni, H.; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.; Marjanac, T.

    2016-08-01

    Agoudal impact structure shattered limestone and breccia are well studied and described using petrographical observations and geochemical analyses, and a new discovery of the magnesiwustite mineral as a further evidence of impact event.

  17. Evidence for Divisome Localization Mechanisms Independent of the Min System and SlmA in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Matthew W.; Bisicchia, Paola; Warren, Boyd T.; Sherratt, David J.; Männik, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    Cell division in Escherichia coli starts with assembly of FtsZ protofilaments into a ring-like structure, the Z-ring. Positioning of the Z-ring at midcell is thought to be coordinated by two regulatory systems, nucleoid occlusion and the Min system. In E. coli, nucleoid occlusion is mediated by the SlmA proteins. Here, we address the question of whether there are additional positioning systems that are capable of localizing the E. coli divisome with respect to the cell center. Using quantitative fluorescence imaging we show that slow growing cells lacking functional Min and SlmA nucleoid occlusion systems continue to divide preferentially at midcell. We find that the initial Z-ring assembly occurs over the center of the nucleoid instead of nucleoid-free regions under these conditions. We determine that Z-ring formation begins shortly after the arrival of the Ter macrodomain at the nucleoid center. Removal of either the MatP, ZapB, or ZapA proteins significantly affects the accuracy and precision of Z-ring positioning relative to the nucleoid center in these cells in accordance with the idea that these proteins link the Ter macrodomain and the Z-ring. Interestingly, even in the absence of Min, SlmA, and the putative Ter macrodomain – Z-ring link, there remains a weak midcell positioning bias for the Z-ring. Our work demonstrates that additional Z-ring localization systems are present in E. coli than are known currently. In particular, we identify that the Ter macrodomain acts as a landmark for the Z-ring in the presence of MatP, ZapB and ZapA proteins. PMID:25101671

  18. Independent Contributions of the Central Executive, Intelligence, and In-Class Attentive Behavior to Developmental Change in the Strategies Used to Solve Addition Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geary, David C.; Hoard, Mary K.; Nugent, Lara

    2012-01-01

    Children's (N = 275) use of retrieval, decomposition (e.g., 7 = 4+3 and thus 6+7 = 6+4+3), and counting to solve additional problems was longitudinally assessed from first grade to fourth grade, and intelligence, working memory, and in-class attentive behavior was assessed in one or several grades. The goal was to assess the relation between…

  19. A Four-Step and Four-Criteria Approach for Evaluating Evidence of Dose Addition in Chemical Mixture Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose addition is the most frequently-used component-based approach for predicting dose response for a mixture of toxicologically-similar chemicals and for statistical evaluation of whether the mixture response is consistent with dose additivity and therefore predictable from the ...

  20. High-level exogenous glutamic acid-independent production of poly-(γ-glutamic acid) with organic acid addition in a new isolated Bacillus subtilis C10.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huili; Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Cai, Jin; Zhang, Anyi; Hong, Yizhi; Huang, Jin; Huang, Lei; Xu, Zhinan

    2012-07-01

    A new exogenous glutamic acid-independent γ-PGA producing strain was isolated and characterized as Bacillus subtilis C10. The factors influencing the endogenous glutamic acid supply and the biosynthesis of γ-PGA in this strain were investigated. The results indicated that citric acid and oxalic acid showed the significant capability to support the overproduction of γ-PGA. This stimulated increase of γ-PGA biosynthesis by citric acid or oxalic acid was further proved in the 10 L fermentor. To understand the possible mechanism contributing to the improved γ-PGA production, the activities of four key intracellular enzymes were measured, and the possible carbon fluxes were proposed. The result indicated that the enhanced level of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity caused by oxalic acid was important for glutamic acid synthesized de novo from glucose. Moreover, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were the positive regulators of glutamic acid biosynthesis, while 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC) was the negative one.

  1. Widespread evidence for non-additive genetic variation in Cloninger's and Eysenck's personality dimensions using a twin plus sibling design.

    PubMed

    Keller, Matthew C; Coventry, William L; Heath, Andrew C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2005-11-01

    Studies using the classical twin design often conclude that most genetic variation underlying personality is additive in nature. However, studies analyzing only twins are very limited in their ability to detect non-additive genetic variation and are unable to detect sources of variation unique to twins, which can mask non-additive genetic variation. The current study assessed 9672 MZ and DZ twin individuals and 3241 of their siblings to investigate the environmental and genetic architecture underlying eight dimensions of personality: four from Eysenck's Personality Questionnaire and four from Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory. Broad-sense heritability estimates from best-fitting models were two to three times greater than the narrow-sense heritability estimates for Harm Avoidance, Novelty Seeking, Reward Dependence, Persistence, Extraversion, and Neuroticism. This genetic non-additivity could be due to dominance, additive-by-additive epistasis, or to additive genetic effects combined with higher-order epistasis. Environmental effects unique to twins were detected for both Lie and Psychoticism but accounted for little overall variation. Our results illustrate the increased sensitivity afforded by extending the classical twin design to include siblings, and may provide clues to the evolutionary origins of genetic variation underlying personality.

  2. Model-Independent Evidence for J/ψp Contributions to Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψpK^{-} Decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; 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Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2016-08-19

    The data sample of Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψpK^{-} decays acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1}, is inspected for the presence of J/ψp or J/ψK^{-} contributions with minimal assumptions about K^{-}p contributions. It is demonstrated at more than nine standard deviations that Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψpK^{-} decays cannot be described with K^{-}p contributions alone, and that J/ψp contributions play a dominant role in this incompatibility. These model-independent results support the previously obtained model-dependent evidence for P_{c}^{+}→J/ψp charmonium-pentaquark states in the same data sample.

  3. Implementation of a Positive Development, Evidence-Supported Practice for Emerging Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions: The Transition to Independence Process (TIP) Model.

    PubMed

    Dresser, Karyn; Clark, Hewitt B; Deschênes, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    Transition into adulthood represents a particularly challenging period for youth and young adults with serious mental health conditions and related needs. The Transition to Independence Process (TIP) model is based on a positive development approach and has been demonstrated to be an evidence-supported practice for preparing emerging adults in their movement into employment/career, education, living situation, personal effectiveness/well-being, and community-life functioning--and to be responsive to their families. This article describes the TIP model from a positive youth development framework, its empirical underpinnings, and the fidelity and outcome tracking tools that have been developed for use with transition sites for implementation and sustainability. A research study on the fidelity tools showed their reliability and validity and a second study presents progress and outcome findings for youth and young adults at a new TIP model site. The implications of the TIP model and these findings are discussed.

  4. Model-Independent Evidence for J /ψ p Contributions to Λb0→J /ψ p K- Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, MM; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    The data sample of Λb0→J /ψ p K- decays acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8 TeV p p collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 , is inspected for the presence of J /ψ p or J /ψ K- contributions with minimal assumptions about K-p contributions. It is demonstrated at more than nine standard deviations that Λb0→J /ψ p K- decays cannot be described with K-p contributions alone, and that J /ψ p contributions play a dominant role in this incompatibility. These model-independent results support the previously obtained model-dependent evidence for Pc+→J /ψ p charmonium-pentaquark states in the same data sample.

  5. Recombinant expression of mutants of the Frankenstein disintegrin, RTS-ocellatusin. Evidence for the independent origin of RGD and KTS/RTS disintegrins.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Soler, Raquel; Lorente, Carolina; Company, Beatriz; Sanz, Libia; Juárez, Paula; Pérez, Alicia; Zhang, Yun; Jin, Yang; Chen, Runqiang; Eble, Johannes A; Calvete, Juan J; Bolás, Gema

    2012-09-15

    The requirements to transform a short disintegrin of the RGD clade into an RTS disintegrin, were investigated through the generation of recombinant mutants of ocellatusin in which the RGD tripeptide was substituted for RTS in different positions along the integrin-specificity loop. Any attempt to create an active integrin α(1)β(1) inhibitory motif within the specificity loop of ocellatusin was unsuccessful. Replacing the whole RGD-loop of ocellatusin by the RTS-loop of jerdostatin was neither sufficient for confering α(1)β(1) binding specificity to this ocellatusin-RTS Frankenstein(2) mutant. Factors other than the integrin-binding loop sequence per se are thus required to transform a disintegrin scaffold from the RGD clade into another scaffold from the RTS/KTS clade. Moreover, our results provide evidences, that the RTS/KTS short disintegrins have potentially been recruited into the venom gland of Eurasian vipers independently from the canonical neofunctionalization pathway of the RGD disintegrins. PCR-amplifications of jerdostatin-like sequences from a number of taxa across reptiles, including snakes (Crotalinae, Viperinae, and Elapidae taxa) and lizards (Lacertidae and Iguanidae) clearly showed that genes coding for RTS/KTS disintegrins existed long before the split of Lacertidae and Iguania, thus predating the recruitment of the SVMP precursors of disintegrins, providing strong support for the view of an independent evolutionary history of the RTS/KTS and the RGD clades of short disintegrins.

  6. Evidence for eIF2α phosphorylation-independent effects of GSK2656157, a novel catalytic inhibitor of PERK with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Jothilatha; Rajesh, Kamindla; Mirzajani, Farzaneh; Kesoglidou, Polixenia; Papadakis, Andreas I; Koromilas, Antonis E

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein kinase PERK is a major component of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which promotes the adaptation of cells to various forms of stress. PERK phosphorylates the α subunit of the translation initiation factor eIF2 at serine 51, a modification that plays a key role in the regulation of mRNA translation in stressed cells. Several studies have demonstrated that the PERK-eIF2α phosphorylation pathway maintains insulin biosynthesis and glucose homeostasis, facilitates tumor formation and decreases the efficacy of tumor treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Recently, a selective catalytic PERK inhibitor termed GSK2656157 has been developed with anti-tumor properties in mice. Herein, we provide evidence that inhibition of PERK activity by GSK2656157 does not always correlate with inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation. Also, GSK2656157 does not always mimic the biological effects of the genetic inactivation of PERK. Furthermore, cells treated with GSK2656157 increase eIF2α phosphorylation as a means to compensate for the loss of PERK. Using human tumor cells impaired in eIF2α phosphorylation, we demonstrate that GSK2656157 induces ER stress-mediated death suggesting that the drug acts independent of the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation. We conclude that GSK2656157 might be a useful compound to dissect pathways that compensate for the loss of PERK and/or identify PERK pathways that are independent of eIF2α phosphorylation.

  7. Geochemical and mineralogical evidence for Sahara and Sahel dust additions to Quaternary soils on Lanzarote, eastern Canary Islands, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Skipp, G.; Prospero, J.M.; Patterson, D.; Bettis, E. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Africa is the most important source of dust in the world today, and dust storms are frequent on the nearby Canary Islands. Previous workers have inferred that the Sahara is the most important source of dust to Canary Islands soils, with little contribution from the Sahel region. Soils overlying a late Quaternary basalt flow on Lanzarote, Canary Islands, contain, in addition to volcanic minerals, quartz and mica, exotic to the island's bedrock. Kaolinite in the soils also likely has an exotic origin. Trace-element geochemistry shows that the soils are derived from varying proportions of locally derived basalt and African dust. Major-element geochemistry, clay mineralogy and interpretation of satellite imagery suggest that dust additions to the Canary Islands come not only from the Sahara Desert, but also from the Sahel region. ?? Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Behavioural response of adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) to predator and conspecific alarm cues: evidence of additive effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Di Rocco, Richard T.; Imre, Istvan; Johnson, Nicholas; Brown, Grant B

    2016-01-01

    Sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus, an invasive pest in the Upper Great Lakes, avoid odours that represent danger in their habitat. These odours include conspecific alarm cues and predator cues, like 2-phenylethylamine hydrochloride (PEA HCl), which is found in the urine of mammalian predators. Whether conspecific alarm cues and predator cues function additively or synergistically when mixed together is unknown. The objectives of this experimental study were to determine if the avoidance response of sea lamprey to PEA HCl is proportional to the concentration delivered, and if the avoidance response to the combination of a predator cue (PEA HCl) and sea lamprey alarm cue is additive. To accomplish the first objective, groups of ten sea lampreys were placed in an artificial stream channel and presented with stepwise concentrations of PEA HCl ranging from 5 × 10−8 to 5 × 10−10 M and a deionized water control. Sea lampreys exhibited an increase in their avoidance behaviour in response to increasing concentrations of PEA HCl. To accomplish the second objective, sea lampreys were exposed to PEA HCl, conspecific alarm cue and a combination of the two. Sea lampreys responded to the combination of predator cue and conspecific alarm cue in an additive manner.

  9. Brain activation during fear conditioning in humans depends on genetic variations related to functioning of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis: first evidence from two independent subsamples

    PubMed Central

    Ridder, S.; Treutlein, J.; Nees, F.; Lang, S.; Diener, S.; Wessa, M.; Kroll, A.; Pohlack, S.; Cacciaglia, R.; Gass, P.; Schütz, G.; Schumann, G.; Flor, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Enhanced acquisition and delayed extinction of fear conditioning are viewed as major determinants of anxiety disorders, which are often characterized by a dysfunctional hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. Method In this study we employed cued fear conditioning in two independent samples of healthy subjects (sample 1: n=60, sample 2: n=52). Two graphical shapes served as conditioned stimuli and painful electrical stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. In addition, guided by findings from published animal studies on HPA axis-related genes in fear conditioning, we examined variants of the glucocorticoid receptor and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 genes. Results Variation in these genes showed enhanced amygdala activation during the acquisition and reduced prefrontal activation during the extinction of fear as well as altered amygdala–prefrontal connectivity. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of the involvement of genes related to the HPA axis in human fear conditioning. PMID:22410078

  10. Additional information is not ignored: New evidence for information integration and inhibition in take-the-best decisions.

    PubMed

    Dummel, Sebastian; Rummel, Jan; Voss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ignoring information when making a decision is at the heart of the take-the-best (TTB) strategy, according to which decision makers only consider information about the most valid cue (TTB-relevant) and ignore less valid cues (TTB-irrelevant). Results of four experiments, however, show that participants do not ignore information when cues are easily available (Experiments 1a, 1b, and 3) or when task instructions emphasize decision accuracy (Experiment 2). In all four experiments we found that the consistency between the TTB-relevant cue and a supposedly TTB-irrelevant cue systematically affected decision times and confidence ratings of even those participants whose choices were consistently driven by only the TTB-relevant cue. In Experiments 1a and 1b, we also found that these participants were more likely to ignore information when cues had to be acquired sequentially, suggesting that whether or not participants ignore information depends on information availability. Experiment 2 further showed that different task instructions (emphasizing decision accuracy vs. speed) affect whether or not participants ignore information. Finally, Experiment 3 addressed the question of how participants process information that, according to TTB, is considered irrelevant for their choices. We find first evidence that participants who consistently make choices in line with TTB inhibit information about a TTB-irrelevant cue when this information conflicts with their decisions. Findings are considered and discussed in relation to current models of decision making.

  11. Additional evidence for a dual-strategy model of reasoning: Probabilistic reasoning is more invariant than reasoning about logical validity.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Henry; Brisson, Janie; de Chantal, Pier-Luc

    2015-11-01

    One of the major debates concerning the nature of inferential reasoning is between counterexample-based strategies such as mental model theory and the statistical strategies underlying probabilistic models. The dual-strategy model proposed by Verschueren, Schaeken, and d'Ydewalle (2005a, 2005b) suggests that people might have access to both kinds of strategies. One of the postulates of this approach is that statistical strategies correspond to low-cost, intuitive modes of evaluation, whereas counterexample strategies are higher-cost and more variable in use. We examined this hypothesis by using a deductive-updating paradigm. The results of Study 1 showed that individual differences in strategy use predict different levels of deductive updating on inferences about logical validity. Study 2 demonstrated no such variation when explicitly probabilistic inferences were examined. Study 3 showed that presenting updating problems with probabilistic inferences modified performance on subsequent problems using logical validity, whereas the opposite was not true. These results provide clear evidence that the processes used to make probabilistic inferences are less subject to variation than those used to make inferences of logical validity.

  12. 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE): evidence of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1-dependent and -independent nociceptive and vasoactive responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Graepel, Rabea; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Aubdool, Aisah A; Andersson, David A; Bevan, Stuart; Brain, Susan D

    2011-04-01

    This study explores the in vivo effects of the proposed transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonist 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE). Pharmacological inhibitors and genetically modified mice were used to investigate the ability of 4-ONE to act via TRPA1 receptors and possible mechanisms involving transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). We hypothesized that 4-ONE activates sensory nerves, via TRPA1 or possibly TRPV1, and thus triggers mechanical hyperalgesia, edema formation, and vasodilatation in mice. An automated dynamic plantar aesthesiometer was used to determine hind paw withdrawal thresholds, and a laser Doppler flowmeter was used to measure skin blood flow. Edema formation was determined by measuring paw weights and thickness. 4-ONE (10 nmol) triggers unilateral mechanical hyperalgesia, edema formation, and vasodilatation in mice and is shown here to exhibit TRPA1-dependent and -independent effects. Neurogenic vasodilatation and mechanical hyperalgesia at 0.5 h postinjection were significantly greater in TRPA1 wild-type (WT) mice compared with TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice. Edema formation throughout the time course as well as mechanical hyperalgesia from 1 to 4 h postinjection were similar in WT and TRPA1 KO mice. Studies involving TRPV1 KO mice revealed no evidence of TRPV1 involvement or interactions between TRPA1 and TRPV1 in mediating the in vivo effects of 4-ONE. Previously, 4-ONE was shown to be a potent TRPA1 agonist in vitro. We demonstrate its ability to mediate vasodilatation and certain nociceptive effects in vivo. These data indicate the potential of TRPA1 as an oxidant sensor for vasodilator responses in vivo. However, 4-ONE also triggers TRPA1-independent effects that relate to edema formation and pain.

  13. Early Holocene human remains from the Argentinean Pampas: additional evidence for distinctive cranial morphology of early South Americans.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Héctor M; Perez, S Ivan; Politis, Gustavo G

    2010-10-01

    The cranial morphology of Early Holocene American human samples is characterized by a long and narrow cranial vault, whereas more recent samples exhibit a shorter and wider cranial vault. Two hypotheses have been proposed to account for the morphological differences between early and late-American samples: (a) the migratory hypothesis that suggests that the morphological variation between early and late American samples was the result of a variable number of migratory waves; and (b) the local diversification hypothesis, that is, the morphological differences between early and late American samples were mainly generated by local, random (genetic drift), and nonrandom factors (selection and phenotypic plasticity). We present the first craniometric study of three early skulls from the Argentinean Pampas, dated ∼8,000 cal. years BP (Arroyo Seco 2, Chocorí, and La Tigra), and one associated with mega-faunal remains (Fontezuelas skull). In addition, we studied several Late Holocene samples. We show that the skulls from the Argentinean Pampas are morphologically similar to other Early Holocene American skulls (i.e., Lagoa Santa from Brazil, Tequendama, Checua, and Aguazuque from Colombia, Lauricocha from Peru, and early Mexicans) that exhibit long and narrow cranial vaults. These samples differ from the Late Holocene American samples that exhibit a shorter and wider cranial vault. Our results underscore the important differences in cranial morphology between early and late-American samples. However, we emphasize the need for further studies to discuss alternative hypotheses regarding such differences.

  14. Framing the evidence for health smart homes and home-based consumer health technologies as a public health intervention for independent aging: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Meyer, Ellen; Lazar, Amanda; Chaudhuri, Shomir; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a critical need for public health interventions to support the independence of older adults as the world’s population ages. Health smart homes (HSH) and home-based consumer health (HCH) technologies may play a role in these interventions. Methods We conducted a systematic review of HSH and HCH literature from indexed repositories for health care and technology disciplines (e.g., MEDLINE, CINAHL, and IEEE Xplore) and classified included studies according to an evidence-based public health (EBPH) typology. Results One thousand, six hundred and thirty nine candidate articles were identified. Thirty-one studies from the years 1998–2011 were included. Twenty-one included studies were classified as emerging, 10 as promising and 3 as effective (first tier). Conclusion The majority of included studies were published in the period beginning in the year 2005. All 3 effective (first tier) studies and 9 of 10 of promising studies were published during this period. Almost all studies included an activity sensing component and most of these used passive infrared motion sensors. The three effective (first tier) studies all used a multicomponent technology approach that included activity sensing, reminders and other technologies tailored to individual preferences. Future research should explore the use of technology for self-management of health by older adults, social support and self-reported health measures incorporated into personal health records, electronic medical records, and community health registries. PMID:23639263

  15. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  16. Are Independent Probes Truly Independent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Gino; Pecher, Diane; Schmidt, Henk G.; Zeelenberg, Rene

    2009-01-01

    The independent cue technique has been developed to test traditional interference theories against inhibition theories of forgetting. In the present study, the authors tested the critical criterion for the independence of independent cues: Studied cues not presented during test (and unrelated to test cues) should not contribute to the retrieval…

  17. Evidence of Shared Genome-Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rohan H C; Nugent, Nicole R; Brick, Leslie A; Bidwell, Cinnamon L; McGeary, John E; Keller, Matthew C; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which additive genetic effects on trauma are shared with additive genetic effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate additive genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with additive genetic effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma.

  18. Trend in proportions of missed children during polio supplementary immunization activities in the African Region: evidence from independent monitoring data 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Okeibunor, Joseph; Gasasira, Alex; Mihigo, Richard; Salla, Mbaye; Poy, Alain; Orkeh, Godwin; Shaba, Keith; Nshimirimana, Deo

    2014-02-19

    This is a comparative analysis of independent monitoring data collected between 2010 and 2012, following the implementation of supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) in countries in the three sub regional blocs of World Health Organization in the African Region. The sub regional blocs are Central Africa, West Africa, East and Southern Africa. In addition to the support for SIAs, the Central and West African blocs, threatened with importation and re-establishment of polio transmission received intensive coordination through weekly teleconferences. The later, East and Southern African bloc with low polio threats was not engaged in the intensive coordination through teleconferences. The key indicator of the success of SIAs is the proportion of children missed during SIAs. The results showed that generally there was a decrease in the proportion of children missed during SIAs in the region, from 7.94% in 2010 to 5.95% in 2012. However, the decrease was mainly in the Central and West African blocs. The East and Southern African bloc had countries with as much as 25% missed children. In West Africa and Central Africa, where more coordinated SIAs were conducted, there were progressive and consistent drops, from close to 20-10% at the maximum. At the country and local levels, steps were undertaken to ameliorate situation of low immunization uptake. Wherever an area is observed to have low coverage, local investigations were conducted to understand reasons for low coverage, plans to improve coverage are made and implemented in a coordinated manner. Lessons learned from close monitoring of polio eradication SIAs are will be applied to other campaigns being conducted in the African Region to accelerate control of other vaccine preventable diseases including cerebrospinal meningitis A, measles and yellow fever.

  19. Evidence for the formation of an enamine species during aldol and Michael-type addition reactions promiscuously catalyzed by 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Harshwardhan; Rahimi, Mehran; Geertsema, Edzard M; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2015-03-23

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which has a catalytic N-terminal proline residue (Pro1), can promiscuously catalyze various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, including aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde, and Michael-type addition of acetaldehyde to a wide variety of nitroalkenes to yield valuable γ-nitroaldehydes. To gain insight into how 4-OT catalyzes these unnatural reactions, we carried out exchange studies in D2 O, and X-ray crystallography studies. The former established that H-D exchange within acetaldehyde is catalyzed by 4-OT and that the Pro1 residue is crucial for this activity. The latter showed that Pro1 of 4-OT had reacted with acetaldehyde to give an enamine species. These results provide evidence of the mechanism of the 4-OT-catalyzed aldol and Michael-type addition reactions in which acetaldehyde is activated for nucleophilic addition by Pro1-dependent formation of an enamine intermediate.

  20. Salam's independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    In his kind review of my biography of the Nobel laureate Abdus Salam (December 2008 pp45-46), John W Moffat wrongly claims that Salam had "independently thought of the idea of parity violation in weak interactions".

  1. Phylogenetic Reconstruction by Cross-Species Chromosome Painting and G-Banding in Four Species of Phyllostomini Tribe (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae) in the Brazilian Amazon: An Independent Evidence for Monophyly

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Talita Fernanda Augusto; Rodrigues, Luis Reginaldo Ribeiro; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Gomes, Anderson José Baia; Rissino, Jorge das Dores; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Yang, Fengtang; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    The subfamily Phyllostominae comprises taxa with a variety of feeding strategies. From the cytogenetic point of view, Phyllostominae shows different rates of chromosomal evolution between genera, with Phyllostomus hastatus probably retaining the ancestral karyotype for the subfamily. Since chromosomal rearrangements occur rarely in the genome and have great value as phylogenetic markers and in taxonomic characterization, we analyzed three species: Lophostoma silvicola (LSI), Phyllostomus discolor (PDI) and Tonatia saurophila (TSA), representing the tribe Phyllostomini, collected in the Amazon region, by classic and molecular cytogenetic techniques in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships within this tribe. LSA has a karyotype of 2n=34 and FN=60, PDI has 2n=32 and FN=60 and TSA has 2n=16 and FN=20. Comparative analysis using G-banding and chromosome painting show that the karyotypic complement of TSA is highly rearranged relative to LSI and PHA, while LSI, PHA and PDI have similar karyotypes, differing by only three chromosome pairs. Nearly all chromosomes of PDI and PHA were conserved in toto, except for chromosome 15 that was changed by a pericentric inversion. A strongly supported phylogeny (bootstrap=100 and Bremer=10 steps), confirms the monophyly of Phyllostomini. In agreement with molecular topologies, TSA was in the basal position, while PHA and LSI formed sister taxa. A few ancestral syntenies are conserved without rearrangements and most associations are autapomorphic traits for Tonatia or plesiomorphic for the three genera analyzed here. The karyotype of TSA is highly derived in relation to that of other phyllostomid bats, differing from the supposed ancestral karyotype of Phyllostomidae by multiple rearrangements. Phylogenies based on chromosomal data are independent evidence for the monophyly of tribe Phyllostomini as determined by molecular topologies and provide additional support for the paraphyly of the genus Tonatia by the exclusion

  2. Additional evidence for morpho-dimensional tooth crown variation in a New Indonesian H. erectus sample from the Sangiran Dome (Central Java).

    PubMed

    Zanolli, Clément

    2013-01-01

    This contribution reports fifteen human fossil dental remains found during the last two decades in the Sangiran Dome area, in Central Java, Indonesia. Among this sample, only one of the specimens had already been briefly described, with the other fourteen remaining unreported. Seven of the fifteen isolated teeth were found in a secured stratigraphic context in the late Lower-early Middle Pleistocene Kabuh Formation. The remaining elements were surface finds which, based on coincidental sources of information, were inferred as coming from the Kabuh Formation. Mainly constituted of permanent molars, but also including one upper incisor and one upper premolar, this dental sample brings additional evidence for a marked degree of size variation and time-related structural reduction in Javanese H. erectus. This is notably expressed by a significant decrease of the mesiodistal diameter, frequently associated to the reduction or even loss of the lower molar distal cusp (hypoconulid) and to a more square occlusal outline. In addition to the hypoconulid reduction or loss, this new sample also exhibits a low frequency of the occlusal Y-groove pattern, with a dominance of the X and, to a lesser extent, of the+patterns. This combination is rare in the Lower and early Middle Pleistocene paleoanthropological record, including in the early Javanese dental assemblage from the Sangiran Dome. On the other hand, similar dental features are found in Chinese H. erectus and in H. heidelbergensis. As a whole, this new record confirms the complex nature of the intermittent exchanges that occurred between continental and insular Southeast Asia through the Pleistocene.

  3. Additional Evidence for Morpho-Dimensional Tooth Crown Variation in a New Indonesian H. erectus Sample from the Sangiran Dome (Central Java)

    PubMed Central

    Zanolli, Clément

    2013-01-01

    This contribution reports fifteen human fossil dental remains found during the last two decades in the Sangiran Dome area, in Central Java, Indonesia. Among this sample, only one of the specimens had already been briefly described, with the other fourteen remaining unreported. Seven of the fifteen isolated teeth were found in a secured stratigraphic context in the late Lower-early Middle Pleistocene Kabuh Formation. The remaining elements were surface finds which, based on coincidental sources of information, were inferred as coming from the Kabuh Formation. Mainly constituted of permanent molars, but also including one upper incisor and one upper premolar, this dental sample brings additional evidence for a marked degree of size variation and time-related structural reduction in Javanese H. erectus. This is notably expressed by a significant decrease of the mesiodistal diameter, frequently associated to the reduction or even loss of the lower molar distal cusp (hypoconulid) and to a more square occlusal outline. In addition to the hypoconulid reduction or loss, this new sample also exhibits a low frequency of the occlusal Y-groove pattern, with a dominance of the X and, to a lesser extent, of the+patterns. This combination is rare in the Lower and early Middle Pleistocene paleoanthropological record, including in the early Javanese dental assemblage from the Sangiran Dome. On the other hand, similar dental features are found in Chinese H. erectus and in H. heidelbergensis. As a whole, this new record confirms the complex nature of the intermittent exchanges that occurred between continental and insular Southeast Asia through the Pleistocene. PMID:23843996

  4. Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This issue of "OSERS" addresses the subject of independent living of individuals with disabilities. The issue includes a message from Judith E. Heumann, the Assistant Secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), and 10 papers. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Changes in the…

  5. Expression and role of TRPC proteins in human platelets: evidence that TRPC6 forms the store-independent calcium entry channel.

    PubMed

    Hassock, Sheila R; Zhu, Michael X; Trost, Claudia; Flockerzi, Veit; Authi, Kalwant S

    2002-10-15

    Store-operated Ca(++) entry (SOCE) is thought to comprise the major pathway for Ca(++) entry in platelets. Recently, a number of transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins, which have been divided into 3 groups (TRPC, TRPM, and TRPV), have been suggested as SOCE channels. We report the expression and function of TRPC proteins in human platelets. TRPC6 is found at high levels and TRPC1 at low levels. Using purified plasma (PM) and intracellular membranes (IM), TRPC6 is found in the PM, but TRPC1 is localized to the IM. Using Fura-2-loaded platelets, we report that, in line with TRPC6 expression, 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) stimulated the entry of Ca(++) and Ba(2+) independently of protein kinase C. Thrombin also induced the entry of Ca(++) and Ba(2+), but thapsigargin, which depletes the stores, induced the entry of only Ca(++). Thus, thrombin activated TRPC6 via a SOCE-independent mechanism. In phosphorylation studies, we report that neither TRPC6 nor TRPC1 was a substrate for tyrosine kinases. TRPC6 was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK) and associated with other cAMP-PK substrates. TRPC1 was not phosphorylated by cAMP-PK but also associated with other substrates. Activation of cAMP-PK inhibited Ca(++) but not Ba(2+) entry induced by thrombin and neither Ca(++) nor Ba(2+) entry stimulated by OAG. These results suggest that TRPC6 is a SOCE-independent, nonselective cation entry channel stimulated by thrombin and OAG. TRPC6 is a substrate for cAMP-PK, although phosphorylation appears to not affect cation permeation. TRPC1 is located in IM, suggesting a role at the level of the stores.

  6. Analysis of Recent Serotype O Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses from Livestock in Kenya: Evidence of Four Independently Evolving Lineages.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, S N; Muwanika, V B; Siegismund, H R; Sangula, A K; Namatovu, A; Dhikusooka, M T; Tjørnehøj, K; Balinda, S N; Wadsworth, J; Knowles, N J; Belsham, G J

    2015-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Kenya where four serotypes (O, A, SAT 1 and SAT 2) of the virus are currently in circulation. Within 2010 and 2011, the National Laboratory recorded an increase in the number of FMD outbreaks caused by serotype O virus. The characteristics of these viruses were determined to ascertain whether these were independent outbreaks or one single strain spreading throughout the country. The sequences of the complete VP1-coding region were analysed from viruses sampled within different areas of Kenya during 2010 and 2011. The results indicated that the 2010 to 2011 outbreaks in Kenya were caused by four independent strains. By comparison with earlier type O isolates from Eastern Africa, it was apparent that the outbreaks were caused by viruses from three different lineages of topotype EA-2 and a fourth virus strain belonging to topotype EA-4. The topotypes EA-1 and EA-3 were not detected from these outbreaks. Implications of these results for FMD control in Eastern Africa are discussed.

  7. Evidence for two independent pathways of biologically effective excision repair from its rate and extent in cells cultured from sun-sensitive humans

    SciTech Connect

    Tyrrell, R.M.; Amaudruz, F.

    1987-07-15

    Repair-proficient human cells can be sensitized to exposure to UV radiation at 254 nm by postirradiation incubation in the presence of the eukaryotic alpha polymerase inhibitor, aphidicolin. The degree of sensitization has been examined in cells cultured from humans suffering from various types of sun-sensitive syndromes. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) variant and Bloom's cell lines (both excision proficient) were strongly sensitized by aphidicolin. An excision repair proficient Cockayne's cell line and a deficient XPD line were both sensitized to a level similar to the sensitivity of excision deficient XPA cells. In contrast, three XPC cell lines which show intermediate UV-induced repair replication and UV sensitivity were sensitized little (in one case) or not at all (in two cases) to UV by postirradiation inhibition of the alpha polymerase. These results lead us to conclude that there are two independent pathways of biologically effective excision repair, the major one of which involves the alpha polymerase and a second, less efficient and slower pathway which is independent of the alpha polymerase and which is the only pathway operating in two of the three XPC strains tested. The rates of biologically effective excision repair were similar in normal, XP variant, and Cockayne's cell lines, but these rates were considerably higher than published rates of dimer excision measured under similar conditions.

  8. Understanding independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annan, James; Hargreaves, Julia

    2016-04-01

    In order to perform any Bayesian processing of a model ensemble, we need a prior over the ensemble members. In the case of multimodel ensembles such as CMIP, the historical approach of ``model democracy'' (i.e. equal weight for all models in the sample) is no longer credible (if it ever was) due to model duplication and inbreeding. The question of ``model independence'' is central to the question of prior weights. However, although this question has been repeatedly raised, it has not yet been satisfactorily addressed. Here I will discuss the issue of independence and present a theoretical foundation for understanding and analysing the ensemble in this context. I will also present some simple examples showing how these ideas may be applied and developed.

  9. Unraveling a Hotspot for TCR Recognition on HLA-A2: Evidence Against the Existence of Peptide-independent TCR Binding Determinants

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Susan J.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Clemens, John R.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Turner, Richard V.; Damirjian, Marale; Biddison, William E.; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-07-19

    T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide takes place in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, which accounts for approximately two-thirds of the peptide/MHC buried surface. Using the class I MHC HLA-A2 and a large panel of mutants, we have previously shown that surface mutations that disrupt TCR recognition vary with the identity of the peptide. The single exception is Lys66 on the HLA-A2 {alpha}1 helix, which when mutated to alanine disrupts recognition for 93% of over 250 different T cell clones or lines, independent of which peptide is bound. Thus, Lys66 could serve as a peptide-independent TCR binding determinant. Here, we have examined the role of Lys66 in TCR recognition of HLA-A2 in detail. The structure of a peptide/HLA-A2 molecule with the K66A mutation indicates that although the mutation induces no major structural changes, it results in the exposure of a negatively charged glutamate (Glu63) underneath Lys66. Concurrent replacement of Glu63 with glutamine restores TCR binding and function for T cells specific for five different peptides presented by HLA-A2. Thus, the positive charge on Lys66 does not serve to guide all TCRs onto the HLA-A2 molecule in a manner required for productive signaling. Furthermore, electrostatic calculations indicate that Lys66 does not contribute to the stability of two TCR-peptide/HLA-A2 complexes. Our findings are consistent with the notion that each TCR arrives at a unique solution of how to bind a peptide/MHC, most strongly influenced by the chemical and structural features of the bound peptide. This would not rule out an intrinsic affinity of TCRs for MHC molecules achieved through multiple weak interactions, but for HLA-A2 the collective mutational data place limits on the role of any single MHC amino acid side-chain in driving TCR binding in a peptide-independent fashion.

  10. Ubiquitous [Na+]i/[K+]i-Sensitive Transcriptome in Mammalian Cells: Evidence for Ca2+i-Independent Excitation-Transcription Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Koltsova, Svetlana V.; Trushina, Yulia; Haloui, Mounsif; Akimova, Olga A.; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel; Orlov, Sergei N.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus-dependent elevation of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) affects the expression of numerous genes – a phenomenon known as excitation-transcription coupling. Recently, we found that increases in [Na+]i trigger c-Fos expression via a novel Ca2+i-independent pathway. In the present study, we identified ubiquitous and tissue-specific [Na+]i/[K+]i-sensitive transcriptomes by comparative analysis of differentially expressed genes in vascular smooth muscle cells from rat aorta (RVSMC), the human adenocarcinoma cell line HeLa, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To augment [Na+]i and reduce [K+]i, cells were treated for 3 hrs with the Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitor ouabain or placed for the same time in the K+-free medium. Employing Affymetrix-based technology, we detected changes in expression levels of 684, 737 and 1839 transcripts in HeLa, HUVEC and RVSMC, respectively, that were highly correlated between two treatments (p<0.0001; R2>0.62). Among these Na+i/K+i-sensitive genes, 80 transcripts were common for all three types of cells. To establish if changes in gene expression are dependent on increases in [Ca2+]i, we performed identical experiments in Ca2+-free media supplemented with extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ chelators. Surprisingly, this procedure elevated rather than decreased the number of ubiquitous and cell-type specific Na+i/K+i-sensitive genes. Among the ubiquitous Na+i/K+i-sensitive genes whose expression was regulated independently of the presence of Ca2+ chelators by more than 3-fold, we discovered several transcription factors (Fos, Jun, Hes1, Nfkbia), interleukin-6, protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit, dual specificity phosphatase (Dusp8), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, cyclin L1, whereas expression of metallopeptidase Adamts1, adrenomedulin, Dups1, Dusp10 and Dusp16 was detected exclusively in Ca2+-depleted cells. Overall, our findings indicate that Ca2+i-independent mechanisms of excitation-transcription coupling are

  11. Ubiquitous [Na+]i/[K+]i-sensitive transcriptome in mammalian cells: evidence for Ca(2+)i-independent excitation-transcription coupling.

    PubMed

    Koltsova, Svetlana V; Trushina, Yulia; Haloui, Mounsif; Akimova, Olga A; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel; Orlov, Sergei N

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus-dependent elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) affects the expression of numerous genes--a phenomenon known as excitation-transcription coupling. Recently, we found that increases in [Na(+)](i) trigger c-Fos expression via a novel Ca(2+) (i)-independent pathway. In the present study, we identified ubiquitous and tissue-specific [Na(+)](i)/[K(+)](i)-sensitive transcriptomes by comparative analysis of differentially expressed genes in vascular smooth muscle cells from rat aorta (RVSMC), the human adenocarcinoma cell line HeLa, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To augment [Na(+)](i) and reduce [K(+)](i), cells were treated for 3 hrs with the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain or placed for the same time in the K(+)-free medium. Employing Affymetrix-based technology, we detected changes in expression levels of 684, 737 and 1839 transcripts in HeLa, HUVEC and RVSMC, respectively, that were highly correlated between two treatments (p<0.0001; R(2)>0.62). Among these Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive genes, 80 transcripts were common for all three types of cells. To establish if changes in gene expression are dependent on increases in [Ca(2+)](i), we performed identical experiments in Ca(2+)-free media supplemented with extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) chelators. Surprisingly, this procedure elevated rather than decreased the number of ubiquitous and cell-type specific Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive genes. Among the ubiquitous Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive genes whose expression was regulated independently of the presence of Ca(2+) chelators by more than 3-fold, we discovered several transcription factors (Fos, Jun, Hes1, Nfkbia), interleukin-6, protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit, dual specificity phosphatase (Dusp8), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, cyclin L1, whereas expression of metallopeptidase Adamts1, adrenomedulin, Dups1, Dusp10 and Dusp16 was detected exclusively in Ca(2+)-depleted cells. Overall, our findings

  12. Ar/Ar and U/Pb Ages and Geochemistry of the Benton Range Dike Swarm, SE California: New Evidence for an Independence Poly-phased Dike Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, F.; Renne, P. R.; Mundil, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Independence dike swarm (IDS) is a locally profuse, mostly NNW striking and ~700 km-long dike swarm occurring throughout southeastern California and possibly extending into northern Mexico. Dike compositions range from mafic to silicic (though strongly bimodal) and span the composition range of the coeval Sierran calc-alkaline arc plutons. Recent geochronological and structural investigations had cast some doubt on the accurate definition of the Independence dike swarm as the swarm more likely represents a poly-phase dike assemblage including at least two generation of dikes (i.e. 90 and 150 Ma; Chen and Moore, 1979; Coleman et al., 2000). To date, most of the geochronological and geochemical investigations available are strongly localized and part of the swarm lacks basic data. Here, we present new 40Ar39Ar (n=4) and U/Pb (n=1) ages and detailed major, trace and REE geochemical data on mafic (E-W to N-S) and more abundant silicic (NW-SE to N-S) dikes from the Benton Range dike swarm (BRDS), north-easternmost IDS. Two of the silicic dikes yielded concordant biotite 40Ar39Ar mini-plateau and weighted mean ages of 153 ± 2 and 152 ± 3 Ma (2 sigma), in agreement with previous K-Ar biotite ages of 150-155 Ma (Renne et al., 1987) and similar to the "accepted" age for the Independence swarm (~150 Ma). These biotite ages, however, may record a cooling age that significantly post-dates dike intrusion. One silicic dike yields a significantly older, preliminary 206Pb238U zircon age of 164.6 ± 0.8 Ma from single-crystal analyses. Two E-W striking mafic dikes which cross-cut NNW-striking silicic dikes yield hornblende plateau and mini-plateau ages of 171 ± 2 and 166 ± 2 Ma. BRDS chemical compositions are typical of mafic (SiO2 = 47-57 wt%; La/Ybn = 3-14) and granitic (SiO2 =67-77 wt%; La/Ybn = 5-31) arc magmas (e.g. Nb anomaly) and typify the known end-member compositions of the IDS. These results, together with compilated published and unpublished geochronological and

  13. Dilution of individual microtubules observed in real time in vitro: evidence that cap size is small and independent of elongation rate

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Although the mechanism of microtubule dynamic instability is thought to involve the hydrolysis of tubulin-bound GTP, the mechanism of GTP hydrolysis and the basis of microtubule stability are controversial. Video microscopy of individual microtubules and dilution protocols were used to examine the size and lifetime of the stabilizing cap. Purified porcine brain tubulin (7-23 microM) was assembled at 37 degrees C onto both ends of isolated sea urchin axoneme fragments in a miniature flow cell to give a 10-fold variation in elongation rate. The tubulin concentration in the region of microtubule growth could be diluted rapidly (by 84% within 3 s of the onset of dilution). Upon perfusion with buffer containing no tubulin, microtubules experienced a catastrophe (conversion from elongation to rapid shortening) within 4-6 s on average after dilution to 16% of the initial concentration, independent of the predilution rate of elongation and length. Based on extrapolation of catastrophe frequency to zero tubulin concentration, the estimated lifetime of the stable cap after infinite dilution was less than 3-4 s for plus and minus ends, much shorter than the approximately 200 s observed at steady state (Walker, R. A., E. T. O'Brien, N. K. Pryer, M. Soboeiro, W. A. Voter, H. P. Erickson, and E. D. Salmon. 1988. J. Cell Biol. 107:1437-1448.). We conclude that during elongation, both plus and minus ends are stabilized by a short region (approximately 200 dimers or less) and that the size of the stable cap is independent of 10-fold variation in elongation rate. These results eliminate models of dynamic instability which predict extensive "build- up" stabilizing caps and support models which constrain the cap to the elongating tip. We propose that the cell may take advantage of such an assembly mechanism by using "catastrophe factors" that can promote frequent catastrophe even at high elongation rates by transiently binding to microtubule ends and briefly inhibiting GTP

  14. Genetic evidence for the adhesion protein IgSF9/Dasm1 to regulate inhibitory synapse development independent of its intracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Archana; Traut, Matthias H; Becker, Lore; Klopstock, Thomas; Stein, Valentin; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-03-19

    Normal brain function requires balanced development of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. An imbalance in synaptic transmission underlies many brain disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism. Compared with excitatory synapses, relatively little is known about the molecular control of inhibitory synapse development. We used a genetic approach in mice to identify the Ig superfamily member IgSF9/Dasm1 as a candidate homophilic synaptic adhesion protein that regulates inhibitory synapse development. IgSF9 is expressed in pyramidal cells and subsets of interneurons in the CA1 region of hippocampus. Electrophysiological recordings of acute hippocampal slices revealed that genetic inactivation of the IgSF9 gene resulted in fewer functional inhibitory synapses; however, the strength of the remaining synapses was unaltered. These physiological abnormalities were correlated with decreased expression of inhibitory synapse markers in IgSF9(-/-) mice, providing anatomical evidence for a reduction in inhibitory synapse numbers, whereas excitatory synapse development was normal. Surprisingly, knock-in mice expressing a mutant isoform of IgSF9 lacking the entire cytoplasmic domain (IgSF9(ΔC/ΔC) mice) had no defects in inhibitory synapse development, providing genetic evidence that IgSF9 regulates synapse development via ectodomain interactions rather than acting itself as a signaling receptor. Further, we found that IgSF9 mediated homotypic binding and cell aggregation, but failed to induce synapse formation, suggesting that IgSF9 acts as a cell adhesion molecule (CAM) to maintain synapses. Juvenile IgSF9(-/-) mice exhibited increased seizure susceptibility indicative of an imbalance in synaptic excitation and inhibition. These results provide genetic evidence for a specific role of IgSF9 in inhibitory synapse development/maintenance, presumably by its CAM-like activity.

  15. Molecular surveillance on Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage in non-elderly adults; little evidence for pneumococcal circulation independent from the reservoir in children

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, Anne L.; Rümke, Lidewij W.; Arp, Kayleigh; Bosch, Astrid A. T. M.; Bruin, Jacob P.; Rots, Nynke Y.; Wijmenga-Monsuur, Alienke J.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Trzciński, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults is rarely detected by the gold standard culture method. With molecular tests of high sensitivity now available, we analysed upper respiratory tract samples collected during autumn/winter 2012/2013 from parents of PCV7-vaccinated infants and from childless adults, directly comparing culture and qPCR-based S. pneumoniae detection. As compared to the gold standard of testing nasopharyngeal swabs, qPCR-based analysis of oral samples significantly improved detection of pneumococcal carriage (5% versus 20%, p < 0.0001) with higher carriage rates in parents compared to childless adults (34% versus 7%; p < 0.001). Molecular methods also increased the number of serotype-carriage events detected with higher carriage frequencies of serotypes 3 and 7A/F and lower of serotypes 6C/D and 15A/B/C in parents compared to their infant children. We provide evidence that culture-based methods severely underestimate adult carriage rates and for the superiority of testing oral samples over nasopharyngeal swabs. The substantial circulation of pneumococci in parents is however, not representative for the entire adult population. While age-associated differences in serotype carriage suggests reservoirs outside infants as potential sources of vaccine-serotypes contributing to weakening of vaccine herd effects, we find no evidence for reservoirs in adults contributing to serotype replacement in carriage. PMID:27713565

  16. Evidence that transient changes in sudomotor output with cold and warm fluid ingestion are independently modulated by abdominal, but not oral thermoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nathan B.; Bain, Anthony R.; Cramer, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Two studies were performed to 1) characterize changes in local sweat rate (LSR) following fluid ingestion of different temperatures during exercise, and 2) identify the potential location of thermoreceptors along the gastrointestinal tract that independently modify sudomotor activity. In study 1, 12 men cycled at 50% V̇o2peak for 75 min while ingesting 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C, 37°C, or 50°C fluid 5 min before exercise; and after 15, 30, and 45-min of exercise. In study 2, 8 men cycled at 50% V̇o2peak for 75 min while 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C or 50°C fluid was delivered directly into the stomach via a nasogastric tube (NG trials) or was mouth-swilled only (SW trials) after 15, 30, and 45 min of exercise. Rectal (Tre), aural canal (Tau), and mean skin temperature (Tsk); and LSR on the forehead, upper-back, and forearm were measured. In study 1, Tre, Tau, and Tsk were identical between trials, but after each ingestion, LSR was significantly suppressed at all sites with 1.5°C fluid and was elevated with 50°C fluid compared with 37°C fluid (P < 0.001). The peak difference in mean LSR between 1.5°C and 50°C fluid after ingestion was 0.29 ± 0.06 mg·min−1·cm−2. In study 2, LSR was similar between 1.5°C and 50°C fluids with SW trials (P = 0.738), but lower at all sites with 1.5°C fluid in NG trials (P < 0.001) despite no concurrent differences in Tre, Tau, and Tsk. These data demonstrate that 1) LSR is transiently altered by cold and warm fluid ingestion despite similar core and skin temperatures; and 2) thermoreceptors that independently and acutely modulate sudomotor output during fluid ingestion probably reside within the abdominal area, but not the mouth. PMID:24577060

  17. Evidence that transient changes in sudomotor output with cold and warm fluid ingestion are independently modulated by abdominal, but not oral thermoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Morris, Nathan B; Bain, Anthony R; Cramer, Matthew N; Jay, Ollie

    2014-04-15

    Two studies were performed to 1) characterize changes in local sweat rate (LSR) following fluid ingestion of different temperatures during exercise, and 2) identify the potential location of thermoreceptors along the gastrointestinal tract that independently modify sudomotor activity. In study 1, 12 men cycled at 50% Vo2peak for 75 min while ingesting 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C, 37°C, or 50°C fluid 5 min before exercise; and after 15, 30, and 45-min of exercise. In study 2, 8 men cycled at 50% Vo2peak for 75 min while 3.2 ml/kg of 1.5°C or 50°C fluid was delivered directly into the stomach via a nasogastric tube (NG trials) or was mouth-swilled only (SW trials) after 15, 30, and 45 min of exercise. Rectal (Tre), aural canal (Tau), and mean skin temperature (Tsk); and LSR on the forehead, upper-back, and forearm were measured. In study 1, Tre, Tau, and Tsk were identical between trials, but after each ingestion, LSR was significantly suppressed at all sites with 1.5°C fluid and was elevated with 50°C fluid compared with 37°C fluid (P < 0.001). The peak difference in mean LSR between 1.5°C and 50°C fluid after ingestion was 0.29 ± 0.06 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2). In study 2, LSR was similar between 1.5°C and 50°C fluids with SW trials (P = 0.738), but lower at all sites with 1.5°C fluid in NG trials (P < 0.001) despite no concurrent differences in Tre, Tau, and Tsk. These data demonstrate that 1) LSR is transiently altered by cold and warm fluid ingestion despite similar core and skin temperatures; and 2) thermoreceptors that independently and acutely modulate sudomotor output during fluid ingestion probably reside within the abdominal area, but not the mouth.

  18. Evidence of CCR2-independent transmigration of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into the brain after permanent cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hannah X; Kim, Hyun Ah; Lee, Seyoung; Broughton, Brad R S; Drummond, Grant R; Sobey, Christopher G

    2016-04-15

    Previously we showed that INCB3344, a CCR2 antagonist, inhibits transmigration of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into the brain after ischemia-reperfusion. Here we tested the effect of CCR2 inhibition during permanent cerebral ischemia. Mice were administered either vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide/carboxymethylcellulose) or INCB3344 (30 or 100mg/kg IP) 1h before middle cerebral artery occlusion and at 2 and 6h after the initiation of ischemia. After 24h, we assessed functional outcome, infarct volume and quantified immune cells in blood and brain. The increase in circulating bone marrow-derived Ly6C(hi) monocytes, but not the infiltration of those cells into the brain, was blocked by the CCR2 antagonist. INCB3344 had no effect on either neurological deficit or infarct volume. Our data confirm that cerebral ischemia triggers a CCR2-dependent increase in circulating Ly6C(hi) monocytes, but suggest that in the absence of reperfusion these cells may transmigrate into the ischemic brain in a CCR2-independent manner.

  19. Genetic evidence that Celsr3 and Celsr2, together with Fzd3, regulate forebrain wiring in a Vangl-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yibo; Huang, Yuhua; Feng, Jia; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Grove, Elizabeth A.; Yang, Yingzi; Tissir, Fadel; Zhou, Libing; Goffinet, Andre M.

    2014-01-01

    Celsr3 and Fzd3, members of “core planar cell polarity” (PCP) genes, were shown previously to control forebrain axon guidance and wiring by acting in axons and/or guidepost cells. Here, we show that Celsr2 acts redundantly with Celsr3, and that their combined mutation mimics that of Fzd3. The phenotypes generated upon inactivation of Fzd3 in different forebrain compartments are similar to those in conditional Celsr2-3 mutants, indicating that Fzd3 and Celsr2-3 act in the same population of cells. Inactivation of Celsr2-3 or Fzd3 in thalamus does not affect forebrain wiring, and joint inactivation in cortex and thalamus adds little to cortical inactivation alone in terms of thalamocortical projections. On the other hand, joint inactivation perturbs strongly the formation of the barrel field, which is unaffected upon single cortical or thalamic inactivation, indicating a role for interactions between thalamic axons and cortical neurons in cortical arealization. Unexpectedly, forebrain wiring is normal in mice defective in Vangl1 and Vangl2, showing that, contrary to epithelial PCP, axon guidance can be Vangl independent in some contexts. Our results suggest that Celsr2-3 and Fzd3 regulate axonal navigation in the forebrain by using mechanisms different from classical epithelial PCP, and require interacting partners other than Vangl1-2 that remain to be identified. PMID:25002511

  20. Mitomycin C potentiates TRAIL-induced apoptosis through p53-independent upregulation of death receptors: evidence for the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hairong; Hong, Bo; Zhou, Lanlan; Allen, Joshua E; Tai, Guihua; Humphreys, Robin; Dicker, David T; Liu, Yingqiu Y; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2012-09-01

    The discovery of the molecular targets of chemotherapeutic medicines and their chemical footprints can validate and improve the use of such medicines. In the present report, we investigated the effect of mitomycin C (MMC), a classical chemotherapeutic agent on cancer cell apoptosis induced by TRAIL. We found that MMC not only potentiated TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 (p53-/-) colon cancer cells but also sensitized TRAIL-resistant colon cancer cells HT-29 to the cytokine both in vitro and in vivo. MMC also augmented the pro-apoptotic effects of two TRAIL receptor agonist antibodies, mapatumumab and lexatumumab. At a mechanistic level, MMC downregulated cell survival proteins, including Bcl2, Mcl-1 and Bcl-XL, and upregulated pro-apoptotic proteins including Bax, Bim and the cell surface expression of TRAIL death receptors DR4 and DR5. Gene silencing of DR5 by short hairpin RNA reduced the apoptosis induced by combination treatment of MMC and TRAIL. Induction of DR4 and DR5 was independent of p53, Bax and Bim but was dependent on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) as JNK pharmacological inhibition and siRNA abolished the induction of the TRAIL receptors by MMC.

  1. Evidence of a Shockley-Read-Hall Defect State Independent of Band-Edge Energy in InAs/In(As,Sb) Type-II Superlattices

    DOE PAGES

    Aytac, Y.; Olson, B. V.; Kim, J. K.; ...

    2016-06-01

    A set of seven InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) were designed to have speci c bandgap energies between 290 meV (4.3 m) and 135 meV (9.2 m) in order to study the e ects of the T2SL bandgap energy on the minority carrier lifetime. A temperature dependent optical pump-probe technique is used to measure the carrier lifetimes, and the e ect of a mid-gap defect level on the carrier recombination dynamics is reported. The Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defect state is found to be at energy of approximately -250 12 meV relative to the valence band edge of bulk GaSb for the entiremore » set of T2SL structures, even though the T2SL valence band edge shifts by 155 meV on the same scale. These results indicate that the SRH defect state in InAs/InAsSb T2SLs is singular and is nearly independent of the exact position of the T2SL bandgap or band edge energies. They also suggest the possibility of engineering the T2SL structure such that the SRH state is removed completely from the bandgap, a result that should signi cantly increase the minority carrier lifetime.« less

  2. Life and Death of the Resurrection Plate: Evidence for an Additional Plate in the NE Pacific in Paleocene-Eocene Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeussler, P. J.; Bradley, D. C.; Wells, R.; Rowley, D. B.; Miller, M.; Otteman, A.; Labay, K.

    2001-12-01

    We propose an additional plate in the northeastern Pacific Ocean in Paleocene-Eocene time. The Resurrection Plate, named after exposures of the Resurrection Peninsula ophiolite near Seward Alaska, was located northeast of the Kula Plate and north of the Farallon plate. We interpret concurrent near-trench magmatism in southern Alaska and the northwestern US as evidence for two slab windows associated with trench-ridge-trench (TRT) triple junctions that formed the boundaries of the Resurrection Plate. A compilation of geochronology from 100 Ma to the present from Alaska to Oregon displayed in movie form shows the following features. The Sanak-Baranof belt of near trench-intrusions in southern Alaska records a west to east migration of the northern TRT triple junction along a 2100-km-long section of coastline between 61-50 Ma. In Oregon, Washington, and southern Vancouver Island, voluminous basaltic volcanism of the Siletz River Volcanics, Crescent, and Metchosin Formations occurred between ~66-48 Ma. Lack of an age progression indicates this southern triple junction did not migrate significantly. Synchronous near-trench magmatism in southeastern Alaska, on southern Vancouver Island and beneath Puget Sound at ~50 Ma indicates a spreading center was subparallel to the margin of southeastern Alaska and British Columbia and was subducted all at once. We interpret 50 Ma as the approximate time of death of the Resurrection plate. The existence and demise of the Resurrection plate explains: 1) rapid northward terrane transport between 70 and 50 Ma; 2) uplift and magmatism in the Coast Mountains prior to 50 Ma; 3) cessation of magmatism in the Coast Mountains of BC and SE Alaska around 50 Ma; and 4) a major change in Pacific-North America plate motion and birth of the Queen Charlotte transform margin around 50 Ma. Death of the Resurrection plate was a contributing factor in the extensional collapse of the southern Canadian Cordilleran foreland fold and thrust belt after 50

  3. Learning to Spell: Raising Standards in Spelling and Independent Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers evidence from an intervention designed to raise standards in spelling and independent writing. "The Complete Spelling Programme" (McMurray and Fleming, 1998) is designed to ensure that all processes involved in learning to spell are activated and that the interaction between them is facilitated. In addition, a number…

  4. Transcriptomic Changes Triggered by Hypoxia: Evidence for HIF-1α -Independent, [Na+]i/[K+]i-Mediated, Excitation-Transcription Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Koltsova, Svetlana V.; Shilov, Boris; Birulina, Julia G.; Akimova, Olga A.; Haloui, Mounsif; Kapilevich, Leonid V.; Gusakova, Svetlana V.; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel; Orlov, Sergei N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relative impact of canonical hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha- (HIF-1α and Na+i/K+i-mediated signaling on transcriptomic changes evoked by hypoxia and glucose deprivation. Incubation of RASMC in ischemic conditions resulted in ∼3-fold elevation of [Na+]i and 2-fold reduction of [K+]i. Using global gene expression profiling we found that Na+,K+-ATPase inhibition by ouabain or K+-free medium in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC) led to the differential expression of dozens of genes whose altered expression was previously detected in cells subjected to hypoxia and ischemia/reperfusion. For further investigations, we selected Cyp1a1, Fos, Atf3, Klf10, Ptgs2, Nr4a1, Per2 and Hes1, i.e. genes possessing the highest increments of expression under sustained Na+,K+-ATPase inhibition and whose implication in the pathogenesis of hypoxia was proved in previous studies. In ouabain-treated RASMC, low-Na+, high-K+ medium abolished amplification of the [Na+]i/[K+]i ratio as well as the increased expression of all tested genes. In cells subjected to hypoxia and glucose deprivation, dissipation of the transmembrane gradient of Na+ and K+ completely eliminated increment of Fos, Atf3, Ptgs2 and Per2 mRNAs and sharply diminished augmentation expression of Klf10, Edn1, Nr4a1 and Hes1. In contrast to low-Na+, high-K+ medium, RASMC transfection with Hif-1a siRNA attenuated increments of Vegfa, Edn1, Klf10 and Nr4a1 mRNAs triggered by hypoxia but did not impact Fos, Atf3, Ptgs2 and Per2 expression. Thus, our investigation demonstrates, for the first time, that Na+i/K+i-mediated, Hif-1α- -independent excitation-transcription coupling contributes to transcriptomic changes evoked in RASMC by hypoxia and glucose deprivation. PMID:25375852

  5. 'Independence' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Independence' Panorama (QTVR)

    This is the Spirit 'Independence' panorama, acquired on martian days, or sols, 536 to 543 (July 6 to 13, 2005), from a position in the 'Columbia Hills' near the summit of 'Husband Hill.' The summit of 'Husband Hill' is the peak near the right side of this panorama and is about 100 meters (328 feet) away from the rover and about 30 meters (98 feet) higher in elevation. The rocky outcrops downhill and on the left side of this mosaic include 'Larry's Lookout' and 'Cumberland Ridge,' which Spirit explored in April, May, and June of 2005.

    The panorama spans 360 degrees and consists of 108 individual images, each acquired with five filters of the rover's panoramic camera. The approximate true color of the mosaic was generated using the camera's 750-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters. During the 8 martian days, or sols, that it took to acquire this image, the lighting varied considerably, partly because of imaging at different times of sol, and partly because of small sol-to-sol variations in the dustiness of the atmosphere. These slight changes produced some image seams and rock shadows. These seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see. However, it is often not possible or practical to smooth out such seams for regions of rock, soil, rover tracks or solar panels. Such is the nature of acquiring and assembling large panoramas from the rovers.

  6. Evidence of a direct influence between the thalamus and hMT+ independent of V1 in the human brain as measured by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Gaglianese, Anna; Costagli, Mauro; Bernardi, Giulio; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Pietrini, Pietro

    2012-04-02

    In the present study we employed Conditional Granger Causality (CGC) and Coherence analysis to investigate whether visual motion-related information reaches the human middle temporal complex (hMT+) directly from the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus, by-passing the primary visual cortex (V1). Ten healthy human volunteers underwent brain scan examinations by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during two optic flow experiments. In addition to the classical LGN-V1-hMT+ pathway, our results showed a significant direct influence of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal recorded in LGN over that in hMT+, not mediated by V1 activity, which strongly supports the existence of a bilateral pathway that connects LGN directly to hMT+ and serves visual motion processing. Furthermore, we evaluated the relative latencies among areas functionally connected in the processing of visual motion. Using LGN as a reference region, hMT+ exhibited a statistically significant earlier peak of activation as compared to V1. In conclusion, our findings suggest the co-existence of an alternative route that directly links LGN to hMT+, bypassing V1. This direct pathway may play a significant functional role for the faster detection of motion and may contribute to explain persistence of unconscious motion detection in individuals with severe destruction of primary visual cortex (blindsight).

  7. Further evidence for association of polymorphisms in the CNR1 gene with cocaine addiction: confirmation in an independent sample and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Toni-Kim; Bloch, Paul J; Ambrose-Lanci, Lisa M; Ferraro, Thomas N; Berrettini, Wade H; Kampman, Kyle M; Dackis, Charles A; Pettinati, Helen M; O'Brien, Charles P; Oslin, David W; Lohoff, Falk W

    2013-07-01

    Genetic research on cocaine dependence (CD) may help clarify our understanding of the disorder as well as provide insights for effective treatment. As endocannabinoid signaling and dopamine neurotransmission have been shown to be involved in drug reward, genes related to these systems are plausible candidates for susceptibility to CD. The cannabinoid receptor 1 protein regulates both the endocannabinoid and dopaminergic neurobiological systems, and polymorphisms in the cannabinoid receptor gene, CNR1, have been associated previously with substance dependence. In this study, we attempt to replicate findings associating CNR1 with CD in African Americans. Cocaine-addicted individuals (n=860) and unaffected controls (n=334) of African descent were genotyped for two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CNR1 (rs6454674, rs806368). We observed a significant difference in genotype frequencies between cases and controls for both SNPs (P≤0.042). A meta-analysis was also performed combining our data with that of Zuo et al. who also studied these polymorphisms in African American cocaine addicts (total n=1253 cases versus 543 controls). When our data were combined, rs6454674 increased in significance to P=0.027; however, rs806368 was no longer significant. This study confirms the association between rs6454674 and CD. However, because there is considerable co-morbidity of CD with other drugs of abuse, additional studies are necessary to determine whether polymorphisms in CNR1 induce a general susceptibility to substance dependence or are specific to cocaine addiction. Furthermore, as this population consists of American individuals of African descent, the possibility of population stratification should not be excluded.

  8. Gap junction- and hemichannel-independent actions of connexins

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jean X.; Gu, Sumin

    2007-01-01

    Connexins have been known to be the protein building blocks of gap junctions and mediate cell–cell communication. In contrast to the conventional dogma, recent evidence suggests that in addition to forming gap junction channels, connexins possess gap junction-independent functions. One important gap junction-independent function for connexins is to serve as the major functional component for hemichannels, the un-apposed halves of gap junctions. Hemichannels, as independent functional units, play roles that are different from that of gap junctions in the cell. The other functions of connexins appear to be gap junction- and hemichannel-independent. Published studies implicate the latter functions of connexins in cell growth, differentiation, tumorigenicity, injury, and apoptosis, although the mechanistic aspects of these actions remain largely unknown. In this review, gap junction- and hemichannel-independent functions of connexins are summarized, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these connexin functions are speculated and discussed. PMID:15955305

  9. Evidence-Based Design for Project-Based Learning: A Case Study for a 50,000 SF Addition Dedicated to the New Tech Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moretti, Richard D.; Conte, Philip R.

    2012-01-01

    The Seaford School District, Seaford, Delaware, determined that a component of their "reinvention" of Seaford High School would be the creation of a New Tech Academy, affiliated with the New Tech Network and housed in an addition to that building. The New Tech Network, headquartered in Napa, California, is a rapidly growing association…

  10. Evidence for an Additive Neurorestorative Effect of Simultaneously Administered CDNF and GDNF in Hemiparkinsonian Rats: Implications for Different Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Francesca; Stepanova, Polina; Bäck, Susanne; Yu, Li-Ying; Pörsti, Eeva; Männistö, Pekka T.; Tuominen, Raimo K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with a progressive loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) and the accumulation of intracellular inclusions containing α-synuclein. Current therapies do not stop the progression of the disease, and the efficacy of these treatments wanes over time. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are naturally occurring proteins promoting the survival and differentiation of neurons and the maintenance of neuronal contacts. CDNF (cerebral dopamine NTF) and GDNF (glial cell line-derived NTF) are able to protect DAergic neurons against toxin-induced degeneration in experimental models of PD. Here, we report an additive neurorestorative effect of coadministration of CDNF and GDNF in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of PD in rats. NTFs were given into the striatum four weeks after unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-OHDA (20 µg). Amphetamine-induced (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) rotational behavior was measured every two weeks. Number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells from SN pars compacta (SNpc) and density of TH-positive fibers in the striatum were analyzed at 12 weeks after lesion. CDNF and GDNF alone restored the DAergic function, and one specific dose combination had an additive effect: CDNF (2.5µg) and GDNF (1µg) coadministration led to a stronger trophic effect relative to either of the single treatments alone. The additive effect may indicate different mechanism of action for the NTFs. Indeed, both NTFs activated the survival promoting PI3 kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway, but only CDNF decreased the expression level of tested endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress markers ATF6, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), and phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α subunit (eIF2α). PMID:28303260

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies variants at CLU and PICALM associated with Alzheimer's disease, and shows evidence for additional susceptibility genes

    PubMed Central

    Harold, Denise; Abraham, Richard; Hollingworth, Paul; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Hamshere, Marian; Singh Pahwa, Jaspreet; Moskvina, Valentina; Dowzell, Kimberley; Williams, Amy; Jones, Nicola; Thomas, Charlene; Stretton, Alexandra; Morgan, Angharad; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John; Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Brayne, Carol; Rubinsztein, David C.; Gill, Michael; Lawlor, Brian; Lynch, Aoibhinn; Morgan, Kevin; Brown, Kristelle; Passmore, Peter; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Todd, Stephen; Holmes, Clive; Mann, David; Smith, A. David; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Hardy, John; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick; Rossor, Martin; Collinge, John; Maier, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Schürmann, Britta; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Heuser, Isabella; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Dichgans, Martin; Frölich, Lutz; Hampel, Harald; Hüll, Michael; Rujescu, Dan; Goate, Alison; Kauwe, John S.K.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nowotny, Petra; Morris, John C.; Mayo, Kevin; Sleegers, Kristel; Bettens, Karolien; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Livingston, Gill; Bass, Nicholas J.; Gurling, Hugh; McQuillin, Andrew; Gwilliam, Rhian; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Tsolaki, Magda; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Klopp, Norman; Wichmann, H-Erich; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Younkin, Steven G.; Holmans, Peter; O'Donovan, Michael; Owen, Michael J.; Williams, Julie

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a two-stage genome-wide association study of Alzheimer's disease involving over 16,000 individuals. In stage 1 (3,941 cases and 7,848 controls), we replicated the established association with the APOE locus (most significant SNP: rs2075650, p= 1.8×10−157) and observed genome-wide significant association with SNPs at two novel loci: rs11136000 in the CLU or APOJ gene (p= 1.4×10−9) and rs3851179, a SNP 5′ to the PICALM gene (p= 1.9×10−8). Both novel associations were supported in stage 2 (2,023 cases and 2,340 controls), producing compelling evidence for association with AD in the combined dataset (rs11136000: p= 8.5×10−10, odds ratio= 0.86; rs3851179: p= 1.3×10−9, odds ratio= 0.86). We also observed more variants associated at p< 1×10−5 than expected by chance (p=7.5×10−6), including polymorphisms at the BIN1, DAB1 and CR1 loci. PMID:19734902

  12. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  13. Evidence that additional mechanisms to cyclic GMP mediate the decrease in intracellular calcium and relaxation of rabbit aortic smooth muscle to nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Griswold, Mark C; Yaghoubi, Mohammad; Komalavilas, Padmini; Lincoln, Thomas M; Cohen, Richard A

    1998-01-01

    The role of cyclic GMP in the ability of nitric oxide (NO) to decrease intracellular free calcium concentration [Ca2+]i and divalent cation influx was studied in rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells in primary culture. In cells stimulated with angiotensin II (AII, 10−7 M), NO (10−10–10−6 M) increased cyclic GMP levels measured by radioimmunoassay and decreased [Ca2+]i and cation influx as indicated by fura-2 fluorimetry.Zaprinast (10−4 M), increased NO-stimulated levels of cyclic GMP by 3–20 fold. Although the phosphodiesterase inhibitor lowered the level of [Ca2+]i reached after administration of NO, the initial decreases in [Ca2+]i initiated by NO were not significantly different in magnitude or duration from those that occurred in the absence of zaprinast.The guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, H-(1,2,4) oxadiazolo(4,3-a) quinoxallin-1-one (ODQ, 10−5 M), blocked cyclic GMP accumulation and activation of protein kinase G, as measured by back phosphorylation of the inositol trisphosphate receptor. ODQ and Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS, a protein kinase G inhibitor, decreased the effects of NO, 10−10–10−8 M, but the decrease in [Ca2+]i or cation influx caused by higher concentrations of NO (10−7–10−6 M) were unaffected. Relaxation of intact rabbit aorta rings to NO (10−7–10−5 M) also persisted in the presence of ODQ without a significant increase in cyclic GMP. Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS blocked the decreases in cation influx caused by a cell permeable cyclic GMP analog, but ODQ and/or the protein kinase G inhibitor had no significant effect on the decrease caused by NO.Although inhibitors of cyclic GMP, protein kinase G and phosphodiesterase can be shown to affect the decrease in [Ca2+]i and cation influx via protein kinase G, these studies indicate that when these mechanisms are blocked, cyclic GMP-independent mechanisms also contribute significantly to the decrease in [Ca2+]i and smooth muscle relaxation to NO. PMID:9886761

  14. Lack of Impact of Posidonia oceanica Leaf Nutrient Enrichment on Sarpa salpa Herbivory: Additional Evidence for the Generalist Consumer Behavior of This Cornerstone Mediterranean Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Méndez, Candela; Wessel, Caitlin; Scheffel, Whitney; Ferrero-Vicente, Luis; Fernández-Torquemada, Yolanda; Cebrián, Just; Heck, Kenneth L.; Sánchez-Lizaso, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    The fish Sarpa salpa (L.) is one of the main macroherbivores in the western Mediterranean. Through direct and indirect mechanisms, this herbivore can exert significant control on the structure and functional dynamics of seagrass beds and macroalgae. Past research has suggested nutritional quality of their diet influences S. salpa herbivory, with the fish feeding more intensively and exerting greater top down control on macrophytes with higher internal nutrient contents. However recent findings have questioned this notion and shown that herbivores do not preferentially feed on macrophytes with higher nutrient contents, but rather feed on a wide variety of them with no apparent selectivity. To contribute to this debate, we conducted a field fertilization experiment where we enriched leaves of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, a staple diet for S. salpa, and examined the response by the herbivore. These responses included quantification of leaf consumption in fertilized and non-fertilized/control plots within the bed, and food choice assays where fertilized and non-fertilized/control leaves were simultaneously offered to the herbivore. Despite the duration of leaf exposure to herbivores (30 days) and abundant schools of S. salpa observed around the plots, leaf consumption was generally low in the plots examined. Consumption was not higher on fertilized than on non-fertilized leaves. Food choice experiments did not show strong evidence for selectivity of enriched leaves. These results add to a recent body of work reporting a broad generalist feeding behavior by S. salpa with no clear selectivity for seagrass with higher nutrient content. In concert, this and other studies suggest S. salpa is often generalist consumers not only dictated by diet nutrient content but by complex interactions between other traits of nutritional quality, habitat heterogeneity within their ample foraging area, and responses to predation risk. PMID:27992498

  15. Lack of Impact of Posidonia oceanica Leaf Nutrient Enrichment on Sarpa salpa Herbivory: Additional Evidence for the Generalist Consumer Behavior of This Cornerstone Mediterranean Herbivore.

    PubMed

    Marco-Méndez, Candela; Wessel, Caitlin; Scheffel, Whitney; Ferrero-Vicente, Luis; Fernández-Torquemada, Yolanda; Cebrián, Just; Heck, Kenneth L; Sánchez-Lizaso, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    The fish Sarpa salpa (L.) is one of the main macroherbivores in the western Mediterranean. Through direct and indirect mechanisms, this herbivore can exert significant control on the structure and functional dynamics of seagrass beds and macroalgae. Past research has suggested nutritional quality of their diet influences S. salpa herbivory, with the fish feeding more intensively and exerting greater top down control on macrophytes with higher internal nutrient contents. However recent findings have questioned this notion and shown that herbivores do not preferentially feed on macrophytes with higher nutrient contents, but rather feed on a wide variety of them with no apparent selectivity. To contribute to this debate, we conducted a field fertilization experiment where we enriched leaves of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, a staple diet for S. salpa, and examined the response by the herbivore. These responses included quantification of leaf consumption in fertilized and non-fertilized/control plots within the bed, and food choice assays where fertilized and non-fertilized/control leaves were simultaneously offered to the herbivore. Despite the duration of leaf exposure to herbivores (30 days) and abundant schools of S. salpa observed around the plots, leaf consumption was generally low in the plots examined. Consumption was not higher on fertilized than on non-fertilized leaves. Food choice experiments did not show strong evidence for selectivity of enriched leaves. These results add to a recent body of work reporting a broad generalist feeding behavior by S. salpa with no clear selectivity for seagrass with higher nutrient content. In concert, this and other studies suggest S. salpa is often generalist consumers not only dictated by diet nutrient content but by complex interactions between other traits of nutritional quality, habitat heterogeneity within their ample foraging area, and responses to predation risk.

  16. Additional patient with del(12)(q21.2q22): further evidence for a candidate region for cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome?

    PubMed

    Rauen, Katherine A; Albertson, Donna G; Pinkel, Daniel; Cotter, Philip D

    2002-06-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by a distinct facial appearance, cardiac defects, ectodermal anomalies and developmental delay. Recently, we reported a 19-month-old girl with phenotypic manifestations consistent with the CFC syndrome who had an interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 12, del(12)(q21.2q22), implicating a possible locus for CFC syndrome. Here, we report an additional patient with a cytogenetically identical interstitial deletion: 47,XYY,del(12)(q21.2q22). To further characterize this deletion we used microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Array CGH confirmed both the deletion and the second Y chromosome. The deletion on chromosome 12q spanned at least 14 Mb as indicated by the positions on the genome sequence of the 4 BAC clones included in the deletion. While the proband did not have the classic features of CFC, he had some dysmorphic craniofacial characteristics, ectodermal anomalies and moderate developmental delay which were suggestive of CFC syndrome; however, this patient did not have classical CFC. The phenotypic differences between the two del(12)(q21.2q22) patients may be due to variability in the expression of the syndrome, or this deletion may present as a syndrome with overlapping features. Alternatively, the phenotypic differences may result from discordance at the molecular level, which may yield a critical minimal region of deletion for CFC. The region 12q21.2 --> q22 remains a possible candidate region for CFC syndrome. Additional characterization of these and other CFC patients may confirm and further refine this candidate region.

  17. Characterization of Fluorescent Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake in Pseudomonas sp. Strain M114: Evidence for the Existence of an Additional Ferric Siderophore Receptor.

    PubMed

    Morris, J; O'sullivan, D J; Koster, M; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J; O'gara, F

    1992-02-01

    In Pseudomonas sp. strain M114, the outer membrane receptor for ferric pseudobactin M114 was shown to transport ferric pseudobactins B10 and A225, in addition to its own. The gene encoding this receptor, which was previously cloned on pCUP3, was localized by Tn5 mutagenesis to a region comprising >1.6 kb of M114 DNA. A mutant (strain M114R1) lacking this receptor was then created by a marker exchange technique. Characterization of this mutant by using purified pseudobactin M114 in radiolabeled ferric iron uptake studies confirmed that it was completely unable to utilize this siderophore for acquisition of iron. In addition, it lacked an outer membrane protein band of 89 kDa when subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. As a result, growth of the mutant was severely restricted under low-iron conditions. However, this phenotype was reversed in the presence of another fluorescent siderophore (pseudobactin MT3A) from Pseudomonas sp. strain MT3A, suggesting the presence of a second receptor in strain M114. Furthermore, wild-type Pseudomonas sp. strain B24 was not able to utilize ferric pseudobactin MT3A, and this phenotype was not reversed upon expression of the M114 receptor encoded on pCUP3. However, a cosmid clone (pMS1047) that enabled strain B24 to utilize ferric pseudobactin MT3A was isolated from an M114 gene bank. Radiolabel transport assays with purified pseudobactin MT3A confirmed this event. Plasmid pMS1047 was shown to encode an outer membrane protein of 81 kDa in strain B24 under iron-limiting conditions; this protein corresponds to a similar protein in strain M114.

  18. Cytogenetic and Molecular Evidence of Additional Cryptic Diversity in High Elevation Black fly Simulium feuerborni (Diptera: Simuliidae) Populations in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Pramual, Pairot; Thaijarern, Jiraporn; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Ya'cob, Zubaidah; Hadi, Upik Kesumawati; Takaoka, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Simulium feuerborni Edwards is geographically widespread in Southeast Asia. Previous cytogenetic study in Thailand revealed that this species is a species complex composed of two cytoforms (A and B). In this study, we cytologically examined specimens obtained from the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia, and Puncak, Java, Indonesia. The results revealed two additional cytoforms (C and D) of S. feuerborni. Specimens from Malaysia represent cytoform C, differentiated from other cytoforms by a fixed chromosome inversion on the long arm of chromosome III (IIIL-5). High frequencies of the B chromosome (33-83%) were also observed in this cytoform. Specimens from Indonesia represent the cytoform D. This cytoform is differentiated from others by a fixed chromosome inversion difference on the long arm of chromosome II (IIL-4). Mitochondrial DNA sequences support genetic differentiation among cytoforms A, B, and C. The pairwise F(ST) values among these cytoforms were highly significantly consistent with the divergent lineages of the cytoforms in a median-joining haplotype network. However, a lack of the sympatric populations prevented us from testing the species status of the cytoforms.

  19. Molecular characterization of begomoviruses and DNA satellites from Vietnam: additional evidence that the New World geminiviruses were present in the Old World prior to continental separation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Cuong; Coombs, Steven; Revill, Peter; Harding, Rob; Vu, Man; Dale, James

    2008-01-01

    Sixteen viruses, belonging to 16 species of begomovirus, that infect crops and weeds in Vietnam were identified. Sequence analysis of the complete genomes showed that nine of the viruses (six monopartite and three bipartite) belong to novel species and five of them were identified in Vietnam for the first time. Additionally, eight DNA-beta and three nanovirus-like DNA-1 molecules were also found associated with some of the monopartite viruses. Five of the DNA-beta molecules were novel. Importantly, a second bipartite begomovirus, Corchorus golden mosaic virus, shared several features with the previously characterized virus Corchorus yellow vein virus and with other bipartite begomoviruses from the New World, supporting the hypothesis that New World-like viruses were present in the Old World. This, together with a high degree of virus diversity that included putative recombinant viruses, satellite molecules and viruses with previously undescribed variability in the putative stem-loop sequences, suggested that South-East Asia, and Vietnam in particular, is one of the origins of begomovirus diversity.

  20. Additive genetic variation in resistance traits of an exotic pine species: little evidence for constraints on evolution of resistance against native herbivores.

    PubMed

    Moreira, X; Zas, R; Sampedro, L

    2013-05-01

    The apparent failure of invasions by alien pines in Europe has been explained by the co-occurrence of native pine congeners supporting herbivores that might easily recognize the new plants as hosts. Previous studies have reported that exotic pines show reduced tolerance and capacity to induce resistance to those native herbivores. We hypothesize that limited genetic variation in resistance to native herbivores and the existence of evolutionary trade-offs between growth and resistance could represent additional potential constraints on the evolution of invasiveness of exotic pines outside their natural range. In this paper, we examined genetic variation for constitutive and induced chemical defences (measured as non-volatile resin in the stem and total phenolics in the needles) and resistance to two major native generalist herbivores of pines in cafeteria bioassays (the phloem-feeder Hylobius abietis and the defoliator Thaumetopoea pityocampa) using half-sib families drawn from a sample of the population of Pinus radiata introduced to Spain in the mid-19th century. We found (i) significant genetic variation, with moderate-to-high narrow-sense heritabilities for both the production of constitutive non-volatile resin and induced total phenolics, and for constitutive resistance against T. pityocampa in bioassays, (ii) no evolutionary trade-offs between plant resistance and growth traits or between the production of different quantitative chemical defences and (iii) a positive genetic correlation between constitutive resistance to the two studied herbivores. Overall, results of our study indicate that the exotic pine P. radiata has limited genetic constraints on the evolution of resistance against herbivores in its introduced range, suggesting that, at least in terms of interactions with these enemies, this pine species has potential to become invasive in the future.

  1. Two additional human serum proteins structurally related to complement factor H: Evidence for a family of factor H-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Skerka, C.; Timmann, C.; Horstmann, R.D. ); Zipfel, P.F.

    1992-05-15

    The authors identify and characterize two human serum proteins with an apparent molecular mass of 24 and 29 kDa, which are antigenically related to complement factor H. These proteins represent differently glycosylated forms and are encoded by the same mRNA. The corresponding cDNA clone is 1051 bp in size and hybridized to a 1.4-kb mRNA derived from human liver. The predicted translation product represents a protein of 270 amino acids, which displays a hydrophobic leader sequence, indicative of a secreted protein. The secreted part is organized in four short consensus repeats (SCR) and has a single putative N-linked glycosylation site. The predicted sequence is closely related to that of the previously described factor H-related proteins h37 and h42, which are also derived from a 1.4-kb mRNA. Amino acid comparison of these factor H-related proteins showed identical leader sequences, an exchange of three amino acids in SCR1, identical sequences of SCR2, and a lower degree of homology between SCR3-4 (h24 and h29) and SCR4-5 (h37 and h42). In addition, SCR3-4 of h24 and h29 display homology to SCR19-20 of human complement factor H. The relatedness of structural elements of the factor H-related proteins h24, h29, h37, and h42 and of factor H, suggests a function common to these proteins and indicates the existence of a gene family consisting of factor H and at least two factor H-related genes. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. U-Pb ages of detrital zircons from the Sanbagawa Belt in western Shikoku: Additional evidence for the prevalence of Late Cretaceous protoliths of the Sanbagawa Metamorphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, U.; Suzuki, S.; Nishizaka, N.; Kimura, K.; Tsai, W.-L.; Lu, H.-Y.; Ishikawa, Y.; Ohno, Y.; Yanagida, M.; Lee, Y.-H.

    2014-12-01

    The Sanbagawa Metamorphic Belt in Japan is one of the best studied high-pressure, low temperature metamorphic belts. Recent work applying new dating techniques has challenged the previously accepted temporal framework for the evolution of the belt, as it was shown that large parts of the belt contain detrital zircons of Late Cretaceous age (younger than 100 Ma), i.e. they have protolith ages younger than the previously accepted age of metamorphism at ca. 110 Ma. A 2000 m bore hole from north-western Shikoku provided an excellent opportunity to further evaluate the areal extent of Late Cretaceous protoliths as the drill hole was drilled in an area considered to be part of the Jurassic to Early Cretaceous part of the Sanbagawa Belt. Dating of single zircon grains using the LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating method shows that all but one sample contain zircons younger than 100 Ma and thus the protoliths are younger than the previously accepted age of metamorphism of the Sanbagawa Belt. The single sample that contains only zircons dated at 136 ± 3 Ma, apparently is of volcanic origin and could be a clast representing the source of 130-140 Ma zircons of the sample taken about 120 above this sample. In addition, three surface samples were analysed. Two of these also contain zircons younger than 100 Ma, whereas the third sample contains only zircons older than 159 Ma. The zircons from this sample also exhibit an age spectrum different from that exhibited by the other samples. The exact significance of this sample is not clear as yet.

  3. Constitutive ALK5-Independent c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activation Contributes to Endothelin-1 Overexpression in Pulmonary Fibrosis: Evidence of an Autocrine Endothelin Loop Operating through the Endothelin A and B Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shi-Wen, Xu; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando; Lamas, Santiago; Holmes, Alan; Howat, Sarah; Pearson, Jeremy D.; Dashwood, Michael R.; du Bois, Roland M.; Denton, Christopher P.; Black, Carol M.; Abraham, David J.; Leask, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The signal transduction mechanisms generating pathological fibrosis are almost wholly unknown. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), which is up-regulated during tissue repair and fibrosis, induces lung fibroblasts to produce and contract extracellular matrix. Lung fibroblasts isolated from scleroderma patients with chronic pulmonary fibrosis produce elevated levels of ET-1, which contribute to the persistent fibrotic phenotype of these cells. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) induces fibroblasts to produce and contract matrix. In this report, we show that TGF-β induces ET-1 in normal and fibrotic lung fibroblasts in a Smad-independent ALK5/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/Ap-1-dependent fashion. ET-1 induces JNK through TAK1. Fibrotic lung fibroblasts display constitutive JNK activation, which was reduced by the dual ETA/ETB receptor inhibitor, bosentan, providing evidence of an autocrine endothelin loop. Thus, ET-1 and TGF-β are likely to cooperate in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. As elevated JNK activation in fibrotic lung fibroblasts contributes to the persistence of the myofibroblast phenotype in pulmonary fibrosis by promoting an autocrine ET-1 loop, targeting the ETA and ETB receptors or constitutive JNK activation by fibrotic lung fibroblasts is likely to be of benefit in combating chronic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:16809784

  4. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  5. The combined inhibitory effect of the adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors on cAMP accumulation in the hippocampus is additive and independent of A1 receptor desensitization.

    PubMed

    Serpa, André; Correia, Sara; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Cascalheira, José F

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors are highly expressed in hippocampus where they trigger similar transduction pathways. We investigated how the combined acute activation of A1 and CB1 receptors modulates cAMP accumulation in rat hippocampal slices. The CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 (0.3-30 μM) decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation with an EC50 of 6.6±2.7 μM and an Emax of 31%±2%, whereas for the A1 agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10-150 nM), an EC50 of 35±19 nM, and an Emax of 29%±5 were obtained. The combined inhibitory effect of WIN55212-2 (30 μM) and CPA (100 nM) on cAMP accumulation was 41%±6% (n=4), which did not differ (P>0.7) from the sum of the individual effects of each agonist (43%±8%) but was different (P<0.05) from the effects of CPA or WIN55212-2 alone. Preincubation with CPA (100 nM) for 95 min caused desensitization of adenosine A1 activity, which did not modify the effect of WIN55212-2 (30 μM) on cAMP accumulation. In conclusion, the combined effect of CB1 and A1 receptors on cAMP formation is additive and CB1 receptor activity is not affected by short-term A1 receptor desensitization.

  6. Mnemonic Vocabulary Instruction: Additional Effectiveness Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Joel R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Four experiments with 132 seventh graders, 162 eighth graders, 75 fourth graders, and 52 third graders compared the mnemonic keyword method with various other vocabulary learning strategies. Mnemonic keyword students outperformed sentence-context and free-study counterparts and generally outperformed others on tests of vocabulary usage. (SLD)

  7. Independent effects of sleep duration and body mass index on the risk of a work-related injury: evidence from the US National Health Interview Survey (2004-2010).

    PubMed

    Lombardi, David A; Wirtz, Anna; Willetts, Joanna L; Folkard, Simon

    2012-06-01

    Fatigue has been linked to adverse safety outcomes, and poor quality or decreased sleep has been associated with obesity (higher body mass index, BMI). Additionally, higher BMI is related to an increased risk for injury; however, it is unclear whether BMI modifies the effect of short sleep or has an independent effect on work-related injury risk. To answer this question, the authors examined the risk of a work-related injury as a function of total daily sleep time and BMI using the US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). The NHIS is an in-person household survey using a multistage, stratified, clustered sample design representing the US civilian population. Data were pooled for the 7-yr survey period from 2004 to 2010 for 101 891 "employed" adult subjects (51.7%; 41.1 ± yrs of age [mean ± SEM]) with data on both sleep and BMI. Weighted annualized work-related injury rates were estimated across a priori defined categories of BMI: healthy weight (BMI: <25), overweight (BMI: 25-29.99), and obese (BMI: ≥30) and also categories of usual daily sleep duration: <6, 6-6.99, 7-7.99, 8-8.99, and ≥9 h. To account for the complex sampling design, including stratification, clustering, and unequal weighting, weighted multiple logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of a work-related injury. The initial model examined the interaction among daily sleep duration and BMI, controlling for weekly working hours, age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, type of pay, industry, and occupation. No significant interaction was found between usual daily sleep duration and BMI (p = .72); thus, the interaction term of the final logistic model included these two variables as independent predictors of injury, along with the aforementioned covariates. Statistically significant covariates (p ≤ .05) included age, sex, weekly work hours, occupation, and if the worker was paid hourly. The lowest categories of usual sleep duration (<6 and 6-6.9 h) showed significantly (p

  8. Early Mars climate near the Noachian-Hesperian boundary: Independent evidence for cold conditions from basal melting of the south polar ice sheet (Dorsa Argentea Formation) and implications for valley network formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastook, James L.; Head, James W.; Marchant, David R.; Forget, Francois; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    2012-05-01

    Currently, and throughout much of the Amazonian, the mean annual surface temperatures of Mars are so cold that basal melting does not occur in ice sheets and glaciers and they are cold-based. The documented evidence for extensive and well-developed eskers (sediment-filled former sub-glacial meltwater channels) in the south circumpolar Dorsa Argentea Formation is an indication that basal melting and wet-based glaciation occurred at the South Pole near the Noachian-Hesperian boundary. We employ glacial accumulation and ice-flow models to distinguish between basal melting from bottom-up heat sources (elevated geothermal fluxes) and top-down induced basal melting (elevated atmospheric temperatures warming the ice). We show that under mean annual south polar atmospheric temperatures (-100 °C) simulated in typical Amazonian climate experiments and typical Noachian-Hesperian geothermal heat fluxes (45-65 mW/m2), south polar ice accumulations remain cold-based. In order to produce significant basal melting with these typical geothermal heat fluxes, the mean annual south polar atmospheric temperatures must be raised from today's temperature at the surface (-100 °C) to the range of -50 to -75 °C. This mean annual polar surface atmospheric temperature range implies lower latitude mean annual temperatures that are likely to be below the melting point of water, and thus does not favor a "warm and wet" early Mars. Seasonal temperatures at lower latitudes, however, could range above the melting point of water, perhaps explaining the concurrent development of valley networks and open basin lakes in these areas. This treatment provides an independent estimate of the polar (and non-polar) surface temperatures near the Noachian-Hesperian boundary of Mars history and implies a cold and relatively dry Mars climate, similar to the Antarctic Dry Valleys, where seasonal melting forms transient streams and permanent ice-covered lakes in an otherwise hyperarid, hypothermal climate.

  9. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  10. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  11. Independent Peer Reviews

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-16

    Independent Assessments: DOE's Systems Integrator convenes independent technical reviews to gauge progress toward meeting specific technical targets and to provide technical information necessary for key decisions.

  12. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by proteoliposomes and cultured rat sertoli cells: Evidence for involvement of voltage-activated and voltage-independent calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1989-12-01

    We have previously reported incorporation into liposomes of Triton X-100-solubilized FSH receptor-G-protein complexes derived from purified bovine calf testis membranes. In the present study we have used this model system to show that FSH induces flux of 45Ca2+ into such proteoliposomes in a hormone-specific concentration-dependent manner. FSH, inactivated by boiling, had no stimulatory effect on 45Ca2+ flux, nor did isolated alpha- or beta-subunits of FSH. Addition of GTP (or its analogs 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate and guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)) or sodium fluoride (in the presence or absence of GTP or its analogs) failed to induce 45Ca2+ flux into proteoliposomes, suggesting that the uptake of 45Ca2+ was receptor, and not G-protein, related. Voltage-independent (ruthenium red and gadolinium chloride) and voltage-activated (methyoxyverapamil and nifedipine) calcium channel-blocking agents reduced FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ flux into proteoliposomes to control levels. FSH also induced uptake of 45Ca2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells. Ruthenium red and gadolinium chloride had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake or estradiol secretion by cultured rat Sertoli cells, nor did methoxyverapamil or nifedipine. All four calcium channel blockers, however, were able to reduce FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake to basal levels and FSH-stimulated conversion of androstenedione to estradiol by up to 50%, indicating an involvement of Ca2+ in FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Our results suggest that the well documented changes in intracellular calcium levels consequent to FSH binding may be due, at least in part, to an influx of calcium through FSH receptor-regulated calcium channels.

  13. Fused Lasso Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Witten, Daniela; Simon, Noah

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable using p covariates that are measured on n independent observations, in a setting in which additive, flexible, and interpretable fits are desired. We propose the fused lasso additive model (FLAM), in which each additive function is estimated to be piecewise constant with a small number of adaptively-chosen knots. FLAM is the solution to a convex optimization problem, for which a simple algorithm with guaranteed convergence to a global optimum is provided. FLAM is shown to be consistent in high dimensions, and an unbiased estimator of its degrees of freedom is proposed. We evaluate the performance of FLAM in a simulation study and on two data sets. Supplemental materials are available online, and the R package flam is available on CRAN. PMID:28239246

  14. Independent Study in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Univ., Moscow.

    This guide to independent study in Idaho begins with introductory information on the following aspects of independent study: the Independent Study in Idaho consortium, student eligibility, special needs, starting dates, registration, costs, textbooks and instructional materials, e-mail and faxing, refunds, choosing a course, time limits, speed…

  15. An Approach to Keeping Independent Colleges Independent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Area Foundation, St. Paul, Minn.

    As a result of the financial difficulties faced by independent colleges in the northwestern United States, the Northwest Area Foundation in 1972 surveyed the administrations of 80 private colleges to get a profile of the colleges, a list of their current problems, and some indication of how the problems might be approached. The three top problems…

  16. Evidence for the primary role for 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(v) channels in beta(3)-adrenoceptor-mediated, cyclic AMP-independent relaxations of guinea-pig gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Takahiro; Tanaka, Yoshio; Koike, Katsuo

    2003-02-01

    Gastrointestinal smooth muscles exhibit relaxation in response to the stimulation of beta-adrenoceptors with catecholamines. Subtypes of beta-adrenoceptors which mediate catecholamine-elicited relaxations in gastrointestinal smooth muscles are predominantly atypical beta-adrenoceptors including beta(3)-adrenoceptors. Gastrointestinal smooth muscle relaxations mediated via beta(3)-adrenoceptors can occur independently of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) elevation. One of the mechanisms responsible for cyclic AMP-independent smooth muscle relaxation following activation of G(s) protein-coupled receptors could be activation of voltage-gated K(+) channels. In the present study, possible contribution of two types of K(+) (large-conductance, Ca(2+)-sensitive and voltage-gated K(+), BK(Ca); voltage-gated, K(v)) channels to beta(3)-adrenoceptor-mediated, cyclic AMP-independent relaxations was compared in gastric fundus and duodenum smooth muscles isolated from the guinea-pig. In these gastrointestinal smooth muscles, three catecholamines ((-)-isoprenaline, (-)-noradrenaline and (-)-adrenaline) and two beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonists ((R(*), R(*))-(+/-)-4-[2-[(2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl)amino]propyl]phenoxyacetic acid sodium (BRL37344) and (+/-)-[4-[3-[(1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]-2-hydroxypropoxy] -1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one] hydrochloride ((+/-)-CGP12177A)) elicited a concentration-dependent relaxation in the presence of beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonists. The relaxations were unaffected by an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, SQ-22536 (100 microM), which indicates their characteristic of cyclic AMP-independency. On the other hand, the SQ-22536-resistant, beta(3)-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxant components were potently attenuated when the tone was raised using high-KCl (80 mM) or in the presence of a K(v) channel blocker, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 1-3 mM). Iberiotoxin (100 nM), a selective blocker of BK(Ca) channels which significantly

  17. Prospects for an Independent Kurdistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    are mostly Sunni.25 In addition, about 5 percent of the Kurds are Yazidis, which is a “mixture of Islamic, Christian , Jewish, and pagan beliefs...significant political progress has been made by the Kurds of Iraq. The probability of ongoing ethnic and religious strife within Iraq creates an...seek independence. Figure 2 shows the ethno- religious 38 “Guide to Iraqi political parties,” BBC News, http://news.bbc.co.uk

  18. American Independence. Fifth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Annette

    This fifth grade teaching unit covers early conflicts between the American colonies and Britain, battles of the American Revolutionary War, and the Declaration of Independence. Knowledge goals address the pre-revolutionary acts enforced by the British, the concepts of conflict and independence, and the major events and significant people from the…

  19. Independence of Internal Auditors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montondon, Lucille; Meixner, Wilda F.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 288 college and university auditors investigated patterns in their appointment, reporting, and supervisory practices as indicators of independence and objectivity. Results indicate a weakness in the positioning of internal auditing within institutions, possibly compromising auditor independence. Because the auditing function is…

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm-an independent disease to atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Toghill, Bradley J; Saratzis, Athanasios; Bown, Matthew J

    Atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are multifactorial and polygenic diseases with known environmental and genetic risk factors that contribute toward disease development. Atherosclerosis represents an important independent risk factor for AAA, as people with AAA often have atherosclerosis. Studies have shown that comorbidity is usually between ~25% and 55%, but it is still not fully known whether this association is causal or a result of common shared risk profiles. Most recent epidemiological, clinical, and biological evidence suggests that the two pathologies are more distinct than traditionally thought. For instance diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity are high risk for atherosclerosis development but are not as pronounced in AAA, whereas smoking, gender, and ethnicity are particularly high risk for AAA but less so for atherosclerosis. In addition, genetic and epigenetic studies have identified independent risk loci involved in AAA susceptibility that are not associated with other cardiovascular diseases, and research on important common cardiovascular biomarkers has illustrated discrepancies in those with AAA.

  1. Semantic Modelling of Digital Forensic Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahvedžić, Damir; Kechadi, Tahar

    The reporting of digital investigation results are traditionally carried out in prose and in a large investigation may require successive communication of findings between different parties. Popular forensic suites aid in the reporting process by storing provenance and positional data but do not automatically encode why the evidence is considered important. In this paper we introduce an evidence management methodology to encode the semantic information of evidence. A structured vocabulary of terms, ontology, is used to model the results in a logical and predefined manner. The descriptions are application independent and automatically organised. The encoded descriptions aim to help the investigation in the task of report writing and evidence communication and can be used in addition to existing evidence management techniques.

  2. Media independent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The work done on the Media Independent Interface (MII) Interface Control Document (ICD) program is described and recommendations based on it were made. Explanations and rationale for the content of the ICD itself are presented.

  3. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  4. Evidence for o-atom exchange in the O(1D) + N2O reaction as the source of mass-independent isotopic fractionation in atmospheric N2O.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Charles E.; Liang, Mao-Chang; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Muller, Richard Partain; Yung, Yuk L.

    2004-07-01

    Recent experiments have shown that in the oxygen isotopic exchange reaction for O({sup 1}D) + CO{sub 2} the elastic channel is approximately 50% that of the inelastic channel [Perri et al., 2003]. We propose an analogous oxygen atom exchange reaction for the isoelectronic O({sup 1}D) + N{sub 2}O system to explain the mass-independent isotopic fractionation (MIF) in atmospheric N{sub 2}O. We apply quantum chemical methods to compute the energetics of the potential energy surfaces on which the O({sup 1}D) + N{sub 2}O reaction occurs. Preliminary modeling results indicate that oxygen isotopic exchange via O({sup 1}D) + N{sub 2}O can account for the MIF oxygen anomaly if the oxygen atom isotopic exchange rate is 30-50% that of the total rate for the reactive channels.

  5. Suppression of interleukin 2-dependent human T cell growth in vitro by prostaglandin E (PGE) and their precursor fatty acids. Evidence for a PGE-independent mechanism of inhibition by the fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Santoli, D; Phillips, P D; Colt, T L; Zurier, R B

    1990-01-01

    PGE represent oxygenation products of polyunsaturated essential fatty acids and are important regulators of cell-mediated immune responses. Because oils enriched in such fatty acids reduce inflammation and tissue injury in vivo, we examined the effects of these PGE precursors on IL-2-driven growth of human T lymphocytes. Dihomogamma linoleic acid (DGLA), AA, and their metabolites (PGE1 and PGE2, respectively) strongly inhibited short- and long-term growth of IL-2-dependent T cell cultures; EPA was much less inhibitory and its product, PGE3, failed to suppress IL-2 responses. Short-term pretreatment of the cells with DGLA or AA and removal of the fatty acids before the proliferation assay resulted in a smaller reduction in [3H]TdR incorporation. PGE and fatty acids did not alter the number of high affinity IL-2 binding sites on the T cell cultures but reduced the percentage of cells expressing CD25 and HLA class II molecules. No PGE was detected in supernatants from the fatty acid-treated cultures. Moreover, indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, did not reverse the antiproliferative effects of the fatty acids. Together, these findings indicate that fatty acids can inhibit IL-2-driven T cell growth via a PGE-independent mechanism and might be relevant to inflammatory diseases associated with persistent T cell activation. Images PMID:2298918

  6. Independent technical review, handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Purpose Provide an independent engineering review of the major projects being funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The independent engineering review will address questions of whether the engineering practice is sufficiently developed to a point where a major project can be executed without significant technical problems. The independent review will focus on questions related to: (1) Adequacy of development of the technical base of understanding; (2) Status of development and availability of technology among the various alternatives; (3) Status and availability of the industrial infrastructure to support project design, equipment fabrication, facility construction, and process and program/project operation; (4) Adequacy of the design effort to provide a sound foundation to support execution of project; (5) Ability of the organization to fully integrate the system, and direct, manage, and control the execution of a complex major project.

  7. Homebirth and independent midwifery.

    PubMed

    Harris, G

    2000-07-01

    Why do women choose to give birth at home, and midwives to work independently, in a culture that does little to support this option? This article looks at the reasons childbearing women and midwives make these choices and the barriers to achieving them. The safety of the homebirth option is supported in reference to analysis of mortality and morbidity. Homebirth practices and level of success are compared in Australia and New Zealand (NZ), in particular, and The Netherlands, England and America. The success of popularity of homebirths is analysed in terms of socio-economic status. The current situation and challenges of independent midwifery in Darwin are described.

  8. Changes in Faculty Composition at Independent Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morphew, Christopher; Ward, Kelly; Wolf-Wendel, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This report provides empirical evidence about specific trends in faculty staffing, roles, and responsibilities at smaller private liberal arts institutions in the United States, with a focus on the more than 600 four-year colleges and universities that are members of the Council of Independent Colleges. It also addresses how the changing…

  9. Extrapancreatic effects of incretin hormones: evidence for weight-independent changes in morphological aspects and oxidative status in insulin-sensitive organs of the obese nondiabetic Zucker rat (ZFR).

    PubMed

    Colin, Ides M; Colin, Henri; Dufour, Ines; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Many, Marie-Christine; Saey, Jean; Knoops, Bernard; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Incretin-based therapies are widely used to treat type 2 diabetes. Although hypoglycemic actions of incretins are mostly due to their insulinotropic/glucagonostatic effects, they may also influence extrapancreatic metabolism. We administered exendin-4 (Ex-4), a long-acting glucagon-like peptide receptor agonist, at low dose (0.1 nmol/kg/day) for a short period (10 days), in obese nondiabetic fa/fa Zucker rats (ZFRs). Ex-4-treated ZFRs were compared to vehicle (saline)-treated ZFRs and vehicle- and Ex-4-treated lean rats (LRs). Blood glucose levels were measured at days 0, 9, and 10. Ingested food and animal weight were recorded daily. On the day of sacrifice (d10), blood was sampled along with liver, epididymal, subcutaneous, brown adipose, and skeletal muscle tissues from animals fasted for 24 h. Plasma insulin and blood glucose levels, food intake, and body and epididymal fat weight were unchanged, but gross morphological changes were observed in insulin-sensitive tissues. The average size of hepatocytes was significantly lower in Ex-4-treated ZFRs, associated with decreased number and size of lipid droplets and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) staining, a marker of oxidative stress (OS). Myocytes, which were smaller in ZFRs than in LRs, were significantly enlarged and depleted of lipid droplets in Ex-4-treated ZFRs. Weak HNE staining was increased by Ex-4. A similar observation was made in brown adipose tissue, whereas the elevated HNE staining observed in epididymal adipocytes of ZFRs, suggestive of strong OS, was decreased by Ex-4. These results suggest that incretins by acting on OS in insulin-sensitive tissues may contribute to weight-independent improvement in insulin sensitivity.

  10. Evidence for stasis and not genetic piracy in developmental expression patterns of Branchiostoma lanceolatum and Branchiostoma floridae, two amphioxus species that have evolved independently over the course of 200 Myr.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Ildiko; Bertrand, Stéphanie; Camasses, Alain; Haguenauer, Anne; Escriva, Hector

    2008-12-01

    Cephalochordates, the most basal extant group in the phylum Chordata, are represented chiefly by about 20 species of the genus Branchiostoma, commonly called amphioxus or lancelets. In recent years, insights into the evolutionary origin of the vertebrates have been gained from molecular genetic studies during the development of three of these amphioxus species (Branchiostoma floridae in North America, Branchiostoma lanceolatum in Europe, and Branchiostoma belcheri in East Asia). In spite of an estimated divergence time of 100-200 Myr among these species, all three are remarkably similar morphologically, and students of amphioxus have tacitly assumed that such resemblances arise during ontogeny from nearly identical networks of developmental genes. We felt that this assumption needed to be reexamined because instances are known--even in comparisons of closely related species--where characters seeming homologous on the basis of morphology actually develop under the control of conspicuously divergent genetic programs (a phenomenon termed "genetic piracy"). In the present work, we tested the hypothesis that morphological similarities reflect strict conservation of developmentally important genes' expression patterns in order to assess whether the developmental genetics of different amphioxus species show evidence of genetic piracy. To these ends, we cloned 18 genes implicated in different developmental functions in B. lanceolatum and compared their gene expression patterns with the known expression patterns of their orthologous genes in B. floridae. We show that, for the most part, conservation of gene expression parallels that of morphology in these two species. We also identified some differences in gene expression, likely reflecting experimental sensitivity, with the exception of Pax1/9, which may result from true developmental specificities in each amphioxus species. Our results demonstrate that morphological conservation reflects stasis in developmental gene

  11. Postcard from Independence, Mo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    This article reports results showing that the Independence, Missori school district failed to meet almost every one of its improvement goals under the No Child Left Behind Act. The state accreditation system stresses improvement over past scores, while the federal law demands specified amounts of annual progress toward the ultimate goal of 100…

  12. Native American Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Julie Anna

    1992-01-01

    Examines features of independent living philosophy with regard to compatibility with Native American cultures, including definition or conceptualization of disability; self-advocacy; systems advocacy; peer counseling; and consumer control and involvement. Discusses an actualizing process as one method of resolving cultural conflicts and…

  13. Touchstones of Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roha, Thomas Arden

    1999-01-01

    Foundations affiliated with public higher education institutions can avoid having to open records for public scrutiny, by having independent boards of directors, occupying leased office space or paying market value for university space, using only foundation personnel, retaining legal counsel, being forthcoming with information and use of public…

  14. Independent Video in Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David

    Maintaining the status quo as well as the attitude toward cultural funding and development that it imposes on video are detrimental to the formation of a thriving video network, and also out of key with the present social and political situation in Britain. Independent video has some quite specific advantages as a medium for cultural production…

  15. Caring about Independent Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Karen

    2010-01-01

    With the rhetoric of independence, new cash for care systems were introduced in many developed welfare states at the end of the 20th century. These systems allow local authorities to pay people who are eligible for community care services directly, to enable them to employ their own careworkers. Despite the obvious importance of the careworker's…

  16. Independence and Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, H. Thomas

    Independent schools that are of viable size, well managed, and strategically located to meet competition will survive and prosper past the current financial crisis. We live in a complex technological society with insatiable demands for knowledgeable people to keep it running. The future will be marked by the orderly selection of qualified people,…

  17. ADHD Diet: Do Food Additives Cause Hyperactivity?

    MedlinePlus

    ... There's no solid evidence that food additives cause attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the topic of food additives and their possible effects is controversial. Some studies indicate that certain food ...

  18. Agent independent task planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William S.

    1990-01-01

    Agent-Independent Planning is a technique that allows the construction of activity plans without regard to the agent that will perform them. Once generated, a plan is then validated and translated into instructions for a particular agent, whether a robot, crewmember, or software-based control system. Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is planned for orbital operations for approximately thirty years, it will almost certainly experience numerous enhancements and upgrades, including upgrades in robotic manipulators. Agent-Independent Planning provides the capability to construct plans for SSF operations, independent of specific robotic systems, by combining techniques of object oriented modeling, nonlinear planning and temporal logic. Since a plan is validated using the physical and functional models of a particular agent, new robotic systems can be developed and integrated with existing operations in a robust manner. This technique also provides the capability to generate plans for crewmembers with varying skill levels, and later apply these same plans to more sophisticated robotic manipulators made available by evolutions in technology.

  19. International exploration by independent

    SciTech Connect

    Bertragne, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    Recent industry trends indicate that the smaller U.S. independents are looking at foreign exploration opportunities as one of the alternatives for growth in the new age of exploration. Foreign finding costs per barrel usually are accepted to be substantially lower than domestic costs because of the large reserve potential of international plays. To get involved in overseas exploration, however, requires the explorationist to adapt to different cultural, financial, legal, operational, and political conditions. Generally, foreign exploration proceeds at a slower pace than domestic exploration because concessions are granted by a country's government, or are explored in partnership with a national oil company. First, the explorationist must prepare a mid- to long-term strategy, tailored to the goals and the financial capabilities of the company; next, is an ongoing evaluation of quality prospects in various sedimentary basins, and careful planning and conduct of the operations. To successfully explore overseas also requires the presence of a minimum number of explorationists and engineers thoroughly familiar with the various exploratory and operational aspects of foreign work. Ideally, these team members will have had a considerable amount of on-site experience in various countries and climates. Independents best suited for foreign expansion are those who have been financially successful in domestic exploration. When properly approached, foreign exploration is well within the reach of smaller U.S. independents, and presents essentially no greater risk than domestic exploration; however, the reward can be much larger and can catapult the company into the 'big leagues.'

  20. International exploration by independents

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagne, R.G. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent industry trends indicate that the smaller US independents are looking at foreign exploration opportunities as one of the alternatives for growth in the new age of exploration. It is usually accepted that foreign finding costs per barrel are substantially lower than domestic because of the large reserve potential of international plays. To get involved overseas requires, however, an adaptation to different cultural, financial, legal, operational, and political conditions. Generally foreign exploration proceeds at a slower pace than domestic because concessions are granted by the government, or are explored in partnership with the national oil company. First, a mid- to long-term strategy, tailored to the goals and the financial capabilities of the company, must be prepared; it must be followed by an ongoing evaluation of quality prospects in various sedimentary basins, and a careful planning and conduct of the operations. To successfully explore overseas also requires the presence on the team of a minimum number of explorationists and engineers thoroughly familiar with the various exploratory and operational aspects of foreign work, having had a considerable amount of onsite experience in various geographical and climatic environments. Independents that are best suited for foreign expansion are those that have been financially successful domestically, and have a good discovery track record. When properly approached foreign exploration is well within the reach of smaller US independents and presents essentially no greater risk than domestic exploration; the reward, however, can be much larger and can catapult the company into the big leagues.

  1. Why Additional Presentations Help Identify a Stimulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guest, Duncan; Kent, Christopher; Adelman, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Nosofsky (1983) reported that additional stimulus presentations within a trial increase discriminability in absolute identification, suggesting that each presentation creates an independent stimulus representation, but it remains unclear whether exposure duration or the formation of independent representations improves discrimination in such…

  2. Cary Potter on Independent Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Cary

    1978-01-01

    Cary Potter was President of the National Association of Independent Schools from 1964-1978. As he leaves NAIS he gives his views on education, on independence, on the independent school, on public responsibility, on choice in a free society, on educational change, and on the need for collective action by independent schools. (Author/RK)

  3. Myth or Truth: Independence Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    Most Americans think of the Fourth of July as Independence Day, but is it really the day the U.S. declared and celebrated independence? By exploring myths and truths surrounding Independence Day, this lesson asks students to think critically about commonly believed stories regarding the beginning of the Revolutionary War and the Independence Day…

  4. Did the ctenophore nervous system evolve independently?

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph F

    2014-08-01

    Recent evidence supports the placement of ctenophores as the most distant relative to all other animals. This revised animal tree means that either the ancestor of all animals possessed neurons (and that sponges and placozoans apparently lost them) or that ctenophores developed them independently. Differentiating between these possibilities is important not only from a historical perspective, but also for the interpretation of a wide range of neurobiological results. In this short perspective paper, I review the evidence in support of each scenario and show that the relationship between the nervous system of ctenophores and other animals is an unsolved, yet tractable problem.

  5. Evidence from Visuomotor Adaptation for Two Partially Independent Visuomotor Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler, Lore; Todd, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Visual information can specify spatial layout with respect to the observer (egocentric) or with respect to an external frame of reference (allocentric). People can use both of these types of visual spatial information to guide their hands. The question arises if movements based on egocentric and movements based on allocentric visual information…

  6. ADHD and Dyscalculia: Evidence for Independent Familial Transmission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monuteaux, Michael C.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Herzig, Kathleen; Navsaria, Neha; Biederman, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The familial relationship between dyscalculia and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was assessed. We conducted a familial risk analysis using probands with and without ADHD of both genders and their first-degree relatives. Participants were assessed with structured diagnostic interviews and a cognitive test battery. We found elevated…

  7. Evidence for an Age-Independent Process in Category Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Kenneth R.; Andrews, Janet K.

    2005-01-01

    After learning to categorize a set of alien-like stimuli in the context of a story, a group of 5-year-old children and adults judged pairs of stimuli from different categories to be less similar than did groups not learning the category distinction. In a same-different task, the learning group made more errors on pairs of non-identical stimuli…

  8. Promoting Independent Learning by Curriculum Design and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Gill

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper evaluates whether the revalidated Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) programme encourages independent learning by its curriculum design, delivery and assessment. Results: Evidence regarding the promotion of independent learning was gained from learners and external examiners. The scientific publications, presentations and posters…

  9. The Evidence Value Matrix for Diagnostic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Seidel, David; Frank, Richard A; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2016-10-01

    Evidence and value are independent factors that together affect the adoption of diagnostic imaging. For example, noncoverage decisions by reimbursement authorities can be justified by a lack of evidence and/or value. To create transparency and a common understanding among various stakeholders, we have proposed a two-dimensional matrix that allows classification of imaging devices into three distinct categories based on the available evidence and value: "question marks" (low value demonstrated in studies of any evidence level), "candidates" (high value demonstrated in retrospective case-control studies and smaller case series), and "stars" (high value demonstrated in large prospective cohort studies or, preferably, randomized controlled trials). We use several examples to illustrate the application of our matrix. A major benefit of the matrix includes the development of specific strategies for evidence and value generation. High-evidence/low-value studies are expensive and unlikely to convince decision makers, given the uncertainty of the impact on patient management and outcomes. Developing question marks into candidates first and then into stars will often be quicker and less expensive ("success sequence"). Only this more sophisticated and objective approach can justify the additional funding necessary to generate the evidence base to inform reimbursement by payers and adoption by providers.

  10. Congruence of additive and non-additive effects on gene expression estimated from pedigree and SNP data.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joseph E; Henders, Anjali K; McRae, Allan F; Kim, Jinhee; Hemani, Gibran; Martin, Nicholas G; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Gibson, Greg; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M

    2013-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that heritable variation in gene expression underlies genetic variation in susceptibility to disease. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the similarity between relatives for transcript variation is warranted--in particular, dissection of phenotypic variation into additive and non-additive genetic factors and shared environmental effects. We conducted a gene expression study in blood samples of 862 individuals from 312 nuclear families containing MZ or DZ twin pairs using both pedigree and genotype information. From a pedigree analysis we show that the vast majority of genetic variation across 17,994 probes is additive, although non-additive genetic variation is identified for 960 transcripts. For 180 of the 960 transcripts with non-additive genetic variation, we identify expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) with dominance effects in a sample of 339 unrelated individuals and replicate 31% of these associations in an independent sample of 139 unrelated individuals. Over-dominance was detected and replicated for a trans association between rs12313805 and ETV6, located 4MB apart on chromosome 12. Surprisingly, only 17 probes exhibit significant levels of common environmental effects, suggesting that environmental and lifestyle factors common to a family do not affect expression variation for most transcripts, at least those measured in blood. Consistent with the genetic architecture of common diseases, gene expression is predominantly additive, but a minority of transcripts display non-additive effects.

  11. Dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junling; Kodippili, Kasun; Yue, Yongping; Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Lakmini; Pan, Xiufang; Zhang, Keqing; Yang, Nora N; Duan, Dongsheng; Lai, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Dystrophin is a large sub-sarcolemmal protein. Its absence leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Binding to the sarcolemma is essential for dystrophin to protect muscle from contraction-induced injury. It has long been thought that membrane binding of dystrophin depends on its cysteine-rich (CR) domain. Here, we provide in vivo evidence suggesting that dystrophin contains three additional membrane-binding domains including spectrin-like repeats (R)1-3, R10-12 and C-terminus (CT). To systematically study dystrophin membrane binding, we split full-length dystrophin into ten fragments and examined subcellular localizations of each fragment by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. In skeletal muscle, R1-3, CR domain and CT were exclusively localized at the sarcolemma. R10-12 showed both cytosolic and sarcolemmal localization. Importantly, the CR-independent membrane binding was conserved in murine and canine muscles. A critical function of the CR-mediated membrane interaction is the assembly of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC). While R1-3 and R10-12 did not restore the DGC, surprisingly, CT alone was sufficient to establish the DGC at the sarcolemma. Additional studies suggest that R1-3 and CT also bind to the sarcolemma in the heart, though relatively weak. Taken together, our study provides the first conclusive in vivo evidence that dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains. These structurally and functionally distinctive membrane-binding domains provide a molecular framework for dystrophin to function as a shock absorber and signaling hub. Our results not only shed critical light on dystrophin biology and DMD pathogenesis, but also provide a foundation for rationally engineering minimized dystrophins for DMD gene therapy.

  12. Melanoma biomolecules: independently identified but functionally intertwined.

    PubMed

    Dye, Danielle E; Medic, Sandra; Ziman, Mel; Coombe, Deirdre R

    2013-09-24

    The majority of patients diagnosed with melanoma present with thin lesions and generally these patients have a good prognosis. However, 5% of patients with early melanoma (<1 mm thick) will have recurrence and die within 10 years, despite no evidence of local or metastatic spread at the time of diagnosis. Thus, there is a need for additional prognostic markers to help identify those patients that may be at risk of recurrent disease. Many studies and several meta-analyses have compared gene and protein expression in melanocytes, naevi, primary, and metastatic melanoma in an attempt to find informative prognostic markers for these patients. However, although a large number of putative biomarkers have been described, few of these molecules are informative when used in isolation. The best approach is likely to involve a combination of molecules. We believe one approach could be to analyze the expression of a group of interacting proteins that regulate different aspects of the metastatic pathway. This is because a primary lesion expressing proteins involved in multiple stages of metastasis may be more likely to lead to secondary disease than one that does not. This review focuses on five putative biomarkers - melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM), galectin-3 (gal-3), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), and paired box 3 (PAX3). The goal is to provide context around what is known about the contribution of these biomarkers to melanoma biology and metastasis. Although each of these molecules have been independently identified as likely biomarkers, it is clear from our analyses that each are closely linked with each other, with intertwined roles in melanoma biology.

  13. High performance addition-type thermoplastics (ATTs) - Evidence for the formation of a Diels-Alder adduct in the reaction of an acetylene-terminated material and a bismaleimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, R. H.; Soucek, M. D.; Chang, A. C.; Partos, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, the concept and demonstration of a new versatile synthetic reaction for making a large number of high-performance addition-type thermoplastics (ATTs) were reported. The synthesis shows promise for providing polymers having an attractive combination of easy processability, good toughness, respectable high temperature mechanical performance, and excellent thermo-oxidative stability. The new chemistry involves the reaction of an acetylene-terminated material with a bismaleimide or benzoquinone. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism, model compound studies were undertaken in solutions as well as in the solid state. The reaction products were purified by flash chromatography and characterized by conventional analytical techniques including NMR, FT-IR, UV-visible, mass spectroscopy, and high pressure liquid chromatography. The results are presented of the model compound studies which strongly support the formation of a Diels-Alder adduct in the reaction of an acetylene-terminated compound and a bismaleimide or benzoquinone.

  14. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  15. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  16. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  17. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  18. Evidence for an additional intracellular site of action of probucol in the prevention of oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein. Use of a new water-soluble probucol derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, S

    1992-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) renders it more atherogenic. Probucol, a highly nonpolar antioxidant, is transported in lipoproteins, including LDL, and inhibits oxidative modification of LDL in vitro. The ability of probucol to inhibit atherogenesis in the LDL receptor-deficient rabbit has been attributed to its antioxidant effect. We report synthesis of a new water-soluble analogue of probucol that is very effective in preventing cell-induced LDL oxidation. The polar probucol derivative, diglutaryl probucol, is efficiently taken up by endothelial cells and macrophages in culture and is hydrolyzed to release the active antioxidant, probucol. The treated cells, after thorough washing, show a marked decrease in their capacity to oxidize LDL during a subsequent incubation. At high concentrations of the derivative, the cells also released free probucol into the medium. Thus, the effectiveness of probucol in vivo may be related both to its presence in LDL, acting as a nonspecific antioxidant, and to an additional ability to inhibit cell-mediated oxidation of LDL by virtue of its uptake into cells. PMID:1569200

  19. Modulation of additive and interactive effects by trial history revisited.

    PubMed

    Masson, Michael E J; Rabe, Maximilian M; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2017-04-01

    Masson and Kliegl (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 898-914, 2013) reported evidence that the nature of the target stimulus on the previous trial of a lexical decision task modulates the effects of independent variables on the current trial, including additive versus interactive effects of word frequency and stimulus quality. In contrast, recent reanalyses of previously published data from experiments that, unlike the Masson and Kliegl experiments, did not include semantic priming as a factor, found no evidence for modulation of additive effects of frequency and stimulus quality by trial history (Balota, Aschenbrenner, & Yap, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 1563-1571, 2013; O'Malley & Besner, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 1400-1411, 2013). We report two experiments that included semantic priming as a factor and that attempted to replicate the modulatory effects found by Masson and Kliegl. In neither experiment was additivity of frequency and stimulus quality modulated by trial history, converging with the findings reported by Balota et al. and O'Malley and Besner. Other modulatory influences of trial history, however, were replicated in the new experiments and reflect potential trial-by-trial alterations in decision processes.

  20. New recA mutations that dissociate the various RecA protein activities in Escherichia coli provide evidence for an additional role for RecA protein in UV mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Dutreix, M; Moreau, P L; Bailone, A; Galibert, F; Battista, J R; Walker, G C; Devoret, R

    1989-01-01

    To isolate strains with new recA mutations that differentially affect RecA protein functions, we mutagenized in vitro the recA gene carried by plasmid mini-F and then introduced the mini-F-recA plasmid into a delta recA host that was lysogenic for prophage phi 80 and carried a lac duplication. By scoring prophage induction and recombination of the lac duplication, we isolated new recA mutations. A strain carrying mutation recA1734 (Arg-243 changed to Leu) was found to be deficient in phi 80 induction but proficient in recombination. The mutation rendered the host not mutable by UV, even in a lexA(Def) background. Yet, the recA1734 host became mutable upon introduction of a plasmid encoding UmuD*, the active carboxyl-terminal fragment of UmuD. Although the recA1734 mutation permits cleavage of lambda and LexA repressors, it renders the host deficient in the cleavage of phi 80 repressor and UmuD protein. Another strain carrying mutation recA1730 (Ser-117 changed to Phe) was found to be proficient in phi 80 induction but deficient in recombination. The recombination defect conferred by the mutation was partly alleviated in a cell devoid of LexA repressor, suggesting that, when amplified, RecA1730 protein is active in recombination. Since LexA protein was poorly cleaved in the recA1730 strain while phage lambda was induced, we conclude that RecA1730 protein cannot specifically mediate LexA protein cleavage. Our results show that the recA1734 and recA1730 mutations differentially affect cleavage of various substrates. The recA1730 mutation prevented UV mutagenesis, even upon introduction into the host of a plasmid encoding UmuD* and was dominant over recA+. With respect to other RecA functions, recA1730 was recessive to recA+. This demonstrates that RecA protein has an additional role in mutagenesis beside mediating the cleavage of LexA and UmuD proteins. Images PMID:2651400

  1. Reconciling catch differences from multiple fishery independent gill net surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraus, Richard T.; Vandergoot, Christopher; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Rogers, Mark W.; Cook, H. Andrew; Brenden, Travis O.

    2017-01-01

    Fishery independent gill net surveys provide valuable demographic information for population assessment and resource management, but relative to net construction, the effects of ancillary species, and environmental variables on focal species catch rates are poorly understood. In response, we conducted comparative deployments with three unique, inter-agency, survey gill nets used to assess walleye Sander vitreus in Lake Erie. We used an information-theoretic approach with Akaike’s second-order information criterion (AICc) to evaluate linear mixed models of walleye catch as a function of net type (multifilament and two types of monofilament netting), mesh size (categorical), Secchi depth, temperature, water depth, catch of ancillary species, and interactions among selected variables. The model with the greatest weight of evidence showed that walleye catches were positively associated with potential prey and intra-guild predators and negatively associated with water depth and temperature. In addition, the multifilament net had higher average walleye catches than either of the two monofilament nets. Results from this study both help inform decisions about proposed gear changes to stock assessment surveys in Lake Erie, and advance our understanding of how multispecies associations explain variation in gill net catches. Of broader interest to fishery-independent gill net studies, effects of abiotic variables and ancillary species on focal specie’s catch rates were small in comparison with net characteristics of mesh size or twine type.

  2. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  3. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  4. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  5. SHORT-TERM MEMORY IS INDEPENDENT OF BRAIN PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Hasker P.; Rosenzweig, Mark R.; Jones, Oliver W.

    1980-09-01

    Male Swiss albino CD-1 mice given a single injection of a cerebral protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (ANI) (1 mg/animal), 20 min prior to single trial passive avoidance training demonstrated impaired retention at tests given 3 hr, 6 hr, 1 day, and 7 days after training. Retention was not significantly different from saline controls when tests were given 0.5 or 1.5 hr after training. Prolonging inhibition of brain protein synthesis by giving either 1 or 2 additional injections of ANI 2 or 2 and 4 hr after training did not prolong short-term retention performance. The temporal development of impaired retention in ANI treated mice could not be accounted for by drug dosage, duration of protein synthesis inhibition, or nonspecific sickness at test. In contrast to the suggestion that protein synthesis inhibition prolongs short-term memory (Quinton, 1978), the results of this experiment indicate that short-term memory is not prolonged by antibiotic drugs that inhibit cerebral protein synthesis. All evidence seems consistent with the hypothesis that short-term memory is protein synthesis independent and that the establishment of long-term memory depends upon protein synthesis during or shortly after training. Evidence for a role of protein synthesis in memory maintenance is discussed.

  6. An inability to set independent attentional control settings by hemifield.

    PubMed

    Becker, Mark W; Ravizza, Susan M; Peltier, Chad

    2015-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that people can simultaneously activate attentional control setting for two distinct colors. However, it is unclear whether both attentional control settings must operate globally across the visual field or whether each can be constrained to a particular spatial location. Using two different paradigms, we investigated participants' ability to apply independent color attentional control settings to distinct regions of space. In both experiments, participants were told to identify red letters in one hemifield and green letters in the opposite hemifield. Additionally, some trials used a "relevant distractor"-a letter that matched the opposite side's target color. In Experiment 1, eight letters appeared (four per hemifield) simultaneously for a brief amount of time and then were masked. Relevant distractors increased the error rate and resulted in a greater number of distractor intrusions than irrelevant distractors. Similar results were observed in Experiment 2 in which red and green targets were presented in two rapid serial visual presentation streams. Relevant distractors were found to produce an attentional blink similar in magnitude to an actual target. The results of both experiments suggest that letters matching either attentional control setting were selected by attention and were processed as if they were targets, providing strong evidence that both attentional control settings were applied globally, rather than being constrained to a particular location.

  7. Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale: Additional Evidence of Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Fisher, Melissa; Martinez, Erin

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted 4 studies investigating the reliability and validity of the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (HDDS; E. Stice, C. F. Telch, & S. L. Rizvi, 2000), a brief self-report measure for diagnosing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Study 1 found that the HDDS showed criterion validity with interview-based…

  8. Evidence for the existence of additional small satellites of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synnott, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    Voyager-1 and 2 long exposure images were studied in a search for previously undiscovered satellites in the Saturn system. The technique used was to overlap the images with common view areas, thereby including increasingly higher-resolution images of nearby exposures with those taken at greater distances during approach. No definite identifications were made of new satellites. However, five objects were apparently detected by the survey and the orbits associated with each of the recorded photographic 'streaks' were calculated. Techniques are discussed for applying the Space Telescope to confirm or disprove the satellite status of the observed objects.

  9. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  10. Device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänggi, Esther

    2010-12-01

    In this thesis, we study two approaches to achieve device-independent quantum key distribution: in the first approach, the adversary can distribute any system to the honest parties that cannot be used to communicate between the three of them, i.e., it must be non-signalling. In the second approach, we limit the adversary to strategies which can be implemented using quantum physics. For both approaches, we show how device-independent quantum key distribution can be achieved when imposing an additional condition. In the non-signalling case this additional requirement is that communication is impossible between all pairwise subsystems of the honest parties, while, in the quantum case, we demand that measurements on different subsystems must commute. We give a generic security proof for device-independent quantum key distribution in these cases and apply it to an existing quantum key distribution protocol, thus proving its security even in this setting. We also show that, without any additional such restriction there always exists a successful joint attack by a non-signalling adversary.

  11. Independent Learning Models: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickett, R. E. Y.

    Five models of independent learning are suitable for use in adult education programs. The common factor is a facilitator who works in some way with the student in the learning process. They display different characteristics, including the extent of independence in relation to content and/or process. Nondirective tutorial instruction and learning…

  12. An ATM-independent S-phase checkpoint response involves CHK1 pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Baocheng; Guan, Jun; Iliakis, George; Wang, Ya

    2002-01-01

    After exposure to genotoxic stress, proliferating cells actively slow down the DNA replication through a S-phase checkpoint to provide time for repair. We report that in addition to the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent pathway that controls the fast response, there is an ATM-independent pathway that controls the slow response to regulate the S-phase checkpoint after ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. The slow response of S-phase checkpoint, which is resistant to wortmannin, sensitive to caffeine and UCN-01, and related to cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation, is much stronger in CHK1 overexpressed cells, and it could be abolished by Chk1 antisense oligonucleotides. These results provide evidence that the ATM-independent slow response of S-phase checkpoint involves CHK1 pathway.

  13. Clonal analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with "cytogenetically independent" cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Pui, C H; Raskind, W H; Kitchingman, G R; Raimondi, S C; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Crist, W M; Fialkow, P J; Williams, D L

    1989-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is generally regarded as a clonal disease in which a single abnormal progenitor cell gives rise to neoplastic progeny. Five of 463 cases of childhood ALL with adequately banded leukemic cells were found to have two cytogenetically independent cell populations. In addition, two of the four cases tested had more than two rearranged immunoglobulin genes and (or) T cell receptor genes. To investigate the clonality of these unusual leukemias, we examined the neoplastic cells for X-linked markers extrinsic to the disease. Leukemic cells from each of the three patients heterozygous for an X-linked, restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a single active parental allele, suggesting that both apparently independent cell populations developed from a common progenitor. These cases provide evidence that leukemogenesis involves a multistep process of mutation and suggest that karyotypic abnormalities may be a late event of malignant transformation. Images PMID:2566623

  14. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed.

  15. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  16. Eastern North America as an independent center of plant domestication.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bruce D

    2006-08-15

    The status of eastern North America as an independent center of plant domestication has recently been called into question by a number of genetic and archaeological studies, which suggest that the region may not have witnessed the independent domestication of local crop plants, but rather may have been on the receiving end of domesticated crop plants introduced from Mexico. Here, I provide a synthesis of the currently available archaeological and genetic evidence from both eastern North America and Mexico regarding the spatial and temporal context of initial domestication of the four plant species identified as potential eastern North American domesticates: marshelder (Iva annua), chenopod (Chenopodium berlandieri), squash (Cucurbita pepo), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Genetic and archaeological evidence provides strong support for the independent domestication of all four of these plant species in the eastern United States and reconfirms the region as one of the world's independent centers of domestication.

  17. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, Stefan K.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei.

  18. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, S.K.

    1998-03-24

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example, the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei. 25 figs.

  19. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  20. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  1. Chandra Independently Determines Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    A critically important number that specifies the expansion rate of the Universe, the so-called Hubble constant, has been independently determined using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new value matches recent measurements using other methods and extends their validity to greater distances, thus allowing astronomers to probe earlier epochs in the evolution of the Universe. "The reason this result is so significant is that we need the Hubble constant to tell us the size of the Universe, its age, and how much matter it contains," said Max Bonamente from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., lead author on the paper describing the results. "Astronomers absolutely need to trust this number because we use it for countless calculations." Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect The Hubble constant is calculated by measuring the speed at which objects are moving away from us and dividing by their distance. Most of the previous attempts to determine the Hubble constant have involved using a multi-step, or distance ladder, approach in which the distance to nearby galaxies is used as the basis for determining greater distances. The most common approach has been to use a well-studied type of pulsating star known as a Cepheid variable, in conjunction with more distant supernovae to trace distances across the Universe. Scientists using this method and observations from the Hubble Space Telescope were able to measure the Hubble constant to within 10%. However, only independent checks would give them the confidence they desired, considering that much of our understanding of the Universe hangs in the balance. Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 By combining X-ray data from Chandra with radio observations of galaxy clusters, the team determined the distances to 38 galaxy clusters ranging from 1.4 billion to 9.3 billion

  2. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  3. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  4. Independence and dependence in human causal reasoning.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Bob

    2014-07-01

    Causal graphical models (CGMs) are a popular formalism used to model human causal reasoning and learning. The key property of CGMs is the causal Markov condition, which stipulates patterns of independence and dependence among causally related variables. Five experiments found that while adult's causal inferences exhibited aspects of veridical causal reasoning, they also exhibited a small but tenacious tendency to violate the Markov condition. They also failed to exhibit robust discounting in which the presence of one cause as an explanation of an effect makes the presence of another less likely. Instead, subjects often reasoned "associatively," that is, assumed that the presence of one variable implied the presence of other, causally related variables, even those that were (according to the Markov condition) conditionally independent. This tendency was unaffected by manipulations (e.g., response deadlines) known to influence fast and intuitive reasoning processes, suggesting that an associative response to a causal reasoning question is sometimes the product of careful and deliberate thinking. That about 60% of the erroneous associative inferences were made by about a quarter of the subjects suggests the presence of substantial individual differences in this tendency. There was also evidence that inferences were influenced by subjects' assumptions about factors that disable causal relations and their use of a conjunctive reasoning strategy. Theories that strive to provide high fidelity accounts of human causal reasoning will need to relax the independence constraints imposed by CGMs.

  5. Independent Schools: Landscape and Learnings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Examines American independent schools (parochial, southern segregated, and private institutions) in terms of their funding, expenditures, changing enrollment patterns, teacher-student ratios, and societal functions. Journal available from Daedalus Subscription Department, 1172 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02132. (AM)

  6. Technology for Independent Living: Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Alexandra, Ed.

    This sourcebook provides information for the practical implementation of independent living technology in the everyday rehabilitation process. "Information Services and Resources" lists databases, clearinghouses, networks, research and development programs, toll-free telephone numbers, consumer protection caveats, selected publications, and…

  7. Experimental interference of independent photons.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Blauensteiner, Bibiane; Zukowski, Marek; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-06-23

    Interference of photons emerging from independent sources is essential for modern quantum-information processing schemes, above all quantum repeaters and linear-optics quantum computers. We report an observation of nonclassical interference of two single photons originating from two independent, separated sources, which were actively synchronized with a rms timing jitter of 260 fs. The resulting (two-photon) interference visibility was (83+/-4)%.

  8. Independence test for sparse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J. E.; González-López, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a new non-parametric independence test is presented. García and González-López (2014) [1] introduced the LIS test for the hypothesis of independence between two continuous random variables, the test proposed in this work is a generalization of the LIS test. The new test does not require the assumption of continuity for the random variables, it test is applied to two datasets and also compared with the Pearson's Chi-squared test.

  9. Isolation of CD4-independent primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates that are syncytium inducing and acutely cytopathic for CD8+ lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zerhouni, Bouchra; Nelson, Julie A E; Saha, Kunal

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies have established the existence of CD4-independent simian immunodeficiency virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), and laboratory strains of HIV-1. However, whether CD4-independent viruses may also exist in HIV-1-infected patients has remained unclear. We have recently reported the isolation of viruses from an AIDS patient that were able to infect CD8(+) cells independent of CD4, using CD8 as a receptor. Using a similar approach, here we examined viruses from 12 randomly selected patients (obtained from the AIDS Research and Reference Program, National Institutes of Health) for the presence of CD4-independent HIV-1. CD4-independent variants were isolated from infected CD8(+) cells from the viral quasispecies of 7 of 12 patients. The CD4-independent isolates were able to infect primary CD8(+) cells as well as a CD4(-) CD8(+) T-cell line. Soluble CD4 and blocking anti-CD4 or -CD8 antibody had no effect on infection of CD8(+) cells. Remarkably, two of the seven CD4-independent isolates, but not their parental bulk viruses, induced syncytia and caused acute death of infected CD8(+) cells. Some of the CD4-independent variants were also able to infect U87 cells that were negative for CD4, CD8, and common HIV coreceptors, suggesting a novel entry mechanism for these isolates. The CD4-independent isolates were derived from adults and children infected with subtypes A, B, and D. Although no common motif for CD4 independence was found, novel sequence changes were observed in critical areas of the envelopes of the CD4-independent viruses. These results demonstrate that HIV-1-infected patients can frequently harbor viruses that are able to mediate CD4-independent infection of CD8(+) cells. In addition, this study also provides evidence of primary HIV-1 variants that are syncytium inducing and acutely cytopathic for CD8(+) lymphocytes.

  10. Proepithelin Regulates Prostate Cancer Cell Biology by Promoting Cell Growth, Migration, and Anchorage-Independent Growth

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Giada; Emiliozzi, Velia; Bitto, Alessandro; Lovat, Francesca; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Goldoni, Silvia; Fassan, Matteo; Serrero, Ginette; Gomella, Leonard G.; Baffa, Raffaele; Iozzo, Renato V.; Morrione, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The growth factor proepithelin has recently emerged as an important regulator of transformation in several physiological and pathological systems. In this study, we determined the biological roles of proepithelin in prostate cancer cells using purified human recombinant proepithelin as well as proepithelin-depletion strategies. Proepithelin promoted the migration of androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells; androgen-independent DU145 cells were the more responsive. In these cells, proepithelin additionally stimulated wound closure, invasion, and promotion of cell growth in vitro. These effects required the activation of both the Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. We have analyzed proepithelin expression levels in different available prostate cancer microarray studies using the Oncomine database and found a statistically significant increase in proepithelin mRNA expression levels in prostate cancers compared with nonneoplastic controls. Notably, depletion of endogenous proepithelin by siRNA and antisense strategies impaired the ability of DU145 cells to grow and migrate after serum withdrawal and inhibited anchorage-independent growth. Our results provide the first evidence for a role of proepithelin in stimulating the migration, invasion, proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This study supports the hypothesis that proepithelin may play a critical role as an autocrine growth factor in the establishment and initial progression of prostate cancer. Furthermore, proepithelin may prove to be a useful clinical marker for the diagnosis of prostate tumors. PMID:19179604

  11. Group Sparse Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junming; Chen, Xi; Xing, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of sparse variable selection in nonparametric additive models, with the prior knowledge of the structure among the covariates to encourage those variables within a group to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group sparsity in the parametric setting (e.g., group lasso), or address the problem in the nonparametric setting without exploiting the structural information (e.g., sparse additive models). In this paper, we present a new method, called group sparse additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group sparsity in additive models. We generalize the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm to Hilbert spaces as the sparsity-inducing penalty in GroupSpAM. Moreover, we derive a novel thresholding condition for identifying the functional sparsity at the group level, and propose an efficient block coordinate descent algorithm for constructing the estimate. We demonstrate by simulation that GroupSpAM substantially outperforms the competing methods in terms of support recovery and prediction accuracy in additive models, and also conduct a comparative experiment on a real breast cancer dataset.

  12. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  13. District nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers.

    PubMed

    Downer, Frances; Shepherd, Chew Kim

    2010-07-01

    Nurse prescribing has been established in the UK since 1994, however, limited focus has been placed on the experiences of district nurses adopting this additional role. This phenomenological study explores the experiences of district nurses prescribing as nurse independent prescribers across the West of Scotland. A qualitative Heideggarian approach examined the every-day experiences of independent prescribing among district nurses. A purposive sample was used and data collected using audio taped one-to-one informal interviews. The data was analysed thematically using Colaizzi's seven procedural steps. Overall these nurses reported that nurse prescribing was a predominantly positive experience. Participants identified improvements in patient care, job satisfaction, level of autonomy and role development. However, some of the participants indicated that issues such as support, record keeping, confidence and ongoing education are all major influences on prescribing practices.

  14. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  15. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidi none to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  16. A comparison of tests for independence in the FBI RFLP data bases.

    PubMed

    Maiste, P J; Weir, B S

    1995-01-01

    Several tests of independence of allelic frequencies within and between loci have been compared, and it has been found that Fisher's exact test is the best test to use. When this test is applied to RFLP databases established by the FBI, paying no attention to the single-band problem, there is generally evidence for independence at one locus but not at two loci. When the test is restricted to double-banded entries in the databases; there is overall evidence for independence.

  17. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  18. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  19. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  20. More Than Additional Space...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A much needed addition to the Jamestown Elementary School turned out to be more than an expansion of walls for more space. A new educational program, a limited budget, and a short time line were tackled on a team approach basis and were successfully resolved. (Author)

  1. New opportunities seen for independents

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.A. )

    1990-10-22

    The collapse of gas and oil prices in the mid-1980s significantly reduced the number of independent exploration companies. At the same time, a fundamental shift occurred among major oil companies as they allocated their exploration budgets toward international operations and made major production purchases. Several large independents also embraced a philosophy of budget supplementation through joint venture partnership arrangements. This has created a unique and unusual window of opportunity for the smaller independents (defined for this article as exploration and production companies with a market value of less than $1 billion) to access the extensive and high quality domestic prospect inventories of the major and large independent oil and gas companies and to participate in the search for large reserve targets on attractive joint venture terms. Participation in these types of joint ventures, in conjunction with internally generated plays selected through the use of today's advanced technology (computer-enhanced, high-resolution seismic; horizontal drilling; etc.) and increasing process for oil and natural gas, presents the domestic exploration-oriented independent with an attractive money-making opportunity for the 1990s.

  2. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  3. The Independent Technical Analysis Process

    SciTech Connect

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2007-04-13

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical analytical support for system-wide fish passage information (BPA Project No. 2006-010-00). The goal of this project was to produce rigorous technical analysis products using independent analysts and anonymous peer reviewers. In the past, regional parties have interacted with a single entity, the Fish Passage Center to access the data, analyses, and coordination related to fish passage. This project provided an independent technical source for non-routine fish passage analyses while allowing routine support functions to be performed by other well-qualified entities.

  4. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  5. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  6. Cognitive Abilities Independent of IQ Correlate with Regional Brain Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Jung, Rex E.; Colom, Roberto; Haier, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating psychometric measures of general intelligence and reasoning to regional brain structure and function assessed with a variety of neuroimaging techniques. Cognitive dimensions independent of general intelligence can also be identified psychometrically and studied for any neuroanatomical correlates. Here we…

  7. Making Mavericks: Preparing Musicians for Independent Artistic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canham, Nicole L.

    2016-01-01

    This essay explores the role that maverick qualities--"independent or unorthodox behaviour" ("The Oxford Dictionary," 2015)--play in developing and sustaining musician employability. Whilst career education for musicians often highlights new career models (Bridgstock, 2005), there is limited evidence of how these concepts work…

  8. The independent and combined effects of lifetime smoke exposures and asthma as they relate to COPD.

    PubMed

    Perret, Jennifer L; Walters, Eugene H; Abramson, Michael J; McDonald, Christine F; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2014-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is part of a worldwide tobacco-related disease epidemic, and is associated with progressive airflow obstruction and varying degrees of emphysema and/or hyperinflation. Greater focus has been placed recently on the potential for early life factors to influence the development of COPD, based on the premise that delayed lung growth during childhood and adolescence might predispose to lung disease in later life. For most people, the adverse effects on lung function of adult and early childhood factors are additive, which provides no additional incentive for current smokers to quit. However, if there is a (synergistic) interaction between active smoking and asthma, smoking cessation is likely to have a greater lung function benefit for the smoker who is also asthmatic, especially if quitting occurs at an early age. This article critically evaluates the evidence for the independent associations of lifetime asthma, smoking and smoke exposures with airflow obstruction, plus their interaction when multiple factors are present.

  9. Content Independence in Multimedia Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Arjen P.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the role of data management in multimedia digital libraries, and its implications for the design of database management systems. Introduces the notions of content abstraction and content independence. Proposes a blueprint of a new class of database technology, which supports the basic functionality for the management of both content…

  10. Independent Study Course Development Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Clayton R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses actual costs for developing independent study print courses for use in learning centers or for distance delivery, and presents a resource allocation guideline based on figures from Grant MacEwan Community College (Alberta). Topics discussed include the course writer/developer, clerical support, copyright clearance, instructional design,…

  11. Boston: Cradle of American Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2005 American Association of Community Colleges Annual Convention will be held April 6-9 in Boston. While thoroughly modern, the iconic city's identity is firmly rooted in the past. As the cradle of American independence, Boston's long history is an integral part of the American fabric. Adams, Revere, Hancock are more than historical figures;…

  12. Scales of Independent Behavior (SIB).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paulette J.

    1990-01-01

    Designed for use with individuals ages 3 months to 44 years, the Scales of Independent Behavior (SIB) measure adaptive behavior and problem behaviors in such areas as motor skills, social interaction, language, personal self-care, punctuality, destructiveness, and inattention. This paper describes the SIB's administration, scoring,…

  13. 10 Questions about Independent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truby, Dana

    2012-01-01

    Teachers know that establishing a robust independent reading program takes more than giving kids a little quiet time after lunch. But how do they set up a program that will maximize their students' gains? Teachers have to know their students' reading levels inside and out, help them find just-right books, and continue to guide them during…

  14. Will Independent Junior Colleges Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    This essay reviews the current status of private independent junior colleges in the United States. Several studies and innovative programs are cited. Because private junior colleges face shrinking enrollments and diminished funding for instruction, services, and activities, they must now stress cost-effectiveness and practical financial management…

  15. Haptic Tracking Permits Bimanual Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Dawson, Amanda A.; Challis, John H.

    2006-01-01

    This study shows that in a novel task--bimanual haptic tracking--neurologically normal human adults can move their 2 hands independently for extended periods of time with little or no training. Participants lightly touched buttons whose positions were moved either quasi-randomly in the horizontal plane by 1 or 2 human drivers (Experiment 1), in…

  16. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  17. Categorical evidence, confidence, and urgency during probabilistic categorization

    PubMed Central

    Braunlich, Kurt; Seger, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    We used a temporally-extended categorization task to investigate the neural substrates underlying our ability to integrate information over time and across multiple stimulus features. Using model-based fMRI, we tracked the temporal evolution of two important variables as participants deliberated about impending choices: 1) categorical evidence, and 2) confidence (the total amount of evidence provided by the stimuli, irrespective of the particular category favored). Importantly, in each model, we also included a covariate which allowed us to differentiate signals related to information accumulation from other, evidence-independent functions that increased monotonically with time (such as urgency or cognitive load). We found that somatomotor regions tracked the temporal evolution of categorical evidence, while regions in both medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal cortex, and the striatum tracked decision confidence. As both theory and experimental work suggest that patterns of activity thought to be related to information-accumulation may reflect, in whole or in part, an interaction between sensory evidence and urgency, we additionally investigated whether urgency might modulate the slopes of the two evidence-dependent functions. We found that the slopes of both functions were likely modulated by urgency such that the difference between the high and low evidence states increased as the response deadline loomed. PMID:26564532

  18. A coordinate-independent characterization of a black hole shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    A large international effort is under way to assess the presence of a shadow in the radio emission from the compact source at the centre of our Galaxy, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). If detected, this shadow would provide the first direct evidence of the existence of black holes and that Sgr A* is a supermassive black hole. In addition, the shape of the shadow could be used to learn about extreme gravity near the event horizon and to determine which theory of gravity better describes the observations. The mathematical description of the shadow has so far used a number of simplifying assumptions that are unlikely to be met by the real observational data. We here provide a general formalism to describe the shadow as an arbitrary polar curve expressed in terms of a Legendre expansion. Our formalism does not presume any knowledge of the properties of the shadow, e.g. the location of its centre, and offers a number of routes to characterize the distortions of the curve with respect to reference circles. These distortions can be implemented in a coordinate-independent manner by different teams analysing the same data. We show that the new formalism provides an accurate and robust description of noisy observational data, with smaller error variances when compared to previous approaches for the measurement of the distortion.

  19. HMGB1-dependent and -independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofang; Tang, Daolin

    2014-10-01

    HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1) is a multifunctional, ubiquitous protein located inside and outside cells that plays a critical role in various physiological and pathological processes including cell development, differentiation, inflammation, immunity, metastasis, metabolism, and death. Increasing evidence demonstrates that HMGB1-dependent autophagy promotes chemotherapy resistance, sustains tumor metabolism requirements and T cell survival, prevents polyglutamine aggregates and excitotoxicity, and protects against endotoxemia, bacterial infection, and ischemia-reperfusion injury in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, HMGB1 may not be required for autophagy in some organs such as the liver and heart. Understanding HMGB1-dependent and -independent autophagy in more detail will provide insight into the integrated stress response and guide HMGB1-based therapeutic intervention.

  20. Platelet additive solution - electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Junichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Ikeda, Hisami

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to solutions that replace most or all plasma in platelet concentrates, while maintaining satisfactory platelet function, is motivated by the potential of plasma reduction or depletion to mitigate various transfusion-related adverse events. This report considers the electrolytic composition of previously described platelet additive solutions, in order to draw general conclusions about what is required for platelet function and longevity. The optimal concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) are 69-115 mM. The presence of both K(+) and Mg(2+) in platelet suspension at nearly physiological concentrations (3-5mM and 1.5-3mM, respectively) is indispensable for good preservation capacity because both electrolytes are required to prevent platelet activation. In contrast to K(+) and Mg(2+), Ca(2+) may not be important because no free Ca(2+) is available in M-sol, which showed excellent platelet preservation capacity at less than 5% plasma concentration. The importance of bicarbonate (approximately 40 mM) can be recognized when the platelets are suspended in additive solution under less than 5% residual plasma concentration.

  1. GnRH Neuron-Specific Ablation of Gαq/11 Results in Only Partial Inactivation of the Neuroendocrine-Reproductive Axis in Both Male and Female Mice: In Vivo Evidence for Kiss1r-Coupled Gαq/11-Independent GnRH Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Víctor M.; Ahow, Maryse; Pampillo, Macarena; Nash, Connor; Fayazi, Mehri; Calder, Michele; Elbert, Adrienne; Urbanski, Henryk F.; Wettschureck, Nina; Offermanns, Stefan; Carroll, Rona S.; Bhattacharya, Moshmi; Tobet, Stuart A.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the master regulator of fertility and kisspeptin (KP) is a potent trigger of GnRH secretion from GnRH neurons. KP signals via KISS1R, a Gαq/11-coupled receptor, and mice bearing a global deletion of Kiss1r (Kiss1r−/−) or a GnRH neuron-specific deletion of Kiss1r (Kiss1rd/d) display hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and infertility. KISS1R also signals via β-arrestin, and in mice lacking β-arrestin-1 or -2, KP-triggered GnRH secretion is significantly diminished. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that ablation of Gαq/11 in GnRH neurons would diminish but not completely block KP-triggered GnRH secretion and that Gαq/11-independent GnRH secretion would be sufficient to maintain fertility. To test this, Gnaq (encodes Gαq) was selectively inactivated in the GnRH neurons of global Gna11 (encodes Gα11)-null mice by crossing Gnrh-Cre and Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/− mice. Experimental Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/−;Gnrh-Cre (Gnaqd/d) and control Gnaqfl/fl;Gna11−/− (Gnaqfl/fl) littermate mice were generated and subjected to reproductive profiling. This process revealed that testicular development and spermatogenesis, preputial separation, and anogenital distance in males and day of vaginal opening and of first estrus in females were significantly less affected in Gnaqd/d mice than in previously characterized Kiss1r−/− or Kiss1rd/d mice. Additionally, Gnaqd/d males were subfertile, and although Gnaqd/d females did not ovulate spontaneously, they responded efficiently to a single dose of gonadotropins. Finally, KP stimulation triggered a significant increase in gonadotropins and testosterone levels in Gnaqd/d mice. We therefore conclude that the milder reproductive phenotypes and maintained responsiveness to KP and gonadotropins reflect Gαq/11-independent GnRH secretion and activation of the neuroendocrine-reproductive axis in Gnaqd/d mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the master

  2. Independent Axes of Genetic Variation and Parallel Evolutionary Divergence Of Opercle Bone Shape in Threespine Stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Charles B.; Cresko, William A.; Phillips, Patrick C.; Ullmann, Bonnie; Currey, Mark; von Hippel, Frank; Kristjánsson, Bjarni K.; Gelmond, Ofer; McGuigan, Katrina

    2014-01-01

    Evolution of similar phenotypes in independent populations is often taken as evidence of adaptation to the same fitness optimum. However, the genetic architecture of traits might cause evolution to proceed more often toward particular phenotypes, and less often toward others, independently of the adaptive value of the traits. Freshwater populations of Alaskan threespine stickleback have repeatedly evolved the same distinctive opercle shape after divergence from an oceanic ancestor. Here we demonstrate that this pattern of parallel evolution is widespread, distinguishing oceanic and freshwater populations across the Pacific Coast of North America and Iceland. We test whether this parallel evolution reflects genetic bias by estimating the additive genetic variance– covariance matrix (G) of opercle shape in an Alaskan oceanic (putative ancestral) population. We find significant additive genetic variance for opercle shape and that G has the potential to be biasing, because of the existence of regions of phenotypic space with low additive genetic variation. However, evolution did not occur along major eigenvectors of G, rather it occurred repeatedly in the same directions of high evolvability. We conclude that the parallel opercle evolution is most likely due to selection during adaptation to freshwater habitats, rather than due to biasing effects of opercle genetic architecture. PMID:22276538

  3. PPARγ-Independent Antitumor Effects of Thiazolidinediones

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuo; Yang, Jian; Lee, Su-Lin; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2009-01-01

    The thiazolidinedione (TZD) family of PPARγ agonists, especially troglitazone and ciglitazone, induce cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer cells. Mounting evidence indicates that TZDs interfere with multiple signaling mechanisms independently of PPARγactivation, which affect many aspects of cellular functions governing cell cycle progression and survival of cancer cells. Here, we review the “off-target” mechanisms that underlie the antitumor effects of TZDs with emphasis on three key pathways, namely, inhibition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL function, proteasomal degradation of cell cycle- and apoptosis-regulatory proteins, and transcriptional repression of androgen receptor (AR) through Sp1 degradation. Relative to tumor cells, nonmalignant cells are resistant to these PPARγ-independent antitumor effects, which underscores the translational potential of these agents. Furthermore, dissociation of these antitumor effects from their PPARγ agonist activity provides a rationale for using TZDs as scaffolds for lead optimization to develop a novel class of antitumor agents with a unique mode of mechanism. PMID:18790559

  4. Hormone-independent pathways of sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Marilyn B; Chew, Keng Yih; Shaw, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    New observations over the last 25 years of hormone-independent sexual dimorphisms have gradually and unequivocally overturned the dogma, arising from Jost's elegant experiments in the mid-1900s, that all somatic sex dimorphisms in vertebrates arise from the action of gonadal hormones. Although we know that Sry, a Y-linked gene, is the primary gonadal sex determinant in mammals, more recent analysis in marsupials, mice, and finches has highlighted numerous sexual dimorphisms that are evident well before the differentiation of the testis and which cannot be explained by a sexually dimorphic hormonal environment. In marsupials, scrotal bulges and mammary primordia are visible before the testis has differentiated due to the expression of a gene(s) on the X chromosome. ZZ and ZW gynandromorph finches have brains that develop in a sexually dimorphic way dependent on their sex chromosome content. In genetically manipulated mice, it is the X chromosomes, not the gonads, that determine many characters including rate of early development, adiposity, and neural circuits. Even spotted hyenas have sexual dimorphisms that cannot be simply explained by hormonal exposure. This review discusses the recent findings that confirm that there are hormone-independent sexual dimorphisms well before the gonads begin to produce their hormones.

  5. Additive composition, for gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Vataru, M.

    1989-01-10

    An admixture is described that comprises Diesel fuel and an additive composition added thereto which is between about 0.05 to about 2.0 percent by weight of the fuel, the composition comprising: (a) between about 0.05 and 25% relative weight parts of an organic peroxide, and (b) between about 0.1 and 25% relative weight parts of detergent selected from the component group that consists of: (i) fatty amines; (ii) ethoxylated and propoxylated derivatives of fatty amines; (iii) fatty diamines; (iv) fatty imidazlines; (v) polymeric amines and derivatives thereof; (vi) combination of one or more of the (i) through (v) components with carboxylic acid or acids having from three to forth carbon atoms, (c) from about 99.0 to about 50% by weight of a hydrocarbon solvent.

  6. Teardrop bladder: additional considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    Nine cases of teardrop bladder (TDB) seen at excretory urography are presented. In some of these patients, the iliopsoas muscles were at the upper limit of normal in size, and additional evaluation of the perivesical structures with computed tomography (CT) was necessary. CT demonstrated only hypertrophied muscles with or without perivesical fat. The psoas muscles and pelvic width were measured in 8 patients and compared with the measurements of a control group of males without TDB. Patients with TDB had large iliopsoas muscles and narrow pelves compared with the control group. The psoas muscle width/pelvic width ratio was significantly greater (p < 0.0005) in patients with TDB than in the control group, with values of 1.04 + 0.05 and 0.82 + 0.09, respectively. It is concluded that TDB is not an uncommon normal variant in black males. Both iliopsoas muscle hypertrophy and a narrow pelvis are factors that predispose a patient to TDB.

  7. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  8. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  9. 8. Interior view, basement, west addition, looking northeast towards (exterior) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Interior view, basement, west addition, looking northeast towards (exterior) west wall of original section, bottom corbel of chimney base visible along wall - Latham House, 1200 North Quaker Lane, Alexandria, Independent City, VA

  10. Steps to Independent Living Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    This set of six activity books and a teacher's guide is designed to help students from eighth grade to adulthood with special needs to learn independent living skills. The activity books have a reading level of 2.5 and address: (1) "How to Get Well When You're Sick or Hurt," including how to take a temperature, see a doctor, and use medicines…

  11. Do rats learn conditional independence?

    PubMed Central

    Timberlake, William

    2017-01-01

    If acquired associations are to accurately represent real relevance relations, there is motivation for the hypothesis that learning will, in some circumstances, be more appropriately modelled, not as direct dependence, but as conditional independence. In a serial compound conditioning experiment, two groups of rats were presented with a conditioned stimulus (CS1) that imperfectly (50%) predicted food, and was itself imperfectly predicted by a CS2. Groups differed in the proportion of CS2 presentations that were ultimately followed by food (25% versus 75%). Thus, the information presented regarding the relevance of CS2 to food was ambiguous between direct dependence and conditional independence (given CS1). If rats learnt that food was conditionally independent of CS2, given CS1, subjects of both groups should thereafter respond similarly to CS2 alone. Contrary to the conditionality hypothesis, subjects attended to the direct food predictability of CS2, suggesting that rats treat even distal stimuli in a CS sequence as immediately relevant to food, not conditional on an intermediate stimulus. These results urge caution in representing indirect associations as conditional associations, accentuate the theoretical weight of the Markov condition in graphical models, and challenge theories to articulate the conditions under which animals are expected to learn conditional associations, if ever. PMID:28386451

  12. The ability to listen with independent ears.

    PubMed

    Gallun, Frederick J; Mason, Christine R; Kidd, Gerald

    2007-11-01

    In three experiments, listeners identified speech processed into narrow bands and presented to the right ("target") ear. The ability of listeners to ignore (or even use) conflicting contralateral stimulation was examined by presenting various maskers to the target ear ("ipsilateral") and nontarget ear ("contralateral"). Theoretically, an absence of contralateral interference would imply selectively attending to only the target ear; the presence of interference from the contralateral stimulus would imply that listeners were unable to treat the stimuli at the two ears independently; and improved performance in the presence of informative contralateral stimulation would imply that listeners can process the signals at both ears and keep them separate rather than combining them. Experiments showed evidence of the ability to selectively process (or respond to) only the target ear in some, but not all, conditions. No evidence was found for improved performance due to contralateral stimulation. The pattern of interference found across experiments supports an interaction of stimulus-based factors (auditory grouping) and task-based factors (demand for processing resources) and suggests that listeners may not always be able to listen to the "better" ear even when it would be beneficial to do so.

  13. Additive lattice kirigami.

    PubMed

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D

    2016-09-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  14. Ceramics with Different Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juanjuan; Feng, Lajun; Lei, Ali; Zhao, Kang; Yan, Aijun

    2014-09-01

    Li2CO3, MgCO3, BaCO3, and Bi2O3 dopants were introduced into CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) ceramics in order to improve the dielectric properties. The CCTO ceramics were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method. The phase structure, microstructure, and dielectric behavior were carefully investigated. The pure structure without any impurity phases can be confirmed by the x-ray diffraction patterns. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis illuminated that the grains of Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics were greater than that of pure CCTO. It was important for the properties of the CCTO ceramics to study the additives in complex impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics had the higher permittivity (>45000), the lower dielectric loss (<0.025) than those of CCTO at 1 kHz at room temperature and good temperature stability from -30 to 75 °C.

  15. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  16. Putting evidence into practice.

    PubMed

    Feight, Deborah; Baney, Tara; Bruce, Susan; McQuestion, Maurene

    2011-10-01

    Radiation dermatitis, or radiodermatitis, is a significant symptom caused by radiation therapy for the treatment of cancerous and noncancerous conditions. Radiodermatitis can negatively affect patients' physical functioning and quality of life. The Oncology Nursing Society coordinated a Putting Evidence Into Practice (PEP) project team to develop a PEP resource summarizing current evidence for the management of patients with radiodermatitis. Oncology nurses play an important role in educating, assessing, and monitoring patients for this symptom. Many common nursing interventions for radiodermatitis are based on tradition or opinion and have not been researched thoroughly. In addition, evidence to support some current interventions in practice is lacking. This article presents information concerning radiodermatitis, summarizes the evidence-based review for its prevention and management, and identifies gaps in the literature, as well as opportunities for research, education, and practice.

  17. Evidence and evidence gaps - an introduction.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Gabriele; Löhler, Jan

    2016-01-01

    , databases, information portals with processed evidence as well as specific journals and finally teaching are appropriate vehicles. One problem is the multitude of information so that knowledge gaps may affect the clinical routine despite actually existing evidence. Generally, it still takes several years until new knowledge is implemented in daily routine. Tasks: The German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-, Nasen- und Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e.V., DGHNOKHC) and the Professional Association of Otolaryngologists (Deutscher Berufsverband der HNO-Ärzte e.V., BVHNO) have fundamental interest in supporting their members in generating, processing, and providing evidence as well as accompanying knowledge transfer. It encompasses the fields of diagnostics, therapy, and prognosis in the same way as prevention and applies to medicinal products as well as to medical devices or surgical procedures. The base for this is the regular assessment of evidence gaps, also in the area of established procedures, that has to be followed by a prioritization of research questions and the subsequent initiation of clinical research. In addition, large trials verifying therapies and diagnostics, for example in the context of daily conditions after approval, can only be conducted combining all resources in the ENT community. Method, results, and outlook: Together, the executive committees of the DGHNOKHC and the BVHNO founded the German Study Center of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (Deutsches Studienzentrum für Hals-, Nasen- und Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie, DSZ-HNO). First projects have been initiated, among those a clinical trial on the therapy of sudden hearing loss supported by the BMBF and a survey on evidence gaps in oto-rhino-laryngology. It seems to be both reasonable and feasible to make available methodological expertise via such an infrastructure of a study center for physicians in

  18. Evidence and evidence gaps – an introduction

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Gabriele; Löhler, Jan

    2016-01-01

    , databases, information portals with processed evidence as well as specific journals and finally teaching are appropriate vehicles. One problem is the multitude of information so that knowledge gaps may affect the clinical routine despite actually existing evidence. Generally, it still takes several years until new knowledge is implemented in daily routine. Tasks: The German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-, Nasen- und Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e.V., DGHNOKHC) and the Professional Association of Otolaryngologists (Deutscher Berufsverband der HNO-Ärzte e.V., BVHNO) have fundamental interest in supporting their members in generating, processing, and providing evidence as well as accompanying knowledge transfer. It encompasses the fields of diagnostics, therapy, and prognosis in the same way as prevention and applies to medicinal products as well as to medical devices or surgical procedures. The base for this is the regular assessment of evidence gaps, also in the area of established procedures, that has to be followed by a prioritization of research questions and the subsequent initiation of clinical research. In addition, large trials verifying therapies and diagnostics, for example in the context of daily conditions after approval, can only be conducted combining all resources in the ENT community. Method, results, and outlook: Together, the executive committees of the DGHNOKHC and the BVHNO founded the German Study Center of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (Deutsches Studienzentrum für Hals-, Nasen- und Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie, DSZ-HNO). First projects have been initiated, among those a clinical trial on the therapy of sudden hearing loss supported by the BMBF and a survey on evidence gaps in oto-rhino-laryngology. It seems to be both reasonable and feasible to make available methodological expertise via such an infrastructure of a study center for physicians in

  19. Ancient bacteria show evidence of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Hebsgaard, Martin B.; Christensen, Torben R.; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Nielsen, Rasmus; Munch, Kasper; Brand, Tina; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Zuber, Maria T.; Bunce, Michael; Rønn, Regin; Gilichinsky, David; Froese, Duane; Willerslev, Eske

    2007-01-01

    Recent claims of cultivable ancient bacteria within sealed environments highlight our limited understanding of the mechanisms behind long-term cell survival. It remains unclear how dormancy, a favored explanation for extended cellular persistence, can cope with spontaneous genomic decay over geological timescales. There has been no direct evidence in ancient microbes for the most likely mechanism, active DNA repair, or for the metabolic activity necessary to sustain it. In this paper, we couple PCR and enzymatic treatment of DNA with direct respiration measurements to investigate long-term survival of bacteria sealed in frozen conditions for up to one million years. Our results show evidence of bacterial survival in samples up to half a million years in age, making this the oldest independently authenticated DNA to date obtained from viable cells. Additionally, we find strong evidence that this long-term survival is closely tied to cellular metabolic activity and DNA repair that over time proves to be superior to dormancy as a mechanism in sustaining bacteria viability. PMID:17728401

  20. Mass-independent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L

    2013-02-28

    Three fundamental properties of atomic nuclei-mass, spin (and related magnetic moment), and volume-are the source of isotope effects. The mostly deserved and popular, with almost hundred-year history, is the mass-dependent isotope effect. The first mass-independent isotope effect which chemically discriminates isotopes by their nuclear spins and nuclear magnetic moments rather than by their masses was detected in 1976. It was named as the magnetic isotope effect because it is controlled by magnetic interaction, i.e., electron-nuclear hyperfine coupling in the paramagnetic species, the reaction intermediates. The effect follows from the universal physical property of chemical reactions to conserve angular momentum (spin) of electrons and nuclei. It is now detected for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, germanium, tin, mercury, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and uranium in a great variety of chemical and biochemical reactions including those of medical and ecological importance. Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. On the physical basis, it is in fact a mass-dependent effect, but it surprisingly results in isotope fractionation which is incompatible with that predicted by traditional mass-dependent effects. It is supposed to be a function of dynamic parameters of reaction and energy relaxation in excited states of products. The third, nuclear volume mass-independent isotope effect is detected in the high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra and in the extraction processes, but there are no unambiguous indications of its importance as an isotope fractionation factor in chemical reactions.

  1. Independent Component Analysis of Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Portilla, Javier

    2000-01-01

    A common method for texture representation is to use the marginal probability densities over the outputs of a set of multi-orientation, multi-scale filters as a description of the texture. We propose a technique, based on Independent Components Analysis, for choosing the set of filters that yield the most informative marginals, meaning that the product over the marginals most closely approximates the joint probability density function of the filter outputs. The algorithm is implemented using a steerable filter space. Experiments involving both texture classification and synthesis show that compared to Principal Components Analysis, ICA provides superior performance for modeling of natural and synthetic textures.

  2. A Hard Look at Independent Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Whitelaw

    1976-01-01

    Sparked by James P. Beckford's article, "Administering the Independent Study Program" (Independent School Bulletin, February 1974, p.57), the author supplemented his comments by addressing two major aspects of independent study. The first is the notion that independent study is an educational vehicle or tool and the second is how it fits in with a…

  3. Secured Independent Tools in Peritoneoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Fausto; Dominguez, Guillermo; Manolas, Panagiotis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Secured independent tools are being introduced to aid in peritoneoscopy. We present a simple technique for anchoring instruments, powered lights, and micro machines through the abdominal wall. Methods: We used a laparoscopic trainer, micro alligator clips with one or two 2-0 nylon tails and cables for engines and lights. The above instruments were introduced via a 12-mm or 15-mm port. Clips were placed for traction, retraction and exposure, lights for illumination, and motors for potential work. A laparoscopy port closure or suture passer was introduced percutaneously to grab and extract the tails or cables outside of the simulated abdominal cavity. The engines and lights were powered by a direct electric current (DC) plugged into exteriorized cables. Results: We used 2 to 3 clips for each, and engines performed well. Conclusion: This basic simulation adds independent instruments, lights, and engines. We replaced cannulas with threads or cables in an attempt to limit the number of ports. This technique further opens the door for innovations in wired machines in laparoscopy, single-port laparoscopy, or natural orifice surgery. PMID:20932379

  4. ]Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Shuttle program is one of the most complex engineering activities undertaken anywhere in the world at the present time. The Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) was chartered in September 1999 by NASA to provide an independent review of the Space Shuttle sub-systems and maintenance practices. During the period from October through December 1999, the team led by Dr. McDonald and comprised of NASA, contractor, and DOD experts reviewed NASA practices, Space Shuffle anomalies, as well as civilian and military aerospace experience. In performing the review, much of a very positive nature was observed by the SIAT, not the least of which was the skill and dedication of the workforce. It is in the unfortunate nature of this type of review that the very positive elements are either not mentioned or dwelt upon. This very complex program has undergone a massive change in structure in the last few years with the transition to a slimmed down, contractor-run operation, the Shuttle Flight Operations Contract (SFOC). This has been accomplished with significant cost savings and without a major incident. This report has identified significant problems that must be addressed to maintain an effective program. These problems are described in each of the Issues, Findings or Observations summarized, and unless noted, appear to be systemic in nature and not confined to any one Shuttle sub-system or element. Specifics are given in the body of the report, along with recommendations to improve the present systems.

  5. Interpreting Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munsart, Craig A.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity that allows students to experience the type of discovery process that paleontologists necessarily followed during the early dinosaur explorations. Students are read parts of a story taken from the "American Journal of Science" and interpret the evidence leading to the discovery of Triceratops and Stegosaurus. (PR)

  6. Mid-space-independent deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Aganj, Iman; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Reuter, Martin; Sabuncu, Mert Rory; Fischl, Bruce

    2017-02-24

    Aligning images in a mid-space is a common approach to ensuring that deformable image registration is symmetric - that it does not depend on the arbitrary ordering of the input images. The results are, however, generally dependent on the mathematical definition of the mid-space. In particular, the set of possible solutions is typically restricted by the constraints that are enforced on the transformations to prevent the mid-space from drifting too far from the native image spaces. The use of an implicit atlas has been proposed as an approach to mid-space image registration. In this work, we show that when the atlas is aligned to each image in the native image space, the data term of implicit-atlas-based deformable registration is inherently independent of the mid-space. In addition, we show that the regularization term can be reformulated independently of the mid-space as well. We derive a new symmetric cost function that only depends on the transformation morphing the images to each other, rather than to the atlas. This eliminates the need for anti-drift constraints, thereby expanding the space of allowable deformations. We provide an implementation scheme for the proposed framework, and validate it through diffeomorphic registration experiments on brain magnetic resonance images.

  7. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD, together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.

  8. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; ...

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD,more » together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.« less

  9. Culture-independent genome sequencing of clinical samples reveals an unexpected heterogeneity of infections by Chlamydia pecorum.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Sullivan, Mitchell J; Jelocnik, Martina; Myers, Garry S A; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is an important global pathogen of livestock, and it is also a significant threat to the long-term survival of Australia's koala populations. This study employed a culture-independent DNA capture approach to sequence C. pecorum genomes directly from clinical swab samples collected from koalas with chlamydial disease as well as from sheep with arthritis and conjunctivitis. Investigations into single-nucleotide polymorphisms within each of the swab samples revealed that a portion of the reads in each sample belonged to separate C. pecorum strains, suggesting that all of the clinical samples analyzed contained mixed populations of genetically distinct C. pecorum isolates. This observation was independent of the anatomical site sampled and the host species. Using the genomes of strains identified in each of these samples, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis revealed that a clade containing a bovine and a koala isolate is distinct from other clades comprised of livestock or koala C. pecorum strains. Providing additional evidence to support exposure of koalas to Australian livestock strains, two minor strains assembled from the koala swab samples clustered with livestock strains rather than koala strains. Culture-independent probe-based genome capture and sequencing of clinical samples provides the strongest evidence yet to suggest that naturally occurring chlamydial infections are comprised of multiple genetically distinct strains.

  10. Independent, dependent, and other variables in healthcare and chaplaincy research.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, Laura T; Flannelly, Kevin J; Jankowski, Katherine R B

    2014-01-01

    This article begins by defining the term variable and the terms independent variable and dependent variable, providing examples of each. It then proceeds to describe and discuss synonyms for the terms independent variable and dependent variable, including treatment, intervention, predictor, and risk factor, and synonyms for dependent variable, such as response variables and outcomes. The article explains that the terms extraneous, nuisance, and confounding variables refer to any variable that can interfere with the ability to establish relationships between independent variables and dependent variables, and it describes ways to control for such confounds. It further explains that even though intervening, mediating, and moderating variables explicitly alter the relationship between independent variables and dependent variables, they help to explain the causal relationship between them. In addition, the article links terminology about variables with the concept of levels of measurement in research.

  11. THE INDEPENDENT ACTION THEORY OF MORTALITY AS TESTED AT FORT DETRICK

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The independent action theory is compared with the probit and similar approaches. The basic question is the variation of susceptibility among...survival against dose and failure of estimates of virus population to conform to the dilution ratio are viewed as evidence against the independent action theory .

  12. An in vitro system from maize seedlings for tryptophan-independent indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Oestin, A.; Ilic, N.; Cohen, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) from indole by an in vitro preparation from maize (Zea mays L.) that does not use tryptophan (Trp) as an intermediate is described. Light-grown seedlings of normal maize and the maize mutant orange pericarp were shown to contain the necessary enzymes to convert [{sup 14}C]indole to IAA. The reaction was not inhibited by unlabeled Trp and neither [{sup 14}C]Trp nor [{sup 14}C]serine substituted for [{sup 14}C]indole in this in vitro system. The reaction had a pH optimum greater than 8.0, required a reducing environment, and had an oxidation potential near that of ascorbate. The results obtained with this in vitro enzyme preparation provide strong, additional evidence for the presence of a Trp-independent IAA biosynthesis pathway in plants.

  13. Autoxidation of ubiquinol-6 is independent of superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J R; Ellerby, L M; Gralla, E B; Valentine, J S; Clarke, C F

    1996-05-28

    Ubiquinone (Q) is an essential, lipid soluble, redox component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Much evidence suggests that ubiquinol (QH2) functions as an effective antioxidant in a number of membrane and biological systems by preventing peroxidative damage to lipids. It has been proposed that superoxide dismutase (SOD) may protect QH2 form autoxidation by acting either directly as a superoxide-semiquinone oxidoreductase or indirectly by scavenging superoxide. In this study, such an interaction between QH2 and SOD was tested by monitoring the fluorescence of cis-parinaric acid (cPN) incorporated phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes. Q6H2 was found to prevent both fluorescence decay and generation of lipid peroxides (LOOH) when peroxidation was initiated by the lipid-soluble azo initiator DAMP, dimethyl 2,2'-azobis (2-methylpropionate), while Q6 or SOD alone had no inhibitory effect. Addition of either SOD or catalase to Q6H2-containing liposomes had little effect on the rate of peroxidation even when incubated in 100% O2. Hence, the autoxidation of QH2 is a competing reaction that reduces the effectiveness of QH2 as an antioxidant and was not slowed by either SOD or catalase. The in vivo interaction of SOD and QH2 was also tested by employing yeast mutant strains harboring deletions in either CuZnSOD and/or MnSOD. The sod mutant yeast strains contained the same percent Q6H2 per cell as wild-type cells. These results indicate that the autoxidation of QH2 is independent of SOD.

  14. Agreement between therapists, parents, patients, and independent evaluators on clinical improvement in pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Adam B.; Peris, Tara S.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective Independent evaluators (IE) are employed widely in clinical trials to make unbiased determinations of treatment response. By virtue of being kept blind to treatment condition, however, IEs are also kept unaware of many pertinent clinical details that are relevant for decisions about clinical improvement. In this study, agreement among raters (children, parents, therapists, and IEs) about treatment response over the course of a 14-week clinical trial for pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) was examined in order to determine the utility of non-blind clinician and patient ratings of treatment response. Method Participants were 71 youth (mean age= 12.2 years; 63.4% female) with a primary diagnosis of OCD and their parents participating in a psychotherapy trial. Independent evaluators provided response ratings (Clinician's Global Impressions-Improvement Scale; CGI-I) at weeks 4, week 8 and 14 and therapists, children and parents completed independent CGI-I ratings at weeks 2, 4, 8 and 14. Results Nonlinear mixed models revealed differences in rating parties, with therapists and IEs slower to rate treatment improvement compared to children and parents and growth curve models suggested that therapists and IEs produced generally consistent ratings. In addition, no evidence was found for an evaluator-by-treatment interaction, indicating that raters displayed these differences consistently across both active and placebo conditions. Conclusions Youth and parents may be able to provide accurate ratings of global improvement; non-blinded treating clinicians (with training in research-oriented assessment) can offer global improvement ratings commensurate with blinded IEs. Findings suggest that alternatives (or additions) to the blinded-IE model may be appropriate for assessing global improvement, especially with the growing emphasis on dissemination and effectiveness trials. PMID:22963592

  15. Fluoride absorption: independence from plasma fluoride levels

    SciTech Connect

    Whitford, G.M.; Williams, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    The concept that there are physiologic mechanisms to homeostatically regulate plasma fluoride concentrations has been supported by results in the literature suggesting an inverse relationship between plasma fluoride levels and the absorption of the ion from the gastrointestinal tract of the rat. The validity of the relationship was questioned because of possible problems in the experimental design. The present work used four different methods to evaluate the effect of plasma fluoride levels on the absorption of the ion in rats: (i) the percentage of the daily fluoride intake that was excreted in the urine; (ii) the concentration of fluoride in femur epiphyses; (iii) the net areas under the time-plasma fluoride concentration curves after intragastric fluoride doses; and (iv) the residual amounts or fluoride in the gastrointestinal tracts after the intragastric fluoride doses. None of these methods indicated that plasma fluoride levels influence the rate or the degree or fluoride absorption. It was concluded that, unless extremely high plasma fluoride levels are involved (pharmacologic or toxic doses), the absorption of the ion is independent of plasma levels. The results provide further evidence that plasma fluoride concentrations are not homeostatically regulated.

  16. Exercise enhances creativity independently of mood

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Hannah; Sykes, Elizabeth A; Moss, Tim; Lowery, Susan; LeBoutillier, Nick; Dewey, Alison

    1997-01-01

    Objectives It has been widely accepted in the literature that various forms of physical exercise, even in a single session, enhance positive mood. It has also been shown that physical exercise may sometimes enhance creative thinking, but the evidence is inconclusive. Positive moods can favour creative thinking, but the opposite has also been reported and these relations are unclear. There is a large anecdotal literature suggesting that creative people sometimes use bodily movement to help overcome “blocks”. The aim of this study was to establish whether post-exercise creative thinking was attributable to improved mood. Methods The responses of 63 participants to an exercise (aerobic workout or aerobic dance) and a “neutral” video watching condition were compared. Mood was measured using an adjective list, and creative thinking was tested by three measures of the Torrance test. Results Analysis of variance showed a large and significant increase in positive mood after exercise (P<0.001) and a significant decrease in positive mood after video watching (P<0.001). A significant increase between the creative thinking scores of the two conditions was found on the flexibility (variety of responses) measure (P<0.05). A multifactorial analysis of all data failed to show a significant covariance of creative thinking with the two measures of mood (P>0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that mood and creativity were improved by physical exercise independently of each other. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:9298561

  17. Independent origins of diploidy in Metarhizium.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Ryan Michael; Chen, Yuan; Kilcrease, James; Shao, Jonathan; Rehner, Stephen A

    2016-09-12

    In fungi, stable diploid genome arrangements are rare. Here we present evidence from nuclear intergenic DNA sequencing, microsatellite genotyping, and configuration of the mating-type locus to demonstrate two independent origins of persistent diploid genome organization in the Metarhizium majus species complex. Most taxa in the complex are genotypically haploid, with individual isolates consistently displaying a single allele across all nuclear loci, as well as having a single mating-type locus. In contrast, individuals of M. majus and the clade designated here MGT1 are shown to be diploid, based on a consistent finding of heterozygosity and the presence of both MAT1 and MAT2 mating-type loci. In single locus phylogenies, nuclear intergenic alleles of M. majus and MGT1 each form monophyletic groups, indicating that diploidy in both taxa likely originated by the union of conspecific individuals. Sequence divergence in the APN2/MAT1-1-3 and APN2/MAT2-1 intergenic spacers indicate the two MAT loci are physically separated in the genomes of both diploid taxa, although the linkage relationship of the MAT loci to one another is unknown. The presence of both mating genes in a single nucleus suggests these diploid genomes may represent a mating event that failed to complete meiosis. Whether or not these isolates are able to complete the sexual cycle under any conditions and form ascospores remains an open question.

  18. Instrument independent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Fu, Henry L; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a fiber optic probe is a powerful tool for quantitative tissue characterization and disease diagnosis. Significant systematic errors can arise in the measured reflectance spectra and thus in the derived tissue physiological and morphological parameters due to real-time instrument fluctuations. We demonstrate a novel fiber optic probe with real-time, self-calibration capability that can be used for UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in biological tissue in clinical settings. The probe is tested in a number of synthetic liquid phantoms over a wide range of tissue optical properties for significant variations in source intensity fluctuations caused by instrument warm up and day-to-day drift. While the accuracy for extraction of absorber concentrations is comparable to that achieved with the traditional calibration (with a reflectance standard), the accuracy for extraction of reduced scattering coefficients is significantly improved with the self-calibration probe compared to traditional calibration. This technology could be used to achieve instrument-independent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo and obviate the need for instrument warm up and post∕premeasurement calibration, thus saving up to an hour of precious clinical time.

  19. Preprototype independent air revitalization subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hallick, T. M.; Woods, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The performance and maturity of a preprototype, three-person capacity, automatically controlled and monitored, self-contained independent air revitalization subsystem were evaluated. The subsystem maintains the cabin partial pressure of oxygen at 22 kPa (3.2 psia) and that of carbon dioxide at 400 Pa (3 mm Hg) over a wide range of cabin air relative humidity conditions. Consumption of water vapor by the water vapor electrolysis module also provides partial humidity control of the cabin environment. During operation, the average carbon dioxide removal efficiency at baseline conditions remained constant throughout the test at 84%. The average electrochemical depolarized concentrator cell voltage at the end of the parametric/endurance test was 0.41 V, representing a very slowly decreasing average cell voltage. The average water vapor electrolysis cell voltage increased only at a rate of 20 mu/h from the initial level of 1.67 V to the final level of 1.69 V at conclusion of the testing.

  20. Cultural variation in implicit independence: An extension of Kitayama et al. ().

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Uchida, Yukiko; Kitayama, Shinobu

    2016-08-01

    Previous research shows that European Americans are consistently more independent (or less interdependent) than Japanese when implicit indices are used to assess independence (vs. interdependence). The present work extended this evidence by including a novel implicit association test (IAT), as an index of implicit attitude towards independence and interdependence. Consistent with the previous findings, as compared to Japanese, Americans were significantly higher in multiple indices of implicit independence (vs. interdependence) including personal (vs. social) self-definition, experience of disengaging (vs. engaging) emotions and personal (vs. social) form of happiness. Furthermore, as compared to Japanese, Americans had a significantly more positive implicit attitude towards independence assessed with the IAT. As also observed in the previous research, explicit measures showed inconsistent cross-cultural patterns. Lastly, we observed little statistical within-culture coherence among the implicit measures of independence (vs. interdependence), consistent with a view that the implicit indices capture alternative ways for individuals to achieve the cultural mandate of independence or interdependence.

  1. Learning Dilemmas in Undergraduate Student Independent Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Maria; Åse, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Essay-writing is generally viewed as the primary learning activity to foster independence and analytical thinking. In this article, we show that independent research projects do not necessarily lead to critical thinking. University-level education on conducting independent projects can, in several respects, counteract enhanced analytical skills.…

  2. 47 CFR 64.904 - Independent audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Independent audits. 64.904 Section 64.904... RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Allocation of Costs § 64.904 Independent audits. (a) Each carrier... independent auditor every two years, covering the prior two year period, or have a financial audit...

  3. 47 CFR 64.904 - Independent audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Independent audits. 64.904 Section 64.904... RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Allocation of Costs § 64.904 Independent audits. (a) Each carrier... independent auditor every two years, covering the prior two year period, or have a financial audit...

  4. Independence, Individualism & Connection among Share Householders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natalier, Kristin

    2007-01-01

    How do young people who are financially dependent on their parents but living in share households conceive of the concept of independence? The meanings of independence are discussed in relation to a qualitative study of young people who described themselves as independent although they accepted money on a regular basis from their parents. Their…

  5. 47 CFR 64.904 - Independent audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Independent audits. 64.904 Section 64.904... RULES RELATING TO COMMON CARRIERS Allocation of Costs § 64.904 Independent audits. (a) Each carrier... independent auditor every two years, covering the prior two year period, or have a financial audit...

  6. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  7. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  8. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  9. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  10. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  11. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... instrumentation systems for any vital system must be independent of each other. (2) Independent sensors are not required except that sensors for primary speed, pitch, or direction of rotation control in closed loop..., or instrumentation sensors. (3) The safety trip control of § 62.35-5(b)(2) must be independent...

  12. 11 CFR 100.113 - Independent expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Independent expenditures. 100.113 Section 100...) Definition of Expenditure (2 U.S.C. 431(9)) § 100.113 Independent expenditures. An independent expenditure that meets the requirements of 11 CFR 104.4 or part 109 is an expenditure, and such...

  13. Large Independent Primary Care Medical Groups

    PubMed Central

    Casalino, Lawrence P.; Chen, Melinda A.; Staub, C. Todd; Press, Matthew J.; Mendelsohn, Jayme L.; Lynch, John T.; Miranda, Yesenia

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE In the turbulent US health care environment, many primary care physicians seek hospital employment. Large physician-owned primary care groups are an alternative, but few physicians or policy makers realize that such groups exist. We wanted to describe these groups, their advantages, and their challenges. METHODS We identified 21 groups and studied 5 that varied in size and location. We conducted interviews with group leaders, surveyed randomly selected group physicians, and interviewed external observers—leaders of a health plan, hospital, and specialty medical group that shared patients with the group. We triangulated responses from group leaders, group physicians, and external observers to identify key themes. RESULTS The groups’ physicians work in small practices, with the group providing economies of scale necessary to develop laboratory and imaging services, health information technology, and quality improvement infrastructure. The groups differ in their size and the extent to which they engage in value-based contracting, though all are moving to increase the amount of financial risk they take for their quality and cost performance. Unlike hospital-employed and multispecialty groups, independent primary care groups can aim to reduce health care costs without conflicting incentives to fill hospital beds and keep specialist incomes high. Each group was positively regarded by external observers. The groups are under pressure, however, to sell to organizations that can provide capital for additional infrastructure to engage in value-based contracting, as well as provide substantial income to physicians from the sale. CONCLUSIONS Large, independent primary care groups have the potential to make primary care attractive to physicians and to improve patient care by combining human scale advantages of physician autonomy and the small practice setting with resources that are important to succeed in value-based contracting. PMID:26755779

  14. Altered muscle coordination when pedaling with independent cranks

    PubMed Central

    Hug, François; Boumier, Florian; Dorel, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Pedaling with independent cranks ensures each leg cycles independently of the other, and thus eliminates the contribution of the contralateral leg during the upstroke phase. Consequently the subject is required to actively pull-up the pedal to complete the cycle. The present study aimed to determine the acute effect of the use of independent cranks on muscle coordination during a submaximal pedaling exercise. Ten healthy males were asked to perform submaximal pedaling exercises at 100 Watts with normal fixed cranks (control condition) or independent cranks. Both 2-D pedal forces and electromyographic (EMG) SIGNALS of 10 lower limb muscles were recorded. When the mean EMG activity across the cycle was considered, the use of independent cranks significantly increased the activity level compared to control for Tibialis anterior (TA) (P = 0.0017; +336 ± 302%), Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) (P = 0.0005; +47 ± 25%), Rectus femoris (RF) (P = 0.005; +123 ± 153%), Biceps femoris (BF)—long head (P = 0.0001; +162 ± 97%), Semimembranosus (SM) (P = 0.0001; +304 ± 192%), and Tensor fascia latae (P = 0.0001; +586 ± 262%). The analysis of the four pedaling sectors revealed that the increased activity of hip and knee flexors mainly occurred during the top dead center and the upstroke phase. In addition, a high inter-individual variability was found in the way the participants adapted to pedaling with independent cranks. The present results showed that the enforced pull-up action required when using independent cranks was achieved by increasing the activation of hip and knee flexors. Further studies are needed to determine whether training with independent cranks has the potential to induce long-term changes in muscle coordination, and, if so, whether these changes are beneficial for cycling performance. PMID:24009587

  15. Altered muscle coordination when pedaling with independent cranks.

    PubMed

    Hug, François; Boumier, Florian; Dorel, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Pedaling with independent cranks ensures each leg cycles independently of the other, and thus eliminates the contribution of the contralateral leg during the upstroke phase. Consequently the subject is required to actively pull-up the pedal to complete the cycle. The present study aimed to determine the acute effect of the use of independent cranks on muscle coordination during a submaximal pedaling exercise. Ten healthy males were asked to perform submaximal pedaling exercises at 100 Watts with normal fixed cranks (control condition) or independent cranks. Both 2-D pedal forces and electromyographic (EMG) SIGNALS of 10 lower limb muscles were recorded. When the mean EMG activity across the cycle was considered, the use of independent cranks significantly increased the activity level compared to control for Tibialis anterior (TA) (P = 0.0017; +336 ± 302%), Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) (P = 0.0005; +47 ± 25%), Rectus femoris (RF) (P = 0.005; +123 ± 153%), Biceps femoris (BF)-long head (P = 0.0001; +162 ± 97%), Semimembranosus (SM) (P = 0.0001; +304 ± 192%), and Tensor fascia latae (P = 0.0001; +586 ± 262%). The analysis of the four pedaling sectors revealed that the increased activity of hip and knee flexors mainly occurred during the top dead center and the upstroke phase. In addition, a high inter-individual variability was found in the way the participants adapted to pedaling with independent cranks. The present results showed that the enforced pull-up action required when using independent cranks was achieved by increasing the activation of hip and knee flexors. Further studies are needed to determine whether training with independent cranks has the potential to induce long-term changes in muscle coordination, and, if so, whether these changes are beneficial for cycling performance.

  16. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene’s (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P < 2.5e-05) vGWAS signals within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across all three study cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis. We further identified 10 epistatic interactions between the vGWAS signals independent of the MHC additive effects, each with a weak effect but jointly explained 1.9% of phenotypic variance. PTPN22 was also identified in the discovery cohort but replicated in only one independent cohort. Combining the three cohorts boosted power of vGWAS and additionally identified TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  17. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the pyrotechnics subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Pyrotechnics (PYRO) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baseline with proposed Post 51-L updates included. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter Pyrotechnics hardware.

  18. Evidence and Clinical Trials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Steven N.

    1989-11-01

    This dissertation explores the use of a mathematical measure of statistical evidence, the log likelihood ratio, in clinical trials. The methods and thinking behind the use of an evidential measure are contrasted with traditional methods of analyzing data, which depend primarily on a p-value as an estimate of the statistical strength of an observed data pattern. It is contended that neither the behavioral dictates of Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing methods, nor the coherency dictates of Bayesian methods are realistic models on which to base inference. The use of the likelihood alone is applied to four aspects of trial design or conduct: the calculation of sample size, the monitoring of data, testing for the equivalence of two treatments, and meta-analysis--the combining of results from different trials. Finally, a more general model of statistical inference, using belief functions, is used to see if it is possible to separate the assessment of evidence from our background knowledge. It is shown that traditional and Bayesian methods can be modeled as two ends of a continuum of structured background knowledge, methods which summarize evidence at the point of maximum likelihood assuming no structure, and Bayesian methods assuming complete knowledge. Both schools are seen to be missing a concept of ignorance- -uncommitted belief. This concept provides the key to understanding the problem of sampling to a foregone conclusion and the role of frequency properties in statistical inference. The conclusion is that statistical evidence cannot be defined independently of background knowledge, and that frequency properties of an estimator are an indirect measure of uncommitted belief. Several likelihood summaries need to be used in clinical trials, with the quantitative disparity between summaries being an indirect measure of our ignorance. This conclusion is linked with parallel ideas in the philosophy of science and cognitive psychology.

  19. Children, Additive Change, and Calculus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; And Others

    Students can learn to solve problems of qualitative integration and differentiation independently of their study of formal calculus or algebra. This exploratory study investigated the basic intuitions that elementary school children construct in their daily experience with physical and symbolic change. Elementary school children (n=18) were…

  20. How Safe Are Color Additives?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How Safe are Color Additives? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed Download PDF (380 K) Color additives give the red tint to your fruit ...

  1. Detergent Additive for Lubricating Oils,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Russian patent pertains to a method of producing additives for lubricating oils . A method is known for producing an antiwear additive for... lubricating oils by processing phenols with phosphorus oxychloride, phosphoric acid esters are obtained. In order to give the additive detergent properties

  2. Telomere-independent functions of telomerase in nuclei, cytoplasm, and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase canonical activity at telomeres prevents telomere shortening, allowing chromosome stability and cellular proliferation. To perform this task, the catalytic subunit (telomerase reverse transcriptase, TERT) of the enzyme works as a reverse transcriptase together with the telomerase RNA component (TERC), adding telomeric repeats to DNA molecule ends. Growing evidence indicates that, besides the telomeric-DNA synthesis activity, TERT has additional functions in tumor development and is involved in many different biological processes, among which cellular proliferation, gene expression regulation, and mitochondrial functionality. TERT has been shown to act independently of TERC in the Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway, regulating the expression of Wnt target genes, which play a role in development and tumorigenesis. Moreover, TERT RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity has been found, leading to the genesis of double-stranded RNAs that act as precursor of silencing RNAs. In mitochondria, a TERT TERC-independent reverse transcriptase activity has been described that could play a role in the protection of mitochondrial integrity. In this review, we will discuss some of the extra-telomeric functions of telomerase.

  3. Telomere-independent functions of telomerase in nuclei, cytoplasm, and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase canonical activity at telomeres prevents telomere shortening, allowing chromosome stability and cellular proliferation. To perform this task, the catalytic subunit (telomerase reverse transcriptase, TERT) of the enzyme works as a reverse transcriptase together with the telomerase RNA component (TERC), adding telomeric repeats to DNA molecule ends. Growing evidence indicates that, besides the telomeric-DNA synthesis activity, TERT has additional functions in tumor development and is involved in many different biological processes, among which cellular proliferation, gene expression regulation, and mitochondrial functionality. TERT has been shown to act independently of TERC in the Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway, regulating the expression of Wnt target genes, which play a role in development and tumorigenesis. Moreover, TERT RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity has been found, leading to the genesis of double-stranded RNAs that act as precursor of silencing RNAs. In mitochondria, a TERT TERC-independent reverse transcriptase activity has been described that could play a role in the protection of mitochondrial integrity. In this review, we will discuss some of the extra-telomeric functions of telomerase. PMID:23061047

  4. The prototype foamy virus protease is active independently of the integrase domain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, contradictory results on foamy virus protease activity were published. While our own results indicated that protease activity is regulated by the viral RNA, others suggested that the integrase is involved in the regulation of the protease. Results To solve this discrepancy we performed additional experiments showing that the protease-reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) exhibits protease activity in vitro and in vivo, which is independent of the integrase domain. In contrast, Pol incorporation, and therefore PR activity in the viral context, is dependent on the integrase domain. To further analyse the regulation of the protease, we incorporated Pol in viruses by expressing a GagPol fusion protein, which supported near wild-type like infectivity. A GagPR-RT fusion, lacking the integrase domain, also resulted in wild-type like Gag processing, indicating that the integrase is dispensable for viral Gag maturation. Furthermore, we demonstrate with a trans-complementation assays that the PR in the context of the PR-RT protein supports in trans both, viral maturation and infectivity. Conclusion We provide evidence that the FV integrase is required for Pol encapsidation and that the FV PR activity is integrase independent. We show that an active PR can be encapsidated in trans as a GagPR-RT fusion protein. PMID:22574974

  5. Independent effects of intra- and extracellular Abeta on learning-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Fulgencio Maisch, Ana; Eicke, Daniel; Radde, Rebecca; Herzig, Martin C; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias; Calhoun, Michael E

    2009-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by numerous pathological abnormalities, including amyloid beta (Abeta) deposition in the brain parenchyma and vasculature. In addition, intracellular Abeta accumulation may affect neuronal viability and function. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different forms of Abeta on cognitive decline by analyzing the behavioral induction of the learning-related gene Arc/Arg3.1 in three different transgenic mouse models of cerebral amyloidosis (APPPS1, APPDutch, and APP23). Following a controlled spatial exploration paradigm, reductions in both the number of Arc-activated neurons and the levels of Arc mRNA were seen in the neocortices of depositing mice from all transgenic lines (deficits ranging from 14 to 26%), indicating an impairment in neuronal encoding and network activation. Young APPDutch and APP23 mice exhibited intracellular, granular Abeta staining that was most prominent in the large pyramidal cells of cortical layer V; these animals also had reductions in levels of Arc. In the dentate gyrus, striking reductions (up to 58% in aged APPPS1 mice) in the number of Arc-activated cells were found. Single-cell analyses revealed both the proximity to fibrillar amyloid in aged mice, and the transient presence of intracellular granular Abeta in young mice, as independent factors that contribute to reduced Arc levels. These results provide evidence that two independent Abeta pathologies converge in their impact on cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Ubiquitin-independent function of optineurin in autophagic clearance of protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Korac, Jelena; Schaeffer, Veronique; Kovacevic, Igor; Clement, Albrecht M.; Jungblut, Benno; Behl, Christian; Terzic, Janos; Dikic, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Aggregation of misfolded proteins and the associated loss of neurons are considered as a hallmark of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. Optineurin is present in protein inclusions observed in various neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Creutzfeld-Jacob disease and Pick’s disease. Optineurin deletion mutations have also been described in ALS patients. However, the role of optineurin in mechanisms of protein aggregation remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that optineurin recognized various protein aggregates via its C-terminal coiled-coil domain in a ubiquitin-independent manner. We also show that optineurin depletion significantly increase protein aggregation in HeLa cells and morpholino-silencing of the optineurin ortholog in zebrafish causes the motor axonopathy phenotype similar to a zebrafish model of ALS. A more severe phenotype is observed when optineurin is depleted in zebrafish carrying ALS mutations. Furthermore, TANK1 binding kinase 1 (TBK1) is co-localized with optineurin on protein aggregates and is important in clearance of protein aggregates through the autophagy-lysosome pathway. TBK1 phosphorylates optineurin at position Ser-177 and regulates its ability to interact with autophagy modifiers. This study provides evidence for a ubiquitin-independent function of optineurin in autophagic clearance of protein aggregates as well as additional relevance for TBK1 as an upstream regulator of the autophagic pathway. PMID:23178947

  7. Hydrogenase-independent uptake and metabolism of electrons by the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Svenja T; Deutzmann, Jörg S; Logan, Bruce E; Leigh, John; Spormann, Alfred M

    2014-08-01

    Direct, shuttle-free uptake of extracellular, cathode-derived electrons has been postulated as a novel mechanism of electron metabolism in some prokaryotes that may also be involved in syntrophic electron transport between two microorganisms. Experimental proof for direct uptake of cathodic electrons has been mostly indirect and has been based on the absence of detectable concentrations of molecular hydrogen. However, hydrogen can be formed as a transient intermediate abiotically at low cathodic potentials (<-414 mV) under conditions of electromethanogenesis. Here we provide genetic evidence for hydrogen-independent uptake of extracellular electrons. Methane formation from cathodic electrons was observed in a wild-type strain of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis as well as in a hydrogenase-deletion mutant lacking all catabolic hydrogenases, indicating the presence of a hydrogenase-independent mechanism of electron catabolism. In addition, we discovered a new route for hydrogen or formate production from cathodic electrons: Upon chemical inhibition of methanogenesis with 2-bromo-ethane sulfonate, hydrogen or formate accumulated in the bioelectrochemical cells instead of methane. These results have implications for our understanding on the diversity of microbial electron uptake and metabolism.

  8. Spatial Variance in Resting fMRI Networks of Schizophrenia Patients: An Independent Vector Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Shruti; Miller, Robyn L; Michael, Andrew; Adali, Tulay; Cetin, Mustafa; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Bustillo, Juan R; Cahill, Nathan; Baum, Stefi A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-01-01

    Spatial variability in resting functional MRI (fMRI) brain networks has not been well studied in schizophrenia, a disease known for both neurodevelopmental and widespread anatomic changes. Motivated by abundant evidence of neuroanatomical variability from previous studies of schizophrenia, we draw upon a relatively new approach called independent vector analysis (IVA) to assess this variability in resting fMRI networks. IVA is a blind-source separation algorithm, which segregates fMRI data into temporally coherent but spatially independent networks and has been shown to be especially good at capturing spatial variability among subjects in the extracted networks. We introduce several new ways to quantify differences in variability of IVA-derived networks between schizophrenia patients (SZs = 82) and healthy controls (HCs = 89). Voxelwise amplitude analyses showed significant group differences in the spatial maps of auditory cortex, the basal ganglia, the sensorimotor network, and visual cortex. Tests for differences (HC-SZ) in the spatial variability maps suggest, that at rest, SZs exhibit more activity within externally focused sensory and integrative network and less activity in the default mode network thought to be related to internal reflection. Additionally, tests for difference of variance between groups further emphasize that SZs exhibit greater network variability. These results, consistent with our prediction of increased spatial variability within SZs, enhance our understanding of the disease and suggest that it is not just the amplitude of connectivity that is different in schizophrenia, but also the consistency in spatial connectivity patterns across subjects.

  9. State-independent intracellular access of quaternary ammonium blockers to the pore of TREK-1.

    PubMed

    Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Matthias R; Sharma, Chetan; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Sansom, Mark S P; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Tucker, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that TREK-1 gating by internal pH and pressure occurs close to or within the selectivity filter. These conclusions were based upon kinetic measurements of high-affinity block by quaternary ammonium (QA) ions that appeared to exhibit state-independent accessibility to their binding site within the pore. Intriguingly, recent crystal structures of two related K2P potassium channels were also both found to be open at the helix bundle crossing. However, this did not exclude the possibility of gating at the bundle crossing and it was suggested that side-fenestrations within these structures might allow state-independent access of QA ions to their binding site. In this addendum to our original study we demonstrate that even hydrophobic QA ions do not access the TREK-1 pore via these fenestrations. Furthermore, by using a chemically reactive QA ion immobilized within the pore via covalent cysteine modification we provide additional evidence that the QA binding site remains accessible to the cytoplasm in the closed state. These results support models of K2P channel gating which occur close to or within the selectivity filter and do not involve closure at the helix bundle crossing.

  10. Hydrogenase-independent uptake and metabolism of electrons by the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Lohner, Svenja T; Deutzmann, Jörg S; Logan, Bruce E; Leigh, John; Spormann, Alfred M

    2014-01-01

    Direct, shuttle-free uptake of extracellular, cathode-derived electrons has been postulated as a novel mechanism of electron metabolism in some prokaryotes that may also be involved in syntrophic electron transport between two microorganisms. Experimental proof for direct uptake of cathodic electrons has been mostly indirect and has been based on the absence of detectable concentrations of molecular hydrogen. However, hydrogen can be formed as a transient intermediate abiotically at low cathodic potentials (<−414 mV) under conditions of electromethanogenesis. Here we provide genetic evidence for hydrogen-independent uptake of extracellular electrons. Methane formation from cathodic electrons was observed in a wild-type strain of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis as well as in a hydrogenase-deletion mutant lacking all catabolic hydrogenases, indicating the presence of a hydrogenase-independent mechanism of electron catabolism. In addition, we discovered a new route for hydrogen or formate production from cathodic electrons: Upon chemical inhibition of methanogenesis with 2-bromo-ethane sulfonate, hydrogen or formate accumulated in the bioelectrochemical cells instead of methane. These results have implications for our understanding on the diversity of microbial electron uptake and metabolism. PMID:24844759

  11. Independent contributions of alcohol and stress axis hormones to painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Levine, E; Levine, J D

    2013-01-03

    Painful small-fiber peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating complication of chronic alcohol abuse. Evidence from previous studies suggests that neuroendocrine mechanisms, in combination with other, as yet unidentified actions of alcohol, are required to produce this neuropathic pain syndrome. In addition to neurotoxic effects of alcohol, in the setting of alcohol abuse neuroendocrine stress axes release glucocorticoids and catecholamines. Since receptors for these stress hormones are located on nociceptors, at which they can act to cause neuronal dysfunction, we tested the hypothesis that alcohol and stress hormones act on the nociceptor, independently, to produce neuropathic pain. We used a rat model, which allows the distinction of the effects of alcohol from those produced by neuroendocrine stress axis mediators. We now demonstrate that topical application of alcohol and exposure to unpredictable sound stress, each alone, has no effect on the nociceptive threshold. However, when animals that had previous exposure to alcohol were subsequently exposed to stress, they rapidly developed mechanical hyperalgesia. Conversely, sound stress followed by topical alcohol exposure also produced mechanical hyperalgesia. The contribution of stress hormones was prevented by spinal intrathecal administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to β(2)-adrenergic or glucocorticoid receptor mRNA, which attenuates receptor level in nociceptors, as well as by adrenal medullectomy. These experiments establish an independent role of alcohol and stress hormones on the primary afferent nociceptor in the induction of painful peripheral neuropathy.

  12. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  13. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  14. Independent Structural Domains in Paramyxovirus Polymerase Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Melanie; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Crowe, James E.; Moore, Martin L.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    All enzymatic activities required for genomic replication and transcription of nonsegmented negative strand RNA viruses (or Mononegavirales) are believed to be concentrated in the viral polymerase (L) protein. However, our insight into the organization of these different enzymatic activities into a bioactive tertiary structure remains rudimentary. Fragments of Mononegavirales polymerases analyzed to date cannot restore bioactivity through trans-complementation, unlike the related L proteins of segmented NSVs. We investigated the domain organization of phylogenetically diverse Paramyxovirus L proteins derived from measles virus (MeV), Nipah virus (NiV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Through a comprehensive in silico and experimental analysis of domain intersections, we defined MeV L position 615 as an interdomain candidate in addition to the previously reported residue 1708. Only position 1708 of MeV and the homologous positions in NiV and RSV L also tolerated the insertion of epitope tags. Splitting of MeV L at residue 1708 created fragments that were unable to physically interact and trans-complement, but strikingly, these activities were reconstituted by the addition of dimerization tags to the fragments. Equivalently split fragments of NiV, RSV, and MeV L oligomerized with comparable efficiency in all homo- and heterotypic combinations, but only the homotypic pairs were able to trans-complement. These results demonstrate that synthesis as a single polypeptide is not required for the Mononegavirales polymerases to adopt a proper tertiary conformation. Paramyxovirus polymerases are composed of at least two truly independent folding domains that lack a traditional interface but require molecular compatibility for bioactivity. The functional probing of the L domain architecture through trans-complementation is anticipated to be applicable to all Mononegavirales polymerases. PMID:22215662

  15. Image classification independent of orientation and scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Henri H.; Parent, Sebastien; Moisan, Sylvain

    1998-04-01

    The recognition of targets independently of orientation has become fairly well developed in recent years for in-plane rotation. The out-of-plane rotation problem is much less advanced. When both out-of-plane rotations and changes of scale are present, the problem becomes very difficult. In this paper we describe our research on the combined out-of- plane rotation problem and the scale invariance problem. The rotations were limited to rotations about an axis perpendicular to the line of sight. The objects to be classified were three kinds of military vehicles. The inputs used were infrared imagery and photographs. We used a variation of a method proposed by Neiberg and Casasent, where a neural network is trained with a subset of the database and a minimum distances from lines in feature space are used for classification instead of nearest neighbors. Each line in the feature space corresponds to one class of objects, and points on one line correspond to different orientations of the same target. We found that the training samples needed to be closer for some orientations than for others, and that the most difficult orientations are where the target is head-on to the observer. By means of some additional training of the neural network, we were able to achieve 100% correct classification for 360 degree rotation and a range of scales over a factor of five.

  16. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions.

  17. Hybrid Scheduling Model for Independent Grid Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Shanthini, J.; Kalaikumaran, T.; Karthik, S.

    2015-01-01

    Grid computing facilitates the resource sharing through the administrative domains which are geographically distributed. Scheduling in a distributed heterogeneous environment is intrinsically very hard because of the heterogeneous nature of resource collection. Makespan and tardiness are two different measures of scheduling, and many of the previous researches concentrated much on reduction of makespan, which measures the machine utilization. In this paper, we propose a hybrid scheduling algorithm for scheduling independent grid tasks with the objective of reducing total weighted tardiness of grid tasks. Tardiness is to measure the due date performance, which has a direct impact on cost for executing the jobs. In this paper we propose BG_ATC algorithm which is a combination of best gap (BG) search and Apparent Tardiness Cost (ATC) indexing algorithm. Furthermore, we implemented these two algorithms in two different phases of the scheduling process. In addition to that, the comparison was made on results with various benchmark algorithms and the experimental results show that our algorithm outperforms the benchmark algorithms. PMID:26543897

  18. Calmodulin independence of human duodenal adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Griffin, M; Mireylees, S E; Long, R G

    1991-01-01

    The calmodulin and calcium dependence of human adenylate cyclase from the second part of the duodenum was assessed in washed particulate preparations of biopsy specimens by investigating (a) the concentration dependent effects of free [Ca2+] on enzyme activity, (b) the effects of exogenous calmodulin on enzyme activity in ethylene glycol bis (b-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) washed particulate preparations, and (c) the effects of calmodulin antagonists on enzyme activity. Both basal (IC50 = 193.75 (57.5) nmol/l (mean (SEM)) and NaF stimulated (IC50 = 188.0 (44.0) nmol/l) adenylate cyclase activity was strongly inhibited by free [Ca2+] greater than 90 nmol/l. Free [Ca2+] less than 90 nmol/l had no effect on adenylate cyclase activity. NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by 50% at 2.5 mmol/l EGTA. This inhibition could not be reversed by free Ca2+. The addition of exogenous calmodulin to EGTA (5 mmol/l) washed particulate preparations failed to stimulate adenylate cyclase activity. Trifluoperazine and N-(8-aminohexyl)-5-IODO-1-naphthalene-sulphonamide (IODO 8) did not significantly inhibit basal and NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity when measured at concentrations of up to 100 mumol/l. These results suggest that human duodenal adenylate cyclase activity is calmodulin independent but is affected by changes in free [Ca2+]. PMID:1752461

  19. Source-Independent Quantum Random Number Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhu; Zhou, Hongyi; Yuan, Xiao; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Quantum random number generators can provide genuine randomness by appealing to the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. In general, a physical generator contains two parts—a randomness source and its readout. The source is essential to the quality of the resulting random numbers; hence, it needs to be carefully calibrated and modeled to achieve information-theoretical provable randomness. However, in practice, the source is a complicated physical system, such as a light source or an atomic ensemble, and any deviations in the real-life implementation from the theoretical model may affect the randomness of the output. To close this gap, we propose a source-independent scheme for quantum random number generation in which output randomness can be certified, even when the source is uncharacterized and untrusted. In our randomness analysis, we make no assumptions about the dimension of the source. For instance, multiphoton emissions are allowed in optical implementations. Our analysis takes into account the finite-key effect with the composable security definition. In the limit of large data size, the length of the input random seed is exponentially small compared to that of the output random bit. In addition, by modifying a quantum key distribution system, we experimentally demonstrate our scheme and achieve a randomness generation rate of over 5 ×103 bit /s .

  20. Food additives and contaminants. An update.

    PubMed

    Newberne, P M; Conner, M W

    1986-10-15

    Food additives continue to be a source of benefits to the consuming public but there are also perceived risks. Concern for the latter in the last decade has produced a society afflicted with cancer phobia. The intentional additives including sugars, salt, corn syrup, and dextrose make up 90% of the direct additives. These, along with a limited number of familiar items make up a large proportion of the remainder of the additives. Such common ingredients as nitrates and nitrites, solanine, cyanogenetic compounds, arsenic, etc., are unavoidably consumed in the diet and with little if any evidence for public health consequences. Major concern on the part of the public in recent years has been focused on man-made chemicals which are intentionally added to foods to enhance flavors and acceptability, nutrient value, shelf life and increased availability. These include food colors, nonnutritive and low-nutrient sweeteners, (saccharin, cyclamate, aspartame); antioxidants; and nitrites. Contaminants, sometimes incorrectly included in lists of food additives, present the greatest potential threat to public health. Such contaminants as mycotoxins, nitrosamines, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, among others, provide a continuing challenge to our regulatory agencies and to public health authorities. Evidence to date indicate that these responsible for food safety are doing an admirable job, and as a society, our food supply has never been better, or safer, and, as a population, we have never been healthier. Aside from contaminants, major concerns relate to an excess of good food and to obesity. These comments should not be taken to infer that we should relax our concern and surveillance; instead more concern and surveillance should be exerted toward those uncontrolled substances such as natural plant products and alleged natural nutrients, roots, herbs, etc., which are given much credit for positive health effects, without meeting the high standards of our

  1. Efficient Markov Network Structure Discovery Using Independence Tests

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Facundo; Margaritis, Dimitris; Honavar, Vasant

    2011-01-01

    We present two algorithms for learning the structure of a Markov network from data: GSMN* and GSIMN. Both algorithms use statistical independence tests to infer the structure by successively constraining the set of structures consistent with the results of these tests. Until very recently, algorithms for structure learning were based on maximum likelihood estimation, which has been proved to be NP-hard for Markov networks due to the difficulty of estimating the parameters of the network, needed for the computation of the data likelihood. The independence-based approach does not require the computation of the likelihood, and thus both GSMN* and GSIMN can compute the structure efficiently (as shown in our experiments). GSMN* is an adaptation of the Grow-Shrink algorithm of Margaritis and Thrun for learning the structure of Bayesian networks. GSIMN extends GSMN* by additionally exploiting Pearl’s well-known properties of the conditional independence relation to infer novel independences from known ones, thus avoiding the performance of statistical tests to estimate them. To accomplish this efficiently GSIMN uses the Triangle theorem, also introduced in this work, which is a simplified version of the set of Markov axioms. Experimental comparisons on artificial and real-world data sets show GSIMN can yield significant savings with respect to GSMN*, while generating a Markov network with comparable or in some cases improved quality. We also compare GSIMN to a forward-chaining implementation, called GSIMN-FCH, that produces all possible conditional independences resulting from repeatedly applying Pearl’s theorems on the known conditional independence tests. The results of this comparison show that GSIMN, by the sole use of the Triangle theorem, is nearly optimal in terms of the set of independences tests that it infers. PMID:22822297

  2. Independent Domestication of Two Old World Cotton Species.

    PubMed

    Renny-Byfield, Simon; Page, Justin T; Udall, Joshua A; Sanders, William S; Peterson, Daniel G; Arick, Mark A; Grover, Corrinne E; Wendel, Jonathan F

    2016-07-02

    Domesticated cotton species provide raw material for the majority of the world's textile industry. Two independent domestication events have been identified in allopolyploid cotton, one in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and the other to Egyptian cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.). However, two diploid cotton species, Gossypium arboreum L. and Gossypium herbaceum L., have been cultivated for several millennia, but their status as independent domesticates has long been in question. Using genome resequencing data, we estimated the global abundance of various repetitive DNAs. We demonstrate that, despite negligible divergence in genome size, the two domesticated diploid cotton species contain different, but compensatory, repeat content and have thus experienced cryptic alterations in repeat abundance despite equivalence in genome size. Evidence of independent origin is bolstered by estimates of divergence times based on molecular evolutionary analysis of f7,000 orthologous genes, for which synonymous substitution rates suggest that G. arboreum and G. herbaceum last shared a common ancestor approximately 0.4-2.5 Ma. These data are incompatible with a shared domestication history during the emergence of agriculture and lead to the conclusion that G. arboreum and G. herbaceum were each domesticated independently.

  3. Quantitative orientation-independent differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shribak, Michael; LaFountain, James; Biggs, David; Inoué, Shinya

    2007-02-01

    We describe a new DIC technique, which records phase gradients within microscopic specimens independently of their orientation. The proposed system allows the generation of images representing the distribution of dry mass (optical path difference) in the specimen. Unlike in other forms of interference microscopes, this approach does not require a narrow illuminating cone. The orientation-independent differential interference contrast (OI-DIC) system can also be combined with orientation-independent polarization (OI-Pol) measurements to yield two complementary images: one showing dry mass distribution (which is proportional to refractive index) and the other showing distribution of birefringence (due to structural or internal anisotropy). With a model specimen used for this work -- living spermatocytes from the crane fly, Nephrotoma suturalis --- the OI-DIC image clearly reveals the detailed shape of the chromosomes while the polarization image quantitatively depicts the distribution of the birefringent microtubules in the spindle, both without any need for staining or other modifications of the cell. We present examples of a pseudo-color combined image incorporating both orientation-independent DIC and polarization images of a spermatocyte at diakinesis and metaphase of meiosis I. Those images provide clear evidence that the proposed technique can reveal fine architecture and molecular organization in live cells without perturbation associated with staining or fluorescent labeling. The phase image was obtained using optics having a numerical aperture 1.4, thus achieving a level of resolution never before achieved with any interference microscope.

  4. Independent Domestication of Two Old World Cotton Species

    PubMed Central

    Renny-Byfield, Simon; Page, Justin T.; Udall, Joshua A.; Sanders, William S.; Peterson, Daniel G.; Arick, Mark A.; Grover, Corrinne E.; Wendel, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Domesticated cotton species provide raw material for the majority of the world's textile industry. Two independent domestication events have been identified in allopolyploid cotton, one in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and the other to Egyptian cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.). However, two diploid cotton species, Gossypium arboreum L. and Gossypium herbaceum L., have been cultivated for several millennia, but their status as independent domesticates has long been in question. Using genome resequencing data, we estimated the global abundance of various repetitive DNAs. We demonstrate that, despite negligible divergence in genome size, the two domesticated diploid cotton species contain different, but compensatory, repeat content and have thus experienced cryptic alterations in repeat abundance despite equivalence in genome size. Evidence of independent origin is bolstered by estimates of divergence times based on molecular evolutionary analysis of f7,000 orthologous genes, for which synonymous substitution rates suggest that G. arboreum and G. herbaceum last shared a common ancestor approximately 0.4–2.5 Ma. These data are incompatible with a shared domestication history during the emergence of agriculture and lead to the conclusion that G. arboreum and G. herbaceum were each domesticated independently. PMID:27289095

  5. The SCN-independent clocks, methamphetamine and food restriction.

    PubMed

    Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2009-11-01

    The circadian system in mammals consists of the central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the peripheral clocks in a variety of tissues and organs. The SCN clock entrains to a light-dark cycle and resets the peripheral clocks. In addition, there are at least two other clocks in the circadian domain which are independent of the SCN and which entrain to nonphotic time cues: methamphetamine (MAP)-induced and restricted daily feeding (RF)-induced clocks. Neither the site nor the mechanism of SCN-independent clocks is known. Canonical clock genes for circadian oscillation are not required for the expression of either SCN-independent rhythm. The central catecholaminergic system is probably involved in the expression of the SCN-independent rhythms, especially of the MAP-induced rhythm. MAP-induced activity rhythms in rats and the sleep-wake cycles in humans share unique phenomena such as spontaneous internal desynchronization, circabidian rhythm and nonphotic entrainment, suggesting overlapping oscillatory mechanisms. The SCN-independent clock is an adaptation that regulates behavior in response to nonphotic time cues, and seems to be closely related to the arousal mechanism.

  6. Independent Long Fingers are not Essential for a Grasping Hand

    PubMed Central

    Montagnani, Federico; Controzzi, Marco; Cipriani, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human hand is a complex integrated system with motor and sensory components that provides individuals with high functionality and elegant behaviour. In direct connection with the brain, the hand is capable of performing countless actions ranging from fine digit manipulation to the handling of heavy objects. However the question of which movements mostly contribute to the manipulation skills of the hand, and thus should be included in prosthetic hands, is yet to be answered. Building from our previous work, and assuming that a hand with independent long fingers allowed performance comparable to a hand with coupled fingers, here we explored the actual contribution of independent fingers while performing activities of daily living using custom built orthoses. Our findings show that, when an opposable thumb is present, independent long fingers provide a measureable advantage in performing activities of daily living only when precision grasps are involved. In addition, the results suggest that the remarkable grasping skills of the human hand rely more on the independent abduction/adduction of the fingers than on their independent flexion/extension. These findings are of interest to the designers of artificial hands, including biomimetic prostheses and exoskeletons. PMID:27759046

  7. Development Factors and Field Dependence-Independence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    The use of field dependence -field independence measures has been suggested for both the selection and classification of naval aviators. If measures...of field dependence -field independence are predictive of pilot proficiency, the utility of the construct for selection and classification could be...moderated by the influence of intraindividual changes in field dependence -field independence (FD-FI) over time. This report reviews (1) particulars of the

  8. Enantioselective Michael addition of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-02-09

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry.

  9. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  10. Independently Controlled Wing Stroke Patterns in the Fruit Fly Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Soma; Bartussek, Jan; Fry, Steven N.; Zapotocky, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Flies achieve supreme flight maneuverability through a small set of miniscule steering muscles attached to the wing base. The fast flight maneuvers arise from precisely timed activation of the steering muscles and the resulting subtle modulation of the wing stroke. In addition, slower modulation of wing kinematics arises from changes in the activity of indirect flight muscles in the thorax. We investigated if these modulations can be described as a superposition of a limited number of elementary deformations of the wing stroke that are under independent physiological control. Using a high-speed computer vision system, we recorded the wing motion of tethered flying fruit flies for up to 12 000 consecutive wing strokes at a sampling rate of 6250 Hz. We then decomposed the joint motion pattern of both wings into components that had the minimal mutual information (a measure of statistical dependence). In 100 flight segments measured from 10 individual flies, we identified 7 distinct types of frequently occurring least-dependent components, each defining a kinematic pattern (a specific deformation of the wing stroke and the sequence of its activation from cycle to cycle). Two of these stroke deformations can be associated with the control of yaw torque and total flight force, respectively. A third deformation involves a change in the downstroke-to-upstroke duration ratio, which is expected to alter the pitch torque. A fourth kinematic pattern consists in the alteration of stroke amplitude with a period of 2 wingbeat cycles, extending for dozens of cycles. Our analysis indicates that these four elementary kinematic patterns can be activated mutually independently, and occur both in isolation and in linear superposition. The results strengthen the available evidence for independent control of yaw torque, pitch torque, and total flight force. Our computational method facilitates systematic identification of novel patterns in large kinematic datasets. PMID:25710715

  11. Prosaposin facilitates sortilin-independent lysosomal trafficking of progranulin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolai; Sun, Lirong; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco; Qi, Xiaoyang; Brown, William J; Smolka, Marcus B; Sun, Ying; Hu, Fenghua

    2015-09-14

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene have been linked to two distinct neurodegenerative diseases, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Accumulating evidence suggests a critical role of PGRN in lysosomes. However, how PGRN is trafficked to lysosomes is still not clear. Here we report a novel pathway for lysosomal delivery of PGRN. We found that prosaposin (PSAP) interacts with PGRN and facilitates its lysosomal targeting in both biosynthetic and endocytic pathways via the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. PSAP deficiency in mice leads to severe PGRN trafficking defects and a drastic increase in serum PGRN levels. We further showed that this PSAP pathway is independent of, but complementary to, the previously identified PGRN lysosomal trafficking mediated by sortilin. Collectively, our results provide new understanding on PGRN trafficking and shed light on the molecular mechanisms behind FTLD and NCL caused by PGRN mutations.

  12. The dependency paradox in close relationships: accepting dependence promotes independence.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Brooke C

    2007-02-01

    Using multiple methods, this investigation tested the hypothesis that a close relationship partner's acceptance of dependence when needed (e.g., sensitive responsiveness to distress cues) is associated with less dependence, more autonomous functioning, and more self-sufficiency (as opposed to more dependence) on the part of the supported individual. In two studies, measures of acceptance of dependency needs and independent functioning were obtained through couple member reports, by observing couple members' behaviors during laboratory interactions, by observing responses to experimentally manipulated partner assistance provided during an individual laboratory task, and by following couples over a period of 6 months to examine independent goal striving as a function of prior assessments of dependency acceptance. Results provided converging evidence in support of the proposed hypothesis. Implications of the importance of close relationships for optimal individual functioning are discussed.

  13. Evidence of a Shockley-Read-Hall Defect State Independent of Band-Edge Energy in InAs/In(As,Sb) Type-II Superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Aytac, Y.; Olson, B. V.; Kim, J. K.; Shaner, E. A.; Hawkins, S. D.; Klem, J. F.; Flatté, M. E.; Boggess, T. F.

    2016-06-01

    A set of seven InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) were designed to have speci c bandgap energies between 290 meV (4.3 m) and 135 meV (9.2 m) in order to study the e ects of the T2SL bandgap energy on the minority carrier lifetime. A temperature dependent optical pump-probe technique is used to measure the carrier lifetimes, and the e ect of a mid-gap defect level on the carrier recombination dynamics is reported. The Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defect state is found to be at energy of approximately -250 12 meV relative to the valence band edge of bulk GaSb for the entire set of T2SL structures, even though the T2SL valence band edge shifts by 155 meV on the same scale. These results indicate that the SRH defect state in InAs/InAsSb T2SLs is singular and is nearly independent of the exact position of the T2SL bandgap or band edge energies. They also suggest the possibility of engineering the T2SL structure such that the SRH state is removed completely from the bandgap, a result that should signi cantly increase the minority carrier lifetime.

  14. Membrane-association of mRNA decapping factors is independent of stress in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Gommlich, Jessie; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Beckham, Carla; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the degradation of mRNA occurs on translating ribosomes or alternatively within RNA granules called P bodies, which are aggregates whose core constituents are mRNA decay proteins and RNA. In this study, we examined the mRNA decapping proteins, Dcp1, Dcp2, and Dhh1, using subcellular fractionation. We found that decapping factors co-sediment in the polysome fraction of a sucrose gradient and do not alter their behaviour with stress, inhibition of translation or inhibition of the P body formation. Importantly, their localisation to the polysome fraction is independent of the RNA, suggesting that these factors may be constitutively localised to the polysome. Conversely, polysomal and post-polysomal sedimentation of the decapping proteins was abolished with the addition of a detergent, which shifts the factors to the non-translating RNP fraction and is consistent with membrane association. Using a membrane flotation assay, we observed the mRNA decapping factors in the lower density fractions at the buoyant density of membrane-associated proteins. These observations provide further evidence that mRNA decapping factors interact with subcellular membranes, and we suggest a model in which the mRNA decapping factors interact with membranes to facilitate regulation of mRNA degradation. PMID:27146487

  15. Negative Regulation of Autophagy by Sulfide Is Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence in mammalian, and recently plant, systems has led to a change in our understanding of the role played by hydrogen sulfide in life processes. In plants, hydrogen sulfide mitigates stress and regulates important plant processes such as photosynthesis, stomatal movement, and autophagy, although the underlying mechanism is not well known. In this study, we provide new experimental evidence that, together with our previous findings, demonstrates the role of hydrogen sulfide in regulating autophagy. We used green fluorescent protein fluorescence associated with autophagic bodies and immunoblot analysis of the ATG8 protein to show that sulfide (and no other molecules such as sulfur-containing molecules or ammonium) was able to inhibit the autophagy induced in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots under nitrogen deprivation. Our results showed that sulfide was unable to scavenge reactive oxygen species generated by nitrogen limitation, in contrast to well-established reducers. In addition, reducers were unable to inhibit the accumulation of autophagic bodies and ATG8 protein forms to the same extent as sulfide. Therefore, we conclude that sulfide represses autophagy via a mechanism that is independent of redox conditions.

  16. Early and adult social environments have independent effects on individual fitness in a social vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Berger, Vérane; Lemaître, Jean-François; Allainé, Dominique; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Cohas, Aurélie

    2015-08-22

    Evidence that the social environment at critical stages of life-history shapes individual trajectories is accumulating. Previous studies have identified either current or delayed effects of social environments on fitness components, but no study has yet analysed fitness consequences of social environments at different life stages simultaneously. To fill the gap, we use an extensive dataset collected during a 24-year intensive monitoring of a population of Alpine marmots (Marmota marmota), a long-lived social rodent. We test whether the number of helpers in early life and over the dominance tenure length has an impact on litter size at weaning, juvenile survival, longevity and lifetime reproductive success (LRS) of dominant females. Dominant females, who were born into a group containing many helpers and experiencing a high number of accumulated helpers over dominance tenure length showed an increased LRS through an increased longevity. We provide evidence that in a wild vertebrate, both early and adult social environments influence individual fitness, acting additionally and independently. These findings demonstrate that helpers have both short- and long-term effects on dominant female Alpine marmots and that the social environment at the time of birth can play a key role in shaping individual fitness in social vertebrates.

  17. Early and adult social environments have independent effects on individual fitness in a social vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Vérane; Lemaître, Jean-François; Allainé, Dominique; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Cohas, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    Evidence that the social environment at critical stages of life-history shapes individual trajectories is accumulating. Previous studies have identified either current or delayed effects of social environments on fitness components, but no study has yet analysed fitness consequences of social environments at different life stages simultaneously. To fill the gap, we use an extensive dataset collected during a 24-year intensive monitoring of a population of Alpine marmots (Marmota marmota), a long-lived social rodent. We test whether the number of helpers in early life and over the dominance tenure length has an impact on litter size at weaning, juvenile survival, longevity and lifetime reproductive success (LRS) of dominant females. Dominant females, who were born into a group containing many helpers and experiencing a high number of accumulated helpers over dominance tenure length showed an increased LRS through an increased longevity. We provide evidence that in a wild vertebrate, both early and adult social environments influence individual fitness, acting additionally and independently. These findings demonstrate that helpers have both short- and long-term effects on dominant female Alpine marmots and that the social environment at the time of birth can play a key role in shaping individual fitness in social vertebrates. PMID:26246552

  18. No Generalization of Practice for Nonzero Simple Addition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jamie I. D.; Beech, Leah C.

    2014-01-01

    Several types of converging evidence have suggested recently that skilled adults solve very simple addition problems (e.g., 2 + 1, 4 + 2) using a fast, unconscious counting algorithm. These results stand in opposition to the long-held assumption in the cognitive arithmetic literature that such simple addition problems normally are solved by fact…

  19. 14 CFR 65.123 - Additional type ratings: Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Parachute Riggers § 65.123 Additional type ratings: Requirements. A certificated parachute rigger who applies for an additional type rating must— (a) Present evidence satisfactory to the Administrator that he has packed at least 20...

  20. 14 CFR 65.123 - Additional type ratings: Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Parachute Riggers § 65.123 Additional type ratings: Requirements. A certificated parachute rigger who applies for an additional type rating must— (a) Present evidence satisfactory to the Administrator that he has packed at least 20...

  1. 14 CFR 65.123 - Additional type ratings: Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Parachute Riggers § 65.123 Additional type ratings: Requirements. A certificated parachute rigger who applies for an additional type rating must— (a) Present evidence satisfactory to the Administrator that he has packed at least 20...

  2. 14 CFR 65.123 - Additional type ratings: Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Parachute Riggers § 65.123 Additional type ratings: Requirements. A certificated parachute rigger who applies for an additional type rating must— (a) Present evidence satisfactory to the Administrator that he has packed at least 20...

  3. 14 CFR 65.123 - Additional type ratings: Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Parachute Riggers § 65.123 Additional type ratings: Requirements. A certificated parachute rigger who applies for an additional type rating must— (a) Present evidence satisfactory to the Administrator that he has packed at least 20...

  4. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  5. Additive Effects on Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Wangsheng; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-23

    This review highlights a number of additives that can be used to make asymmetric reactions perfect. Without changing other reaction conditions, simply adding additives can lead to improved asymmetric catalysis, such as reduced reaction time, improved yield, or/and increased selectivity.

  6. The Wnt Target Protein Peter Pan Defines a Novel p53-independent Nucleolar Stress-Response Pathway.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Astrid S; Keil, Marina; Kühl, Michael

    2015-04-24

    Proper ribosome formation is a prerequisite for cell growth and proliferation. Failure of this process results in nucleolar stress and p53-mediated apoptosis. The Wnt target Peter Pan (PPAN) is required for 45 S rRNA maturation. So far, the role of PPAN in nucleolar stress response has remained elusive. We demonstrate that PPAN localizes to mitochondria in addition to its nucleolar localization and inhibits the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in a p53-independent manner. Loss of PPAN induces BAX stabilization, depolarization of mitochondria, and release of cytochrome c, demonstrating its important role as an anti-apoptotic factor. Staurosporine-induced nucleolar stress and apoptosis disrupt nucleolar PPAN localization and induce its accumulation in the cytoplasm. This is accompanied by phosphorylation and subsequent cleavage of PPAN by caspases. Moreover, we show that PPAN is a novel interaction partner of the anti-apoptotic protein nucleophosmin (NPM). PPAN depletion induces NPM and upstream-binding factor (UBF) degradation, which is independent of caspases. In summary, we provide evidence for a novel nucleolar stress-response pathway involving PPAN, NPM, and BAX to guarantee cell survival in a p53-independent manner.

  7. The alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin induces prostate cancer cell death through a p53 and Rb independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kexin; Wang, Xianghong; Ling, Patrick M T; Tsao, S W; Wong, Y C

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Treatment failure in prostate cancer is usually due to the development of androgen independence and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs at an advanced stage. Recently, it was reported that the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin was able to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth and indicated that it may have an implication in the treatment of prostate cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in terazosin-induced prostate cancer cell death using two androgen-independent cell lines, PC-3 and DU145. Our results showed that terazosin inhibited not only prostate cancer cell growth but also colony forming ability, which is the main target of chemotherapy. We also found that the sensitivity of these cells to terazosin was not affected by the presence of either functional p53 or Rb, suggesting that the terazosin-induced cell death was independent of p53 and Rb. However, the terazosin-induced cell death was associated with G1 phase cell cycle arrest and up-regulation of p27KIP1. In addition, up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 was also observed indicating that these two apoptotic regulators may play important roles in terazosin-mediated cell death pathway. Our results provide evidence for the first time that terazosin may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  8. Hybrid speciation and independent evolution in lineages of alpine butterflies.

    PubMed

    Nice, Chris C; Gompert, Zachariah; Fordyce, James A; Forister, Matthew L; Lucas, Lauren K; Buerkle, C Alex

    2013-04-01

    The power of hybridization between species to generate variation and fuel adaptation is poorly understood despite long-standing interest. There is, however, increasing evidence that hybridization often generates biodiversity, including via hybrid speciation. We tested the hypothesis of hybrid speciation in butterflies occupying extreme, high-altitude habitats in four mountain ranges in western North America with an explicit, probabilistic model, and genome-wide DNA sequence data. Using this approach, in concert with ecological experiments and observations and morphological data, we document three lineages of hybrid origin. These lineages have different genome admixture proportions and distinctive trait combinations that suggest unique and independent evolutionary histories.

  9. Independent origins of middle ear bones in monotremes and therians.

    PubMed

    Rich, Thomas H; Hopson, James A; Musser, Anne M; Flannery, Timothy F; Vickers-Rich, Patricia

    2005-02-11

    A dentary of the oldest known monotreme, the Early Cretaceous Teinolophos trusleri, has an internal mandibular trough, which in outgroups to mammals houses accessory jaw bones, and probable contact facets for angular, coronoid, and splenial bones. Certain of these accessory bones were detached from the mandible to become middle ear bones in mammals. Evidence that the angular (homologous with the mammalian ectotympanic) and the articular and prearticular (homologous with the mammalian malleus) bones retained attachment to the lower jaw in a basal monotreme indicates that the definitive mammalian middle ear evolved independently in living monotremes and therians (marsupials and placentals).

  10. Additively manufactured metallic pentamode meta-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayati, R.; Leeflang, A. M.; Zadpoor, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual mechanical properties that originate from their topological design. Pentamode metamaterials are particularly interesting because they could be designed to possess any thermodynamically admissible elasticity tensor. In this study, we additively manufacture the metallic pentamode metamaterials from a biocompatible and mechanically strong titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) using an energy distribution method developed for the powder bed fusion techniques. The mechanical properties of the developed materials were a few orders of magnitude higher than those of the similar topologies fabricated previously from polymers. Moreover, the elastic modulus and yield stress of the presented pentamode metamaterials were decoupled from their relative density, meaning that the metallic meta-biomaterials with independently tailored elastic and mass transport (permeability) properties could be designed for tissue regeneration purposes.

  11. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, T.; Zuback, J. S.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2016-01-01

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is used to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. The findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts. PMID:26796864

  12. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, T.; Zuback, J. S.; de, A.; Debroy, T.

    2016-01-01

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is used to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. The findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts.

  13. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, T; Zuback, J S; De, A; DebRoy, T

    2016-01-22

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is used to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. The findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts.

  14. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, T.; Zuback, J. S.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2016-01-22

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is used to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. Here, the findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts.

  15. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Mukherjee, T.; Zuback, J. S.; De, A.; ...

    2016-01-22

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is usedmore » to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. Here, the findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts.« less

  16. Teaching the Declaration of Independence. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, John J.

    The Declaration of Independence is the founding document of the United States. It is part of the social studies core curriculum in U.S. schools. By the time they graduate from high school, students are expected to know the main ideas in the Declaration of Independence and their significance. This digest discusses: (1) the origins of the…

  17. The Public Stake in Independent Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lawrence

    The importance of higher education in providing the skilled labor force needed to respond to changing technologies; the cost-efficiency of independent higher education; and implications for government, industry, and independent higher education are considered. The most readily changing technologies include computers and electronics, satellite…

  18. 33 CFR 159.93 - Independent supporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Independent supporting. 159.93 Section 159.93 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.93 Independent supporting....

  19. 33 CFR 159.93 - Independent supporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Independent supporting. 159.93 Section 159.93 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.93 Independent supporting....

  20. 33 CFR 159.93 - Independent supporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Independent supporting. 159.93 Section 159.93 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.93 Independent supporting....

  1. 33 CFR 159.93 - Independent supporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Independent supporting. 159.93 Section 159.93 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.93 Independent supporting....

  2. 33 CFR 159.93 - Independent supporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Independent supporting. 159.93 Section 159.93 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.93 Independent supporting....

  3. Hiring and Retaining Great Independent School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balossi, Matt; Hernández, Natalie R.

    2016-01-01

    While numerous studies measure teacher effectiveness in public schools, there is little research on teacher quality among independent schools. In fact, the topic of teacher quality in public schools receives widespread media coverage, funding, and special interest. In order to better understand how independent schools describe high-quality…

  4. 38 CFR 46.8 - Independent contractors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Independent contractors... contractors. Independent contractors acting on behalf of the Department of Veterans Affairs are subject to the... provide the contractor with notice that a report of a clinical privileges action will be filed with...

  5. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Independence. 62.30-5 Section 62.30-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION Reliability and Safety Criteria, All Automated Vital Systems § 62.30-5 Independence. (a) Single...

  6. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Independence. 62.30-5 Section 62.30-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION Reliability and Safety Criteria, All Automated Vital Systems § 62.30-5 Independence. (a) Single...

  7. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Independence. 62.30-5 Section 62.30-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION Reliability and Safety Criteria, All Automated Vital Systems § 62.30-5 Independence. (a) Single...

  8. The Independent Living Behavior Checklist: Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walls, Richard T.; And Others

    The document describes independent living skills, and provides information on how they can be measured. It is explained in an introductory chapter that the checklist is an extensive list of 343 independent living skill objectives specified in terms of conditions (antecedents or givens), behaviors, and standards. Objectives are classified and…

  9. 29 CFR 785.30 - Independent training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Independent training. 785.30 Section 785.30 Labor... POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS HOURS WORKED Application of Principles Lectures, Meetings and Training Programs § 785.30 Independent training. Of course, if an employee on...

  10. 29 CFR 785.30 - Independent training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Independent training. 785.30 Section 785.30 Labor... POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS HOURS WORKED Application of Principles Lectures, Meetings and Training Programs § 785.30 Independent training. Of course, if an employee on...

  11. 29 CFR 785.30 - Independent training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Independent training. 785.30 Section 785.30 Labor... POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS HOURS WORKED Application of Principles Lectures, Meetings and Training Programs § 785.30 Independent training. Of course, if an employee on...

  12. 29 CFR 785.30 - Independent training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Independent training. 785.30 Section 785.30 Labor... POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS HOURS WORKED Application of Principles Lectures, Meetings and Training Programs § 785.30 Independent training. Of course, if an employee on...

  13. The New Marketing Handbook for Independent Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boarding Schools, Boston, MA.

    Planning coherent, relevant marketing strategies is crucial to the survival of independent education in the United States. This handbook was created for independent school marketers; principals; and development, publications, public relations, and admissions directors. It offers checklists, sidebars, callouts, and summaries that focus on…

  14. 12 CFR 34.45 - Appraiser independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appraiser independence. 34.45 Section 34.45 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REAL ESTATE LENDING AND APPRAISALS Appraisals § 34.45 Appraiser independence. (a) Staff appraisers. If an appraisal is prepared by...

  15. 12 CFR 34.45 - Appraiser independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appraiser independence. 34.45 Section 34.45 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REAL ESTATE LENDING AND APPRAISALS Appraisals § 34.45 Appraiser independence. (a) Staff appraisers. If an appraisal is prepared by...

  16. 12 CFR 34.45 - Appraiser independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appraiser independence. 34.45 Section 34.45 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REAL ESTATE LENDING AND APPRAISALS Appraisals § 34.45 Appraiser independence. (a) Staff appraisers. If an appraisal is prepared by...

  17. 12 CFR 34.45 - Appraiser independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appraiser independence. 34.45 Section 34.45 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REAL ESTATE LENDING AND APPRAISALS Appraisals § 34.45 Appraiser independence. (a) Staff appraisers. If an appraisal is prepared by...

  18. 12 CFR 34.45 - Appraiser independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appraiser independence. 34.45 Section 34.45 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REAL ESTATE LENDING AND APPRAISALS Appraisals § 34.45 Appraiser independence. (a) Staff appraisers. If an appraisal is prepared by...

  19. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Independence. 62.30-5 Section 62.30-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION Reliability and Safety Criteria, All Automated Vital Systems § 62.30-5 Independence. (a) Single...

  20. Teacher's Guide to Independence National Historical Park.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Philadelphia, PA. Independence National Historical Park.

    Independence National Historical Park, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is operated by the National Park Service. The park was authorized by an Act of Congress on June 28, 1948, and formally established on July 4, 1956. The mission of Independence National Historical Park is to preserve its stories, buildings, and artifacts as a source of…

  1. Accounting for Independent Schools. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Independent Schools, Boston, MA.

    This is a thoroughly revised edition of the 1969 publication, "Accounting for Independent Schools," a guide that attempted to codify basic accounting principles and practices for specific application to independent schools. The focus of the second edition is more on refining practices than on initiating them, and more on extending the managerial…

  2. Independence and Community in Our Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallery, David

    During the past few years a new trend in day to day schooling has developed, namely independent studies, that involves learning experience between people. This monograph presents the idea that there is a relation between independence in school programs and a desire for "community" (the coming-together of people) which is mutually nourishing.…

  3. 29 CFR 785.30 - Independent training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Independent training. 785.30 Section 785.30 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL... Lectures, Meetings and Training Programs § 785.30 Independent training. Of course, if an employee on...

  4. Quantum Interference between independent environments in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne; Lukin, Mikhail

    2014-03-01

    When a general quantum system interacts with multiple environments, the environmental effects are usually treated in an additive manner in the master equation. This assumption becomes questionable for non-Markovian environments that have finite memory times. Here, we show that quantum interferences between independent environments exist and can qualitatively modify the dynamics of the reduced physical system. We illustrate this effect with examples of atomic systems coupled to structured reservoirs, and discuss its origin in general using a non-equilibrium diagrammatic technique. The consequential decoherence dynamics cannot be captured by an additive master equation.

  5. Immunochip analyses identify a novel risk locus for primary biliary cirrhosis at 13q14, multiple independent associations at four established risk loci and epistasis between 1p31 and 7q32 risk variants.

    PubMed

    Juran, Brian D; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Invernizzi, Pietro; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Li, Yafang; Xie, Gang; Kosoy, Roman; Ransom, Michael; Sun, Ye; Bianchi, Ilaria; Schlicht, Erik M; Lleo, Ana; Coltescu, Catalina; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Podda, Mauro; Lammert, Craig; Shigeta, Russell; Chan, Landon L; Balschun, Tobias; Marconi, Maurizio; Cusi, Daniele; Heathcote, E Jenny; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Odin, Joseph A; Luketic, Velimir A; Bacon, Bruce R; Bodenheimer, Henry C; Liakina, Valentina; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Franke, Andre; Gregersen, Peter K; Bossa, Fabrizio; Gershwin, M Eric; deAndrade, Mariza; Amos, Christopher I; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Seldin, Michael F; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2012-12-01

    To further characterize the genetic basis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), we genotyped 2426 PBC patients and 5731 unaffected controls from three independent cohorts using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array (Immunochip) enriched for autoimmune disease risk loci. Meta-analysis of the genotype data sets identified a novel disease-associated locus near the TNFSF11 gene at 13q14, provided evidence for association at six additional immune-related loci not previously implicated in PBC and confirmed associations at 19 of 22 established risk loci. Results of conditional analyses also provided evidence for multiple independent association signals at four risk loci, with haplotype analyses suggesting independent SNP effects at the 2q32 and 16p13 loci, but complex haplotype driven effects at the 3q25 and 6p21 loci. By imputing classical HLA alleles from this data set, four class II alleles independently contributing to the association signal from this region were identified. Imputation of genotypes at the non-HLA loci also provided additional associations, but none with stronger effects than the genotyped variants. An epistatic interaction between the IL12RB2 risk locus at 1p31and the IRF5 risk locus at 7q32 was also identified and suggests a complementary effect of these loci in predisposing to disease. These data expand the repertoire of genes with potential roles in PBC pathogenesis that need to be explored by follow-up biological studies.

  6. Statistical mechanics of maximal independent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo; Ramezanpour, Abolfazl

    2009-12-01

    The graph theoretic concept of maximal independent set arises in several practical problems in computer science as well as in game theory. A maximal independent set is defined by the set of occupied nodes that satisfy some packing and covering constraints. It is known that finding minimum and maximum-density maximal independent sets are hard optimization problems. In this paper, we use cavity method of statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the corresponding constraint satisfaction problem on random graphs. We obtain the entropy of maximal independent sets within the replica symmetric and one-step replica symmetry breaking frameworks, shedding light on the metric structure of the landscape of solutions and suggesting a class of possible algorithms. This is of particular relevance for the application to the study of strategic interactions in social and economic networks, where maximal independent sets correspond to pure Nash equilibria of a graphical game of public goods allocation.

  7. 9. March 1960 FRONT ROOM OF THE ADDITION BUILT BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. March 1960 FRONT ROOM OF THE ADDITION BUILT BY JOHN RUSSELL POPE FACING ON MOUNT VERNON PLACE. THIS WAS EITHER A LIBRARY OR A ROOM FOR DISPLAYING TROPHIES OR OBJETS D'ART. THE VIEW IS LOOKING SOUTH, THROUGH A STAIRCASE HALL, TO THE THEATER OR BALLROOM - Garrett-Jacobs House, 7, 9, 11, 13 West Mount Vernon Place, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  8. 5. March 1960 ROOM IN BASEMENT OF THE ADDITION BUILT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. March 1960 ROOM IN BASEMENT OF THE ADDITION BUILT BY JOHN RUSSELL POPE, SUPPER ROOM, LOOKING NORTH 9I.E. IN THE DIRECTION OF MOUNT VERNON PLACE) - Garrett-Jacobs House, 7, 9, 11, 13 West Mount Vernon Place, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  9. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  10. Independent Passive Mechanical Behavior of Bovine Extraocular Muscle Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew; Yoo, Lawrence; Chaudhuri, Zia; Demer, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Intramuscular innervation of horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is segregated into superior and inferior (transverse) compartments, while all EOMs are also divided into global (GL) and orbital (OL) layers with scleral and pulley insertions, respectively. We sought evidence of potential independent action by examining passive mechanical coupling between EOM compartments. Methods. Putative compartments of each of the six whole bovine anatomical EOMs were separately clamped to a physiologically controlled, dual channel microtensile load cell (5-mN force resolution) driven by independent, high-speed, linear motors having 20-nm position resolution. One channel at a time was extended or retracted by 3 to 5 mm, with the other channel stationary. Fiducials distributed on the EOM global surface enabled optical tracking of local deformation. Loading rates of 5 to 100 mm/sec were applied to explore speeds from slow vergence to saccades. Control loadings employed transversely loaded EOM and isotropic latex. Results. All EOM bellies and tendons exhibited substantial compartmental independence when loaded in the physiologic direction, both between OL and GL, and for arbitrary transverse parsings of EOM width ranging from 60%:40% to 80%:20%. Intercompartmental force coupling in the physiologic direction was less than or equal to 10% in all six EOMS even for saccadic loading rates. Coupling was much higher for nonphysiologic transverse EOM loading and isotropic latex. Optical tracking demonstrated independent strain distribution between EOM compartments. Conclusions. Substantial mechanical independence exists among physiologically loaded fiber bundles in bovine EOMs and tendons, providing biomechanical support for the proposal that differential compartmental function in horizontal rectus EOMs contributes to novel torsional and vertical actions. PMID:23188730

  11. Political attitudes develop independently of personality traits.

    PubMed

    Hatemi, Peter K; Verhulst, Brad

    2015-01-01

    The primary assumption within the recent personality and political orientations literature is that personality traits cause people to develop political attitudes. In contrast, research relying on traditional psychological and developmental theories suggests the relationship between most personality dimensions and political orientations are either not significant or weak. Research from behavioral genetics suggests the covariance between personality and political preferences is not causal, but due to a common, latent genetic factor that mutually influences both. The contradictory assumptions and findings from these research streams have yet to be resolved. This is in part due to the reliance on cross-sectional data and the lack of longitudinal genetically informative data. Here, using two independent longitudinal genetically informative samples, we examine the joint development of personality traits and attitude dimensions to explore the underlying causal mechanisms that drive the relationship between these features and provide a first step in resolving the causal question. We find change in personality over a ten-year period does not predict change in political attitudes, which does not support a causal relationship between personality traits and political attitudes as is frequently assumed. Rather, political attitudes are often more stable than the key personality traits assumed to be predicting them. Finally, the results from our genetic models find that no additional variance is accounted for by the causal pathway from personality traits to political attitudes. Our findings remain consistent with the original construction of the five-factor model of personality and developmental theories on attitude formation, but challenge recent work in this area.

  12. Political Attitudes Develop Independently of Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Hatemi, Peter K.; Verhulst, Brad

    2015-01-01

    The primary assumption within the recent personality and political orientations literature is that personality traits cause people to develop political attitudes. In contrast, research relying on traditional psychological and developmental theories suggests the relationship between most personality dimensions and political orientations are either not significant or weak. Research from behavioral genetics suggests the covariance between personality and political preferences is not causal, but due to a common, latent genetic factor that mutually influences both. The contradictory assumptions and findings from these research streams have yet to be resolved. This is in part due to the reliance on cross-sectional data and the lack of longitudinal genetically informative data. Here, using two independent longitudinal genetically informative samples, we examine the joint development of personality traits and attitude dimensions to explore the underlying causal mechanisms that drive the relationship between these features and provide a first step in resolving the causal question. We find change in personality over a ten-year period does not predict change in political attitudes, which does not support a causal relationship between personality traits and political attitudes as is frequently assumed. Rather, political attitudes are often more stable than the key personality traits assumed to be predicting them. Finally, the results from our genetic models find that no additional variance is accounted for by the causal pathway from personality traits to political attitudes. Our findings remain consistent with the original construction of the five-factor model of personality and developmental theories on attitude formation, but challenge recent work in this area. PMID:25734580

  13. Human skin: an independent peripheral endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C

    2000-01-01

    The historical picture of the endocrine system as a set of discrete hormone-producing organs has been substituted by organs regarded as organized communities in which the cells emit, receive and coordinate molecular signals from established endocrine organs, other distant sources, their neighbors, and themselves. In this wide sense, the human skin and its tissues are targets as well as producers of hormones. Although the role of hormones in the development of human skin and its capacity to produce and release hormones are well established, little attention has been drawn to the ability of human skin to fulfil the requirements of a classic endocrine organ. Indeed, human skin cells produce insulin-like growth factors and -binding proteins, propiomelanocortin derivatives, catecholamines, steroid hormones and vitamin D from cholesterol, retinoids from diet carotenoids, and eicosanoids from fatty acids. Hormones exert their biological effects on the skin through interaction with high-affinity receptors, such as receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, steroid hormones and thyroid hormones. In addition, the human skin is able to metabolize hormones and to activate and inactivate them. These steps are overtaken in most cases by different skin cell populations in a coordinated way indicating the endocrine autonomy of the skin. Characteristic examples are the metabolic pathways of the corticotropin-releasing hormone/propiomelanocortin axis, steroidogenesis, vitamin D, and retinoids. Hormones exhibit a wide range of biological activities on the skin, with major effects caused by growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, neuropeptides, sex steroids, glucocorticoids, retinoids, vitamin D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands, and eicosanoids. At last, human skin produces hormones which are released in the circulation and are important for functions of the entire organism, such as sex hormones, especially in aged individuals, and insulin-like growth

  14. Multisensory integration is independent of perceived simultaneity.

    PubMed

    Harrar, Vanessa; Harris, Laurence R; Spence, Charles

    2017-03-01

    The importance of multisensory integration for perception and action has long been recognised. Integrating information from individual senses increases the chance of survival by reducing the variability in the incoming signals, thus allowing us to respond more rapidly. Reaction times (RTs) are fastest when the components of the multisensory signals are simultaneous. This response facilitation is traditionally attributed to multisensory integration. However, it is unclear if facilitation of RTs occurs when stimuli are perceived as synchronous or are actually physically synchronous. Repeated exposure to audiovisual asynchrony can change the delay at which multisensory stimuli are perceived as simultaneous, thus changing the delay at which the stimuli are integrated-perceptually. Here we set out to determine how such changes in multisensory integration for perception affect our ability to respond to multisensory events. If stimuli perceived as simultaneous were reacted to most rapidly, it would suggest a common system for multisensory integration for perception and action. If not, it would suggest separate systems. We measured RTs to auditory, visual, and audiovisual stimuli following exposure to audiovisual asynchrony. Exposure affected the variability of the unisensory RT distributions; in particular, the slowest RTs were either speed up or slowed down (in the direction predicted from shifts in perceived simultaneity). Additionally, the multisensory facilitation of RTs (beyond statistical summation) only occurred when audiovisual onsets were physically synchronous, rather than when they appeared simultaneous. We conclude that the perception of synchrony is therefore independent of multisensory integration and suggest a division between multisensory processes that are fast (automatic and unaffected by temporal adaptation) and those that are slow (perceptually driven and adaptable).

  15. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  16. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... SNIPEND SNIPSTART Find A Radiation Oncologist SNIPEND Additional Treatment Options SNIPSTART A A SNIPEND Chemotherapy Medicines prescribed ... such as antibodies, to fight cancer. Novel Targeted Therapies Cancer doctors now know much more about how ...

  17. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  18. Food additives and preschool children.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Danika M; McNulty, Breige A; Nugent, Anne P; Gibney, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Food additives have been used throughout history to perform specific functions in foods. A comprehensive framework of legislation is in place within Europe to control the use of additives in the food supply and ensure they pose no risk to human health. Further to this, exposure assessments are regularly carried out to monitor population intakes and verify that intakes are not above acceptable levels (acceptable daily intakes). Young children may have a higher dietary exposure to chemicals than adults due to a combination of rapid growth rates and distinct food intake patterns. For this reason, exposure assessments are particularly important in this age group. The paper will review the use of additives and exposure assessment methods and examine factors that affect dietary exposure by young children. One of the most widely investigated unfavourable health effects associated with food additive intake in preschool-aged children are suggested adverse behavioural effects. Research that has examined this relationship has reported a variety of responses, with many noting an increase in hyperactivity as reported by parents but not when assessed using objective examiners. This review has examined the experimental approaches used in such studies and suggests that efforts are needed to standardise objective methods of measuring behaviour in preschool children. Further to this, a more holistic approach to examining food additive intakes by preschool children is advisable, where overall exposure is considered rather than focusing solely on behavioural effects and possibly examining intakes of food additives other than food colours.

  19. Neuroimage evidence and the insanity defense.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, N J; Saks, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of neuroscientific evidence in criminal trials has given rise to fears that neuroimagery presented by an expert witness might inordinately influence jurors' evaluations of the defendant. In this experiment, a diverse sample of 1,170 community members from throughout the U.S. evaluated a written mock trial in which psychological, neuropsychological, neuroscientific, and neuroimage-based expert evidence was presented in support of a not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) defense. No evidence of an independent influence of neuroimagery was found. Overall, neuroscience-based evidence was found to be more persuasive than psychological and anecdotal family history evidence. These effects were consistent across different insanity standards. Despite the non-influence of neuroimagery, however, jurors who were not provided with a neuroimage indicated that they believed neuroimagery would have been the most helpful kind of evidence in their evaluations of the defendant.

  20. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting.

  1. Telomerase recruitment requires both TCAB1 and Cajal bodies independently.

    PubMed

    Stern, J Lewis; Zyner, Katherine G; Pickett, Hilda A; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2012-07-01

    The ability of most cancer cells to grow indefinitely relies on the enzyme telomerase and its recruitment to telomeres. In human cells, recruitment depends on the Cajal body RNA chaperone TCAB1 binding to the RNA subunit of telomerase (hTR) and is also thought to rely on an N-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit, hTERT. We demonstrate that coilin, an essential structural component of Cajal bodies, is required for endogenous telomerase recruitment to telomeres but that overexpression of telomerase can compensate for Cajal body absence. In contrast, recruitment of telomerase was sensitive to levels of TCAB1, and this was not rescued by overexpression of telomerase. Thus, although Cajal bodies are important for recruitment, TCAB1 has an additional role in this process that is independent of these structures. TCAB1 itself localizes to telomeres in a telomerase-dependent but Cajal body-independent manner. We identify a point mutation in hTERT that largely abolishes recruitment yet does not affect association of telomerase with TCAB1, suggesting that this region mediates recruitment by an independent mechanism. Our results demonstrate that telomerase has multiple independent requirements for recruitment to telomeres and that the function of TCAB1 is to directly transport telomerase to telomeres.

  2. CdiA promotes receptor-independent intercellular adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ruhe, Zachary C; Townsley, Loni; Wallace, Adam B; King, Andrew; Van der Woude, Marjan W; Low, David A; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Hayes, Christopher S

    2015-10-01

    CdiB/CdiA proteins mediate inter-bacterial competition in a process termed contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI). Filamentous CdiA exoproteins extend from CDI(+) cells and bind specific receptors to deliver toxins into susceptible target bacteria. CDI has also been implicated in auto-aggregation and biofilm formation in several species, but the contribution of CdiA-receptor interactions to these multi-cellular behaviors has not been examined. Using Escherichia coli isolate EC93 as a model, we show that cdiA and bamA receptor mutants are defective in biofilm formation, suggesting a prominent role for CdiA-BamA mediated cell-cell adhesion. However, CdiA also promotes auto-aggregation in a BamA-independent manner, indicating that the exoprotein possesses an additional adhesin activity. Cells must express CdiA in order to participate in BamA-independent aggregates, suggesting that adhesion could be mediated by homotypic CdiA-CdiA interactions. The BamA-dependent and BamA-independent interaction domains map to distinct regions within the CdiA filament. Thus, CdiA orchestrates a collective behavior that is independent of its growth-inhibition activity. This adhesion should enable 'greenbeard' discrimination, in which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate with one another based on a single shared trait. This kind-selective social behavior could provide immediate fitness benefits to bacteria that acquire the systems through horizontal gene transfer.

  3. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  4. Additional factors in chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Cullen, K J; Elder, J; Adams, A R; Stenhouse, N S

    1970-02-14

    A review of persons with chronic bronchitis and controls without bronchitis showed several irritants around the home that aggravated cough, such as house dust, flowers and grasses, smoke, strong fumes, hair spray, insecticide, and soap powders. Most subjects with bronchitis were affected by exposure to one or more of these irritants for at least once a day for three months of the year or more. Out of 163 subjects with chronic bronchitis only six non-smokers were free of factors associated with pulmonary irritation. This evidence from non-smokers not exposed to air pollution adds further strength to the hypothesis that daily phlegm is caused by persistent inhalation of irritants.

  5. Materialism, status consumption, and consumer independence.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Ronald Earl; Clark, Ronald A

    2012-01-01

    Materialism influences many people. We focus on two aspects of this influence: reactions to prestige products and to the influence of others. A study of 187 U.S. student consumers shows that materialism is positively related to buying products that confer status. In contrast, materialism is negatively related to consumer independence, an enduring tendency to pay minimal attention to the prescribed norms of other consumers and to make product and brand decisions according to personal preferences. Consuming products for status is also negatively related to consumer independence. Moreover, the association between materialism and consumer independence is completely mediated by consuming for status. Materialism urges consumers to be status conscious so that they follow social norms in purchasing, but seeking status through goods is avoided by less materialistic, independent consumers. A second study (n = 258) also using student consumers confirmed these results.

  6. Prompting Sequences in Teaching Independent Living Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walls, Richard T.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The effects of three prompting sequences on the acquisition of independent living skills with 14 mild and moderately mentally retarded vocational rehabilitation clients (16 to 50 years old) are examined. (Author)

  7. Geometry independence of three-string vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Masahiro

    1989-01-01

    The geometry independence of three-string vertices in both HIKKO's and Witten's string field theories is examined. A careful regularization shows that the anomaly which has been reported by Morris and Mañes vanishes.

  8. The Isle of Independent Study: A Parable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Cathy; Norberg, Carol M.

    1982-01-01

    The author mentions Project THINK (Tapping Heuristic Intelligence for New Knowledge) and describes the Isle of Independent Study, a seven-step procedure designed in the form of a map for use with upper elementary gifted students. (SB)

  9. Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, which aims to increase U.S. energy security, develop renewable energy production, and improve vehicle fuel economy.

  10. Natural Products: An Independent Study Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Roger W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Described is an independent study project for students in chemistry at New College, Sarasota, Florida. Six students collected and analyzed local plants to determine content of alkaloids, terpenes, and flavonoids. (RH)

  11. Residential independence of elderly immigrants in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sharon M; Edmonston, Barry

    2014-12-01

    This article addresses three questions: Are elderly immigrants less likely than Canadian-born elderly people to reside independently? What are the effects of economic, cultural, and life course factors on residential independence among elderly immigrants? What are the effects of immigrant-specific characteristics such as duration of residence and cultural background? Descriptive results show that elderly immigrants are less likely to reside independently, but the large gap of over 15 per cent is reduced to 5 per cent once economic, cultural, life course, and other factors are considered in the multivariate analysis. Effects of economic, cultural, and life course factors are mostly as expected, as are those of immigrant-specific characteristics such as duration of residence. Although aging immigrants have more-varied living arrangements than their Canadian-born peers, these are likely to increasingly include residential independence.

  12. List of Independent Commercial Importers (ICIs)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a list of Independent Commercial Importers (ICIs) who currently hold a valid certificate of conformity from EPA allowing importation of certain nonconforming vehicles into the United States. (EPA publication # EPA-420-F-13-036)

  13. Energy Independent Agri-Business Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Niday, Karen

    2011-01-30

    Establish and showcase energy independence at a small to medium scale farm by installing renewable energy equipment that will enable an agribusiness to survive using only energy that is generated onsite

  14. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  15. Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks. 2015 Letter Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Conner, Carol E. H.; Masys, Daniel R.; Liverman, Catharyn T.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has requested a study from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to provide an independent review of more than 30 evidence reports on human health risks for long duration and exploration spaceflight. The evidence reports, which are publicly available, are categorized into five broad categories: (1) behavioral health and performance; (2) human health countermeasures (with a focus on bone metabolism and orthopedics, nutrition, immunology, and cardiac and pulmonary physiology); (3) radiation; (4) human factors issues; and (5) exploration medical capabilities. The reports are revised on an ongoing basis to incorporate new scientific information. In conducting this study, an IOM ad hoc committee will build on the 2008 IOM report Review of NASA's Human Research Program Evidence Books. That report provided an assessment of the process used for developing the evidence reports and provided an initial review of the evidence reports that had been completed at that time. Each year, NASA staff will identify a set of evidence reports for committee review. Over the course of the study all evidence reports will be reviewed. The committee will hold an annual scientific workshop to receive input on the evidence reports it is reviewing that year and an update on the recent literature. The committee will issue an annual letter report that addresses the following questions relevant to each evidence report: 1. Does the evidence report provide sufficient evidence, as well as sufficient risk context, that the risk is of concern for long-term space missions? 2. Does the evidence report make the case for the research gaps presented? 3. Are there any additional gaps in knowledge or areas of fundamental research that should be considered to enhance the basic understanding of this specific risk? 4. Does the evidence report address relevant interactions among risks? 5. Is input from additional disciplines needed? 6. Is the breadth of the cited literature sufficient? 7. What is the overall

  16. Superresolving multiphoton interferences with independent light sources.

    PubMed

    Oppel, S; Büttner, T; Kok, P; von Zanthier, J

    2012-12-07

    We propose to use multiphoton interferences from statistically independent light sources in combination with linear optical detection techniques to enhance the resolution in imaging. Experimental results with up to five independent thermal light sources confirm this approach to improve the spatial resolution. Since no involved quantum state preparation or detection is required, the experiment can be considered an extension of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiment for spatial intensity correlations of order N>2.

  17. Independence Day for IgA.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Andrew J; McCoy, Kathy D

    2015-09-15

    IgA is induced through T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways. In this issue, Bunker et al. (2015) now show that the T-cell-independent pathway is sufficient to coat most small intestinal microbes specifically, and Fransen et al. (2015) find that IgA coating promotes uptake of microbes into Peyer's patches and drives further induction in a positive-feedback loop.

  18. No additional value of fusion techniques on anterior discectomy for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Ostelo, Raymond; van Tulder, Maurits W; Peul, Wilco; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to assess the effects of additional fusion on surgical interventions to the cervical spine for patients with neck pain with or without radiculopathy or myelopathy by performing a systematic review. The search strategy outlined by the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG) was followed. The primary search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL and PEDro up to June 2011. Only randomised, controlled trials of adults with neck pain that evaluated at least one clinically relevant primary outcome measure (pain, functional status, recovery) were included. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias by using the criteria recommended by the CBRG and extracted the data. Data were pooled using a random effects model. The quality of the evidence was rated using the GRADE method. In total, 10 randomised, controlled trials were identified comparing additional fusion upon anterior decompression techniques, including 2 studies with a low risk of bias. Results revealed no clinically relevant differences in recovery: the pooled risk difference in the short-term follow-up was -0.06 (95% confidence interval -0.22 to 0.10) and -0.07 (95% confidence interval -0.14 to 0.00) in the long-term follow-up. Pooled risk differences for pain and return to work all demonstrated no differences. There is no additional benefit of fusion techniques applied within an anterior discectomy procedure on pain, recovery and return to work.

  19. NASA 2010 Pharmacology Evidence Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Institute of Medicine reviewed NASA's Human Research Program Evidence in assessing the Pharmacology risk identified in NASA's Human Research Program Requirements Document (PRD). Since this review there was a major reorganization of the Pharmacology discipline within the HRP, as well as a re-evaluation of the Pharmacology evidence. This panel is being asked to review the latest version of the Pharmacology Evidence Report. Specifically, this panel will: (1) Appraise the descriptions of the human health-related risk in the HRP PRD. (2) Assess the relevance and comprehensiveness of the evidence in identifying potential threats to long-term space missions. (3) Assess the associated gaps in knowledge and identify additional areas for research as necessary.

  20. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)