Science.gov

Sample records for additional input parameters

  1. CASIM input parameters for various materials

    SciTech Connect

    Malensek, A.J.; Elwyn, A.J.

    1994-07-14

    During the past year, the computer program CASIM has been placed in a common area from which copies can be obtained by a wide array of users. The impetus for this arrangement was the need to have a standard code that could be maintained and transported to other platforms. In addition, an historical record would be kept of each version as the program evolved. CASIM requires a series of parameters (input by the user) that describe the medium in which the cascade develops. Presently a total of 9 materials can be defined. Occasions arise when one needs to know the properties of materials (elements, compounds, and mixtures) that have not been defined. Because it is desirable to have a uniform set of values for all CASIM users, this note presents a methodology for obtaining the input parameters for an arbitrary material. They are read in by the Subroutine CASIM{underscore}PROG from the user supplied file CASIM.DAT.

  2. Input Type and Parameter Resetting: Is Naturalistic Input Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Iverson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that extended exposure to naturalistic input provides L2 learners with more of an opportunity to converge of target morphosyntactic competence as compared to classroom-only environments, given that the former provide more positive evidence of less salient linguistic properties than the latter (e.g., Isabelli 2004). Implicitly,…

  3. Investigation of RADTRAN Stop Model input parameters for truck stops

    SciTech Connect

    Griego, N.R.; Smith, J.D.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1996-03-01

    RADTRAN is a computer code for estimating the risks and consequences as transport of radioactive materials (RAM). RADTRAN was developed and is maintained by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy (DOE). For incident-free transportation, the dose to persons exposed while the shipment is stopped is frequently a major percentage of the overall dose. This dose is referred to as Stop Dose and is calculated by the Stop Model. Because stop dose is a significant portion of the overall dose associated with RAM transport, the values used as input for the Stop Model are important. Therefore, an investigation of typical values for RADTRAN Stop Parameters for truck stops was performed. The resulting data from these investigations were analyzed to provide mean values, standard deviations, and histograms. Hence, the mean values can be used when an analyst does not have a basis for selecting other input values for the Stop Model. In addition, the histograms and their characteristics can be used to guide statistical sampling techniques to measure sensitivity of the RADTRAN calculated Stop Dose to the uncertainties in the stop model input parameters. This paper discusses the details and presents the results of the investigation of stop model input parameters at truck stops.

  4. Macroscopic singlet oxygen model incorporating photobleaching as an input parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-03-01

    A macroscopic singlet oxygen model for photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used extensively to calculate the reacted singlet oxygen concentration for various photosensitizers. The four photophysical parameters (ξ, σ, β, δ) and threshold singlet oxygen dose ([1O2]r,sh) can be found for various drugs and drug-light intervals using a fitting algorithm. The input parameters for this model include the fluence, photosensitizer concentration, optical properties, and necrosis radius. An additional input variable of photobleaching was implemented in this study to optimize the results. Photobleaching was measured by using the pre-PDT and post-PDT sensitizer concentrations. Using the RIF model of murine fibrosarcoma, mice were treated with a linear source with fluence rates from 12 - 150 mW/cm and total fluences from 24 - 135 J/cm. The two main drugs investigated were benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) and 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH). Previously published photophysical parameters were fine-tuned and verified using photobleaching as the additional fitting parameter. Furthermore, photobleaching can be used as an indicator of the robustness of the model for the particular mouse experiment by comparing the experimental and model-calculated photobleaching ratio.

  5. Effects of control inputs on the estimation of stability and control parameters of a light airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannaday, R. L.; Suit, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique was used to determine the values of stability and control derivatives from flight test data for a low-wing, single-engine, light airplane. Several input forms were used during the tests to investigate the consistency of parameter estimates as it relates to inputs. These consistencies were compared by using the ensemble variance and estimated Cramer-Rao lower bound. In addition, the relationship between inputs and parameter correlations was investigated. Results from the stabilator inputs are inconclusive but the sequence of rudder input followed by aileron input or aileron followed by rudder gave more consistent estimates than did rudder or ailerons individually. Also, square-wave inputs appeared to provide slightly improved consistency in the parameter estimates when compared to sine-wave inputs.

  6. [Input impedance for studying hydraulic parameters of the vessel system].

    PubMed

    Naumov, A Iu; Sheptutsolov, K V; Balashov, S A; Mel'kumiants, A M

    2001-03-01

    Vascular input impedance can be used as an effective tool in estimating hydraulic parameters of arterial bed. These parameters may be interpreted as hydraulic resistance, elastance and inertance of particular sites of the arterial system. There is no significant difference between these parameters and those obtained through a direct measurement.

  7. Estimation of the input parameters in the Feller neuronal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2006-06-01

    The stochastic Feller neuronal model is studied, and estimators of the model input parameters, depending on the firing regime of the process, are derived. Closed expressions for the first two moments of functionals of the first-passage time (FTP) through a constant boundary in the suprathreshold regime are derived, which are used to calculate moment estimators. In the subthreshold regime, the exponentiality of the FTP is utilized to characterize the input parameters. The methods are illustrated on simulated data. Finally, approximations of the first-passage-time moments are suggested, and biological interpretations and comparisons of the parameters in the Feller and the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models are discussed.

  8. Practical input optimization for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. Ph.D. Thesis, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this research was to develop an algorithm for the design of practical, optimal flight test inputs for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. A general, single pass technique was developed which allows global optimization of the flight test input design for parameter estimation using the principles of dynamic programming with the input forms limited to square waves only. Provision was made for practical constraints on the input, including amplitude constraints, control system dynamics, and selected input frequency range exclusions. In addition, the input design was accomplished while imposing output amplitude constraints required by model validity and considerations of safety during the flight test. The algorithm has multiple input design capability, with optional inclusion of a constraint that only one control move at a time, so that a human pilot can implement the inputs. It is shown that the technique can be used to design experiments for estimation of open loop model parameters from closed loop flight test data. The report includes a new formulation of the optimal input design problem, a description of a new approach to the solution, and a summary of the characteristics of the algorithm, followed by three example applications of the new technique which demonstrate the quality and expanded capabilities of the input designs produced by the new technique. In all cases, the new input design approach showed significant improvement over previous input design methods in terms of achievable parameter accuracies.

  9. Improved input parameters for diffusion models of skin absorption.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steffi; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F

    2013-02-01

    To use a diffusion model for predicting skin absorption requires accurate estimates of input parameters on model geometry, affinity and transport characteristics. This review summarizes methods to obtain input parameters for diffusion models of skin absorption focusing on partition and diffusion coefficients. These include experimental methods, extrapolation approaches, and correlations that relate partition and diffusion coefficients to tabulated physico-chemical solute properties. Exhaustive databases on lipid-water and corneocyte protein-water partition coefficients are presented and analyzed to provide improved approximations to estimate lipid-water and corneocyte protein-water partition coefficients. The most commonly used estimates of lipid and corneocyte diffusion coefficients are also reviewed. In order to improve modeling of skin absorption in the future diffusion models should include the vertical stratum corneum heterogeneity, slow equilibration processes, the absorption from complex non-aqueous formulations, and an improved representation of dermal absorption processes. This will require input parameters for which no suitable estimates are yet available.

  10. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wasiolek

    2004-09-10

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA-LA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) (TWP). This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA). This report is one of the five reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model and the mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters. The output of this report is used as direct input in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' and in the ''Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios, respectively. The purpose of this analysis was to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or in volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]).

  11. Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Rasmuson; K. Rautenstrauch

    2004-09-14

    This analysis is one of 10 technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) (i.e., the biosphere model). It documents development of agricultural and environmental input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the repository at Yucca Mountain. The ERMYN provides the TSPA with the capability to perform dose assessments. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships between the major activities and their products (the analysis and model reports) that were planned in ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the ERMYN and its input parameters.

  12. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Rautenstrauch

    2004-09-10

    This analysis is one of 10 reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception.

  13. DC servomechanism parameter identification: a Closed Loop Input Error approach.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Ruben; Miranda, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a Closed Loop Input Error (CLIE) approach for on-line parametric estimation of a continuous-time model of a DC servomechanism functioning in closed loop. A standard Proportional Derivative (PD) position controller stabilizes the loop without requiring knowledge on the servomechanism parameters. The analysis of the identification algorithm takes into account the control law employed for closing the loop. The model contains four parameters that depend on the servo inertia, viscous, and Coulomb friction as well as on a constant disturbance. Lyapunov stability theory permits assessing boundedness of the signals associated to the identification algorithm. Experiments on a laboratory prototype allows evaluating the performance of the approach.

  14. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-06-27

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2003 [163602]). Some documents in Figure 1-1 may be under development and not available when this report is issued. This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA), but access to the listed documents is not required to understand the contents of this report. This report is one of the reports that develops input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes the conceptual model, the mathematical model, and the input parameters. The purpose of this analysis is to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2003 [163602]). This analysis develops values of parameters associated with many features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the reference biosphere (DTN: M00303SEPFEPS2.000 [162452]), which are addressed in the biosphere model (BSC 2003 [160699]). The treatment of these FEPs is described in BSC (2003 [160699], Section 6.2). Parameter values

  15. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wasiolek

    2006-06-05

    This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the

  16. Soil-related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Smith

    2003-07-02

    This analysis is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003 [163602]). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. ''The Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters needed to evaluate doses from pathways associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation and ash

  17. The definition of input parameters for modelling of energetic subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptacek, M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper is a short review and a basic description of mathematical models of renewable energy sources which present individual investigated subsystems of a system created in Matlab/Simulink. It solves the physical and mathematical relationships of photovoltaic and wind energy sources that are often connected to the distribution networks. The fuel cell technology is much less connected to the distribution networks but it could be promising in the near future. Therefore, the paper informs about a new dynamic model of the low-temperature fuel cell subsystem, and the main input parameters are defined as well. Finally, the main evaluated and achieved graphic results for the suggested parameters and for all the individual subsystems mentioned above are shown.

  18. Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Smith

    2004-09-09

    This report presents one of the analyses that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the details of the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and the required input parameters. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A schematic representation of the documentation flow for the Biosphere input to TSPA is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the evolutionary relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation or ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in other environmental media that are affected by radionuclide concentrations in soil. The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) where the governing procedure was defined as AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses''. This

  19. Input parameters for LEAP and analysis of the Model 22C data base

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, L.; Goldstein, M.

    1981-05-01

    The input data for the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP) employed by EIA for projections of long-term energy supply and demand in the US were studied and additional documentation provided. Particular emphasis has been placed on the LEAP Model 22C input data base, which was used in obtaining the output projections which appear in the 1978 Annual Report to Congress. Definitions, units, associated model parameters, and translation equations are given in detail. Many parameters were set to null values in Model 22C so as to turn off certain complexities in LEAP; these parameters are listed in Appendix B along with parameters having constant values across all activities. The values of the parameters for each activity are tabulated along with the source upon which each parameter is based - and appropriate comments provided, where available. The structure of the data base is briefly outlined and an attempt made to categorize the parameters according to the methods employed for estimating the numerical values. Due to incomplete documentation and/or lack of specific parameter definitions, few of the input values could be traced and uniquely interpreted using the information provided in the primary and secondary sources. Input parameter choices were noted which led to output projections which are somewhat suspect. Other data problems encountered are summarized. Some of the input data were corrected and a revised base case was constructed. The output projections for this revised case are compared with the Model 22C output for the year 2020, for the Transportation Sector. LEAP could be a very useful tool, especially so in the study of emerging technologies over long-time frames.

  20. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  1. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  2. Estimating input parameters from intracellular recordings in the Feller neuronal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibbona, Enrico; Lansky, Petr; Sirovich, Roberta

    2010-03-01

    We study the estimation of the input parameters in a Feller neuronal model from a trajectory of the membrane potential sampled at discrete times. These input parameters are identified with the drift and the infinitesimal variance of the underlying stochastic diffusion process with multiplicative noise. The state space of the process is restricted from below by an inaccessible boundary. Further, the model is characterized by the presence of an absorbing threshold, the first hitting of which determines the length of each trajectory and which constrains the state space from above. We compare, both in the presence and in the absence of the absorbing threshold, the efficiency of different known estimators. In addition, we propose an estimator for the drift term, which is proved to be more efficient than the others, at least in the explored range of the parameters. The presence of the threshold makes the estimates of the drift term biased, and two methods to correct it are proposed.

  3. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Quantification of major input parameters: MAACS (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System) input

    SciTech Connect

    Sprung, J.L.; Jow, H-N ); Rollstin, J.A. ); Helton, J.C. )

    1990-12-01

    Estimation of offsite accident consequences is the customary final step in a probabilistic assessment of the risks of severe nuclear reactor accidents. Recently, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission reassessed the risks of severe accidents at five US power reactors (NUREG-1150). Offsite accident consequences for NUREG-1150 source terms were estimated using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS). Before these calculations were performed, most MACCS input parameters were reviewed, and for each parameter reviewed, a best-estimate value was recommended. This report presents the results of these reviews. Specifically, recommended values and the basis for their selection are presented for MACCS atmospheric and biospheric transport, emergency response, food pathway, and economic input parameters. Dose conversion factors and health effect parameters are not reviewed in this report. 134 refs., 15 figs., 110 tabs.

  4. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional requirements to provide heat... requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of a Hg Budget unit that monitors and reports Hg... monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  5. Method of validating measurement data of a process parameter from a plurality of individual sensor inputs

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for generating a validated measurement of a process parameter at a point in time by using a plurality of individual sensor inputs from a scan of said sensors at said point in time. The sensor inputs from said scan are stored and a first validation pass is initiated by computing an initial average of all stored sensor inputs. Each sensor input is deviation checked by comparing each input including a preset tolerance against the initial average input. If the first deviation check is unsatisfactory, the sensor which produced the unsatisfactory input is flagged as suspect. It is then determined whether at least two of the inputs have not been flagged as suspect and are therefore considered good inputs. If two or more inputs are good, a second validation pass is initiated by computing a second average of all the good sensor inputs, and deviation checking the good inputs by comparing each good input including a present tolerance against the second average. If the second deviation check is satisfactory, the second average is displayed as the validated measurement and the suspect sensor as flagged as bad. A validation fault occurs if at least two inputs are not considered good, or if the second deviation check is not satisfactory. In the latter situation the inputs from each of all the sensors are compared against the last validated measurement and the value from the sensor input that deviates the least from the last valid measurement is displayed.

  6. Modeling the cardiovascular system using a nonlinear additive autoregressive model with exogenous input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, M.; Suhrbier, A.; Malberg, H.; Penzel, T.; Bretthauer, G.; Kurths, J.; Wessel, N.

    2008-07-01

    The parameters of heart rate variability and blood pressure variability have proved to be useful analytical tools in cardiovascular physics and medicine. Model-based analysis of these variabilities additionally leads to new prognostic information about mechanisms behind regulations in the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we analyze the complex interaction between heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration by nonparametric fitted nonlinear additive autoregressive models with external inputs. Therefore, we consider measurements of healthy persons and patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), with and without hypertension. It is shown that the proposed nonlinear models are capable of describing short-term fluctuations in heart rate as well as systolic blood pressure significantly better than similar linear ones, which confirms the assumption of nonlinear controlled heart rate and blood pressure. Furthermore, the comparison of the nonlinear and linear approaches reveals that the heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects is caused by a higher level of noise as well as nonlinearity than in patients suffering from OSAS. The residue analysis points at a further source of heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects, in addition to heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration. Comparison of the nonlinear models within and among the different groups of subjects suggests the ability to discriminate the cohorts that could lead to a stratification of hypertension risk in OSAS patients.

  7. Sensitivity of injection costs to input petrophysical parameters in numerical geologic carbon sequestration models

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C. L.; Gragg, M. J.; Perfect, E.; White, Mark D.; Lemiszki, P. J.; McKay, L. D.

    2013-08-24

    Numerical simulations are widely used in feasibility studies for geologic carbon sequestration. Accurate estimates of petrophysical parameters are needed as inputs for these simulations. However, relatively few experimental values are available for CO2-brine systems. Hence, a sensitivity analysis was performed using the STOMP numerical code for supercritical CO2 injected into a model confined deep saline aquifer. The intrinsic permeability, porosity, pore compressibility, and capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters (residual liquid saturation, residual gas saturation, and van Genuchten alpha and m values) were varied independently. Their influence on CO2 injection rates and costs were determined and the parameters were ranked based on normalized coefficients of variation. The simulations resulted in differences of up to tens of millions of dollars over the life of the project (i.e., the time taken to inject 10.8 million metric tons of CO2). The two most influential parameters were the intrinsic permeability and the van Genuchten m value. Two other parameters, the residual gas saturation and the residual liquid saturation, ranked above the porosity. These results highlight the need for accurate estimates of capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters for geologic carbon sequestration simulations in addition to measurements of porosity and intrinsic permeability.

  8. Optimal Input Design for Aircraft Parameter Estimation using Dynamic Programming Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Klein, Vladislav

    1990-01-01

    A new technique was developed for designing optimal flight test inputs for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. The principles of dynamic programming were used for the design in the time domain. This approach made it possible to include realistic practical constraints on the input and output variables. A description of the new approach is presented, followed by an example for a multiple input linear model describing the lateral dynamics of a fighter aircraft. The optimal input designs produced by the new technique demonstrated improved quality and expanded capability relative to the conventional multiple input design method.

  9. Optimal input design for aircraft parameter estimation using dynamic programming principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Morelli, Eugene A.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique was developed for designing optimal flight test inputs for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. The principles of dynamic programming were used for the design in the time domain. This approach made it possible to include realistic practical constraints on the input and output variables. A description of the new approach is presented, followed by an example for a multiple input linear model describing the lateral dynamics of a fighter aircraft. The optimal input designs produced by the new technique demonstrated improved quality and expanded capability relative to the conventional multiple input design method.

  10. In vivo correlation of Doppler waveform analysis with arterial input impedance parameters.

    PubMed

    Downing, G J; Maulik, D; Phillips, C; Kadado, T R

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that Doppler waveform analysis (DWA) offers a valid reflection of changes in peripheral vascular resistance. However, the ability of the pulsatility index (PI), a parameter of DWA, to reflect the dynamic components of the circulation, as assessed by arterial input parameters, remains uncertain. In addition, the state of the central circulation is considered an important factor influencing the accuracy of this technique. This study evaluated the ability of the aortic PI to reflect alterations of input impedance in a chronically instrumented lamb model that was subjected to pharmacologic alteration of the circulation. Pressure, volumetric flow and continuous-wave Doppler frequency shift measurements were recorded from the infrarenal abdominal aorta. The parameters of input impedance, peripheral vascular resistance (Zpr), characteristic impedance (Zo) and reflection coefficient (Rc), were determined and then correlated with changes in the aortic PI. Initially, perturbations of the circulatory state were created with a vasodilator, hydralazine (HY) and a vasoconstrictor, phenylephrine (PE). During a second set of experiments, the effect of the reflex heart rate (HR) responses on the PI was evaluated. This was accomplished by inhibiting reflex HR responses to these vasoactive agents with either trimethophan (TM) or atropine methyl bromide (AMB). In response to HY and HY with TM, significant decreases in the PI and impedance parameters occurred. Administration of PE and PE with AMB resulted in significant increases in PI and each of the impedance parameters. HY and PE induced changes in PI correlated significantly with changes in volumetric flow (r = 0.82, 0.80; p < 0.001), mean arterial blood pressure (r = 0.64, 0.70; p < 0.001) and Zpr (r = 0.77, 0.80; p < 0.001), but not with Zo (r = 0.34, 0.36) and Rc (r = 0.26, 0.31). However, when reflex HR responses were inhibited during the administration of the vasoactive agents, HY with TM and PE

  11. An analytical study of relay neuron's reliability: dependence on input and model parameters.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rahul; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2011-01-01

    Relay neurons are widely found in our nervous system, including the Thalamus, spinal cord and lateral geniculate body. They receive a modulating input (background activity) and a reference input. The modulating input modulates relay of the reference input. This modulation is critical for correct functioning of relay neurons, but is poorly understood. In this paper, we use a biophysical-based model and systems theoretic tools to calculate how well a single relay neuron relays a reference input signal as a function of the neuron's electro physiological properties (i.e. model parameters), the modulating signal, and the reference signal parameters. Our analysis is more rigorous than previous related works and is generalizable to all relay cells in the body. Our analytical expression matches relay performance obtained in simulation and suggest that increasing the frequency of a sinusoidal modulating input or decreasing its DC offset increases the relay cell reliability.

  12. Describing the catchment-averaged precipitation as a stochastic process improves parameter and input estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giudice, Dario; Albert, Carlo; Rieckermann, Jörg; Reichert, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall input uncertainty is one of the major concerns in hydrological modeling. Unfortunately, during inference, input errors are usually neglected, which can lead to biased parameters and implausible predictions. Rainfall multipliers can reduce this problem but still fail when the observed input (precipitation) has a different temporal pattern from the true one or if the true nonzero input is not detected. In this study, we propose an improved input error model which is able to overcome these challenges and to assess and reduce input uncertainty. We formulate the average precipitation over the watershed as a stochastic input process (SIP) and, together with a model of the hydrosystem, include it in the likelihood function. During statistical inference, we use "noisy" input (rainfall) and output (runoff) data to learn about the "true" rainfall, model parameters, and runoff. We test the methodology with the rainfall-discharge dynamics of a small urban catchment. To assess its advantages, we compare SIP with simpler methods of describing uncertainty within statistical inference: (i) standard least squares (LS), (ii) bias description (BD), and (iii) rainfall multipliers (RM). We also compare two scenarios: accurate versus inaccurate forcing data. Results show that when inferring the input with SIP and using inaccurate forcing data, the whole-catchment precipitation can still be realistically estimated and thus physical parameters can be "protected" from the corrupting impact of input errors. While correcting the output rather than the input, BD inferred similarly unbiased parameters. This is not the case with LS and RM. During validation, SIP also delivers realistic uncertainty intervals for both rainfall and runoff. Thus, the technique presented is a significant step toward better quantifying input uncertainty in hydrological inference. As a next step, SIP will have to be combined with a technique addressing model structure uncertainty.

  13. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional requirements to provide heat... requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of a Hg Budget unit that monitors and reports Hg mass emissions using a Hg concentration monitoring system and a flow monitoring system shall...

  14. Comparison of input parameters regarding rock mass in analytical solution and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasitli, N. E.

    2016-12-01

    Characteristics of stress redistribution around a tunnel excavated in rock are of prime importance for an efficient tunnelling operation and maintaining stability. As it is a well known fact that rock mass properties are the most important factors affecting stability together with in-situ stress field and tunnel geometry. Induced stresses and resultant deformation around a tunnel can be approximated by means of analytical solutions and application of numerical modelling. However, success of these methods depends on assumptions and input parameters which must be representative for the rock mass. However, mechanical properties of intact rock can be found by laboratory testing. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of proper representation of rock mass properties as input data for analytical solution and numerical modelling. For this purpose, intact rock data were converted into rock mass data by using the Hoek-Brown failure criterion and empirical relations. Stress-deformation analyses together with yield zone thickness determination have been carried out by using analytical solutions and numerical analyses by using FLAC3D programme. Analyses results have indicated that incomplete and incorrect design causes stability and economic problems in the tunnel. For this reason during the tunnel design analytical data and rock mass data should be used together. In addition, this study was carried out to prove theoretically that numerical modelling results should be applied to the tunnel design for the stability and for the economy of the support.

  15. Net thrust calculation sensitivity of an afterburning turbofan engine to variations in input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.; Ray, R. J.; Walton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The calculated value of net thrust of an aircraft powered by a General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine was evaluated for its sensitivity to various input parameters. The effects of a 1.0-percent change in each input parameter on the calculated value of net thrust with two calculation methods are compared. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and also gives the estimated accuracy of the overall net thrust calculation as determined from the influence coefficients and estimated parameter measurement accuracies.

  16. Microstrip superconducting quantum interference device radio-frequency amplifier: Scattering parameters and input coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kinion, D; Clarke, J

    2008-01-24

    The scattering parameters of an amplifier based on a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) are directly measured at 4.2 K. The results can be described using an equivalent circuit model of the fundamental resonance of the microstrip resonator which forms the input of the amplifier. The circuit model is used to determine the series capacitance required for critical coupling of the microstrip to the input circuit.

  17. 6 DOF synchronized control for spacecraft formation flying with input constraint and parameter uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yueyong; Hu, Qinglei; Ma, Guangfu; Zhou, Jiakang

    2011-10-01

    This paper treats the problem of synchronized control of spacecraft formation flying (SFF) in the presence of input constraint and parameter uncertainties. More specifically, backstepping based robust control is first developed for the total 6 DOF dynamic model of SFF with parameter uncertainties, in which the model consists of relative translation and attitude rotation. Then this controller is redesigned to deal with the input constraint problem by incorporating a command filter such that the generated control could be implementable even under physical or operating constraints on the control input. The convergence of the proposed control algorithms is proved by the Lyapunov stability theorem. Compared with conventional methods, illustrative simulations of spacecraft formation flying are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach to achieve the spacecraft track the desired attitude and position trajectories in a synchronized fashion even in the presence of uncertainties, external disturbances and control saturation constraint.

  18. Effect of tutorial input in addition to augmented feedback on manual dexterity training and its retention.

    PubMed

    Wierinck, E; Puttemans, V; van Steenberghe, D

    2006-02-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators can be used as tools in manual dexterity training. The visual feedback guides the subject towards proper performance but creates, at the same time, some dependency on this feedback. To overcome this drawback, the effect of adjunct tutorial input on motor learning behaviour was examined. Novice dental students were randomly assigned to one of two training groups or to a non-training control group, given the task of preparing a geometrical class 1 cavity in phantom teeth. The feedback (FB) group trained under augmented visual feedback conditions, provided by the VR system (DentSim). The feedback-plus (FB+) group received, in addition, standardised expert input to enrich the augmented feedback information. The control group, consisting of same year students, did not participate in any training programme. All preparations were evaluated by the VR scoring system. Performance analyses revealed an overall trend towards significant improvement with practice for the training groups. Performance of the FB+ group was most accurate across training. After 1 day and 3 weeks of no practice, both training groups outperformed the control group. After 4 months, however, only the FB+ condition was significantly more accurate than the control group. The same tendency was noted for the transfer tests. Consequently, cavity preparation experience on a VR system under the condition of frequently provided feedback supplemented with expert input was most beneficial to long time learning.

  19. Rainfall simulations on steep calanchi landscapes: Generating input parameters for physically based erosion modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Buchholz, Arno; Neugirg, Fabian; Schindewolf, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Calanchi landscapes in central Italy have been subject to geoscientific research since many years, not exclusively but especially for questions regarding soil erosion and land degradation. Seasonal dynamics play an important role for morphological processes within the Calanchi. As in most Mediterranean landscapes also in the research site at Val d'Orcia long and dry summers are ended by heavy rainfall events in autumn. The latter contribute to most of the annual sediment output of the incised hollows and can cause damage to agricultural land and infrastructures. While research for understanding Calanco development is of high importance, the complex morphology and thus limited accessibility impedes in situ works. To still improve the understanding of morphodynamics without unnecessarily impinging natural conditions a remote sensing and erosion modelling approach was carried out in the presented work. UAV and LiDAR based very high resolution digital surface models were produced and served as an input parameter for the raster and physically based soil erosion model EROSION3D. Additionally, data on infiltration, runoff generation and sediment detachment were generated with artificial rainfall simulations - the most invasive but unavoidable method. To increase the 1 m plot length virtually to around 20 m the sediment loaded runoff water was again introduced to the plot by a reflux system. Rather elaborate logistics were required to set up the simulator on strongly inclined slopes, to establish sufficient water supply and to secure the simulator on the slope but experiments produced plausible results and valuable input data for modelling. The model results are then compared to the repeated UAV and LiDAR campaigns and the resulting digital elevation models of difference. By simulating different rainfall and moisture scenarios and implementing in situ measured weather data runoff induced processes can be distinguished from gravitational slides and rockfall.

  20. Discrete element modelling (DEM) input parameters: understanding their impact on model predictions using statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Z.; Wilkinson, S. K.; Stitt, E. H.; Marigo, M.

    2015-09-01

    Selection or calibration of particle property input parameters is one of the key problematic aspects for the implementation of the discrete element method (DEM). In the current study, a parametric multi-level sensitivity method is employed to understand the impact of the DEM input particle properties on the bulk responses for a given simple system: discharge of particles from a flat bottom cylindrical container onto a plate. In this case study, particle properties, such as Young's modulus, friction parameters and coefficient of restitution were systematically changed in order to assess their effect on material repose angles and particle flow rate (FR). It was shown that inter-particle static friction plays a primary role in determining both final angle of repose and FR, followed by the role of inter-particle rolling friction coefficient. The particle restitution coefficient and Young's modulus were found to have insignificant impacts and were strongly cross correlated. The proposed approach provides a systematic method that can be used to show the importance of specific DEM input parameters for a given system and then potentially facilitates their selection or calibration. It is concluded that shortening the process for input parameters selection and calibration can help in the implementation of DEM.

  1. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Young, P. G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Koning, A. J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V. A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M. B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V. M.; Reffo, G.; Sin, M.; Soukhovitskii, E. Sh.; Talou, P.

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and γ-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  2. Estimating unknown input parameters when implementing the NGA ground-motion prediction equations in engineering practice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaklamanos, James; Baise, Laurie G.; Boore, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) developed as part of the Next Generation Attenuation of Ground Motions (NGA-West) project in 2008 are becoming widely used in seismic hazard analyses. However, these new models are considerably more complicated than previous GMPEs, and they require several more input parameters. When employing the NGA models, users routinely face situations in which some of the required input parameters are unknown. In this paper, we present a framework for estimating the unknown source, path, and site parameters when implementing the NGA models in engineering practice, and we derive geometrically-based equations relating the three distance measures found in the NGA models. Our intent is for the content of this paper not only to make the NGA models more accessible, but also to help with the implementation of other present or future GMPEs.

  3. Explicit least squares system parameter identification for exact differential input/output models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    The equation error for a class of systems modeled by input/output differential operator equations has the potential to be integrated exactly, given the input/output data on a finite time interval, thereby opening up the possibility of using an explicit least squares estimation technique for system parameter identification. The paper delineates the class of models for which this is possible and shows how the explicit least squares cost function can be obtained in a way that obviates dealing with unknown initial and boundary conditions. The approach is illustrated by two examples: a second order chemical kinetics model and a third order system of Lorenz equations.

  4. Flight Test of Orthogonal Square Wave Inputs for Hybrid-Wing-Body Parameter Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an effort to improve emissions, noise, and performance of next generation aircraft, it is expected that future aircraft will use distributed, multi-objective control effectors in a closed-loop flight control system. Correlation challenges associated with parameter estimation will arise with this expected aircraft configuration. The research presented in this paper focuses on addressing the correlation problem with an appropriate input design technique in order to determine individual control surface effectiveness. This technique was validated through flight-testing an 8.5-percent-scale hybrid-wing-body aircraft demonstrator at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California). An input design technique that uses mutually orthogonal square wave inputs for de-correlation of control surfaces is proposed. Flight-test results are compared with prior flight-test results for a different maneuver style.

  5. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:25030908

  6. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies.

  7. Genetic algorithm to estimate the input parameters of Klatt and HLSyn formant-based speech synthesizers.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Fabíola; Filho, José; Klautau, Aldebaro

    2016-12-01

    Voice imitation basically consists in estimating a synthesizer's input parameters to mimic a target speech signal. This is a difficult inverse problem because the mapping is time-varying, non-linear and from many to one. It typically requires considerable amount of time to be done manually. This work presents the evolution of a system based on a genetic algorithm (GA) to automatically estimate the input parameters of the Klatt and HLSyn formant synthesizers using an analysis-by-synthesis process. Results are presented for natural (human-generated) speech for three male speakers. The results obtained with the GA-based system outperform those obtained with the baseline Winsnoori with respect to four objective figures of merit and a subjective test. The GA with Klatt synthesizer generated similar voices to the target and the subjective tests indicate an improvement in the quality of the synthetic voices when compared to the ones produced by the baseline.

  8. A New Ensemble of Perturbed-Input-Parameter Simulations by the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C; Brandon, S; Bremer, P T; Domyancis, D; Garaizar, X; Johannesson, G; Klein, R; Klein, S A; Lucas, D D; Tannahill, J; Zhang, Y

    2011-10-27

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is a fundamental challenge in the numerical simulation of Earth's weather and climate, and other complex systems. It entails much more than attaching defensible error bars to predictions: in particular it includes assessing low-probability but high-consequence events. To achieve these goals with models containing a large number of uncertain input parameters, structural uncertainties, etc., raw computational power is needed. An automated, self-adapting search of the possible model configurations is also useful. Our UQ initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has produced the most extensive set to date of simulations from the US Community Atmosphere Model. We are examining output from about 3,000 twelve-year climate simulations generated with a specialized UQ software framework, and assessing the model's accuracy as a function of 21 to 28 uncertain input parameter values. Most of the input parameters we vary are related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other sub-grid scale processes. Our simulations prescribe surface boundary conditions (sea surface temperatures and sea ice amounts) to match recent observations. Fully searching this 21+ dimensional space is impossible, but sensitivity and ranking algorithms can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination. Bayesian statistical constraints, employing a variety of climate observations as metrics, also seem promising. Observational constraints will be important in the next step of our project, which will compute sea surface temperatures and sea ice interactively, and will study climate change due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  9. An Integrated Bayesian Uncertainty Estimator: fusion of Input, Parameter and Model Structural Uncertainty Estimation in Hydrologic Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajami, N. K.; Duan, Q.; Sorooshian, S.

    2005-12-01

    To-date single conceptual hydrologic models often applied to interpret physical processes within a watershed. Nevertheless hydrologic models regardless of their sophistication and complexity are simplified representation of the complex, spatially distributed and highly nonlinear real world system. Consequently their hydrologic predictions contain considerable uncertainty from different sources including: hydrometeorological forcing inputs, boundary/initial conditions, model structure, model parameters which need to be accounted for. Thus far the effort has gone to address these sources of uncertainty explicitly, making an implicit assumption that uncertainties from different sources are additive. Nevertheless because of the nonlinear nature of the hydrologic systems, it is not feasible to account for these uncertainties independently. Here we present the Integrated Bayesian Uncertainty Estimator (IBUNE) which accounts for total uncertainties from all major sources: inputs forcing, model structure, model parameters. This algorithm explores multi-model framework to tackle model structural uncertainty while using the Bayesian rules to estimate parameter and input uncertainty within individual models. Three hydrologic models including SACramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, Hydrologic model (HYMOD) and Simple Water Balance (SWB) model were considered within IBUNE framework for this study. The results which are presented for the Leaf River Basin, MS, indicates that IBUNE gives a better quantification of uncertainty through hydrological modeling processes, therefore provide more reliable and less bias prediction with realistic uncertainty boundaries.

  10. A generalized multiple-input, multiple-output modal parameter estimation algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Blair, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new method for experimental determination of the modal parameters of a structure is presented. The method allows for multiple input forces to be applied simultaneously, and for an arbitrary number of acceleration response measurements to be employed. These data are used to form the equations of motion for a damped linear elastic structure. The modal parameters are then obtained through an eigenvalue technique. In conjunction with the development of the equations, an extensive computer simulation study was performed. The results of the study show a marked improvement in the mode shape identification for closely-spaced modes as the number of applied forces is increased. Also demonstrated is the influence of noise on the method's ability to identify accurate modal parameters. Here again, an increase in the number of exciters leads to a significant improvement in the identified parameters.

  11. Impacts of input parameter spatial aggregation on an agricultural nonpoint source pollution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzHugh, T. W.; Mackay, D. S.

    2000-09-01

    The accuracy of agricultural nonpoint source pollution models depends in part on how well model input parameters describe the relevant characteristics of the watershed. The spatial extent of input parameter aggregation has previously been shown to have a substantial impact on model output. This study investigates this problem using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a distributed-parameter agricultural nonpoint source pollution model. The primary question addressed here is: how does the size or number of subwatersheds used to partition the watershed affect model output, and what are the processes responsible for model behavior? SWAT was run on the Pheasant Branch watershed in Dane County, WI, using eight watershed delineations, each with a different number of subwatersheds. Model runs were conducted for the period 1990-1996. Streamflow and outlet sediment predictions were not seriously affected by changes in subwatershed size. The lack of change in outlet sediment is due to the transport-limited nature of the Pheasant Branch watershed and the stable transport capacity of the lower part of the channel network. This research identifies the importance of channel parameters in determining the behavior of SWAT's outlet sediment predictions. Sediment generation estimates do change substantially, dropping by 44% between the coarsest and the finest watershed delineations. This change is primarily due to the sensitivity of the runoff term in the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation to the area of hydrologic response units (HRUs). This sensitivity likely occurs because SWAT was implemented in this study with a very detailed set of HRUs. In order to provide some insight on the scaling behavior of the model two indexes were derived using the mathematics of the model. The indexes predicted SWAT scaling behavior from the data inputs without a need for running the model. Such indexes could be useful for model users by providing a direct way to evaluate alternative models

  12. State, Parameter, and Unknown Input Estimation Problems in Active Automotive Safety Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanomchoeng, Gridsada

    A variety of driver assistance systems such as traction control, electronic stability control (ESC), rollover prevention and lane departure avoidance systems are being developed by automotive manufacturers to reduce driver burden, partially automate normal driving operations, and reduce accidents. The effectiveness of these driver assistance systems can be significant enhanced if the real-time values of several vehicle parameters and state variables, namely tire-road friction coefficient, slip angle, roll angle, and rollover index, can be known. Since there are no inexpensive sensors available to measure these variables, it is necessary to estimate them. However, due to the significant nonlinear dynamics in a vehicle, due to unknown and changing plant parameters, and due to the presence of unknown input disturbances, the design of estimation algorithms for this application is challenging. This dissertation develops a new approach to observer design for nonlinear systems in which the nonlinearity has a globally (or locally) bounded Jacobian. The developed approach utilizes a modified version of the mean value theorem to express the nonlinearity in the estimation error dynamics as a convex combination of known matrices with time varying coefficients. The observer gains are then obtained by solving linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A number of illustrative examples are presented to show that the developed approach is less conservative and more useful than the standard Lipschitz assumption based nonlinear observer. The developed nonlinear observer is utilized for estimation of slip angle, longitudinal vehicle velocity, and vehicle roll angle. In order to predict and prevent vehicle rollovers in tripped situations, it is necessary to estimate the vertical tire forces in the presence of unknown road disturbance inputs. An approach to estimate unknown disturbance inputs in nonlinear systems using dynamic model inversion and a modified version of the mean value theorem is

  13. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Burger, A.; Gorgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Massey, T. N.; Siem, S.

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  14. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    DOE PAGES

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; ...

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  15. Ground Motion Simulations for Bursa Region (Turkey) Using Input Parameters derived from the Regional Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, B.; Askan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes are among the most destructive natural disasters in Turkey and it is important to assess seismicity in different regions with the use of seismic networks. Bursa is located in Marmara Region, Northwestern Turkey and to the south of the very active North Anatolian Fault Zone. With around three million inhabitants and key industrial facilities of the country, Bursa is the fourth largest city in Turkey. Since most of the focus is on North Anatolian Fault zone, despite its significant seismicity, Bursa area has not been investigated extensively until recently. For reliable seismic hazard estimations and seismic design of structures, assessment of potential ground motions in this region is essential using both recorded and simulated data. In this study, we employ stochastic finite-fault simulation with dynamic corner frequency approach to model previous events as well to assess potential earthquakes in Bursa. To ensure simulations with reliable synthetic ground motion outputs, the input parameters must be carefully derived from regional data. In this study, using strong motion data collected at 33 stations in the region, site-specific parameters such as near-surface high frequency attenuation parameter and amplifications are obtained. Similarly, source and path parameters are adopted from previous studies that as well employ regional data. Initially, major previous events in the region are verified by comparing the records with the corresponding synthetics. Then simulations of scenario events in the region are performed. We present the results in terms of spatial distribution of peak ground motion parameters and time histories at selected locations.

  16. Robust unknown input observer design for state estimation and fault detection using linear parameter varying model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanzhi; Wang, Haoping; Aitouche, Abdel; Tian, Yang; Christov, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a robust unknown input observer for state estimation and fault detection using linear parameter varying model. Since the disturbance and actuator fault is mixed together in the physical system, it is difficult to isolate the fault from the disturbance. Using the state transforation, the estimation of the original state becomes to associate with the transform state. By solving the linear matrix inequalities (LMIs)and linear matrix equalities (LMEs), the parameters of the UIO can be obtained. The convergence of the UIO is also analysed by the Layapunov theory. Finally, a wind turbine system with disturbance and actuator fault is tested for the proposed method. From the simulations, it demonstrates the effectiveness and performances of the proposed method.

  17. Impact of spatial and temporal aggregation of input parameters on the assessment of irrigation scheme performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite, I. J.; Mateos, L.; Fereres, E.

    2005-01-01

    SummaryThe simulations of dynamic, spatially distributed non-linear models are impacted by the degree of spatial and temporal aggregation of their input parameters and variables. This paper deals with the impact of these aggregations on the assessment of irrigation scheme performance by simulating water use and crop yield. The analysis was carried out on a 7000 ha irrigation scheme located in Southern Spain. Four irrigation seasons differing in rainfall patterns were simulated (from 1996/1997 to 1999/2000) with the actual soil parameters and with hypothetical soil parameters representing wider ranges of soil variability. Three spatial aggregation levels were considered: (I) individual parcels (about 800), (II) command areas (83) and (III) the whole irrigation scheme. Equally, five temporal aggregation levels were defined: daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly and annually. The results showed little impact of spatial aggregation in the predictions of irrigation requirements and of crop yield for the scheme. The impact of aggregation was greater in rainy years, for deep-rooted crops (sunflower) and in scenarios with heterogeneous soils. The highest impact on irrigation requirement estimations was in the scenario of most heterogeneous soil and in 1999/2000, a year with frequent rainfall during the irrigation season: difference of 7% between aggregation levels I and III was found. Equally, it was found that temporal aggregation had only significant impact on irrigation requirements predictions for time steps longer than 4 months. In general, simulated annual irrigation requirements decreased as the time step increased. The impact was greater in rainy years (specially with abundant and concentrated rain events) and in crops which cycles coincide in part with the rainy season (garlic, winter cereals and olive). It is concluded that in this case, average, representative values for the main inputs of the model (crop, soil properties and sowing dates) can generate results

  18. Comparisons of CAP88PC version 2.0 default parameters to site specific inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Lehto, M. A.; Courtney, J. C.; Charter, N.; Egan, T.

    2000-03-02

    The effects of varying the input for the CAP88PC Version 2.0 program on the total effective dose equivalents (TEDEs) were determined for hypothetical releases from the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Argonne National Laboratory site on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Values for site specific meteorological conditions and agricultural production parameters were determined for the 80 km radius surrounding the HFEF. Four nuclides, {sup 3}H, {sup 85}Kr, {sup 129}I, and {sup 137}Cs (with its short lived progeny, {sup 137m}Ba) were selected for this study; these are the radioactive materials most likely to be released from HFEF under normal or abnormal operating conditions. Use of site specific meteorological parameters of annual precipitation, average temperature, and the height of the inversion layer decreased the TEDE from {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba up to 36%; reductions for other nuclides were less than 3%. Use of the site specific agricultural parameters reduced TEDE values between 7% and 49%, depending on the nuclide. Reductions are associated with decreased committed effective dose equivalents (CEDEs) from the ingestion pathway. This is not surprising since the HFEF is located well within the INEEL exclusion area, and the surrounding area closest to the release point is a high desert with limited agricultural diversity. Livestock and milk production are important in some counties at distances greater than 30 km from the HFEF.

  19. Comparison of the pulsatility index and input impedance parameters in a model of altered hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Downing, G J; Yarlagadda, A P; Maulik, D

    1991-06-01

    Clinical use of Doppler waveform analysis assumes that vascular resistance is accurately represented by the Doppler indices. This assumption was examined by correlating the pulsatility index (PI) with measures of input impedance including peripheral vascular resistance (Zpr), characteristic impedance (Zo), and reflection coefficient (Rc). Assessment of these parameters from the descending aorta was performed in five chronically instrumented, newborn lambs subjected to administration of norepinephrine and hydralazine. Significant increases in PI, Zpr, Zo, and Rc were seen in response to administration of norepinephrine, and decreases in PI and Zpr occurred with hydralazine use. Significant correlation existed between PI and Zpr throughout the study, but changes in PI did not correlate with changes in Zo and Rc. PI appears to reflect changes in Zpr accurately. However, the lack of ability for PI to assess Zo or Rc requires further investigation.

  20. Modelling pesticide leaching under climate change: parameter vs. climate input uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, K.; Larsbo, M.; Moeys, J.; Kjellström, E.; Jarvis, N.; Lewan, E.

    2014-02-01

    Assessing climate change impacts on pesticide leaching requires careful consideration of different sources of uncertainty. We investigated the uncertainty related to climate scenario input and its importance relative to parameter uncertainty of the pesticide leaching model. The pesticide fate model MACRO was calibrated against a comprehensive one-year field data set for a well-structured clay soil in south-western Sweden. We obtained an ensemble of 56 acceptable parameter sets that represented the parameter uncertainty. Nine different climate model projections of the regional climate model RCA3 were available as driven by different combinations of global climate models (GCM), greenhouse gas emission scenarios and initial states of the GCM. The future time series of weather data used to drive the MACRO model were generated by scaling a reference climate data set (1970-1999) for an important agricultural production area in south-western Sweden based on monthly change factors for 2070-2099. 30 yr simulations were performed for different combinations of pesticide properties and application seasons. Our analysis showed that both the magnitude and the direction of predicted change in pesticide leaching from present to future depended strongly on the particular climate scenario. The effect of parameter uncertainty was of major importance for simulating absolute pesticide losses, whereas the climate uncertainty was relatively more important for predictions of changes of pesticide losses from present to future. The climate uncertainty should be accounted for by applying an ensemble of different climate scenarios. The aggregated ensemble prediction based on both acceptable parameterizations and different climate scenarios has the potential to provide robust probabilistic estimates of future pesticide losses.

  1. Modelling pesticide leaching under climate change: parameter vs. climate input uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, K.; Larsbo, M.; Moeys, J.; Kjellström, E.; Jarvis, N.; Lewan, E.

    2013-08-01

    The assessment of climate change impacts on the risk for pesticide leaching needs careful consideration of different sources of uncertainty. We investigated the uncertainty related to climate scenario input and its importance relative to parameter uncertainty of the pesticide leaching model. The pesticide fate model MACRO was calibrated against a comprehensive one-year field data set for a well-structured clay soil in south-west Sweden. We obtained an ensemble of 56 acceptable parameter sets that represented the parameter uncertainty. Nine different climate model projections of the regional climate model RCA3 were available as driven by different combinations of global climate models (GCM), greenhouse gas emission scenarios and initial states of the GCM. The future time series of weather data used to drive the MACRO-model were generated by scaling a reference climate data set (1970-1999) for an important agricultural production area in south-west Sweden based on monthly change factors for 2070-2099. 30 yr simulations were performed for different combinations of pesticide properties and application seasons. Our analysis showed that both the magnitude and the direction of predicted change in pesticide leaching from present to future depended strongly on the particular climate scenario. The effect of parameter uncertainty was of major importance for simulating absolute pesticide losses, whereas the climate uncertainty was relatively more important for predictions of changes of pesticide losses from present to future. The climate uncertainty should be accounted for by applying an ensemble of different climate scenarios. The aggregated ensemble prediction based on both acceptable parameterizations and different climate scenarios could provide robust probabilistic estimates of future pesticide losses and assessments of changes in pesticide leaching risks.

  2. Determination of critical nondimensional parameters in aircraft dynamic response to random input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, S. E.; Sevik, M. M.

    1974-01-01

    The critical parameters of subsonic jet aircraft response in a random atmospheric environment are determined. Equations of motion are presented for semirigid aircraft with a flexible primary airfoil. However, the analysis is easily extendable to include additional appendage flexibility. The analysis establishes the mechanical admittance values for pitching, plunging, and the first mode effects from wing elastic bending and torsion. Nondimensional parameters are established which allow the representation of all subsonic jet transport aircraft with one nondimensional model. The critical parameters for random forcing are found to be aircraft relative mass, reduced natural and forcing frequencies, and Mach number. Turbulence scale lengths are found to be directly related to the critical values of reduced forcing frequency. Results are given for subsonic craft traveling at constant altitude. Specific values of admittance functions are tabulated at Mach numbers of 0.2, 0.5, and 0.7. The relative mass range covers all aircraft currently in operation.

  3. Efficient Screening of Climate Model Sensitivity to a Large Number of Perturbed Input Parameters [plus supporting information

    DOE PAGES

    Covey, Curt; Lucas, Donald D.; Tannahill, John; ...

    2013-07-01

    Modern climate models contain numerous input parameters, each with a range of possible values. Since the volume of parameter space increases exponentially with the number of parameters N, it is generally impossible to directly evaluate a model throughout this space even if just 2-3 values are chosen for each parameter. Sensitivity screening algorithms, however, can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination.This can aid both model development and the uncertainty quantification (UQ) process. Here we report results from a parameter sensitivity screening algorithm hitherto untested in climate modeling,more » the Morris one-at-a-time (MOAT) method. This algorithm drastically reduces the computational cost of estimating sensitivities in a high dimensional parameter space because the sample size grows linearly rather than exponentially with N. It nevertheless samples over much of the N-dimensional volume and allows assessment of parameter interactions, unlike traditional elementary one-at-a-time (EOAT) parameter variation. We applied both EOAT and MOAT to the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), assessing CAM’s behavior as a function of 27 uncertain input parameters related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other subgrid scale processes. For radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, EOAT and MOAT rank most input parameters similarly, but MOAT identifies a sensitivity that EOAT underplays for two convection parameters that operate nonlinearly in the model. MOAT’s ranking of input parameters is robust to modest algorithmic variations, and it is qualitatively consistent with model development experience. Supporting information is also provided at the end of the full text of the article.« less

  4. Efficient Screening of Climate Model Sensitivity to a Large Number of Perturbed Input Parameters [plus supporting information

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, Curt; Lucas, Donald D.; Tannahill, John; Garaizar, Xabier; Klein, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Modern climate models contain numerous input parameters, each with a range of possible values. Since the volume of parameter space increases exponentially with the number of parameters N, it is generally impossible to directly evaluate a model throughout this space even if just 2-3 values are chosen for each parameter. Sensitivity screening algorithms, however, can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination.This can aid both model development and the uncertainty quantification (UQ) process. Here we report results from a parameter sensitivity screening algorithm hitherto untested in climate modeling, the Morris one-at-a-time (MOAT) method. This algorithm drastically reduces the computational cost of estimating sensitivities in a high dimensional parameter space because the sample size grows linearly rather than exponentially with N. It nevertheless samples over much of the N-dimensional volume and allows assessment of parameter interactions, unlike traditional elementary one-at-a-time (EOAT) parameter variation. We applied both EOAT and MOAT to the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), assessing CAM’s behavior as a function of 27 uncertain input parameters related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other subgrid scale processes. For radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, EOAT and MOAT rank most input parameters similarly, but MOAT identifies a sensitivity that EOAT underplays for two convection parameters that operate nonlinearly in the model. MOAT’s ranking of input parameters is robust to modest algorithmic variations, and it is qualitatively consistent with model development experience. Supporting information is also provided at the end of the full text of the article.

  5. Atmospheric transport and deposition, an additional input pathway for triazine herbicides to surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.C.G.; Rawn, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    Although surface runoff from treated fields is regarded as the major route of entry of triazine herbicides to surface waters, other pathways such as deposition via precipitation, gas absorption and dryfall may also be important. Triazine herbicides have been detected in precipitation but there has been only a very limited amount of work on gas phase and aerosols. To examine the importance of atmospheric inputs concentrations of atrazine, cyanazine and terbuthylazine in gas phase/aerosols, precipitation, and surface waters were determined (along with other herbicides) using selected ion GC-MS. Atrazine was detected at low ng/L concentrations in surface waters (<0.04-5.3 ng/L) and precipitation (0.1-53 ng/L), and at 0.02-0.1 ng/m{sup 3} in air. Cyanazine and terbuthylazine were detected in air and infrequently in water. Highest atrazine concentrations in air were found during June each year on both gas phase and particles. Concentrations of atrazine in surface waters at both locations increased during June, even in the absence of precipitation or overland flow, presumably due to inputs from dryfall and to gas areas and boreal forest lakes due to transport and deposition. Ecological risk assessment of triazines, especially for pristine aquatic environments should include consideration of this atmospheric pathway.

  6. Finding identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear ODE models and the rational reparameterization of their input-output equations.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Anderson, Chris; Distefano, Joseph J

    2011-09-01

    When examining the structural identifiability properties of dynamic system models, some parameters can take on an infinite number of values and yet yield identical input-output data. These parameters and the model are then said to be unidentifiable. Finding identifiable combinations of parameters with which to reparameterize the model provides a means for quantitatively analyzing the model and computing solutions in terms of the combinations. In this paper, we revisit and explore the properties of an algorithm for finding identifiable parameter combinations using Gröbner Bases and prove useful theoretical properties of these parameter combinations. We prove a set of M algebraically independent identifiable parameter combinations can be found using this algorithm and that there exists a unique rational reparameterization of the input-output equations over these parameter combinations. We also demonstrate application of the procedure to a nonlinear biomodel.

  7. Additional Investigations of Ice Shape Sensitivity to Parameter Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Langhals, Tammy J.

    2006-01-01

    A second parameter sensitivity study was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) using a 36 in. chord (0.91 m) NACA-0012 airfoil. The objective of this work was to further investigate the feasibility of using ice shape feature changes to define requirements for the simulation and measurement of SLD and appendix C icing conditions. A previous study concluded that it was feasible to use changes in ice shape features (e.g., ice horn angle, ice horn thickness, and ice shape mass) to detect relatively small variations in icing spray condition parameters (LWC, MVD, and temperature). The subject of this current investigation extends the scope of this previous work, by also examining the effect of icing tunnel spray-bar parameter variations (water pressure, air pressure) on ice shape feature changes. The approach was to vary spray-bar water pressure and air pressure, and then evaluate the effects of these parameter changes on the resulting ice shapes. This paper will provide a description of the experimental method, present selected experimental results, and conclude with an evaluation of these results.

  8. Star Classification for the Kepler Input Catalog: From Images to Stellar Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, T. M.; Everett, M.; Latham, D. W.; Monet, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    The Stellar Classification Project is a ground-based effort to screen stars within the Kepler field of view, to allow removal of stars with large radii (and small potential transit signals) from the target list. Important components of this process are: (1) An automated photometry pipeline estimates observed magnitudes both for target stars and for stars in several calibration fields. (2) Data from calibration fields yield extinction-corrected AB magnitudes (with g, r, i, z magnitudes transformed to the SDSS system). We merge these with 2MASS J, H, K magnitudes. (3) The Basel grid of stellar atmosphere models yields synthetic colors, which are transformed to our photometric system by calibration against observations of stars in M67. (4) We combine the r magnitude and stellar galactic latitude with a simple model of interstellar extinction to derive a relation connecting {Teff, luminosity} to distance and reddening. For models satisfying this relation, we compute a chi-squared statistic describing the match between each model and the observed colors. (5) We create a merit function based on the chi-squared statistic, and on a Bayesian prior probability distribution which gives probability as a function of Teff, luminosity, log(Z), and height above the galactic plane. The stellar parameters ascribed to a star are those of the model that maximizes this merit function. (6) Parameter estimates are merged with positional and other information from extant catalogs to yield the Kepler Input Catalog, from which targets will be chosen. Testing and validation of this procedure are underway, with encouraging initial results.

  9. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Monitoring and Reporting § 96.76 Additional...

  10. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Monitoring and Reporting § 96.76 Additional...

  11. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V.; Rooney, William D.; Garzotto, Mark G.; Springer, Charles S.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (Ktrans) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  12. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V; Rooney, William D; Garzotto, Mark G; Springer, Charles S

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (K(trans)) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  13. Variance estimation of modal parameters from output-only and input/output subspace-based system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, Philippe; Döhler, Michael; Mevel, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    An important step in the operational modal analysis of a structure is to infer on its dynamic behavior through its modal parameters. They can be estimated by various modal identification algorithms that fit a theoretical model to measured data. When output-only data is available, i.e. measured responses of the structure, frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes can be identified assuming that ambient sources like wind or traffic excite the system sufficiently. When also input data is available, i.e. signals used to excite the structure, input/output identification algorithms are used. The use of input information usually provides better modal estimates in a desired frequency range. While the identification of the modal mass is not considered in this paper, we focus on the estimation of the frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes, relevant for example for modal analysis during in-flight monitoring of aircrafts. When identifying the modal parameters from noisy measurement data, the information on their uncertainty is most relevant. In this paper, new variance computation schemes for modal parameters are developed for four subspace algorithms, including output-only and input/output methods, as well as data-driven and covariance-driven methods. For the input/output methods, the known inputs are considered as realizations of a stochastic process. Based on Monte Carlo validations, the quality of identification, accuracy of variance estimations and sensor noise robustness are discussed. Finally these algorithms are applied on real measured data obtained during vibrations tests of an aircraft.

  14. A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M.

    1997-08-01

    A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values.

  15. Hunting for hydrogen: random structure searching and prediction of NMR parameters of hydrous wadsleyite† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Further information on the structures generated by AIRSS, alternative structural models, supercell calculations, total enthalpies of all computed structures and further information on 1H/2H NMR parameters. Example input and all raw output files from AIRSS and CASTEP NMR calculations are also included. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cp01529h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Robert F.; McKay, David; Pickard, Chris J.; Berry, Andrew J.; Griffin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The structural chemistry of materials containing low levels of nonstoichiometric hydrogen is difficult to determine, and producing structural models is challenging where hydrogen has no fixed crystallographic site. Here we demonstrate a computational approach employing ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to generate a series of candidate structures for hydrous wadsleyite (β-Mg2SiO4 with 1.6 wt% H2O), a high-pressure mineral proposed as a repository for water in the Earth's transition zone. Aligning with previous experimental work, we solely consider models with Mg3 (over Mg1, Mg2 or Si) vacancies. We adapt the AIRSS method by starting with anhydrous wadsleyite, removing a single Mg2+ and randomly placing two H+ in a unit cell model, generating 819 candidate structures. 103 geometries were then subjected to more accurate optimisation under periodic DFT. Using this approach, we find the most favourable hydration mechanism involves protonation of two O1 sites around the Mg3 vacancy. The formation of silanol groups on O3 or O4 sites (with loss of stable O1–H hydroxyls) coincides with an increase in total enthalpy. Importantly, the approach we employ allows observables such as NMR parameters to be computed for each structure. We consider hydrous wadsleyite (∼1.6 wt%) to be dominated by protonated O1 sites, with O3/O4–H silanol groups present as defects, a model that maps well onto experimental studies at higher levels of hydration (J. M. Griffin et al., Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 1523). The AIRSS approach adopted herein provides the crucial link between atomic-scale structure and experimental studies. PMID:27020937

  16. Guidance for Selecting Input Parameters in Modeling the Environmental Fate and Transport of Pesticides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance to select and prepare input values for OPP's aquatic exposure models. Intended to improve the consistency in modeling the fate of pesticides in the environment and quality of OPP's aquatic risk assessments.

  17. Evaluation of Uncertainty in Constituent Input Parameters for Modeling the Fate of RDX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    analysis . The previous application of TREECS™ that was selected for study was the one for Demolition (Demo) Area 2 at Massachusetts Military Reservation...MODEL UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS : As with all modeling, there are uncertainties in the prescribed model inputs. The uncertainty is greater for some inputs...plume centerline may not be well known in most cases. Usually, the centerline is assumed to align in the primary direction of Darcy flow , or along the

  18. On the reliability of voltage and power as input parameters for the characterization of high power ultrasound applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Julian; Wilkens, Volker

    2012-11-01

    For power levels up to 200 W and sonication times up to 60 s, the electrical power, the voltage and the electrical impedance (more exactly: the ratio of RMS voltage and RMS current) have been measured for a piezocomposite high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) transducer with integrated matching network, two piezoceramic HITU transducers with external matching networks and for a passive dummy 50 Ω load. The electrical power and the voltage were measured during high power application with an inline power meter and an RMS voltage meter, respectively, and the complex electrical impedance was indirectly measured with a current probe, a 100:1 voltage probe and a digital scope. The results clearly show that the input RMS voltage and the input RMS power change unequally during the application. Hence, the indication of only the electrical input power or only the voltage as the input parameter may not be sufficient for reliable characterizations of ultrasound transducers for high power applications in some cases.

  19. Active vibration control of Flexible Joint Manipulator using Input Shaping and Adaptive Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. P.; Luo, B.; Huang, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a vibration control strategy for a two-link Flexible Joint Manipulator (FJM) with a Hexapod Active Manipulator (HAM). A dynamic model of the multi-body, rigid-flexible system composed of an FJM, a HAM and a spacecraft was built. A hybrid controller was proposed by combining the Input Shaping (IS) technique with an Adaptive-Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller (APADRC). The controller was used to suppress the vibration caused by external disturbances and input motions. Parameters of the APADRC were adaptively adjusted to ensure the characteristic of the closed loop system to be a given reference system, even if the configuration of the manipulator significantly changes during motion. Because precise parameters of the flexible manipulator are not required in the IS system, the operation of the controller was sufficiently robust to accommodate uncertainties in system parameters. Simulations results verified the effectiveness of the HAM scheme and controller in the vibration suppression of FJM during operation.

  20. Blind Deconvolution for Distributed Parameter Systems with Unbounded Input and Output and Determining Blood Alcohol Concentration from Transdermal Biosensor Data.

    PubMed

    Rosen, I G; Luczak, Susan E; Weiss, Jordan

    2014-03-15

    We develop a blind deconvolution scheme for input-output systems described by distributed parameter systems with boundary input and output. An abstract functional analytic theory based on results for the linear quadratic control of infinite dimensional systems with unbounded input and output operators is presented. The blind deconvolution problem is then reformulated as a series of constrained linear and nonlinear optimization problems involving infinite dimensional dynamical systems. A finite dimensional approximation and convergence theory is developed. The theory is applied to the problem of estimating blood or breath alcohol concentration (respectively, BAC or BrAC) from biosensor-measured transdermal alcohol concentration (TAC) in the field. A distributed parameter model with boundary input and output is proposed for the transdermal transport of ethanol from the blood through the skin to the sensor. The problem of estimating BAC or BrAC from the TAC data is formulated as a blind deconvolution problem. A scheme to identify distinct drinking episodes in TAC data based on a Hodrick Prescott filter is discussed. Numerical results involving actual patient data are presented.

  1. Methods to Register Models and Input/Output Parameters for Integrated Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.; Whelan, Gene; Tryby, Michael E.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Taira, Randal Y.; Dorow, Kevin E.

    2010-07-10

    Significant resources can be required when constructing integrated modeling systems. In a typical application, components (e.g., models and databases) created by different developers are assimilated, requiring the framework’s functionality to bridge the gap between the user’s knowledge of the components being linked. The framework, therefore, needs the capability to assimilate a wide range of model-specific input/output requirements as well as their associated assumptions and constraints. The process of assimilating such disparate components into an integrated modeling framework varies in complexity and difficulty. Several factors influence the relative ease of assimilating components, including, but not limited to, familiarity with the components being assimilated, familiarity with the framework and its tools that support the assimilation process, level of documentation associated with the components and the framework, and design structure of the components and framework. This initial effort reviews different approaches for assimilating models and their model-specific input/output requirements: 1) modifying component models to directly communicate with the framework (i.e., through an Application Programming Interface), 2) developing model-specific external wrappers such that no component model modifications are required, 3) using parsing tools to visually map pre-existing input/output files, and 4) describing and linking models as dynamic link libraries. Most of these approaches are illustrated using the widely distributed modeling system called Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES). The review concludes that each has its strengths and weakness, the factors that determine which approaches work best in a given application.

  2. Optimization of input parameters of acoustic-transfection for the intracellular delivery of macromolecules using FRET-based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic-transfection technique has been developed for the first time. We have developed acoustic-transfection by integrating a high frequency ultrasonic transducer and a fluorescence microscope. High frequency ultrasound with the center frequency over 150 MHz can focus acoustic sound field into a confined area with the diameter of 10 μm or less. This focusing capability was used to perturb lipid bilayer of cell membrane to induce intracellular delivery of macromolecules. Single cell level imaging was performed to investigate the behavior of a targeted single-cell after acoustic-transfection. FRET-based Ca2+ biosensor was used to monitor intracellular concentration of Ca2+ after acoustic-transfection and the fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide (PI) was used to observe influx of PI molecules. We changed peak-to-peak voltages and pulse duration to optimize the input parameters of an acoustic pulse. Input parameters that can induce strong perturbations on cell membrane were found and size dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules was explored. To increase the amount of delivered molecules by acoustic-transfection, we applied several acoustic pulses and the intensity of PI fluorescence increased step wise. Finally, optimized input parameters of acoustic-transfection system were used to deliver pMax-E2F1 plasmid and GFP expression 24 hours after the intracellular delivery was confirmed using HeLa cells.

  3. A Sensitivity Study of Liric Algorithm to User-defined Input Parameters, Using Selected Cases from Thessaloniki's Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filioglou, M.; Balis, D.; Siomos, N.; Poupkou, A.; Dimopoulos, S.; Chaikovsky, A.

    2016-06-01

    A targeted sensitivity study of the LIRIC algorithm was considered necessary to estimate the uncertainty introduced to the volume concentration profiles, due to the arbitrary selection of user-defined input parameters. For this purpose three different tests were performed using Thessaloniki's Lidar data. Overall, tests in the selection of the regularization parameters, an upper and a lower limit test were performed. The different sensitivity tests were applied on two cases with different predominant aerosol types, a dust episode and a typical urban case.

  4. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Quantification of major input parameters. Experts` determination of structural response issues

    SciTech Connect

    Breeding, R.J.; Harper, F.T.; Brown, T.D.; Gregory, J.J.; Payne, A.C.; Gorham, E.D.; Murfin, W.; Amos, C.N.

    1992-03-01

    In support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) assessment of the risk from severe accidents at commercial nuclear power plants in the US reported in NUREG-1150, the Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program (SAARP) has completed a revised calculation of the risk to the general public from severe accidents at five nuclear power plants: Surry, Sequoyah, Zion, Peach Bottom, and Grand Gulf. The emphasis in this risk analysis was not on determining a ``so-called`` point estimate of risk. Rather, it was to determine the distribution of risk, and to discover the uncertainties that account for the breadth of this distribution. Off-site risk initiation by events, both internal to the power station and external to the power station were assessed. Much of the important input to the logic models was generated by expert panels. This document presents the distributions and the rationale supporting the distributions for the questions posed to the Structural Response Panel.

  5. Optimal input experiment design and parameter estimation in core-scale pressure oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potters, M. G.; Mansoori, M.; Bombois, X.; Jansen, J. D.; Van den Hof, P. M. J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers Pressure Oscillation (PO) experiments for which we find the minimum experiment time that guarantees user-imposed parameter variance upper bounds and honours actuator limits. The parameters permeability and porosity are estimated with a classical least-squares estimation method for which an expression of the covariance matrix of the estimates is calculated. This expression is used to tackle the optimization problem. We study the Dynamic Darcy Cell experiment set-up (Heller et al., 2002) and focus on data generation using square wave actuator signals, which, as we shall prove, deliver shorter experiment times than sinusoidal ones. Parameter identification is achieved using either inlet pressure/outlet pressure measurements (Heller et al., 2002) or actuator position/outlet pressure measurements, where the latter is a novel approach. The solution to the optimization problem reveals that for both measurement methods an optimal excitation frequency, an optimal inlet volume, and an optimal outlet volume exist. We find that under the same parameter variance bounds and actuator constraints, actuator position/outlet pressure measurements result in required experiment times that are a factor fourteen smaller compared to inlet pressure/outlet pressure measurements. This result is analysed in detail and we find that the dominant effect driving this difference originates from an identifiability problem when using inlet-outlet pressure measurements for joint estimation of permeability and porosity. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations, and show excellent agreement with theoretical expectations.

  6. Impact of input parameters on the prediction of hepatic plasma clearance using the well-stirred model.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hong; Bold, Peter; Larsson, Lars-Olof; Ulander, Johan; Peters, Sheila; Löfberg, Boel; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Någård, Mats; Llinàs, Antonio

    2010-09-01

    The in vitro metabolic stability assays are indispensable for screening the metabolic liability of new chemical entities (NCEs) in drug discovery. Intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) values from liver microsomes and/or hepatocytes are frequently used to assess metabolic stability as well as to quantitatively predict in vivo hepatic plasma clearance (CL(H)). An often used approximation is the so called well-stirred model which has gained widespread use. The applications of the well-stirred model are typically dependent on several measured parameters and hence with potential for error-propagation. Despite widespread use, it was recently suggested that the well-stirred model in some circumstances has been misused for in vitro in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). In this work, we follow up that discussion and present a retrospective analysis of IVIVE for hepatic clearance prediction from in vitro metabolic stability data. We focus on the impact of input parameters on the well stirred model; in particular comparing "reference model" (with all experimentally determined values as input parameters) versus simplified models (with incomplete input parameters in the models). Based on a systematic comparative analysis and model comparison using datasets of diverse drug-like compounds and NCEs from rat and human, we conclude that simplified models, disregarding binding data, may be sufficiently good for IVIVE evaluation and compound ranking at early stage for cost-effective screening. Factors that can influence prediction accuracy are discussed, including in vitro intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) and in vivo CL(int) scaling factor used, non-specific binding to microsomes (fu(m)), blood to plasma ratio (C(B)/C(P)) and in particular fraction unbound in plasma (fu). In particular, the fu discrepancies between literature data and in-house values and between two different compound concentrations 1 and 10 µM are exemplified and its potential impact on prediction performance is demonstrated using a

  7. An Integrated Hydrologic Bayesian Multi-Model Combination Framework: Confronting Input, parameter and model structural uncertainty in Hydrologic Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Ajami, N K; Duan, Q; Sorooshian, S

    2006-05-05

    This paper presents a new technique--Integrated Bayesian Uncertainty Estimator (IBUNE) to account for the major uncertainties of hydrologic rainfall-runoff predictions explicitly. The uncertainties from the input (forcing) data--mainly the precipitation observations and from the model parameters are reduced through a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) scheme named Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis (SCEM) algorithm which has been extended to include a precipitation error model. Afterwards, the Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) scheme is employed to further improve the prediction skill and uncertainty estimation using multiple model output. A series of case studies using three rainfall-runoff models to predict the streamflow in the Leaf River basin, Mississippi are used to examine the necessity and usefulness of this technique. The results suggests that ignoring either input forcings error or model structural uncertainty will lead to unrealistic model simulations and their associated uncertainty bounds which does not consistently capture and represent the real-world behavior of the watershed.

  8. The sensitivity of conduit flow models to basic input parameters: there is no need for magma trolls!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. E.; Neuberg, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    Many conduit flow models now exist and some of these models are becoming extremely complicated, conducted in three dimensions and incorporating the physics of compressible three phase fluids (magmas), intricate conduit geometries and fragmentation processes, to name but a few examples. These highly specialised models are being used to explain observations of the natural system, and there is a danger that possible explanations may be getting needlessly complex. It is coherent, for instance, to propose the involvement of sub-surface dwelling magma trolls as an explanation for the change in a volcanoes eruptive style, but assuming the simplest explanation would prevent such additions, unless they were absolutely necessary. While the understanding of individual, often small scale conduit processes is increasing rapidly, is this level of detail necessary? How sensitive are these models to small changes in the most basic of governing parameters? Can these changes be used to explain observed behaviour? Here we will examine the sensitivity of conduit flow models to changes in the melt viscosity, one of the fundamental inputs to any such model. However, even addressing this elementary issue is not straight forward. There are several viscosity models in existence, how do they differ? Can models that use different viscosity models be realistically compared? Each of these viscosity models is also heavily dependent on the magma composition and/or temperature, and how well are these variables constrained? Magma temperatures and water contents are often assumed as "ball-park" figures, and are very rarely exactly known for the periods of observation the models are attempting to explain, yet they exhibit a strong controlling factor on the melt viscosity. The role of both these variables will be discussed. For example, using one of the available viscosity models a 20 K decrease in temperature of the melt results in a greater than 100% increase in the melt viscosity. With changes of

  9. Probabilistic Parameter Uncertainty Analysis of Single Input Single Output Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brett A.; Kenny, Sean P.; Crespo, Luis G.

    2005-01-01

    The current standards for handling uncertainty in control systems use interval bounds for definition of the uncertain parameters. This approach gives no information about the likelihood of system performance, but simply gives the response bounds. When used in design, current methods of m-analysis and can lead to overly conservative controller design. With these methods, worst case conditions are weighted equally with the most likely conditions. This research explores a unique approach for probabilistic analysis of control systems. Current reliability methods are examined showing the strong areas of each in handling probability. A hybrid method is developed using these reliability tools for efficiently propagating probabilistic uncertainty through classical control analysis problems. The method developed is applied to classical response analysis as well as analysis methods that explore the effects of the uncertain parameters on stability and performance metrics. The benefits of using this hybrid approach for calculating the mean and variance of responses cumulative distribution functions are shown. Results of the probabilistic analysis of a missile pitch control system, and a non-collocated mass spring system, show the added information provided by this hybrid analysis.

  10. Intensity Inhomogeneity Correction of Structural MR Images: A Data-Driven Approach to Define Input Algorithm Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ganzetti, Marco; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Intensity non-uniformity (INU) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a major issue when conducting analyses of brain structural properties. An inaccurate INU correction may result in qualitative and quantitative misinterpretations. Several INU correction methods exist, whose performance largely depend on the specific parameter settings that need to be chosen by the user. Here we addressed the question of how to select the best input parameters for a specific INU correction algorithm. Our investigation was based on the INU correction algorithm implemented in SPM, but this can be in principle extended to any other algorithm requiring the selection of input parameters. We conducted a comprehensive comparison of indirect metrics for the assessment of INU correction performance, namely the coefficient of variation of white matter (CVWM), the coefficient of variation of gray matter (CVGM), and the coefficient of joint variation between white matter and gray matter (CJV). Using simulated MR data, we observed the CJV to be more accurate than CVWM and CVGM, provided that the noise level in the INU-corrected image was controlled by means of spatial smoothing. Based on the CJV, we developed a data-driven approach for selecting INU correction parameters, which could effectively work on actual MR images. To this end, we implemented an enhanced procedure for the definition of white and gray matter masks, based on which the CJV was calculated. Our approach was validated using actual T1-weighted images collected with 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T MR scanners. We found that our procedure can reliably assist the selection of valid INU correction algorithm parameters, thereby contributing to an enhanced inhomogeneity correction in MR images. PMID:27014050

  11. Improving Rotor-Stator Interaction Noise Code Through Analysis of Input Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unton, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    There are two major sources of aircraft noise. The first is from the airframe and the second is from the engines. The focus of the acoustics branch at NASA Glenn is on the engine noise sources. There are two major sources of engine noise; fan noise and jet noise. Fan noise, produced by rotating machinery of the engine, consists of both tonal noise, which occurs at discrete frequencies, and broadband noise, which occurs across a wide range of frequencies. The focus of my assignment is on the broadband noise generated by the interaction of fan flow turbulence and the stator blades. such as the sweep and stagger angles and blade count, as well as the flow parameters such as intensity of turbulence in the flow. The tool I employed in this work is a computer program that predicts broadband noise from fans. The program assumes that the complex shape of the curved blade can be represented as a single flat plate, allowing it to use fairly simple equations that can be solved in a reasonable amount of time. While the results from such representation provided reasonable estimates of the broadband noise levels, they did not usually represent the entire spectrum accurately. My investigation found that the discrepancy between data and theory can be improved if the leading edge and the trailing edge of the blade are treated separately. Using this approach, I reduced the maximum error in noise level from a high of 30% to less than 5% for the cases investigated. Detailed results of this investigation will be discussed at my presentation. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of geometric parameters

  12. Flight Test Validation of Optimal Input Design and Comparison to Conventional Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1997-01-01

    A technique for designing optimal inputs for aerodynamic parameter estimation was flight tested on the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV). Model parameter accuracies calculated from flight test data were compared on an equal basis for optimal input designs and conventional inputs at the same flight condition. In spite of errors in the a priori input design models and distortions of the input form by the feedback control system, the optimal inputs increased estimated parameter accuracies compared to conventional 3-2-1-1 and doublet inputs. In addition, the tests using optimal input designs demonstrated enhanced design flexibility, allowing the optimal input design technique to use a larger input amplitude to achieve further increases in estimated parameter accuracy without departing from the desired flight test condition. This work validated the analysis used to develop the optimal input designs, and demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the optimal input design technique.

  13. Isotope parameters (δD, δ18O) and sources of freshwater input to Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinina, E. O.; Kossova, S. A.; Miroshnikov, A. Yu.; Fyaizullina, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    The isotope characteristics (δD, δ18O) of Kara Sea water were studied for quantitative estimation of freshwater runoff at stations located along transect from Yamal Peninsula to Blagopoluchiya Bay (Novaya Zemlya). Freshwater samples were studied for glaciers (Rose, Serp i Molot) and for Yenisei and Ob estuaries. As a whole, δD and δ18O are higher in glaciers than in river waters. isotope composition of estuarial water from Ob River is δD =-131.4 and δ18O =-17.6‰. Estuarial waters of Yenisei River are characterized by compositions close to those of Ob River (-134.4 and-17.7‰), as well as by isotopically "heavier" compositions (-120.7 and-15.8‰). Waters from studied section of Kara Sea can be product of mixing of freshwater (δD =-119.4, δ18O =-15.5) and seawater (S = 34.9, δD = +1.56, δ18O = +0.25) with a composition close to that of Barents Sea water. isotope parameters of water vary significantly with salinity in surface layer, and Kara Sea waters are desalinated along entire studied transect due to river runoff. concentration of freshwater is 5-10% in main part of water column, and <5% at a depth of >100 m. maximum contribution of freshwater (>65%) was recorded in surface layer of central part of sea.

  14. Simulation and Flight Evaluation of a Parameter Estimation Input Design Method for Hybrid-Wing-Body Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an effort to improve emissions, noise, and performance of next generation aircraft, it is expected that future aircraft will make use of distributed, multi-objective control effectors in a closed-loop flight control system. Correlation challenges associated with parameter estimation will arise with this expected aircraft configuration. Research presented in this paper focuses on addressing the correlation problem with an appropriate input design technique and validating this technique through simulation and flight test of the X-48B aircraft. The X-48B aircraft is an 8.5 percent-scale hybrid wing body aircraft demonstrator designed by The Boeing Company (Chicago, Illinois, USA), built by Cranfield Aerospace Limited (Cranfield, Bedford, United Kingdom) and flight tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA). Based on data from flight test maneuvers performed at Dryden Flight Research Center, aerodynamic parameter estimation was performed using linear regression and output error techniques. An input design technique that uses temporal separation for de-correlation of control surfaces is proposed, and simulation and flight test results are compared with the aerodynamic database. This paper will present a method to determine individual control surface aerodynamic derivatives.

  15. A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Yosif A; Khalil, Rabah A

    2006-10-01

    A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method has been introduced. Three general nitrogen-15 NMR chemical shift additivity parameters with physical significance for aliphatic amines in methanol and cyclohexane and their hydrochlorides in methanol have been derived. A characteristic feature of these additivity parameters is the individual equation can be applied to both open-chain and rigid systems. The factors that influence the (15)N chemical shift of these substances have been determined. A new method for evaluating conformational equilibria at nitrogen in these compounds using the derived additivity parameters has been developed. Conformational analyses of these substances have been worked out. In general, the results indicate that there are four factors affecting the (15)N chemical shift of aliphatic amines; paramagnetic term (p-character), lone pair-proton interactions, proton-proton interactions, symmetry of alkyl substituents and molecular association.

  16. Additional field verification of convective scaling for the lateral dispersion parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, S.K.; Davis, P.A.

    1988-07-01

    The results of a series of diffusion trials over the heterogeneous surface of the Canadian Precambrian Shield provide additional support for the convective scaling of the lateral dispersion parameter. The data indicate that under convective conditions, the lateral dispersion parameter can be scaled with the convective velocity scale and the mixing depth. 10 references.

  17. Rheological parameters of dough with inulin addition and its effect on bread quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojnanska, T.; Tokar, M.; Vollmannova, A.

    2015-04-01

    The rheological properties of enriched flour prepared with an addition of inulin were studied. The addition of inulin caused changes of the rheological parameters of the recorder curve. 10% and more addition significantly extended development time and on the farinogram were two peaks of consistency, what is a non-standard shape. With increasing addition of inulin resistance to deformation grows and dough is difficult to process, over 15% addition make dough short and unsuitable for making bread. Bread volume, the most important parameter, significantly decreased with inulin addition. Our results suggest a level of 5% inulin to produce a functional bread of high sensory acceptance and a level of 10% inulin produce a bread of satisfactory sensory acceptance. Bread with a level over 10% of inulin was unsatisfactory.

  18. Influence of additive laser manufacturing parameters on surface using density of partially melted particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Benoit; Brient, Antoine; Samper, Serge; Hascoët, Jean-Yves

    2016-12-01

    Mastering the additive laser manufacturing surface is a real challenge and would allow functional surfaces to be obtained without finishing. Direct Metal Deposition (DMD) surfaces are composed by directional and chaotic textures that are directly linked to the process principles. The aim of this work is to obtain surface topographies by mastering the operating process parameters. Based on experimental investigation, the influence of operating parameters on the surface finish has been modeled. Topography parameters and multi-scale analysis have been used in order to characterize the DMD obtained surfaces. This study also proposes a methodology to characterize DMD chaotic texture through topography filtering and 3D image treatment. In parallel, a new parameter is proposed: density of particles (D p). Finally, this study proposes a regression modeling between process parameters and density of particles parameter.

  19. Sensitivity of soil water content simulation to different methods of soil hydraulic parameter characterization as initial input values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Meisam; Seuntjens, Piet; Shahidi, Reihaneh; Joris, Ingeborg; Boënne, Wesley; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Soil hydraulic parameters, which can be derived from in situ and/or laboratory experiments, are key input parameters for modeling water flow in the vadose zone. In this study, we measured soil hydraulic properties with typical laboratory measurements and field tension infiltration experiments using Wooding's analytical solution and inverse optimization along the vertical direction within two typical podzol profiles with sand texture in a potato field. The objective was to identify proper sets of hydraulic parameters and to evaluate their relevance on hydrological model performance for irrigation management purposes. Tension disc infiltration experiments were carried out at five different depths for both profiles at consecutive negative pressure heads of 12, 6, 3 and 0.1 cm. At the same locations and depths undisturbed samples were taken to determine the water retention curve with hanging water column and pressure extractors and lab saturated hydraulic conductivity with the constant head method. Both approaches allowed to determine the Mualem-van Genuchten (MVG) hydraulic parameters (residual water content θr, saturated water content θs,, shape parameters α and n, and field or lab saturated hydraulic conductivity Kfs and Kls). Results demonstrated horizontal differences and vertical variability of hydraulic properties. Inverse optimization resulted in excellent matches between observed and fitted infiltration rates in combination with final water content at the end of the experiment, θf, using Hydrus 2D/3D. It also resulted in close correspondence of  and Kfs with those from Logsdon and Jaynes' (1993) solution of Wooding's equation. The MVG parameters Kfs and α estimated from the inverse solution (θr set to zero), were relatively similar to values from Wooding's solution which were used as initial value and the estimated θs corresponded to (effective) field saturated water content θf. We found the Gardner parameter αG to be related to the optimized van

  20. F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) parameter identification flight test maneuvers for optimal input design validation and lateral control effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1995-01-01

    Flight test maneuvers are specified for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The maneuvers were designed for open loop parameter identification purposes, specifically for optimal input design validation at 5 degrees angle of attack, identification of individual strake effectiveness at 40 and 50 degrees angle of attack, and study of lateral dynamics and lateral control effectiveness at 40 and 50 degrees angle of attack. Each maneuver is to be realized by applying square wave inputs to specific control effectors using the On-Board Excitation System (OBES). Maneuver descriptions and complete specifications of the time/amplitude points define each input are included, along with plots of the input time histories.

  1. Sampling of Stochastic Input Parameters for Rockfall Calculations and for Structural Response Calculations Under Vibratory Ground Motion

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to define the sampled values of stochastic (random) input parameters for (1) rockfall calculations in the lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones under vibratory ground motions, and (2) structural response calculations for the drip shield and waste package under vibratory ground motions. This analysis supplies: (1) Sampled values of ground motion time history and synthetic fracture pattern for analysis of rockfall in emplacement drifts in nonlithophysal rock (Section 6.3 of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'', BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]); (2) Sampled values of ground motion time history and rock mechanical properties category for analysis of rockfall in emplacement drifts in lithophysal rock (Section 6.4 of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'', BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]); (3) Sampled values of ground motion time history and metal to metal and metal to rock friction coefficient for analysis of waste package and drip shield damage to vibratory motion in ''Structural Calculations of Waste Package Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167083]) and in ''Structural Calculations of Drip Shield Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163425]). The sampled values are indices representing the number of ground motion time histories, number of fracture patterns and rock mass properties categories. These indices are translated into actual values within the respective analysis and model reports or calculations. This report identifies the uncertain parameters and documents the sampled values for these parameters. The sampled values are determined by GoldSim V6.04.007 [DIRS 151202] calculations using appropriate distribution types and parameter ranges. No software development or model development was required for these calculations. The calculation of the sampled values allows parameter uncertainty to be incorporated into the rockfall and structural response calculations that support development of the seismic scenario for the

  2. Regulatory consideration of bioavailability for metals: simplification of input parameters for the chronic copper biotic ligand model.

    PubMed

    Peters, Adam; Merrington, Graham; de Schamphelaere, Karel; Delbeke, Katrien

    2011-07-01

    The chronic Cu biotic ligand model (CuBLM) provides a means by which the bioavailability of Cu can be taken into account in assessing the potential chronic risks posed by Cu at specific freshwater locations. One of the barriers to the widespread regulatory application of the CuBLM is the perceived complexity of the approach when compared to the current systems that are in place in many regulatory organizations. The CuBLM requires 10 measured input parameters, although some of these have a relatively limited influence on the predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) for Cu. Simplification of the input requirements of the CuBLM is proposed by estimating the concentrations of the major ions Mg2+, Na+, K+, SO4(2-), Cl- , and alkalinity from Ca concentrations. A series of relationships between log10 (Ca, mg l(-1)) and log10 (major ion, mg l(-1)) was established from surface water monitoring data for Europe, and applied in the prediction of Cu PNEC values for some UK freshwater monitoring data. The use of default values for major ion concentrations was also considered, and both approaches were compared to the use of measured major ion concentrations. Both the use of fixed default major ion concentrations, and major ion concentrations estimated from Ca concentrations, provided Cu PNEC predictions which were in good agreement with the results of calculations using measured data. There is a slight loss of accuracy when using estimates of major ion concentrations compared to using measured concentration data, although to a lesser extent than when fixed default values are applied. The simplifications proposed provide a practical evidence-based methodology to facilitate the regulatory implementation of the CuBLM.

  3. Transportation radiological risk assessment for the programmatic environmental impact statement: An overview of methodologies, assumptions, and input parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Monette, F.; Biwer, B.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.Y.

    1994-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is considering a broad range of alternatives for the future configuration of radioactive waste management at its network of facilities. Because the transportation of radioactive waste is an integral component of the management alternatives being considered, the estimated human health risks associated with both routine and accident transportation conditions must be assessed to allow a complete appraisal of the alternatives. This paper provides an overview of the technical approach being used to assess the radiological risks from the transportation of radioactive wastes. The approach presented employs the RADTRAN 4 computer code to estimate the collective population risk during routine and accident transportation conditions. Supplemental analyses are conducted using the RISKIND computer code to address areas of specific concern to individuals or population subgroups. RISKIND is used for estimating routine doses to maximally exposed individuals and for assessing the consequences of the most severe credible transportation accidents. The transportation risk assessment is designed to ensure -- through uniform and judicious selection of models, data, and assumptions -- that relative comparisons of risk among the various alternatives are meaningful. This is accomplished by uniformly applying common input parameters and assumptions to each waste type for all alternatives. The approach presented can be applied to all radioactive waste types and provides a consistent and comprehensive evaluation of transportation-related risk.

  4. User's manual for a parameter identification technique. [with options for model simulation for fixed input forcing functions and identification from wind tunnel and flight measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanning, G.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program written in FORTRAN is presented that implements the system identification theory for deterministic systems using input-output measurements. The user supplies programs simulating the mathematical model of the physical plant whose parameters are to be identified. The user may choose any one of three options. The first option allows for a complete model simulation for fixed input forcing functions. The second option identifies up to 36 parameters of the model from wind tunnel or flight measurements. The third option performs a sensitivity analysis for up to 36 parameters. The use of each option is illustrated with an example using input-output measurements for a helicopter rotor tested in a wind tunnel.

  5. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  6. Geometric calibration of a terrestrial laser scanner with local additional parameters: An automatic strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-San-Miguel, D.; Lerma, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning systems are steadily increasing in many fields of engineering, geoscience and architecture namely for fast data acquisition, 3-D modeling and mapping. Similarly to other precision instruments, these systems provide measurements with implicit systematic errors. Systematic errors are physically corrected by manufacturers before delivery and sporadically afterwards. The approach presented herein tackles the raw observables acquired by a laser scanner with additional parameters, a set of geometric calibration parameters that model the systematic error of the instrument to achieve the most accurate point cloud outputs, improving eventual workflow owing to less filtering, better registration and best 3D modeling. This paper presents a fully automatic strategy to calibrate geometrically terrestrial laser scanning datasets. The strategy is tested with multiple scans taken by a FARO FOCUS 3D, a phase-based terrestrial laser scanner. A calibration with local parameters for datasets is undertaken to improve the raw observables and a weighted mathematical index is proposed to select the most significant set of additional parameters. The improvements achieved are exposed, highlighting the necessity of correcting the terrestrial laser scanner before handling multiple data sets.

  7. A New Metamodeling Approach for Time-dependent Reliability of Dynamic Systems with Random Parameters Excited by Input Random Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-09

    random process. A kriging model is then established between the input and output decomposition coefficients and subsequently used to quantify the...output random process. A kriging model is then established between the input and output decomposition coefficients and subsequently used to quantify the...estimate the distributions of the decomposition coefficients. A similar decomposition is also performed on the output random process. A kriging

  8. To establish the parameters of optimal nutrition do we need to consider psychological in addition to physiological parameters?

    PubMed

    Benton, David

    2013-01-01

    The criteria used to establish dietary reference values are discussed and it is suggested that the too often the "need" they aim to satisfy is at the best vaguely specified. The proposition is considered that if we aim to establish optimal nutrition we will gain from considering psychological in addition to physiological parameters. The brain is by a considerable extent the most complex and metabolically active organ in the body. As such it would be predicted that the first signs of minor subclinical deficiencies will be the disruption of the functioning of the brain. The output of the brain is the product of countless millions of biochemical processes, such that if enzyme activity is only a few percentage points less than maximum, a cumulative influence would result. A series of studies of micronutrient supplementation in well-designed trials were reviewed. In metaanalyses the cognitive functioning of children and the mood and memory of adults has been shown to respond to multivitamin/mineral supplementation. Given the concerns that have been expressed about the negative responses to high levels of micronutrients, the implications are discussed of the finding that psychological functioning may benefits from an intake greater than those currently recommended.

  9. Results of investigations of Ethernet network fault-tolerance parameters by using additional analysis subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, Albert H.; Gayfulin, Renat R.; Vinogradova, Irina L.

    2008-04-01

    Fiber optic telecommunication systems with duplex data transmitting over single fiber require reflection minimization. Moreover reflections may be so high that causes system deactivating by misoperation of conventional alarm, and system can not automatically adjudge the collision, so operator manual control is required. In this paper we proposed technical solution of mentioned problem based on additional analysis subsystem, realized on the installed Ufa-city fiber optic CTV system "Crystal". Experience of it's maintenance and results of investigations of the fault tolerance parameters are represented

  10. Blind Deconvolution for Distributed Parameter Systems with Unbounded Input and Output and Determining Blood Alcohol Concentration from Transdermal Biosensor Data(1)

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, I.G.; Luczak, Susan E.; Weiss, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    We develop a blind deconvolution scheme for input-output systems described by distributed parameter systems with boundary input and output. An abstract functional analytic theory based on results for the linear quadratic control of infinite dimensional systems with unbounded input and output operators is presented. The blind deconvolution problem is then reformulated as a series of constrained linear and nonlinear optimization problems involving infinite dimensional dynamical systems. A finite dimensional approximation and convergence theory is developed. The theory is applied to the problem of estimating blood or breath alcohol concentration (respectively, BAC or BrAC) from biosensor-measured transdermal alcohol concentration (TAC) in the field. A distributed parameter model with boundary input and output is proposed for the transdermal transport of ethanol from the blood through the skin to the sensor. The problem of estimating BAC or BrAC from the TAC data is formulated as a blind deconvolution problem. A scheme to identify distinct drinking episodes in TAC data based on a Hodrick Prescott filter is discussed. Numerical results involving actual patient data are presented. PMID:24707065

  11. A data-input program (MFI2005) for the U.S. Geological Survey modular groundwater model (MODFLOW-2005) and parameter estimation program (UCODE_2005)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harbaugh, Arien W.

    2011-01-01

    The MFI2005 data-input (entry) program was developed for use with the U.S. Geological Survey modular three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater model, MODFLOW-2005. MFI2005 runs on personal computers and is designed to be easy to use; data are entered interactively through a series of display screens. MFI2005 supports parameter estimation using the UCODE_2005 program for parameter estimation. Data for MODPATH, a particle-tracking program for use with MODFLOW-2005, also can be entered using MFI2005. MFI2005 can be used in conjunction with other data-input programs so that the different parts of a model dataset can be entered by using the most suitable program.

  12. Cough reflex is additively potentiated by inputs from the laryngeal and tracheobronchial [corrected] receptors and enhanced by stimulation of the central respiratory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tetsuri; Hayama, Naoki

    2009-09-01

    The cough is an essential airway defense reflex. In this study we investigated the coordination of inputs from the laryngeal and tracheobronchial receptors in the cough reflex. In 15 beagle dogs (7-9 kg) lightly anesthetized with intravenous profobol (20-30 mg/kg/h), the cough response was elicited with mechanical stimulation of either the vocal chord or tracheal bifurcation. Simultaneous stimulation of both sites increased all the parameters of cough strength, that is, mean pleural pressure (P (pl)), mean expiratory flow, number of cough bouts, and cough duration, in comparison with stimulation of the sites individually. The increases in mean P (pl) and cough duration reached statistical significance (13.3 vs. 18.4 cmH(2)O and 13.3 vs. 18.2 s, respectively). When the anesthetic level became deeper, the prolongation of cough duration almost disappeared, but the augmentation of mean P (pl) was much less affected. During stimulation of the central respiratory neurons by intravenous dimorphoramine or acute hyperoxic hypercapnia, the cough strength increased significantly. We concluded that inputs from the laryngeal and tracheobonchial cough receptors acted in concert and potentiated the cough reflex. Furthermore, stimulation of the central respiratory neurons may increase the intensity of a cough response.

  13. BASELINE PARAMETER UPDATE FOR HUMAN HEALTH INPUT AND TRANSFER FACTORS FOR RADIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, T; Patricia Lee, P

    2007-01-31

    The purpose of this report is to update parameters utilized in Human Health Exposure calculations and Bioaccumulation Transfer Factors utilized at SRS for Performance Assessment modeling. The reason for the update is to utilize more recent information issued, validate information currently used and correct minor inconsistencies between modeling efforts performed in SRS contiguous areas of the heavy industrialized central site usage areas called the General Separations Area (GSA). SRS parameters utilized were compared to a number of other DOE facilities and generic national/global references to establish relevance of the parameters selected and/or verify the regional differences of the southeast USA. The parameters selected were specifically chosen to be expected values along with identifying a range for these values versus the overly conservative specification of parameters for estimating an annual dose to the maximum exposed individual (MEI). The end uses are to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data and maintain it via review of any future issued national references to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released. These reviews are to be added to this document by revision.

  14. Effect of processing parameters and glycerin addition on the properties of Al foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilani, Hossein; Jafari, Sajjad; Gholami, Roozbeh; Habibolahzadeh, Ali; Mirshahi, Mohammad

    2012-04-01

    Aluminum foam has been produced by sintering and dissolution processes using NaCl powders as a space holder. In this research, glycerin is used as a novel lubricant along with acetone. The effects of the processing parameters including compacting pressure, sintering temperatures (620, 640 and 650 °C), size, and volume fraction of the space holder, on the physical and mechanical properties of the produced foams have been investigated. Due to segregation of the Al and NaCl powders at high compaction pressures, spalling of Al foams was observed. Meanwhile, adding small amounts of acetone and glycerin to the mixture ensures homogeneity and prevents segregation of dissimilar powders at varying pressure. Moreover, the addition of glycerin provides an improved homogenous stress distribution within the produced foams during mechanical testing, which in turn halts crack propagation. Meanwhile, an alternative technique to remove NaCl particles during the dissolution stage has been proposed. The results showed that high quality foams were successfully produced under a compaction pressure range of 250-265 MPa and sintering temperature of 650 °C.

  15. Application of QbD principles for the evaluation of empty hard capsules as an input parameter in formulation development and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Sven; Connolly, Paul; Matthews, Wayne; Barnett, Rodger; Aylott, Mike; Schrooten, Karin; Cadé, Dominique; Taylor, Anthony; Bresciani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the product and process variable on the final product performance is an essential part of the quality-by-design (QbD) principles in pharmaceutical development. The hard capsule is an established pharmaceutical dosage form used worldwide in development and manufacturing. The empty hard capsules are supplied as an excipient that is filled by pharmaceutical manufacturers with a variety of different formulations and products. To understand the potential variations of the empty hard capsules as an input parameter and its potential impact on the finished product quality, a study was performed investigating the critical quality parameters within and in between different batches of empty hard gelatin capsules. The variability of the hard capsules showed high consistency within the specification of the critical quality parameters. This also accounts for the disintegration times, when automatic endpoint detection was used. Based on these data, hard capsules can be considered as a suitable excipient for product development using QbD principles.

  16. Noontime Latitudinal Behavior of the Ionospheric Peak Parameters (foF2 and hmF2) to the Variation of Solar Energy Input for the American Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabassa-Miranda, E.; Garnett Marques Brum, C.

    2013-12-01

    We are presenting a statistical study of the behavior of the noontime F2 peak parameters (foF2 and hmF2) to the variation of solar energy input based on digisonde data and EUV-UV solar emissions registered by SOHO satellite for geomagnetic quiet-to-normal condition. For this, we selected digisonde data from fourteen different stations spread along the American sector (ten of them located above and four below the equator). These registers were collected from 2000 to 2012 and encompass the last unusual super minimum period.

  17. Effect of a phytogenic feed additive on performance, ovarian morphology, serum lipid parameters and egg sensory quality in laying hen

    PubMed Central

    Saki, Ali Asghar; Aliarabi, Hassan; Hosseini Siyar, Sayed Ali; Salari, Jalal; Hashemi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    This present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary inclusion of 4, 8 and 12 g kg-1 phytogenic feed additives mixture on performance, egg quality, ovary parameters, serum biochemical parameters and yolk trimethylamine level in laying hens. The results of experiment have shown that egg weight was increased by supplementation of 12 g kg-1 feed additive whereas egg production, feed intake and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were not significantly affected. There were no significant differences in egg quality parameters by supplementation of phytogenic feed additive, whereas yolk trimethylamine level was decreased as the feed additive level increased. The sensory evaluation parameters did not differ significantly. No significant differences were found in serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels between the treatments but low- and high-density lipoprotein were significantly increased. Number of small follicles and ovary weight were significantly increased by supplementation of 12 g kg-1 feed additive. Overall, dietary supplementation of polyherbal additive increased egg weigh, improved ovary characteristics and declined yolk trimethylamine level. PMID:25610580

  18. Effect of a phytogenic feed additive on performance, ovarian morphology, serum lipid parameters and egg sensory quality in laying hen.

    PubMed

    Saki, Ali Asghar; Aliarabi, Hassan; Hosseini Siyar, Sayed Ali; Salari, Jalal; Hashemi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    This present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary inclusion of 4, 8 and 12 g kg(-1) phytogenic feed additives mixture on performance, egg quality, ovary parameters, serum biochemical parameters and yolk trimethylamine level in laying hens. The results of experiment have shown that egg weight was increased by supplementation of 12 g kg(-1) feed additive whereas egg production, feed intake and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were not significantly affected. There were no significant differences in egg quality parameters by supplementation of phytogenic feed additive, whereas yolk trimethylamine level was decreased as the feed additive level increased. The sensory evaluation parameters did not differ significantly. No significant differences were found in serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels between the treatments but low- and high-density lipoprotein were significantly increased. Number of small follicles and ovary weight were significantly increased by supplementation of 12 g kg(-1) feed additive. Overall, dietary supplementation of polyherbal additive increased egg weigh, improved ovary characteristics and declined yolk trimethylamine level.

  19. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  20. Seasonal variation in coat characteristics, tick loads, cortisol levels, some physiological parameters and temperature humidity index on Nguni cows raised in low- and high-input farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyatiya, C. L. F.; Muchenje, V.; Mushunje, A.

    2014-08-01

    Seasonal variations in hair length, tick loads, cortisol levels, haematological parameters (HP) and temperature humidity index (THI) in Nguni cows of different colours raised in two low-input farms, and a commercial stud was determined. The sites were chosen based on their production systems, climatic characteristics and geographical locations. Zazulwana and Komga are low-input, humid-coastal areas, while Honeydale is a high-input, dry-inland Nguni stud farm. A total of 103 cows, grouped according to parity, location and coat colour, were used in the study. The effects of location, coat colour, hair length and season were used to determine tick loads on different body parts, cortisol levels and HP in blood from Nguni cows. Highest tick loads were recorded under the tail and the lowest on the head of each of the animals (P < 0.05). Zazulwana cows recorded the highest tick loads under the tails of all the cows used in the study from the three farms (P < 0.05). High tick loads were recorded for cows with long hairs. Hair lengths were longest during the winter season in the coastal areas of Zazulwana and Honeydale (P < 0.05). White and brown-white patched cows had significantly longer (P < 0.05) hair strands than those having a combination of red, black and white colour. Cortisol and THI were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in summer season. Red blood cells, haematoglobin, haematocrit, mean cell volumes, white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and basophils were significantly different (P < 0.05) as some associated with age across all seasons and correlated to THI. It was concluded that the location, coat colour and season had effects on hair length, cortisol levels, THI, HP and tick loads on different body parts and heat stress in Nguni cows.

  1. Seasonal variation in coat characteristics, tick loads, cortisol levels, some physiological parameters and temperature humidity index on Nguni cows raised in low- and high-input farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyatiya, C. L. F.; Muchenje, V.; Mushunje, A.

    2015-06-01

    Seasonal variations in hair length, tick loads, cortisol levels, haematological parameters (HP) and temperature humidity index (THI) in Nguni cows of different colours raised in two low-input farms, and a commercial stud was determined. The sites were chosen based on their production systems, climatic characteristics and geographical locations. Zazulwana and Komga are low-input, humid-coastal areas, while Honeydale is a high-input, dry-inland Nguni stud farm. A total of 103 cows, grouped according to parity, location and coat colour, were used in the study. The effects of location, coat colour, hair length and season were used to determine tick loads on different body parts, cortisol levels and HP in blood from Nguni cows. Highest tick loads were recorded under the tail and the lowest on the head of each of the animals ( P < 0.05). Zazulwana cows recorded the highest tick loads under the tails of all the cows used in the study from the three farms ( P < 0.05). High tick loads were recorded for cows with long hairs. Hair lengths were longest during the winter season in the coastal areas of Zazulwana and Honeydale ( P < 0.05). White and brown-white patched cows had significantly longer ( P < 0.05) hair strands than those having a combination of red, black and white colour. Cortisol and THI were significantly lower ( P < 0.05) in summer season. Red blood cells, haematoglobin, haematocrit, mean cell volumes, white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and basophils were significantly different ( P < 0.05) as some associated with age across all seasons and correlated to THI. It was concluded that the location, coat colour and season had effects on hair length, cortisol levels, THI, HP and tick loads on different body parts and heat stress in Nguni cows.

  2. Radiation processing of thermoplastic starch by blending aromatic additives: Effect of blend composition and radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandal, Dhriti; Mikus, Pierre-Yves; Dole, Patrice; Coqueret, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on poly α-1,4-glucose oligomers (maltodextrins) in the presence of water and of various aromatic additives, as model blends for gaining a better understanding at a molecular level the modifications occurring in amorphous starch-lignin blends submitted to ionizing irradiation for improving the properties of this type of bio-based thermoplastic material. A series of aromatic compounds, namely p-methoxy benzyl alcohol, benzene dimethanol, cinnamyl alcohol and some related carboxylic acids namely cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, was thus studied for assessing the ability of each additive to counteract chain scission of the polysaccharide and induce interchain covalent linkages. Gel formation in EB-irradiated blends comprising of maltodextrin was shown to be dependent on three main factors: the type of aromatic additive, presence of glycerol, and irradiation dose. The chain scission versus grafting phenomenon as a function of blend composition and dose were studied using Size Exclusion Chromatography by determining the changes in molecular weight distribution (MWD) from Refractive Index (RI) chromatograms and the presence of aromatic grafts onto the maltodextrin chains from UV chromatograms. The occurrence of crosslinking was quantified by gel fraction measurements allowing for ranking the cross-linking efficiency of the additives. When applying the method to destructurized starch blends, gel formation was also shown to be strongly affected by the moisture content of the sample submitted to irradiation. The results demonstrate the possibility to tune the reactivity of tailored blend for minimizing chain degradation and control the degree of cross-linking.

  3. Application of Model Based Parameter Estimation for Fast Frequency Response Calculations of Input Characteristics of Cavity-Backed Aperture Antennas Using Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy C. J.

    1998-01-01

    Model Based Parameter Estimation (MBPE) is presented in conjunction with the hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique for fast computation of the input characteristics of cavity-backed aperture antennas over a frequency range. The hybrid FENI/MoM technique is used to form an integro-partial- differential equation to compute the electric field distribution of a cavity-backed aperture antenna. In MBPE, the electric field is expanded in a rational function of two polynomials. The coefficients of the rational function are obtained using the frequency derivatives of the integro-partial-differential equation formed by the hybrid FEM/ MoM technique. Using the rational function approximation, the electric field is obtained over a frequency range. Using the electric field at different frequencies, the input characteristics of the antenna are obtained over a wide frequency range. Numerical results for an open coaxial line, probe-fed coaxial cavity and cavity-backed microstrip patch antennas are presented. Good agreement between MBPE and the solutions over individual frequencies is observed.

  4. Additional erythrocytic and reticulocytic parameters helpful for diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis: results of a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Mullier, François; Lainey, Elodie; Fenneteau, Odile; Da Costa, Lydie; Schillinger, Françoise; Bailly, Nicolas; Cornet, Yvan; Chatelain, Christian; Dogne, Jean-Michel; Chatelain, Bernard

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is characterised by weakened vertical linkages between the membrane skeleton and the red blood cell's lipid bilayer, leading to the release of microparticles. All the reference tests suffer from specific limitations. The aim of this study was to develop easy to use diagnostic tool for screening of hereditary spherocytosis based on routinely acquired haematological parameters like percentage of microcytes, percentage of hypochromic cells, reticulocyte counts, and percentage of immature reticulocytes. The levels of haemoglobin, mean cell volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, reticulocytes (Ret), immature reticulocytes fraction (IRF), hypochromic erythrocytes (Hypo-He) and microcytic erythrocytes (MicroR) were determined on EDTA samples on Sysmex instruments from a cohort of 45 confirmed SH. The HS group was then compared with haemolytical disorders, microcytic anaemia, healthy individuals and routine samples (n = 1,488). HS is characterised by a high Ret count without an equally elevated IRF. All 45 HS have Ret >80,000/μl and Ret(10(9)/L)/IRF (%) greater than 7.7 (rule 1). Trait and mild HS had a Ret/IRF ratio greater than 19. Moderate and severe HS had increased MicroR and MicroR/Hypo-He (rule 2). Combination of both rules gave predictive positive value and negative predictive value of respectively 75% and 100% (n=1,488), which is much greater than single parameters or existing rules. This simple and fast diagnostic method could be used as an excellent screening tool for HS. It is also valid for mild HS, neonates and ABO incompatibilities and overcomes the lack of sensitivity of electrophoresis in ankyrin deficiencies.

  5. Influence of the input radiation pulse characteristics on the parameters of a XeF(C - A) amplifier in a THL-100 laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastremskii, A. G.; Ivanov, N. G.; Losev, V. F.

    2016-11-01

    We report the results of experimental and theoretical investigations on the influence of spatial and energy parameters of input radiation with a pulse duration of 50 {\\text{ps}} on output characteristics of a XeF(C - A) amplifier in a visible-range, multi-terawatt THL-100 laser system. Dynamics of the energy density radial distribution for laser radiation passing through the amplifier is studied. Results of numerical simulation are presented for amplification of laser beams with Gaussian and super-Gaussian radial energy density distributions. It is shown that the laser energy of 3.2 {\\text{J}} obtained experimentally is not the limiting value. According to calculations, the output energy of the amplifier with such mirror configuration may reach 4.1 {\\text{J}}, which in the case of a pulse compressed down to 50 {\\text{fs}} corresponds to the radiation power of 82 {\\text{TW}}.

  6. THE LATTICE PARAMETERS AND SOLUBILITY LIMITS OF ALPHA IRON AS AFFECTED BY SOME BINARY TRANSITION-ELEMENT ADDITIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The lattice parameters of alpha iron with binary additions of all the transition metals, except technetium, have been accurately determined on solid...samples. No direct correlation with solute size is observed, but an effect of electron configuration is noted. The solubility limits of alpha iron with

  7. Root Parameters Show How Management Alters Resource Distribution and Soil Quality in Conventional and Low-Input Cropping Systems in Central Iowa

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Matt; Wander, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant-soil relations may explain why low-external input (LEI) diversified cropping systems are more efficient than their conventional counterparts. This work sought to identify links between management practices, soil quality changes, and root responses in a long-term cropping systems experiment in Iowa where grain yields of 3-year and 4-year LEI rotations have matched or exceeded yield achieved by a 2-year maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) rotation. The 2-year system was conventionally managed and chisel-ploughed, whereas the 3-year and 4-year systems received plant residues and animal manures and were periodically moldboard ploughed. We expected changes in soil quality to be driven by organic matter inputs, and root growth to reflect spatial and temporal fluctuations in soil quality resulting from those additions. We constructed a carbon budget and measured soil quality indicators (SQIs) and rooting characteristics using samples taken from two depths of all crop-phases of each rotation system on multiple dates. Stocks of particulate organic matter carbon (POM-C) and potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN) were greater and more evenly distributed in the LEI than conventional systems. Organic C inputs, which were 58% and 36% greater in the 3-year rotation than in the 4-year and 2-year rotations, respectively, did not account for differences in SQI abundance or distribution. Surprisingly, SQIs did not vary with crop-phase or date. All biochemical SQIs were more stratified (p<0.001) in the conventionally-managed soils. While POM-C and PMN in the top 10 cm were similar in all three systems, stocks in the 10–20 cm depth of the conventional system were less than half the size of those found in the LEI systems. This distribution was mirrored by maize root length density, which was also concentrated in the top 10 cm of the conventionally managed plots and evenly distributed between depths in the LEI systems. The plow-down of organic amendments and

  8. Root Parameters Show How Management Alters Resource Distribution and Soil Quality in Conventional and Low-Input Cropping Systems in Central Iowa.

    PubMed

    Lazicki, Patricia A; Liebman, Matt; Wander, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    Plant-soil relations may explain why low-external input (LEI) diversified cropping systems are more efficient than their conventional counterparts. This work sought to identify links between management practices, soil quality changes, and root responses in a long-term cropping systems experiment in Iowa where grain yields of 3-year and 4-year LEI rotations have matched or exceeded yield achieved by a 2-year maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) rotation. The 2-year system was conventionally managed and chisel-ploughed, whereas the 3-year and 4-year systems received plant residues and animal manures and were periodically moldboard ploughed. We expected changes in soil quality to be driven by organic matter inputs, and root growth to reflect spatial and temporal fluctuations in soil quality resulting from those additions. We constructed a carbon budget and measured soil quality indicators (SQIs) and rooting characteristics using samples taken from two depths of all crop-phases of each rotation system on multiple dates. Stocks of particulate organic matter carbon (POM-C) and potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMN) were greater and more evenly distributed in the LEI than conventional systems. Organic C inputs, which were 58% and 36% greater in the 3-year rotation than in the 4-year and 2-year rotations, respectively, did not account for differences in SQI abundance or distribution. Surprisingly, SQIs did not vary with crop-phase or date. All biochemical SQIs were more stratified (p<0.001) in the conventionally-managed soils. While POM-C and PMN in the top 10 cm were similar in all three systems, stocks in the 10-20 cm depth of the conventional system were less than half the size of those found in the LEI systems. This distribution was mirrored by maize root length density, which was also concentrated in the top 10 cm of the conventionally managed plots and evenly distributed between depths in the LEI systems. The plow-down of organic amendments and manures

  9. Land and Water Use Characteristics and Human Health Input Parameters for use in Environmental Dosimetry and Risk Assessments at the Savannah River Site. 2016 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, G. Tim; Hartman, Larry; Stagich, Brooke

    2016-09-26

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters, but the use of applicant site-specific values is encouraged. Detailed surveys of land-use and water-use parameters were conducted in 1991 and 2010. They are being updated in this report. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates, as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors (to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS) are documented. The intent of this report is to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data, and that is maintained via review of future-issued national references (to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released). These reviews will continue to be added to this document by revision.

  10. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Pande, Vijay S.; Case, David A.; Brooks, Charles L.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.

  11. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; ...

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  12. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Modeling the Effects of Irrigation on Land Surface Fluxes and States over the Conterminous United States: Sensitivity to Input Data and Model Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Sacks, William J.; Lei, Huimin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-16

    Previous studies on irrigation impacts on land surface fluxes/states were mainly conducted as sensitivity experiments, with limited analysis of uncertainties from the input data and model irrigation schemes used. In this study, we calibrated and evaluated the performance of irrigation water use simulated by the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) against observations from agriculture census. We investigated the impacts of irrigation on land surface fluxes and states over the conterminous United States (CONUS) and explored possible directions of improvement. Specifically, we found large uncertainty in the irrigation area data from two widely used sources and CLM4 tended to produce unrealistically large temporal variations of irrigation demand for applications at the water resources region scale over CONUS. At seasonal to interannual time scales, the effects of irrigation on surface energy partitioning appeared to be large and persistent, and more pronounced in dry than wet years. Even with model calibration to yield overall good agreement with the irrigation amounts from the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), differences between the two irrigation area datasets still dominate the differences in the interannual variability of land surface response to irrigation. Our results suggest that irrigation amount simulated by CLM4 can be improved by (1) calibrating model parameter values to account for regional differences in irrigation demand and (2) accurate representation of the spatial distribution and intensity of irrigated areas.

  14. Vital capacity and inspiratory capacity as additional parameters to evaluate bronchodilator response in asthmatic patients: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bronchodilator response in patients with asthma is evaluated based on post-bronchodilator increase in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). However, the need for additional parameters, mainly among patients with severe asthma, has already been demonstrated. Methods The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of vital capacity (VC) and inspiratory capacity (IC) to evaluate bronchodilator response in asthma patients with persistent airflow obstruction. The 43 asthma patients enrolled in the study were stratified into moderate or severe airflow obstruction groups based on baseline FEV1. All patients performed a 6-minute walk test before and after the bronchodilator (BD). A bipolar visual analogue scale post-BD was performed to assess clinical effect. The correlation between VC and IC and clinical response, determined by visual analogue scale (VAS) and 6-minute walk test (6MWT), was investigated. Results Patients in the severe group presented: 1) greater bronchodilator response in VC (48% vs 15%, p = 0.02), 2) a significant correlation between VC variation and the reduction in air trapping (Rs = 0.70; p < 0.01), 3) a significant agreement between VC and VAS score (kappa = 0.57; p < 0.01). There was no correlation between IC and the reduction in air trapping or clinical data. Conclusions VC may be a useful additional parameter to evaluate bronchodilator response in asthma patients with severe airflow obstruction. PMID:22950529

  15. Support vector machine to predict diesel engine performance and emission parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive Support Vector Machine (SVM) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For SVM modelling, different values for radial basis function (RBF) kernel width and penalty parameters (C) were considered and the optimum values were then found. The results demonstrate that SVM is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve complete combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  16. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium.

  17. Role of anaerobic fungi in wheat straw degradation and effects of plant feed additives on rumen fermentation parameters in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dagar, S S; Singh, N; Goel, N; Kumar, S; Puniya, A K

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, rumen microbial groups, i.e. total rumen microbes (TRM), total anaerobic fungi (TAF), avicel enriched bacteria (AEB) and neutral detergent fibre enriched bacteria (NEB) were evaluated for wheat straw (WS) degradability and different fermentation parameters in vitro. Highest WS degradation was shown for TRM, followed by TAF, NEB and least by AEB. Similar patterns were observed with total gas production and short chain fatty acid profiles. Overall, TAF emerged as the most potent individual microbial group. In order to enhance the fibrolytic and rumen fermentation potential of TAF, we evaluated 18 plant feed additives in vitro. Among these, six plant additives namely Albizia lebbeck, Alstonia scholaris, Bacopa monnieri, Lawsonia inermis, Psidium guajava and Terminalia arjuna considerably improved WS degradation by TAF. Further evaluation showed A. lebbeck as best feed additive. The study revealed that TAF plays a significant role in WS degradation and their fibrolytic activities can be improved by inclusion of A. lebbeck in fermentation medium. Further studies are warranted to elucidate its active constituents, effect on fungal population and in vivo potential in animal system.

  18. LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

    2010-08-06

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6

  19. Hematological parameters in Polish mixed breed rabbits with addition of meat breed blood in the annual cycle.

    PubMed

    Tokarz-Deptuła, B; Niedźwiedzka-Rystwej, P; Adamiak, M; Hukowska-Szematowicz, B; Trzeciak-Ryczek, A; Deptuła, W

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we studied haematologic values, such as haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit value, thrombocytes, leucocytes: lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils and monocytes in the pheral blood in Polish mixed-breeds with addition of meat breed blood in order to obtain the reference values which are until now not available for this animals. In studying this indices we took into consideration the impact of the season (spring, summer, autumn, winter), and sex of the animals. The studies have shown a high impact of the season of the year on those rabbits, but only in spring and summer. Moreover we observed that the sex has mean impact on the studied values of haematological parameters in those rabbits. According to our knowledge, this is the first paper on haematologic values in this widely used group of rabbits, so they may serve as reference values.

  20. [Influence Additional Cognitive Tasks on EEG Beta Rhythm Parameters during Forming and Testing Set to Perception of the Facial Expression].

    PubMed

    Yakovenko, I A; Cheremushkin, E A; Kozlov, M K

    2015-01-01

    The research of changes of a beta rhythm parameters on condition of working memory loading by extension of a interstimuli interval between the target and triggering stimuli to 16 sec is investigated on 70 healthy adults in two series of experiments with set to a facial expression. In the second series at the middle of this interval for strengthening of the load was entered the additional cognitive task in the form of conditioning stimuli like Go/NoGo--circles of blue or green color. Data analysis of the research was carried out by means of continuous wavelet-transformation on the basis of "mather" complex Morlet-wavelet in the range of 1-35 Hz. Beta rhythm power was characterized by the mean level, maxima of wavelet-transformation coefficient (WLC) and latent periods of maxima. Introduction of additional cognitive task to pause between the target and triggering stimuli led to essential increase in absolute values of the mean level of beta rhythm WLC and relative sizes of maxima of beta rhythm WLC. In the series of experiments without conditioning stimulus subjects with large number of mistakes (from 6 to 40), i.e. rigid set, in comparison with subjects with small number of mistakes (to 5), i.e. plastic set, at the forming stage were characterized by higher values of the mean level of beta rhythm WLC. Introduction of the conditioning stimuli led to smoothing of intergroup distinctions throughout the experiment.

  1. Signal Prediction With Input Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin

    1999-01-01

    A novel coding technique is presented for signal prediction with applications including speech coding, system identification, and estimation of input excitation. The approach is based on the blind equalization method for speech signal processing in conjunction with the geometric subspace projection theory to formulate the basic prediction equation. The speech-coding problem is often divided into two parts, a linear prediction model and excitation input. The parameter coefficients of the linear predictor and the input excitation are solved simultaneously and recursively by a conventional recursive least-squares algorithm. The excitation input is computed by coding all possible outcomes into a binary codebook. The coefficients of the linear predictor and excitation, and the index of the codebook can then be used to represent the signal. In addition, a variable-frame concept is proposed to block the same excitation signal in sequence in order to reduce the storage size and increase the transmission rate. The results of this work can be easily extended to the problem of disturbance identification. The basic principles are outlined in this report and differences from other existing methods are discussed. Simulations are included to demonstrate the proposed method.

  2. Sonochemical degradation of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine: Effect of parameters, organic and inorganic additives and combination with a biological system.

    PubMed

    Serna-Galvis, Efraím A; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Giraldo-Aguirre, Ana L; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2015-08-15

    Fluoxetine (FLX), one of the most widely used antidepressants in the world, is an emergent pollutant found in natural waters that causes disrupting effects on the endocrine systems of some aquatic species. This work explores the total elimination of FLX by sonochemical treatment coupled to a biological system. The biological process acting alone was shown to be unable to remove the pollutant, even under favourable conditions of pH and temperature. However, sonochemical treatment (600 kHz) was shown to be able to remove the pharmaceutical. Several parameters were evaluated for the ultrasound application: the applied power (20-60 W), dissolved gas (air, Ar and He), pH (3-11) and initial concentration of fluoxetine (2.9-162.0 μmol L(-1)). Additionally, the presence of organic (1-hexanol and 2-propanol) and inorganic (Fe(2+)) compounds in the water matrix and the degradation of FLX in a natural mineral water were evaluated. The sonochemical treatment readily eliminates FLX following a kinetic Langmuir. After 360 min of ultrasonic irradiation, 15% mineralization was achieved. Analysis of the biodegradability provided evidence that the sonochemical process transforms the pollutant into biodegradable substances, which can then be mineralized in a subsequent biological treatment.

  3. Influence of processing parameters and alloying additions on the mechanically determined no-recrystallization temperature in niobium microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsher-Ritosa, Caryn Nicole

    Microalloying elements are added to plate steels to improve the mechanical properties through grain refinement and precipitation strengthening. In industrial practice, such refinement is obtained by controlling the rolling near critical temperatures in austenite. Generally, a large amount of hot deformation is desired below the no-recrystallization temperature (TNR) to increase the grain boundary area to promote fine ferrite grains upon transformation during cooling. Ideally, a high TNR is desired for increased deformation below TNR at minimal rolling loads and minimal loss of productivity. To increase TNR, microalloying elements such as Nb, V, and Ti are used. The primary purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of multiple microalloying elements on the mechanically determined via torsion testing no-recrystallization temperature (TNR_Tor) in Nb-bearing plate steel. This project focused on the influence of alloying elements and deformation parameters on TNR_Tor. The main objective was to experimentally determine the TNR_Tor for various laboratory-grade steels with systematically varying amounts of Nb, V, and Ti, with C and N held constant. The synergistic effects of these microalloying elements were evaluated. Another objective was to determine the TNR_Tor with systematically varied deformation parameters for the same set of steels. Comparisons of the measured TNR through two different mechanical tests were conducted. Finally, a microstructural evaluation around the mechanically determined TNR_Tor via multistep hot torsion testing was made. To accomplish these objectives six Nb-bearing steels were laboratory produced with 0.065 wt pct C, 0.044 wt pct N, and varying amounts of Nb, V, and Ti. Multistep hot torsion tests were conducted using the GleebleRTM 3500 thermomechanical simulator between the temperatures of 1200 and 750 °C. The mean flow stress was calculated for each deformation step and plotted against the inverse absolute temperature. The

  4. Effect of the addition of conventional additives and whey proteins concentrates on technological parameters, physicochemical properties, microstructure and sensory attributes of sous vide cooked beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2012-03-01

    Beef muscles submitted to four enhancement treatments (1.88% whey protein concentrate (WPC)+1.25% sodium chloride (NaCl); 1.88% modified whey protein concentrate (MWPC)+1.25%NaCl; 0.25% sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP)+1.25%NaCl; 1.25%NaCl) and a control treatment (non-injected muscles) were sous vide cooked. Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented a significantly higher total yield (106.5%) in comparison to those with WPC/MWPC+NaCl (94.7% and 92.9%, respectively), NaCl alone (84.8%) or controls (72.1%). Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented significantly lower shear force values than control ones; also, WPC/MWPC+NaCl added muscles presented similar values than those from the other treatments. After cooking, muscles with STPP+NaCl or WPC/MWPC+NaCl depicted compacted and uniform microstructures. Muscles with STPP+NaCl showed a pink colour, meanwhile other treatment muscles presented colours between pinkish-grey and grey-brown. STPP+NaCl added samples presented the highest values of global tenderness and juiciness. The addition of STPP+NaCl had a better performance than WPC/MWPC+NaCl. However, the addition of WPC/MWPC+NaCl improved total yield in comparison to NaCl added or control ones.

  5. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields.

    PubMed

    Joosten, S; Pammler, K; Silny, J

    2009-02-07

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  6. Sensitivity of Forward Radiative Transfer Model on Spectroscopic Assumptions and Input Geophysical Parameters at 23.8 GHz and 183 GHz Channels and its Impact on Inter-calibration of Microwave Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S.; Jones, W. L.; Ebrahimi, H.; Chen, R.; Payne, V.; Kroodsma, R.

    2014-12-01

    The first step in radiometric inter-calibration is to ascertain the self-consistency and reasonableness of the observed brightness temperature (Tb) for each individual sensor involved. One of the widely used approaches is to compare the observed Tb with a simulated Tb using a forward radiative transfer model (RTM) and input geophysical parameters at the geographic location and time of the observation. In this study we intend to test the sensitivity of the RTM to uncertainties in the input geophysical parameters as well as to the underlying physical assumptions of gaseous absorption and surface emission in the RTM. SAPHIR, a cross track scanner onboard Indo-French Megha-Tropique Satellite, gives us a unique opportunity of studying 6 dual band 183 GHz channels at an inclined orbit over the Tropics for the first time. We will also perform the same sensitivity analysis using the Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) 23 GHz and five 183 GHz channels. Preliminary analysis comparing GDAS and an independent retrieved profile show some sensitivity of the RTM to the input data. An extended analysis of this work using different input geophysical parameters will be presented. Two different absorption models, the Rosenkranz and the MonoRTM will be tested to analyze the sensitivity of the RTM to spectroscopic assumptions in each model. Also for the 23.8 GHz channel, the sensitivity of the RTM to the surface emissivity model will be checked. Finally the impact of these sensitivities on radiometric inter-calibration of radiometers at sounding frequencies will be assessed.

  7. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Tutorial – SDMProjectBuilder: Import Local Data Files to Identify and Modify Contamination Sources and Input Parameters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twelve example local data support files are automatically downloaded when the SDMProjectBuilder is installed on a computer. They allow the user to modify values to parameters that impact the release, migration, fate, and transport of microbes within a watershed, and control delin...

  8. Effect of addition of a probiotic micro-organism to broiler diet on intestinal mucosal architecture and electrophysiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Awad, W A; Ghareeb, K; Böhm, J

    2010-08-01

    Probiotics might be one of the solutions to reduce the effects of the recent ban on antimicrobial growth promoters in feed. However, the mode of action of probiotics still not fully understood. Therefore, evaluating probiotics (microbial feed additives) is essential. Thus the objective of this work was to investigate the efficacy of a new microbial feed additive (Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus reuteri) in broiler nutrition. The body weight (BW), average daily weight gain was relatively increased by the dietary inclusion of Lactobacillus sp. in broiler diets. Furthermore, the Lactobacillus feed additive influenced the histomorphological measurements of small intestinal villi. The addition of Lactobacillus sp. increased (p < 0.05) the villus height (VH)/crypt depth ratio and the VH was numerically increased in duodenum. The duodenal crypt depth remained unaffected (p > 0.05), while the ileal crypt depth was decreased by dietary supplementation of Lactobacillus sp. compared with the control. At the end of the feeding period, the basal and glucose stimulated short-circuit current (Isc) and electrical tissue conductivity were measured in the isolated gut mucosa to characterize the electrical properties of the gut. The addition of glucose on the mucosal side in Ussing chamber produced a significant increase (p = 0.001) in Isc in both jejunum and colon relative to the basal values in Lactobacillus probiotic group. This increase in Isc for probiotic group in jejunum is equivalent to an increase of about two times that for the basal values, while in the control group is about half fold that for the basal value. In addition, the DeltaIsc after glucose addition to the large intestine was greater than the DeltaIsc in the small intestine in both control and probiotic group. Moreover in both jejunum and colon, the increase in Isc for birds fed Lactobacillus was higher than their control counterparts (p < or = 0.1). This result suggests that the addition of

  9. Variation in some chemical parameters and organic matter in soils regenerated by the addition of municipal solid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Carlos; Hernandez, Teresa; Costa, Francisco

    1992-11-01

    The organic fraction of a municipal solid waste was added in different doses to an eroded soil formed of loam and with no vegetal cover. After three years, the changes in macronutrient content and the chemical-structural composition of its organic matter were studied. The addition of the organic fraction from a municipal solid waste had a positive effect on soil regeneration, the treated soils being covered with spontaneous vegetation from 1 yr onwards. An increase in electrical conductivity and a fall in pH were noted in the treated soils as were increases in macronutrients, particularly N and available P and the different carbon fractions. Optical density measurements of the organic matter extracted with sodium pyrophosphate showed that the treated soils contained an organic matter with less condensed compounds and with a greater tendency to evolve than the control. A pyrolysis-gas chromatography study of the organic matter extracted with pyrophosphate showed large quantities of benzene both in the treated soils and control; pyrrole was also relatively abundant, although this fragment decreased as the dose rose. Xylenes and pyridine were present in greater quantities in the control and furfural in the treated soils. Three years after addition to the soil, the organic matter had a higher proportion of fragments derived from aromatic compounds and a smaller proportion derived from hydrocarbons. Similarity indices showed that, although the added and newly formed organic matter 3 yr after addition continued to differ from that of the original soil and to be more mineralizable, the transformations it has undergone made it more similar to the original organic matter of the soil than it was at the moment of being added.

  10. Additive effects due to biochar and endophyte application enable soybean to enhance nutrient uptake and modulate nutritional parameters* #

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Muhammad; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul Latif; Shahzad, Raheem; Asaf, Sajjad; Hamayun, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad Aaqil; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effects of hardwood-derived biochar (BC) and the phytohormone-producing endophyte Galactomyces geotrichum WLL1 in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) with respect to basic, macro-and micronutrient uptakes and assimilations, and their subsequent effects on the regulation of functional amino acids, isoflavones, fatty acid composition, total sugar contents, total phenolic contents, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-scavenging activity. The assimilation of basic nutrients such as nitrogen was up-regulated, leaving carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen unaffected in BC+G. geotrichum-treated soybean plants. In comparison, the uptakes of macro-and micronutrients fluctuated in the individual or co-application of BC and G. geotrichum in soybean plant organs and rhizospheric substrate. Moreover, the same attribute was recorded for the regulation of functional amino acids, isoflavones, fatty acid composition, total sugar contents, total phenolic contents, and DPPH-scavenging activity. Collectively, these results showed that BC+G. geotrichum-treated soybean yielded better results than did the plants treated with individual applications. It was concluded that BC is an additional nutriment source and that the G. geotrichum acts as a plant biostimulating source and the effects of both are additive towards plant growth promotion. Strategies involving the incorporation of BC and endophytic symbiosis may help achieve eco-friendly agricultural production, thus reducing the excessive use of chemical agents. PMID:28124840

  11. [Immunobiological blood parameters in rabbits after addition to the diet suspensions of chlorella, sodium sulfate, citrate and chromium chloride].

    PubMed

    Lesyk, Ia V; Fedoruk, R S; Dolaĭchuk, O P

    2013-01-01

    We studied the content of glycoproteins and their individual carbohydrate components, the phagocyte activity of neutrophils, phagocyte index, phagocyte number lizotsym and bactericidal activity of the serum concentration of circulating immune complexes and middle mass molecules in the blood of rabbits following administration into the diet chlorella suspension, sodium sulfate, chromium citrate and chromium chloride. The studies were conducted on rabbits weighing 3.7-3.9 kg with altered diet from the first day of life to 118 days old. Rabbits were divided into five groups: the control one and four experimental groups. We found that in the blood of rabbits of experimental groups recieved sodium sulphate, chromium chloride and chromium citrate, the content of glycoprotein's and their carbohydrate components was significantly higher during the 118 days of the study compared with the control group. Feeding rabbits with mineral supplements likely reflected the differences compared with the control parameters of nonspecific resistance in the blood for the study period, which was more pronounced in the first two months of life.

  12. Potential of Lactobacillus reuteri from Spontaneous 
Sourdough as a Starter Additive for Improving Quality Parameters of Bread

    PubMed Central

    Vaičiulytė-Funk, Lina; Šalomskienė, Joana; Alenčikienė, Gitana; Mieželienė, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Summary Retardation of microbial spoilage of bread can be achieved by the use of spontaneous sourdough with an antimicrobial activity. This study was undertaken to identify lactic acid bacteria naturally occurring in spontaneous sourdough and use them for quality improvement and prolonging shelf life of rye, wheat and rye with wheat bread. Identification of isolates from spontaneous sourdough by pyrosequencing assay showed that Lactobacillus reuteri were dominant lactic acid bacteria. The isolates showed a wide range of antimicrobial activity and displayed a synergistic activity against other lactobacilli, some lactococci and foodborne yeasts. The best application of spontaneous sourdough was noticed in the rye bread with the lowest crumb firmness of the final product, although the sensory results of wheat and rye with wheat bread did not statistically differ from control bread. L. reuteri showed a high preserving capacity against fungi during storage. This may be due to bacteriocins and various fatty acids secreted into the growth medium that were identified by agar well diffusion assay and gas chromatography. L. reuteri showing high antimicrobial activity have the potential to be used as a starter additive that could improve safety and/or shelf life of bread. PMID:27956866

  13. Study on the effect of hydrogen addition on the variation of plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge for synthesis of TiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Partha; Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Bhuyan, Heman

    2016-04-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen addition on plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge plasma in the synthesis of H-doped TiO2 films. The parameters of the hydrogen-added Ar/O2 plasma influence the properties and the structural phases of the deposited TiO2 film. Therefore, the variation of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (Te), electron density (ne), ion density (ni), degree of ionization of Ar and degree of dissociation of H2 as a function of hydrogen content in the discharge is studied. Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the plasma. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase of the magnetron discharge, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. It is observed that the electron and heavy ion density decline with gradual addition of hydrogen in the discharge. Hydrogen addition significantly changes the degree of ionization of Ar which influences the structural phases of the TiO2 film.

  14. Data including GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of mixed, asymmetric bilayers including molecular topologies, equilibrated structures, and force field for lipids compatible with OPLS-AA parameters.

    PubMed

    Róg, Tomasz; Orłowski, Adam; Llorente, Alicia; Skotland, Tore; Sylvänne, Tuulia; Kauhanen, Dimple; Ekroos, Kim; Sandvig, Kirsten; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-06-01

    In this Data in Brief article we provide a data package of GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of multicomponent, asymmetric lipid bilayers using the OPLS-AA force field. These data include 14 model bilayers composed of 8 different lipid molecules. The lipids present in these models are: cholesterol (CHOL), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (SOPE), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (SOPS), N-palmitoyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM16), and N-lignoceroyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM24). The bilayers׳ compositions are based on lipidomic studies of PC-3 prostate cancer cells and exosomes discussed in Llorente et al. (2013) [1], showing an increase in the section of long-tail lipid species (SOPS, SOPE, and SM24) in the exosomes. Former knowledge about lipid asymmetry in cell membranes was accounted for in the models, meaning that the model of the inner leaflet is composed of a mixture of PC, PS, PE, and cholesterol, while the extracellular leaflet is composed of SM, PC and cholesterol discussed in Van Meer et al. (2008) [2]. The provided data include lipids׳ topologies, equilibrated structures of asymmetric bilayers, all force field parameters, and input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp). The data is associated with the research article "Interdigitation of Long-Chain Sphingomyelin Induces Coupling of Membrane Leaflets in a Cholesterol Dependent Manner" (Róg et al., 2016) [3].

  15. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) and also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.

  16. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; ...

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) andmore » also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.« less

  17. In vivo assessment of an industrial waste product as a feed additive in dairy cows: Effects of larch (Larix decidua L.) sawdust on blood parameters and milk composition.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, D; Garavaglia, L; Spagnuolo, M S; Pferschy-Wenzig, E M; Bauer, R; Franz, C

    2015-12-01

    When larch (Larix spp.) is processed in the wood industry, the sawdust is currently disposed of as waste or used as combustible material, even though it is rich in biologically active compounds. In this study the effect of larch sawdust supplementation on blood parameters as well as milk composition was examined in healthy mid-lactating dairy cows. Twenty-four multiparous Italian Friesian dairy cows were assigned to groups receiving either 300 g/day/cow of larch sawdust or a control diet, and treatments were continued for a 20 day period. Milk parameters were unaffected by treatment. A lower plasma total protein concentration was observed and can be attributed to a decrease in globulin concentration. A lower plasma urea concentration was also detected in the larch group. Moreover, biomarkers of liver function were influenced by the treatment. Total bilirubin was lower in larch-treated animals, and cholesterol tended to be lower. In addition, an interaction between day and treatment was observed for very low density lipoprotein. The concentration of other parameters, including reactive oxygen metabolites, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and nitrotyrosine, did not differ between treatments. The observed benefits, together with the good palatability, make larch sawdust a promising candidate for the development of beneficial feed supplements for livestock. Further studies will be useful, particularly to evaluate its efficacy in different health conditions.

  18. Dynamic Input Conductances Shape Neuronal Spiking(1,2).

    PubMed

    Drion, Guillaume; Franci, Alessio; Dethier, Julie; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the role of biophysical parameter variations in neuronal activity is critical to the understanding of modulation, robustness, and homeostasis of neuronal signalling. The paper proposes that this question can be addressed through the analysis of dynamic input conductances. Those voltage-dependent curves aggregate the concomitant activity of all ion channels in distinct timescales. They are shown to shape the current-voltage dynamical relationships that determine neuronal spiking. We propose an experimental protocol to measure dynamic input conductances in neurons. In addition, we provide a computational method to extract dynamic input conductances from arbitrary conductance-based models and to analyze their sensitivity to arbitrary parameters. We illustrate the relevance of the proposed approach for modulation, compensation, and robustness studies in a published neuron model based on data of the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab Cancer borealis.

  19. An updated Quantitative Water Air Sediment Interaction (QWASI) model for evaluating chemical fate and input parameter sensitivities in aquatic systems: application to D5 (decamethylcyclopentasiloxane) and PCB-180 in two lakes.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald; Hughes, Lauren; Powell, David E; Kim, Jaeshin

    2014-09-01

    The QWASI fugacity mass balance model has been widely used since 1983 for both scientific and regulatory purposes to estimate the concentrations of organic chemicals in water and sediment, given an assumed rate of chemical emission, advective inflow in water or deposition from the atmosphere. It has become apparent that an updated version is required, especially to incorporate improved methods of obtaining input parameters such as partition coefficients. Accordingly, the model has been revised and it is now available in spreadsheet format. Changes to the model are described and the new version is applied to two chemicals, D5 (decamethylcyclopentasiloxane) and PCB-180, in two lakes, Lake Pepin (MN, USA) and Lake Ontario, showing the model's capability of illustrating both the chemical to chemical differences and lake to lake differences. Since there are now increased regulatory demands for rigorous sensitivity and uncertainty analyses, these aspects are discussed and two approaches are illustrated. It is concluded that the new QWASI water quality model can be of value for both evaluative and simulation purposes, thus providing a tool for obtaining an improved understanding of chemical mass balances in lakes, as a contribution to the assessment of fate and exposure and as a step towards the assessment of risk.

  20. Effectiveness of Phytogenic Feed Additive as Alternative to Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate on Hematological Parameters, Intestinal Histomorphology and Microbial Population and Production Performance of Japanese Quails

    PubMed Central

    Manafi, M.; Hedayati, M.; Khalaji, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of phytogenic additive and antibiotic growth promoter in laying Japanese quails. One hundred and sixty five quails were divided into three groups of 5 replicates and 11 quails (8 females and 3 males) in each replicate. Treatment 1 was fed control diet, treatment 2 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.05% bacitracin methylene disalicylate as antibiotic growth promoter and treatment 3 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.1% phytogenic feed additive (PFA) for two periods of 3 weeks each from 37 to 42 weeks of age. Results showed that egg production, eggshell strength, eggshell weight, villus height and villus height to crypt depth ratio were significantly (p≤0.05) increased and feed consumption, feed conversion ratio, albumen, Haugh unit, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, alanine transaminase, gamma glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, number of goblet cell, crypt depth and intestinal bacterial population of Coliforms, Salmonella and E. coli were significantly (p≤0.05) decreased in PFA fed group. It is concluded that addition of PFA containing phytomolecules and organic acids as main ingredients could significantly improve the production parameters and the general health of laying quails as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters. PMID:27189636

  1. Effect of Mn and Cr additions on kinetics of recrystallization and parameters of grain-boundary relaxation of Al-4.9Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailovskaya, A. V.; Golovin, I. S.; Zaitseva, A. A.; Portnoi, V. K.; Dröttboom, P.; Cifre, J.

    2013-03-01

    Methods of microstructural analysis, measurements of hardness, and temperature and time dependences of internal friction (TDIF and TDIF(iso), respectively) have been used to study recrystallization in cold-rolled alloys and grain-boundary relaxation in annealed alloys. A complex analysis of the effect of additions of transition metals (Mn, Cr) on the magnitude of the activation energy of the background of the internal friction in deformed and annealed states and on the activation parameters of grain-boundary relaxation has been performed. Methods of amplitude dependences of internal friction (ADIF) have been used to determine the critical amplitude that corresponds to the beginning of microplastic deformation in the alloys at different temperatures.

  2. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict CI engine parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For ANFIS modelling, Gaussian curve membership function (gaussmf) and 200 training epochs (iteration) were found to be optimum choices for training process. The results demonstrate that ANFIS is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  3. Superposition-additive approach in the description of thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization of substituted alkanes at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Belyaeva, E A; Fomina, E S; Vasylyev, A O; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R

    2012-12-01

    The superposition-additive approach developed previously was shown to be applicable for the calculations of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and atomization of conjugate systems, their dipole polarizability, molecular diamagnetic susceptibility, π-electronic ring currents, etc. In the present work, the applicability of this approach for the calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization at the water/air interface of alkanes, fatty alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, nitriles, fatty acids (C(n)H(2n+1)X, X is the functional group) and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids (C(n)H(2n-1)COOH) is studied. Using the proposed approach the thermodynamic quantities determined agree well with the available data, either calculated using the semiempirical (PM3) quantum chemical method, or obtained in experiments. In particular, for enthalpy and Gibbs' energy of the formation of substituted alkane monomers from the elementary substances, and their absolute entropy, the standard deviations of the values calculated according to the superposition-additive scheme with the mutual superimposition domain C(n-2)H(2n-4) (n is the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain) from the results of PM3 calculations for alkanes, alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, fatty acids, nitriles and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids are respectively: 0.05, 0.004, 2.87, 0.02, 0.01, 0.77, and 0.01 kJ/mol for enthalpy; 2.32, 5.26, 4.49, 0.53, 1.22, 1.02, 5.30 J/(molK) for absolute entropy; 0.69, 1.56, 3.82, 0.15, 0.37, 0.69, 1.58 kJ/mol for Gibbs' energy, whereas the deviations from the experimental data are: 0.52, 5.75, 1.40, 1.00, 4.86 kJ/mol; 0.52, 0.63, 1.40, 6.11, 2.21 J/(molK); 2.52, 5.76, 1.58, 1.78, 4.86 kJ/mol, respectively (for nitriles and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids experimental data are not available). The proposed approach provides also quite accurate estimates of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of boiling and melting, critical temperatures and standard heat

  4. Breath-hold and free-breathing F-18-FDG-PET/CT in malignant melanoma—detection of additional tumoral foci and effects on quantitative parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bärwolf, Robert; Zirnsak, Mariana; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract During PET/CT acquisition, respiratory motion generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which may impair lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. This observational study was undertaken to verify whether breath-hold F-18-FDG-PET/CT (bhPET) detects additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET) in cases of malignant melanoma, and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and metabolic isocontoured volume (mVic40). Thirty-four patients with melanoma were examined. BhPET and fbPET findings of 117 lesions were compared and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, and mVic40) were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman correlation. The impact of lesion size and time interval between investigations was analyzed. In 1 patient, a CT-confirmed liver metastasis was seen only on bhPET but not on fbPET. At bhPET, SUVmax, and SUVmean proved significantly higher and mVic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. The positive effect on SUVmax and SUVmean was more pronounced in smaller lesions, whereas the time interval between bhPET and fbPET did not influence SUV or mVic40. In our patient cohort, bhPET yielded significantly higher SUV and provided improved volumetric lesion definition, particularly of smaller lesions. Also one additional liver lesion was identified. Breath-hold PET/CT is technically feasible, and may become clinically useful when fine quantitative evaluations are needed. PMID:28079829

  5. Kinetic analysis of HO{sub 2} addition to ethylene, propene, and isobutene, and thermochemical parameters of alkyl hydroperoxides and hydroperoxide alkyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.J.; Bozzelli, J.W.

    2000-06-01

    Thermochemical kinetic analysis for the reactions of HO{sub 2} radical addition to the primary, secondary, and tertiary carbon-carbon double bonds of ethylene, propene, and isobutene are studied using canonical transition state theory (TST). Thermochemical properties of reactants, alkyl hydroperoxides (ROOH), hydroperoxy alkyl radicals (R-OOH), and transition states (TSs) are determined by ab initio and density functional calculations. Enthalpies of formation ({Delta}H{sub f 298}{degree}) of product radicals (R-OOH) are determined using isodesmic reactions with group balance at MP4(full)6-31G(d,p)/MP2(full)/6-31G(d), MP2(full)/6-31G(d), complete basis set model chemistry (CBS-q with MP2(full)/6-31g(d) and B3LYP/6-31g(d) optimized geometries), and density functional (B3LYP/6-31g(d) and B3LYP/6-311+g(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31g(d)) calculations. {Delta}H{sub f 298}{degree} of TSs are obtained from the {Delta}H{sub f 298}{degree} of reactants plus energy differences between reactants and TSs. Entropies (S{sub 298}{degree}) and heat capacities (Cp(T) 300 {le} T/K {le} 1,500) contributions from vibrational, translational, and external rotational are calculated using the rigid-rotor-harmonic-oscillator approximation based on geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies obtained at MP2(full)/6-31G(d) and B3LYP/6-31G(d) levels of theory. Selected potential barriers of internal rotations for hydroperoxy alkyl radicals and TSs are calculated at MP2(full)/6-31G(d) and CBS-Q//MP2(full)/6-31G(d) levels. Contributions from hindered rotors of S{sub 298}{degree} and Cp(T) are calculated by the method of Pitzer and Gwinn and by summation over the energy levels obtained by direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix of hindered internal rotations when the potential barriers of internal rotations are available. calculated rate constants obtained at CBS-q/MP2(full)/6-31G(d) and CBS-q//B3LYP/6-31G(d) levels of theory show similar trends with experimental data: HO{sub 2} radical

  6. INDES User's guide multistep input design with nonlinear rotorcraft modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The INDES computer program, a multistep input design program used as part of a data processing technique for rotorcraft systems identification, is described. Flight test inputs base on INDES improve the accuracy of parameter estimates. The input design algorithm, program input, and program output are presented.

  7. The role of the input scale in parton distribution analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pedro Jimenez-Delgado

    2012-08-01

    A first systematic study of the effects of the choice of the input scale in global determinations of parton distributions and QCD parameters is presented. It is shown that, although in principle the results should not depend on these choices, in practice a relevant dependence develops as a consequence of what is called procedural bias. This uncertainty should be considered in addition to other theoretical and experimental errors, and a practical procedure for its estimation is proposed. Possible sources of mistakes in the determination of QCD parameter from parton distribution analysis are pointed out.

  8. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  9. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  10. Talking Speech Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliss-Vincent, Jane; Whitford, Gigi

    2002-01-01

    This article presents both the factors involved in successful speech input use and the potential barriers that may suggest that other access technologies could be more appropriate for a given individual. Speech input options that are available are reviewed and strategies for optimizing use of speech recognition technology are discussed. (Contains…

  11. The effect of phytogenic feed additives to substitute in-feed antibiotics on growth traits and blood biochemical parameters in broiler chicks challenged with Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Abudabos, Alaeldein M; Alyemni, Abdullah H; Dafalla, Yousif M; Khan, Rifat Ullah

    2016-12-01

    There is a growing concern over the use of antibiotics due to the increased resistance of pathogens in broiler. The present study was designed to find the comparative effect of an antibiotic, and some phytogenic on performance traits, blood biochemical parameters, and antioxidant status during starter phase exposed to Salmonella typhimurium challenge. A total of 560-day-old broiler chicks (Ross 308) were randomly allocated to seven treatments (eight replicates). Control (basal diet); T1, infected with Salmonella enterica subsp. typhimurium; T2, infected + avilamycin at the rate of 0.2 g/kg; T3, infected + essential oil of thymol; T4, infected + phytogenic; T5, infected + anti-Salmonella organic acid; and T6, infected + essential oils of thyme, anise, and other components. Body weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were significantly (P < 0.05) high in the T2 and T5 at the end of the first and the second week and similar to T4. During the second week, European production efficiency factor (EPEF) was also significantly (P < 0.05) high in T2, T4 and T5. Blood albumin increased significantly (P < 0.05) in birds of T2 in the first week, while during the second week, blood glucose and triglyceride concentration decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in T5. Blood ALT concentration decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in T6 compared to other treatments in the second week. Total antioxidant capacity (at the end of the second week) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) did not change significantly. From the results of the present study, it was concluded that different feed additives could be substituted with antibiotics in the feed of broiler exposed to S. typhimurium challenge.

  12. Robust tracking control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with input constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gang; Wang, Jinzhi; Wang, Xianghua

    2014-12-01

    The focus of this paper is on the design and simulation of robust tracking control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (AHV), which is affected by high nonlinearity, uncertain parameters and input constraints. The linearisation method is employed for the longitudinal AHV model about a specific trim condition, and then considering the additive uncertainties of three parameters, the linearised model is just in the form of affine parameter dependence. From this point, the linear parameter-varying method is applied to design the desired controller. The poles for the closed-loop system of the linearised model are placed into a desired vertical strip, and the quadratic stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed. Input constraints of the AHV are addressed by additional linear matrix inequalities. Finally, the designed controller is evaluated on the nonlinear AHV model and simulation results demonstrate excellent tracking performance with good robustness.

  13. Input and Input Processing in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcon, Eva

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes second-language learners' processing of linguistic data within the target language, focusing on input and intake in second-language acquisition and factors and cognitive processes that affect input processing. Input factors include input simplification, input enhancement, and interactional modifications. Individual learner differences…

  14. Input Decimated Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using an ensemble of classifiers instead of a single classifier has been shown to improve generalization performance in many pattern recognition problems. However, the extent of such improvement depends greatly on the amount of correlation among the errors of the base classifiers. Therefore, reducing those correlations while keeping the classifiers' performance levels high is an important area of research. In this article, we explore input decimation (ID), a method which selects feature subsets for their ability to discriminate among the classes and uses them to decouple the base classifiers. We provide a summary of the theoretical benefits of correlation reduction, along with results of our method on two underwater sonar data sets, three benchmarks from the Probenl/UCI repositories, and two synthetic data sets. The results indicate that input decimated ensembles (IDEs) outperform ensembles whose base classifiers use all the input features; randomly selected subsets of features; and features created using principal components analysis, on a wide range of domains.

  15. Optimal input shaping for Fisher identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberger, Michael J.

    This dissertation examines the fundamental challenge of optimally shaping input trajectories to maximize parameter identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models. Identifiability is a property from information theory that determines the solvability of parameter estimation for mathematical models using input-output measurements. This dissertation creates a framework that exploits the Fisher information metric to quantify the level of battery parameter identifiability, optimizes this metric through input shaping, and facilitates faster and more accurate estimation. The popularity of lithium-ion batteries is growing significantly in the energy storage domain, especially for stationary and transportation applications. While these cells have excellent power and energy densities, they are plagued with safety and lifespan concerns. These concerns are often resolved in the industry through conservative current and voltage operating limits, which reduce the overall performance and still lack robustness in detecting catastrophic failure modes. New advances in automotive battery management systems mitigate these challenges through the incorporation of model-based control to increase performance, safety, and lifespan. To achieve these goals, model-based control requires accurate parameterization of the battery model. While many groups in the literature study a variety of methods to perform battery parameter estimation, a fundamental issue of poor parameter identifiability remains apparent for lithium-ion battery models. This fundamental challenge of battery identifiability is studied extensively in the literature, and some groups are even approaching the problem of improving the ability to estimate the model parameters. The first approach is to add additional sensors to the battery to gain more information that is used for estimation. The other main approach is to shape the input trajectories to increase the amount of information that can be gained from input

  16. Atlas of relations between climatic parameters and distributions of important trees and shrubs in North America; additional conifers, hardwoods, and monocots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Robert S.; Anderson, Katherine H.; Bartlein, Patrick J.; Smith, Sharon A.

    2000-01-01

    This volume explores the continental-scale relations between climate and the geographic ranges of woody plant species in North America. A 25-km equal-area grid of modern climatic and bioclimatic parameters for North America was constructed from instrumental weather records. The geographic distributions of selected tree and shrub species were digitized, and the presence or absence of each species was determined for each cell on the 25-km grid, thus providing a basis for comparing climatic data and species' distribution.

  17. Effect of Withania somnifera (L. Dunal) root as a feed additive on immunological parameters and disease resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila in Labeo rohita (Hamilton) fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arun; Deo, Ashutosh D; Riteshkumar, S Tandel; Chanu, Thongam Ibemcha; Das, Arabinda

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of dietary doses of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) root powder on immunological parameters and disease resistance against the bacterial pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila infections in Indian major carp, Labeo rohita fingerlings. Fishes were fed with dry diet containing 0 gkg(-1) (control), 1 gkg(-1) (T(1)), 2 gkg(-1) (T(2)) and 3 gkg(-1) (T(3)) W. somnifera root powder for 42 days. Immunological (NBT level, Phagocytic activity, total immunoglobulin and lysozyme activity) parameters of fishes were examined at 0 days, 14 days, 28 days and 42 days of feeding. Fishes were challenged with A. hydrophila 42 days post feeding and mortalities (%) were recorded over 14 days post-infection. The results demonstrate that fishes fed with W. somnifera root showed enhanced NBT level, Phagocytic activity, total Immunoglobulin level and lysozyme activity (p<0.05) compared with the control group. The survivability was higher in experimental diets than the control group. Dietary W. somnifera at the level of 2 gkg(-1) showed significantly (P<0.05) higher protection (RPS 42.85+/-0.65%) against A. hydrophila infection than control. The results suggest that the W. somnifera root powder have a stimulatory effect on immunological parameters and increases disease resistance in L. rohita fingerlings against A. hydrophila infection.

  18. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Compensation for thermally induced aberrations in optical elements by means of additional heating by CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Kozhevatov, I. E.; Palashov, O. V.; Khazanov, E. A.

    2006-10-01

    A method is proposed for compensating thermally induced phase distortions of laser radiation in absorbing optical elements. The method is based on supplementary heating of the peripheral region of the distorting element by the radiation from an auxiliary laser. A programme code has been developed for calculating the optimal parameters of supplementary radiation for minimising phase distortions. This code is based on the numerical solution of the thermal conductivity and static elasticity equations for a nonuniformly heated solid of cylindrical symmetry. Experiments reveal a high efficiency of the method for compensating distortions resulting from absorption of radiation with a Gaussian intensity profile.

  19. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Computational Process and Material Modeling of Powder Bed additive manufacturing of IN 718. Optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling. Increase understanding of build properties. Increase reliability of builds. Decrease time to adoption of process for critical hardware. Potential to decrease post-build heat treatments. Conduct single-track and coupon builds at various build parameters. Record build parameter information and QM Meltpool data. Refine Applied Optimization powder bed AM process model using data. Report thermal modeling results. Conduct metallography of build samples. Calibrate STK models using metallography findings. Run STK models using AO thermal profiles and report STK modeling results. Validate modeling with additional build. Photodiode Intensity measurements highly linear with power input. Melt Pool Intensity highly correlated to Melt Pool Size. Melt Pool size and intensity increase with power. Applied Optimization will use data to develop powder bed additive manufacturing process model.

  20. Dimensionless numbers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, T.; Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of many process variables and alloy properties on the structure and properties of additively manufactured parts are examined using four dimensionless numbers. The structure and properties of components made from 316 Stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, and Inconel 718 powders for various dimensionless heat inputs, Peclet numbers, Marangoni numbers, and Fourier numbers are studied. Temperature fields, cooling rates, solidification parameters, lack of fusion defects, and thermal strains are examined using a well-tested three-dimensional transient heat transfer and fluid flow model. The results show that lack of fusion defects in the fabricated parts can be minimized by strengthening interlayer bonding using high values of dimensionless heat input. The formation of harmful intermetallics such as laves phases in Inconel 718 can be suppressed using low heat input that results in a small molten pool, a steep temperature gradient, and a fast cooling rate. Improved interlayer bonding can be achieved at high Marangoni numbers, which results in vigorous circulation of liquid metal, larger pool dimensions, and greater depth of penetration. A high Fourier number ensures rapid cooling, low thermal distortion, and a high ratio of temperature gradient to the solidification growth rate with a greater tendency of plane front solidification.

  1. The effect of rider weight and additional weight in Icelandic horses in tölt: part II. Stride parameters responses.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, V; Stefánsdóttir, G J; Jansson, A; Roepstorff, L

    2017-03-21

    This study investigated the effects of rider weight in the BW ratio (BWR) range common for Icelandic horses (20% to 35%), on stride parameters in tölt in Icelandic horses. The kinematics of eight experienced Icelandic school horses were measured during an incremental exercise test using a high-speed camera (300 frames/s). Each horse performed five phases (642 m each) in tölt at a BWR between rider (including saddle) and horse starting at 20% (BWR20) and increasing to 25% (BWR25), 30% (BWR30), 35% (BWR35) and finally 20% (BWR20b) was repeated. One professional rider rode all horses and weight (lead) was added to saddle and rider as needed. For each phase, eight strides at speed of 5.5 m/s were analyzed for stride duration, stride frequency, stride length, duty factor (DF), lateral advanced placement, lateral advanced liftoff, unipedal support (UPS), bipedal support (BPS) and height of front leg action. Stride length became shorter (Y=2.73-0.004x; P0.05). In conclusion, increased BWR decreased stride length and increased DF proportionally to the same extent in all limbs, whereas BPS increased at the expense of decreased UPS. These changes can be expected to decrease tölt quality when subjectively evaluated according to the breeding goals for the Icelandic horse. However, beat, symmetry and height of front leg lifting were not affected by BWR.

  2. Development of a Three-Dimensional Heat-Transfer Model for the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Process Using the Finite Element Method Coupled with a Genetic Algorithm Based Identification of Uncertain Input Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, S.; de, A.

    2008-11-01

    An accurate estimation of the temperature field in weld pool and its surrounding area is important for a priori determination of the weld-pool dimensions and the weld thermal cycles. A finite element based three-dimensional (3-D) quasi-steady heat-transfer model is developed in the present work to compute temperature field in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. The numerical model considers temperature-dependent material properties and latent heat of melting and solidification. A novelty of the numerical model is that the welding heat source is considered in the form of an adaptive volumetric heat source that confirms to the size and the shape of the weld pool. The need to predefine the dimensions of the volumetric heat source is thus overcome. The numerical model is further integrated with a parent-centric recombination (PCX) operated generalized generation gap (G3) model based genetic algorithm to identify the magnitudes of process efficiency and arc radius that are usually unknown but required for the accurate estimation of the net heat input into the workpiece. The complete numerical model and the genetic algorithm based optimization code are developed indigenously using an Intel Fortran Compiler. The integrated model is validated further with a number of experimentally measured weld dimensions in GTA-welded samples in stainless steels.

  3. Detection and characterisation of frauds in bovine meat in natura by non-meat ingredient additions using data fusion of chemical parameters and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Karen M; Andrade, Marcus Vinícius O; Santos Filho, Antônio M P; Lasmar, Marcelo C; Sena, Marcelo M

    2016-08-15

    Concerns about meat authenticity are increasing recently, due to great fraud scandals. This paper analysed real samples (43 adulterated and 12 controls) originated from criminal networks dismantled by the Brazilian Police. This fraud consisted of injecting solutions of non-meat ingredients (NaCl, phosphates, carrageenan, maltodextrin) in bovine meat, aiming to increase its water holding capacity. Five physico-chemical variables were determined, protein, ash, chloride, sodium, phosphate. Additionally, infrared spectra were recorded. Supervised classification PLS-DA models were built with each data set individually, but the best model was obtained with data fusion, correctly detecting 91% of the adulterated samples. From this model, a variable selection based on the highest VIPscores was performed and a new data fusion model was built with only one chemical variable, providing slightly lower predictions, but a good cost/performance ratio. Finally, some of the selected infrared bands were specifically associated to the presence of adulterants NaCl, tripolyphosphate and carrageenan.

  4. Addition of superoxide dismutase mimics during cooling process prevents oxidative stress and improves semen quality parameters in frozen/thawed ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Santiani, Alexei; Evangelista, Shirley; Sepúlveda, Néstor; Risopatrón, Jennie; Villegas, Juana; Sánchez, Raúl

    2014-10-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be related to reduced semen quality, are detected during semen cryopreservation in some species. The objectives of this study were to measure the oxidative stress during ram semen cryopreservation and to evaluate the effect of adding 2 antioxidant mimics of superoxide dismutase (Tempo and Tempol) during the cooling process on sperm motility, viability, acrosomal integrity, capacitation status, ROS levels, and lipid peroxidation in frozen and/or thawed ram spermatozoa. Measuring of ROS levels during the cooling process at 35, 25, 15, and 5 °C and after freezing and/or thawing showed a directly proportional increase (P < 0.05) when temperatures were lowering. Adding antioxidants at 10 °C confered a higher motility and sperm viability after cryopreservation in comparison with adding at 35 °C or at 35 °C/5 °C. After freezing and/or thawing, sperm motility was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in Tempo and Tempol 1 mM than that in control group. Percentage of capacitated spermatozoa was lower (P < 0.05) in Tempo and Tempol 1 mM in comparison with that in control group. In addition, ROS levels and lipid peroxidation in group Tempo 1 mM were lower (P < 0.05) than those in control group. These results demonstrate that ram spermatozoa are exposed to oxidative stress during the cooling process, specifically when maintained at 5 °C and that lipid peroxidation induced by high levels of ROS decreases sperm motility and induces premature sperm capacitation. In contrast, the addition of Tempo or Tempol at 0.5 to 1 mM during the cooling process (10 °C) protects ram spermatozoa from oxidative stress.

  5. Optimal input design for aircraft instrumentation systematic error estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique for designing optimal flight test inputs for accurate estimation of instrumentation systematic errors was developed and demonstrated. A simulation model of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the optimal input compared to input recorded during flight test. Instrumentation systematic error parameter estimates and their standard errors were compared. It was found that the optimal input design improved error parameter estimates and their accuracies for a fixed time input design. Pilot acceptability of the optimal input design was demonstrated using a six degree-of-freedom fixed base piloted simulation of the F-18 HARV. The technique described in this work provides a practical, optimal procedure for designing inputs for data compatibility experiments.

  6. TASSRAP Input Module

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-29

    retrieve data necessary for the other modules to function. Initially there are 13 inputs, with the CRT dis - playing the information to be entered...id 46aý .0sso somma % 4bt--f. ft Aa W #4t - lQ *a - 4 c ,0 45 40 aK 43 ’ C = 04 ZSC 0 de *020.4 %- li’l ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ & 1&.1 gol~ -,.-’ ow. -6 -N*4••1L...tv Z (𔃽 - C- ft %- ftb 0*4 *- -1 *4* (30 w ag &h 𔃾 0 a _6a .N I 0 A. 6.2 IL ILN ’ S MS 6C 0 to ~ 0 " di a S 0 m J *- -j f’ md op9 -9 $-. -6 = -A U .Af

  7. Program for User-Friendly Management of Input and Output Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    A computer program manages large, hierarchical sets of input and output (I/O) parameters (typically, sequences of alphanumeric data) involved in computational simulations in a variety of technological disciplines. This program represents sets of parameters as structures coded in object-oriented but otherwise standard American National Standards Institute C language. Each structure contains a group of I/O parameters that make sense as a unit in the simulation program with which this program is used. The addition of options and/or elements to sets of parameters amounts to the addition of new elements to data structures. By association of child data generated in response to a particular user input, a hierarchical ordering of input parameters can be achieved. Associated with child data structures are the creation and description mechanisms within the parent data structures. Child data structures can spawn further child data structures. In this program, the creation and representation of a sequence of data structures is effected by one line of code that looks for children of a sequence of structures until there are no more children to be found. A linked list of structures is created dynamically and is completely represented in the data structures themselves. Such hierarchical data presentation can guide users through otherwise complex setup procedures and it can be integrated within a variety of graphical representations.

  8. Input Multiplicities in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Lowell B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes research investigating potential effect of input multiplicity on multivariable chemical process control systems. Several simple processes are shown to exhibit the possibility of theoretical developments on input multiplicity and closely related phenomena are discussed. (JN)

  9. Modeling and generating input processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This tutorial paper provides information relevant to the selection and generation of stochastic inputs to simulation studies. The primary area considered is multivariate but much of the philosophy at least is relevant to univariate inputs as well. 14 refs.

  10. Handling Input and Output for COAMPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Patrick; Tran, Nam; Li, Yongzuo; Anantharaj, Valentine

    2007-01-01

    Two suites of software have been developed to handle the input and output of the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS), which is a regional atmospheric model developed by the Navy for simulating and predicting weather. Typically, the initial and boundary conditions for COAMPS are provided by a flat-file representation of the Navy s global model. Additional algorithms are needed for running the COAMPS software using global models. One of the present suites satisfies this need for running COAMPS using the Global Forecast System (GFS) model of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first step in running COAMPS downloading of GFS data from an Internet file-transfer-protocol (FTP) server computer of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is performed by one of the programs (SSC-00273) in this suite. The GFS data, which are in gridded binary (GRIB) format, are then changed to a COAMPS-compatible format by another program in the suite (SSC-00278). Once a forecast is complete, still another program in the suite (SSC-00274) sends the output data to a different server computer. The second suite of software (SSC- 00275) addresses the need to ingest up-to-date land-use-and-land-cover (LULC) data into COAMPS for use in specifying typical climatological values of such surface parameters as albedo, aerodynamic roughness, and ground wetness. This suite includes (1) a program to process LULC data derived from observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard NASA s Terra and Aqua satellites, (2) programs to derive new climatological parameters for the 17-land-use-category MODIS data; and (3) a modified version of a FORTRAN subroutine to be used by COAMPS. The MODIS data files are processed to reformat them into a compressed American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format used by COAMPS for efficient processing.

  11. Beyond Rainfall Multipliers: Describing Input Uncertainty as an Autocorrelated Stochastic Process Improves Inference in Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giudice, D.; Albert, C.; Reichert, P.; Rieckermann, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall is the main driver of hydrological systems. Unfortunately, it is highly variable in space and time and therefore difficult to observe accurately. This poses a serious challenge to correctly estimate the catchment-averaged precipitation, a key factor for hydrological models. As biased precipitation leads to biased parameter estimation and thus to biased runoff predictions, it is very important to have a realistic description of precipitation uncertainty. Rainfall multipliers (RM), which correct each observed storm with a random factor, provide a first step into this direction. Nevertheless, they often fail when the estimated input has a different temporal pattern from the true one or when a storm is not detected by the raingauge. In this study we propose a more realistic input error model, which is able to overcome these challenges and increase our certainty by better estimating model input and parameters. We formulate the average precipitation over the watershed as a stochastic input process (SIP). We suggest a transformed Gauss-Markov process, which is estimated in a Bayesian framework by using input (rainfall) and output (runoff) data. We tested the methodology in a 28.6 ha urban catchment represented by an accurate conceptual model. Specifically, we perform calibration and predictions with SIP and RM using accurate data from nearby raingauges (R1) and inaccurate data from a distant gauge (R2). Results show that using SIP, the estimated model parameters are "protected" from the corrupting impact of inaccurate rainfall. Additionally, SIP can correct input biases during calibration (Figure) and reliably quantify rainfall and runoff uncertainties during both calibration (Figure) and validation. In our real-word application with non-trivial rainfall errors, this was not the case with RM. We therefore recommend SIP in all cases where the input is the predominant source of uncertainty. Furthermore, the high-resolution rainfall intensities obtained with this

  12. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A novel input filter compensation scheme for a buck regulator that eliminates the interaction between the input filter output impedance and the regulator control loop is presented. The scheme is implemented using a feedforward loop that senses the input filter state variables and uses this information to modulate the duty cycle signal. The feedforward design process presented is seen to be straightforward and the feedforward easy to implement. Extensive experimental data supported by analytical results show that significant performance improvement is achieved with the use of feedforward in the following performance categories: loop stability, audiosusceptibility, output impedance and transient response. The use of feedforward results in isolating the switching regulator from its power source thus eliminating all interaction between the regulator and equipment upstream. In addition the use of feedforward removes some of the input filter design constraints and makes the input filter design process simpler thus making it possible to optimize the input filter. The concept of feedforward compensation can also be extended to other types of switching regulators.

  13. A Bayesian approach to model structural error and input variability in groundwater modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Valocchi, A. J.; Lin, Y. F. F.; Liang, F.

    2015-12-01

    Effective water resource management typically relies on numerical models to analyze groundwater flow and solute transport processes. Model structural error (due to simplification and/or misrepresentation of the "true" environmental system) and input forcing variability (which commonly arises since some inputs are uncontrolled or estimated with high uncertainty) are ubiquitous in groundwater models. Calibration that overlooks errors in model structure and input data can lead to biased parameter estimates and compromised predictions. We present a fully Bayesian approach for a complete assessment of uncertainty for spatially distributed groundwater models. The approach explicitly recognizes stochastic input and uses data-driven error models based on nonparametric kernel methods to account for model structural error. We employ exploratory data analysis to assist in specifying informative prior for error models to improve identifiability. The inference is facilitated by an efficient sampling algorithm based on DREAM-ZS and a parameter subspace multiple-try strategy to reduce the required number of forward simulations of the groundwater model. We demonstrate the Bayesian approach through a synthetic case study of surface-ground water interaction under changing pumping conditions. It is found that explicit treatment of errors in model structure and input data (groundwater pumping rate) has substantial impact on the posterior distribution of groundwater model parameters. Using error models reduces predictive bias caused by parameter compensation. In addition, input variability increases parametric and predictive uncertainty. The Bayesian approach allows for a comparison among the contributions from various error sources, which could inform future model improvement and data collection efforts on how to best direct resources towards reducing predictive uncertainty.

  14. The Kepler Input Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, D. W.; Brown, T. M.; Monet, D. G.; Everett, M.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Hergenrother, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    The Kepler mission will monitor 170,000 planet-search targets during the first year, and 100,000 after that. The Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) will be used to select optimum targets for the search for habitable earth-like transiting planets. The KIC will include all known catalogued stars in an area of about 177 square degrees centered at RA 19:22:40 and Dec +44:30 (l=76.3 and b=+13.5). 2MASS photometry will be supplemented with new ground-based photometry obtained in the SDSS g, r, i, and z bands plus a custom filter centered on the Mg b lines, using KeplerCam on the 48-inch telescope at the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. The photometry will be used to estimate stellar characteristics for all stars brighter than K 14.5 mag. The KIC will include effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, reddening, distance, and radius estimates for these stars. The CCD images are pipeline processed to produce instrumental magnitudes at PSI. The photometry is then archived and transformed to the SDSS system at HAO, where the astrophysical analysis of the stellar characteristics is carried out. The results are then merged with catalogued data at the USNOFS to produce the KIC. High dispersion spectroscopy with Hectochelle on the MMT will be used to supplement the information for many of the most interesting targets. The KIC will be released before launch for use by the astronomical community and will be available for queries over the internet. Support from the Kepler mission is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. INGEN: A COBRA-NC input generator user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, C.L.; Dodge, R.E.

    1986-12-01

    The INGEN (INput GENerator) computer program has been developed as a preprocessor to simplify input generation for the COBRA-NC computer program. INGEN uses several empirical correlations and geometric assumptions to simplify the data input requirements for the COBRA-NC computer code. The simplified input scheme is obtained at the expense of much flexibility provided by COBRA-NC. For more complex problems requiring additional flexibility however, INGEN may be used to provide a skeletal input file to which the more detailed input may be added. This report describes the input requirements for INGEN and describes the algorithms and correlations used to generate the COBRA-NC input. 9 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Diversity matters: parent input predicts toddler verb production.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ning; Hadley, Pamela A; Rispoli, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of parent input to children's subsequent expressive verb diversity was explored in twenty typically developing toddlers with small verb lexicons. Child developmental factors and parent input measures (i.e. verb quantity, verb diversity, and verb-related structural cues) at age 1;9 were examined as potential predictors of children's verb production in spontaneous language samples at age 2;3. Parent verb input diversity, rather than input quantity, was the primary input factor contributing to children's subsequent verb diversity. Regression analysis showed that verb diversity in parent input at age 1;9 accounted for 30% of the variance in children's verb production six months later, with children's total vocabulary size at age 1;9 accounting for an additional 16% of the variance. These findings demonstrate the relative contributions of developmental and input factors to individual differences in toddlers' language development and establish the importance of input diversity to verb acquisition.

  17. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  18. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  19. Intermediate inputs and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Baptist, Simon; Hepburn, Cameron

    2013-03-13

    Many models of economic growth exclude materials, energy and other intermediate inputs from the production function. Growing environmental pressures and resource prices suggest that this may be increasingly inappropriate. This paper explores the relationship between intermediate input intensity, productivity and national accounts using a panel dataset of manufacturing subsectors in the USA over 47 years. The first contribution is to identify sectoral production functions that incorporate intermediate inputs, while allowing for heterogeneity in both technology and productivity. The second contribution is that the paper finds a negative correlation between intermediate input intensity and total factor productivity (TFP)--sectors that are less intensive in their use of intermediate inputs have higher productivity. This finding is replicated at the firm level. We propose tentative hypotheses to explain this association, but testing and further disaggregation of intermediate inputs is left for further work. Further work could also explore more directly the relationship between material inputs and economic growth--given the high proportion of materials in intermediate inputs, the results in this paper are suggestive of further work on material efficiency. Depending upon the nature of the mechanism linking a reduction in intermediate input intensity to an increase in TFP, the implications could be significant. A third contribution is to suggest that an empirical bias in productivity, as measured in national accounts, may arise due to the exclusion of intermediate inputs. Current conventions of measuring productivity in national accounts may overstate the productivity of resource-intensive sectors relative to other sectors.

  20. Master control data handling program uses automatic data input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alliston, W.; Daniel, J.

    1967-01-01

    General purpose digital computer program is applicable for use with analysis programs that require basic data and calculated parameters as input. It is designed to automate input data preparation for flight control computer programs, but it is general enough to permit application in other areas.

  1. An update of input instructions to TEMOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The theory and operation of a FORTRAN 4 computer code, designated as TEMOD, used to calcuate tubular thermoelectric generator performance is described in WANL-TME-1906. The original version of TEMOD was developed in 1969. A description is given of additions to the mathematical model and an update of the input instructions to the code. Although the basic mathematical model described in WANL-TME-1906 has remained unchanged, a substantial number of input/output options were added to allow completion of module performance parametrics as required in support of the compact thermoelectric converter system technology program.

  2. Two-Input Enzymatic Logic Gates Made Sigmoid by Modifications of the Biocatalytic Reaction Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Zavalov, Oleksandr; Bocharova, Vera; Halamek, Jan; Halamkova, Lenka; Korkmaz, Sevim; Arugula, Mary; Chinnapareddy, Soujanya; Katz, Evgeny; Privman, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Computing based on biochemical processes is a newest rapidly developing field of unconventional information and signal processing. In this paper we present results of our research in the field of biochemical computing and summarize the obtained numerical and experimental data for implementations of the standard two-input OR and AND gates with double-sigmoid shape of the output signal. This form of response was obtained as a function of the two inputs in each of the realized biochemical systems. The enzymatic gate processes in the first system were activated with two chemical inputs and resulted in optically detected chromogen oxidation, which happens when either one or both of the inputs are present. In this case, the biochemical system is functioning as the OR gate. We demonstrate that the addition of a filtering biocatalytic process leads to a considerable reduction of the noise transmission factor and the resulting gate response has sigmoid shape in both inputs. The second system was developed for functioning as an AND gate, where the output signal was activated only by a simultaneous action of two enzymatic biomarkers. This response can be used as an indicator of liver damage, but only if both of these of the inputs are present at their elevated, pathophysiological values of concentrations. A kinetic numerical model was developed and used to estimate the range of parameters for which the experimentally realized logic gate is close to optimal. We also analyzed the system to evaluate its noise-handling properties.

  3. Input Impedance of the Microstrip SQUID Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinion, Darin; Clarke, John

    2008-03-01

    We present measurements of the complex scattering parameters of microstrip SQUID amplifiers (MSA) cooled to 4.2 K. The input of the MSA is a microstrip transmission line in the shape of a square spiral coil surrounding the hole in the SQUID washer that serves as the ground plane. The input impedance is found by measuring the reverse scattering parameter (S11) and is described well by a low-loss transmission line model. We map the low-loss transmission line model into an equivalent parallel RLC circuit in which a resistance R, inductance L, and capacitance C are calculated from the resonant frequency, characteristic impedance and attenuation factor. Using this equivalent RLC circuit, we model the MSA and input network with a lumped circuit model that accurately predicts the observed gain given by the forward scattering parameter (S21). We will summarize results for different coil geometries and terminations as well as SQUID bias conditions. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in part under Contract W-7405-Eng-48 and in part under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  4. Third order TRANSPORT with MAD (Methodical Accelerator Design) input

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.

    1988-09-20

    This paper describes computer-aided design codes for particle accelerators. Among the topics discussed are: input beam description; parameters and algebraic expressions; the physical elements; beam lines; operations; and third-order transfer matrix. (LSP)

  5. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Quantification of major input parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, F.T.; Payne, A.C.; Breeding, R.J.; Gorham, E.D.; Brown, T.D.; Rightley, G.S.; Gregory, J.J. ); Murfin, W. ); Amos, C.N. )

    1991-04-01

    This report records part of the vast amount of information received during the expert judgment elicitation process that took place in support of the NUREG-1150 effort sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The results of the Containment Loads and Molten Core/Containment Interaction Expert Panel Elicitation are presented in this part of Volume 2 of NUREG/CR-4551. The Containment Loads Expert Panel considered seven issues: (1) hydrogen phenomena at Grand Gulf; (2) hydrogen burn at vessel breach at Sequoyah; (3) BWR reactor building failure due to hydrogen; (4) Grand Gulf containment loads at vessel breach; (5) pressure increment in the Sequoyah containment at vessel breach; (6) loads at vessel breach: Surry; and (7) pressure increment in the Zion containment at vessel breach. The report begins with a brief discussion of the methods used to elicit the information from the experts. The information for each issue is then presented in five sections: (1) a brief definition of the issue, (2) a brief summary of the technical rationale supporting the distributions developed by each of the experts, (3) a brief description of the operations that the project staff performed on the raw elicitation results in order to aggregate the distributions, (4) the aggregated distributions, and (5) the individual expert elicitation summaries. The Molten Core/Containment Interaction Panel considered three issues. The results of the following two of these issues are presented in this document: (1) Peach Bottom drywell shell meltthrough; and (2) Grand Gulf pedestal erosion. 89 figs., 154 tabs.

  6. Land Building Models: Uncertainty in and Sensitivity to Input Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Science (69):370-380. Parker, G., C. Paola, K. X. Whipple, and D. Mohrig. 1998. Alluvial fans formed by channelized fluvial sheet flow. I: Theory...simulates the evolution of a prograding fan -shaped delta advancing into open water. This model is an extension of a tool developed for managing the

  7. Methods for Combining Payload Parameter Variations with Input Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, D. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Methods are presented for calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria. The approach is based on the concept that the desired limit load, defined as the largest load occuring in a mission, is a random variable having a specific probability distribution which may be determined from extreme-value theory. The design limit load, defined as a particular value of this random limit load, is the value conventionally used in structural design. Methods are presented for determining the limit load probability distributions from both time-domain and frequency-domain dynamic load simulations. Numerical demonstrations of the methods are also presented.

  8. System and method for motor parameter estimation

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

    2014-03-18

    A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values for motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.

  9. Biogenic inputs to ocean mixing.

    PubMed

    Katija, Kakani

    2012-03-15

    Recent studies have evoked heated debate about whether biologically generated (or biogenic) fluid disturbances affect mixing in the ocean. Estimates of biogenic inputs have shown that their contribution to ocean mixing is of the same order as winds and tides. Although these estimates are intriguing, further study using theoretical, numerical and experimental techniques is required to obtain conclusive evidence of biogenic mixing in the ocean. Biogenic ocean mixing is a complex problem that requires detailed understanding of: (1) marine organism behavior and characteristics (i.e. swimming dynamics, abundance and migratory behavior), (2) mechanisms utilized by swimming animals that have the ability to mix stratified fluids (i.e. turbulence and fluid drift) and (3) knowledge of the physical environment to isolate contributions of marine organisms from other sources of mixing. In addition to summarizing prior work addressing the points above, observations on the effect of animal swimming mode and body morphology on biogenic fluid transport will also be presented. It is argued that to inform the debate on whether biogenic mixing can contribute to ocean mixing, our studies should focus on diel vertical migrators that traverse stratified waters of the upper pycnocline. Based on our understanding of mixing mechanisms, body morphologies, swimming modes and body orientation, combined with our knowledge of vertically migrating populations of animals, it is likely that copepods, krill and some species of gelatinous zooplankton and fish have the potential to be strong sources of biogenic mixing.

  10. REL - English Bulk Data Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Richard Henry

    A bulk data input processor which is available for the Rapidly Extensible Language (REL) English versions is described. In REL English versions, statements that declare names of data items and their interrelationships normally are lines from a terminal or cards in a batch input stream. These statements provide a convenient means of declaring some…

  11. Inputs for L2 Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleemi, Anjum P.

    1989-01-01

    Major approaches of describing or examining linguistic data from a potential target language (input) are analyzed for adequacy in addressing the concerns of second language learning theory. Suggestions are made for making the best of these varied concepts of input and for reformulation of a unified concept. (MSE)

  12. Input in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan M., Ed.; Madden, Carolyn G., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers includes: "When Does Teacher Talk Work as Input?"; "Cultural Input in Second Language Learning"; "Skilled Variation in a Kindergarten Teacher's Use of Foreigner Talk"; "Teacher-Pupil Interaction in Second Language Development"; "Foreigner Talk in the University…

  13. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  14. PREVIMER : Meteorological inputs and outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenel, H.; Lecornu, F.; Kerléguer, L.

    2009-09-01

    PREVIMER is a pre-operational system aiming to provide a wide range of users, from private individuals to professionals, with short-term forecasts about the coastal environment along the French coastlines bordering the English Channel, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea. Observation data and digital modelling tools first provide 48-hour (probably 96-hour by summer 2009) forecasts of sea states, currents, sea water levels and temperatures. The follow-up of an increasing number of biological parameters will, in time, complete this overview of coastal environment. Working in partnership with the French Naval Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine, SHOM), the French National Weather Service (Météo-France), the French public science and technology research institute (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, IRD), the European Institute of Marine Studies (Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, IUEM) and many others, IFREMER (the French public institute fo marine research) is supplying the technologies needed to ensure this pertinent information, available daily on Internet at http://www.previmer.org, and stored at the Operational Coastal Oceanographic Data Centre. Since 2006, PREVIMER publishes the results of demonstrators assigned to limited geographic areas and to specific applications. This system remains experimental. The following topics are covered : Hydrodynamic circulation, sea states, follow-up of passive tracers, conservative or non-conservative (specifically of microbiological origin), biogeochemical state, primary production. Lastly, PREVIMER provides researchers and R&D departments with modelling tools and access to the database, in which the observation data and the modelling results are stored, to undertake environmental studies on new sites. The communication will focus on meteorological inputs to and outputs from PREVIMER. It will draw the lessons from almost 3 years during

  15. Computer program for single input-output, single-loop feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Additional work is reported on a completely automatic computer program for the design of single input/output, single loop feedback systems with parameter uncertainly, to satisfy time domain bounds on the system response to step commands and disturbances. The inputs to the program are basically the specified time-domain response bounds, the form of the constrained plant transfer function and the ranges of the uncertain parameters of the plant. The program output consists of the transfer functions of the two free compensation networks, in the form of the coefficients of the numerator and denominator polynomials, and the data on the prescribed bounds and the extremes actually obtained for the system response to commands and disturbances.

  16. A circuit design for multi-inputs stateful OR gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Wang, Xiaoping; Wan, Haibo; Yang, Ran; Zheng, Jian

    2016-09-01

    The in situ logic operation on memristor memory has attracted researchers' attention. In this brief, a new circuit structure that performs a stateful OR logic operation is proposed. When our OR logic is operated in series with other logic operations (IMP, AND), only two voltages should to be changed while three voltages are necessary in the previous one-step OR logic operation. In addition, this circuit structure can be extended to multi-inputs OR operation to perfect the family of logic operations on memristive memory in nanocrossbar based networks. The proposed OR gate can enable fast logic operation, reduce the number of required memristors and the sequential steps. Through analysis and simulation, the feasibility of OR operation is demonstrated and the appropriate parameters are obtained.

  17. Input management of production systems.

    PubMed

    Odum, E P

    1989-01-13

    Nonpoint sources of pollution, which are largely responsible for stressing regional and global life-supporting atmosphere, soil, and water, can only be reduced (and ultimately controlled) by input management that involves increasing the efficiency of production systems and reducing the inputs of environmentally damaging materials. Input management requires a major change, an about-face, in the approach to management of agriculture, power plants, and industries because the focus is on waste reduction and recycling rather than on waste disposal. For large-scale ecosystem-level situations a top-down hierarchical approach is suggested and illustrated by recent research in agroecology and landscape ecology.

  18. System monitors discrete computer inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. J.

    1966-01-01

    Computer system monitors inputs from checkout devices. The comparing, addressing, and controlling functions are performed in the I/O unit. This leaves the computer main frame free to handle memory, access priority, and interrupt instructions.

  19. Multiphoton catalysis with coherent state input: nonclassicality and decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Yun; Wu, Jia-Ni; Liao, Zeyang; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-09-01

    We propose a scheme to generate a new kind of non-Gaussian state—the Laguerre polynomial excited coherent state (LPECS)—by using multiphoton catalysis with coherent state input. The nonclassical properties of the LPECS are studied in terms of nonclassical depth, Mandel’s parameter, second-order correlation, quadrature squeezing, and the negativity of the Wigner function (WF). It is found that the LPECS is highly nonclassical and its nonclassicality depends on the amplitude of the coherent state, the catalysis photon number, and the parameters of the unbalanced beam splitter (BS). In particular, the maximum degree of squeezing can be enhanced by increasing the catalysis photon number. In addition, we examine the effect of decoherence using the WF, which shows that the negative region, the characteristic time of decoherence, and the structure of the WF are affected by catalysis photon number and the parameters of the unbalanced BS. Our work provides general analysis on how to prepare polynomial quantum states, which may be useful in the fields of quantum information and quantum computation.

  20. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  1. Screening somatic cell nuclear transfer parameters for generation of transgenic cloned cattle with intragenomic integration of additional gene copies that encode bovine adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; Li, Hejuan; Wang, Ying; Yan, Xingrong; Sheng, Xihui; Chang, Di; Qi, Xiaolong; Wang, Xiangguo; Liu, Yunhai; Li, Junya; Ni, Hemin

    2017-02-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is frequently used to produce transgenic cloned livestock, but it is still associated with low success rates. To our knowledge, we are the first to report successful production of transgenic cattle that overexpress bovine adipocyte-type fatty acid binding proteins (A-FABPs) with the aid of SCNT. Intragenomic integration of additional A-FABP gene copies has been found to be positively correlated with the intramuscular fat content in different farm livestock species. First, we optimized the cloning parameters to produce bovine embryos integrated with A-FABP by SCNT, such as applied voltage field strength and pulse duration for electrofusion, morphology and size of donor cells, and number of donor cells passages. Then, bovine fibroblast cells from Qinchuan cattle were transfected with A-FABP and used as donor cells for SCNT. Hybrids of Simmental and Luxi local cattle were selected as the recipient females for A-FABP transgenic SCNT-derived embryos. The results showed that a field strength of 2.5 kV/cm with two 10-μs duration electrical pulses was ideal for electrofusion, and 4-6th generation circular smooth type donor cells with diameters of 15-25 μm were optimal for producing transgenic bovine embryos by SCNT, and resulted in higher fusion (80%), cleavage (73%), and blastocyst (27%) rates. In addition, we obtained two transgenic cloned calves that expressed additional bovine A-FABP gene copies, as detected by PCR-amplified cDNA sequencing. We proposed a set of optimal protocols to produce transgenic SCNT-derived cattle with intragenomic integration of ectopic A-FABP-inherited exon sequences.

  2. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  3. Parameter Identifiability of Fundamental Pharmacodynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Janzén, David L. I.; Bergenholm, Linnéa; Jirstrand, Mats; Parkinson, Joanna; Yates, James; Evans, Neil D.; Chappell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Issues of parameter identifiability of routinely used pharmacodynamics models are considered in this paper. The structural identifiability of 16 commonly applied pharmacodynamic model structures was analyzed analytically, using the input-output approach. Both fixed-effects versions (non-population, no between-subject variability) and mixed-effects versions (population, including between-subject variability) of each model structure were analyzed. All models were found to be structurally globally identifiable under conditions of fixing either one of two particular parameters. Furthermore, an example was constructed to illustrate the importance of sufficient data quality and show that structural identifiability is a prerequisite, but not a guarantee, for successful parameter estimation and practical parameter identifiability. This analysis was performed by generating artificial data of varying quality to a structurally identifiable model with known true parameter values, followed by re-estimation of the parameter values. In addition, to show the benefit of including structural identifiability as part of model development, a case study was performed applying an unidentifiable model to real experimental data. This case study shows how performing such an analysis prior to parameter estimation can improve the parameter estimation process and model performance. Finally, an unidentifiable model was fitted to simulated data using multiple initial parameter values, resulting in highly different estimated uncertainties. This example shows that although the standard errors of the parameter estimates often indicate a structural identifiability issue, reasonably “good” standard errors may sometimes mask unidentifiability issues. PMID:27994553

  4. Mass exchange processes with input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapivsky, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a system of interacting clusters evolving through mass exchange and supplemented by input of small clusters. Three possibilities depending on the rate of exchange generically occur when input is homogeneous: continuous growth, gelation, and instantaneous gelation. We mostly study the growth regime using scaling methods. An exchange process with reaction rates equal to the product of reactant masses admits an exact solution which allows us to justify the validity of scaling approaches in this special case. We also investigate exchange processes with a localized input. We show that if the diffusion coefficients are mass-independent, the cluster mass distribution becomes stationary and develops an algebraic tail far away from the source.

  5. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  6. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  7. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  8. Optimal Inputs for System Identification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    The derivation of the power spectral density of the optimal input for system identification is addressed in this research. Optimality is defined in...identification potential of general System Identification algorithms, a new and efficient System Identification algorithm that employs Iterated Weighted Least

  9. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  10. The advanced LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chris L.; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan. T.; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V.; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J.; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z.; Martin, Rodica M.; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  11. Lab Inputs for Common Micros.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, Robert

    1984-01-01

    The game paddle inputs of Apple microcomputers provide a simple way to get laboratory measurements into the computer. Discusses these game paddles and the necessary interface software. Includes schematics for Apple built-in paddle electronics, TRS-80 game paddle I/O, Commodore circuit for user port, and bus interface for Sinclair/Timex, Commodore,…

  12. The advanced LIGO input optics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Chris L. Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; Feldbaum, David; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Martin, Rodica M.; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido; DeRosa, Ryan T.; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Frolov, Valery V.; Mullavey, Adam; Kawabe, Keita; Vorvick, Cheryl; King, Eleanor J.; and others

    2016-01-15

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  13. Incorporating uncertainty in RADTRAN 6.0 input files.

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John

    2010-02-01

    Uncertainty may be introduced into RADTRAN analyses by distributing input parameters. The MELCOR Uncertainty Engine (Gauntt and Erickson, 2004) has been adapted for use in RADTRAN to determine the parameter shape and minimum and maximum of the distribution, to sample on the distribution, and to create an appropriate RADTRAN batch file. Coupling input parameters is not possible in this initial application. It is recommended that the analyst be very familiar with RADTRAN and able to edit or create a RADTRAN input file using a text editor before implementing the RADTRAN Uncertainty Analysis Module. Installation of the MELCOR Uncertainty Engine is required for incorporation of uncertainty into RADTRAN. Gauntt and Erickson (2004) provides installation instructions as well as a description and user guide for the uncertainty engine.

  14. Evaluation of Advanced Stirling Convertor Net Heat Input Correlation Methods Using a Thermal Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell; Schifer, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Test hardware used to validate net heat prediction models. Problem: Net Heat Input cannot be measured directly during operation. Net heat input is a key parameter needed in prediction of efficiency for convertor performance. Efficiency = Electrical Power Output (Measured) divided by Net Heat Input (Calculated). Efficiency is used to compare convertor designs and trade technology advantages for mission planning.

  15. Systems and methods for reconfiguring input devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Jeff (Inventor); De Mers, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes an input device having first and second input members configured to be activated by a user. The input device is configured to generate activation signals associated with activation of the first and second input members, and each of the first and second input members are associated with an input function. A processor is coupled to the input device and configured to receive the activation signals. A memory coupled to the processor, and includes a reconfiguration module configured to store the input functions assigned to the first and second input members and, upon execution of the processor, to reconfigure the input functions assigned to the input members when the first input member is inoperable.

  16. Dynamics of ultrasonic additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a solid-state technology for joining similar and dissimilar metal foils near room temperature by scrubbing them together with ultrasonic vibrations under pressure. Structural dynamics of the welding assembly and work piece influence how energy is transferred during the process and ultimately, part quality. To understand the effect of structural dynamics during UAM, a linear time-invariant model is proposed to relate the inputs of shear force and electric current to resultant welder velocity and voltage. Measured frequency response and operating performance of the welder under no load is used to identify model parameters. Using this model and in-situ measurements, shear force and welder efficiency are estimated to be near 2000N and 80% when welding Al 6061-H18 weld foil, respectively. Shear force and welder efficiency have never been estimated before in UAM. The influence of processing conditions, i.e., welder amplitude, normal force, and weld speed, on shear force and welder efficiency are investigated. Welder velocity was found to strongly influence the shear force magnitude and efficiency while normal force and weld speed showed little to no influence. The proposed model is used to describe high frequency harmonic content in the velocity response of the welder during welding operations and coupling of the UAM build with the welder.

  17. National hospital input price index.

    PubMed

    Freeland, M S; Anderson, G; Schendler, C E

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 per cent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies.

  18. The IVS data input to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Alef, Walter; Amagai, Jun; Andersen, Per Helge; Andreeva, Tatiana; Artz, Thomas; Bachmann, Sabine; Barache, Christophe; Baudry, Alain; Bauernfeind, Erhard; Baver, Karen; Beaudoin, Christopher; Behrend, Dirk; Bellanger, Antoine; Berdnikov, Anton; Bergman, Per; Bernhart, Simone; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bianco, Giuseppe; Bielmaier, Ewald; Boboltz, David; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Boer, Armin; Bolotin, Sergei; Bougeard, Mireille; Bourda, Geraldine; Buttaccio, Salvo; Cannizzaro, Letizia; Cappallo, Roger; Carlson, Brent; Carter, Merri Sue; Charlot, Patrick; Chen, Chenyu; Chen, Maozheng; Cho, Jungho; Clark, Thomas; Collioud, Arnaud; Colomer, Francisco; Colucci, Giuseppe; Combrinck, Ludwig; Conway, John; Corey, Brian; Curtis, Ronald; Dassing, Reiner; Davis, Maria; de-Vicente, Pablo; De Witt, Aletha; Diakov, Alexey; Dickey, John; Diegel, Irv; Doi, Koichiro; Drewes, Hermann; Dube, Maurice; Elgered, Gunnar; Engelhardt, Gerald; Evangelista, Mark; Fan, Qingyuan; Fedotov, Leonid; Fey, Alan; Figueroa, Ricardo; Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro; Gambis, Daniel; Garcia-Espada, Susana; Gaume, Ralph; Gaylard, Michael; Geiger, Nicole; Gipson, John; Gomez, Frank; Gomez-Gonzalez, Jesus; Gordon, David; Govind, Ramesh; Gubanov, Vadim; Gulyaev, Sergei; Haas, Ruediger; Hall, David; Halsig, Sebastian; Hammargren, Roger; Hase, Hayo; Heinkelmann, Robert; Helldner, Leif; Herrera, Cristian; Himwich, Ed; Hobiger, Thomas; Holst, Christoph; Hong, Xiaoyu; Honma, Mareki; Huang, Xinyong; Hugentobler, Urs; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Iddink, Andreas; Ihde, Johannes; Ilijin, Gennadiy; Ipatov, Alexander; Ipatova, Irina; Ishihara, Misao; Ivanov, D. V.; Jacobs, Chris; Jike, Takaaki; Johansson, Karl-Ake; Johnson, Heidi; Johnston, Kenneth; Ju, Hyunhee; Karasawa, Masao; Kaufmann, Pierre; Kawabata, Ryoji; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Eiji; Kaydanovsky, Michael; Kharinov, Mikhail; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kokado, Kensuke; Kondo, Tetsuro; Korkin, Edward; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Krasna, Hana; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Kurdubov, Sergey; Kurihara, Shinobu; Kuroda, Jiro; Kwak, Younghee; La Porta, Laura; Labelle, Ruth; Lamb, Doug; Lambert, Sébastien; Langkaas, Line; Lanotte, Roberto; Lavrov, Alexey; Le Bail, Karine; Leek, Judith; Li, Bing; Li, Huihua; Li, Jinling; Liang, Shiguang; Lindqvist, Michael; Liu, Xiang; Loesler, Michael; Long, Jim; Lonsdale, Colin; Lovell, Jim; Lowe, Stephen; Lucena, Antonio; Luzum, Brian; Ma, Chopo; Ma, Jun; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Machida, Morito; MacMillan, Dan; Madzak, Matthias; Malkin, Zinovy; Manabe, Seiji; Mantovani, Franco; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Marshalov, Dmitry; Mathiassen, Geir; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; McCarthy, Dennis; Melnikov, Alexey; Michailov, Andrey; Miller, Natalia; Mitchell, Donald; Mora-Diaz, Julian Andres; Mueskens, Arno; Mukai, Yasuko; Nanni, Mauro; Natusch, Tim; Negusini, Monia; Neidhardt, Alexander; Nickola, Marisa; Nicolson, George; Niell, Arthur; Nikitin, Pavel; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Nishikawa, Takashi; Noll, Carey; Nozawa, Kentarou; Ogaja, Clement; Oh, Hongjong; Olofsson, Hans; Opseth, Per Erik; Orfei, Sandro; Pacione, Rosa; Pazamickas, Katherine; Petrachenko, William; Pettersson, Lars; Pino, Pedro; Plank, Lucia; Ploetz, Christian; Poirier, Michael; Poutanen, Markku; Qian, Zhihan; Quick, Jonathan; Rahimov, Ismail; Redmond, Jay; Reid, Brett; Reynolds, John; Richter, Bernd; Rioja, Maria; Romero-Wolf, Andres; Ruszczyk, Chester; Salnikov, Alexander; Sarti, Pierguido; Schatz, Raimund; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Schiavone, Francesco; Schreiber, Ulrich; Schuh, Harald; Schwarz, Walter; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Searle, Anthony; Sekido, Mamoru; Seitz, Manuela; Shao, Minghui; Shibuya, Kazuo; Shu, Fengchun; Sieber, Moritz; Skjaeveland, Asmund; Skurikhina, Elena; Smolentsev, Sergey; Smythe, Dan; Sousa, Don; Sovers, Ojars; Stanford, Laura; Stanghellini, Carlo; Steppe, Alan; Strand, Rich; Sun, Jing; Surkis, Igor; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Tanir, Emine; Tao, An; Tateyama, Claudio; Teke, Kamil; Thomas, Cynthia; Thorandt, Volkmar; Thornton, Bruce; Tierno Ros, Claudia; Titov, Oleg; Titus, Mike; Tomasi, Paolo; Tornatore, Vincenza; Trigilio, Corrado; Trofimov, Dmitriy; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Tuccari, Gino; Tzioumis, Tasso; Ujihara, Hideki; Ullrich, Dieter; Uunila, Minttu; Venturi, Tiziana; Vespe, Francesco; Vityazev, Veniamin; Volvach, Alexandr; Vytnov, Alexander; Wang, Guangli; Wang, Jinqing; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Na; Wang, Shiqiang; Wei, Wenren; Weston, Stuart; Whitney, Alan; Wojdziak, Reiner; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Yang, Wenjun; Ye, Shuhua; Yi, Sangoh; Yusup, Aili; Zapata, Octavio; Zeitlhoefler, Reinhard; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Xiuzhong; Zhao, Rongbing; Zheng, Weimin; Zhou, Ruixian; Zubko, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a primary space-geodetic technique for determining precise coordinates on the Earth, for monitoring the variable Earth rotation and orientation with highest precision, and for deriving many other parameters of the Earth system. The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS, http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The datasets published here are the results of individual Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions in the form of normal equations in SINEX 2.0 format (http://www.iers.org/IERS/EN/Organization/AnalysisCoordinator/SinexFormat/sinex.html, the SINEX 2.0 description is attached as pdf) provided by IVS as the input for the next release of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRF): ITRF2014. This is a new version of the ITRF2008 release (Bockmann et al., 2009). For each session/ file, the normal equation systems contain elements for the coordinate components of all stations having participated in the respective session as well as for the Earth orientation parameters (x-pole, y-pole, UT1 and its time derivatives plus offset to the IAU2006 precession-nutation components dX, dY (https://www.iau.org/static/resolutions/IAU2006_Resol1.pdf). The terrestrial part is free of datum. The data sets are the result of a weighted combination of the input of several IVS Analysis Centers. The IVS contribution for ITRF2014 is described in Bachmann et al (2015), Schuh and Behrend (2012) provide a general overview on the VLBI method, details on the internal data handling can be found at Behrend (2013).

  19. The effect of smoothed solar wind inputs on global modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Raluca; Liemohn, Michael W.; Ridley, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the role of fluctuations in the solar wind parameters in triggering a magnetic storm and assesses the storm simulation ability of the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) through a model-data comparison. The event of 22 September 1999 is examined through global magnetosphere simulations, using as input Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) observations (4 min temporal resolution) along with running averages of this data with windows of 60, 120, and 180 min. It is noted that for this storm the model produces a two phase, fast then slow recovery phase due to a sudden drop in plasma sheet density during the interval of southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Also, smoothing the input with a window larger than 60 min changes the entire magnetosphere and reduces the plasma sheet density and pressure, therefore a less intense storm develops. It is worth mentioning that the main phase (measured from Storm Sudden Commencement to minimum Dst) for this magnetic storm lasted about 3 h. This explains the change in the Dst profile for the 120 and 180 min averaged input. Averaging only IMF Bz or solar wind density reveals that all input parameters are important for the development of the storm, but Bz is the most significant. Also, comparison with Dst predictions (using the formula of O'Brien and McPherron (2000)) are presented and discussed. For all cases studied, there are no significant differences for Cross Polar Cap Potential (CPCP) in both hemispheres, while the nightside plasma sheet density shows a sharp drop when the input is averaged over 60 min or more. Our results indicate that the magnetosphere responds nonlinearly to the changes in the energy input, suggesting the need for a threshold in the amount of energy transferred to the system in order for the ring current to develop. Further increase of the energy input leads to a saturation limit where the inner magnetosphere response is no longer affected by any additional amount of energy

  20. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  1. Analysis of first and second order binary quantized digital phase-locked loops for ideal and white Gaussian noise inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasche, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    Specific configurations of first and second order all digital phase locked loops are analyzed for both ideal and additive white gaussian noise inputs. In addition, a design for a hardware digital phase locked loop capable of either first or second order operation is presented along with appropriate experimental data obtained from testing of the hardware loop. All parameters chosen for the analysis and the design of the digital phase locked loop are consistent with an application to an Omega navigation receiver although neither the analysis nor the design are limited to this application.

  2. Tilt compensated MOEMS projector as input device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüger, Heinrich; Heberer, Andreas; Gerwig, Christian; Nauber, Petra; Scholles, Michael; Lakner, Hubert

    2007-02-01

    Silicon micro machining once headed into two directions: MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) based sensors like accelerometers and gyroscopes on the one hand, MOEMS (micro opto electro mechanical systems) based actuators like scanner mirrors on the other hand. Now both directions meet again: A tilt compensated projector module uses a two dimensional excited scanner mirror as well as accelerometers and gyroscopes. The projector module can have a minimum size of 30 x 15 x 15 mm 3 with a monochrome red laser source (λ = 635 nm). It reaches a resolution of 640 x 480 pixels (VGA) and a frame rate of 50fps. Colour projection requires lager size due to the lack of compact green laser sources. The tilt and roll angles are measured statically by a three axes accelerometer, fast movement is detected dynamically by three single axis gyroscopes. Thus tilt of the projection systems was compensated successfully. The dynamic range was set to 300 x 300 pixels for sufficient system dynamic. Furthermore the motion detection was used to achieve control and input device functions. The first demonstration and test system consists of a projector mounted at the axis of a PC racing wheel together with the additional inertial measurement unit (IMU) system. It was shown that projection and input function work well together. Using this approach, new possibilities for hand-held devices arise in the close future.

  3. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  4. Input Shaping to Reduce Solar Array Structural Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael J.; Tolson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Structural vibrations induced by actuators can be minimized using input shaping. Input shaping is a feedforward method in which actuator commands are convolved with shaping functions to yield a shaped set of commands. These commands are designed to perform the maneuver while minimizing the residual structural vibration. In this report, input shaping is extended to stepper motor actuators. As a demonstration, an input-shaping technique based on pole-zero cancellation was used to modify the Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) actuator commands for the Lewis satellite. A series of impulses were calculated as the ideal SADA output for vibration control. These impulses were then discretized for use by the SADA stepper motor actuator and simulated actuator outputs were used to calculate the structural response. The effectiveness of input shaping is limited by the accuracy of the knowledge of the modal frequencies. Assuming perfect knowledge resulted in significant vibration reduction. Errors of 10% in the modal frequencies caused notably higher levels of vibration. Controller robustness was improved by incorporating additional zeros in the shaping function. The additional zeros did not require increased performance from the actuator. Despite the identification errors, the resulting feedforward controller reduced residual vibrations to the level of the exactly modeled input shaper and well below the baseline cases. These results could be easily applied to many other vibration-sensitive applications involving stepper motor actuators.

  5. Canopy Research Network seeks input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In July 1993, the Canopy Research Network was established with a 2-year planning grant from the National Science Foundation to bring together forest canopy researchers, quantitative scientists, and computer specialists to establish methods for collecting, storing, analyzing, interpreting, and displaying three-dimensional data that relate to tree crowns and forest canopies. The CRN is now soliciting input from scientists in other fields who may have developed techniques and software to help obtain answers to questions that concern the complex three-dimensional structure of tree crowns and forest canopies. Over the next 3 years, the CRN plans to compile an array of research questions and issues requiring information on canopy structure, examine useful information models and software tools already in use in allied fields, and develop conceptual models and recommendations for the types and format of information and analyses necessary to answer research questions posed by canopy researchers.

  6. Reconstruction of the input signal of the leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model from its interspike intervals.

    PubMed

    Seydnejad, Saeid R

    2016-02-01

    Extracting the input signal of a neuron by analyzing its spike output is an important step toward understanding how external information is coded into discrete events of action potentials and how this information is exchanged between different neurons in the nervous system. Most of the existing methods analyze this decoding problem in a stochastic framework and use probabilistic metrics such as maximum-likelihood method to determine the parameters of the input signal assuming a leaky and integrate-and-fire (LIF) model. In this article, the input signal of the LIF model is considered as a combination of orthogonal basis functions. The coefficients of the basis functions are found by minimizing the norm of the observed spikes and those generated by the estimated signal. This approach gives rise to the deterministic reconstruction of the input signal and results in a simple matrix identity through which the coefficients of the basis functions and therefore the neuronal stimulus can be identified. The inherent noise of the neuron is considered as an additional factor in the membrane potential and is treated as the disturbance in the reconstruction algorithm. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated by numerical simulations, and it is shown that input signals with different characteristics can be well recovered by this algorithm.

  7. High Performance Input/Output Systems for High Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Geoffrey C.; Ou, Chao-Wei

    1997-01-01

    The approach of this task was to apply leading parallel computing research to a number of existing techniques for assimilation, and extract parameters indicating where and how input/output limits computational performance. The following was used for detailed knowledge of the application problems: 1. Developing a parallel input/output system specifically for this application 2. Extracting the important input/output characteristics of data assimilation problems; and 3. Building these characteristics s parameters into our runtime library (Fortran D/High Performance Fortran) for parallel input/output support.

  8. Measurement of optical fiber sensing parameter using FBG with WDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huanhuan; Wang, Li; Peng, Zhaozhuang; Hu, Shuyang

    2016-11-01

    In this experiment, the optical parameters of optical fiber sensing measurements with the wavelength division multiplexer (WDM) and Fiber Bragg grating have obtained in temperature-controlled cabinet. The wavelength division multiplexer device not only make different wavelength illuminant input at the same time be possible, but also can achieve multi-channel output based on the feature of WDM. We design and put forward a new method which can realize various parameters measured at the same time, such as temperature and the refractive index or stress measurement. In addition, it can measure the same parameters with different wavelengths of laser at the same time. The contrast analysis results of different wavelengths of illuminant on the same parameter sensitivity and reliability of the measurement will use to provide reference to design the same illuminant with different parameter measurements.

  9. Detection of Floating Inputs in Logic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, B.; Thornton, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    Simple modification of oscilloscope probe allows easy detection of floating inputs or tristate outputs in digital-IC's. Oscilloscope probe easily modified with 1/4 W resistor and switch for detecting floating inputs in CMOS logic circuits.

  10. Repositioning Recitation Input in College English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to discuss how recitation input helps overcome the negative influences on the basis of second language acquisition theory and confirms the important role that recitation input plays in improving college students' oral and written English.

  11. Textual Enhancement of Input: Issues and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Park, Eun Sung; Combs, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The input enhancement hypothesis proposed by Sharwood Smith (1991, 1993) has stimulated considerable research over the last 15 years. This article reviews the research on textual enhancement of input (TE), an area where the majority of input enhancement studies have aggregated. Methodological idiosyncrasies are the norm of this body of research.…

  12. Input Devices for Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Karen

    The versatility of the computer can be expanded considerably for young handicapped children by using input devices other than the typewriter-style keyboard. Input devices appropriate for young children can be classified into four categories: alternative keyboards, contact switches, speech input devices, and cursor control devices. Described are…

  13. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Problems caused by input filter interaction and conventional input filter design techniques are discussed. The concept of feedforward control is modeled with an input filter and a buck regulator. Experimental measurement and comparison to the analytical predictions is carried out. Transient response and the use of a feedforward loop to stabilize the regulator system is described. Other possible applications for feedforward control are included.

  14. Effect of Energy Input on the Characteristic of AISI H13 and D2 Tool Steels Deposited by a Directed Energy Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Seok; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Min-Gyu; Sung, Ji Hyun; Cha, Kyoung Je; Kim, Da Hye

    2016-05-01

    Among the many additive manufacturing technologies, the directed energy deposition (DED) process has attracted significant attention because of the application of metal products. Metal deposited by the DED process has different properties than wrought metal because of the rapid solidification rate, the high thermal gradient between the deposited metal and substrate, etc. Additionally, many operating parameters, such as laser power, beam diameter, traverse speed, and powder mass flow rate, must be considered since the characteristics of the deposited metal are affected by the operating parameters. In the present study, the effect of energy input on the characteristics of H13 and D2 steels deposited by a direct metal tooling process based on the DED process was investigated. In particular, we report that the hardness of the deposited H13 and D2 steels decreased with increasing energy input, which we discuss by considering microstructural observations and thermodynamics.

  15. Stochastic control system parameter identifiability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. H.; Herget, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The parameter identification problem of general discrete time, nonlinear, multiple input/multiple output dynamic systems with Gaussian white distributed measurement errors is considered. The knowledge of the system parameterization was assumed to be known. Concepts of local parameter identifiability and local constrained maximum likelihood parameter identifiability were established. A set of sufficient conditions for the existence of a region of parameter identifiability was derived. A computation procedure employing interval arithmetic was provided for finding the regions of parameter identifiability. If the vector of the true parameters is locally constrained maximum likelihood (CML) identifiable, then with probability one, the vector of true parameters is a unique maximal point of the maximum likelihood function in the region of parameter identifiability and the constrained maximum likelihood estimation sequence will converge to the vector of true parameters.

  16. The effect of input perturbations on swimming performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Andrea M.; Thornycroft, Patrick J. M.; Lauder, George V.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2014-11-01

    The influence of flexibility and fluid characteristics on the hydrodynamics of swimming has been investigated for a range of experimental systems. One investigative method is to use reduced-order physical models--pitching and heaving hydrofoils. Typically, a smooth, periodic, input signal is used to control foil motion in experiments that explore fundamental factors (aspect ratio, shape, etc.) in swimming performance. However, the significance of non-smooth input signals in undulating swimmers is non-trivial. Instead of varying external properties, we study the impact of perturbed input motions on swimming performance. A smooth sinusoid is overlaid with high frequency, low amplitude perturbations as the input signal for a heaving panel in a closed loop flow tank. Specifically, 1 cm heave amplitude base sinusoids are added to 0.1 cm heave perturbations with frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 13 Hz. Two thin foils with different stiffness are flapped with the combined input signals in addition to the individual high heave and low heave signals that were added to create the combined inputs. Results demonstrate that perturbations can increase thrust and that adding the perturbed signal to a base frequency alters wake structure.

  17. Turn customer input into innovation.

    PubMed

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis.

  18. Input reconstruction of chaos sensors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongchuan; Liu, Fang; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2008-06-01

    Although the sensitivity of sensors can be significantly enhanced using chaotic dynamics due to its extremely sensitive dependence on initial conditions and parameters, how to reconstruct the measured signal from the distorted sensor response becomes challenging. In this paper we suggest an effective method to reconstruct the measured signal from the distorted (chaotic) response of chaos sensors. This measurement signal reconstruction method applies the neural network techniques for system structure identification and therefore does not require the precise information of the sensor's dynamics. We discuss also how to improve the robustness of reconstruction. Some examples are presented to illustrate the measurement signal reconstruction method suggested.

  19. Using model order tests to determine sensory inputs in a motion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Junker, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    In the study of motion effects on tracking performance, a problem of interest is the determination of what sensory inputs a human uses in controlling his tracking task. In the approach presented here a simple canonical model (FID or a proportional, integral, derivative structure) is used to model the human's input-output time series. A study of significant changes in reduction of the output error loss functional is conducted as different permutations of parameters are considered. Since this canonical model includes parameters which are related to inputs to the human (such as the error signal, its derivatives and integration), the study of model order is equivalent to the study of which sensory inputs are being used by the tracker. The parameters are obtained which have the greatest effect on reducing the loss function significantly. In this manner the identification procedure converts the problem of testing for model order into the problem of determining sensory inputs.

  20. Reduction of uncertainty of hydrological modelling using different precipitation inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluntke, T.; Pavlik, D.; Bernhofer, C.

    2012-04-01

    Precipitation is one of the main sources of uncertainty in hydrological modelling, due to its high temporal and spatial variability. A dense network of rain gauge stations or a combination with, e.g., radar data is needed to account for the - in comparison to other climatic elements - pronounced variability. The density of existing station-networks is low in many countries worldwide. Alternative approaches that use additional information should be applied to improve the estimation of areal precipitation. Within the project "International Research Alliance Saxony" (http://www.iwas-sachsen.ufz.de/), one subproject aims at a system analysis of a meso-scale catchment of the Western Bug in Ukraine. Effective and sustainable measures have to be identified to improve the water quality of the Western Bug under the premise of upcoming changes of climate, land use and socio economy. An exact quantification of the water balance is needed as a pre-requisite for a matter balance. This contribution demonstrates possibilities to reduce the uncertainties of water balance modelling of the catchment Kamianka-Buzka/ Western Bug (2560 km2) by applying and combining alternative precipitation inputs. Available precipitation data were undergone an extensive quality check and were bias corrected. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT, http://swatmodel.tamu.edu/) was used for water balance modelling. By default, meteorological observations are incorporated into SWAT using the station that is nearest to the centroid of each sub-catchment. Two alternative precipitation inputs were applied: 1) Data of 20 stations were regionalized using kriging methods. 2) The output of the Regional Climate Model CCLM that was set up for the region was used. After a pre-calibration of the model, three models - having different precipitation inputs - were set up and calibrated independently applying the auto-calibration procedure Sequential Uncertainty Fitting (Abbaspour et al. 2004). The performance of the

  1. Mixing at the microscale: Power input in shaken microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Dürauer, Astrid; Hobiger, Stefanie; Walther, Cornelia; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-12-01

    Power input and local energy dissipation are crucial parameters for the engineering characterization of mixing and fluid dynamics at the microscale. Since hydrodynamic stress is solely dependent on the maximum power input, we adapted the clay/polymer method to obtain flock destruction kinetics in six-, 24-, and 96-well microtiter plates on orbital shakers. We also determined the specific power input using calorimetry and found that the power input is at the same order of magnitude for the six- and 96-well plates and the laboratory-scale stirred tank reactor, with 40 to 90 W/m(3) (Re' = 180 to 440), 40 to 140 W/m3 (Re' = 320 to 640), and 30 to 50 W/m(3) (Re = 4000 to 8500), respectively. All of these values are significantly below 450 to 2100 W/m(3) determined for the pilot-scale reactor. The hydrodynamic stress differs significantly between the different formats of MTPs, as the 96-well plates showed very low shear stress on the shaker with a shaking amplitude of 3 mm. Thus, the transfer of mixing conditions from the microtiter plate to small-scale and pilot-scale reactors must be undertaken with care. Our findings, especially the power input determined by the calorimetric method, show that the hydrodynamic conditions in laboratory- and pilot-scale reactors cannot be reached.

  2. Identification of single-input-single-output quantum linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Matthew; GuÅ£ǎ, Mǎdǎlin

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate system identification for single-input-single-output general (active or passive) quantum linear systems. For a given input we address the following questions: (1) Which parameters can be identified by measuring the output? (2) How can we construct a system realization from sufficient input-output data? We show that for time-dependent inputs, the systems which cannot be distinguished are related by symplectic transformations acting on the space of system modes. This complements a previous result of Guţă and Yamamoto [IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 61, 921 (2016), 10.1109/TAC.2015.2448491] for passive linear systems. In the regime of stationary quantum noise input, the output is completely determined by the power spectrum. We define the notion of global minimality for a given power spectrum, and characterize globally minimal systems as those with a fully mixed stationary state. We show that in the case of systems with a cascade realization, the power spectrum completely fixes the transfer function, so the system can be identified up to a symplectic transformation. We give a method for constructing a globally minimal subsystem direct from the power spectrum. Restricting to passive systems the analysis simplifies so that identifiability may be completely understood from the eigenvalues of a particular system matrix.

  3. Earthquake motion input and its dissemination via the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldorsson, Benedikt; Dong, Gang; Papageorgiou, Apostolos S.

    2002-06-01

    Objectives of this task are to conduct research on seismic hazards, and to provide relevant input on the expected levels of these hazards to other tasks. Other tasks requiring this input include those dealing with inventory, fragility curves, rehabilitation strategies and demonstration projects. The corresponding input is provided in various formats depending on the intended use: as peak ground motion parameters and/or response spectral values for a given magnitude, epicentral distance and site conditions; or as time histories for scenario earthquakes that are selected based on the disaggregated seismic hazard mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey and are incorporated in building codes. The user community for this research is both academic researchers and practicing engineers who may use the seismic input generated by the synthesis techniques that are developed under this task for a variety of applications. These include ground motions for scenario earthquakes, for developing fragility curves and in specifying ground motion input for critical facilities (such as hospitals) located in the eastern U.S.

  4. Information Fusion of Conflicting Input Data

    PubMed Central

    Mönks, Uwe; Dörksen, Helene; Lohweg, Volker; Hübner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Sensors, and also actuators or external sources such as databases, serve as data sources in order to realise condition monitoring of industrial applications or the acquisition of characteristic parameters like production speed or reject rate. Modern facilities create such a large amount of complex data that a machine operator is unable to comprehend and process the information contained in the data. Thus, information fusion mechanisms gain increasing importance. Besides the management of large amounts of data, further challenges towards the fusion algorithms arise from epistemic uncertainties (incomplete knowledge) in the input signals as well as conflicts between them. These aspects must be considered during information processing to obtain reliable results, which are in accordance with the real world. The analysis of the scientific state of the art shows that current solutions fulfil said requirements at most only partly. This article proposes the multilayered information fusion system MACRO (multilayer attribute-based conflict-reducing observation) employing the μBalTLCS (fuzzified balanced two-layer conflict solving) fusion algorithm to reduce the impact of conflicts on the fusion result. The performance of the contribution is shown by its evaluation in the scope of a machine condition monitoring application under laboratory conditions. Here, the MACRO system yields the best results compared to state-of-the-art fusion mechanisms. The utilised data is published and freely accessible. PMID:27801874

  5. Information Fusion of Conflicting Input Data.

    PubMed

    Mönks, Uwe; Dörksen, Helene; Lohweg, Volker; Hübner, Michael

    2016-10-29

    Sensors, and also actuators or external sources such as databases, serve as data sources in order to realise condition monitoring of industrial applications or the acquisition of characteristic parameters like production speed or reject rate. Modern facilities create such a large amount of complex data that a machine operator is unable to comprehend and process the information contained in the data. Thus, information fusion mechanisms gain increasing importance. Besides the management of large amounts of data, further challenges towards the fusion algorithms arise from epistemic uncertainties (incomplete knowledge) in the input signals as well as conflicts between them. These aspects must be considered during information processing to obtain reliable results, which are in accordance with the real world. The analysis of the scientific state of the art shows that current solutions fulfil said requirements at most only partly. This article proposes the multilayered information fusion system MACRO (multilayer attribute-based conflict-reducing observation) employing the μBalTLCS (fuzzified balanced two-layer conflict solving) fusion algorithm to reduce the impact of conflicts on the fusion result. The performance of the contribution is shown by its evaluation in the scope of a machine condition monitoring application under laboratory conditions. Here, the MACRO system yields the best results compared to state-of-the-art fusion mechanisms. The utilised data is published and freely accessible.

  6. Optimized input shaping for a single flexible robot link

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.G.; Stokes, D.; Starr, G.; Robinett, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper will discuss the design of an input shaped open-loop control for a single flexible robot link. The authors develop the equations of motion, including the first flexible mode shape and the actuator dynamics. Additional content includes the hardware system identification iterative runs used to update the model. Optimized input shaped commands for the flexible robot link to produce a rest-to-rest, residual vibration-free, 90 degree maneuver are developed. Correlation between both experimental and analytical results of the 90{degree} slew, using two different identification models, are reviewed.

  7. Supersymmetry Parameter Analysis: SPA Convention and Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.; et al.

    2005-05-05

    High-precision analyses of supersymmetry parameters aim atreconstructing the fundamental supersymmetric theory and its breakingmechanism. A well defined theoretical framework is needed whenhigher-order corrections are included. We propose such a scheme,Supersymmetry Parameter Analysis SPA, based on a consistent set ofconventions and input parameters. A repository for computer programs isprovided which connect parameters in different schemes and relate theLagrangian parameters to physical observables at LHC and high energy e+e-linear collider experiments, i.e., masses, mixings, decay widths andproduction cross sections for supersymmetric particles. In addition,programs for calculating high-precision low energy observables, thedensity of cold dark matter (CDM) in the universe as well as the crosssections for CDM search experiments are included. The SPA scheme stillrequires extended efforts on both the theoretical and experimental sidebefore data can be evaluated in the future at the level of the desiredprecision. We take here an initial step of testing the SPA scheme byapplying the techniques involved to a specific supersymmetry referencepoint.

  8. UNCERTAINTY IN MODEL PREDICTIONS-PLAUSIBLE OUTCOMES FROM ESTIMATES OF INPUT RANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models are commonly used to predict the future extent of contamination given estimates of hydraulic conductivity, porosity, hydraulic gradient, biodegradation rate, and other parameters. Often best estimates or averages of these are used as inputs to models, which then transform...

  9. FT-Raman and chemometric tools for rapid determination of quality parameters in milk powder: Classification of samples for the presence of lactose and fraud detection by addition of maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Júnior, Paulo Henrique; de Sá Oliveira, Kamila; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Rocha; De Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa; Stephani, Rodrigo; Pinto, Michele da Silva; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler

    2016-04-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy has been explored as a quick screening method to evaluate the presence of lactose and identify milk powder samples adulterated with maltodextrin (2.5-50% w/w). Raman measurements can easily differentiate samples of milk powder, without the need for sample preparation, while traditional quality control methods, including high performance liquid chromatography, are cumbersome and slow. FT-Raman spectra were obtained from samples of whole lactose and low-lactose milk powder, both without and with addition of maltodextrin. Differences were observed between the spectra involved in identifying samples with low lactose content, as well as adulterated samples. Exploratory data analysis using Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis was also developed to classify samples with PCA and PLS-DA. The PLS-DA models obtained allowed to correctly classify all samples. These results demonstrate the utility of FT-Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics to infer about the quality of milk powder.

  10. Effects of input discretization, model complexity, and calibration strategy on model performance in a data-scarce glacierized catchment in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasova, L.; Knoche, M.; Dietrich, J.; Merz, R.

    2016-06-01

    Glacierized high-mountainous catchments are often the water towers for downstream region, and modeling these remote areas are often the only available tool for the assessment of water resources availability. Nevertheless, data scarcity affects different aspects of hydrological modeling in such mountainous glacierized basins. On the example of poorly gauged glacierized catchment in Central Asia, we examined the effects of input discretization, model complexity, and calibration strategy on model performance. The study was conducted with the GSM-Socont model driven with climatic input from the corrected High Asia Reanalysis data set of two different discretizations. We analyze the effects of the use of long-term glacier volume loss, snow cover images, and interior runoff as an additional calibration data. In glacierized catchments with winter accumulation type, where the transformation of precipitation into runoff is mainly controlled by snow and glacier melt processes, the spatial discretization of precipitation tends to have less impact on simulated runoff than a correct prediction of the integral precipitation volume. Increasing model complexity by using spatially distributed input or semidistributed parameters values does not increase model performance in the Gunt catchment, as the more complex model tends to be more sensitive to errors in the input data set. In our case, better model performance and quantification of the flow components can be achieved by additional calibration data, rather than by using a more distributed model parameters. However, a semidistributed model better predicts the spatial patterns of snow accumulation and provides more plausible runoff predictions at the interior sites.

  11. Chemical input multiplicity facilitates arithmetical processing.

    PubMed

    Margulies, David; Melman, Galina; Felder, Clifford E; Arad-Yellin, Rina; Shanzer, Abraham

    2004-12-01

    We describe the design and function of a molecular logic system, by which a combinatorial recognition of the input signals is utilized to efficiently process chemically encoded information. Each chemical input can target simultaneously multiple domains on the same molecular platform, resulting in a unique combination of chemical states, each with its characteristic fluorescence output. Simple alteration of the input reagents changes the emitted logic pattern and enables it to perform different algebraic operations between two bits, solely in the fluorescence mode. This system exhibits parallelism in both its chemical inputs and light outputs.

  12. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  13. NASTRAN variance analysis and plotting of HBDY elements. [analysis of uncertainties of the computer results as a function of uncertainties in the input data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The NASTRAN Thermal Analyzer has been intended to do variance analysis and plot the thermal boundary elements. The objective of the variance analysis addition is to assess the sensitivity of temperature variances resulting from uncertainties inherent in input parameters for heat conduction analysis. The plotting capability provides the ability to check the geometry (location, size and orientation) of the boundary elements of a model in relation to the conduction elements. Variance analysis is the study of uncertainties of the computed results as a function of uncertainties of the input data. To study this problem using NASTRAN, a solution is made for both the expected values of all inputs, plus another solution for each uncertain variable. A variance analysis module subtracts the results to form derivatives, and then can determine the expected deviations of output quantities.

  14. The application of Global Sensitivity Analysis to quantify the dominant input factors for hydraulic model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Pianosi, Francesca; Bates, Paul; Freer, Jim; Wagener, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    inundation indicators and flood wave travel time in addition to temporally and spatially variable indicators. This enables us to assess whether the sensitivity of the model to various input factors is stationary in both time and space. Furthermore, competing models are assessed against observations of water depths from a historical flood event. Consequently we are able to determine which of the input factors has the most influence on model performance. Initial findings suggest the sensitivity of the model to different input factors varies depending on the type of model output assessed and at what stage during the flood hydrograph the model output is assessed. We have also found that initial decisions regarding the characterisation of the input factors, for example defining the upper and lower bounds of the parameter sample space, can be significant in influencing the implied sensitivities.

  15. Effects of black pepper (piper nigrum), turmeric powder (curcuma longa) and coriander seeds (coriandrum sativum) and their combinations as feed additives on growth performance, carcass traits, some blood parameters and humoral immune response of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elkhair, R; Ahmed, H A; Selim, S

    2014-06-01

    Different herbs and spices have been used as feed additives for various purposes in poultry production. This study was conducted to assess the effect of feed supplemented with black pepper (Piper nigrum), turmeric powder (Curcuma longa), coriander seeds (Coriandrum sativum) and their combinations on the performance of broilers. A total of 210 (Cobb) one-d-old chicks were divided into seven groups of 30 birds each. The treatments were: a control group received no supplement, 0.5% black pepper (T1), 0.5% turmeric powder (T2), 2% coriander seeds (T3), a mixture of 0.5% black pepper and 0.5% turmeric powder (T4), a mixture of 0.5% black pepper and 2% coriander seed (T5), and a mixture of 0.5% black pepper, 0.5% turmeric powder and 2% coriander seeds (T6). Higher significant values of body weight gain during the whole period of 5 weeks (p<0.001) were observed in broilers on T1, T3, T5, and T6 compared to control. Dietary supplements with T1, T2, T3, and T6 improved the cumulative G:F of broilers during the whole period of 5 weeks (p<0.001) compared with control. The dressing percentage and edible giblets were not influenced by dietary supplements, while higher values of relative weight of the liver (p<0.05) were obtained in T5 and T6 compared to control. The addition of feed supplements in T5 and T6 significantly increased serum total protein and decreased serum glucose, triglycerides and alkaline phosphatase concentrations compared with the control group (p<0.05). Broilers on T6 showed significant decrease in the serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase concentration (p<0.05) compared to control. The broilers having T5 and T6 supplemented feed had relatively greater antibody titre (p<0.001) at 35 d of age than control. It is concluded that dietary supplements with black pepper or coriander seeds or their combinations enhanced the performance and health status of broiler chickens.

  16. Research on hysteresis loop considering the prestress effect and electrical input dynamics for a giant magnetostrictive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuchuan; Yang, Xulei; Wereley, Norman M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, focusing on the application-oriented giant magnetostrictive material (GMM)-based electro-hydrostatic actuator, which features an applied magnetic field at high frequency and high amplitude, and concentrating on the static and dynamic characteristics of a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA) considering the prestress effect on the GMM rod and the electrical input dynamics involving the power amplifier and the inductive coil, a methodology for studying the static and dynamic characteristics of a GMA using the hysteresis loop as a tool is developed. A GMA that can display the preforce on the GMM rod in real-time is designed, and a magnetostrictive model dependent on the prestress on a GMM rod instead of the existing quadratic domain rotation model is proposed. Additionally, an electrical input dynamics model to excite GMA is developed according to the simplified circuit diagram, and the corresponding parameters are identified by the experimental data. A dynamic magnetization model with the eddy current effect is deduced according to the Jiles-Atherton model and the Maxwell equations. Next, all of the parameters, including the electrical input characteristics, the dynamic magnetization and the mechanical structure of GMA, are identified by the experimental data from the current response, magnetization response and displacement response, respectively. Finally, a comprehensive comparison between the model results and experimental data is performed, and the results show that the test data agree well with the presented model results. An analysis on the relation between the GMA displacement response and the parameters from the electrical input dynamics, magnetization dynamics and mechanical structural dynamics is performed.

  17. Nitrogen input effectiveness on carbon sequestration in rainfed cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Poma, Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    The combined effect of total N and C/N ratio had a large influence on the decomposition rate and consequently on potential soil organic carbon sequestration. The aim of the work was to evaluate Carbon sequestration potentiality under three mineral N fertilization levels in interaction with two cropping systems characterized by addition of N input due to leguminous species in the rotation. The study was carried out in the semiarid Mediterranean environment in a 18years long-term experiment. Is well know that in the semiarid environment the excess of N fertilization reduces biomass yield and the consequent C input. On the contrary, both N and C input determine high difference in C/N input ratio and faster organic matter mineralization. Results showed no influence of N fertilization on SOC sequestration and a reduction of SOC stock due to crop rotation due to lower C input. Crop residue quality of durum wheat-pea crop rotation characterized by a faster decomposition rate could explain the lower ability of crop rotation to sequester C in the semiarid environment.

  18. Reconstruction of neuronal input through modeling single-neuron dynamics and computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qing; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Chan, Wai-lok

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models provide a mathematical description of neuron activity, which can better understand and quantify neural computations and corresponding biophysical mechanisms evoked by stimulus. In this paper, based on the output spike train evoked by the acupuncture mechanical stimulus, we present two different levels of models to describe the input-output system to achieve the reconstruction of neuronal input. The reconstruction process is divided into two steps: First, considering the neuronal spiking event as a Gamma stochastic process. The scale parameter and the shape parameter of Gamma process are, respectively, defined as two spiking characteristics, which are estimated by a state-space method. Then, leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model is used to mimic the response system and the estimated spiking characteristics are transformed into two temporal input parameters of LIF model, through two conversion formulas. We test this reconstruction method by three different groups of simulation data. All three groups of estimates reconstruct input parameters with fairly high accuracy. We then use this reconstruction method to estimate the non-measurable acupuncture input parameters. Results show that under three different frequencies of acupuncture stimulus conditions, estimated input parameters have an obvious difference. The higher the frequency of the acupuncture stimulus is, the higher the accuracy of reconstruction is.

  19. Remote sensing inputs to water demand modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Jensen, J. R.; Tinney, L. R.; Rector, M.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the ability of remote sensing techniques to economically generate data required by water demand models, the Geography Remote Sensing Unit, in conjunction with the Kern County Water Agency of California, developed an analysis model. As a result it was determined that agricultural cropland inventories utilizing both high altitude photography and LANDSAT imagery can be conducted cost effectively. In addition, by using average irrigation application rates in conjunction with cropland data, estimates of agricultural water demand can be generated. However, more accurate estimates are possible if crop type, acreage, and crop specific application rates are employed. An analysis of the effect of saline-alkali soils on water demand in the study area is also examined. Finally, reference is made to the detection and delineation of water tables that are perched near the surface by semi-permeable clay layers. Soil salinity prediction, automated crop identification on a by-field basis, and a potential input to the determination of zones of equal benefit taxation are briefly touched upon.

  20. Articulatory Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladefoged, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes the 16 parameters hypothesized to be necessary and sufficient for linguistic phonetic specifications. Suggests seven parameters affecting tongue shapes, three determining the positions of the lips, one controlling the position of the velum, four varying laryngeal actions, and one controlling respiratory activity. (RL)

  1. Fresh carbon input differentially impacts soil carbon decomposition across natural and managed systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongkui; Wang, Enli; Smith, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The amount of fresh carbon input into soil is experiencing substantial changes under global change. It is unclear what will be the consequences of such input changes on native soil carbon decomposition across ecosystems. By synthesizing data from 143 experimental comparisons, we show that, on average, fresh carbon input stimulates soil carbon decomposition by 14%. The response was lower in forest soils (1%) compared with soils from other ecosystems (> 24%), and higher following inputs of plant residue-like substrates (31%) compared to root exudate-like substrates (9%). The responses decrease with the baseline soil carbon decomposition rate under no additional carbon input, but increase with the fresh carbon input rate. The rates of these changes vary significantly across ecosystems and with the carbon substrates being added. These findings can be applied to provide robust estimates of soil carbon balance across ecosystems under changing aboveground and belowground inputs as consequence of climate and land management changes.

  2. Computing Functions by Approximating the Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mayer

    2012-01-01

    In computing real-valued functions, it is ordinarily assumed that the input to the function is known, and it is the output that we need to approximate. In this work, we take the opposite approach: we show how to compute the values of some transcendental functions by approximating the input to these functions, and obtaining exact answers for their…

  3. Tools to Develop or Convert MOVES Inputs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following tools are designed to help users develop inputs to MOVES and post-process the output. With the release of MOVES2014, EPA strongly encourages state and local agencies to develop local inputs based on MOVES fleet and activity categories.

  4. EDP Applications to Musical Bibliography: Input Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Donald C.

    1972-01-01

    The application of Electronic Data Processing (EDP) has been a boon in the analysis and bibliographic control of music. However, an extra step of encoding must be undertaken for input of music. The best hope to facilitate musical input is the development of an Optical Character Recognition (OCR) music-reading machine. (29 references) (Author/NH)

  5. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  6. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  7. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  8. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  9. CREATING INPUT TABLES FROM WAPDEG FOR RIP

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    1998-08-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to create tables for input into RIP ver. 5.18 (Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems) from WAPDEG ver. 3.06 (Waste Package Degradation) output. This calculation details the creation of the RIP input tables for TSPA-VA REV.00.

  10. Managing Input during Assistive Technology Product Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Young Mi

    2011-01-01

    Many different sources of input are available to assistive technology innovators during the course of designing products. However, there is little information on which ones may be most effective or how they may be efficiently utilized within the design process. The aim of this project was to compare how three types of input--from simulation tools,…

  11. Input, Interaction, and Second Language Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan M.; Varonis, Evangeline Marlos

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among input, interaction, and second-language production among 16 native-nonnative dyads. The results indicated that both modified input and interaction initiated by the native speaker lead to greater comprehension by the nonnative speaker, as measured by task performance. (Contains 48 references.) (MDM)

  12. Making Input Comprehensible: Do Interactional Modifications Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Teresa; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A pilot study of a larger project on second language comprehension under two input conditions is reported. The first condition is characterized by the availability of samples of target input that have been modified a priori toward greater semantic redundancy and transparency and less complex syntax. The second condition is characterized by the…

  13. Electroacoustics modeling of piezoelectric welders for ultrasonic additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent 3D metal printing technology which utilizes ultrasonic vibrations from high power piezoelectric transducers to additively weld similar and dissimilar metal foils. CNC machining is used intermittent of welding to create internal channels, embed temperature sensitive components, sensors, and materials, and for net shaping parts. Structural dynamics of the welder and work piece influence the performance of the welder and part quality. To understand the impact of structural dynamics on UAM, a linear time-invariant model is used to relate system shear force and electric current inputs to the system outputs of welder velocity and voltage. Frequency response measurements are combined with in-situ operating measurements of the welder to identify model parameters and to verify model assumptions. The proposed LTI model can enhance process consistency, performance, and guide the development of improved quality monitoring and control strategies.

  14. Statistical identification of effective input variables. [SCREEN

    SciTech Connect

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A statistical sensitivity analysis procedure has been developed for ranking the input data of large computer codes in the order of sensitivity-importance. The method is economical for large codes with many input variables, since it uses a relatively small number of computer runs. No prior judgemental elimination of input variables is needed. The sceening method is based on stagewise correlation and extensive regression analysis of output values calculated with selected input value combinations. The regression process deals with multivariate nonlinear functions, and statistical tests are also available for identifying input variables that contribute to threshold effects, i.e., discontinuities in the output variables. A computer code SCREEN has been developed for implementing the screening techniques. The efficiency has been demonstrated by several examples and applied to a fast reactor safety analysis code (Venus-II). However, the methods and the coding are general and not limited to such applications.

  15. Genetic algorithm based input selection for a neural network function approximator with applications to SSME health monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Charles C.; Dhawan, Atam P.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is used to select the inputs to a neural network function approximator. In the application considered, modeling critical parameters of the space shuttle main engine (SSME), the functional relationship between measured parameters is unknown and complex. Furthermore, the number of possible input parameters is quite large. Many approaches have been used for input selection, but they are either subjective or do not consider the complex multivariate relationships between parameters. Due to the optimization and space searching capabilities of genetic algorithms they were employed to systematize the input selection process. The results suggest that the genetic algorithm can generate parameter lists of high quality without the explicit use of problem domain knowledge. Suggestions for improving the performance of the input selection process are also provided.

  16. The series product for gaussian quantum input processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, John E.; James, Matthew R.

    2017-02-01

    We present a theory for connecting quantum Markov components into a network with quantum input processes in a Gaussian state (including thermal and squeezed). One would expect on physical grounds that the connection rules should be independent of the state of the input to the network. To compute statistical properties, we use a version of Wicks' theorem involving fictitious vacuum fields (Fock space based representation of the fields) and while this aids computation, and gives a rigorous formulation, the various representations need not be unitarily equivalent. In particular, a naive application of the connection rules would lead to the wrong answer. We establish the correct interconnection rules, and show that while the quantum stochastic differential equations of motion display explicitly the covariances (thermal and squeezing parameters) of the Gaussian input fields we introduce the Wick-Stratonovich form which leads to a way of writing these equations that does not depend on these covariances and so corresponds to the universal equations written in terms of formal quantum input processes. We show that a wholly consistent theory of quantum open systems in series can be developed in this way, and as required physically, is universal and in particular representation-free.

  17. Input space-dependent controller for multi-hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liang; Laflamme, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Semi-active and active structural control systems are advanced mechanical devices and systems capable of high damping performance, ideal for mitigation of multi-hazards. The implementation of these devices within structural systems is still in its infancy, because of the complexity in designing a robust closed-loop control system that can ensure reliable and high mitigation performance. Particular challenges in designing a controller for multi-hazard mitigation include: 1) very large uncertainties on dynamic parameters and unknown excitations; 2) limited measurements with probabilities of sensor failure; 3) immediate performance requirements; and 4) unavailable sets of input-output during design. To facilitate the implementation of structural control systems, a new type of controllers with high adaptive capabilities is proposed. It is based on real-time identification of an embedding that represents the essential dynamics found in the input space, or in the sensors measurements. This type of controller is termed input-space dependent controllers (ISDC). In this paper, the principle of ISDC is presented, their stability and performance derived analytically for the case of harmonic inputs, and their performance demonstrated in the case of different types of hazards. Results show the promise of this new type of controller at mitigating multi-hazards by 1) relying on local and limited sensors only; 2) not requiring prior evaluation or training; and 3) adapting to systems non-stationarities.

  18. Input Response of Neural Network Model with Lognormally Distributed Synaptic Weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshihiro; Karakida, Ryo; Watanabe, Norifumi; Aoyama, Atsushi; Okada, Masato

    2016-07-01

    Neural assemblies in the cortical microcircuit can sustain irregular spiking activity without external inputs. On the other hand, neurons exhibit rich evoked activities driven by sensory stimulus, and both activities are reported to contribute to cognitive functions. We studied the external input response of the neural network model with lognormally distributed synaptic weights. We show that the model can achieve irregular spontaneous activity and population oscillation depending on the presence of external input. The firing rate distribution was maintained for the external input, and the order of firing rates in evoked activity reflected that in spontaneous activity. Moreover, there were bistable regions in the inhibitory input parameter space. The bimodal membrane potential distribution, which is a characteristic feature of the up-down state, was obtained under such conditions. From these results, we can conclude that the model displays various evoked activities due to the external input and is biologically plausible.

  19. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and

  20. MODFLOW-style parameters in underdetermined parameter estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Oria, Marco D.; Fienen, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of MODFLOW-Style parameters in the numerical codes MODFLOW_2005 and MODFLOW_2005-Adjoint for the definition of variables in the Layer Property Flow package. Parameters are a useful tool to represent aquifer properties in both codes and are the only option available in the adjoint version. Moreover, for overdetermined parameter estimation problems, the parameter approach for model input can make data input easier. We found that if each estimable parameter is defined by one parameter, the codes require a large computational effort and substantial gains in efficiency are achieved by removing logical comparison of character strings that represent the names and types of the parameters. An alternative formulation already available in the current implementation of the code can also alleviate the efficiency degradation due to character comparisons in the special case of distributed parameters defined through multiplication matrices. The authors also hope that lessons learned in analyzing the performance of the MODFLOW family codes will be enlightening to developers of other Fortran implementations of numerical codes.

  1. MODFLOW-Style parameters in underdetermined parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    D'Oria, Marco; Fienen, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of MODFLOW-Style parameters in the numerical codes MODFLOW_2005 and MODFLOW_2005-Adjoint for the definition of variables in the Layer Property Flow package. Parameters are a useful tool to represent aquifer properties in both codes and are the only option available in the adjoint version. Moreover, for overdetermined parameter estimation problems, the parameter approach for model input can make data input easier. We found that if each estimable parameter is defined by one parameter, the codes require a large computational effort and substantial gains in efficiency are achieved by removing logical comparison of character strings that represent the names and types of the parameters. An alternative formulation already available in the current implementation of the code can also alleviate the efficiency degradation due to character comparisons in the special case of distributed parameters defined through multiplication matrices. The authors also hope that lessons learned in analyzing the performance of the MODFLOW family codes will be enlightening to developers of other Fortran implementations of numerical codes.

  2. MODFLOW-style parameters in underdetermined parameter estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Oria, M.; Fienen, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of MODFLOW-Style parameters in the numerical codes MODFLOW-2005 and MODFLOW-2005-Adjoint for the definition of variables in the Layer Property Flow package. Parameters are a useful tool to represent aquifer properties in both codes and are the only option available in the adjoint version. Moreover, for overdetermined parameter estimation problems, the parameter approach for model input can make data input easier. We found that if each estimable parameter is defined by one parameter, the codes require a large computational effort and substantial gains in efficiency are achieved by removing logical comparison of character strings that represent the names and types of the parameters. An alternative formulation already available in the current implementation of the code can also alleviate the efficiency degradation due to character comparisons in the special case of distributed parameters defined through multiplication matrices. The authors also hope that lessons learned in analyzing the performance of the MODFLOW family codes will be enlightening to developers of other Fortran implementations of numerical codes. ?? 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  3. Partial and total actuator faults accommodation for input-affine nonlinear process plants.

    PubMed

    Mihankhah, Amin; Salmasi, Farzad R; Salahshoor, Karim

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a new fault-tolerant control system is proposed for input-affine nonlinear plants based on Model Reference Adaptive System (MRAS) structure. The proposed method has the capability to accommodate both partial and total actuator failures along with bounded external disturbances. In this methodology, the conventional MRAS control law is modified by augmenting two compensating terms. One of these terms is added to eliminate the nonlinear dynamic, while the other is reinforced to compensate the distractive effects of the total actuator faults and external disturbances. In addition, no Fault Detection and Diagnosis (FDD) unit is needed in the proposed method. Moreover, the control structure has good robustness capability against the parameter variation. The performance of this scheme is evaluated using a CSTR system and the results were satisfactory.

  4. Engineering the Input Impedance of Electric Planar Metamaterials Analogue of Dipole Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yan-Wu; Qiu, Yang; Liu, Qi; Domenic, Belgiovane

    2014-11-01

    Since the demand of metamaterial (MM) based devices for practical applications is increased, the method with input impedance of dipole aims to produce fast results with reasonable accuracy for its design proposed. In this work, the unit of MM is equivalent to a dipole and then MM could be treated as a dipole array. An analysis is performed based on classical microwave dipole and numerical simulation by using the finite-difference time-domain for different MM configurations in the form of dipoles array. Additionally, a quality factor (Q-factor) based analysis is shown to yield simulation results which are in good agreement with the experiment. In essence, this shows that we could use antenna theory and numerical method to analyze MM thus opening the doors for a more efficient parameter optimization method.

  5. Contributions of skin and muscle afferent input to movement sense in the human hand.

    PubMed

    Cordo, Paul J; Horn, Jean-Louis; Künster, Daniela; Cherry, Anne; Bratt, Alex; Gurfinkel, Victor

    2011-04-01

    In the stationary hand, static joint-position sense originates from multimodal somatosensory input (e.g., joint, skin, and muscle). In the moving hand, however, it is uncertain how movement sense arises from these different submodalities of proprioceptors. In contrast to static-position sense, movement sense includes multiple parameters such as motion detection, direction, joint angle, and velocity. Because movement sense is both multimodal and multiparametric, it is not known how different movement parameters are represented by different afferent submodalities. In theory, each submodality could redundantly represent all movement parameters, or, alternatively, different afferent submodalities could be tuned to distinctly different movement parameters. The study described in this paper investigated how skin input and muscle input each contributes to movement sense of the hand, in particular, to the movement parameters dynamic position and velocity. Healthy adult subjects were instructed to indicate with the left hand when they sensed the unseen fingers of the right hand being passively flexed at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint through a previously learned target angle. The experimental approach was to suppress input from skin and/or muscle: skin input by anesthetizing the hand, and muscle input by unexpectedly extending the wrist to prevent MCP flexion from stretching the finger extensor muscle. Input from joint afferents was assumed not to play a significant role because the task was carried out with the MCP joints near their neutral positions. We found that, during passive finger movement near the neutral position in healthy adult humans, both skin and muscle receptors contribute to movement sense but qualitatively differently. Whereas skin input contributes to both dynamic position and velocity sense, muscle input may contribute only to velocity sense.

  6. The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift Estimation: A Neural Network Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Shmakova, M.; Gerke, B.; Griffith, R.L.; Lotz, J.; /NOAO, Tucson

    2011-05-20

    We present a determination of the effects of including galaxy morphological parameters in photometric redshift estimation with an artificial neural network method. Neural networks, which recognize patterns in the information content of data in an unbiased way, can be a useful estimator of the additional information contained in extra parameters, such as those describing morphology, if the input data are treated on an equal footing. We show that certain principal components of the morphology information are correlated with galaxy type. However, we find that for the data used the inclusion of morphological information does not have a statistically significant benefit for photometric redshift estimation with the techniques employed here. The inclusion of these parameters may result in a trade-off between extra information and additional noise, with the additional noise becoming more dominant as more parameters are added.

  7. Input-state approach to Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Daizhan

    2009-03-01

    This paper investigates the structure of Boolean networks via input-state structure. Using the algebraic form proposed by the author, the logic-based input-state dynamics of Boolean networks, called the Boolean control networks, is converted into an algebraic discrete-time dynamic system. Then the structure of cycles of Boolean control systems is obtained as compounded cycles. Using the obtained input-state description, the structure of Boolean networks is investigated, and their attractors are revealed as nested compounded cycles, called rolling gears. This structure explains why small cycles mainly decide the behaviors of cellular networks. Some illustrative examples are presented.

  8. Non-recursive sequential input deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Dionisio

    2017-01-01

    A scheme for sequential deconvolution of inputs from measured outputs is presented. The key feature in the formulation is elimination of the initial state from the input-output relations by projecting the output in the left null space of the observability block. Removal of the initial state allows the sequential format of the deconvolution, essential for computational reasons, to be implemented non-recursively, assuring unconditional stability. Identifiability is realized when the input-output arrangement does not have transmission zeros, and observability and controllability are shown immaterial. Comparison of results from the scheme with those from Dynamic Programming highlights the benefits of eliminating the initial state.

  9. Wireless, relative-motion computer input device

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides a system for controlling a computer display in a workspace using an input unit/output unit. A train of EM waves are sent out to flood the workspace. EM waves are reflected from the input unit/output unit. A relative distance moved information signal is created using the EM waves that are reflected from the input unit/output unit. Algorithms are used to convert the relative distance moved information signal to a display signal. The computer display is controlled in response to the display signal.

  10. A novel feedforward compensation canceling input filter-regulator interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between the input and the control loop of switching regulators often results in deterimental effects, such as loop instability, degradation of transient response, and audiosusceptibility, etc. The concept of pole-zero cancelation is employed to mitigate some of these detrimental effects and is implemented using a novel feedforward loop, in addition to existing feedback loops of a buck regulator. Experimental results are presented which show excellent correlation with theory.

  11. Sinusoidal input describing function for hysteresis followed by elementary backlash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    The author proposes a new sinusoidal input describing function which accounts for the serial combination of hysteresis followed by elementary backlash in a single nonlinear element. The output of the hysteresis element drives the elementary backlash element. Various analytical forms of the describing function are given, depending on the a/A ratio, where a is the half width of the hysteresis band or backlash gap, and A is the amplitude of the assumed input sinusoid, and on the value of the parameter representing the fraction of a attributed to the backlash characteristic. The negative inverse describing function is plotted on a gain-phase plot, and it is seen that a relatively small amount of backlash leads to domination of the backlash character in the describing function. The extent of the region of the gain-phase plane covered by the describing function is such as to guarantee some form of limit cycle behavior in most closed-loop systems.

  12. Blurring the Inputs: A Natural Language Approach to Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Thompson, Richard A.; Johnston, Christopher O.

    2007-01-01

    To document model parameter uncertainties and to automate sensitivity analyses for numerical simulation codes, a natural-language-based method to specify tolerances has been developed. With this new method, uncertainties are expressed in a natural manner, i.e., as one would on an engineering drawing, namely, 5.25 +/- 0.01. This approach is robust and readily adapted to various application domains because it does not rely on parsing the particular structure of input file formats. Instead, tolerances of a standard format are added to existing fields within an input file. As a demonstration of the power of this simple, natural language approach, a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis is performed for three disparate simulation codes: fluid dynamics (LAURA), radiation (HARA), and ablation (FIAT). Effort required to harness each code for sensitivity analysis was recorded to demonstrate the generality and flexibility of this new approach.

  13. Frequency dependent precompensation for dominance in a four input/output theme problem model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, R. M.; Sain, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports on additional experience in applying the CARDIAD methodology to design of dynamical input compensation to achieve column dominance for linear multivariable models of realistic turbine engine simulations. In particular, the approach has been extended to models having four inputs and four outputs, and successful compensations have been achieved with an investment of about thirty minutes desk time.

  14. Inputs and Processes in Education: A Background Paper. Final Report Deliverable #1-2.2b.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Judy A.

    This background paper is a result of a literature review conducted under Project FORUM that identifies research-based inputs and processes related to student outcomes. It was intended to provide background information for the participants attending the Wingspread Conference on Inputs and Processes in October, 1998. In addition, the report is…

  15. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS New Era Rural Technology Competitive Grants Program § 3430.907 Stakeholder input..., for technology development, applied research, and/or training....

  16. Effects on Diagnostic Parameters After Removing Additional Synchronous Gear Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Harry J.

    2003-01-01

    Gear cracks are typically difficult to diagnose with sufficient time before catastrophic damage occurs. Significant damage must be present before algorithms appear to be able to detect the damage. Frequently there are multiple gear meshes on a single shaft. Since they are all synchronous with the shaft frequency, the commonly used synchronous averaging technique is ineffective in removing other gear mesh effects. Carefully applying a filter to these extraneous gear mesh frequencies can reduce the overall vibration signal and increase the accuracy of commonly used vibration metrics. The vibration signals from three seeded fault tests were analyzed using this filtering procedure. Both the filtered and unfiltered vibration signals were then analyzed using commonly used fault detection metrics and compared. The tests were conducted on aerospace quality spur gears in a test rig. The tests were conducted at speeds ranging from 2500 to 5000 revolutions per minute and torques from 184 to 228 percent of design load. The inability to detect these cracks with high confidence results from the high loading which is causing fast fracture as opposed to stable crack growth. The results indicate that these techniques do not currently produce an indication of damage that significantly exceeds experimental scatter.

  17. Multi-input distributed classifiers for synthetic genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Kanakov, Oleg; Kotelnikov, Roman; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Tsimring, Lev; Huerta, Ramón; Zaikin, Alexey; Ivanchenko, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    For practical construction of complex synthetic genetic networks able to perform elaborate functions it is important to have a pool of relatively simple modules with different functionality which can be compounded together. To complement engineering of very different existing synthetic genetic devices such as switches, oscillators or logical gates, we propose and develop here a design of synthetic multi-input classifier based on a recently introduced distributed classifier concept. A heterogeneous population of cells acts as a single classifier, whose output is obtained by summarizing the outputs of individual cells. The learning ability is achieved by pruning the population, instead of tuning parameters of an individual cell. The present paper is focused on evaluating two possible schemes of multi-input gene classifier circuits. We demonstrate their suitability for implementing a multi-input distributed classifier capable of separating data which are inseparable for single-input classifiers, and characterize performance of the classifiers by analytical and numerical results. The simpler scheme implements a linear classifier in a single cell and is targeted at separable classification problems with simple class borders. A hard learning strategy is used to train a distributed classifier by removing from the population any cell answering incorrectly to at least one training example. The other scheme implements a circuit with a bell-shaped response in a single cell to allow potentially arbitrary shape of the classification border in the input space of a distributed classifier. Inseparable classification problems are addressed using soft learning strategy, characterized by probabilistic decision to keep or discard a cell at each training iteration. We expect that our classifier design contributes to the development of robust and predictable synthetic biosensors, which have the potential to affect applications in a lot of fields, including that of medicine and industry.

  18. The Linguistic Landscape as an Additional Source of Input in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cenoz, Jasone; Gorter, Durk

    2008-01-01

    In this article we explore the role that the linguistic landscape, in the sense of all the written language in the public space, can have in second language acquisition (SLA). The linguistic landscape has symbolic and informative functions and it is multimodal, because it combines visual and printed texts, and multilingual, because it uses several…

  19. Semi-globally input-to-state stable controller design for flexible spacecraft attitude stabilization under bounded disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qinglei

    2010-02-01

    Semi-globally input-to-state stable (ISS) control law is derived for flexible spacecraft attitude maneuvers in the presence of parameter uncertainties and external disturbances. The modified rodrigues parameters (MRP) are used as the kinematic variables since they are nonsingular for all possible rotations. This novel simple control is a proportional-plus-derivative (PD) type controller plus a sign function through a special Lyapunov function construction involving the sum of quadratic terms in the angular velocities, kinematic parameters, modal variables and the cross state weighting. A sufficient condition under which this nonlinear PD-type control law can render the system semi-globally input-to-state stable is provided such that the closed-loop system is robust with respect to any disturbance within a quantifiable restriction on the amplitude, as well as the set of initial conditions, if the control gains are designed appropriately. In addition to detailed derivations of the new controllers design and a rigorous sketch of all the associated stability and attitude convergence proofs, extensive simulation studies have been conducted to validate the design and the results are presented to highlight the ensuring closed-loop performance benefits when compared with the conventional control schemes.

  20. Computing functions by approximating the input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Mayer

    2012-12-01

    In computing real-valued functions, it is ordinarily assumed that the input to the function is known, and it is the output that we need to approximate. In this work, we take the opposite approach: we show how to compute the values of some transcendental functions by approximating the input to these functions, and obtaining exact answers for their output. Our approach assumes only the most rudimentary knowledge of algebra and trigonometry, and makes no use of calculus.

  1. Combined LTP and LTD of modulatory inputs controls neuronal processing of primary sensory inputs.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Brent; Zhao, Yanjun; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2011-07-20

    A hallmark of brain organization is the integration of primary and modulatory pathways by principal neurons. However, the pathway interactions that shape primary input processing remain unknown. We investigated this problem in mouse dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) where principal cells integrate primary, auditory nerve input with modulatory, parallel fiber input. Using a combined experimental and computational approach, we show that combined LTP and LTD of parallel fiber inputs to DCN principal cells and interneurons, respectively, broaden the time window within which synaptic inputs summate. Enhanced summation depolarizes the resting membrane potential and thus lowers the response threshold to auditory nerve inputs. Combined LTP and LTD, by preserving the variance of membrane potential fluctuations and the membrane time constant, fixes response gain and spike latency as threshold is lowered. Our data reveal a novel mechanism mediating adaptive and concomitant homeostatic regulation of distinct features of neuronal processing of sensory inputs.

  2. Influential input classification in probabilistic multimedia models

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Dennis P.H.; Geng, Shu

    1999-05-01

    Monte Carlo analysis is a statistical simulation method that is often used to assess and quantify the outcome variance in complex environmental fate and effects models. Total outcome variance of these models is a function of (1) the uncertainty and/or variability associated with each model input and (2) the sensitivity of the model outcome to changes in the inputs. To propagate variance through a model using Monte Carlo techniques, each variable must be assigned a probability distribution. The validity of these distributions directly influences the accuracy and reliability of the model outcome. To efficiently allocate resources for constructing distributions one should first identify the most influential set of variables in the model. Although existing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis methods can provide a relative ranking of the importance of model inputs, they fail to identify the minimum set of stochastic inputs necessary to sufficiently characterize the outcome variance. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a novel sensitivity/uncertainty analysis method for assessing the importance of each variable in a multimedia environmental fate model. Our analyses show that for a given scenario, a relatively small number of input variables influence the central tendency of the model and an even smaller set determines the shape of the outcome distribution. For each input, the level of influence depends on the scenario under consideration. This information is useful for developing site specific models and improving our understanding of the processes that have the greatest influence on the variance in outcomes from multimedia models.

  3. Effective time closures: quantifying the conservation benefits of input control for the Pacific chub mackerel fishery.

    PubMed

    Ichinokawa, Momoko; Okamura, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Chikako; Kawabata, Atsushi; Oozeki, Yoshioki

    2015-09-01

    Restricting human access to a specific wildlife species, community, or ecosystem, i.e., input control, is one of the most popular tools to control human impacts for natural resource management and wildlife conservation. However, quantitative evaluations of input control are generally difficult, because it is unclear how much human impacts can actually be reduced by the control. We present a model framework to quantify the effectiveness of input control using day closures to reduce actual fishing impact by considering the observed fishery dynamics. The model framework was applied to the management of the Pacific stock of the chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus) fishery, in which fishing was suspended for one day following any day when the total mackerel catch exceeded a threshold level. We evaluated the management measure according to the following steps: (1) we fitted the daily observed catch and fishing effort data to a generalized linear model (GLM) or generalized autoregressive state-space model (GASSM), (2) we conducted population dynamics simulations based on annual catches randomly generated from the parameters estimated in the first step, (3) we quantified the effectiveness of day closures by comparing the results of two simulation scenarios with and without day closures, and (4) we conducted additional simulations based on different sets of explanatory variables and statistical models (sensitivity analysis). In the first step, we found that the GASSM explained the observed data far better than the simple GLM. The model parameterized with the estimates from the GASSM demonstrated that the day closures implemented from 2004 to 2009 would have decreased exploitation fractions by ~10% every year and increased the 2009 stock biomass by 37-46% (median), relative to the values without day closures. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the effectiveness of day closures was particularly influenced by autoregressive processes in the fishery data and by positive

  4. LCA of emerging technologies: addressing high uncertainty on inputs' variability when performing global sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Lacirignola, Martino; Blanc, Philippe; Girard, Robin; Pérez-López, Paula; Blanc, Isabelle

    2017-02-01

    In the life cycle assessment (LCA) context, global sensitivity analysis (GSA) has been identified by several authors as a relevant practice to enhance the understanding of the model's structure and ensure reliability and credibility of the LCA results. GSA allows establishing a ranking among the input parameters, according to their influence on the variability of the output. Such feature is of high interest in particular when aiming at defining parameterized LCA models. When performing a GSA, the description of the variability of each input parameter may affect the results. This aspect is critical when studying new products or emerging technologies, where data regarding the model inputs are very uncertain and may cause misleading GSA outcomes, such as inappropriate input rankings. A systematic assessment of this sensitivity issue is now proposed. We develop a methodology to analyze the sensitivity of the GSA results (i.e. the stability of the ranking of the inputs) with respect to the description of such inputs of the model (i.e. the definition of their inherent variability). With this research, we aim at enriching the debate on the application of GSA to LCAs affected by high uncertainties. We illustrate its application with a case study, aiming at the elaboration of a simple model expressing the life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) as a function of few key parameters. Our methodology allows identifying the key inputs of the LCA model, taking into account the uncertainty related to their description.

  5. Can Simulation Credibility Be Improved Using Sensitivity Analysis to Understand Input Data Effects on Model Outcome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Young, M.; Goodenow, Debra A.; Keenan, A.; Walton, M.; Boley, L.

    2015-01-01

    Model and simulation (MS) credibility is defined as, the quality to elicit belief or trust in MS results. NASA-STD-7009 [1] delineates eight components (Verification, Validation, Input Pedigree, Results Uncertainty, Results Robustness, Use History, MS Management, People Qualifications) that address quantifying model credibility, and provides guidance to the model developers, analysts, and end users for assessing the MS credibility. Of the eight characteristics, input pedigree, or the quality of the data used to develop model input parameters, governing functions, or initial conditions, can vary significantly. These data quality differences have varying consequences across the range of MS application. NASA-STD-7009 requires that the lowest input data quality be used to represent the entire set of input data when scoring the input pedigree credibility of the model. This requirement provides a conservative assessment of model inputs, and maximizes the communication of the potential level of risk of using model outputs. Unfortunately, in practice, this may result in overly pessimistic communication of the MS output, undermining the credibility of simulation predictions to decision makers. This presentation proposes an alternative assessment mechanism, utilizing results parameter robustness, also known as model input sensitivity, to improve the credibility scoring process for specific simulations.

  6. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  7. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  8. Hybrid supervisory control using recurrent fuzzy neural network for tracking periodic inputs.

    PubMed

    Lin, F J; Wai, R J; Hong, C M

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid supervisory control system using a recurrent fuzzy neural network (RFNN) is proposed to control the mover of a permanent magnet linear synchronous motor (PMLSM) servo drive for the tracking of periodic reference inputs. First, the field-oriented mechanism is applied to formulate the dynamic equation of the PMLSM. Then, a hybrid supervisory control system, which combines a supervisory control system and an intelligent control system, is proposed to control the mover of the PMLSM for periodic motion. The supervisory control law is designed based on the uncertainty bounds of the controlled system to stabilize the system states around a predefined bound region. Since the supervisory control law will induce excessive and chattering control effort, the intelligent control system is introduced to smooth and reduce the control effort when the system states are inside the predefined bound region. In the intelligent control system, the RFNN control is the main tracking controller which is used to mimic a idea control law and a compensated control is proposed to compensate the difference between the idea control law and the RFNN control. The RFNN has the merits of fuzzy inference, dynamic mapping and fast convergence speed, In addition, an online parameter training methodology, which is derived using the Lyapunov stability theorem and the gradient descent method, is proposed to increase the learning capability of the RFNN. The proposed hybrid supervisory control system using RFNN can track various periodic reference inputs effectively with robust control performance.

  9. The Building Loads Analysis System Thermodynamics (BLAST) Program, Version 2.0: Input Booklet.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Z ); Delete all handwritten text i.e., form should be blank Input Form. Delete all hyphens between words. Accession For " 7 MIS GfSki rry DOC...NO 4. TITLE f«nd Subtitle) THE BUILDING LOADS ANALYSIS SYSTEM THERMODYNAMICS (BLAST) PROGRAM, VERSION 2.0: INPUT BOOkLET 7 . AUTHORf»; E... 7 I quipmenl Types 8 Speeial Parameters Applicability Al Other System Parameters A2 Speeial Parameters Page 30 34 7 5 ->b 46 77 [08 110

  10. A Statistical investigation of sloshing parameters for multiphase offshore separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, Md; Khan, Rafiqul; Xu, Qiang

    Liquid sloshing in multiphase offshore separators has been the subject of intense investigations for last several decades both by experiments and simulations. Large number scientists have worked to minimize sloshing impacts/intensity and some others have developed new methods to describe the sloshing patterns. In addition, complex mathematical models are developed to characterize sloshing phenomenon. However, a comprehensive statistical study of the input parameters and output results is not yet been studied. In this study, statistical approach will be considered to determine the significant parameters for liquid sloshing. The factor analysis and principal component analysis techniques are considered to identify the significant parameters for liquid sloshing. Numerical experiments are carried out through Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique using ANSYS Fluent software. The input parameters considered here are liquid depth/tank length ratio, tank acceleration, wave frequencies, amplitudes in various sea state conditions .The measured variables include hydrodynamic force, pressure, moments, turbulent kinetic energy, height of the free surface, vorticity. Mathematical correlations may be developed from the data analysis. Doctoral Candidate Dept of Chemical Engineering Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710.

  11. A Statistical investigation of sloshing parameters for multiphase offshore separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, Md; Khan, Rafiqul; Xu, Qiang

    Liquid sloshing in multiphase offshore separators has been the subject of intense investigations for last several decades both by experiments and simulations. Large number scientists have worked to minimize sloshing impacts and others have developed new methods to describe the sloshing patterns. In addition, complex mathematical models are developed to characterize sloshing phenomenon. However, a comprehensive statistical study of the input parameters and output results is yet to be done. In this study, statistical approaches will be considered to determine the significant parameters for liquid sloshing. The factor analysis and principal component analysis techniques are considered to identify the significant parameters for liquid sloshing. Numerical experiments are carried out through Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique using ANSYS Fluent software. The input parameters considered here are liquid depth/length ratio, acceleration, wave frequencies, amplitudes in various sea state conditions. The measured variables include hydrodynamic force, pressure, moments, turbulent kinetic energy, height of interfaces. Mathematical correlations may be developed from the data analysis. Graduate Student Dept of Chemical Eng,Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710.

  12. Interaction between rod and cone inputs in mixed-input bipolar cells in goldfish retina.

    PubMed

    Joselevitch, Christina; Kamermans, Maarten

    2007-05-15

    One class of goldfish bipolar cells, the mixed-input bipolar cell, contacts both rods and cones. Although the morphology of the different mixed-input bipolar cell subtypes has been described, insight into the interaction between rods and cones at the bipolar cell level is scarce. The aim of this study was to characterize this interaction in the different physiological types of mixed-input bipolar cells. We found mixed-input bipolar cells that depolarized, hyperpolarized, or showed a combination of the two types of response after center stimulation. The relative contributions of rod and cone inputs varied strongly in these cell populations. Depolarizing mixed-input bipolar cells are rod-dominated, having the highest sensitivity and the smallest dynamic range. Hyperpolarizing mixed-input bipolar cells, on the other hand, have a more balanced rod-cone input ratio. This extends their dynamic range and decreases their sensitivity. Finally, opponent mixed-input bipolar cells seem to be mostly cone-dominated, although some rod input is present. The antagonistic photoreceptor inputs form a push-pull system that makes these mixed-input bipolar cells very sensitive to changes in light intensity. Our finding that spectral tuning changes with light intensity conflicts with the idea that the separate non-opponent and opponent channels are related to coding of brightness and color, respectively. The organization of mixed-input bipolar cells into various classes with different dynamic ranges and absolute sensitivities might be a strategy to transmit information about all visual aspects most efficiently, given the sustained nature of bipolar cell responses and their limited voltage range.

  13. Optimizing Input/Output Using Adaptive File System Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhyastha, Tara M.; Elford, Christopher L.; Reed, Daniel A.

    1996-01-01

    Parallel input/output characterization studies and experiments with flexible resource management algorithms indicate that adaptivity is crucial to file system performance. In this paper we propose an automatic technique for selecting and refining file system policies based on application access patterns and execution environment. An automatic classification framework allows the file system to select appropriate caching and pre-fetching policies, while performance sensors provide feedback used to tune policy parameters for specific system environments. To illustrate the potential performance improvements possible using adaptive file system policies, we present results from experiments involving classification-based and performance-based steering.

  14. Establishing a database of radionuclide transfer parameters for freshwater wildlife.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, T; Beresford, N A; Fesenko, S; Fesenko, J; Phaneuf, M; Dagher, E; Outola, I; Andersson, P; Thiessen, K; Ryan, J; Wood, M D; Bollhöfer, A; Barnett, C L; Copplestone, D

    2013-12-01

    Environmental assessments to evaluate potentials risks to humans and wildlife often involve modelling to predict contaminant exposure through key pathways. Such models require input of parameter values, including concentration ratios, to estimate contaminant concentrations in biota based on measurements or estimates of concentrations in environmental media, such as water. Due to the diversity of species and the range in physicochemical conditions in natural ecosystems, concentration ratios can vary by orders of magnitude, even within similar species. Therefore, to improve model input parameter values for application in aquatic systems, freshwater concentration ratios were collated or calculated from national grey literature, Russian language publications, and refereed papers. Collated data were then input into an international database that is being established by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The freshwater database enables entry of information for all radionuclides listed in ICRP (1983), in addition to the corresponding stable elements, and comprises a total of more than 16,500 concentration ratio (CRwo-water) values. Although data were available for all broad wildlife groups (with the exception of birds), data were sparse for many organism types. For example, zooplankton, crustaceans, insects and insect larvae, amphibians, and mammals, for which there were CRwo-water values for less than eight elements. Coverage was most comprehensive for fish, vascular plants, and molluscs. To our knowledge, the freshwater database that has now been established represents the most comprehensive set of CRwo-water values for freshwater species currently available for use in radiological environmental assessments.

  15. Six axis force feedback input device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, Timothy (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a low friction, low inertia, six-axis force feedback input device comprising an arm with double-jointed, tendon-driven revolute joints, a decoupled tendon-driven wrist, and a base with encoders and motors. The input device functions as a master robot manipulator of a microsurgical teleoperated robot system including a slave robot manipulator coupled to an amplifier chassis, which is coupled to a control chassis, which is coupled to a workstation with a graphical user interface. The amplifier chassis is coupled to the motors of the master robot manipulator and the control chassis is coupled to the encoders of the master robot manipulator. A force feedback can be applied to the input device and can be generated from the slave robot to enable a user to operate the slave robot via the input device without physically viewing the slave robot. Also, the force feedback can be generated from the workstation to represent fictitious forces to constrain the input device's control of the slave robot to be within imaginary predetermined boundaries.

  16. Sensorless estimation of pressure head and flow of a continuous flow artificial heart based on input power and rotational speed.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Makoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Akira; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Nosé, Yukihiko

    2002-01-01

    The present study has proposed a new method for estimating the pressure head (P(t)[mm Hg]) and flow (Q(t)[L/min]) of a centrifugal pump on the basis of voltage (V(t)[V]), current (I(t)[A]), and rotational speed (N(t)[k(rpm)]) of the DC motor for a pump without any additional sensors. In the proposed estimation method, two auto-regressive exogenous (ARX) models are employed. One ARX model has an output, P(t) or Q(t), and three inputs, VI(t) = V(t)I(t) and N(t) and the steady state gain (K) of the system from VI(t) to N(t). It can be assumed that K may include the information on viscosity of blood. The coefficient parameters of this ARX model are identified in an off-line fashion before implantation of the pump. After implantation, P(t) or Q(t) is estimated by the same ARX model with the already identified parameters. The other ARX model is used to identify Kon the basis of VI(t) and N(t) in an on-line fashion every time the viscosity of blood may change. In the experiment, a mock circulatory system consisting of a centrifugal pump and a reservoir with 37% glycerin or water was employed. The root mean square error between measured Q(t) and its estimate obtained from the proposed method was 1.66L/min. On the other hand, a different method based on a single ARX model with inputs of VI(t) and N(t), but without the additional input of K, yielded the corresponding estimation error of 2.22L/min. This means that the proposed method can reduce its estimation error by about 25% in comparison with a method that cannot cope with the change in blood viscosity.

  17. Input-current shaped ac to dc converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The problem of achieving near unity power factor while supplying power to a dc load from a single phase ac source of power is examined. Power processors for this application must perform three functions: input current shaping, energy storage, and output voltage regulation. The methods available for performing each of these three functions are reviewed. Input current shaping methods are either active or passive, with the active methods divided into buck-like and boost-like techniques. In addition to large reactances, energy storage methods include resonant filters, active filters, and active storage schemes. Fast voltage regulation can be achieved by post regulation or by supplementing the current shaping topology with an extra switch. Some indications of which methods are best suited for particular applications concludes the discussion.

  18. Synchronization phenomena in pulse-coupled networks driven by spike-train inputs.

    PubMed

    Torikai, Hiroyuki; Saito, Toshimichi

    2004-03-01

    We present a pulse-coupled network (PCN) of spiking oscillators (SOCs) which can be implemented as a simple electrical circuit. The SOC has a periodic reset level that can realize rich dynamics represented by chaotic spike-trains. Applying a spike-train input, the PCN can exhibit the following interesting phenomena. 1) Each SOC synchronizes with a part of the input without overlapping, i.e., the input is decomposed. 2) Some SOCs synchronize with a part of the input with overlapping, i.e., the input is decomposed and the SOCs are clustered. The PCN has multiple synchronization phenomena and exhibits one of them depending on the initial state. We clarify the numbers of the synchronization phenomena and the parameter regions in which these phenomena can be observed. Also stability of the synchronization phenomena is clarified. Presenting a simple test circuit, typical phenomena are confirmed experimentally.

  19. Double-input compartmental modeling and spectral analysis for the quantification of positron emission tomography data in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, G.; Kimberley, S.; Rosso, L.; Aboagye, E.; Turkheimer, F.

    2012-04-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) studies involving organs different from the brain, ignoring the metabolite contribution to the tissue time-activity curves (TAC), as in the standard single-input (SI) models, may compromise the accuracy of the estimated parameters. We employed here double-input (DI) compartmental modeling (CM), previously used for [11C]thymidine, and a novel DI spectral analysis (SA) approach on the tracers 5-[18F]fluorouracil (5-[18F]FU) and [18F]fluorothymidine ([18F]FLT). CM and SA were performed initially with a SI approach using the parent plasma TAC as an input function. These methods were then employed using a DI approach with the metabolite plasma TAC as an additional input function. Regions of interest (ROIs) corresponding to healthy liver, kidneys and liver metastases for 5-[18F]FU and to tumor, vertebra and liver for [18F]FLT were analyzed. For 5-[18F]FU, the improvement of the fit quality with the DI approaches was remarkable; in CM, the Akaike information criterion (AIC) always selected the DI over the SI model. Volume of distribution estimates obtained with DI CM and DI SA were in excellent agreement, for both parent 5-[18F]FU (R2 = 0.91) and metabolite [18F]FBAL (R2 = 0.99). For [18F]FLT, the DI methods provided notable improvements but less substantial than for 5-[18F]FU due to the lower rate of metabolism of [18F]FLT. On the basis of the AIC values, agreement between [18F]FLT Ki estimated with the SI and DI models was good (R2 = 0.75) for the ROIs where the metabolite contribution was negligible, indicating that the additional input did not bias the parent tracer only-related estimates. When the AIC suggested a substantial contribution of the metabolite [18F]FLT-glucuronide, on the other hand, the change in the parent tracer only-related parameters was significant (R2 = 0.33 for Ki). Our results indicated that improvements of DI over SI approaches can range from moderate to substantial and are more significant for tracers with

  20. Decontextualized language input and preschoolers' vocabulary development.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Meredith L

    2013-11-01

    This article discusses the importance of using decontextualized language, or language that is removed from the here and now including pretend, narrative, and explanatory talk, with preschool children. The literature on parents' use of decontextualized language is reviewed and results of a longitudinal study of parent decontextualized language input in relation to child vocabulary development are explained. The main findings are that parents who provide their preschool children with more explanations and narrative utterances about past or future events in the input have children with larger vocabularies 1 year later, even with quantity of parent input and child prior vocabulary skill controlled. Recommendations for how to engage children in decontextualized language conversations are provided.

  1. On Markov parameters in system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed discussion of Markov parameters in system identification is given. Different forms of input-output representation of linear discrete-time systems are reviewed and discussed. Interpretation of sampled response data as Markov parameters is presented. Relations between the state-space model and particular linear difference models via the Markov parameters are formulated. A generalization of Markov parameters to observer and Kalman filter Markov parameters for system identification is explained. These extended Markov parameters play an important role in providing not only a state-space realization, but also an observer/Kalman filter for the system of interest.

  2. Simple circuit performs binary addition and subtraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A.; Schaefer, D. H.

    1965-01-01

    Ripple adder reduces the number of logic circuits required to preform binary addition and subtraction. The adder uses dual input and delayed output flip-flops in one register. The contents of this register are summed with those of a standard register through conventional AND/gates.

  3. Teaching Additional Languages. Educational Practices Series 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Elliot L.; Tan, Lihua; Walberg, Herbert J.

    This booklet describes key principles of and research on teaching additional languages. The 10 chapters focus on the following: (1) "Comprehensible Input" (learners need exposure to meaningful, understandable language); (2) "Language Opportunities" (classroom activities should let students use natural and meaningful language with their…

  4. The pupillary light response: functional and anatomical interaction among inputs to the pretectum from transplanted retinae and host eyes.

    PubMed

    Radel, J D; Kustra, D J; Lund, R D

    1995-10-01

    Pupilloconstriction to light can be mediated in rats through direct illumination of retinae previously transplanted to intracranial locations. Transplant-driven and normal pupillary light responses are stable under optimal testing conditions, and parameters describing the response can be quantified precisely. The present study demonstrates the interaction between transplant-driven and normal pupillary response patterns. When stimuli are presented concurrently to a transplanted retina and to the remaining eye in host rats, a greater degree of pupilloconstriction occurs than when either the transplanted or the host eye is illuminated independently. This suggests that transplant and host retinal inputs act in concert to determine pupil diameter. The second portion of this study investigates the pattern of retinal input to the pretectum to determine if a structural basis for such functional interactions may exist. Crossed and uncrossed retinal projections to the olivary pretectal nucleus occupy non-overlapping regions of this bilaterally represented nucleus in normal rats, with a greater number of optic axons directed to the contralateral olivary pretectal nucleus. Retinae transplanted to the midbrain of neonatal rats, from whom the contralateral eye had been removed, also project to the olivary pretectal nucleus at maturity. By contrast with the normal pattern of segregated retinal inputs, however, the terminal fields of transplant axons were found to overlap extensively with the retinal projection from the remaining host eye. In addition, the relative proportion of transplant axons directed to the ipsilateral and contralateral olivary pretectal nucleus varied among animals. The lack of spatial segregation between inputs from transplant and host sources and the relative proportion of ipsilateral and contralateral transplant axons together may represent a structural basis for the observed functional interactoin of these inputs to the neural circuit subserving

  5. Effects of input uncertainty on cross-scale crop modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waha, Katharina; Huth, Neil; Carberry, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The quality of data on climate, soils and agricultural management in the tropics is in general low or data is scarce leading to uncertainty in process-based modeling of cropping systems. Process-based crop models are common tools for simulating crop yields and crop production in climate change impact studies, studies on mitigation and adaptation options or food security studies. Crop modelers are concerned about input data accuracy as this, together with an adequate representation of plant physiology processes and choice of model parameters, are the key factors for a reliable simulation. For example, assuming an error in measurements of air temperature, radiation and precipitation of ± 0.2°C, ± 2 % and ± 3 % respectively, Fodor & Kovacs (2005) estimate that this translates into an uncertainty of 5-7 % in yield and biomass simulations. In our study we seek to answer the following questions: (1) are there important uncertainties in the spatial variability of simulated crop yields on the grid-cell level displayed on maps, (2) are there important uncertainties in the temporal variability of simulated crop yields on the aggregated, national level displayed in time-series, and (3) how does the accuracy of different soil, climate and management information influence the simulated crop yields in two crop models designed for use at different spatial scales? The study will help to determine whether more detailed information improves the simulations and to advise model users on the uncertainty related to input data. We analyse the performance of the point-scale crop model APSIM (Keating et al., 2003) and the global scale crop model LPJmL (Bondeau et al., 2007) with different climate information (monthly and daily) and soil conditions (global soil map and African soil map) under different agricultural management (uniform and variable sowing dates) for the low-input maize-growing areas in Burkina Faso/West Africa. We test the models' response to different levels of input

  6. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed.

  7. Prediction of States of Discrete Systems with Unknown Input of the Model Using Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of state prediction for linear dynamic systems with discrete time is considered in the presence of unknown input and inaccurately specified parameters in the model. An algorithm with compensation for the constant component and estimation of the unknown variable input component by the least squares method is suggested. Results of statistical simulation are presented. The algorithm can be used for solving problems of processing information obtained as a result of observations over physical processes.

  8. Effects of bias in solar radiation inputs on ecosystem model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asao, Shinichi; Sun, Zhibin; Gao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Solar radiation inputs drive many processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. The processes (e.g. photosynthesis) account for most of the fluxes of carbon and water cycling in the models. It is thus clear that errors in solar radiation inputs cause key model outputs to deviate from observations, parameters to become suboptimal, and model predictions to loose confidence. However, errors in solar radiation inputs are unavoidable for most model predictions since models are often run with observations with spatial or / and temporal gaps. As modeled processes are non-linear and interacting with each other, it is unclear how much confidence most model predictions merits without examining the effects of those errors on the model performance. In this study, we examined the effects using a terrestrial ecosystem model, DayCent. DayCent was parameterized for annual grassland in California with six years of daily eddy covariance data totaling 15,337 data points. Using observed solar radiation values, we introduced bias at four different levels. We then simultaneously calibrated 48 DayCent parameters through inverse modeling using the PEST parameter estimation software. The bias in solar radiation inputs affected the calibration only slightly and preserved model performance. Bias slightly worsened simulations of water flux, but did not affect simulations of CO2 fluxes. This arose from distinct parameter set for each bias level, and the parameter sets were surprisingly unconstrained by the extensive observations. We conclude that ecosystem models perform relatively well even with substantial bias in solar radiation inputs. However, model parameters and predictions warrant skepticism because model parameters can accommodate biases in input data despite extensive observations.

  9. Reduced basis ANOVA methods for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qifeng; Lin, Guang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a reduced basis ANOVA approach for partial deferential equations (PDEs) with random inputs. The ANOVA method combined with stochastic collocation methods provides model reduction in high-dimensional parameter space through decomposing high-dimensional inputs into unions of low-dimensional inputs. In this work, to further reduce the computational cost, we investigate spatial low-rank structures in the ANOVA-collocation method, and develop efficient spatial model reduction techniques using hierarchically generated reduced bases. We present a general mathematical framework of the methodology, validate its accuracy and demonstrate its efficiency with numerical experiments.

  10. Investigation of Input Signal Curve Effect on Formed Pulse of Hydraulic-Powered Pulse Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoseltseva, M. V.; Masson, I. A.; Pashkov, E. N.

    2016-04-01

    Well drilling machines should have as high efficiency factor as it is possible. This work proposes factors that are affected by change of input signal pulse curve. A series of runs are conducted on mathematical model of hydraulic-powered pulse machine. From this experiment, interrelations between input pulse curve and construction parameters are found. Results of conducted experiment are obtained with the help of the mathematical model, which is created in Simulink Matlab. Keywords - mathematical modelling; impact machine; output signal amplitude; input signal curve.

  11. Reduced basis ANOVA methods for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Qifeng; Lin, Guang

    2016-07-15

    In this paper we present a reduced basis ANOVA approach for partial deferential equations (PDEs) with random inputs. The ANOVA method combined with stochastic collocation methods provides model reduction in high-dimensional parameter space through decomposing high-dimensional inputs into unions of low-dimensional inputs. In this work, to further reduce the computational cost, we investigate spatial low-rank structures in the ANOVA-collocation method, and develop efficient spatial model reduction techniques using hierarchically generated reduced bases. We present a general mathematical framework of the methodology, validate its accuracy and demonstrate its efficiency with numerical experiments.

  12. Comprehensible Input and Second Language Acquisition: What Is the Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loschky, Lester

    1994-01-01

    Examined the influence of input and interactional modifications on second-language acquisition, assigning 41 learners of Japanese to 1 of 3 experimental groups: (1) unmodified input with no interaction; (2) premodified input with no interaction; and (3) unmodified input with the chance for negotiated input. Results indicated that comprehension was…

  13. Experimental Studies of Nuclear Physics Input for γ -Process Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Philipp; Heim, Felix; Mayer, Jan; Netterdon, Lars; Zilges, Andreas

    The predictions of reaction rates for the γ process in the scope of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model crucially depend on nuclear physics input-parameters as optical-model potentials (OMP) or γ -ray strength functions. Precise cross-section measurements at astrophysically relevant energies help to constrain adopted models and, therefore, to reduce the uncertainties in the theoretically predicted reaction rates. During the last years, several cross-sections of charged-particle induced reactions on heavy nuclei have been measured at the University of Cologne. Either by means of the in-beam method at the HORUS γ -ray spectrometer or the activation technique using the Cologne Clover Counting Setup, total and partial cross-sections could be used to further constrain different models for nuclear physics input-parameters. It could be shown that modifications on the α -OMP in the case of the 112Sn(α , γ ) reaction also improve the description of the recently measured cross sections of the 108Cd(α , γ ) and 108Cd(α , n) reaction and other reactions as well. Partial cross-sections of the 92Mo(p, γ ) reaction were used to improve the γ -strength function model in 93Tc in the same way as it was done for the 89Y(p, γ ) reaction.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of a sound absorption model with correlated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, W.; Christen, J.-L.; Zine, A.-M.; Ichchou, M.

    2017-04-01

    Sound absorption in porous media is a complex phenomenon, which is usually addressed with homogenized models, depending on macroscopic parameters. Since these parameters emerge from the structure at microscopic scale, they may be correlated. This paper deals with sensitivity analysis methods of a sound absorption model with correlated inputs. Specifically, the Johnson-Champoux-Allard model (JCA) is chosen as the objective model with correlation effects generated by a secondary micro-macro semi-empirical model. To deal with this case, a relatively new sensitivity analysis method Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test with Correlation design (FASTC), based on Iman's transform, is taken into application. This method requires a priori information such as variables' marginal distribution functions and their correlation matrix. The results are compared to the Correlation Ratio Method (CRM) for reference and validation. The distribution of the macroscopic variables arising from the microstructure, as well as their correlation matrix are studied. Finally the results of tests shows that the correlation has a very important impact on the results of sensitivity analysis. Assessment of correlation strength among input variables on the sensitivity analysis is also achieved.

  15. Input and Intake in Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliardi, Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents an approach for a productive way forward in the study of language acquisition, sealing the rift between claims of an innate linguistic hypothesis space and powerful domain general statistical inference. This approach breaks language acquisition into its component parts, distinguishing the input in the environment from…

  16. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS New Era Rural Technology Competitive Grants Program § 3430.907 Stakeholder input. NIFA...: (a) Community college(s). (b) Advanced technological center(s), located in rural area, for...

  17. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS New Era Rural Technology Competitive Grants Program § 3430.907 Stakeholder input. NIFA...: (a) Community college(s). (b) Advanced technological center(s), located in rural area, for...

  18. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS New Era Rural Technology Competitive Grants Program § 3430.907 Stakeholder input. NIFA...: (a) Community college(s). (b) Advanced technological center(s), located in rural area, for...

  19. Multiple Input Microcantilever Sensor with Capacitive Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L., Jr.; Brown, G.M.; Bryan, W.L.; Clonts, L.G.; DePriest, J.C.; Emergy, M.S.; Ericson, M.N.; Hu, Z.; Jones, R.L.; Moore, M.R.; Oden, P.I.; Rochelle, J.M.; Smith, S.F.; Threatt, T.D.; Thundat, T.; Turner, G.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Wintenberg, A.L.

    1999-03-11

    A surface-micromachined MEMS process has been used to demonstrate multiple-input chemical sensing using selectively coated cantilever arrays. Combined hydrogen and mercury-vapor detection was achieved with a palm-sized, self-powered module with spread-spectrum telemetry reporting.

  20. Input-Based Incremental Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcroft, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This fascinating presentation of current research undoes numerous myths about how we most effectively learn new words in a second language. In clear, reader-friendly text, the author details the successful approach of IBI vocabulary instruction, which emphasizes the presentation of target vocabulary as input early on and the incremental (gradual)…

  1. Treatments of Precipitation Inputs to Hydrologic Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrological models are used to assess many water resources problems from agricultural use and water quality to engineering issues. The success of these models are dependent on correct parameterization; the most sensitive being the rainfall input time series. These records can come from land-based ...

  2. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon sequ...

  3. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon (C) input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon ...

  4. Young Children's Use of Microcomputer Input Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, John; Alloway, Nola

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a study of the ability of preschoolers and first, second, and third graders to use three computer input devices: a joystick, a mouse, and a keyboard. For all grade levels, the mouse offered the greatest ease of use in manipulating icons, followed by the joystick and the keyboard. No effect for gender was found. (Contains 30 references.)…

  5. Preschooler's Use of Microcomputers and Input Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, John; Alloway, Nola

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that measured preschoolers' use of microcomputers in the following areas: (1) efficiency of use of input devices, including the keyboard, the joystick, and the mouse; (2) use during free-play activities, including interaction with the microcomputer and with each other; and (3) gender differences. (40 references) (LRW)

  6. Input, Interaction and Output: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan; Mackey, Alison

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of what has come to be known as the "Interaction Hypothesis," the basic tenet of which is that through input and interaction with interlocutors, language learners have opportunities to notice differences between their own formulations of the target language and the language of their conversational…

  7. Adaptive random testing with combinatorial input domain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rubing; Chen, Jinfu; Lu, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Random testing (RT) is a fundamental testing technique to assess software reliability, by simply selecting test cases in a random manner from the whole input domain. As an enhancement of RT, adaptive random testing (ART) has better failure-detection capability and has been widely applied in different scenarios, such as numerical programs, some object-oriented programs, and mobile applications. However, not much work has been done on the effectiveness of ART for the programs with combinatorial input domain (i.e., the set of categorical data). To extend the ideas to the testing for combinatorial input domain, we have adopted different similarity measures that are widely used for categorical data in data mining and have proposed two similarity measures based on interaction coverage. Then, we propose a new version named ART-CID as an extension of ART in combinatorial input domain, which selects an element from categorical data as the next test case such that it has the lowest similarity against already generated test cases. Experimental results show that ART-CID generally performs better than RT, with respect to different evaluation metrics.

  8. Calibration of a distributed flood forecasting model with input uncertainty using a Bayesian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingliang; Yang, Dawen; Chen, Jinsong; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2012-08-01

    In the process of calibrating distributed hydrological models, accounting for input uncertainty is important, yet challenging. In this study, we develop a Bayesian model to estimate parameters associated with a geomorphology-based hydrological model (GBHM). The GBHM model uses geomorphic characteristics to simplify model structure and physically based methods to represent hydrological processes. We divide the observed discharge into low- and high-flow data, and use the first-order autoregressive model to describe their temporal dependence. We consider relative errors in rainfall as spatially distributed variables and estimate them jointly with the GBHM parameters. The joint posterior probability distribution is explored using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, which include Metropolis-Hastings, delay rejection adaptive Metropolis, and Gibbs sampling methods. We evaluate the Bayesian model using both synthetic and field data sets. The synthetic case study demonstrates that the developed method generally is effective in calibrating GBHM parameters and in estimating their associated uncertainty. The calibration ignoring input errors has lower accuracy and lower reliability compared to the calibration that includes estimation of the input errors, especially under model structure uncertainty. The field case study shows that calibration of GBHM parameters under complex field conditions remains a challenge. Although jointly estimating input errors and GBHM parameters improves the continuous ranked probability score and the consistency of the predictive distribution with the observed data, the improvement is incremental. To better calibrate parameters in a distributed model, such as GBHM here, we need to develop a more complex model and incorporate much more information.

  9. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  10. Adaptive Control of Semi-Autonomous Teleoperation System With Asymmetric Time-Varying Delays and Input Uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Di-Hua; Xia, Yuanqing

    2016-06-07

    This paper addresses the adaptive task-space bilateral teleoperation for heterogeneous master and slave robots to guarantee stability and tracking performance, where a novel semi-autonomous teleoperation framework is developed to ensure the safety and enhance the efficiency of the robot in remote site. The basic idea is to stabilize the tracking error in task space while enhancing the efficiency of complex teleoperation by using redundant slave robot with subtask control. To unify the study of the asymmetric time-varying delays, passive/nonpassive exogenous forces, dynamic parameter uncertainties and dead-zone input in the same framework, a novel switching technique-based adaptive control scheme is investigated, where a special switched error filter is developed. By replacing the derivatives of position errors with their filtered outputs in the coordinate torque design, and employing the multiple Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals method, the complete closed-loop master (slave) system is proven to be state-independent input-to-output stable. It is shown that both the position tracking errors in task space and the adaptive parameter estimation errors remain bounded for any bounded exogenous forces. Moreover, by using the redundancy of the slave robot, the proposed teleoperation framework can autonomously achieve additional subtasks in the remote environment. Finally, the obtained results are demonstrated by the simulation.

  11. Application of Voice Recognition Input to Decision Support Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Support System (GDSS) Talkwriter Human Computer Interface Voice Input Individual Decision Support System (IDSS) Voice Input/Output Man Machine Voice ... Interface Voice Processing Natural Language Voice Input Voice Recognition Natural Language Accessed Voice Recognizer Speech Entry Voice Vocabulary

  12. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Urbanization - Wastewater Inputs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Intro to wastewater inputs associated with urbanization, overview of combined sewer overflows, overview of how wastewater inputs can contribute to enrichment or eutrophication, overview of how wastewater inputs can affect reproduction by stream fauna.

  13. Glycine input induces the synaptic facilitation in salamander rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen; Jiang, Zheng; Li, Baoqin

    2008-11-01

    Glycinergic synapses in photoreceptors are made by centrifugal feedback neurons in the network, but the function of the synapses is largely unknown. Here we report that glycinergic input enhances photoreceptor synapses in amphibian retinas. Using specific antibodies against a glycine transporter (GlyT2) and glycine receptor beta subunit, we identified the morphology of glycinergic input in photoreceptor terminals. Electrophysiological recordings indicated that 10 muM glycine depolarized rods and activated voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in the neurons. The effects facilitated glutamate vesicle release in photoreceptors, meanwhile increased the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in Off-bipolar cells. Endogenous glycine feedback also enhanced glutamate transmission in photoreceptors. Additionally, inhibition of a Cl(-) uptake transporter NKCC1 with bumetanid effectively eliminated glycine-evoked a weak depolarization in rods, suggesting that NKCC1 maintains a high Cl(-) level in rods, which causes to depolarize in responding to glycine input. This study reveals a new function of glycine in retinal synaptic transmission.

  14. Feed and manure use in low-N-input and high-N-input dairy cattle production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. Mark

    2014-11-01

    In most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa fertilizers and feeds are costly, not readily available and used sparingly in agricultural production. In many parts of Western Europe, North America, and Oceania fertilizers and feeds are relatively inexpensive, readily available and used abundantly to maximize profitable agricultural production. A case study, dairy systems approach was used to illustrate how differences in feed and manure management in a low-N-input dairy cattle system (Niger, West Africa) and a high-N-input dairy production system (Wisconsin, USA) impact agricultural production and environmental N loss. In Niger, an additional daily feed N intake of 114 g per dairy animal unit (AU, 1000 kg live weight) could increase annual milk production from 560 to 1320 kg AU-1, and the additional manure N could greatly increase millet production. In Wisconsin, reductions in daily feed N intake of 100 g AU-1 would not greatly impact milk production but decrease urinary N excretion by 25% and ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from manure by 18% to 30%. In Niger, compared to the practice of housing livestock and applying dung only onto fields, corralling cattle or sheep on cropland (to capture urinary N) increased millet yields by 25% to 95%. The additional millet grain due to dung applications or corralling would satisfy the annual food grain requirements of 2-5 persons; the additional forage would provide 120-300 more days of feed for a typical head of cattle; and 850 to 1600 kg ha-1 more biomass would be available for soil conservation. In Wisconsin, compared to application of barn manure only, corralling heifers in fields increased forage production by only 8% to 11%. The application of barn manure or corralling increased forage production by 20% to 70%. This additional forage would provide 350-580 more days of feed for a typical dairy heifer. Study results demonstrate how different approaches to feed and manure management in low-N-input and high-N-input dairy cattle

  15. Identification of Neurofuzzy models using GTLS parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Stefan; Hametner, Christoph

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, nonlinear system identification utilizing generalized total least squares (GTLS) methodologies in neurofuzzy systems is addressed. The problem involved with the estimation of the local model parameters of neurofuzzy networks is the presence of noise in measured data. When some or all input channels are subject to noise, the GTLS algorithm yields consistent parameter estimates. In addition to the estimation of the parameters, the main challenge in the design of these local model networks is the determination of the region of validity for the local models. The method presented in this paper is based on an expectation-maximization algorithm that uses a residual from the GTLS parameter estimation for proper partitioning. The performance of the resulting nonlinear model with local parameters estimated by weighted GTLS is a product both of the parameter estimation itself and the associated residual used for the partitioning process. The applicability and benefits of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by means of illustrative examples and an automotive application.

  16. Probabilistic Density Function Method for Stochastic ODEs of Power Systems with Uncertain Power Input

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Barajas-Solano, David A.; Constantinescu, Emil; Abhyankar, S.; Ghosh, Donetta L.; Smith, Barry; Huang, Zhenyu; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2015-09-22

    Wind and solar power generators are commonly described by a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations (SODEs) where random input parameters represent uncertainty in wind and solar energy. The existing methods for SODEs are mostly limited to delta-correlated random parameters (white noise). Here we use the Probability Density Function (PDF) method for deriving a closed-form deterministic partial differential equation (PDE) for the joint probability density function of the SODEs describing a power generator with time-correlated power input. The resulting PDE is solved numerically. A good agreement with Monte Carlo Simulations shows accuracy of the PDF method.

  17. Program BTLS Technical Description Selection of Input Data, and Running Instructions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    7TZI . „, running the computer program. DD , j"„ 73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV « 5 IS OBSOLETE 3 r r 3 S/K C 105- 0 I «- 6601 I...Range Curves 4 3 Ray Path For Total Internal Reflection 7 4 Ray Path Showing Angle Designations 8 5 Diagram Showing Range, Depth, and Apparent...Frequency Dependence 84 TABLES PAGE 1 Geoparameter Inputs 5 2 Inversion Parameter Inputs 6 3 Sound Speed Profile Parameters from Hamilton 80

  18. Disentangling input and output-related components of spatial neglect

    PubMed Central

    Loetscher, Tobias; Nicholls, Michael E. R.; Brodtmann, Amy; Thomas, Nicole A.; Brugger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Spatial neglect is a heterogeneous disorder with a multitude of manifestations and subtypes. Common clinical paper and pencil neglect tests fail to differentiate between these subtypes. For example, neglect patients typically bisect lines to the right. This bias can be caused by an underestimation of the left half of the line (input-related deficit), by the failure to direct actions toward the left side of space (output-related deficit), or by a mixture of these impairments. To disentangle these impairments, we used a test consisting of a line bisection task on a touch screen monitor (manual motor task) and the subsequent judgment of one's own bisection performance (visual perceptual task). It was hypothesized that patients with mainly output-related neglect should be better able to recognize their misbisected lines than patients with purely input-related neglect. In a group of 16 patients suffering from spatial neglect after right brain damage, we found that patients were three times more likely to suffer from a predominantly input-related than from an output-related subtype. The results thus suggest that neglect is typically an input-related impairment. Additional analysis of the line bisection task revealed that temporal (slowness in initiation and execution of contralateral movements) and spatial (insufficient movement amplitude toward the contralesional side) aspects of output-related neglect were mutually unrelated. This independence raises the possibility that a fine-grained differentiation of output-related neglect is required. That is, impairments in lateralized temporal and spatial aspects of movements may underlie different neglect subtypes. PMID:22707937

  19. Visual parameter optimisation for biomedical image processing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomedical image processing methods require users to optimise input parameters to ensure high-quality output. This presents two challenges. First, it is difficult to optimise multiple input parameters for multiple input images. Second, it is difficult to achieve an understanding of underlying algorithms, in particular, relationships between input and output. Results We present a visualisation method that transforms users' ability to understand algorithm behaviour by integrating input and output, and by supporting exploration of their relationships. We discuss its application to a colour deconvolution technique for stained histology images and show how it enabled a domain expert to identify suitable parameter values for the deconvolution of two types of images, and metrics to quantify deconvolution performance. It also enabled a breakthrough in understanding by invalidating an underlying assumption about the algorithm. Conclusions The visualisation method presented here provides analysis capability for multiple inputs and outputs in biomedical image processing that is not supported by previous analysis software. The analysis supported by our method is not feasible with conventional trial-and-error approaches. PMID:26329538

  20. Modal Parameter Identification of a Flexible Arm System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, Jason; Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Korbieh, Edward; Wade, Montanez; Tantaris, Richard

    1998-01-01

    In this paper an experiment is designed for the modal parameter identification of a flexible arm system. This experiment uses a function generator to provide input signal and an oscilloscope to save input and output response data. For each vibrational mode, many sets of sine-wave inputs with frequencies close to the natural frequency of the arm system are used to excite the vibration of this mode. Then a least-squares technique is used to analyze the experimental input/output data to obtain the identified parameters for this mode. The identified results are compared with the analytical model obtained by applying finite element analysis.

  1. Virtual input device with diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ching Chin; Chu, Chang Sheng

    2005-02-01

    As a portable device, such as PDA and cell phone, a small size build in virtual input device is more convenient for complex input demand. A few years ago, a creative idea called 'virtual keyboard' is announced, but up to now there's still no mass production method for this idea. In this paper we'll show the whole procedure of making a virtual keyboard. First of all is the HOE (Holographic Optical Element) design of keyboard image which yields a fan angle about 30 degrees, and then use the electron forming method to copy this pattern in high precision. And finally we can product this element by inject molding. With an adaptive lens design we can get a well correct keyboard image in distortion and a wilder fan angle about 70 degrees. With a batter alignment of HOE pattern lithography, we"re sure to get higher diffraction efficiency.

  2. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position, and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.

  3. Multimodal interfaces with voice and gesture input

    SciTech Connect

    Milota, A.D.; Blattner, M.M.

    1995-07-20

    The modalities of speech and gesture have different strengths and weaknesses, but combined they create synergy where each modality corrects the weaknesses of the other. We believe that a multimodal system such a one interwining speech and gesture must start from a different foundation than ones which are based solely on pen input. In order to provide a basis for the design of a speech and gesture system, we have examined the research in other disciplines such as anthropology and linguistics. The result of this investigation was a taxonomy that gave us material for the incorporation of gestures whose meanings are largely transparent to the users. This study describes the taxonomy and gives examples of applications to pen input systems.

  4. Neuroprosthetics and the science of patient input.

    PubMed

    Benz, Heather L; Civillico, Eugene F

    2017-01-01

    Safe and effective neuroprosthetic systems are of great interest to both DARPA and CDRH, due to their innovative nature and their potential to aid severely disabled populations. By expanding what is possible in human-device interaction, these devices introduce new potential benefits and risks. Therefore patient input, which is increasingly important in weighing benefits and risks, is particularly relevant for this class of devices. FDA has been a significant contributor to an ongoing stakeholder conversation about the inclusion of the patient voice, working collaboratively to create a new framework for a patient-centered approach to medical device development. This framework is evolving through open dialogue with researcher and patient communities, investment in the science of patient input, and policymaking that is responsive to patient-centered data throughout the total product life cycle. In this commentary, we will discuss recent developments in patient-centered benefit-risk assessment and their relevance to the development of neural prosthetic systems.

  5. NetMOD Version 2.0 Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Bion J.

    2015-08-01

    NetMOD ( Net work M onitoring for O ptimal D etection) is a Java-based software package for conducting simulation of seismic, hydroacoustic and infrasonic networks. Network simulations have long been used to study network resilience to station outages and to determine where additional stations are needed to reduce monitoring thresholds. NetMOD makes use of geophysical models to determine the source characteristics, signal attenuation along the path between the source and station, and the performance and noise properties of the station. These geophysical models are combined to simulate the relative amplitudes of signal and noise that are observed at each of the stations. From these signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), the probability of detection can be computed given a detection threshold. This document describes the parameters that are used to configure the NetMOD tool and the input and output parameters that make up the simulation definitions.

  6. Sensory synergy as environmental input integration

    PubMed Central

    Alnajjar, Fady; Itkonen, Matti; Berenz, Vincent; Tournier, Maxime; Nagai, Chikara; Shimoda, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a method to feed proper environmental inputs back to the central nervous system (CNS) remains one of the challenges in achieving natural movement when part of the body is replaced with an artificial device. Muscle synergies are widely accepted as a biologically plausible interpretation of the neural dynamics between the CNS and the muscular system. Yet the sensorineural dynamics of environmental feedback to the CNS has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we address this issue by exploring the concept of sensory synergy. In contrast to muscle synergy, we hypothesize that sensory synergy plays an essential role in integrating the overall environmental inputs to provide low-dimensional information to the CNS. We assume that sensor synergy and muscle synergy communicate using these low-dimensional signals. To examine our hypothesis, we conducted posture control experiments involving lateral disturbance with nine healthy participants. Proprioceptive information represented by the changes on muscle lengths were estimated by using the musculoskeletal model analysis software SIMM. Changes on muscles lengths were then used to compute sensory synergies. The experimental results indicate that the environmental inputs were translated into the two dimensional signals and used to move the upper limb to the desired position immediately after the lateral disturbance. Participants who showed high skill in posture control were found to be likely to have a strong correlation between sensory and muscle signaling as well as high coordination between the utilized sensory synergies. These results suggest the importance of integrating environmental inputs into suitable low-dimensional signals before providing them to the CNS. This mechanism should be essential when designing the prosthesis' sensory system to make the controller simpler. PMID:25628523

  7. Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingfan Zhang Qinghong

    2006-09-15

    In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

  8. Minimizing structural vibrations with Input Shaping (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhose, Bill; Singer, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A new method for commanding machines to move with increased dynamic performance was developed. This method is an enhanced version of input shaping, a patented vibration suppression algorithm. This technique intercepts a command input to a system command that moves the mechanical system with increased performance and reduced residual vibration. This document describes many advanced methods for generating highly optimized shaping sequences which are tuned to particular systems. The shaping sequence is important because it determines the trade off between move/settle time of the system and the insensitivity of the input shaping algorithm to variations or uncertainties in the machine which can be controlled. For example, a system with a 5 Hz resonance that takes 1 second to settle can be improved to settle instantaneously using a 0.2 shaping sequence (thus improving settle time by a factor of 5). This system could vary by plus or minus 15% in its natural frequency and still have no apparent vibration. However, the same system shaped with a 0.3 second shaping sequence could tolerate plus or minus 40% or more variation in natural frequency. This document describes how to generate sequences that maximize performance, sequences that maximize insensitivity, and sequences that trade off between the two. Several software tools are documented and included.

  9. Light inputs shape the Arabidopsis circadian system.

    PubMed

    Wenden, Bénédicte; Kozma-Bognár, László; Edwards, Kieron D; Hall, Anthony J W; Locke, James C W; Millar, Andrew J

    2011-05-01

    The circadian clock is a fundamental feature of eukaryotic gene regulation that is emerging as an exemplar genetic sub-network for systems biology. The circadian system in Arabidopsis plants is complex, in part due to its phototransduction pathways, which are themselves under circadian control. We therefore analysed two simpler experimental systems. Etiolated seedlings entrained by temperature cycles showed circadian rhythms in the expression of genes that are important for the clock mechanism, but only a restricted set of downstream target genes were rhythmic in microarray assays. Clock control of phototransduction pathways remained robust across a range of light inputs, despite the arrhythmic transcription of light-signalling genes. Circadian interactions with light signalling were then analysed using a single active photoreceptor. Phytochrome A (phyA) is expected to be the only active photoreceptor that can mediate far-red (FR) light input to the circadian clock. Surprisingly, rhythmic gene expression was profoundly altered under constant FR light, in a phyA-dependent manner, resulting in high expression of evening genes and low expression of morning genes. Dark intervals were required to allow high-amplitude rhythms across the transcriptome. Clock genes involved in this response were identified by mutant analysis, showing that the EARLY FLOWERING 4 gene is a likely target and mediator of the FR effects. Both experimental systems illustrate how profoundly the light input pathways affect the plant circadian clock, and provide strong experimental manipulations to understand critical steps in the plant clock mechanism.

  10. Dimensionless parameters for lidar performance characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, Adolfo; Agishev, Ravil R.

    2014-10-01

    A set of three dimensionless parameters is proposed to characterize lidar systems. Two of them are based on an asymptotic approximation of the output signal-to-noise ratio as a function of the input optical power reaching the photoreceiver when there is no background radiation. Of these, one is defined as the ratio between the input signal power level coming from a reference range in a reference atmosphere (reference power level) and the input power level that would produce a reference output signal-to-noise ratio if the photoreceiver operated always in signal-shot noise limited regime. The other is defined as the ratio between the reference power level and the input power level for which the signal-induced shot noise power equals the receiver noise power. A third parameter, defined as the ratio between the background optical power at the photoreceiver input and the reference power level, quantifies the effect of background radiation. With these three parameters a good approximation to the output signal-to-noise ratio of the lidar can be calculated as a function of the power reduction with respect to the power reaching the photodetector in the reference situation. These parameters can also be used to compare and rank the performance of different systems.

  11. Visualization of parameter space for image analysis.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, A Johannes; Bray, Mark-Anthony P; Carpenter, Anne E; Ruddle, Roy A

    2011-12-01

    Image analysis algorithms are often highly parameterized and much human input is needed to optimize parameter settings. This incurs a time cost of up to several days. We analyze and characterize the conventional parameter optimization process for image analysis and formulate user requirements. With this as input, we propose a change in paradigm by optimizing parameters based on parameter sampling and interactive visual exploration. To save time and reduce memory load, users are only involved in the first step--initialization of sampling--and the last step--visual analysis of output. This helps users to more thoroughly explore the parameter space and produce higher quality results. We describe a custom sampling plug-in we developed for CellProfiler--a popular biomedical image analysis framework. Our main focus is the development of an interactive visualization technique that enables users to analyze the relationships between sampled input parameters and corresponding output. We implemented this in a prototype called Paramorama. It provides users with a visual overview of parameters and their sampled values. User-defined areas of interest are presented in a structured way that includes image-based output and a novel layout algorithm. To find optimal parameter settings, users can tag high- and low-quality results to refine their search. We include two case studies to illustrate the utility of this approach.

  12. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  13. Identified Parameters, Parameters of Interest and Their Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Martin, Ernesto; Gonzalez, Jorge; Tuerlinckx, Francis

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this commentary is to provide some additional results to the interesting and provocative paper of Maris and Bechger ("On Interpreting the Model Parameters for the Three Parameter Logistic Model," this issue). In this article, the authors have three aims. First, the authors distinguish between three fundamental concepts that are…

  14. Enhanced Sensitivity to Rapid Input Fluctuations by Nonlinear Threshold Dynamics in Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Mensi, Skander; Hagens, Olivier; Gerstner, Wulfram; Pozzorini, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The way in which single neurons transform input into output spike trains has fundamental consequences for network coding. Theories and modeling studies based on standard Integrate-and-Fire models implicitly assume that, in response to increasingly strong inputs, neurons modify their coding strategy by progressively reducing their selective sensitivity to rapid input fluctuations. Combining mathematical modeling with in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that, in L5 pyramidal neurons, the firing threshold dynamics adaptively adjust the effective timescale of somatic integration in order to preserve sensitivity to rapid signals over a broad range of input statistics. For that, a new Generalized Integrate-and-Fire model featuring nonlinear firing threshold dynamics and conductance-based adaptation is introduced that outperforms state-of-the-art neuron models in predicting the spiking activity of neurons responding to a variety of in vivo-like fluctuating currents. Our model allows for efficient parameter extraction and can be analytically mapped to a Generalized Linear Model in which both the input filter--describing somatic integration--and the spike-history filter--accounting for spike-frequency adaptation--dynamically adapt to the input statistics, as experimentally observed. Overall, our results provide new insights on the computational role of different biophysical processes known to underlie adaptive coding in single neurons and support previous theoretical findings indicating that the nonlinear dynamics of the firing threshold due to Na+-channel inactivation regulate the sensitivity to rapid input fluctuations.

  15. Enhanced Sensitivity to Rapid Input Fluctuations by Nonlinear Threshold Dynamics in Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mensi, Skander; Hagens, Olivier; Gerstner, Wulfram; Pozzorini, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The way in which single neurons transform input into output spike trains has fundamental consequences for network coding. Theories and modeling studies based on standard Integrate-and-Fire models implicitly assume that, in response to increasingly strong inputs, neurons modify their coding strategy by progressively reducing their selective sensitivity to rapid input fluctuations. Combining mathematical modeling with in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that, in L5 pyramidal neurons, the firing threshold dynamics adaptively adjust the effective timescale of somatic integration in order to preserve sensitivity to rapid signals over a broad range of input statistics. For that, a new Generalized Integrate-and-Fire model featuring nonlinear firing threshold dynamics and conductance-based adaptation is introduced that outperforms state-of-the-art neuron models in predicting the spiking activity of neurons responding to a variety of in vivo-like fluctuating currents. Our model allows for efficient parameter extraction and can be analytically mapped to a Generalized Linear Model in which both the input filter—describing somatic integration—and the spike-history filter—accounting for spike-frequency adaptation—dynamically adapt to the input statistics, as experimentally observed. Overall, our results provide new insights on the computational role of different biophysical processes known to underlie adaptive coding in single neurons and support previous theoretical findings indicating that the nonlinear dynamics of the firing threshold due to Na+-channel inactivation regulate the sensitivity to rapid input fluctuations. PMID:26907675

  16. Inputs to combination-sensitive neurons of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, J J; Mittmann, D H; Grose, C D

    1999-07-12

    In the mustached bat, combination-sensitive neurons display integrative responses to combinations of acoustic elements in biosonar or social vocalizations. One type of combination-sensitive neuron responds to multiple harmonics of the frequency-modulated (FM) components in the sonar pulse and echo of the bat. These neurons, termed FM-FM neurons, are sensitive to the pulse-echo delay and may encode the distance of sonar targets. FM-FM neurons are common in high-frequency regions of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) and may be created there. If so, they must receive low-frequency inputs in addition to the expected high-frequency inputs. We placed single deposits of a tracer at FM-FM recording sites in the ICC and then analyzed retrograde labeling in the brainstem and midbrain. We were particularly interested in labeling patterns suggestive of low-frequency input to these FM-FM neurons. In most nuclei containing labeled cells, there was a single focus of labeling in regions thought to be responsive to high-frequency sounds. More complex labeling patterns were observed in three nuclei. In the anteroventral cochlear nucleus, labeling in the anterior and marginal cell divisions occurred in regions thought to respond to low-frequency sounds. This labeling comprised 6% of total brainstem labeled cells. Labeling in the intermediate nucleus of the lateral lemniscus and the magnocellular part of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus together comprised nearly 40% of all labeled cells. In both nuclei, multiple foci of labeling occurred. These different foci may represent groups of cells tuned to different frequency bands. Thus, one or more of these three nuclei may provide low-frequency input to high-frequency-sensitive cells in the ICC, creating FM-FM responses. We also examined whether ICC neurons responsive to lower frequencies project to high-frequency-sensitive ICC regions; only 0.15% of labeling originated from these lower frequency

  17. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  18. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  19. Nitrogen addition alters elemental stoichiometry within soil aggregates in a temperate steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jinfei; Wang, Ruzhen; Liu, Heyong; Feng, Xue; Xu, Zhuwen; Jiang, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Ongoing increases in anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs have largely affected soil carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in most terrestrial ecosystems. Numerous studies have concerned the effects of elevated N inputs on soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic N (DIN), available phosphorus (AP), exchangeable calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), and available iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn). However, few have emphasized the stoichiometric traits of these soil parameters, especially within different soil aggregate fractions. In a semiarid grassland of Inner Mongolia, we studied the effect of N addition on the ratios of DOC : DIN, DOC : AP, DIN : AP, exchangeable Ca : Mg, available Fe : Mn within three soil aggregate classes of large macroaggregates (> 2000 µm), small macroaggregates (250-2000 µm), and microaggregates (< 250 µm). Elevated N inputs significantly decreased the DOC : DIN ratio within three soil aggregates. The soil DOC : AP ratio significantly decreased along with increasing N gradients within large macroaggregates and microaggregates. Nitrogen significantly decreased the ratio of exchangeable Ca : Mg within soil macroaggregates. The ratio of available Fe : Mn decreased with N addition within three soil aggregate classes. Alteration of elemental stoichiometry within soil fractions that are characterized by different nutrient retention capacity will influence the chemical composition of soil microorganisms and plant quality.

  20. Research on input shaping algorithm for rapid positioning of ultra-precision dual-stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fazhi; Wang, Yan; Chen, Xinglin; He, Ping

    2015-08-01

    As a high-precision servo motion platform, the dual-stage lithographic system uses lots of long-stroke air-bearing linear motors to achieve rapid positioning. Residual vibration, resulting from direct drive, almost zero damping, parallel decoupling structure and high velocity, leads to too long settling time and is one of the key factors in slowing the speed of positioning. To suppress the residual vibration and realize the high positioning precision in shorter settling time, this paper designs feedforward controller with input shaping algorithm for the rotary motor. Traditional input shaper is sensitive to system models and it is very difficult to get the parameters. A parameter self-learning method based on PSO(Particle Swarm Optimization) is proposed in this paper. The simulation of the system is performed by MATLAB/Simulation. The experimental results indicate that the input shaping algorithm proposed in this paper brings about significant reduction in the positioning time of the dual-stage.

  1. Modelling cool star spectra with inadequate input physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Karin

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of cool star spectra has a century-long successful history, but the recent explosion in the quality and quantity of spectra has made it clear to us that the state-of-the-art analysis do not do justice to the information content of the data and cannot extract stellar parameters and element abundances to the accuracy that the broader context requires. To progress, the long-standing assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium in the line formation must be lifted, a development that is hindered by gaps in our knowledge of radiative and collisional transition rates. I will exemplify how stellar abundances are affected by missing input physics and discuss various calibration techniques that have been used to circumvent the problem.

  2. Load support system analysis high speed input pinion configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gassel, S. S.; Pirvics, J.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis and a series of computerized calculations were carried out to explore competing prototype design concepts of a shaft and two taper-roller bearings systems to support the high-speed input pinion of an advanced commercial helicopter transmission. The results were used to evaluate designs both for a straddle arrangement where the pinion gear is located between the bearings and for a cantilever arrangement where the pinion is outboard of the two bearings. Effects of varying parameters including applied gear load, preload, wall thickness, interference fits, bearing spacing and pinion gear location on system rigidity, load distribution and bearing rating life were assessed. A comparison of the bearing load distributions for these designs demonstrated that the straddle more equally distributes both radial and axial loads. The performance of these designs over a range of shaft rotational speeds, with lubrication and friction effects included, is also discussed.

  3. Influence of proprioceptive input on parkinsonian tremor.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Jörg; Fuss, Gerhard; Krick, Christoph; Schimrigk, Klaus; Dillmann, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a modification of parkinsonian tremor (PT) by proprioceptive input induced by passive joint movements. The authors investigated the impact of electrically evoked proprioceptive input on PT. In eight patients with PT they recorded surface EMG from the opponens pollicis muscle, and forearm extensors and flexors. Rhythmic electrical stimulation was applied to the ipsilateral median nerve at the wrist using a submaximal stimulus intensity and stimulus frequencies between two stimuli per second and five stimuli per second. The tremor frequency did not adapt to the stimulus frequency. Tremor frequency of parkinsonian resting tremor increased significantly in the directly stimulated opponens pollicis muscle (mean +/- standard deviation, 4.35 +/- 0.64 Hz without stimulation versus 4.53 +/- 0.68 Hz with stimulation; P < 0.05, paired t-test), the not directly stimulated forearm muscles (4.90 +/- 0.72 Hz versus 5.18 +/- 0.73 Hz, P < 0.001), and the upper arm muscles (5.13 +/- 0.61 Hz versus 5.36 +/- 0.68 Hz, P < 0.01). Furthermore, the parkinsonian postural tremor accelerated significantly during ipsilateral median nerve stimulation (5.31 +/- 0.99 Hz versus 5.44 +/- 1.03 Hz, P < 0.05). Parkinsonian resting tremor in the forearm muscles also accelerated significantly during ipsilateral ulnar nerve stimulation (4.85 +/- 0.57 Hz versus 5.05 +/- 0.65 Hz, P < 0.05). Contralateral median nerve stimulation had no significant effect. These results suggest a close interaction between proprioceptive input and PT generation.

  4. Impact of the hard-coded parameters on the hydrologic fluxes of the land surface model Noah-MP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Mai, Juliane; Samaniego, Luis; Clark, Martyn; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Attinger, Sabine; Thober, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Land surface models incorporate a large number of processes, described by physical, chemical and empirical equations. The process descriptions contain a number of parameters that can be soil or plant type dependent and are typically read from tabulated input files. Land surface models may have, however, process descriptions that contain fixed, hard-coded numbers in the computer code, which are not identified as model parameters. Here we searched for hard-coded parameters in the computer code of the land surface model Noah with multiple process options (Noah-MP) to assess the importance of the fixed values on restricting the model's agility during parameter estimation. We found 139 hard-coded values in all Noah-MP process options, which are mostly spatially constant values. This is in addition to the 71 standard parameters of Noah-MP, which mostly get distributed spatially by given vegetation and soil input maps. We performed a Sobol' global sensitivity analysis of Noah-MP to variations of the standard and hard-coded parameters for a specific set of process options. 42 standard parameters and 75 hard-coded parameters were active with the chosen process options. The sensitivities of the hydrologic output fluxes latent heat and total runoff as well as their component fluxes were evaluated. These sensitivities were evaluated at twelve catchments of the Eastern United States with very different hydro-meteorological regimes. Noah-MP's hydrologic output fluxes are sensitive to two thirds of its standard parameters. The most sensitive parameter is, however, a hard-coded value in the formulation of soil surface resistance for evaporation, which proved to be oversensitive in other land surface models as well. Surface runoff is sensitive to almost all hard-coded parameters of the snow processes and the meteorological inputs. These parameter sensitivities diminish in total runoff. Assessing these parameters in model calibration would require detailed snow observations or the

  5. Lattices of processes in graphs with inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhbazyan, K.V.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a continuation of others work, presenting a detailed analysis of finite lattices of processes in graphs with input nodes. Lattices of processes in such graphs are studied by representing the lattices in the form of an algebra of pairs. We define the algebra of pairs somewhat generalizing the definition. Let K and D be bounded distributive lattices. A sublattice {delta} {contained_in} K x D is called an algebra of pairs if for all K {element_of} K we have (K, 1{sub D}) {element_of} {delta} and for all d {element_of} D we have (O{sub K}).

  6. Input data to run Landis-II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeJager, Nathan R.

    2017-01-01

    The data are input data files to run the forest simulation model Landis-II for Isle Royale National Park. Files include: a) Initial_Comm, which includes the location of each mapcode, b) Cohort_ages, which includes the ages for each tree species-cohort within each mapcode, c) Ecoregions, which consist of different regions of soils and climate, d) Ecoregion_codes, which define the ecoregions, and e) Species_Params, which link the potential establishment and growth rates for each species with each ecoregion.

  7. Intelligent Graph Layout Using Many Users' Input.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoru; Che, Limei; Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for graph drawing utilizing layouts of many sub-graphs supplied by a large group of people in a crowd sourcing manner. We developed an algorithm based on Laplacian constrained distance embedding to merge subgraphs submitted by different users, while attempting to maintain the topological information of the individual input layouts. To facilitate collection of layouts from many people, a light-weight interactive system has been designed to enable convenient dynamic viewing, modification and traversing between layouts. Compared with other existing graph layout algorithms, our approach can achieve more aesthetic and meaningful layouts with high user preference.

  8. Modeling input spaace for testing scientific computational software: a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Vilkomir, Sergiy; Swain, W. Thomas; Poore, Jr., Jesse; Clarno, Kevin T

    2008-01-01

    An application of a method of test case generation for scientific computational software is presented. NEWTRNX, neutron transport software being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is treated as a case study. A model of dependencies between input parameters of NEWTRNX is created. Results of NEWTRNX model analysis and test case generation are evaluated.

  9. A Computer Simulation of an Adaptive Noise Canceler with a Single Input

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    parameter values needed to cause the canceler to attenuate the strong signal to a user specified level and pass the weak signal. This study was...10 dBm. (continued) 71 rn -: - , erm utut at the kth interation X k - PTF tap amplptu2u vector at the kth iteration. When the input interfering

  10. Assessment of input uncertainty by seasonally categorized latent variables using SWAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed processes have been explored with sophisticated simulation models for the past few decades. It has been stated that uncertainty attributed to alternative sources such as model parameters, forcing inputs, and measured data should be incorporated during the simulation process. Among varyin...

  11. A state parameter-based model for static recrystallization interacting with precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buken, Heinrich; Sherstnev, Pavel; Kozeschnik, Ernst

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we develop a state parameter-based model for the treatment of simultaneous precipitation and recrystallization based on a single-parameter representation of the total dislocation density and a multi-particle multi-component framework for precipitation kinetics. In contrast to conventional approaches, the interaction of particles with recrystallization is described with a non-zero grain boundary mobility even for the case where the Zener pressure exceeds the driving pressure for recrystallization. The model successfully reproduces the experimentally observed particle-induced recrystallization stasis and subsequent continuation in micro-alloyed steel with a single consistent set of input parameters. In addition, as a state parameter-based approach, our model naturally supports introspection into the physical mechanisms governing the competing recrystallization and recovery processes.

  12. Analytic Remote-Sensing Optical Algorithms Requiring Simple and Practical Field Parameter Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerslev, Niels Kristian

    2001-09-01

    Spectral in-water measurements of downward irradiance (Ed ), upward irradiance (Eu ), and nadir radiance (Lu ) are sufficient to calculate the scalar irradiances E0 , E0d , andE0u , the average cosines ,d , and u , the light absorption coefficient a , the backscattering coefficientbb , and the so-called f factor that relates to R , a , and bb . The solar elevation of 42 is a special case in whichd is independent of all variables except solar elevation. The algorithms are valid for solar elevations between 12 and 81 for horizontally stratified clear and turbid deep waters.

  13. Methods to Register Models and Input/Output Parameters for Integrated Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant resources can be required when constructing integrated modeling systems. In a typical application, components (e.g., models and databases) created by different developers are assimilated, requiring the framework’s functionality to bridge the gap between the user’s kno...

  14. Influence of Input Parameters on Dynamic Orbital Stability of Walking: In-Silico and Experimental Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Federico; Bisi, Maria Cristina; Stagni, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Many measures aiming to assess the stability of human motion have been proposed in the literature, but still there is no commonly accepted way to define or quantify locomotor stability. Among these measures, orbital stability analysis via Floquet multipliers is still under debate. Some of the controversies concerning the use of this technique could lie in the absence of a standard implementation. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of i) experimental measurement noise, ii) variables selected for the construction of the state space, and iii) number of analysed cycles on the outputs of orbital stability applied to walking. The analysis was performed on a 2-dimensional 5-link walking model and on a sample of 10 subjects performing long over-ground walks. Noise resulting from stereophotogrammetric and accelerometric measurement systems was simulated in the in-silico analysis. Maximum Floquet multipliers resulted to be affected by both number of analysed strides and state space composition. The effect of experimental noise was found to be slightly more potentially critical when analysing stereophotogrammetric data then when dealing with acceleration data. Experimental and model results were comparable in terms of overall trend, but a difference was found in the influence of the number of analysed cycles. PMID:24260498

  15. Responses of tree and insect herbivores to elevated nitrogen inputs: A meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Furong; Dudley, Tom L.; Chen, Baoming; Chang, Xiaoyu; Liang, Liyin; Peng, Shaolin

    2016-11-01

    Increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) inputs have the potential to alter terrestrial ecosystem function through impacts on plant-herbivore interactions. The goal of our study is to search for a general pattern in responses of tree characteristics important for herbivores and insect herbivorous performance to elevated N inputs. We conducted a meta-analysis based on 109 papers describing impacts of nitrogen inputs on tree characteristics and 16 papers on insect performance. The differences in plant characteristics and insect performance between broadleaves and conifers were also explored. Tree aboveground biomass, leaf biomass and leaf N concentration significantly increased under elevated N inputs. Elevated N inputs had no significantly overall effect on concentrations of phenolic compounds and lignin but adversely affected tannin, as defensive chemicals for insect herbivores. Additionally, the overall effect of insect herbivore performance (including development time, insect biomass, relative growth rate, and so on) was significantly increased by elevated N inputs. According to the inconsistent responses between broadleaves and conifers, broadleaves would be more likely to increase growth by light interception and photosynthesis rather than producing more defensive chemicals to elevated N inputs by comparison with conifers. Moreover, the overall carbohydrate concentration was significantly reduced by 13.12% in broadleaves while increased slightly in conifers. The overall tannin concentration decreased significantly by 39.21% in broadleaves but a 5.8% decrease in conifers was not significant. The results of the analysis indicated that elevated N inputs would provide more food sources and ameliorate tree palatability for insects, while the resistance of trees against their insect herbivores was weakened, especially for broadleaves. Thus, global forest insect pest problems would be aggravated by elevated N inputs. As N inputs continue to rise in the future, forest

  16. MERRA-2 Input Observations: Summary and Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); McCarty, Will; Coy, Lawrence; Gelaro, Ronald; Huang, Albert; Merkova, Dagmar; Smith, Edmond B.; Sienkiewicz, Meta; Wargan, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) is an atmospheric reanalysis, spanning 1980 through near-realtime, that uses state-of-the-art processing of observations from the continually evolving global observing system. The effectiveness of any reanalysis is a function not only of the input observations themselves, but also of how the observations are handled in the assimilation procedure. Relevant issues to consider include, but are not limited to, data selection, data preprocessing, quality control, bias correction procedures, and blacklisting. As the assimilation algorithm and earth system models are fundamentally fixed in a reanalysis, it is often a change in the character of the observations, and their feedbacks on the system, that cause changes in the character of the reanalysis. It is therefore important to provide documentation of the observing system so that its discontinuities and transitions can be readily linked to discontinuities seen in the gridded atmospheric fields of the reanalysis. With this in mind, this document provides an exhaustive list of the input observations, the context under which they are assimilated, and an initial assessment of selected core observations fundamental to the reanalysis.

  17. Processing in (linear) systems with stochastic input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutu, Catalin Silviu; Axinte, Tiberiu

    2016-12-01

    The paper is providing a different approach to real-world systems, such as micro and macro systems of our real life, where the man has little or no influence on the system, either not knowing the rules of the respective system or not knowing the input of the system, being thus mainly only spectator of the system's output. In such a system, the input of the system and the laws ruling the system could be only "guessed", based on intuition or previous knowledge of the analyzer of the respective system. But, as we will see in the paper, it exists also another, more theoretical and hence scientific way to approach the matter of the real-world systems, and this approach is mostly based on the theory related to Schrödinger's equation and the wave function associated with it and quantum mechanics as well. The main results of the paper are regarding the utilization of the Schrödinger's equation and related theory but also of the Quantum mechanics, in modeling real-life and real-world systems.

  18. Optimization of input-constrained systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, Suleyman; Spaanenburg, Lambert

    2009-05-01

    The computational demands of algorithms are rapidly growing. The naive implementation uses extended doubleprecision floating-point numbers and has therefore extreme difficulties in maintaining real-time performance. For fixedpoint numbers, the value representation pushes in two directions (value range and step size) to set the applicationdependent word size. In the general case, checking all combinations of all different values on all system inputs will easily become computationally infeasible. Checking corner cases only helps to reduce the combinatorial explosion, as still checking for accuracy and precision to limit word size remains a considerable effort. A range of evolutionary techniques have been tried where the sheer size of the problem withstands an extensive search. When the value range can be limited, the problem becomes tractable and a constructive approach becomes feasible. We propose an approach that is reminiscent of the Quine-Mc.Cluskey logic minimization procedure. Next to the conjunctive search as popular in Boolean minimization, we investigate the disjunctive approach that starts from a presumed minimal word size. To eliminate the occurrence of anomalies, this still has to be checked for larger word sizes. The procedure has initially been implemented using Java and Matlab. We have applied the above procedure to feed-forward and to cellular neural networks (CNN) as typical examples of input-constrained systems. In the case of hole-filling by means of a CNN, we find that the 1461 different coefficient sets can be reduced to 360, each giving robust behaviour on 7-bits internal words.

  19. Adaptive Input Reconstruction with Application to Model Refinement, State Estimation, and Adaptive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amato, Anthony M.

    Input reconstruction is the process of using the output of a system to estimate its input. In some cases, input reconstruction can be accomplished by determining the output of the inverse of a model of the system whose input is the output of the original system. Inversion, however, requires an exact and fully known analytical model, and is limited by instabilities arising from nonminimum-phase zeros. The main contribution of this work is a novel technique for input reconstruction that does not require model inversion. This technique is based on a retrospective cost, which requires a limited number of Markov parameters. Retrospective cost input reconstruction (RCIR) does not require knowledge of nonminimum-phase zero locations or an analytical model of the system. RCIR provides a technique that can be used for model refinement, state estimation, and adaptive control. In the model refinement application, data are used to refine or improve a model of a system. It is assumed that the difference between the model output and the data is due to an unmodeled subsystem whose interconnection with the modeled system is inaccessible, that is, the interconnection signals cannot be measured and thus standard system identification techniques cannot be used. Using input reconstruction, these inaccessible signals can be estimated, and the inaccessible subsystem can be fitted. We demonstrate input reconstruction in a model refinement framework by identifying unknown physics in a space weather model and by estimating an unknown film growth in a lithium ion battery. The same technique can be used to obtain estimates of states that cannot be directly measured. Adaptive control can be formulated as a model-refinement problem, where the unknown subsystem is the idealized controller that minimizes a measured performance variable. Minimal modeling input reconstruction for adaptive control is useful for applications where modeling information may be difficult to obtain. We demonstrate

  20. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed.

  1. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  2. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE PAGES

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  3. Extreme inputs/outputs for multiple input multiple output linear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, David Ora

    2005-09-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the auto spectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the auto spectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input auto spectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one will result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.

  4. Shale JP-4 Additive Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    8217. •% . , ’ ,,,r ,% . -- - ,.-. ’ ’ 4,w% %’. " - ,’ . . . * ’, .* . TABLE OF CONTENTS .4q ,4 . * SECTION PAGE I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. TEST PARAMETERS 2 1...42 PRECEDING PAGE BLANK TABLE OF CONTENTS (CON’T) SECT ION PAGE V. CONCLUSIONS 44 REFERENCES 46 APPENDIX A Drum to Test Sample Relationship 47 APPENDIX...B.O.C.L.E. Results 40 vii LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 Antioxidants 3 2 Raw Shale/Petroleum Fuel Properties 10 3 Drum Sample Additive Content 13 4

  5. Dual-input two-compartment pharmacokinetic model of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Li; Yang, Li-Ming; Zhang, Min-Ming; Wang, Bo-Yin; Wang, Ting; Lu, Bao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of a dual-input two-compartment tracer kinetic model for evaluating tumorous microvascular properties in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: From January 2014 to April 2015, we prospectively measured and analyzed pharmacokinetic parameters [transfer constant (Ktrans), plasma flow (Fp), permeability surface area product (PS), efflux rate constant (kep), extravascular extracellular space volume ratio (ve), blood plasma volume ratio (vp), and hepatic perfusion index (HPI)] using dual-input two-compartment tracer kinetic models [a dual-input extended Tofts model and a dual-input 2-compartment exchange model (2CXM)] in 28 consecutive HCC patients. A well-known consensus that HCC is a hypervascular tumor supplied by the hepatic artery and the portal vein was used as a reference standard. A paired Student’s t-test and a nonparametric paired Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare the equivalent pharmacokinetic parameters derived from the two models, and Pearson correlation analysis was also applied to observe the correlations among all equivalent parameters. The tumor size and pharmacokinetic parameters were tested by Pearson correlation analysis, while correlations among stage, tumor size and all pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed by Spearman correlation analysis. RESULTS: The Fp value was greater than the PS value (FP = 1.07 mL/mL per minute, PS = 0.19 mL/mL per minute) in the dual-input 2CXM; HPI was 0.66 and 0.63 in the dual-input extended Tofts model and the dual-input 2CXM, respectively. There were no significant differences in the kep, vp, or HPI between the dual-input extended Tofts model and the dual-input 2CXM (P = 0.524, 0.569, and 0.622, respectively). All equivalent pharmacokinetic parameters, except for ve, were correlated in the two dual-input two-compartment pharmacokinetic models; both Fp and PS in the dual-input 2CXM were correlated with Ktrans derived from the dual-input extended Tofts model

  6. Surrogate models for identifying robust, high yield regions of parameter space for ICF implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbird, Kelli; Peterson, J. Luc; Brandon, Scott; Field, John; Nora, Ryan; Spears, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation supercomputer architecture and in-transit data analysis have been used to create a large collection of 2-D ICF capsule implosion simulations. The database includes metrics for approximately 60,000 implosions, with x-ray images and detailed physics parameters available for over 20,000 simulations. To map and explore this large database, surrogate models for numerous quantities of interest are built using supervised machine learning algorithms. Response surfaces constructed using the predictive capabilities of the surrogates allow for continuous exploration of parameter space without requiring additional simulations. High performing regions of the input space are identified to guide the design of future experiments. In particular, a model for the yield built using a random forest regression algorithm has a cross validation score of 94.3% and is consistently conservative for high yield predictions. The model is used to search for robust volumes of parameter space where high yields are expected, even given variations in other input parameters. Surrogates for additional quantities of interest relevant to ignition are used to further characterize the high yield regions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-697277.

  7. Using pattern recognition to infer parameters governing mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Suzanne; Valentine, Andrew P.; Tackley, Paul J.; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-08-01

    The results of mantle convection simulations are fully determined by the input parameters and boundary conditions used. These input parameters can be for initialisation, such as initial mantle temperature, or can be constant values, such as viscosity exponents. However, knowledge of Earth-like values for many input parameters are very poorly constrained, introducing large uncertainties into the simulation of mantle flow. Convection is highly non-linear, therefore linearised inversion methods cannot be used to recover past configurations over more than very short periods of time, which makes finding both initial and constant simulation input parameters very difficult. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method for making inferences about simulation input parameters from observations of the mantle temperature field after billions of years of convection. The method is fully probabilistic. We use prior sampling to construct probability density functions for convection simulation input parameters, which are represented using neural networks. Assuming smoothness, we need relatively few samples to make inferences, making this approach much more computationally tractable than other probabilistic inversion methods. As a proof of concept, we show that our method can invert the amplitude spectra of temperature fields from 2D convection simulations, to constrain yield stress, surface reference viscosity and the initial thickness of primordial material at the CMB, for our synthetic test cases. The best constrained parameter is yield stress. The reference viscosity and initial thickness of primordial material can also be inferred reasonably well after several billion years of convection.

  8. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input

    PubMed Central

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha-1 yr-1) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha-1 yr-1, and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold. PMID:26731691

  9. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold.

  10. Design of the spoke cavity ED&D input coupler.

    SciTech Connect

    Schmierer, E. N.; Chan, K. D.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Haynes, W. B.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Montoya, D. I.; Roybal, P. L.; Schrage, D. L.; Tajima, T.

    2001-01-01

    The current design of the Accelerator Driven Test Facility (ADTF) accelerator contains multiple {beta}, superconducting, resonant cavities. Spoke-type resonators ({beta} = 0.175 and {beta} = 0.34) are proposed for the low energy linac immediately following the radio frequency quadrupole. A continuous wave power requirement of 8.5 - 211.8 kW, 350 MHz has been established for the input couplers of these spoke cavities. The coupler design approach was to have a single input coupler design for beam currents of 13.3 mA and 100 mA and both cavity {beta}'s. The baseline design consists of a half-height WR2300 waveguide section merged with a shorted coaxial conductor. At the transition is a 4.8-mm thick cylindrical ceramic window creating the air/vacuum barrier. The coax is 103-mm inner diameter, 75 Ohm. The coax extends from the short through the waveguide and terminates with an antenna tip in the sidewall of the cavity. A full diameter pumping port is located in the quarter-wave stub to facilitate good vacuum. The coaxial geometry chosen was based on multipacting and thermal design considerations. The coupling coefficient is adjusted by statically adjusting the outer conductor length. The RF-physics, thermal, vacuum, and structural design considerations will be discussed in this paper, in addition to future room temperature testing plans.

  11. Residential oil burners with low input and two stages firing

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.; Krajewski, R.; Leigh, R.

    1997-12-31

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized, retention head burner. At low firing rates pressure atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low pressure air-atomized burner has been developed watch can operate at fining rates as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low fining rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space heating loads.

  12. Re-evaluating the Malawian Farm Input Subsidy Programme.

    PubMed

    Messina, Joseph P; Peter, Brad G; Snapp, Sieglinde S

    2017-03-06

    The Malawian Farm Input Subsidy Programme (FISP) has received praise as a proactive policy that has transformed the nation's food security, yet irreconcilable differences exist between maize production estimates distributed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Malawi Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security (MoAFS) and the National Statistical Office (NSO) of Malawi. These differences illuminate yield-reporting deficiencies and the value that alternative, politically unbiased yield estimates could play in understanding policy impacts. We use net photosynthesis (PsnNet) as an objective source of evidence to evaluate production history and production potential under a fertilizer input scenario. Even with the most generous harvest index (HI) and area manipulation to match a reported error, we are unable to replicate post-FISP production gains. In addition, we show that the spatial delivery of FISP may have contributed to popular perception of widespread maize improvement. These triangulated lines of evidence suggest that FISP may not have been the success it was thought to be. Lastly, we assert that fertilizer subsidies may not be sufficient or sustainable strategies for production gains in Malawi.

  13. Auto Draw from Excel Input Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Goullioud, Renaud; Cox, Brian; Grimes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The design process often involves the use of Excel files during project development. To facilitate communications of the information in the Excel files, drawings are often generated. During the design process, the Excel files are updated often to reflect new input. The problem is that the drawings often lag the updates, often leading to confusion of the current state of the design. The use of this program allows visualization of complex data in a format that is more easily understandable than pages of numbers. Because the graphical output can be updated automatically, the manual labor of diagram drawing can be eliminated. The more frequent update of system diagrams can reduce confusion and reduce errors and is likely to uncover symmetric problems earlier in the design cycle, thus reducing rework and redesign.

  14. Dual motion valve with single motion input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A dual motion valve includes two dual motion valve assemblies with a rotary input which allows the benefits of applying both rotary and axial motion to a rotary sealing element with a plurality of ports. The motion of the rotary sealing element during actuation provides axial engagement of the rotary sealing element with a stationary valve plate which also has ports. Fluid passages are created through the valve when the ports of the rotary sealing element are aligned with the ports of the stationary valve plate. Alignment is achieved through rotation of the rotary sealing element with respect to the stationary valve plate. The fluid passages provide direct paths which minimize fluid turbulence created in the fluid as it passes through the valve.

  15. Input and output constraints affecting irrigation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, G.

    1981-05-01

    In many of the developing countries the expansion of irrigated agriculture is used as a major development tool for bringing about increases in agricultural output, rural economic growth and income distribution. Apart from constraints imposed by water availability, the major limitations considered to any acceleration of such programs are usually thought to be those of costs and financial resources. However, as is shown on the basis of empirical data drawn from Mexico, in reality the feasibility and effectiveness of such development programs is even more constrained by the lack of specialized physical and human factors on the input and market limitations on the output side. On the input side, the limited availability of complementary factors such as, for example, truly functioning credit systems for small-scale farmers or effective agricultural extension services impose long-term constraints on development. On the output side the limited availability, high risk, and relatively slow growth of markets for high-value crops sharply reduce the usually hoped-for and projected profitable crop mix that would warrant the frequently high costs of irrigation investments. Three conclusions are drawn: (1) Factors in limited supply have to be shadow-priced to reflect their high opportunity costs in alternative uses. (2) Re-allocation of financial resources from immediate construction of projects to longer-term increase in the supply of scarce, highly-trained manpower resources are necessary in order to optimize development over time. (3) Inclusion of high-value, high-income producing crops in the benefit-cost analysis of new projects is inappropriate if these crops could potentially be grown in already existing projects.

  16. Reactor performance of a 750 m(3) anaerobic digestion plant: varied substrate input conditions impacting methanogenic community.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andreas Otto; Malin, Cornelia; Lins, Philipp; Gstraunthaler, Gudrun; Illmer, Paul

    2014-10-01

    A 750 m(3) anaerobic digester was studied over a half year period including a shift from good reactor performance to a reduced one. Various abiotic parameters like volatile fatty acids (VFA) (formic-, acetic-, propionic-, (iso-)butyric-, (iso-)valeric-, lactic acid), total C, total N, NH4 -N, and total proteins, as well as the organic matter content and dry mass were determined. In addition several process parameters such as temperature, pH, retention time and input of substrate and the concentrations of CH4, H2, CO2 and H2S within the reactor were monitored continuously. The present study aimed at the investigation of the abundance of acetogens and total cell numbers and the microbial methanogenic community as derived from PCR-dHPLC analysis in order to put it into context with the determined abiotic parameters. An influence of substrate quantity on the efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process was found as well as a shift from a hydrogenotrophic in times of good reactor performance towards an acetoclastic dominated methanogenic community in times of reduced reactor performance. After the change in substrate conditions it took the methano-archaeal community about 5-6 weeks to be affected but then changes occurred quickly.

  17. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  18. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  19. User's manual for master: Modeling of aerodynamic surfaces by 3-dimensional explicit representation. [input to three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    A system of computer programs was developed to model general three dimensional surfaces. Surfaces are modeled as sets of parametric bicubic patches. There are also capabilities to transform coordinates, to compute mesh/surface intersection normals, and to format input data for a transonic potential flow analysis. A graphical display of surface models and intersection normals is available. There are additional capabilities to regulate point spacing on input curves and to compute surface/surface intersection curves. Input and output data formats are described; detailed suggestions are given for user input. Instructions for execution are given, and examples are shown.

  20. Selection of LCTV operating curves for input and filter. [Liquid Crystal TeleVision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.; Lacroix, Jennifer L.; Rajan, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    A liquid crystal television (LCTV) SLM's phase, amplitude, and polarization all influence our selection of operating curves for input and filter. With its continuum of drive voltage, the LCTV permits grey-level control in both locations. Selection of an optimum curve depends on expected variations in signal amplitude, presence of input scene structured noise, and other factors. Using modulators obtained from a commercially available projection LCTV, and with no specifically added input noise present, we have obtained laboratory results in which the ratio of peak intensity to correlator system noise exceeded 100:1. Unfortunately, it was massively inefficient to implement the algorithm which had been developed as the abstract for this paper was submitted. Fortunately, we have quite recently developed two insights that will speed it by several orders of magnitude, and we shall report that result in the future. We will also extend the work to include clutter objects and additive input scene noise.

  1. Evaluating the uncertainty of input quantities in measurement models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possolo, Antonio; Elster, Clemens

    2014-06-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) gives guidance about how values and uncertainties should be assigned to the input quantities that appear in measurement models. This contribution offers a concrete proposal for how that guidance may be updated in light of the advances in the evaluation and expression of measurement uncertainty that were made in the course of the twenty years that have elapsed since the publication of the GUM, and also considering situations that the GUM does not yet contemplate. Our motivation is the ongoing conversation about a new edition of the GUM. While generally we favour a Bayesian approach to uncertainty evaluation, we also recognize the value that other approaches may bring to the problems considered here, and focus on methods for uncertainty evaluation and propagation that are widely applicable, including to cases that the GUM has not yet addressed. In addition to Bayesian methods, we discuss maximum-likelihood estimation, robust statistical methods, and measurement models where values of nominal properties play the same role that input quantities play in traditional models. We illustrate these general-purpose techniques in concrete examples, employing data sets that are realistic but that also are of conveniently small sizes. The supplementary material available online lists the R computer code that we have used to produce these examples (stacks.iop.org/Met/51/3/339/mmedia). Although we strive to stay close to clause 4 of the GUM, which addresses the evaluation of uncertainty for input quantities, we depart from it as we review the classes of measurement models that we believe are generally useful in contemporary measurement science. We also considerably expand and update the treatment that the GUM gives to Type B evaluations of uncertainty: reviewing the state-of-the-art, disciplined approach to the elicitation of expert knowledge, and its encapsulation in probability distributions that are usable in

  2. Bayesian robot system identification with input and output noise.

    PubMed

    Ting, Jo-Anne; D'Souza, Aaron; Schaal, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    For complex robots such as humanoids, model-based control is highly beneficial for accurate tracking while keeping negative feedback gains low for compliance. However, in such multi degree-of-freedom lightweight systems, conventional identification of rigid body dynamics models using CAD data and actuator models is inaccurate due to unknown nonlinear robot dynamic effects. An alternative method is data-driven parameter estimation, but significant noise in measured and inferred variables affects it adversely. Moreover, standard estimation procedures may give physically inconsistent results due to unmodeled nonlinearities or insufficiently rich data. This paper addresses these problems, proposing a Bayesian system identification technique for linear or piecewise linear systems. Inspired by Factor Analysis regression, we develop a computationally efficient variational Bayesian regression algorithm that is robust to ill-conditioned data, automatically detects relevant features, and identifies input and output noise. We evaluate our approach on rigid body parameter estimation for various robotic systems, achieving an error of up to three times lower than other state-of-the-art machine learning methods.

  3. Linear system identification - The application of Lion's identification scheme to a third order system with noisy input-output measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. M., Jr.; Monopoli, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    A linear system identification technique developed by Lion is adapted for use on a third-order system with six unknown parameters and noisy input-output measurements. A digital computer is employed so that rapid identification takes place with only two state variable filters. Bias in the parameter estimates is partially eliminated by a signal-to-noise ratio testing procedure.

  4. Reconstruction of an input function from a dynamic PET water image using multiple tissue curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Yukito; Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is important for the understanding of normal and pathologic brain physiology. When CBF is assessed using PET with {{\\text{H}}2} 15O or C15O2, its calculation requires an arterial input function, which generally requires invasive arterial blood sampling. The aim of the present study was to develop a new technique to reconstruct an image derived input function (IDIF) from a dynamic {{\\text{H}}2} 15O PET image as a completely non-invasive approach. Our technique consisted of using a formula to express the input using tissue curve with rate constant parameter. For multiple tissue curves extracted from the dynamic image, the rate constants were estimated so as to minimize the sum of the differences of the reproduced inputs expressed by the extracted tissue curves. The estimated rates were used to express the inputs and the mean of the estimated inputs was used as an IDIF. The method was tested in human subjects (n  =  29) and was compared to the blood sampling method. Simulation studies were performed to examine the magnitude of potential biases in CBF and to optimize the number of multiple tissue curves used for the input reconstruction. In the PET study, the estimated IDIFs were well reproduced against the measured ones. The difference between the calculated CBF values obtained using the two methods was small as around  <8% and the calculated CBF values showed a tight correlation (r  =  0.97). The simulation showed that errors associated with the assumed parameters were  <10%, and that the optimal number of tissue curves to be used was around 500. Our results demonstrate that IDIF can be reconstructed directly from tissue curves obtained through {{\\text{H}}2} 15O PET imaging. This suggests the possibility of using a completely non-invasive technique to assess CBF in patho-physiological studies.

  5. Input-output mapping reconstruction of spike trains at dorsal horn evoked by manual acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xile; Shi, Dingtian; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Lu, Meili; Han, Chunxiao; Wang, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a generalized linear model (GLM) is used to reconstruct mapping from acupuncture stimulation to spike trains driven by action potential data. The electrical signals are recorded in spinal dorsal horn after manual acupuncture (MA) manipulations with different frequencies being taken at the “Zusanli” point of experiment rats. Maximum-likelihood method is adopted to estimate the parameters of GLM and the quantified value of assumed model input. Through validating the accuracy of firings generated from the established GLM, it is found that the input-output mapping of spike trains evoked by acupuncture can be successfully reconstructed for different frequencies. Furthermore, via comparing the performance of several GLMs based on distinct inputs, it suggests that input with the form of half-sine with noise can well describe the generator potential induced by acupuncture mechanical action. Particularly, the comparison of reproducing the experiment spikes for five selected inputs is in accordance with the phenomenon found in Hudgkin-Huxley (H-H) model simulation, which indicates the mapping from half-sine with noise input to experiment spikes meets the real encoding scheme to some extent. These studies provide us a new insight into coding processes and information transfer of acupuncture.

  6. Higher-order correlations in common input shapes the output spiking activity of a neural population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montangie, Lisandro; Montani, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Recent neurophysiological experiments suggest that populations of neurons use a computational scheme in which spike timing is regulated by common non-Gaussian inputs across neurons. The presence of beyond-pairwise correlations in the neuronal inputs and the spiking outputs following a non-Gaussian statistics elicits the need of developing a new theoretical framework taking into account the complexity of synchronous activity patterns. To this end, we quantify the amount of higher-order correlations in the common neuronal inputs and outputs of a population of neurons. We provide a novel formalism, of easy numerical implementation, that can capture the subtle changes of the inputs heterogeneities. Within our approach, correlations across neurons arise from q-Gaussian inputs into threshold neurons and higher-order correlations in the spiking outputs activity are quantified by the parameter q. We present an exhaustive analysis of how input statistics are transformed in this threshold process into output statistics, and we show under which conditions higher-order correlations can lead to either bigger or smaller number of synchronized spikes in the neural population outputs.

  7. GEODYN- ORBITAL AND GEODETIC PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B.

    1994-01-01

    The Orbital and Geodetic Parameter Estimation program, GEODYN, possesses the capability to estimate that set of orbital elements, station positions, measurement biases, and a set of force model parameters such that the orbital tracking data from multiple arcs of multiple satellites best fits the entire set of estimation parameters. The estimation problem can be divided into two parts: the orbit prediction problem, and the parameter estimation problem. GEODYN solves these two problems by employing Cowell's method for integrating the orbit and a Bayesian least squares statistical estimation procedure for parameter estimation. GEODYN has found a wide range of applications including determination of definitive orbits, tracking instrumentation calibration, satellite operational predictions, and geodetic parameter estimation, such as the estimations for global networks of tracking stations. The orbit prediction problem may be briefly described as calculating for some later epoch the new conditions of state for the satellite, given a set of initial conditions of state for some epoch, and the disturbing forces affecting the motion of the satellite. The user is required to supply only the initial conditions of state and GEODYN will provide the forcing function and integrate the equations of motion of the satellite. Additionally, GEODYN performs time and coordinate transformations to insure the continuity of operations. Cowell's method of numerical integration is used to solve the satellite equations of motion and the variational partials for force model parameters which are to be adjusted. This method uses predictor-corrector formulas for the equations of motion and corrector formulas only for the variational partials. The parameter estimation problem is divided into three separate parts: 1) instrument measurement modeling and partial derivative computation, 2) data error correction, and 3) statistical estimation of the parameters. Since all of the measurements modeled by

  8. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  9. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  10. Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrielmann, S.

    The tomographic method Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping is a tool to reconstruct spatial distributions of physical parameters (like temperatures and surface densities) in accretion discs of cataclysmic variables. After summarizing the method, we apply it to multi-colour eclipse light curves of various dwarf novae and nova-likes like VZ Scl, IP Peg in outburst, UU Aqr, V2051 Oph and HT Cas in order to derive the temperatures (and surface densities) in the disc, the white dwarf temperature, the disc size, the effective temperatures and the viscosities. The results allows us to establish or refine a physical model for the accretion disc. Our maps of HT Cas and V 2051Oph, for example, indicate that the (quiescent) disc must be structured into a cool, optically thick inner disc sandwiched by hot, optically thin chromospheres. In addition, the disc of HT Cas must be patchy with a covering factor of about 40% caused by magnetic activity in the disc.

  11. Groundwater-derived nutrient inputs to the Upper Gulf of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, William C.; Wattayakorn, Gullaya; Taniguchi, Makoto; Dulaiova, Henrieta; Sojisuporn, Pramot; Rungsupa, Sompop; Ishitobi, Tomotoshi

    2007-01-01

    We report here the first direct measurements of nutrient fluxes via groundwater discharge into the Upper Gulf of Thailand. Nutrient and standard oceanographic surveys were conducted during the wet and dry seasons along the Chao Phraya River, Estuary and out into the Upper Gulf of Thailand. Additional measurements in selected near-shore regions of the Gulf included manual and automatic seepage meter deployments, as well as nutrient evaluations of seepage and coastal waters. The river transects characterized the distribution of biogeochemical parameters in this highly contaminated urban environment. Seepage flux measurements together with nutrient analyses of seepage fluids were used to estimate nutrient fluxes via groundwater pathways for comparison to riverine fluxes. Our findings show that disseminated seepage of nutrient-rich mostly saline groundwater into the Upper Gulf of Thailand is significant. Estimated fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) supplied via groundwater discharge were 40-50% of that delivered by the Chao Phraya River, inorganic phosphate was 60-70%, and silica was 15-40%. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and phosphorus (DOP) groundwater fluxes were also high at 30-40% and 30-130% of the river inputs, respectively. These observations are especially impressive since the comparison is being made to the river that is the largest source of fresh water into the Gulf of Thailand and flows directly through the megacity of Bangkok with high nutrient loadings from industrial and domestic sources.

  12. Exploring Input Processing in the Classroom: An Experimental Comparison of Processing Instruction and Enriched Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Emma

    2006-01-01

    The research reported here tests the claim made in the Input Processing approach to second language (L2) acquisition that interpreting the meaning of language form is essential for learning. This claim has been put forward as an underlying part of the pedagogical package known as Processing Instruction (PI) (VanPatten, 1996, 2002a, 2004). Two…

  13. How Much Input Is Enough? Correlating Comprehension and Child Language Input in an Endangered Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meakins, Felicity; Wigglesworth, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    In situations of language endangerment, the ability to understand a language tends to persevere longer than the ability to speak it. As a result, the possibility of language revival remains high even when few speakers remain. Nonetheless, this potential requires that those with high levels of comprehension received sufficient input as children for…

  14. Input Quality Matters: Some Comments on Input Type and Age-Effects in Adult SLA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Guijarro-Fuentes, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    In accord with the general program of researching factors relating to ultimate attainment and maturational constraints in adult language acquisition, this commentary highlights the importance of input differences in amount, type, and setting between naturalistic and classroom learners of an L2. It is suggested that these variables are often…

  15. Characterisation of vibration input to flywheel used on urban bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Kanarachos, S.; Christensen, J.

    2016-09-01

    Vibration induced from road surface has an impact on the durability and reliability of electrical and mechanical components attached on the vehicle. There is little research published relevant to the durability assessment of a flywheel energy recovery system installed on city and district buses. Relevant international standards and legislations were reviewed and large discrepancy was found among them, in addition, there are no standards exclusively developed for kinetic energy recovery systems on vehicles. This paper describes the experimentation of assessment of road surface vibration input to the flywheel on a bus as obtained at the MIRA Proving Ground. Power density spectra have been developed based on the raw data obtained during the experimentation. Validation of this model will be carried out using accelerated life time tests that will be carried out on a shaker rig using an accumulated profile based on the theory of fatigue damage equivalence in time and frequency domain aligned with the model predictions.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide production during decomposition of landfill inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Fairweather, R.J.; Barlaz, M.A.

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of a number of landfill inputs on hydrogen sulfide production and on competition between methane production and sulfate reduction during refuse decomposition. Tests were conducted in four-liter reactors that contained residential municipal waste; decomposed refuse as a seed; and various mixtures of anaerobically digested polymer-treated sludge, anaerobically digested lime-stabilized sludge, and wallboard (calcium sulfate) simulating construction and demolition waste. Tests demonstrated that wallboard was the major cause of hydrogen sulfide production and that methanogenesis and sulfate reduction occur concurrently during refuse decomposition. Additionally, both polymer- and lime-treated sludge enhanced refuse decomposition. Despite the presence of excess sulfate, 2.9 to 7.0 times more organic carbon was biodegraded through methanogenesis than through sulfate reduction.

  17. Surface-active ionic liquids in micellar catalysis: impact of anion selection on reaction rates in nucleophilic substitutions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Formulae for calculating aggregation parameters and fitting of kinetic constants and copies of NMR spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cp00493h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Cognigni, Alice; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Peterlik, Herwig; Prochazka, Katharina; Schröder, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A series of surface-active ionic liquids based on the 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium cation and different anions such as halides and alkylsulfates was synthesized. The aggregation behavior of these ionic liquids in water was characterized by surface tension, conductivity measurements and UV-Vis spectroscopy in order to determine the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and to provide aggregation parameters. The determination of surface activity and aggregation properties of amphiphilic ionic liquids was accompanied by SAXS studies on selected surface-active ionic liquids. The application of these surface-active ionic liquids with different anions was tested in nucleophilic substitution reactions for the degradation of organophosphorus compounds. Kinetic studies via UV-Vis spectrophotometry showed a strong acceleration of the reaction in the micellar system compared to pure water. In addition, an influence of the anion was observed, resulting in a correlation between the anion binding to the micelle and the reaction rate constants, indicating that the careful choice of the surface-active ionic liquid can considerably affect the outcome of reactions. PMID:27121134

  18. Toward an inventory of nitrogen input to the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate accounting of nitrogen inputs is increasingly necessary for policy decisions related to aquatic nutrient pollution. Here we synthesize available data to provide the first integrated estimates of the amount and uncertainty of nitrogen inputs to the United States. Abou...

  19. Importance and sensitivity of parameters affecting the Zion Seismic Risk

    SciTech Connect

    George, L.L.; O'Connell, W.J.

    1985-06-01

    This report presents the results of a study on the importance and sensitivity of structures, systems, equipment, components and design parameters used in the Zion Seismic Risk Calculations. This study is part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) supported by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objective of this study is to provide the NRC with results on the importance and sensitivity of parameters used to evaluate seismic risk. These results can assist the NRC in making decisions dealing with the allocation of research resources on seismic issues. This study uses marginal analysis in addition to importance and sensitivity analysis to identify subject areas (input parameter areas) for improvements that reduce risk, estimate how much the improvement dfforts reduce risk, and rank the subject areas for improvements. Importance analysis identifies the systems, components, and parameters that are important to risk. Sensitivity analysis estimates the change in risk per unit improvement. Marginal analysis indicates the reduction in risk or uncertainty for improvement effort made in each subject area. The results described in this study were generated using the SEISIM (Systematic Evaluation of Important Safety Improvement Measures) and CHAIN computer codes. Part 1 of the SEISIM computer code generated the failure probabilities and risk values. Part 2 of SEISIM, along with the CHAIN computer code, generated the importance and sensitivity measures.

  20. Group Sparse Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junming; Chen, Xi; Xing, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of sparse variable selection in nonparametric additive models, with the prior knowledge of the structure among the covariates to encourage those variables within a group to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group sparsity in the parametric setting (e.g., group lasso), or address the problem in the nonparametric setting without exploiting the structural information (e.g., sparse additive models). In this paper, we present a new method, called group sparse additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group sparsity in additive models. We generalize the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm to Hilbert spaces as the sparsity-inducing penalty in GroupSpAM. Moreover, we derive a novel thresholding condition for identifying the functional sparsity at the group level, and propose an efficient block coordinate descent algorithm for constructing the estimate. We demonstrate by simulation that GroupSpAM substantially outperforms the competing methods in terms of support recovery and prediction accuracy in additive models, and also conduct a comparative experiment on a real breast cancer dataset.

  1. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  2. Consistent responses of soil microbial communities to elevated nutrient inputs in grasslands across the globe

    PubMed Central

    Leff, Jonathan W.; Jones, Stuart E.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Barberán, Albert; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Firn, Jennifer L.; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Knops, Johannes M. H.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; La Pierre, Kimberly; Risch, Anita C.; Seabloom, Eric W.; Schütz, Martin; Steenbock, Christopher; Stevens, Carly J.; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Soil microorganisms are critical to ecosystem functioning and the maintenance of soil fertility. However, despite global increases in the inputs of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to ecosystems due to human activities, we lack a predictive understanding of how microbial communities respond to elevated nutrient inputs across environmental gradients. Here we used high-throughput sequencing of marker genes to elucidate the responses of soil fungal, archaeal, and bacterial communities using an N and P addition experiment replicated at 25 globally distributed grassland sites. We also sequenced metagenomes from a subset of the sites to determine how the functional attributes of bacterial communities change in response to elevated nutrients. Despite strong compositional differences across sites, microbial communities shifted in a consistent manner with N or P additions, and the magnitude of these shifts was related to the magnitude of plant community responses to nutrient inputs. Mycorrhizal fungi and methanogenic archaea decreased in relative abundance with nutrient additions, as did the relative abundances of oligotrophic bacterial taxa. The metagenomic data provided additional evidence for this shift in bacterial life history strategies because nutrient additions decreased the average genome sizes of the bacterial community members and elicited changes in the relative abundances of representative functional genes. Our results suggest that elevated N and P inputs lead to predictable shifts in the taxonomic and functional traits of soil microbial communities, including increases in the relative abundances of faster-growing, copiotrophic bacterial taxa, with these shifts likely to impact belowground ecosystems worldwide. PMID:26283343

  3. Consistent responses of soil microbial communities to elevated nutrient inputs in grasslands across the globe.

    PubMed

    Leff, Jonathan W; Jones, Stuart E; Prober, Suzanne M; Barberán, Albert; Borer, Elizabeth T; Firn, Jennifer L; Harpole, W Stanley; Hobbie, Sarah E; Hofmockel, Kirsten S; Knops, Johannes M H; McCulley, Rebecca L; La Pierre, Kimberly; Risch, Anita C; Seabloom, Eric W; Schütz, Martin; Steenbock, Christopher; Stevens, Carly J; Fierer, Noah

    2015-09-01

    Soil microorganisms are critical to ecosystem functioning and the maintenance of soil fertility. However, despite global increases in the inputs of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to ecosystems due to human activities, we lack a predictive understanding of how microbial communities respond to elevated nutrient inputs across environmental gradients. Here we used high-throughput sequencing of marker genes to elucidate the responses of soil fungal, archaeal, and bacterial communities using an N and P addition experiment replicated at 25 globally distributed grassland sites. We also sequenced metagenomes from a subset of the sites to determine how the functional attributes of bacterial communities change in response to elevated nutrients. Despite strong compositional differences across sites, microbial communities shifted in a consistent manner with N or P additions, and the magnitude of these shifts was related to the magnitude of plant community responses to nutrient inputs. Mycorrhizal fungi and methanogenic archaea decreased in relative abundance with nutrient additions, as did the relative abundances of oligotrophic bacterial taxa. The metagenomic data provided additional evidence for this shift in bacterial life history strategies because nutrient additions decreased the average genome sizes of the bacterial community members and elicited changes in the relative abundances of representative functional genes. Our results suggest that elevated N and P inputs lead to predictable shifts in the taxonomic and functional traits of soil microbial communities, including increases in the relative abundances of faster-growing, copiotrophic bacterial taxa, with these shifts likely to impact belowground ecosystems worldwide.

  4. The influence of the local effect model parameters on the prediction of the tumor control probability for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chanrion, M-A; Sauerwein, W; Jelen, U; Wittig, A; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Beuve, M

    2014-06-21

    In carbon ion beams, biological effects vary along the ion track; hence, to quantify them, specific radiobiological models are needed. One of them, the local effect model (LEM), in particular version I (LEM I), is implemented in treatment planning systems (TPS) clinically used in European particle therapy centers. From the physical properties of the specific ion radiation, the LEM calculates the survival probabilities of the cell or tissue type under study, provided that some determinant input parameters are initially defined. Mathematical models can be used to predict, for instance, the tumor control probability (TCP), and then evaluate treatment outcomes. This work studies the influence of the LEM I input parameters on the TCP predictions in the specific case of prostate cancer. Several published input parameters and their combinations were tested. Their influence on the dose distributions calculated for a water phantom and for a patient geometry was evaluated using the TPS TRiP98. Changing input parameters induced clinically significant modifications of the mean dose (up to a factor of 3.5), spatial dose distribution, and TCP predictions (up to factor of 2.6 for D50). TCP predictions were found to be more sensitive to the parameter threshold dose (Dt) than to the biological parameters α and β. Additionally, an analytical expression was derived for correlating α, β and Dt, and this has emphasized the importance of [Formula: see text]. The improvement of radiobiological models for particle TPS will only be achieved when more patient outcome data with well-defined patient groups, fractionation schemes and well-defined end-points are available.

  5. Variability of aboveground litter inputs alters soil physicochemical and biological processes: a meta-analysis of litterfall-manipulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Liu, L.; Sayer, E. J.

    2013-03-01

    Global change has been shown to greatly alter the amount of aboveground litter inputs to soil, which could cause substantial cascading effects on belowground biogeochemical cyling. Although having been studied extensively, there is uncertainty about how changes in aboveground litter inputs affect soil carbon and nutrient turnover and transformation. Here, we conducted a comprehensive compilation of 68 studies on litter addition or removal experiments, and used meta-analysis to assess the responses of soil physicochemical properties and carbon and nutrient cycling under changed aboveground litter inputs. Our results suggested that litter addition or removal could significantly alter soil temperature and moisture, but not soil pH. Litter inputs were more crucial in buffering soil temperature and moisture fluctuations in grassland than in forest. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass carbon and total carbon in the mineral soil increased with increasing litter inputs, suggesting that soil acted as a~net carbon sink although carbon loss and transformation increased with increasing litter inputs. Total nitrogen and the C : N ratio in the mineral soil increased with increased litter inputs. However, there was no correlation between litter inputs and extractable inorganic nitrogen in the mineral soil. Compared to other ecosystems, tropical and subtropical forests are more sensitive to variation in litter inputs. Increased or decreased litter inputs altered the turnover and accumulation of soil carbon and nutrient in tropical and subtropical forests more substantially over a shorter time period compared to other ecosystems. Overall, our study suggested that, although the magnitude of responses differed greatly among ecosystems, increased litter inputs generally accelerated the decomposition and accumulation of carbon and nutrients in soil, and decreased litter inputs reduced them.

  6. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  7. Fused Lasso Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Witten, Daniela; Simon, Noah

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable using p covariates that are measured on n independent observations, in a setting in which additive, flexible, and interpretable fits are desired. We propose the fused lasso additive model (FLAM), in which each additive function is estimated to be piecewise constant with a small number of adaptively-chosen knots. FLAM is the solution to a convex optimization problem, for which a simple algorithm with guaranteed convergence to a global optimum is provided. FLAM is shown to be consistent in high dimensions, and an unbiased estimator of its degrees of freedom is proposed. We evaluate the performance of FLAM in a simulation study and on two data sets. Supplemental materials are available online, and the R package flam is available on CRAN. PMID:28239246

  8. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidi none to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  9. Atmospheric input of inorganic nitrogen to Delaware Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Scudlark, J.R.; Church, T.M. )

    1993-12-01

    The coastal waters of the mid-Atlantic region of the United States receive inputs of atmospheric pollutants as a consequence of being located downwind from major industrial and urban emission. These inputs are potentially the largest received by any marine area of the country. Of current interest is the atmospheric input of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = NO[sub 3][sup [minus

  10. Comparison of Linear Microinstability Calculations of Varying Input Realism

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt

    2003-09-08

    The effect of varying ''input realism'' or varying completeness of the input data for linear microinstability calculations, in particular on the critical value of the ion temperature gradient for the ion temperature gradient mode, is investigated using gyrokinetic and gyrofluid approaches. The calculations show that varying input realism can have a substantial quantitative effect on the results.

  11. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  12. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  13. Vomeronasal inputs to the rodent ventral striatum.

    PubMed

    Ubeda-Bañon, I; Novejarque, A; Mohedano-Moriano, A; Pro-Sistiaga, P; Insausti, R; Martinez-Garcia, F; Lanuza, E; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2008-03-18

    Vertebrates sense chemical signals through the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. In squamate reptiles, which possess the largest vomeronasal system of all vertebrates, the accessory olfactory bulb projects to the nucleus sphericus, which in turn projects to a portion of the ventral striatum known as olfactostriatum. Characteristically, the olfactostriatum is innervated by neuropeptide Y, tyrosine hydroxylase and serotonin immunoreactive fibers. In this study, the possibility that a structure similar to the reptilian olfactostriatum might be present in the mammalian brain has been investigated. Injections of dextran-amines have been aimed at the posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus (the putative mammalian homologue of the reptilian nucleus sphericus) of rats and mice. The resulting anterograde labeling includes the olfactory tubercle, the islands of Calleja and sparse terminal fields in the shell of the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum. This projection has been confirmed by injections of retrograde tracers into the ventral striato-pallidum that render retrograde labeling in the posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus. The analysis of the distribution of neuropeptide Y, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and substance P in the ventral striato-pallidum of rats, and the anterograde tracing of the vomeronasal amygdaloid input in the same material confirm that, similar to reptiles, the ventral striatum of mammals includes a specialized vomeronasal structure (olfactory tubercle and islands of Calleja) displaying dense neuropeptide Y-, tyrosine hydroxylase- and serotonin-immunoreactive innervations. The possibility that parts of the accumbens shell and/or ventral pallidum could be included in the mammalian olfactostriatum cannot be discarded.

  14. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  15. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  16. More Than Additional Space...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A much needed addition to the Jamestown Elementary School turned out to be more than an expansion of walls for more space. A new educational program, a limited budget, and a short time line were tackled on a team approach basis and were successfully resolved. (Author)

  17. Parvalbumin-producing cortical interneurons receive inhibitory inputs on proximal portions and cortical excitatory inputs on distal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Hiroshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyo H; Tanaka, Takuma; Sohn, Jaerin; Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Fujiyama, Fumino; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2012-03-01

    To examine inputs to parvalbumin (PV)-producing interneurons, we generated transgenic mice expressing somatodendritic membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein specifically in the interneurons, and completely visualized their dendrites and somata. Using immunolabeling for vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT)1, VGluT2, and vesicular GABA transporter, we found that VGluT1-positive terminals made contacts 4- and 3.1-fold more frequently with PV-producing interneurons than VGluT2-positive and GABAergic terminals, respectively, in the primary somatosensory cortex. Even in layer 4, where VGluT2-positive terminals were most densely distributed, VGluT1-positive inputs to PV-producing interneurons were 2.4-fold more frequent than VGluT2-positive inputs. Furthermore, although GABAergic inputs to PV-producing interneurons were as numerous as VGluT2-positive inputs in most cortical layers, GABAergic inputs clearly preferred the proximal dendrites and somata of the interneurons, indicating that the sites of GABAergic inputs were more optimized than those of VGluT2-positive inputs. Simulation analysis with a PV-producing interneuron model compatible with the present morphological data revealed a plausible reason for this observation, by showing that GABAergic and glutamatergic postsynaptic potentials evoked by inputs to distal dendrites were attenuated to 60 and 87%, respectively, of those evoked by somatic inputs. As VGluT1-positive and VGluT2-positive axon terminals were presumed to be cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs, respectively, cortical excitatory inputs to PV-producing interneurons outnumbered the thalamic excitatory and intrinsic inhibitory inputs more than two-fold in any cortical layer. Although thalamic inputs are known to evoke about two-fold larger unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials than cortical ones, the present results suggest that cortical inputs control PV-producing interneurons at least as strongly as thalamic inputs.

  18. Effect of Burnishing Parameters on Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsat, Uddhav; Ahuja, Basant; Dhuttargaon, Mukund

    2016-06-01

    Burnishing is cold working process in which hard balls are pressed against the surface, resulting in improved surface finish. The surface gets compressed and then plasticized. This is a highly finishing process which is becoming more popular. Surface quality of the product improves its aesthetic appearance. The product made up of aluminum material is subjected to burnishing process during which kerosene is used as a lubricant. In this study factors affecting burnishing process such as burnishing force, speed, feed, work piece diameter and ball diameter are considered as input parameters while surface finish is considered as an output parameter In this study, experiments are designed using 25 factorial design in order to analyze the relationship between input and output parameters. The ANOVA technique and F-test are used for further analysis.

  19. Convergent responses of nitrogen and phosphorus resorption to nitrogen inputs in a semiarid grassland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lü, Xiao-Tao; Reed, Sasha; Yu, Qiang; He, Nian-Peng; Wang, Zheng-Wen; Han, Xing-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Human activities have significantly altered nitrogen (N) availability in most terrestrial ecosystems, with consequences for community composition and ecosystem functioning. Although studies of how changes in N availability affect biodiversity and community composition are relatively common, much less remains known about the effects of N inputs on the coupled biogeochemical cycling of N and phosphorus (P), and still fewer data exist regarding how increased N inputs affect the internal cycling of these two elements in plants. Nutrient resorption is an important driver of plant nutrient economies and of the quality of litter plants produce. Accordingly, resorption patterns have marked ecological implications for plant population and community fitness, as well as for ecosystem nutrient cycling. In a semiarid grassland in northern China, we studied the effects of a wide range of N inputs on foliar nutrient resorption of two dominant grasses, Leymus chinensis and Stipa grandis. After 4 years of treatments, N and P availability in soil and N and P concentrations in green and senesced grass leaves increased with increasing rates of N addition. Foliar N and P resorption significantly decreased along the N addition gradient, implying a resorption-mediated, positive plant–soil feedback induced by N inputs. Furthermore, N : P resorption ratios were negatively correlated with the rates of N addition, indicating the sensitivity of plant N and P stoichiometry to N inputs. Taken together, the results demonstrate that N additions accelerate ecosystem uptake and turnover of both N and P in the temperate steppe and that N and P cycles are coupled in dynamic ways. The convergence of N and P resorption in response to N inputs emphasizes the importance of nutrient resorption as a pathway by which plants and ecosystems adjust in the face of increasing N availability.

  20. An affine projection algorithm using grouping selection of input vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, JaeWook; Kong, NamWoong; Park, PooGyeon

    2011-10-01

    This paper present an affine projection algorithm (APA) using grouping selection of input vectors. To improve the performance of conventional APA, the proposed algorithm adjusts the number of the input vectors using two procedures: grouping procedure and selection procedure. In grouping procedure, the some input vectors that have overlapping information for update is grouped using normalized inner product. Then, few input vectors that have enough information for for coefficient update is selected using steady-state mean square error (MSE) in selection procedure. Finally, the filter coefficients update using selected input vectors. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has small steady-state estimation errors comparing with the existing algorithms.

  1. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  2. Variance-based sensitivity indices for stochastic models with correlated inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Kala, Zdeněk

    2015-03-10

    The goal of this article is the formulation of the principles of one of the possible strategies in implementing correlation between input random variables so as to be usable for algorithm development and the evaluation of Sobol’s sensitivity analysis. With regard to the types of stochastic computational models, which are commonly found in structural mechanics, an algorithm was designed for effective use in conjunction with Monte Carlo methods. Sensitivity indices are evaluated for all possible permutations of the decorrelation procedures for input parameters. The evaluation of Sobol’s sensitivity coefficients is illustrated on an example in which a computational model was used for the analysis of the resistance of a steel bar in tension with statistically dependent input geometric characteristics.

  3. Input-output model for MACCS nuclear accident impacts estimation¹

    SciTech Connect

    Outkin, Alexander V.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Vargas, Vanessa N

    2015-01-27

    Since the original economic model for MACCS was developed, better quality economic data (as well as the tools to gather and process it) and better computational capabilities have become available. The update of the economic impacts component of the MACCS legacy model will provide improved estimates of business disruptions through the use of Input-Output based economic impact estimation. This paper presents an updated MACCS model, bases on Input-Output methodology, in which economic impacts are calculated using the Regional Economic Accounting analysis tool (REAcct) created at Sandia National Laboratories. This new GDP-based model allows quick and consistent estimation of gross domestic product (GDP) losses due to nuclear power plant accidents. This paper outlines the steps taken to combine the REAcct Input-Output-based model with the MACCS code, describes the GDP loss calculation, and discusses the parameters and modeling assumptions necessary for the estimation of long-term effects of nuclear power plant accidents.

  4. Approximation of discrete-time LQG compensators for distributed systems with boundary input and unbounded measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    The approximation of optimal discrete-time linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) compensators for distributed parameter control systems with boundary input and unbounded measurement is considered. The approach applies to a wide range of problems that can be formulated in a state space on which both the discrete-time input and output operators are continuous. Approximating compensators are obtained via application of the LQG theory and associated approximation results for infinite dimensional discrete-time control systems with bounded input and output. Numerical results for spline and modal based approximation schemes used to compute optimal compensators for a one-dimensional heat equation with either Neumann or Dirichlet boundary control and pointwise measurement of temperature are presented and discussed.

  5. Approach for Input Uncertainty Propagation and Robust Design in CFD Using Sensitivity Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putko, Michele M.; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, Perry A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    2002-01-01

    An implementation of the approximate statistical moment method for uncertainty propagation and robust optimization for quasi 3-D Euler CFD code is presented. Given uncertainties in statistically independent, random, normally distributed input variables, first- and second-order statistical moment procedures are performed to approximate the uncertainty in the CFD output. Efficient calculation of both first- and second-order sensitivity derivatives is required. In order to assess the validity of the approximations, these moments are compared with statistical moments generated through Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainties in the CFD input variables are also incorporated into a robust optimization procedure. For this optimization, statistical moments involving first-order sensitivity derivatives appear in the objective function and system constraints. Second-order sensitivity derivatives are used in a gradient-based search to successfully execute a robust optimization. The approximate methods used throughout the analyses are found to be valid when considering robustness about input parameter mean values.

  6. Approximation of discrete-time LQG compensators for distributed systems with boundary input and unbounded measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Rosen, I. G.

    1987-01-01

    The approximation of optimal discrete-time linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) compensators for distributed parameter control systems with boundary input and unbounded measurement is considered. The approach applies to a wide range of problems that can be formulated in a state space on which both the discrete-time input and output operators are continuous. Approximating compensators are obtained via application of the LQG theory and associated approximation results for infinite dimensional discrete-time control systems with bounded input and output. Numerical results for spline and modal based approximation schemes used to compute optimal compensators for a one dimensional heat equation with either Neumann or Dirichlet boundary control and pointwise measurement of temperature are presented and discussed.

  7. On the properties of input-to-output transformations in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Olypher, Andrey; Vaillant, Jean

    2016-06-01

    Information processing in neuronal networks in certain important cases can be considered as maps of binary vectors, where ones (spikes) and zeros (no spikes) of input neurons are transformed into spikes and no spikes of output neurons. A simple but fundamental characteristic of such a map is how it transforms distances between input vectors into distances between output vectors. We advanced earlier known results by finding an exact solution to this problem for McCulloch-Pitts neurons. The obtained explicit formulas allow for detailed analysis of how the network connectivity and neuronal excitability affect the transformation of distances in neurons. As an application, we explored a simple model of information processing in the hippocampus, a brain area critically implicated in learning and memory. We found network connectivity and neuronal excitability parameter values that optimize discrimination between similar and distinct inputs. A decrease of neuronal excitability, which in biological neurons may be associated with decreased inhibition, impaired the optimality of discrimination.

  8. Input visualization for the Cyclus nuclear fuel cycle simulator: CYClus Input Control

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.; Schneider, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses and demonstrates the methods used for the graphical user interface for the Cyclus fuel cycle simulator being developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Cyclus Input Control (CYCIC) is currently being designed with nuclear engineers in mind, but future updates to the program will be made to allow even non-technical users to quickly and efficiently simulate fuel cycles to answer the questions important to them. (authors)

  9. A comprehensive excitatory input map of the striatum reveals novel functional organization

    PubMed Central

    Hunnicutt, Barbara J; Jongbloets, Bart C; Birdsong, William T; Gertz, Katrina J; Zhong, Haining; Mao, Tianyi

    2016-01-01

    The striatum integrates excitatory inputs from the cortex and the thalamus to control diverse functions. Although the striatum is thought to consist of sensorimotor, associative and limbic domains, their precise demarcations and whether additional functional subdivisions exist remain unclear. How striatal inputs are differentially segregated into each domain is also poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive map of the excitatory inputs to the mouse striatum. The input patterns reveal boundaries between the known striatal domains. The most posterior striatum likely represents the 4th functional subdivision, and the dorsomedial striatum integrates highly heterogeneous, multimodal inputs. The complete thalamo-cortico-striatal loop is also presented, which reveals that the thalamic subregions innervated by the basal ganglia preferentially interconnect with motor-related cortical areas. Optogenetic experiments show the subregion-specific heterogeneity in the synaptic properties of striatal inputs from both the cortex and the thalamus. This projectome will guide functional studies investigating diverse striatal functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19103.001 PMID:27892854

  10. A Voice and Mouse Input Interface for 3D Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Bryson, Steve T.

    2003-01-01

    There have been many successful stories on how 3D input devices can be fully integrated into an immersive virtual environment. Electromagnetic trackers, optical trackers, gloves, and flying mice are just some of these input devices. Though we can use existing 3D input devices that are commonly used for VR applications, there are several factors that prevent us from choosing these input devices for our applications. One main factor is that most of these tracking devices are not suitable for prolonged use due to human fatigue associated with using them. A second factor is that many of them would occupy additional office space. Another factor is that many of the 3D input devices are expensive due to the unusual hardware that are required. For our VR applications, we want a user interface that would work naturally with standard equipment. In this paper, we demonstrate applications or our proposed muitimodal interface using a 3D dome display. We also show that effective data analysis can be achieved while the scientists view their data rendered inside the dome display and perform user interactions simply using the mouse and voice input. Though the sphere coordinate grid seems to be ideal for interaction using a 3D dome display, we can also use other non-spherical grids as well.

  11. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  12. A PC-based single-ADC multi-parameter data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, M.; Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    A personal computer (PC) based mult parameter data acquisition system using the Microsoft Window operating environment has been designed and constructed. An IBI AT compatible personal computer with an Intel 486DX5 microprocessor was combined with a National Instruments ATIDIO 32 digital I/O card, a single Canberra 8713 ADC with 13-bit resolution and a modified Canberra 8223 8-input analog multiplexer to acquil data from experiments carried out at the UML Van de Graa accelerator. The accelerator data acquisition (ADAC) computer environment was programmed in Microsoft Visual BASIC for use i Windows. ADAC allows event-mode data acquisition with up to eight parameters (modifiable to 64) and the simultaneous display parameters during acquisition. Additional features of ADAC include replay of event-mode data and graphical analysis/display of data. TV ADAC environment is easy to upgrade or expand, inexpensive 1 implement, and is specifically designed to meet the needs of nuclei spectroscopy.

  13. Mathematical modeling and evaluation of radionuclide transport parameters from the ANL Laboratory Analog Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Hull, J.R.; Seitz, M.G.; Sha, W.T.; Shah, V.L.; Soo, S.L.

    1984-07-01

    Computer model simulation is required to evaluate the performance of proposed or future high-level radioactive waste geological repositories. However, the accuracy of a model in predicting the real situation depends on how well the values of the transport properties are prescribed as input parameters. Knowledge of transport parameters is therefore essential. We have modeled ANL's Experiment Analog Program which was designed to simulate long-term radwaste migration process by groundwater flowing through a high-level radioactive waste repository. Using this model and experimental measurements, we have evaluated neptunium (actinide) deposition velocity and analyzed the complex phenomena of simultaneous deposition, erosion, and reentrainment of bentonite when groundwater is flowing through a narrow crack in a basalt rock. The present modeling demonstrates that we can obtain the values of transport parameters, as added information without any additional cost, from the available measurements of laboratory analog experiments. 8 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  15. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  16. Monitoring Phenology as Indicator for Timing of Nutrient Inputs in Northern Gulf Watersheds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton W.; Spiering, Bruce A.; Kalcic, Maria T.

    2009-01-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as the anthropogenic addition of nutrients, in addition to any natural processes, causing adverse effects or impairments to the beneficial uses of a water body has been identified as one of the most significant environmental problems facing sensitive estuaries and coastal waters. Understanding the timing of nutrient inputs into those waters through remote sensing observables helps define monitoring and mitigation strategies. Remotely sensed data products can trace both forcings and effects of the nutrient system from landscape to estuary. This project is focused on extracting nutrient information from the landscape. The timing of nutrients entering coastal waters from the land boundary is greatly influenced by hydrologic processes, but can also be affected by the timing of nutrient additions across the landscape through natural or anthropogenic means. Non-point source nutrient additions to watersheds are often associated with specific seasonal cycles, such as decomposition of organic materials in fall and winter or addition of fertilizers to crop lands in the spring. These seasonal cycles or phenology may in turn be observed through the use of satellite sensors. Characterization of the phenology of various land cover types may be of particular interest in Gulf of Mexico estuarine systems with relatively short pathways between intensively managed systems and the land/estuarine boundary. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the capability of monitoring phenology of specific classes of land, such as agriculture and managed timberlands, at a refined watershed level. The extraction of phenological information from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data record is accomplished using analytical tools developed for NASA at Stennis Space Center: the Time Series Product Tool and the Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool. MODIS reflectance data (product MOD09) were

  17. The Effects of Multimedia Input on Comprehension of a Short Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, James; Granoff, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Research examined the effects of additional input, audio recordings and video recordings, on second-language readers' comprehension of a short story. Participants were 37 English-language learners enrolled in three college ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) classes. Each group read Shirley Jackson's short story, "The Lottery," and…

  18. Input-output, expandable-parity network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckevitt, J. F., III

    1974-01-01

    Large-scale integrated circuit generates and checks parity of four eight-bit registers. In addition, circuit will indicate by output signal whether parity error exists. Circuit can also generate or check parity of words up to 32 bits. This is done by making appropriate internal wiring connections on the large-scale integrated chip.

  19. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  20. Whole-Brain Mapping of Inputs to Projection Neurons and Cholinergic Interneurons in the Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingchun; Wang, Daqing; He, Xiaobin; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Xu, Fuqiang; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal striatum integrates inputs from multiple brain areas to coordinate voluntary movements, associative plasticity, and reinforcement learning. Its projection neurons consist of the GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine receptor type 1 (D1) or dopamine receptor type 2 (D2). Cholinergic interneurons account for a small portion of striatal neuron populations, but they play important roles in striatal functions by synapsing onto the MSNs and other local interneurons. By combining the modified rabies virus with specific Cre- mouse lines, a recent study mapped the monosynaptic input patterns to MSNs. Because only a small number of extrastriatal neurons were labeled in the prior study, it is important to reexamine the input patterns of MSNs with higher labeling efficiency. Additionally, the whole-brain innervation pattern of cholinergic interneurons remains unknown. Using the rabies virus-based transsynaptic tracing method in this study, we comprehensively charted the brain areas that provide direct inputs to D1-MSNs, D2-MSNs, and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum. We found that both types of projection neurons and the cholinergic interneurons receive extensive inputs from discrete brain areas in the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other subcortical areas, several of which were not reported in the previous study. The MSNs and cholinergic interneurons share largely common inputs from areas outside the striatum. However, innervations within the dorsal striatum represent a significantly larger proportion of total inputs for cholinergic interneurons than for the MSNs. The comprehensive maps of direct inputs to striatal MSNs and cholinergic interneurons shall assist future functional dissection of the striatal circuits. PMID:25830919