Science.gov

Sample records for additional instructional time

  1. Intensifying instruction: Does additional instructional time make a difference for the most at-risk first graders?

    PubMed

    Harn, Beth A; Linan-Thompson, Sylvia; Roberts, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Research is clear on the benefit of early intervention efforts and the importance of intensive instructional supports; however, understanding which features to intensify is less clear. General intervention features of group size, instructional delivery, and time are areas schools can consider manipulating to intensify instruction. Also, each of these features can vary along a continuum making them easier or more challenging for schools to implement. What is unclear is if implementing very intensive interventions early in school (first grade), which require significantly more school resources, provides accordingly accelerated student learning. This article investigates the role of intensifying instructional time for the most at-risk first graders in schools implementing research-based instructional and assessment practices within multitiered instructional support systems. Results indicate that students receiving more intensive intervention made significantly more progress across a range of early reading measures. Intervention features, limitations, recommendations for practice, and implications for treatment resisters are discussed. PMID:18354932

  2. Individualized Additional Instruction for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Ken

    2010-01-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the…

  3. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  4. Informed Additive Literacy Instruction for ELLs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Eurydice Bouchereau

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous reasons why schools struggle to provide English-language learners (ELLs) with additive literacy instruction. One reason for this is the lack of available trained bilingual teachers, mainstream teachers who have not received adequate training on how to teach ELLs, and the current political climate that appears to support an…

  5. Instructional Time Trends. Education Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Julie Rowland

    2015-01-01

    For more than 30 years, Education Commission of the States has tracked instructional time and frequently receives requests for information about policies and trends. In this Education Trends report, Education Commission of the States addresses some of the more frequent questions, including the impact of instructional time on achievement, variation…

  6. A Study of Additional Costs of Second Language Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Nelly

    A study was conducted whose primary aim was to identify and explain additional costs incurred by Alberta, Canada school jurisdictions providing second language instruction in 1980. Additional costs were defined as those which would not have been incurred had the second language program not been in existence. Three types of additional costs were…

  7. A Proposed Instructional Theory for Integer Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Michelle; Akyuz, Didem

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of a 7th-grade classroom teaching experiment that supported students' understanding of integer addition and subtraction. The experiment was conducted to test and revise a hypothetical learning trajectory so as to propose a potential instructional theory for integer addition and subtraction. The instructional…

  8. Making Time for Instructional Leadership. Appendices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Grissom, Jason A.; Neumerski, Christine M.; Murphy, Joseph; Blissett, Richard; Porter, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume report describes the "SAM (School Administration Manager) process," an approach that about 700 schools around the nation are using to direct more of principals' time and effort to improve teaching and learning in classrooms. Research has shown that a principal's instructional leadership is second only to teaching among…

  9. Increasing instruction time in school does increase learning.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Simon Calmar; Humlum, Maria Knoth; Nandrup, Anne Brink

    2016-07-01

    Increasing instruction time in school is a central element in the attempts of many governments to improve student learning, but prior research-mainly based on observational data-disputes the effect of this approach and points out the potential negative effects on student behavior. Based on a large-scale, cluster-randomized trial, we find that increasing instruction time increases student learning and that a general increase in instruction time is at least as efficient as an expert-developed, detailed teaching program that increases instruction with the same amount of time. These findings support the value of increased instruction time. PMID:27325778

  10. How Much English Language Arts and Mathematics Instruction Do Students Receive? Investigating Variation in Instructional Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Corey, Douglas; DeMonte, Jenny; Harrison, Delena; Loewenberg Ball, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The amount of instruction students receive has long been viewed as a foundational educational resource. This article presents an analysis of the time students spend in elementary English language arts (ELA) and mathematics instruction. In mathematics, the average student received about 140 hr of instruction, but students in the top sixth of…

  11. Student Instruction Should Be Distributed over Long Time Periods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Doug

    2015-01-01

    In many academic courses, students encounter a particular fact or concept many times over a period of a few weeks and then do not see it again during the remainder of the course. Are these brief instructional periods sufficient, or should the same amount of instruction be distributed over longer periods of time? This question was the focus of…

  12. Time pressure and instructional choices when teaching mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Yew Hoong; Chick, Helen L.

    2011-09-01

    This paper examines the anecdotal claim of "Not enough time" made by teachers when expressing their struggle to cover a stipulated syllabus. The study focuses on the actual experiences of a teacher teaching mathematics to a Year 7 class in Singapore according to a designated time schedule. The demands of fulfilling multiple instructional goals within a limited time frame gave rise to numerous junctures where time pressure was felt. The interactions between ongoing time consciousness and instructional decisions will be discussed. An examination of the role played by instructional goals sheds light on the nature and causes of time pressure situations.

  13. Addition of Functional Content during Core Content Instruction with Students with Moderate Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Belva C.; Hager, Karen L.; Galloway, Carey Creech

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to add functional content during core content instruction of language arts, science, and math. The investigation involved three middle school students with moderate disabilities who participated in the state's alternate assessment. During instruction using a constant time delay procedure to teach required…

  14. Nonsymbolic, Approximate Arithmetic in Children: Abstract Addition Prior to Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Hilary; Beckmann, Lacey; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2008-01-01

    Do children draw upon abstract representations of number when they perform approximate arithmetic operations? In this study, kindergarten children viewed animations suggesting addition of a sequence of sounds to an array of dots, and they compared the sum to a second dot array that differed from the sum by 1 of 3 ratios. Children performed this…

  15. Enhancing Effective Instructional Time: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Tanya M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This policy brief was written to provide the North Carolina State Board of Education with a summary of research on enhancing effective instructional time. The impetus for extending school time appears to stem from two primary sources: international comparisons, and research on the relationship between time and learning. Research findings indicate…

  16. The Instructional Effects of Diagrams and Time-Compressed Instruction on Student Achievement and Learners' Perceptions of Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of visual representations and time-compressed instruction on learning and learners' perceptions of cognitive load. Time-compressed instruction refers to instruction that has been increased in speed without sacrificing quality. It was anticipated that learners would be able to gain a conceptual…

  17. Teaching Time: Distance Education versus Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Diane M.; Wood, B. Jeanneane; Vredevoogd, Jon D.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents time-and-task records of faculty and teaching assistants' time for comparable computer-aided design courses at two state universities in the midwestern United States. One course was taught at a distance and the other course was a conventional face-to-face course. Results indicate a distance course takes less time to teach than…

  18. Time Pressure and Instructional Choices when Teaching Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, Yew Hoong; Chick, Helen L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the anecdotal claim of "Not enough time" made by teachers when expressing their struggle to cover a stipulated syllabus. The study focuses on the actual experiences of a teacher teaching mathematics to a Year 7 class in Singapore according to a designated time schedule. The demands of fulfilling multiple instructional goals…

  19. Collaborating to Improve Instruction: It's about Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Judith A.; Grier, Harriett L.

    2005-01-01

    The success of implementing school change is determined in large part by the effectiveness of building leadership and time utilization. This paper describes the changing role of an urban principal as her building moved from a traditional junior high structure to a more collaborative small-school structure involving interdisciplinary grade-level…

  20. 24 CFR 1710.200 - Instructions for Statement of Record, Additional Information and Documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Instructions for Statement of Record, Additional Information and Documentation. 1710.200 Section 1710.200 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR...

  1. 43 CFR 3250.13 - What additional BLM orders or instructions govern exploration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What additional BLM orders or instructions govern exploration? 3250.13 Section 3250.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING...

  2. Explaining Variation in Instructional Time: An Application of Quantile Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corey, Douglas Lyman; Phelps, Geoffrey; Ball, Deborah Loewenberg; Demonte, Jenny; Harrison, Delena

    2012-01-01

    This research is conducted in the context of a large-scale study of three nationally disseminated comprehensive school reform projects (CSRs) and examines how school- and classroom-level factors contribute to variation in instructional time in English language arts and mathematics. When using mean-based OLS regression techniques such as…

  3. Making Time for Instructional Leadership. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Grissom, Jason A.; Neumerski, Christine M.; Murphy, Joseph; Blissett, Richard; Porter, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume report describes the "SAM (School Administration Manager) process," an approach that about 700 schools around the nation are using to direct more of principals' time and effort to improve teaching and learning in classrooms. Research has shown that a principal's instructional leadership is second only to teaching among…

  4. Impact of Technology on Teacher Efficacy and Instruction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanderNoor, Jeffrey Michael

    2014-01-01

    In light of the emerging emphasis on interpreting technology, this study investigated how teachers' technology self-efficacy influenced their use of technology in the classroom technology use. The secondary purpose was to examine the extent teacher technology self-efficacy was related to instructional time. The study findings answered questions of…

  5. Instructional Advice, Time Advice and Learning Questions in Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Gunter Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate students (N = 97) used an introductory text and a computer simulation to learn fundamental concepts about statistical analyses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression analysis and General Linear Model). Each learner was randomly assigned to one cell of a 2 (with or without instructional advice) x 2 (with or without time advice) x 2…

  6. Part-Time Instructional Staff Survey and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Commission on Higher Education.

    In compliance with Public Law 2002, Chapter 27, the New Jersey Commission on Higher Education collects and summarizes data regarding part-time instructional staff at the state's public colleges and universities. This study found that the average course load and compensation of adjunct faculty in each semester differed both within and among the…

  7. Kindergarten Time: Kindergarten Teachers' Considerations when Setting Instructional Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Julie; Dever, Martha T.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to obtain an in-depth understanding of kindergarten teachers' instructional time allocations and the factors that influenced their decisions. A maximum variation sample of six kindergarten teachers was chosen representing variations in gender, socioeconomic status of the school where they taught, and…

  8. Time for Time on Task and Quality Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masci, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Time on task, with its twin elements of purposeful use of "time" and rededication to ensuring the quality of the "task," presents educators at all levels with the opportunity to effect change through relatively straightforward means. The purpose of this article is to highlight several aspects of using time effectively through a series of…

  9. Effects of a reduced time-out interval on compliance with the time-out instruction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Jeanne M; Vollmer, Timothy R; Yakich, Theresa M; Van Camp, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Time-out is a negative punishment procedure that parents and teachers commonly use to reduce problem behavior; however, specific time-out parameters have not been evaluated adequately. One parameter that has received relatively little attention in the literature is the mode of administration (verbal or physical) of time-out. In this study, we evaluated a procedure designed to reduce problem behavior and increase compliance with the verbal instruction to go to time-out. Specifically, we reduced the time-out interval contingent on compliance with the time-out instruction. Six preschool-aged boys participated in the study. Time-out effectively reduced the problem behavior of all 6 participants, and the procedure to increase compliance with the time-out instruction was effective for 4 of 6 participants. PMID:24114153

  10. The Effects of Textisms on Learning, Study Time, and Instructional Perceptions in an Online Artificial Intelligence Instructional Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Robert; Bryant, Nathan L.; Dodson, Phillip T.; Entwistle, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of textisms (i.e., abbreviated spellings, acronyms, and other shorthand notations) on learning, study time, and instructional perceptions in an online artificial intelligence instructional module. The independent variable in this investigation was experimental condition. For the control…

  11. Effects of Learner Ability and Instructional Modifications on Time Needed for Learning and Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettinger, Maribeth

    1983-01-01

    A study examined the effects of two factors--learner ability and modifications of instruction through increased feedback and reduced size of instructional units--on the time required for learning and the retention of fourth-grade male students. While instructional modifications best predicted the time needed for learning, learner ability best…

  12. Conceptual question response times in Peer Instruction classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to in-class, conceptual questions [ConcepTests (CTs)] in two introductory physics courses taught using Peer Instruction and use item response theory to determine the difficulty of the CTs. We examine response time differences between correct and incorrect answers both before and after the peer discussion for CTs of varying difficulty. We also determine the relationship between response time and student performance on a standardized test of incoming physics knowledge, precourse self-efficacy, and gender. Our data reveal three results of interest. First, response time for correct answers is significantly faster than for incorrect answers, both before and after peer discussion, especially for easy CTs. Second, students with greater incoming physics knowledge and higher self-efficacy respond faster in both rounds. Third, there is no gender difference in response rate after controlling for incoming physics knowledge scores, although males register significantly more attempts before committing to a final answer than do female students. These results provide insight into effective CT pacing during Peer Instruction. In particular, in order to maintain a pace that keeps everyone engaged, students should not be given too much time to respond. When around 80% of the answers are in, the ratio of correct to incorrect responses rapidly approaches levels indicating random guessing and instructors should close the poll.

  13. The Effectiveness of Time Management Strategies Instruction on Students' Academic Time Management and Academic Self Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kader, Fathi Abdul Hamid Abdul; Eissa, Mourad Ali

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using time management strategies instruction on improving first year learning disabled students' academic time management and academic self efficacy. A total of 60 students identified with LD participated. The sample was divided into two groups; experimental (n = 30 boys) and control (n = 30 boys). ANCOVA and…

  14. Making Time for Literacy: Teacher Knowledge and Time Allocation in Instructional Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spear-Swerling, Louise; Zibulsky, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how K-5 general and special educators (N = 102) would choose to allocate time in a 2-h language arts block if they could do so as they wished, and how these choices related to their knowledge base for reading instruction. Preferences for time allocation were assessed through an open grid on which participants listed…

  15. When Time Matters: Examining the Impact and Distribution of Extra Instructional Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer-Hinton, Raquel L.

    This study examined the impact of the Lighthouse program, a school-based, after-school remediation program in the Chicago Public Schools, on student academic achievement. The Lighthouse program included an extra hour of instructional time and an hour of recreational time. Between the two activities, students received a healthy late afternoon meal.…

  16. Instructional Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Harris J., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews eight 16mm films or topics including animal behavior, medicine, and astronomy. Provides film running time, cost, and supplier address. Article includes reviews of instructional modules and brief descriptions of some additional films. (MA)

  17. Creating a Climate for Linguistically Responsive Instruction: The Case for Additive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Arthi B.; Morales, P. Zitlali

    2015-01-01

    As a state with a longstanding tradition of offering bilingual education, Illinois has a legislative requirement for native language instruction in earlier grades through a model called Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE). This model does not truly develop bilingualism, however, but rather offers native language instruction to English learners…

  18. Making the Most of Extra Time: Relationships between Full-Day Kindergarten Instructional Environments and Reading Achievement. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathbun, Amy

    2010-01-01

    As the number of schools changing from part- to full-day kindergarten programs increases, state and local education agencies need empirically-based evidence on ways that schools and teachers can best structure the additional instructional time of full-day programs to improve children's early reading skills. This brief uses nationally…

  19. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) NONCOMPETITIVE LEASES Preference Right Leases § 3430.2-2 Additional time. (a) If the...

  20. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Student Achievement in Addition and Subtraction at First Grade Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Patsy M.

    This study was conducted to determine whether the traditional classroom approach to instruction involving the addition and subtraction of number facts (digits 0-6) is more or less effective than the traditional classroom approach plus a commercially-prepared computer game. A pretest-posttest control group design was used with two groups of first…

  1. The Influence of Mathematics Vocabulary Instruction Embedded within Addition Tutoring for First-Grade Students with Mathematics Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sarah R.; Driver, Melissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners indicate students require explicit instruction on mathematics vocabulary terms, yet no study has examined the effects of an embedded vocabulary component within mathematics tutoring for early elementary students. First-grade students with mathematics difficulty (MD; n = 98) were randomly assigned to addition tutoring…

  2. Ultrafast amplifier additive timing jitter characterization and control.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Alexis; D'Acremont, Quentin; Santarelli, Giorgio; Dilhaire, Stefan; Courjaud, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    We report on the characterization and long-term compensation of additive timing jitter introduced by a femtosecond ytterbium regenerative amplifier with a 100 kHz repetition rate. A balanced optical cross-correlation technique is used to generate a jitter error signal. This approach is well suited to characterize the additive timing jitter of Yb amplifiers seeded by narrow spectrum Yb oscillators. The balanced optical cross-correlator is in a noncollinear configuration allowing a background free coindence detection. This setup enables the measurement of additive timing jitter from the amplifier, with a noise floor of 300 as integrated from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The measured additive timing jitter level is about 5 fs, integrated from 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. The amplifier timing drift characterization and control are performed for more than an hour. PMID:26974074

  3. The Effect of Supplemental Instruction on Timely Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Tyler J.; McCoy, Adam C.; Bates, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a national program designed to aid college student learning. Many researchers have noted that analysis of the impact of the SI program on student achievement is problematic as a result of the inherent self-selection bias. We apply a sufficiently sophisticated statistical technique that controls for the…

  4. Real-Time Teaching: Learners Need Purposeful and Systematic Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Donna; Frey, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article provides readers with information about an instructional framework that gradually releases responsibility from teachers to learners. Pearson and Gallagher (1983) introduced a model that depicts learning as a purposeful process that allows for a systematic shift in the cognitive load (responsibility) from the teacher to the student. In…

  5. Manipulations to the Timing and Type of Instructions to Examine Motor Skill Performance Under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Nicole T.; Bowcock, Alison; Hodges, Nicola J.

    2010-01-01

    There is evidence that prescriptive versus discovery methods of learning can lead to breakdowns under pressure due to “reinvestment” of knowledge and a more conscious, controlled mode of control. There is some speculation that this breakdown is mediated by the attentional focus of the instructions. We expected these effects to also be moderated by when in practice these instructions are given. Across two experiments, five groups practiced a forehand disk throwing task and we manipulated the timing and attentional focus of instructions. Internally directed instructions provided to participants early in practice resulted in a slower rate of acquisition (outcome error) and detrimental effects under stress, in comparison to the same instructions provided later in practice or not at all. Externally directed, technical instructions positively impacted rate of acquisition and regardless of when in practice they were provided, there were no adverse effects associated with instructions under pressure. These results show that the direction of attention encouraged by instructions moderates performance under stress as does the timing of presentation of these instructions. PMID:21833255

  6. Cohesion, Instructional Time and Reading Performance at MUGC Summer Enrichment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroebel, Sandra S.; Harvey, Brenda S.; O'Keefe, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    As schools attempt to improve the services to struggling readers, teachers are encouraged to work collaboratively to enhance instruction. Studies are needed to examine the effects of teaming on student performance. The purpose of this study was to determine if team cohesion and/or instructional time at the Marshall University Graduate College…

  7. Improving Instructional Leadership Behaviors of School Principals by Means of Implementing Time Management Training Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Yu

    2013-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 increases school accountability and requires educators to improve student academic outcomes using evidence-based practice. One factor that contributes to desirable school outcomes is principals' instructional leadership behaviors. Principals who allocate more time to instructional leadership behaviors are more…

  8. Increasing Instructional Efficiency by Presenting Additional Stimuli in Learning Trials for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vladescu, Jason C.; Kodak, Tiffany M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the effectiveness and efficiency of presenting secondary targets within learning trials for 4 children with an autism spectrum disorder. Specifically, we compared 4 instructional conditions using a progressive prompt delay. In 3 conditions, we presented secondary targets in the antecedent or consequence portion of…

  9. Strategy Instruction in Early Childhood Math Software: Detecting and Teaching Single-Digit Addition Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Kara Kilmartin

    2013-01-01

    In early childhood mathematics, strategy-use is an important indicator of children's conceptual understanding and is a strong predictor of later math performance. Strategy instruction is common in many national curricula, yet is virtually absent from most math software. The current study describes the design of one software activity teaching…

  10. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) NONCOMPETITIVE LEASES Preference Right Leases §...

  11. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) NONCOMPETITIVE LEASES Preference Right Leases §...

  12. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) NONCOMPETITIVE LEASES Preference Right Leases §...

  13. Increasing instructional efficiency by presenting additional stimuli in learning trials for children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Vladescu, Jason C; Kodak, Tiffany M

    2013-12-01

    The current study examined the effectiveness and efficiency of presenting secondary targets within learning trials for 4 children with an autism spectrum disorder. Specifically, we compared 4 instructional conditions using a progressive prompt delay. In 3 conditions, we presented secondary targets in the antecedent or consequence portion of learning trials, or in the absence of prompts and reinforcement. In the fourth condition (control), we did not include secondary targets in learning trials. Results replicate and extend previous research by demonstrating that the majority of participants acquired secondary targets presented in the antecedent and consequent events of learning trials. PMID:24114346

  14. Teachers' Awareness and Perceived Effectiveness of Instructional Activities in Relation to the Allocation of Time in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, S.; Kablan, Z.; Akaydin, B. B.; Demir, D.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the time spent in various types of science instruction with regard to teachers' awareness of instructional activities. The perceived effectiveness of instructional activities in relation to the allocation of time was also examined. A total of 30 4th grade teachers (17 female, 13 male), from seven different primary…

  15. 25 CFR 39.731 - Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... day school students? 39.731 Section 39.731 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Miscellaneous Provisions § 39.731 Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?...

  16. 25 CFR 39.731 - Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... day school students? 39.731 Section 39.731 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Miscellaneous Provisions § 39.731 Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?...

  17. 25 CFR 39.731 - Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... day school students? 39.731 Section 39.731 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Miscellaneous Provisions § 39.731 Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?...

  18. 25 CFR 39.731 - Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... day school students? 39.731 Section 39.731 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Miscellaneous Provisions § 39.731 Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?...

  19. 25 CFR 39.731 - Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... day school students? 39.731 Section 39.731 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Student Transportation Miscellaneous Provisions § 39.731 Can transportation time be used as instruction time for day school students?...

  20. Conceptual Question Response Times in Peer Instruction Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to…

  1. Clocking Instruction: A Reform Whose Time Has Come?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.

    1984-01-01

    Although policymakers have recently tended to call for longer school days or years, such reforms might be ineffective or counterproductive if they fail to take into account the interactions between time and other determinants of learning, including the role of the student in allocating time. Research has shown that the amount of learning is a…

  2. Full time adult credential students' instructional preferences at California State University, Long Beach: pedagogy orandragogy?

    PubMed

    Wang, Victor

    2004-03-01

    This study investigated the instructional preferences of full time adult credential students after they took a live course called Principles of Adult Education at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) in the fall semester of 2002. These full time adult credential students had been working on their adult teaching credentials to meet the competencies specified by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. The course introduced students to Andragogy developed by Malcolm Knowles out of the andragogical model developed by Lindeman (1926). The study used Principles of Adult Learning Scales (PALS), advanced by Gary Conti in 1983 to measure instructional preferences. Data were collected from 30 (100% of 30) full time adult credential students enrolled in a live course to determine their instructional preferences of helping adults learn. The results of the study showed in most cases these adult learning professionals taught adult students andragogically; in some cases they taught adult students pedagogically. PMID:14727315

  3. Direct Instruction and First Grade Reading Achievement: The Role of Technical Support and Time of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockard, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of two implementation variables (source of technical support and time of implementation) to first grade reading achievement across three naturally-occurring conditions over a six-year time span. Two of the conditions involved implementation of Direct Instruction (DI) curriculum programs,…

  4. The Effect of Computer Technology by Braille Students on Instruction Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obringer, S. John; Kemp, Susan C.

    This study used a single-subject design to investigate the feasibility of using computer access technology by Braille reading students who are mainstreamed. The technology would reduce the time that vision teachers spend transcribing Braille work for mainstream teachers and thereby increase the time vision teachers spend in direct instruction and…

  5. Instruction and Service Time Decisions: Itinerant Services to Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students.

    PubMed

    Antia, Shirin D; Rivera, M Christina

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) describe the specific kinds of services provided by itinerant teachers to deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students in general education settings, (b) examine the relationship between student academic performance and instructional support provided by the itinerant teacher, and (c) examine how service provision decisions are made by itinerant teachers. We used quantitative and qualitative data collected during a 5-year longitudinal study. Data were obtained from teacher questionnaires, standardized achievement tests, and interviews. Results indicated that itinerant teachers of DHH students provided direct academic instruction to 60% of students with the majority of students receiving instruction in reading and writing. They provided instruction in nonacademic areas to 80% of students with a majority of students receiving instruction in self-advocacy. Low-achieving students were the most likely to receive academic instruction from the itinerant teacher. Decisions regarding service time were influenced by student needs and performance, age, parental request, and transitions. PMID:27179117

  6. Time jitter versus additive noise in a game theory context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Abdellatif; Boyer, Remy; Duhamel, Pierre

    2005-03-01

    Imperfectly synchronized watermark communication is almost the most hostile watermark channel. A desynchronization attack can yield a very high probability of bit error rate by simply moving the watermark from elements it has been embedded in, inhibiting hence its reliable retrieval from the original. In this paper, we adress attacks that can be modelled by an Additive White Gaussian Noise and Jitter (AWGN&J) channel in a game theory context. The AWGN&J channel was initially introduced to model local time fluctuations in the context of magnetic recording media. This channel is first briefly presented and characterized in terms of induced objective and perceptual distorsions. Also, performance loss of the one-bit watermarking Spread-Spectrum based scheme over an AWGN&J channel is derived. Then, results are applied in a game theoretic context to answer some questions such as: (i) for a given distortion budget, and from the attacker point of view, what part should be allocated to the desynchronization, and what part should be allocated to the additive noise?, (ii) from the defender point of view, what is the worst distortion? and (iii) is there means to countermeasure the attacker (limit the amount of objective distorsion)?

  7. 19 CFR 201.14 - Computation of time, additional hearings, postponements, continuances, and extensions of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of time, additional hearings, postponements, continuances, and extensions of time. 201.14 Section 201.14 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF GENERAL APPLICATION Initiation and Conduct of Investigations § 201.14 Computation of time,...

  8. Cumulative Instructional Time and Relative Effectiveness Conclusions: Extending Research on Response Intervals, Learning, and Measurement Scale.

    PubMed

    Black, Michelle P; Skinner, Christopher H; Forbes, Bethany E; McCurdy, Merilee; Coleman, Mari Beth; Davis, Kristie; Gettelfinger, Maripat

    2016-03-01

    Adapted alternating treatments designs were used to evaluate three computer-based flashcard reading interventions (1-s, 3-s, or 5-s response intervals) across two students with disabilities. When learning was plotted with cumulative instructional sessions on the horizontal axis, the session-series graphs suggest that the interventions were similarly effective. When the same data were plotted as a function of cumulative instructional seconds, time-series graphs suggest that the 1-s intervention caused the most rapid learning for one student. Discussion focuses on applied implications of comparative effectiveness studies and why measures of cumulative instructional time are needed to identify the most effective intervention(s).Comparative effectiveness studies may not identify the intervention which causes the most rapid learning.Session-series repeated measures are not the same as time-series repeated measures.Measuring the time students spend in each intervention (i.e., cumulative instructional seconds) allows practitioners to identify interventions that enhance learning most rapidly.Student time spent working under interventions is critical for drawing applied conclusions. PMID:27606240

  9. Teaching Rational Number Addition Using Video Games: The Effects of Instructional Variation. CRESST Report 808

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendlinski, Terry P.; Chung, Greg K. W. K.; Binning, Kevin R.; Buschang, Rebecca E.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the meaning of rational numbers and how to perform mathematical operations with those numbers seems to be a perennial problem in the United States for both adults and children. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that giving students more time to practice using rational numbers in an environment that enticed them to apply their…

  10. Creating Non-Instructional Time for Elementary School Teachers: Strategies from Schools in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Cynthia; Emerick, Scott; Hirsch, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Governor Mike Easley signed into law House Bill 1151 in July 2006, requiring schools to develop a plan to provide at least five hours of duty-free instructional planning time per week and a daily duty-free lunch period for every teacher. Acknowledging the difficulties in creating school schedules that incorporate sufficient non-instructional…

  11. Development and Implementation of Procedures to Maximize Instructional Time in an Itinerant Special Education Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Robert A.

    The doctoral thesis, three-fourths of which consists of appendixes, describes the development and implementation of procedures to maximize the individualized instruction time of speech, hearing, and visually handicapped students in a public school itinerant special education setting in Pennsylvania. A brief review of the Education for All…

  12. An Analysis of Non-Instructional Time Management of Undergraduates in Southern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogonor, B. O.; Nwadiani, Mon

    2006-01-01

    The study probed the management of non-instructional time by undergraduates in Southern Nigerian Universities. A research question was raised and one hypothesis was proposed for the study. All undergraduates in ten Southern Nigerian Universities during the 1999/2000 session comprised the population of the study. The sample was made up of 535…

  13. Making Time for Instructional Leadership. Volume 1: The Evolution of the SAM Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Grissom, Jason A.; Neumerski, Christine M.; Murphy, Joseph; Blissett, Richard; Porter, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume report describes the "SAM (School Administration Manager) process," an approach that about 700 schools around the nation are using to direct more of principals' time and effort to improve teaching and learning in classrooms. Research has shown that a principal's instructional leadership is second only to teaching among…

  14. Attributes of Effective and Efficient Kindergarten Reading Intervention: An Examination of Instructional Time and Design Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Deborah C.; Kame'enui, Edward J.; Harn, Beth; Coyne, Michael D.; Stoolmiller, Mike; Santoro, Lana Edwards; Smith, Sylvia B.; Beck, Carrie Thomas; Kaufman, Noah K.

    2007-01-01

    A randomized experimental design with three levels of intervention was used to compare the effects of beginning reading interventions on early phonemic, decoding, and spelling outcomes of 96 kindergartners identified as at risk for reading difficulty. The three instructional interventions varied systematically along two dimensions--time and design…

  15. Tipping the Scales: National Trends of Declining Social Studies Instructional Time in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heafner, Tina L.; Fitchett, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    By means of data from the most comprehensive source of teacher data in the nation, Schools and Public School Teacher Staffing Survey (SASS), we designed a follow-up quantitative study to test the effects of two decades of national policy mandates on instructional time allotments for core academic subjects. We used data from the SASS data from…

  16. Teaching Memorized Spelling with a Microcomputer: Time Delay and Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Kay B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A computer-assisted instruction program was used to teach spelling words to 5 learning-disabled or educable mentally handicapped students (ages 11-12) using a time delay procedure; manage content presentation based on individual student responding; and collect performance data. Four students learned the words, though maintenance varied.…

  17. The Use of Instructional Time in the Typical High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Through focused observations of teaching practices in 15 classrooms representing 2,475 minutes, a number of instructional patterns were revealed. The majority of time students spend in high school requires that they listen or wait. Students are engaged in authentic reading, writing, and peer work for only a small fraction of the day. If high…

  18. Instructions for additional qualitative scoring of the initial-letter Word-association Test.

    PubMed

    Zivković, M

    1994-04-01

    An additional scoring method is based on grouping test-words according to whether the same sign is given by subjects to the test-words. In this way five test-word categories are formed, Eros (test-words with double plus signs), demi-Eros (single plus sign), demi-Thanatos (single minus), Thanatos (double minus), and Deviant (+/- and theta signs). The next step in scoring is to count the number of test-words in a given scoring category whose meanings do not conform. The greater the discrepancy between the test-word category and its meaning, the less well adapted is the subject. Several illustrative protocols are discussed. PMID:8022674

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. 19 CFR 210.6 - Computation of time, additional hearings, postponements, continuances, and extensions of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of time, additional hearings, postponements, continuances, and extensions of time. 210.6 Section 210.6 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Rules of General Applicability §...

  1. Assessment of Professional Development Activities, Instructional Needs, and Delivery Methods of Part-Time Technical and Occupational Faculty in U.S. Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Brian A.; McCaslin, N. L.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to describe the frequency of professional development activities provided to part-time occupational and technical program faculty. Additionally, the perceptions of occupational education officers concerning the instructional professional development needs and their appropriate delivery method(s) for these faculty members…

  2. The Effects of Diagrams and Time-Compressed Instruction on Learning and Learners' Perceptions of Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Raymond S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of diagrams and time-compressed instruction on learning and learners' perceptions of cognitive load. The following design factors, visuals (visuals and non-visuals) and time-compressed instruction (0%-normal paced, 25, and 50%) were presented to 216 university students to analyze learning in a…

  3. The Effects of Time-Compressed Instruction and Redundancy on Learning and Learners' Perceptions of Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Can increasing the speed of audio narration in multimedia instruction decrease training time and still maintain learning? The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of time-compressed instruction and redundancy on learning and learners' perceptions of cognitive load. 154 university students were placed into conditions that consisted of…

  4. Additional enhancer copies, with intact cdx binding sites, anteriorize Hoxa-7/lacZ expression in mouse embryos: evidence in keeping with an instructional cdx gradient.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Stephen J; Cockley, Adam; Drage, Deborah

    2004-09-01

    Expression of a Hoxa-7/lacZ reporter construct in transgenic mouse embryos is shifted anteriorly when the upstream enhancer is multimerized. The shift occurs in spinal ganglia, neurectoderm and in both paraxial and lateral plate mesoderms. Much of the multimer effect is inhibited by destruction of a single caudal (cdx) binding motif in the additional copies of the enhancer. These observations are in agreement with earlier enhancer multimerization analyses made for Hoxb-8 (Charite et al., 1998). Our findings therefore provide further evidence that the anterior limit of a Hox gene's expression domain is normally dependent upon and is determined by, the dosage of transcription factor(s) which bind to its enhancer element(s) and that these factors may be, or must include, the cdx proteins. We consider these findings in terms of both instructional (morphogen-like) gradient and timing models for the establishment of Hox gene expression domains. Enhancer multimerization results in an earlier onset of Hoxa-7/lacZ activity in the embryo. In neurectoderm at 8.7 days and in mesoderm at 10.5 days, the anterior boundaries of expression are located posterior to those seen at some earlier stages of development. We discuss how these findings are in keeping with a model where Hox expression boundaries become set along instructional cdx gradients, formed by cdx decay in cells moving away from the primitive streak region. PMID:15470633

  5. Instructional Design Process for a Course on Time Management for Head Nurses and Supervisors at a Veterans Administration Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geering, Adrian D.

    This paper develops an instructional design process for teaching a time management course to head nurses and supervisors. (The course was conducted at the Veterans' Administration Medical Center, Lincoln, Nebraska, and was based on "A New Instructional Design Development Process for Instructors of Adults," by Mary Jane Even.) The paper covers…

  6. The Effects of Constant Time Delay and Instructive Feedback on the Acquisition of English and Spanish Sight Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelman, Michelle; Vail, Cynthia O.; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca G.

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this study evaluated the acquisition of instructive feedback information presented to four kindergarten children with mild delays taught in dyads using a constant time delay (CTD) procedure. They also assessed the learning of observational (dyadic partner) information within this instructional arrangement. A multiple probe design…

  7. Timing of Getter Material Addition in Cementitious Wasteforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawter, A.; Qafoku, N. P.; Asmussen, M.; Neeway, J.; Smith, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    A cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, is being evaluated as a possible supplemental immobilization technology for the Hanford sites's low activity waste (LAW), which contains radioactive 99Tc and 129I, as part of the tank waste cleanup mission. Cast Stone is made of a dry blend 47% blast furnace slag, 45% fly ash, and 8% ordinary Portland cement, mixed with a low-activity waste (LAW). To improve the retention of Tc and/or I in Cast Stone, materials with a high affinity for Tc and/or I, termed "getters," can be added to provide a stable domain for the radionuclides of concern. Previous testing conducted with a variety of getters has identified Tin(II)-Apatite and Silver Exchanged Zeolite as promising candidates for Tc and I, respectively. Investigation into the sequence in which getters are added to Cast Stone was performed following two methods: 1) adding getters to the Cast Stone dry blend, and then mixing with liquid waste, and 2) adding getters to the liquid waste first, followed by addition of the Cast Stone dry blend. Cast Stone monolith samples were prepared with each method and leach tests, following EPA method 1315, were conducted in either distilled water or simulated vadose zone porewater for a period of up to 63 days. The leachate was analyzed for Tc, I, Na, NO3-, NO2- and Cr with ICP-MS, ICP-OES and ion chromatography and the results indicated that the Cast Stone with getter addition in the dry blend mix (method 1) has lower rates of Tc and I leaching. The mechanisms of radionuclide release from the Cast Stone were also investigated with a variety of solid phase characterization techniques of the monoliths before and after leaching, such as XRD, SEM/EDS, TEM/SAED and other spectroscopic techniques.

  8. Detection of continuous-time quaternion signals in additive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Moreno, Jesús; Ruiz-Molina, Juan Carlos; Oya, Antonia; Quesada-Rubio, José M.

    2012-12-01

    Different kinds of quaternion signal detection problems in continuous-time by using a widely linear processing are dealt with. The suggested solutions are based on an extension of the Karhunen-Loève expansion to the quaternion domain which provides uncorrelated scalar real-valued random coefficients. This expansion presents the notable advantage of transforming the original four-dimensional eigen problem to a one-dimensional problem. Firstly, we address the problem of detecting a quaternion deterministic signal in quaternion Gaussian noise and a version of Pitcher's Theorem is given. Also the particular case of a general quaternion Wiener noise is studied and an extension of the Cameron-Martin formula is presented. Finally, the problem of detecting a quaternion random signal in quaternion white Gaussian noise is tackled. In such a case, it is shown that the detector depends on the quaternion widely linear estimator of the signal.

  9. Effects of instructed timing and tempo on snare drum sound in drum kit performance.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Anne; Waadeland, Carl Haakon; Sundt, Henrik G; Witek, Maria A G

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on an experiment investigating the expressive means with which performers of groove-based musics signal the intended timing of a rhythmic event. Ten expert drummers were instructed to perform a rock pattern in three different tempi and three different timing styles: "laid-back," "on-the-beat," and "pushed." The results show that there were systematic differences in the intensity and timbre (i.e., sound-pressure level, temporal centroid, and spectral centroid) of series of snare strokes played with these different timing styles at the individual level. A common pattern was found across subjects concerning the effect of instructed timing on sound-pressure level: a majority of the drummers played laid-back strokes louder than on-the-beat strokes. Furthermore, when the tempo increased, there was a general increase in sound-pressure level and a decrease in spectral centroid across subjects. The results show that both temporal and sound-related features are important in order to indicate that a rhythmic event has been played intentionally early, late, or on-the-beat, and provide insight into the ways in which musicians communicate at the microrhythmic level in groove-based musics. PMID:26520311

  10. Effects of a Reduced Time-Out Interval on Compliance with the Time-Out Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Jeanne M.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Yakich, Theresa M.; Van Camp, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Time-out is a negative punishment procedure that parents and teachers commonly use to reduce problem behavior; however, specific time-out parameters have not been evaluated adequately. One parameter that has received relatively little attention in the literature is the mode of administration (verbal or physical) of time-out. In this study, we…

  11. International Computer-Based Literacy Instruction: The Time Has Come (Editorial Comment).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Jay; Tullis, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Discusses (1) literacy and the related concepts of functional literacy and illiteracy; (2) what is meant by computer technology for literacy instruction; (3) advantages and disadvantages of computer-based literacy instruction; and (4) today's efforts and tomorrow's expectations. (RS)

  12. Time for Teachers: Leveraging Expanded Time to Strengthen Instruction and Empower Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Claire; Chan, Roy; Farbman, David A.; Novoryta, Ami

    2015-01-01

    This study looks deeply inside 17 schools that stand at the vanguard of the current revolution in teaching. This new National Center on Time & Learning (NCTL) report reveals the substantive ways in which these schools are providing their teachers with more time to reflect on, develop, and hone their craft, by very explicitly leveraging an…

  13. An Alternative Time for Telling: When Conceptual Instruction Prior to Problem Solving Improves Mathematical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyfe, Emily R.; DeCaro, Marci S.; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Background: The sequencing of learning materials greatly influences the knowledge that learners construct. Recently, learning theorists have focused on the sequencing of instruction in relation to solving related problems. The general consensus suggests explicit instruction should be provided; however, when to provide instruction remains unclear.…

  14. A wearable device for real-time motion error detection and vibrotactile instructional cuing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom-Chan; Chen, Shu; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2011-08-01

    We have developed a mobile instrument for motion instruction and correction (MIMIC) that enables an expert (i.e., physical therapist) to map his/her movements to a trainee (i.e., patient) in a hands-free fashion. MIMIC comprises an expert module (EM) and a trainee module (TM). Both the EM and TM are composed of six-degree-of-freedom inertial measurement units, microcontrollers, and batteries. The TM also has an array of actuators that provide the user with vibrotactile instructional cues. The expert wears the EM, and his/her relevant body position is computed by an algorithm based on an extended Kalman filter that provides asymptotic state estimation. The captured expert body motion information is transmitted wirelessly to the trainee, and based on the computed difference between the expert and trainee motion, directional instructions are displayed via vibrotactile stimulation to the skin. The trainee is instructed to move in the direction of the vibration sensation until the vibration is eliminated. Two proof-of-concept studies involving young, healthy subjects were conducted using a simplified version of the MIMIC system (pre-specified target trajectories representing ideal expert movements and only two actuators) during anterior-posterior trunk movements. The first study was designed to investigate the effects of changing the expert-trainee error thresholds (0.5(°), 1.0(°), and 1.5(°)) and varying the nature of the control signal (proportional, proportional plus derivative). Expert-subject cross-correlation values were maximized (0.99) and average position errors (0.33(°)) and time delays (0.2 s) were minimized when the controller used a 0.5(°) error threshold and proportional plus derivative feedback control signal. The second study used the best performing activation threshold and control signal determined from the first study to investigate subject performance when the motion task complexity and speed were varied. Subject performance decreased as motion

  15. Internet Access and Use of the Web for Instruction: A National Study of Full-Time and Part-Time Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akroyd, Duane; Jaeger, Audrey; Jackowski, Melissa; Jones, Logan C.

    2004-01-01

    This research explored the issues of access to the internet and use of the web for instructional purposes between full-time and part-time community college faculty. The findings that 40% of part-time faculty do not have Internet access at work would seem to indicate that part-time faculty are poorly integrated into the technology infrastructure of…

  16. Long-term priming of visual search prevails against the passage of time and counteracting instructions.

    PubMed

    Kruijne, Wouter; Meeter, Martijn

    2016-08-01

    Studies on intertrial priming have shown that in visual search experiments, the preceding trial automatically affects search performance: facilitating it when the target features repeat and giving rise to switch costs when they change-so-called (short-term) intertrial priming. These effects also occur at longer time scales: When 1 of 2 possible target colors is more frequent during an experiment block, this results in a prolonged and persistent facilitation for the color that was biased, long after the frequency bias is gone-so-called long-term priming. In this study, we explore the robustness of such long-term priming. In Experiment 1, participants were fully informed of the bias and instructed to prioritize the other unbiased color. Despite these instructions, long-term priming of the biased color persisted in this block, suggesting that guidance by long-term priming is an implicit effect. In Experiment 2, long-term priming was built up in 1 experimental session and was then assessed in a second session a week later. Long-term priming persisted across this week, emphasizing that long-term priming is truly a phenomenon of long-term memory. The results support the view that priming results from the automatic and implicit retrieval of memory traces of past trials. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26866654

  17. Comparison of Motor Inhibition in Variants of the Instructed-Delay Choice Reaction Time Task.

    PubMed

    Quoilin, Caroline; Lambert, Julien; Jacob, Benvenuto; Klein, Pierre-Alexandre; Duque, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Using instructed-delay choice reaction time (RT) paradigms, many previous studies have shown that the motor system is transiently inhibited during response preparation: motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex are typically suppressed during the delay period. This effect has been observed in both selected and non-selected effectors, although MEP changes in selected effectors have been more inconsistent across task versions. Here, we compared changes in MEP amplitudes in three different variants of an instructed-delay choice RT task. All variants required participants to choose between left and right index finger movements but the responses were either provided "in the air" (Variant 1), on a regular keyboard (Variant 2), or on a response device designed to control from premature responses (Variant 3). The task variants also differed according to the visual layout (more concrete in Variant 3) and depending on whether participants received a feedback of their performance (absent in Variant 1). Behavior was globally comparable between the three variants of the task although the propensity to respond prematurely was highest in Variant 2 and lowest in Variant 3. MEPs elicited in a non-selected hand were similarly suppressed in the three variants of the task. However, significant differences emerged when considering MEPs elicited in the selected hand: these MEPs were suppressed in Variants 1 and 3 whereas they were often facilitated in Variant 2, especially in the right dominant hand. In conclusion, MEPs elicited in selected muscles seem to be more sensitive to small variations to the task design than those recorded in non-selected effectors, probably because they reflect a complex combination of inhibitory and facilitatory influences on the motor output system. Finally, the use of a standard keyboard seems to be particularly inappropriate because it encourages participants to respond promptly with no

  18. A Course-Based Research Experience: How Benefits Change with Increased Investment in Instructional Time

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Christopher D.; Alvarez, Consuelo J.; Bednarski, April E.; Dunbar, David; Goodman, Anya L.; Reinke, Catherine; Rosenwald, Anne G.; Wolyniak, Michael J.; Bailey, Cheryl; Barnard, Daron; Bazinet, Christopher; Beach, Dale L.; Bedard, James E. J.; Bhalla, Satish; Braverman, John; Burg, Martin; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Chung, Hui-Min; Clase, Kari; DeJong, Randall J.; DiAngelo, Justin R.; Du, Chunguang; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Eisler, Heather; Emerson, Julia A.; Frary, Amy; Frohlich, Donald; Gosser, Yuying; Govind, Shubha; Haberman, Adam; Hark, Amy T.; Hauser, Charles; Hoogewerf, Arlene; Hoopes, Laura L. M.; Howell, Carina E.; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Christopher J.; Kadlec, Lisa; Kaehler, Marian; Silver Key, S. Catherine; Kleinschmit, Adam; Kokan, Nighat P.; Kopp, Olga; Kuleck, Gary; Leatherman, Judith; Lopilato, Jane; MacKinnon, Christy; Martinez-Cruzado, Juan Carlos; McNeil, Gerard; Mel, Stephanie; Mistry, Hemlata; Nagengast, Alexis; Overvoorde, Paul; Paetkau, Don W.; Parrish, Susan; Peterson, Celeste N.; Preuss, Mary; Reed, Laura K.; Revie, Dennis; Robic, Srebrenka; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer; Rubin, Michael R.; Saville, Kenneth; Schroeder, Stephanie; Sharif, Karim; Shaw, Mary; Skuse, Gary; Smith, Christopher D.; Smith, Mary A.; Smith, Sheryl T.; Spana, Eric; Spratt, Mary; Sreenivasan, Aparna; Stamm, Joyce; Szauter, Paul; Thompson, Jeffrey S.; Wawersik, Matthew; Youngblom, James; Zhou, Leming; Mardis, Elaine R.; Buhler, Jeremy; Leung, Wilson; Lopatto, David; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2014-01-01

    There is widespread agreement that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs should provide undergraduates with research experience. Practical issues and limited resources, however, make this a challenge. We have developed a bioinformatics project that provides a course-based research experience for students at a diverse group of schools and offers the opportunity to tailor this experience to local curriculum and institution-specific student needs. We assessed both attitude and knowledge gains, looking for insights into how students respond given this wide range of curricular and institutional variables. While different approaches all appear to result in learning gains, we find that a significant investment of course time is required to enable students to show gains commensurate to a summer research experience. An alumni survey revealed that time spent on a research project is also a significant factor in the value former students assign to the experience one or more years later. We conclude: 1) implementation of a bioinformatics project within the biology curriculum provides a mechanism for successfully engaging large numbers of students in undergraduate research; 2) benefits to students are achievable at a wide variety of academic institutions; and 3) successful implementation of course-based research experiences requires significant investment of instructional time for students to gain full benefit. PMID:24591510

  19. A course-based research experience: how benefits change with increased investment in instructional time.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Christopher D; Alvarez, Consuelo J; Bednarski, April E; Dunbar, David; Goodman, Anya L; Reinke, Catherine; Rosenwald, Anne G; Wolyniak, Michael J; Bailey, Cheryl; Barnard, Daron; Bazinet, Christopher; Beach, Dale L; Bedard, James E J; Bhalla, Satish; Braverman, John; Burg, Martin; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Chung, Hui-Min; Clase, Kari; Dejong, Randall J; Diangelo, Justin R; Du, Chunguang; Eckdahl, Todd T; Eisler, Heather; Emerson, Julia A; Frary, Amy; Frohlich, Donald; Gosser, Yuying; Govind, Shubha; Haberman, Adam; Hark, Amy T; Hauser, Charles; Hoogewerf, Arlene; Hoopes, Laura L M; Howell, Carina E; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Christopher J; Kadlec, Lisa; Kaehler, Marian; Silver Key, S Catherine; Kleinschmit, Adam; Kokan, Nighat P; Kopp, Olga; Kuleck, Gary; Leatherman, Judith; Lopilato, Jane; Mackinnon, Christy; Martinez-Cruzado, Juan Carlos; McNeil, Gerard; Mel, Stephanie; Mistry, Hemlata; Nagengast, Alexis; Overvoorde, Paul; Paetkau, Don W; Parrish, Susan; Peterson, Celeste N; Preuss, Mary; Reed, Laura K; Revie, Dennis; Robic, Srebrenka; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer; Rubin, Michael R; Saville, Kenneth; Schroeder, Stephanie; Sharif, Karim; Shaw, Mary; Skuse, Gary; Smith, Christopher D; Smith, Mary A; Smith, Sheryl T; Spana, Eric; Spratt, Mary; Sreenivasan, Aparna; Stamm, Joyce; Szauter, Paul; Thompson, Jeffrey S; Wawersik, Matthew; Youngblom, James; Zhou, Leming; Mardis, Elaine R; Buhler, Jeremy; Leung, Wilson; Lopatto, David; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2014-01-01

    There is widespread agreement that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs should provide undergraduates with research experience. Practical issues and limited resources, however, make this a challenge. We have developed a bioinformatics project that provides a course-based research experience for students at a diverse group of schools and offers the opportunity to tailor this experience to local curriculum and institution-specific student needs. We assessed both attitude and knowledge gains, looking for insights into how students respond given this wide range of curricular and institutional variables. While different approaches all appear to result in learning gains, we find that a significant investment of course time is required to enable students to show gains commensurate to a summer research experience. An alumni survey revealed that time spent on a research project is also a significant factor in the value former students assign to the experience one or more years later. We conclude: 1) implementation of a bioinformatics project within the biology curriculum provides a mechanism for successfully engaging large numbers of students in undergraduate research; 2) benefits to students are achievable at a wide variety of academic institutions; and 3) successful implementation of course-based research experiences requires significant investment of instructional time for students to gain full benefit. PMID:24591510

  20. Student and Teacher Ratings of Instructional Quality: Consistency of Ratings over Time, Agreement, and Predictive Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Göllner, Richard; Werth, Sarah; Voss, Thamar; Schmitz, Bernhard; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has shown that the agreement between teacher and student ratings of instructional quality is, at best, moderate, and the associations between measures of instructional quality and outcomes such as standardized achievement are typically small and somewhat mixed across both perspectives. One explanation for these low-to-moderate…

  1. An Alternative Time for Telling: When Conceptual Instruction Prior to Exploration Improves Mathematical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyfe, Emily R.; DeCaro, Marci S.; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany

    2013-01-01

    An emerging consensus suggests that guided discovery, which combines discovery and instruction, is a more effective educational approach than either one in isolation. The goal of this study was to examine two specific forms of guided discovery, testing whether conceptual instruction should precede or follow exploratory problem solving. In both…

  2. Presentation Time Concerning System-Paced Multimedia Instructions and the Superiority of Learner Pacing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiller, Klaus D.; Petzold, Kirstin; Zinnbauer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The superiority of learner-paced over system-paced instructions was demonstrated in multiple experiments. In these experiments, the system-paced presentations were highly speeded, causing cognitive overload, while the learner-paced instructions allowed adjustments of the presentational flow to the learner's needs by pacing facilities, mostly…

  3. Simulation and Community-Based Instruction of Vending Machines with Time Delay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browder, Diane M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The study evaluated the use of simulated instruction on vending machine use as an adjunct to community-based instruction with two moderately retarded children. Results showed concurrent acquisition of the vending machine skills across trained and untrained sites. (Author/DB)

  4. Using Momentary Time Sampling to Estimate Minutes of Physical Activity in Physical Education: Validation of Scores for the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Edward M.; Coleman, Karen J.; Lensegrav, Tera L.; Fallon, Jennifer A.

    2006-01-01

    The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) is a direct observation system specifically developed for use during physical education (PE; McKenzie, 1991; McKenzie, Sallis, & Nader, 1991). The purpose of this study was to validate the estimates of time spent in various physical activity intensities obtained with the paper and pencil…

  5. A method for real-time generation of augmented reality work instructions via expert movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaskar; Winer, Eliot

    2015-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) offers tremendous potential for a wide range of fields including entertainment, medicine, and engineering. AR allows digital models to be integrated with a real scene (typically viewed through a video camera) to provide useful information in a variety of contexts. The difficulty in authoring and modifying scenes is one of the biggest obstacles to widespread adoption of AR. 3D models must be created, textured, oriented and positioned to create the complex overlays viewed by a user. This often requires using multiple software packages in addition to performing model format conversions. In this paper, a new authoring tool is presented which uses a novel method to capture product assembly steps performed by a user with a depth+RGB camera. Through a combination of computer vision and imaging process techniques, each individual step is decomposed into objects and actions. The objects are matched to those in a predetermined geometry library and the actions turned into animated assembly steps. The subsequent instruction set is then generated with minimal user input. A proof of concept is presented to establish the method's viability.

  6. The Effects of Challenging Goal Instructions upon Goal Setting and Performance on a Reaction-Time Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Harold R.

    1981-01-01

    Forty-eight female university students participated in a reaction-time experiment in which challenging goal instructions were manipulated under conditions of minimal feedback. Findings extend Locke's views of the effects of personal goals on subsequent performance to applications involving minimal implicit knowlege of results. (Author/MP)

  7. Effect of Instruction in Appropriate Rubato Usage on the Onset Timings of Musicians in Performances of Bach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher M.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effect of instruction in the use of specific rhythmic nuances on the timings of a musical performance. Forty volunteer upper-division and graduate students performed Johann Sebastian Bach's Suite no. 3 for Violoncello solo, Bouree no. 1, using a computer software program. Discusses the results. (CMK)

  8. Making Time for Instructional Leadership. Volume 2: The Feasibility of a Randomized Control Trial of the SAM Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Grissom, Jason A.; Neumerski, Christine M.; Murphy, Joseph; Blissett, Richard; Porter, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume report describes the "SAM (School Administration Manager) process," an approach that about 700 schools around the nation are using to direct more of principals' time and effort to improve teaching and learning in classrooms. Research has shown that a principal's instructional leadership is second only to teaching among…

  9. Modifying the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time to Measure Teacher Practices Related to Physical Activity Promotion: SOFIT+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Webster, Collin A.; Erwin, Heather; Beighle, Aaron; Beets, Michael W.; Choukroun, Hadrien; Kaysing, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) is commonly used to measure variables related to physical activity during physical education (PE). However, SOFIT does not yield detailed information about teacher practices related to children's moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). This study describes the modification of SOFIT…

  10. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  11. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  12. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  13. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  14. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  15. How to Make Additional Time Matter: Integrating Individualized Tutorials into an Extended Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the effect of extending the school day is decidedly mixed because of the stark differences in how schools use additional time. In this paper, I focus narrowly on the effect of additional time used for individualized tutorials. In 2005, MATCH Charter Public High School integrated two hours of tutorials throughout an extended day. The…

  16. MIMD (multiple instruction multiple data) multiprocessor system for real-time image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirsch, Peter; Jeschke, Hartwig

    1991-06-01

    Anovel MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) based architecture consisting of multiple processing elements (PE) has been developed. This architecture is adapted to real-time processing of sequences of different tasks for local image segments. Each PE contains an arithmetic processing unit (APU), adapted to parallel processing of low level operations, and a high level and control processor (HLCP) for medium and high level operations and control of the PE. This HLCP can be a standard signal processor or a RISC processor. Because of the local control of each PE by the HLCP and a SIMD structure of the APU, the overall system architecture is characterized as MIMD based with a local SIMD structure for low level processing. Due to an overlapped computation and communication the multiprocessor system achieves a linear speedup compared to a single processing element. Main parts of the PE have been realized as two ASICs in a 1.5 jim CMOS-Process. With a system clock rate of 25MHz, each PE provides a peak performance of 400 Mega operations per second (MOPS).

  17. It's about time: the relationships between coverage and instructional practices in college calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Estrella; Ellis, Jessica; Rasmussen, Chris

    2016-05-01

    This paper is based on a large-scale empirical study designed to investigate Calculus I programmes across the United States to better understand the relationship between instructors' concerns about coverage, instructional practices, and the nature of the material covered. We found that there was no association between instructors feeling pressured to go through material quickly to cover all the required topics and intended pacing. Furthermore, our results suggest that both intended pacing and feelings of pressure are poor indicators of instructional practices.

  18. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.483 Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional...

  19. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.483 Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional...

  20. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.483 Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional...

  1. Classroom quality as a predictor of first graders' time in non-instructional activities and literacy achievement.

    PubMed

    McLean, Leigh; Sparapani, Nicole; Toste, Jessica R; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated how quality of the classroom learning environment influenced first grade students' (n=533) time spent in two non-instructional classroom activities (off-task and in transition) and their subsequent literacy outcomes. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that higher classroom quality was related to higher student performance in reading comprehension and expressive vocabulary. Further, classroom quality predicted the amount of time students spent off-task and in transitions in the classroom, with slopes of change across the year particularly impacted. Mediation effects were detected in the case of expressive vocabulary such that the influence of classroom quality on students' achievement operated through students' time spent in these non-instructional activities. Results highlight the importance of overall classroom quality to how students navigate the classroom environment during learning opportunities, with subsequent literacy achievement impacted. Implications for policy and educational practices are discussed. PMID:27268569

  2. Bifurcated method and apparatus for floating point addition with decreased latency time

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  3. Beyond Traditional Sampling Synthesis: Real-Time Timbre Morphing Using Additive Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haken, Lippold; Fitz, Kelly; Christensen, Paul

    Because of its theoretical advantage for making timbral manipulations, sine wave additive synthesis is an attractive alternative to sampling synthesis, which is currently the most popular method for real-time synthesizers. Nevertheless, until recently performers have seldom used additive synthesis because of the practical difficulty of accomplishing these timbral manipulations, which inherently require modification of large numbers of time-varying amplitude and frequency control functions.

  4. Using QuickTime virtual reality objects in computer-assisted instruction of gross anatomy: Yorick--the VR Skull.

    PubMed

    Nieder, G L; Scott, J N; Anderson, M D

    2000-01-01

    QuickTime virtual reality (QTVR) is a software technology that creates, on a normal computer screen, the illusion of holding and turning a three-dimensional object. QTVR is a practical photo-realistic virtual reality technology that is easily implemented on any current personal computer or via the Internet with no special hardware requirements. Because of its ability to present dynamic photo-quality images, we reasoned that QTVR can provide a more realistic presentation of anatomic structure than two-dimensional atlas pictures and facilitate study of specimens outside the dissection lab. We created QTVR objects, using portions of the skull, and incorporated them into an instructional program for first-year medical students. To obtain images, the bones of the skull were mounted on a rotating table, and a digital camera was positioned on a swinging arm so that the focal point remained coincident with the rotational center of the object as the camera was panned through a vertical arc. Digital images were captured at intervals of 10 degrees rotation of the object (horizontal pan). The camera was then swung through an arc with additional horizontal pan sequences taken at 10 degrees intervals of vertical pan. The images were edited to place the object on a solid black background, then assembled into a linear QuickTime movie. The linear movie was processed to yield a QTVR object movie that can be manipulated on vertical and horizontal axes using the mouse. QTVR movies were incorporated into an interactive environment that provided labeling, links to text-based information and self-testing capabilities. This program, Yorick-the VR Skull, has been used in our first-year medical and graduate gross anatomy courses for the past two years. Results of student evaluation of the program indicate that this QTVR-based program is an effective learning tool that is well received by students. PMID:10873221

  5. Troubled Times: The Role of Instructional Design in a Modern Dual-Mode University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyle, Clifford Omodele; Moseley, Alexander; Hayes, Nichola

    2012-01-01

    Reduced higher education funding and other austerity measures imposed by governments and institutions have resulted in cascading cuts in resources for programme design, delivery and revision. The instructional design function is often the first casualty of these cuts in many universities. This paper considers the roles and functions of…

  6. Finding Space and Time for the Visual in K-12 Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassett, Dawnene D.; Schieble, Melissa B.

    2007-01-01

    Dawnene D. Hassett and Melissa B. Schieble contend that literacy instruction must include attention to the multiple ways in which print and visual images work together. They propose ways to update accepted reading strategies "with visual texts and new literacies in mind." Using examples from picture books and graphic novels, they expand our…

  7. Instruction and Service Time Decisions: Itinerant Services to Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antia, Shirin D.; Rivera, M. Christina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) describe the specific kinds of services provided by itinerant teachers to deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students in general education settings, (b) examine the relationship between student academic performance and instructional support provided by the itinerant teacher, and (c) examine how service provision…

  8. Instructional Variability in Bilingual Education Programs: Time of Year, Raters, and Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branum-Martin, Lee; Mehta, Paras D.; Carlson, Coleen D.; Francis, David J.; Foorman, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    There are many types of programs for Spanish speaking students in the US, with varying methods and goals. Some preliminary work suggests that bilingual classrooms may differ widely in instruction, even under the same program labels. However, there are few studies which have compared the extent to which various bilingual program models differ in…

  9. It's about Time: The Relationships between Coverage and Instructional Practices in College Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Estrella; Ellis, Jessica; Rasmussen, Chris

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a large-scale empirical study designed to investigate Calculus I programmes across the United States to better understand the relationship between instructors' concerns about coverage, instructional practices, and the nature of the material covered. We found that there was no association between instructors feeling pressured…

  10. The Relationship between Time in Computer-Assisted Instruction and the Increase in Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Rene M.

    2013-01-01

    Educational leadership appropriates significant amounts of money for technology in school budgets. Teachers must decide how to use technology to maximize student learning and make the most efficient use of instructional minutes. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to determine if a relationship existed between the amount of…

  11. The effect of silane addition timing on mixing processability and properties of silica reinforced rubber compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hee-Hoon; Jin, Hyun-Ho; Ha, Sung-Ho; Jang, Suk-Hee; Kang, Yong-Gu; Han, Min-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    A series of experiments were performed to determine an optimum balance between processability and performance of a highly loaded silica compound. The experiments evaluated 4 different silane injection times. All mixing related to silane addition was conducted with a scaled up "Tandem" mixer line. With exception to silane addition timing, almost all operating conditions were controlled between experimental features. It was found that when the silane addition was introduced earlier in the mixing cycle both the reaction was more complete and the bound rubber content was higher. But processability indicators such as sheet forming and Mooney plasticity were negatively impacted. On the other hand, as silane injection was delayed to later in the mixing process the filler dispersion and good sheet forming was improved. However both the bound rubber content and Silane reaction completion were decreased. With the changes in silane addition time, the processability and properties of a silica compound can be controlled.

  12. The Role of Additional Processing Time and Lexical Constraint in Spoken Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoCasto, Paul C.; Connine, Cynthia M.; Patterson, David

    2007-01-01

    Three phoneme monitoring experiments examined the manner in which additional processing time influences spoken word recognition. Experiment 1a introduced a version of the phoneme monitoring paradigm in which a silent interval is inserted prior to the word-final target phoneme. Phoneme monitoring reaction time decreased as the silent interval…

  13. Do Differences in School's Instruction Time Explain International Achievement Gaps in Maths, Science and Language? Evidence from Developed and Developing Countries. CEE DP 118

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavy, Victor

    2010-01-01

    There are large differences across countries in instructional time in public schooling institutions. For example, among European countries such as Belgium, France and Greece, pupils aged 15 have an average of over a thousand hours per year of total compulsory classroom instruction while in England, Luxembourg and Sweden the average is only 750…

  14. Additional technician tasks and turnaround time in the clinical Stat laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva-Salinas, Maria; Lillo, Rosa; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many additional tasks in the Stat laboratory (SL) increase the workload. It is necessary to control them because they can affect the service provided by the laboratory. Our aim is to calculate these tasks, study their evolution over a 10 year period, and compare turnaround times (TAT) in summer period to the rest of the year. Materials and methods Additional tasks were classified as “additional test request” and “additional sample”. We collected those incidences from the laboratory information system (LIS), and calculated their evolution over time. We also calculated the monthly TAT for troponin for Emergency department (ED) patients, as the difference between the verification and LIS registration time. A median time of 30 minutes was our indicator target. TAT results and tests workload in summer were compared to the rest of the year. Results Over a 10-year period, the technologists in the SL performed 51,385 additional tasks, a median of 475 per month. The workload was significantly higher during the summer (45,496 tests) than the rest of the year (44,555 tests) (P = 0.019). The troponin TAT did not show this variation between summer and the rest of the year, complying always with our 30 minutes indicator target. Conclusion The technicians accomplished a significant number of additional tasks, and the workload kept increasing over the period of 10 years. That did not affect the TAT results. PMID:27346970

  15. Integrating Chemical Information Instruction into the Chemistry Curriculum on Borrowed Time: The Multiyear Development and Evolution of a Virtual Instructional Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Danielle L.; Dalal, Heather A.; Dawson, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    The impetus to incorporate instruction on the efficient and responsible practice of chemical information literacy into the undergraduate chemistry curriculum has become exceptionally urgent. At Rider University, Chemical Information Instruction (CII) has accordingly evolved from face-to-face sessions into online modules to embed information…

  16. A Pilot Study of the Impact of Double-Dose Robust Vocabulary Instruction on Children's Vocabulary Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Ann M.; Davis, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    Double-dose instruction, in which instructional lessons are supplemented to provide additional instructional time, is a mechanism used in some schools for boosting outcomes in certain academic areas. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of double-dose vocabulary instruction, relative to single-dose and business-as-usual control…

  17. Effects of Self-Instructional Methods and Above Real Time Training (ARTT) for Maneuvering Tasks on a Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Khan, Javed Khan; Rossi, Marcia J.; Crane, Peter; Heath, Bruce E.; Knighten, Tremaine; Culpepper, Christi

    2003-01-01

    Personal computer based flight simulators are expanding opportunities for providing low-cost pilot training. One advantage of these devices is the opportunity to incorporate instructional features into training scenarios that might not be cost effective with earlier systems. Research was conducted to evaluate the utility of different instructional features using a coordinated level turn as an aircraft maneuvering task. In study I, a comparison was made between automated computer grades of performance with certified flight instructors grades. Every one of the six student volunteers conducted a flight with level turns at two different bank angles. The automated computer grades were based on prescribed tolerances on bank angle, airspeed and altitude. Two certified flight instructors independently examined the video tapes of heads up and instrument displays of the flights and graded them. The comparison of automated grades with the instructors grades was based on correlations between them. In study II, a 2x2 between subjects factorial design was used to devise and conduct an experiment. Comparison was made between real time training and above real time training and between feedback and no feedback in training. The performance measure to monitor progress in training was based on deviations in bank angle and altitude. The performance measure was developed after completion of the experiment including the training and test flights. It was not envisaged before the experiment. The experiment did not include self- instructions as it was originally planned, although feedback by experimenter to the trainee was included in the study.

  18. Effects of Self-Instructional Methods and Above Real Time Training (ARTT) for Maneuvering Tasks on a Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norlin, Ken (Technical Monitor); Ali, Syed Firasat; Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia J.; Crane, Peter; Heath, Bruce E.; Knighten, Tremaine; Culpepper, Christi

    2003-01-01

    Personal computer based flight simulators are expanding opportunities for providing low-cost pilot training. One advantage of these devices is the opportunity to incorporate instructional features into training scenarios that might not be cost effective with earlier systems. Research was conducted to evaluate the utility of different instructional features using a coordinated level turn as an aircraft maneuvering task. In study I, a comparison was made between automated computer grades of performance with certified flight instructors grades. Every one of the six student volunteers conducted a flight with level turns at two different bank angles. The automated computer grades were based on prescribed tolerances on bank angle, airspeed and altitude. Two certified flight instructors independently examined the video tapes of heads up and instrument displays of the flights and graded them. The comparison of automated grades with the instructors grades ms based on correlations between them. In study II, a 2x2 between subjects factorial design was used to devise and conduct an experiment. Comparison was made between real time training and above real time training and between feedback and no feedback in training. The performance measure to monitor progress in training was based on deviations in bank angle and altitude. The performance measure was developed after completion of the experiment including the training and test flights. It was not envisaged before the experiment. The experiment did not include self-instructions as it was originally planned, although feedback by experimenter to the trainee was included in the study.

  19. Cyclic additional optical true time delay for microwave beam steering with spectral filtering.

    PubMed

    Cao, Z; Lu, R; Wang, Q; Tessema, N; Jiao, Y; van den Boom, H P A; Tangdiongga, E; Koonen, A M J

    2014-06-15

    Optical true time delay (OTTD) is an attractive way to realize microwave beam steering (MBS) due to its inherent features of broadband, low-loss, and compactness. In this Letter, we propose a novel OTTD approach named cyclic additional optical true time delay (CAO-TTD). It applies additional integer delays of the microwave carrier frequency to achieve spectral filtering but without disturbing the spatial filtering (beam steering). Based on such concept, a broadband MBS scheme for high-capacity wireless communication is proposed, which allows the tuning of both spectral filtering and spatial filtering. The experimental results match well with the theoretical analysis. PMID:24978496

  20. Ultimate capacity of linear time-invariant bosonic channels with additive Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Bardhan, Bhaskar; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-optic communications are moving to coherent detection in order to increase their spectral efficiency, i.e., their channel capacity per unit bandwidth. At power levels below the threshold for significant nonlinear effects, the channel model for such operation a linear time-invariant filter followed by additive Gaussian noise is one whose channel capacity is well known from Shannon's noisy channel coding theorem. The fiber channel, however, is really a bosonic channel, meaning that its ultimate classical information capacity must be determined from quantum-mechanical analysis, viz. from the Holevo-Schumacher-Westmoreland (HSW) theorem. Based on recent results establishing the HSW capacity of a linear (lossy or amplifying) channel with additive Gaussian noise, we provide a general continuous-time result, namely the HSW capacity of a linear time-invariant (LTI) bosonic channel with additive Gaussian noise arising from a thermal environment. In particular, we treat quasi-monochromatic communication under an average power constraint through a channel comprised of a stable LTI filter that may be attenuating at all frequencies or amplifying at some frequencies and attenuating at others. Phase-insensitive additive Gaussian noise-associated with the continuous-time Langevin noise operator needed to preserve free-field commutator brackets is included at the filter output. We compare the resulting spectral efficiencies with corresponding results for heterodyne and homodyne detection over the same channel to assess the increased spectral efficiency that might be realized with optimum quantum reception.

  1. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember. 121.483 Section 121.483 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  2. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember. 121.483 Section 121.483 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  3. Passivity and Passification of Memristor-Based Recurrent Neural Networks With Additive Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, Rajan; Chandrasekar, Arunachalam; Cao, Jinde

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new design scheme for the passivity and passification of a class of memristor-based recurrent neural networks (MRNNs) with additive time-varying delays. The predictable assumptions on the boundedness and Lipschitz continuity of activation functions are formulated. The systems considered here are based on a different time-delay model suggested recently, which includes additive time-varying delay components in the state. The connection between the time-varying delay and its upper bound is considered when estimating the upper bound of the derivative of Lyapunov functional. It is recognized that the passivity condition can be expressed in a linear matrix inequality (LMI) format and by using characteristic function method. For state feedback passification, it is verified that it is apathetic to use immediate or delayed state feedback. By constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing Jensen's inequality and reciprocal convex combination technique together with a tighter estimation of the upper bound of the cross-product terms derived from the derivatives of the Lyapunov functional, less conventional delay-dependent passivity criteria are established in terms of LMIs. Moreover, second-order reciprocally convex approach is employed for deriving the upper bound for terms with inverses of squared convex parameters. The model based on the memristor with additive time-varying delays widens the application scope for the design of neural networks. Finally, pertinent examples are given to show the advantages of the derived passivity criteria and the significant improvement of the theoretical approaches. PMID:25415991

  4. The Instructional Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Many administrators are so overwhelmed by the basic responsibilities of their daily work that there seems to be little or no time left for providing quality leadership in instruction. Instead, schools employ department chairs, instructional specialists, and coordinators to provide instructional leadership. How can administrators find time in the…

  5. Developing Mobile Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Pastore, Raymond; Snider, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an instructional design class's experience developing instruction for the mobile web. The class was taught at a southeastern university in the United States in a master's level computer based instruction course. Two example projects are showcased and student reflections on design issues are highlighted. Additionally,…

  6. Experimental model and analytic solution for real-time observation of vehicle's additional steer angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Liang; Pan, Deng; Cao, Chengmao; Song, Jian

    2014-03-01

    The current research of real-time observation for vehicle roll steer angle and compliance steer angle(both of them comprehensively referred as the additional steer angle in this paper) mainly employs the linear vehicle dynamic model, in which only the lateral acceleration of vehicle body is considered. The observation accuracy resorting to this method cannot meet the requirements of vehicle real-time stability control, especially under extreme driving conditions. The paper explores the solution resorting to experimental method. Firstly, a multi-body dynamic model of a passenger car is built based on the ADAMS/Car software, whose dynamic accuracy is verified by the same vehicle's roadway test data of steady static circular test. Based on this simulation platform, several influencing factors of additional steer angle under different driving conditions are quantitatively analyzed. Then ɛ-SVR algorithm is employed to build the additional steer angle prediction model, whose input vectors mainly include the sensor information of standard electronic stability control system(ESC). The method of typical slalom tests and FMVSS 126 tests are adopted to make simulation, train model and test model's generalization performance. The test result shows that the influence of lateral acceleration on additional steer angle is maximal (the magnitude up to 1°), followed by the longitudinal acceleration-deceleration and the road wave amplitude (the magnitude up to 0.3°). Moreover, both the prediction accuracy and the calculation real-time of the model can meet the control requirements of ESC. This research expands the accurate observation methods of the additional steer angle under extreme driving conditions.

  7. New Stabilization for Dynamical System with Two Additive Time-Varying Delays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xiaozhou

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a new delay-dependent stabilization criterion for systems with two additive time-varying delays. The novel functional is constructed, a tighter upper bound of the derivative of the Lyapunov functional is obtained. These results have advantages over some existing ones because the combination of the delay decomposition technique and the reciprocally convex approach. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the less conservatism and effectiveness of the results in this paper. PMID:24701159

  8. Predicting the Survival Time for Bladder Cancer Using an Additive Hazards Model in Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    TAPAK, Leili; MAHJUB, Hossein; SADEGHIFAR, Majid; SAIDIJAM, Massoud; POOROLAJAL, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: One substantial part of microarray studies is to predict patients’ survival based on their gene expression profile. Variable selection techniques are powerful tools to handle high dimensionality in analysis of microarray data. However, these techniques have not been investigated in competing risks setting. This study aimed to investigate the performance of four sparse variable selection methods in estimating the survival time. Methods: The data included 1381 gene expression measurements and clinical information from 301 patients with bladder cancer operated in the years 1987 to 2000 in hospitals in Denmark, Sweden, Spain, France, and England. Four methods of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, smoothly clipped absolute deviation, the smooth integration of counting and absolute deviation and elastic net were utilized for simultaneous variable selection and estimation under an additive hazards model. The criteria of area under ROC curve, Brier score and c-index were used to compare the methods. Results: The median follow-up time for all patients was 47 months. The elastic net approach was indicated to outperform other methods. The elastic net had the lowest integrated Brier score (0.137±0.07) and the greatest median of the over-time AUC and C-index (0.803±0.06 and 0.779±0.13, respectively). Five out of 19 selected genes by the elastic net were significant (P<0.05) under an additive hazards model. It was indicated that the expression of RTN4, SON, IGF1R and CDC20 decrease the survival time, while the expression of SMARCAD1 increase it. Conclusion: The elastic net had higher capability than the other methods for the prediction of survival time in patients with bladder cancer in the presence of competing risks base on additive hazards model. PMID:27114989

  9. Estimation of the lag time in a subsequent monomer addition model for fibril elongation.

    PubMed

    Shoffner, Suzanne K; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Fibrillogenesis, the production or development of protein fibers, has been linked to protein folding diseases. The progress curve of fibrils or aggregates typically takes on a sigmoidal shape with a lag phase, a rapid growth phase, and a final plateau regime. The study of the lag phase and the estimation of its critical timescale provide insight into the factors regulating the fibrillation process. However, methods to estimate a quantitative expression for the lag time rely on empirical expressions, which cannot connect the lag time to kinetic parameters associated with the reaction mechanisms of protein fibrillation. Here we introduce an approach for the estimation of the lag time using the governing rate equations of the elementary reactions of a subsequent monomer addition model for protein fibrillation as a case study. We show that the lag time is given by the sum of the critical timescales for each fibril intermediate in the subsequent monomer addition mechanism and therefore reveals causal connectivity between intermediate species. Furthermore, we find that single-molecule assays of protein fibrillation can exhibit a lag phase without a nucleation process, while dyes and extrinsic fluorescent probe bulk assays of protein fibrillation do not exhibit an observable lag phase during template-dependent elongation. Our approach could be valuable for investigating the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the protein fibrillation reaction mechanism and provides physicochemical insights into parameters regulating the lag phase. PMID:27250246

  10. Additional Nitrogen Fertilization at Heading Time of Rice Down-Regulates Cellulose Synthesis in Seed Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Midorikawa, Keiko; Kuroda, Masaharu; Terauchi, Kaede; Hoshi, Masako; Ikenaga, Sachiko; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Abe, Keiko; Asakura, Tomiko

    2014-01-01

    The balance between carbon and nitrogen is a key determinant of seed storage components, and thus, is of great importance to rice and other seed-based food crops. To clarify the influence of the rhizosphere carbon/nitrogen balance during the maturation stage of several seed components, transcriptome analysis was performed on the seeds from rice plants that were provided additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time. As a result, it was assessed that genes associated with molecular processes such as photosynthesis, trehalose metabolism, carbon fixation, amino acid metabolism, and cell wall metabolism were differentially expressed. Moreover, cellulose and sucrose synthases, which are involved in cellulose synthesis, were down-regulated. Therefore, we compared cellulose content of mature seeds that were treated with additional nitrogen fertilization with those from control plants using calcofluor staining. In these experiments, cellulose content in endosperm from plants receiving additional nitrogen fertilization was less than that in control endosperm. Other starch synthesis-related genes such as starch synthase 1, starch phosphorylase 2, and branching enzyme 3 were also down-regulated, whereas some α-amylase and β-amylase genes were up-regulated. On the other hand, mRNA expression of amino acid biosynthesis-related molecules was up-regulated. Moreover, additional nitrogen fertilization caused accumulation of storage proteins and up-regulated Cys-poor prolamin mRNA expression. These data suggest that additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time changes the expression of some storage substance-related genes and reduces cellulose levels in endosperm. PMID:24905454

  11. The effect of four instructional methods, gender, and time of testing on the achievement of sixth graders learning to interpret graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jerry Wayne

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of four instructional methods (direct instruction, computer-aided instruction, video observation, and microcomputer-based lab activities), gender, and time of testing (pretest, immediate posttest for determining the immediate effect of instruction, and a delayed posttest two weeks later to determine the retained effect of the instruction) on the achievement of sixth graders who were learning to interpret graphs of displacement and velocity. The dependent variable of achievement was reflected in the scores earned by students on a testing instrument of established validity and reliability. The 107 students participating in the study were divided by gender and were then randomly assigned to the four treatment groups, each taught by a different teacher. Each group had approximately equal numbers of males and females. The students were pretested and then involved in two class periods of the instructional method which was unique to their group. Immediately following treatment they were posttested and two weeks later they were posttested again. The data in the form of test scores were analyzed with a two-way split-plot analysis of variance to determine if there was significant interaction among technique, gender, and time of testing. When significant interaction was indicated, the Tukey HSD test was used to determine specific mean differences. The results of the analysis indicated no gender effect. Only students in the direct instruction group and the microcomputer-based laboratory group had significantly higher posttest-1 scores than pretest scores. They also had significantly higher posttest-2 scores than pretest scores. This suggests that the learning was retained. The other groups experienced no significant differences among pretest, posttest-1, and posttest-2 scores. Recommendations are that direct instruction and microcomputer-based laboratory activities should be considered as effective stand-alone methods for

  12. Models for Individualized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiades, William, Ed.; Clark, Donald C., Ed.

    This book, consisting of five parts, provides a collection of source materials that will assist in implementing individualized instruction; provides examples of interrelated systems for individualizing instruction; and describes the components of individualized instructional systems, including flexible use of time, differentiated staffing, new…

  13. A Modified Time-Delay Addition Method to Extract Resistive Leakage Current of MOSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodsuz, Masume; Mirzaie, Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    Metal oxide surge arresters are one of the most important equipment for power system protection against switching and lightning over-voltages. High-energy stresses and environmental features are the main factors which degrade surge arresters. In order to verify surge arresters good condition, their monitoring is necessary. The majority of surge arrester monitoring techniques is based on total leakage current decomposition of their capacitive and resistive components. This paper introduces a new approach based on time-delay addition method to extract the resistive current from the total leakage current without measuring voltage signal. Surge arrester model for calculating leakage current has been performed in ATP-EMTP. In addition, the signal processing has been done using MATLAB software. To show the accuracy of the proposed method, experimental tests have been performed to extract resistive leakage current by the proposed method.

  14. Winter-time CO2 addition in high rate algal mesocosms for enhanced microalgal performance.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Montemezzani, Valerio; Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert J

    2016-02-01

    Carbon limitation in domestic wastewater high rate algal ponds is thought to constrain microalgal photo-physiology and productivity and CO2 augmentation is often used to overcome this limitation in summer. However, the implications of carbon limitation during winter are poorly understood. This paper investigates the effects of 0.5%, 2%, 5% and 10% CO2 addition on the winter-time performance of wastewater microalgae in high rate algal mesocosms. Performance was measured in terms of light absorption, photosynthetic efficiency, biomass production and nutrient removal rates, along with community composition. Varying percentage CO2 addition and associated change in culture pH resulted in 3 distinct microalgal communities. Light absorption by the microalgae increased by up to 144% with CO2 addition, while a reduction in the package effect meant that there was less internal self-shading thereby increasing the efficiency of light absorption. Carbon augmentation increased the maximum rate of photosynthesis by up to 172%, which led to increased microalgal biovolume by up to 181% and an increase in total organic biomass for all treatments except 10% CO2. While 10% CO2 improved light absorption and photosynthesis this did not translate to enhanced microalgal productivity. Increased microalgal productivity with CO2 addition did not result in increased dissolved nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal. This experiment demonstrated that winter-time carbon augmentation up to 5% CO2 improved microalgal light absorption and utilisation, which ultimately increased microalgal biomass and is likely to enhance total annual microalgal areal productivity in HRAPs. PMID:26707731

  15. State to State and Charged Particle Kinetic Modeling of Time Filtering and Cs Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Capitelli, M.; Gorse, C.; Longo, S.; Diomede, P.; Pagano, D.

    2007-08-10

    We present here an account on the progress of kinetic simulation of non equilibrium plasmas in conditions of interest for negative ion production by using the 1D Bari code for hydrogen plasma simulation. The model includes the state to state kinetics of the vibrational level population of hydrogen molecules, plus a PIC/MCC module for the multispecies dynamics of charged particles. In particular we present new results for the modeling of two issues of great interest: the time filtering and the Cs addition via surface coverage.

  16. Complete positivity, finite-temperature effects, and additivity of noise for time-local qubit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankinen, Juho; Lyyra, Henri; Sokolov, Boris; Teittinen, Jose; Ziaei, Babak; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    We present a general model of qubit dynamics which entails pure dephasing and dissipative time-local master equations. This allows us to describe the combined effect of thermalization and dephasing beyond the usual Markovian approximation. We investigate the complete positivity conditions and introduce a heuristic model that is always physical and provides the correct Markovian limit. We study the effects of temperature on the non-Markovian behavior of the system and show that the noise additivity property discussed by Yu and Eberly [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 140403 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.140403] holds beyond the Markovian limit.

  17. Analysis of Time to Event Outcomes in Randomized Controlled Trials by Generalized Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Unruh, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized Controlled Trials almost invariably utilize the hazard ratio calculated with a Cox proportional hazard model as a treatment efficacy measure. Despite the widespread adoption of HRs, these provide a limited understanding of the treatment effect and may even provide a biased estimate when the assumption of proportional hazards in the Cox model is not verified by the trial data. Additional treatment effect measures on the survival probability or the time scale may be used to supplement HRs but a framework for the simultaneous generation of these measures is lacking. Methods By splitting follow-up time at the nodes of a Gauss Lobatto numerical quadrature rule, techniques for Poisson Generalized Additive Models (PGAM) can be adopted for flexible hazard modeling. Straightforward simulation post-estimation transforms PGAM estimates for the log hazard into estimates of the survival function. These in turn were used to calculate relative and absolute risks or even differences in restricted mean survival time between treatment arms. We illustrate our approach with extensive simulations and in two trials: IPASS (in which the proportionality of hazards was violated) and HEMO a long duration study conducted under evolving standards of care on a heterogeneous patient population. Findings PGAM can generate estimates of the survival function and the hazard ratio that are essentially identical to those obtained by Kaplan Meier curve analysis and the Cox model. PGAMs can simultaneously provide multiple measures of treatment efficacy after a single data pass. Furthermore, supported unadjusted (overall treatment effect) but also subgroup and adjusted analyses, while incorporating multiple time scales and accounting for non-proportional hazards in survival data. Conclusions By augmenting the HR conventionally reported, PGAMs have the potential to support the inferential goals of multiple stakeholders involved in the evaluation and appraisal of clinical trial

  18. Toward a Deterministic Polynomial Time Algorithm with Optimal Additive Query Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bshouty, Nader H.; Mazzawi, Hanna

    In this paper, we study two combinatorial search problems: The coin weighing problem with a spring scale (also known as the vector reconstructing problem using additive queries) and the problem of reconstructing weighted graphs using additive queries. Suppose we are given n identical looking coins. Suppose that m out of the n coins are counterfeit and the rest are authentic. Assume that we are allowed to weigh subsets of coins with a spring scale. It is known that the optimal number of weighing for identifying the counterfeit coins and their weights is at least Ω(mlog n/log m). We give a deterministic polynomial time adaptive algorithm for identifying the counterfeit coins and their weights using O(mlog n/log m+ mlog log m) weighings, assuming that the weight of the counterfeit coins are greater than the weight of the authentic coin. This algorithm is optimal when m ≤ n c/loglogn , where c is any constant. Also our weighing complexity is within loglogm times the optimal complexity for all m.

  19. Decreasing Transition Times in Elementary School Classrooms: Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Automate Intervention Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hine, Jeffrey F.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Foster, Tori E.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that students spend a substantial amount of time transitioning between classroom activities, which may reduce time spent academically engaged. This study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of a computer-assisted intervention that automated intervention components previously shown to decrease transition times. We examined…

  20. Classroom Interaction Patterns During Microteaching: Wait-Time As An Instructional Variable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeck, Marjorie A.; Hillenmeyer, Gale P.

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between wait-time and two classroom interaction variables: cognitive level of teacher questions and length of student response. The interval of time between a teacher question and the next verbal response by teacher or student (wait-time) was measured using an electrocardiograph with…

  1. Identifiability of Additive, Time-Varying Actuator and Sensor Faults by State Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Jason M.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has provided a set of necessary and sucient conditions for identifiability of additive step faults (e.g., lock-in-place actuator faults, constant bias in the sensors) using state augmentation. This paper extends these results to an important class of faults which may affect linear, time-invariant systems. In particular, the faults under consideration are those which vary with time and affect the system dynamics additively. Such faults may manifest themselves in aircraft as, for example, control surface oscillations, control surface runaway, and sensor drift. The set of necessary and sucient conditions presented in this paper are general, and apply when a class of time-varying faults affects arbitrary combinations of actuators and sensors. The results in the main theorems are illustrated by two case studies, which provide some insight into how the conditions may be used to check the theoretical identifiability of fault configurations of interest for a given system. It is shown that while state augmentation can be used to identify certain fault configurations, other fault configurations are theoretically impossible to identify using state augmentation, giving practitioners valuable insight into such situations. That is, the limitations of state augmentation for a given system and configuration of faults are made explicit. Another limitation of model-based methods is that there can be large numbers of fault configurations, thus making identification of all possible configurations impractical. However, the theoretical identifiability of known, credible fault configurations can be tested using the theorems presented in this paper, which can then assist the efforts of fault identification practitioners.

  2. Effects of Time Management Instruction on Adolescents' Ability to Self-Manage Time in a Vocational Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPipi-Hoy, Caroline; Jitendra, Asha K.; Kern, Lee

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a time self-management intervention in the work setting of four adolescents with developmental disabilities. A multiple baseline across participants design was used to examine the adolescents' ability to independently identify time and initiate work-related activities. Intervention was delivered by…

  3. Increased Learning Time and Targeted Instruction Improve Academic Skills for At-Risk ESL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, April, Comp.

    2005-01-01

    Students with English as a Second Language (ESL) face two critical challenges: they need to develop English literacy while, at the same time, acquire content knowledge across subject areas. These students need a targeted ESL curriculum from elementary to high school that will allow an extended learning time and opportunities to practice as they…

  4. Towards an Agenda for Studying Learning and Instruction Focusing on Time-Related Competences in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burny, Elise; Valcke, Martin; Desoete, Annemie

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1920s researchers have been studying children's temporal concepts, concluding that the concept of time is complex and difficult to teach children. This research literature review aims to provide a theoretical framework to guide future research about time-related teaching in primary school. After preliminary considerations about the…

  5. RNA polymerase pausing regulates translation initiation by providing additional time for TRAP-RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Alexander V; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2006-11-17

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) pause sites have been identified in several prokaryotic genes. Although the presumed biological function of RNAP pausing is to allow synchronization of RNAP position with regulatory factor binding and/or RNA folding, a direct causal link between pausing and changes in gene expression has been difficult to establish. RNAP pauses at two sites in the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon leader. Pausing at U107 and U144 participates in transcription attenuation and trpE translation control mechanisms, respectively. Substitution of U144 caused a substantial pausing defect in vitro and in vivo. These mutations led to increased trp operon expression that was suppressed by overproduction of TRAP, indicating that pausing at U144 provides additional time for TRAP to bind to the nascent transcript and promote formation of an RNA structure that blocks translation of trpE. These results establish that pausing is capable of playing a role in regulating translation in bacteria. PMID:17114058

  6. Part-Time Instructional Faculty and Staff: Who They Are, What They Do, and What They Think. 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:93). Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Valerie Martin; Leslie, David W.

    Part-time faculty members are a sizeable part of the workforce in postsecondary institutions today. Forty-two percent of all instructional faculty and staff were employed part time by their institutions in the fall of 1992, and 44 percent of those individuals were teaching in two-year institutions. Data from the 1993 National Study of…

  7. Time Is of the Essence: An Investigation of 4th and 5th Grade Teachers' Instructional Practices within the Literacy Block

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Harry J.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the amount of time that fourth and fifth grade teachers devoted to literacy instruction within the time allotted to them within the daily literacy block. Prior research of the literacy block focused largely on primary grades (Allington, McGill-Franzen et a1.,2010; Cunningham & Allington, 2003; Morrow, 1992);…

  8. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology in both research and industrial environments, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid-liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. The observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid-liquid interface in the Al-4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  9. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  10. Regulation of Soil Microbial Carbon-use Efficiency by Soil Moisture, Substrate Addition, and Incubation Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, J.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial carbon-use efficiency (CUE) is a key variable in biogeochemical cycling that regulates soil C sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and retention of inorganic nutrients. Microbial CUE is the fraction of C converted to biomass rather than respired as CO2. Biogeochemical models have been shown to be highly sensitive to variation in CUE; however, we currently have a poor understanding of how CUE responds to environmental variables such as soil moisture and nutrient limitations. We examined the effect of soil moisture and C supply on CUE in soil from a western hemlock / sitka spruce forest in Oregon, USA, using a novel technique which supplies 13C and 15N substrates through the gas phase so that water addition is not necessary. Soil samples (28 g oven-dry equiv. wt) at two water potentials (-0.03 and -3.55 MPa) were exposed to 13C-acetic acid vapor for either 6 or 30 sec to provide two different concentrations of acetate to soil microbial communities. The soils were also injected with small amounts of 15NH3 gas to allow quantification of microbial N assimilation rates and to provide an alternate method of calculating CUE. Rates of 13CO2 respiration were measured continuously during a 48-h incubation using cavity ring-down spectroscopy. Soil samples were extracted at seven time intervals (0, 0.5, 1.5, 4.5, 12, 24, and 48 h) in 0.5 M K2SO4 and analyzed for DO13C, microbial 13C, DO15N, inorganic 15N, and microbial 15N to calculate how gross rates of C and N assimilation and microbial CUE change with incubation time. As expected, microbial C and N assimilation rates and CUE increased with soil moisture and the quantity of acetate added; however, C:N assimilated was higher at lower soil moisture, suggesting that either C-storage compounds were being created, or that fungal communities were responsible for a greater proportion of the assimilation in drier soils. Assimilation rates and CUE also changed with incubation time, demonstrating that estimates of CUE

  11. Decreasing transition times in elementary school classrooms: Using computer-assisted instruction to automate intervention components.

    PubMed

    Hine, Jeffrey F; Ardoin, Scott P; Foster, Tori E

    2015-09-01

    Research suggests that students spend a substantial amount of time transitioning between classroom activities, which may reduce time spent academically engaged. This study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of a computer-assisted intervention that automated intervention components previously shown to decrease transition times. We examined the effects of the intervention on the latency to on-task behavior of 4 students in 2 classrooms. Data also were collected on students' on-task behavior during activities and teachers' use of prompts and praise statements. Implementation of the intervention substantially decreased students' latencies to on-task behavior and increased on-task behavior overall. Further, the 2 teachers used fewer prompts to cue students to transition and stay on task and provided more praise during intervention phases. We discuss how automating classroom interventions may affect student and teacher behavior as well as how it may increase procedural fidelity. PMID:26223859

  12. Perceived affordances and constraints regarding instructors' use of Peer Instruction: Implications for promoting instructional change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpen, Chandra; Dancy, Melissa; Henderson, Charles

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] In order to promote sustained and impactful educational transformation, it is essential for change agents to understand more about faculty perceptions associated with either adopting or not adopting a research-based instructional strategy (RBIS). In this paper, we use interviews with 35 physics faculty to examine barriers and affordances to the use of the research-based instructional strategy of Peer Instruction. We found that the most common reasons faculty give for aligning their instruction with Peer Instruction is that it is not lecture and they have had positive experiences with Peer Instruction. The most common reasons faculty give for not using Peer Instruction are concerns about the time it will take, the loss of content coverage, and having had bad experiences with it. Additionally, we found the perceived barriers to be very different depending on whether the interviewee was a user of Peer Instruction or not, with nonusers being more concerned with time and users being more concerned with implementation difficulties. It is important for change agents to understand and address concerns faculty have about implementing research-based instructional strategies. Based on these results we offer four recommendations for those interested in promoting educational transformation toward research-based instructional strategies: (1) do not waste a lot of time criticizing lecture-based instruction and convincing faculty of the value of research-based strategies (they are already dissatisfied with lecture), (2) understand and address concerns faculty have about implementing active learning techniques, (3) focus on supporting and encouraging faculty experiences with RBIS, (4) address concerns faculty new to RBIS have about the time and energy needed to change.

  13. Use of Constant Time Delay in Small Group Instruction: A Study of Observational and Incidental Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Patricia Munson; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Constant time delay was found to be an effective strategy in teaching targeted facts to four secondary-age students with mild and moderate mental retardation. Students also learned other students' target facts through observation and learned incidental information embedded in the consequent event following correct responding. (Author/JDD)

  14. Individualized Instruction in Science, Time-Space-Matter, Learning Activity Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    Learning Activity Packages (LAP) relating to time, space, and matter are presented for use in sampling a new type of learning for a whole year. Besides the unit on introduction to individualized learning, 11 major topics are incorporated into three other units: (1) observation of the physical world, (2) space and exploration for environmental…

  15. Individualized Instruction in Science, Time-Space-Matter, Self-Directed Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    As a supplement to Learning Activity Packages (LAP) on the time-space-matter subject, details are presented for self-directed activities. Major descriptions are given on the background of LAP characteristics, metric system, profile graph construction, spectroscope operation, radiant energy measurement, sunspot effects, density determination,…

  16. Blogs and Wikis as Instructional Tools: A Social Software Adaptation of Just-in-Time Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higdon, Jude; Topaz, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) methodology uses Web-based tools to gather student responses to questions on preclass reading assignments. However, the technological requirements of JiTT and the content-specific nature of the questions may prevent some instructors from implementing it. Our own JiTT implementation uses publicly and freely available…

  17. Factors that Predict Full-Time Community College Faculty Engagement in Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akroyd, Duane; Patton, Bess; Bracken, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This study is a secondary quantitative analysis of the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF) data. It examines the ability of human capital, intrinsic rewards, extrinsic rewards, and gender/race demographics to predict full-time community college faculty teaching on-line courses. Findings indicate that those faculty with higher…

  18. Variations in Teachers' Management of and Time Spent on Reading Instruction: Effects on Student Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenthal, Helen; Kirsch, Irwin

    To determine if there was variability in scheduled and engaged time in reading among classrooms and in management style among teachers and to see if these factors accounted for differences on a standardized reading achievement measure, a study was conducted involving 13 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade reading classrooms. Pretest and posttest data…

  19. Sequential Effects of High and Low Instructional Guidance on Children's Acquisition of Experimentation Skills: Is It All in the Timing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlen, Bryan J.; Klahr, David

    2013-01-01

    We report the effect of different sequences of high vs low levels of instructional guidance on children's immediate learning and long-term transfer of simple experimental design procedures and concepts, often called "CVS" (Control of Variables Strategy). Third-grade children (N = 57) received instruction in CVS via one of four possible orderings…

  20. Student Computer Skills and Attitudes toward Internet-Delivered Instruction: An Assessment of Stability over Time and Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkerhoff, Jonathan; Koroghlanian, Carol M.

    2005-01-01

    With the expansion of Internet-based instruction, research-based guidelines are needed to support faculty decision making during course design to ensure student success and satisfaction with instruction incorporating new delivery technologies. This investigation consisted of two phases. In Phase One, computer skills and attitudes toward…

  1. Effect of Personalized System of Instruction on Health-Related Fitness Knowledge and Class Time Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Steven L.; Hannon, James C.; Colquitt, Gavin; Brusseau, Timothy A.; Newton, Maria; Shaw, Janet

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies, researchers have identified a general low level of health-related fitness (HRF) knowledge among secondary students that can effect levels of physical activity (PA). An instructional strategy that may increase HRF knowledge without decreasing PA is the personalized system of instruction (PSI). Two classes from a private urban…

  2. Manipulating Instructions Strategically Affects Reliance on the Ventral-Lexical Reading Stream: Converging Evidence from Neuroimaging and Reaction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummine, Jacqueline; Gould, Layla; Zhou, Crystal; Hrybouski, Stan; Siddiqi, Zohaib; Chouinard, Brea; Borowsky, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Neurobiology of reading research has yet to explore whether reliance on the ventral-lexical stream during word reading can be enhanced by the instructed reading strategy, or whether it is impervious to such strategies. We examined Instructions: "name all" vs. "name words" (based on spelling), Word Type: "regular words" vs. "exception words", and…

  3. Guiding Learners through Technology-Based Instruction: The Effects of Adaptive Guidance Design and Individual Differences on Learning over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanar, Adam M.; Bell, Bradford S.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive guidance is an instructional intervention that helps learners to make use of the control inherent in technology-based instruction. The present research investigated the interactive effects of guidance design (i.e., framing of guidance information) and individual differences (i.e., pretraining motivation and ability) on learning basic and…

  4. The Histories and Mysteries of Grammar Instruction: Supporting Elementary Teachers in the Time of the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartland, Lauren B.; Smolkin, Laura B.

    2016-01-01

    The reemergence of grammar instruction in the Common Core State Standards has likely left teachers confused. On the one hand, they have been told repeatedly that grammar instruction does not improve student outcomes, and can, in fact, be "harmful" to students. However, on the other hand, many Anglophone countries, including the United…

  5. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane at millisecond contact times: Effect of H{sub 2} addition

    SciTech Connect

    Bodke, A.S.; Henning, D.; Schmidt, L.D.; Bharadwaj, S.S.; Maj, J.J.; Siddall, J.

    2000-04-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane using Pt/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and various bimetallic catalysts operating at {approximately}1,000 C and very short contact times is examined with H{sub 2} addition to the feed. When H{sub 2} is added with a Pt catalyst, the ethylene selectivity rises from 65 to 72% but ethane conversion drops from 70 to 52%. However, using a Pt-Sn/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} selectivity increases from 70 to greater than 85%, while the conversion remains {approximately}70%. The process also produces approximately as much H{sub 2} as is added to the feed. Effects of other metal promoters, sphere bed and fibermat supports, preheat, pressure, nitrogen dilution, and flow rate are examined in an effort to further elucidate the mechanism. Deactivation of the Pt-Sn catalyst is examined, and a simple method of regenerating the activity on-line is demonstrated. Possible mechanisms to explain high selectivities to ethylene are discussed. Although the process can be regarded as a simple two-step reaction sequence with the exothermic oxidation of hydrogen or ethane driving the endothermic dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene, the exact contributions of heterogeneous or gas-phase reactions and their spatial variations within the catalyst are yet to be determined.

  6. Time- and Isomer-Resolved Measurements of Sequential Addition of Acetylene to the Propargyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Savee, John D; Selby, Talitha M; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A; Osborn, David L

    2015-10-15

    Soot formation in combustion is a complex process in which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are believed to play a critical role. Recent works concluded that three consecutive additions of acetylene (C2H2) to propargyl (C3H3) create a facile route to the PAH indene (C9H8). However, the isomeric forms of C5H5 and C7H7 intermediates in this reaction sequence are not known. We directly investigate these intermediates using time- and isomer-resolved experiments. Both the resonance stabilized vinylpropargyl (vp-C5H5) and 2,4-cyclopentadienyl (c-C5H5) radical isomers of C5H5 are produced, with substantially different intensities at 800 K vs 1000 K. In agreement with literature master equation calculations, we find that c-C5H5 + C2H2 produces only the tropyl isomer of C7H7 (tp-C7H7) below 1000 K, and that tp-C7H7 + C2H2 terminates the reaction sequence yielding C9H8 (indene) + H. This work demonstrates a pathway for PAH formation that does not proceed through benzene. PMID:26722791

  7. Do Differences in School's Instruction Time Explain International Achievement Gaps in Math, Science, and Reading? Evidence from Developed and Developing Countries. NBER Working Paper No. 16227

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavy, Victor

    2010-01-01

    There are large differences across countries in instructional time in schooling institutions. Can these differences explain some of the differences across countries in pupils' achievements in different subjects? While research in recent years provides convincing evidence about the effect of several inputs in the education production function,…

  8. The Influence of Instructional Climates on Time Spent in Management Tasks and Physical Activity of 2nd-Grade Students during Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Samuel W.; Robinson, Leah E.; Webster, E. Kipling; Rudisill, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of two physical education (PE) instructional climates (mastery, performance) on the percentage of time students spent in a) moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and b) management tasks during PE in 2nd-grade students. Forty-eight 2nd graders (mastery, n = 23; performance, n = 25)…

  9. The Use of Piecewise Growth Models to Estimate Learning Trajectories and RtI Instructional Effects in a Comparative Interrupted Time-Series Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zvoch, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Piecewise growth models (PGMs) were used to estimate and model changes in the preliteracy skill development of kindergartners in a moderately sized school district in the Pacific Northwest. PGMs were applied to interrupted time-series (ITS) data that arose within the context of a response-to-intervention (RtI) instructional framework. During the…

  10. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  11. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  12. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  13. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  14. 25 CFR 39.214 - What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the minimum number of instructional hours required in order to be considered a full-time educational program? 39.214 Section 39.214 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION...

  15. Staff in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2001, and Salaries of Full-Time Instructional Faculty, 2001-02. E.D. Tabs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Laura G.; Kelly, Janice E.; Whitmore, Roy W.; Wu, Shiying; Huh, Seungho; Levine, Burton; Broyles, Susan G.

    This report presents findings from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) winter 2001-2002 data collection that included both race and gender information for staff employed in fall 2001 and salaries and fringe benefits of full-time instructional faculty for academic year 2001-2002. Data were collected through a Web-based data…

  16. Measuring Physical Activity in Preschoolers: Reliability and Validity of the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers (SOFIT-P)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Shreela V.; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Skala, Katherine; Atteberry, Heather

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is describe the initial feasibility, reliability, and validity of an instrument to measure physical activity in preschoolers using direct observation. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers was developed and tested among 3- to 6-year-old children over fall 2008 for feasibility and reliability…

  17. The Implications of Expanding the Instruction Time for the English Language Teaching Policy Implementation in the Sultanate of Oman: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Issa, Ali S. M.

    2013-01-01

    This study asks questions and elicits answers about the importance of English language teaching (ELT) instruction time on the national curriculum in the Sultanate of Oman from an ideological perspective. It triangulates data from semi-structured interviews made with different agents involved in the Omani ELT system and representing different…

  18. Eighth Grade Science Teachers Use of Instructional Time: Comparing Questions from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and National Science Foundation Questionnaires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Anne Burgess

    Did the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) ask eighth grade science teachers the right questions about their use of instructional time? TIMSS asked teachers to recall a lesson that they had taught, and then group activities into 11 categories. This study examined the TIMSS question "How did the lesson proceed?" by…

  19. Brief time-based activity pacing instruction as a singular behavioral intervention was not effective in participants with symptomatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Susan L; Kratz, Anna L; Kidwell, Kelley; Lyden, Angela K; Geisser, Michael E; Williams, David A

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the lower extremities is a prevalent cause of disability in which symptoms interfere with mobility and activity participation. Behavioral self-management for OA symptomatology is commonly recommended; but these interventions are underutilized, unstandardized in application, and at times, unavailable in the context of clinical care. For people with chronic pain, rehabilitation professionals may select to apply activity pacing instruction as one behavioral strategy to manage symptoms. Activity pacing is widely used in combination with other pharmacological and behavioral interventions but has not been studied as a singular behavioral intervention for people with OA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an occupational therapist-delivered, time-based activity pacing program for treatment of pain, fatigue, and physical function in people with symptomatic knee or hip OA. A 3-arm randomized controlled trial was conducted in which 193 people were randomized into tailored activity pacing, general activity pacing, or usual care arms. Assessments were done at 10 weeks and 6 months after baseline. Using linear mixed models, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain scores changed over time, decreasing the most in the general and usual care groups; only the usual care group had decreased pain over 6 months. The tailored and general activity pacing groups reported higher frequency of pacing behaviors than the usual care group at 10 weeks, but pacing was not sustained at 6 months. This trial does not support the use of time-based pacing as a singular behavioral strategy for people with knee or hip OA. PMID:26963847

  20. Eighth-grade science teachers use of instructional time: Examining questions from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and comparing TIMSS and National Science Foundation questionnaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Anne Burgess

    Did the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) ask science teachers the right questions about their use of instructional time? Part I of this 2-part study used the TIMSS database to answer the question: Do 8th grade science teachers in the U.S., Czech Republic, Hungary, Japan, and Korea differ significantly in their perceived use of instructional time? Using the instructional activities in the TIMSS teacher question "How did the lesson proceed?" the teacher-reported times were analyzed using a repeated measures multivariate analysis. Significant differences were found between teacher-reported times in the U.S. and the other 4 TIMSS countries, whose 8th grade students outperformed U.S. students on TIMSS achievement tests. Post-hoc analysis indicated that TIMSS U.S. 8th grade science teachers report spending more time on homework in class, on group activities, and on lab activities, but less time on topic development, than TIMSS teachers from some or all of the other countries. Part II of this study further examined the question "How did the lesson proceed?" by videotaping 6 classes of 8th grade science in Alabama and Virginia and comparing observer coding of the video to the teachers' recalled descriptions of the same class. The difference between observer and teacher responses using TIMSS categories was not significant; however, 43% of the total variance was explained by whether the teacher or the observer reported the times for the instructional activities. The teachers also responded to questions from the NSF Local Systemic Change Through Teacher Enhancement K--8 Teacher Questionnaire to describe the same class. The difference found between the teacher and the observer coding was not significant, but the amount of variance explained by the data source (observer or teacher) dropped to 33% when using NSF student activity categories and to 26% when using NSF teacher activity categories. The conclusion of this study was that questionnaires to

  1. Elegant Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luterbach, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new form of instruction called elegant instruction. Generally speaking, educational technologists assert that instruction ought to be effective and efficient. Some educational technologists might add that instruction should also satisfy learners. Incorporating the standard requirements and going beyond satisfaction,…

  2. American Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nila Banton

    A presentation of the history of reading instruction in the United States, this book is a special edition of Nila Banton Smith's original 1965 volume with the addition of a prologue on her life, and an epilogue which updates the history of reading instruction from 1965 to 1985. Chapter headings consist of: (1) The Beginnings of Reading…

  3. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) as a measure of energy expenditure during classroom-based physical activity.

    PubMed

    Honas, Jeffery J; Washburn, Richard A; Smith, Bryan K; Greene, Jerry L; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Donnelly, Joseph E

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop an equation to estimate physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) during a 10-min physically active academic lesson using The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) and demographic information. PAEE (portable indirect calorimeter) and physical activity (SOFIT) were simultaneously assessed in 38, 2nd through 5th grade children. PAEE and SOFIT were 3.04 +/- 1.1 (kcal/min) and 3.8 +/- 0.4 (score), respectively. PAEE was predicted from SOFIT score and body weight [PAEE (kcal/min) = (1.384*SOFIT + 0.084*weight (kg)--5.126), R = .81, SEE = 1.23 kcal/min]. PAEE measured by indirect calorimeter and predicted from SOFIT and body weight were 3.04 +/- 1.1 (kcal/min) and 3.04 +/- 0.9 kcal/min) respectively. SOFIT and body weight may provide a useful measure of PAEE associated with classroom based physical activity. PMID:19168920

  4. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) as a Measure of Energy Expenditure During Classroom-Based Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Greene, Jerry L.; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop an equation to estimate physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) during a 10-min physically active academic lesson using The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) and demographic information. PAEE (portable indirect calorimeter) and physical activity (SOFIT) were simultaneously assessed in 38, 2nd through 5th grade children. PAEE and SOFIT were 3.04 ± 1.1 (kcal/min) and 3.8 ± 0.4 (score), respectively. PAEE was predicted from SOFIT score and body weight [PAEE (kcal/min) = (1.384*SOFIT + 0.084*weight (kg)—5.126), R = .81, SEE = 1.23 kcal/min]. PAEE measured by indirect calorimeter and predicted from SOFIT and body weight were 3.04 ± 1.1 (kcal/min) and 3.04 ± 0.9 kcal/min) respectively. SOFIT and body weight may provide a useful measure of PAEE associated with classroom based physical activity. PMID:19168920

  5. Lateralization of High-Frequency Clicks Based on Interaural Time: Additivity of Information across Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth Marie

    Lateralization performance based on interaural differences of time (IDTs) was measured for trains of Gaussian clicks which varied in spectral content. In the first experiment, thresholds ((DELTA)IDTs) were measured as a function of the number of clicks in the train (n = 1 to 32), the interclick interval (ICI = 2.5 or 5 ms), and the spectral content (1 vs. 2 or 4 carriers). Subjects' performance was compared to perfect statistical summation which predicts slopes of -.50 when log-(DELTA)IDT vs. long -n is plotted. The results showed that increasing the spectral content of the clicks decreased the intercepts of the log -log functions (decreased thresholds) while having little effect on their slopes. Shortening the ICIs caused the slopes of the functions to decrease in absolute value. To estimate the bandwidth of frequency-interaction in lateralization, d's were measured for clicks with constant IDTs (n = 1) with a fixed carrier (FF = 4000, 5200, 6000 or 7200 Hz), both alone and combined with a second click whose carrier (F) varied from 3500 to 8500 Hz. Performance in combined conditions was compared to independent summation of the information carried by the two frequency-bands. Performance improved as the separation between F and FF increased until the level predicted by independence was reached. The final experiment investigated the interaction of frequency content with IDT. d's were measured as a function of the IDT in clicks with carriers of 5200, 6000 or 7200 Hz, both alone and combined with a 4000-Hz click with a fixed IDT. Performance in combined conditions was again compared to independent additivity. The improvement with frequency was explained by an increase in the number of samples of the IDT reaching the binaural centers due to spread of excitation along the basilar membrane. Less than independent summation was explained by correlation between overlapping bands which reduced the amount of information exciting independent channels. The data also suggest that

  6. Applying learning theories and instructional design models for effective instruction.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Elkhider, Ihsan A

    2016-06-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning outcomes, the science of instruction and instructional design models are used to guide the development of instructional design strategies that elicit appropriate cognitive processes. Here, the major learning theories are discussed and selected examples of instructional design models are explained. The main objective of this article is to present the science of learning and instruction as theoretical evidence for the design and delivery of instructional materials. In addition, this article provides a practical framework for implementing those theories in the classroom and laboratory. PMID:27068989

  7. Enhancing Instructional Design Efficiency: Methodologies Employed by Instructional Designers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roytek, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    Instructional systems design (ISD) has been frequently criticised as taking too long to implement, calling for a reduction in cycle time--the time that elapses between project initiation and delivery. While instructional design research has historically focused on increasing "learner" efficiencies, the study of what instructional designers do to…

  8. Effects of Wait Time When Communicating with Children Who Have Sensory and Additional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nicole; Parker, Amy T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study utilized wait-time procedures to determine if they are effective in helping children with deafblindness or multiple disabilities that include a visual impairment communicate in their home. Methods: A single subject with an alternating treatment design was used for the study. Zero- to one-second wait time was utilized…

  9. Addition of random run FM noise to the KPW time scale algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The KPW (Kalman plus weights) time scale algorithm uses a Kalman filter to provide frequency and drift information to a basic time scale equation. This paper extends the algorithm to three-state clocks nd gives results for a simulated eight-clock ensemble.

  10. The Use of Instructive Feedback for Teaching Language Skills to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delmolino, Lara; Hansford, Amy P.; Bamond, Meredith J.; Fiske, Kate E.; LaRue, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Instructive feedback (IF) is a teaching strategy in which extra information is presented to a student during teaching trials for other target skills. Research has shown that when IF is utilized with students with disabilities, they acquire additional skills without additional instructional time (fewer trials and sessions), resulting in more…

  11. High-Challenge Teaching for Senior English as an Additional Language Learners in Times of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Jennifer; Jetnikoff, Anita

    2011-01-01

    This paper will present a brief overview of the recent shifts within English and EAL/D (English as an additional language/dialect) curriculum documents and their focus on critical literacy, using the Queensland context as a case in point. The English syllabus landscape in Queensland has continued to morph in recent years. From 2002 to 2009,…

  12. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  13. High Impact Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The key to improving student achievement isn't more teacher time--it's more teacher impact. But how do you decide which instructional practices will deliver the most bang for your buck? In this handbook, written for teachers but suitable for use by principals and instructional coaches, best-selling author Jim Knight presents the high-leverage…

  14. Programmatic Instructional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutz, Richard E.

    Programmatic instructional development refers to sequenced and coordinated efforts to produce effective instructional programs which cumulate over time and which attain outcomes that would be impossible under non-programmatic projects. As practiced at the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL), it involves the combined efforts of specialists from…

  15. Instructional Coaching. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Julie; Steiner, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Schools and districts invest a great deal of time and money in professional development for teachers through instructional coaching. With this effort comes the responsibility to design coaching programs that have the greatest potential to improve classroom instruction and, in turn, increase student learning. What research is available to help…

  16. Measuring physical activity in preschoolers: Reliability and validity of The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers (SOFIT-P).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shreela; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Skala, Katherine; Atteberry, Heather

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is describe the initial feasibility, reliability, and validity of an instrument to measure physical activity in preschoolers using direct observation. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers was developed and tested among 3- to 6-year-old children over fall 2008 for feasibility and reliability (Phase I, n=67) and in fall 2009 for concurrent validity (Phase II, n=27). Phase I showed that preschoolers spent >75% of their active time at preschool in light physical activity. The mean inter-observer agreements scores were ≥.75 for physical activity level and type. Correlation coefficients, measuring construct validity between the lesson context and physical activity types with and with the activity levels, were moderately strong. Phase II showed moderately strong correlations ranging from .50 to .54 between the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers and Actigraph accelerometers for physical activity levels. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers shows promising initial results as a new method for measuring physical activity among preschoolers. PMID:22485071

  17. Measuring physical activity in preschoolers: Reliability and validity of The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers (SOFIT-P)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shreela; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Skala, Katherine; Atteberry, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is describe the initial feasibility, reliability, and validity of an instrument to measure physical activity in preschoolers using direct observation. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers was developed and tested among 3- to 6-year-old children over fall 2008 for feasibility and reliability (Phase I, n=67) and in fall 2009 for concurrent validity (Phase II, n=27). Phase I showed that preschoolers spent >75% of their active time at preschool in light physical activity. The mean inter-observer agreements scores were ≥.75 for physical activity level and type. Correlation coefficients, measuring construct validity between the lesson context and physical activity types with and with the activity levels, were moderately strong. Phase II showed moderately strong correlations ranging from .50 to .54 between the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers and Actigraph accelerometers for physical activity levels. The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time for Preschoolers shows promising initial results as a new method for measuring physical activity among preschoolers. PMID:22485071

  18. Equivalence of time and aperture domain additive noise in ultrasound coherence

    PubMed Central

    Bottenus, Nick B.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic echoes backscattered from diffuse media, recorded by an array transducer and appropriately focused, demonstrate coherence predicted by the van Cittert–Zernike theorem. Additive noise signals from off-axis scattering, reverberation, phase aberration, and electronic (thermal) noise can all superimpose incoherent or partially coherent signals onto the recorded echoes, altering the measured coherence. An expression is derived to describe the effect of uncorrelated random channel noise in terms of the noise-to-signal ratio. Equivalent descriptions are made in the aperture dimension to describe uncorrelated magnitude and phase apodizations of the array. Binary apodization is specifically described as an example of magnitude apodization and adjustments are presented to minimize the artifacts caused by finite signal length. The effects of additive noise are explored in short-lag spatial coherence imaging, an image formation technique that integrates the calculated coherence curve of acquired signals up to a small fraction of the array length for each lateral and axial location. A derivation of the expected contrast as a function of noise-to-signal ratio is provided and validation is performed in simulation. PMID:25618045

  19. ERIP application instructions

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, D.M.

    1992-01-02

    This report provides background information and instructions to assist applicants in writing Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP) applications. Initial feedback fro usage for the new instructions shows that the best instructions would not be read and followed by all applicants. Applications from more than thirty applicants who have received the new instructions indicated that few had read the instructions. Based on this feedback, the instructions have been further revised to include a title page and table of contents. A warning was also added to advise applicants of the potential penalty of delayed review if these instructions are not followed. This revision was intended to address the possibility that some applicants did not see or bother to follow the instructions which followed the background information about ERIP. Included are two examples of ERIP applications which have been prepared for handout at workshops or mailing to applicants. Writing of example applications was time consuming and more difficult than expected for several reasons: (1) Full disclosures can be lengthy, very detailed, and technical. This contrasts with the desire to prepare examples which are comparatively short and easy for the non-technical person to read. (2) Disclosures contain confidential information which should not be published. (3) It is difficult to imagine that applicants will study examples when they do not bother to read the basic instructions.

  20. An Analysis of Mathematics Interventions: Increased Time-on-Task Compared with Computer-Assisted Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, James M., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Student achievement is not progressing on mathematics as measured by state, national, and international assessments. Much of the research points to mathematics curriculum and instruction as the root cause of student failure to achieve at levels comparable to other nations. Since mathematics is regarded as a gate keeper to many educational…

  1. Inside the Pre-Kindergarten Door: Classroom Climate and Instructional Time Allocation in Tulsa's Pre-K Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Deborah A.; Gormley, William T.; Lowenstein, Amy E.

    2009-01-01

    This observational study of 106 pre-K classrooms in Tulsa, Oklahoma provides descriptive data on children's classroom experiences--classroom climate and exposure to academic instruction--and comparisons of Tulsa classrooms with a multi-state sample of pre-K and Head Start classrooms led by comparably educated teachers. We also examined teacher and…

  2. Instructional Planning Time: A Review of Existing Research and Educator Practice during the 2012-2013 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixson, Nate; Stohr, Amber D.; Hammer, Patricia Cahape

    2013-01-01

    A study of instructional planning periods was undertaken in late 2013 pursuant to West Virginia State Code §18A-4-14 which states: "The state board shall conduct a study on planning periods. The study shall include, but not be limited to, the appropriate length for planning periods at the various grade levels and for the different types of…

  3. Are Pretty Interfaces Worth the Time? The Effects of User Interface Types on Web-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheon, Jongpil; Grant, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of three different interface types on Web-based instruction: a text-based interface, a graphical interface and a metaphorical interface. In order to determine differences among three interface groups, we compared learning performance, cognitive load, usability, and appeal with various data…

  4. Time-Tested ERIC Bibliographic Instruction (BI): Give Them a Pole and Teach Them To Fish (Fiche).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leverence, Mari Ellen

    This article outlines an Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) CD-ROM bibliographic instruction (BI) session at an academic library, which is intended to produce knowledgeable and competent ERIC searchers. The 1.5 hour lecture session includes: a basic introduction to the ERIC database; narrowing down a search topic; using the thesaurus…

  5. Investigating critical effects of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose tablets.

    PubMed

    Patadia, Riddhish; Vora, Chintan; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-01-01

    The research envisaged focuses on vital impacts of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose (EC) tablets using prednisone as a model drug. Several lubricants and glidants such as magnesium stearate, colloidal SiO2, sodium stearyl fumarate, talc, stearic acid, polyethylene glycol (6000) and glyceryl behenate were investigated to understand their effects on lag time by changing their concentrations in outer coat. Further, the effects of hydrophilic additives on lag time were examined for hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (E5), hydroxypropylcellulose (EF and SSL), povidone (K30), copovidone, polyethylene glycol (4000), lactose and mannitol. In vitro drug release testing revealed that each selected lubricant/glidant, if present even at concentration of 0.25% w/w, significantly reduced the lag time of press coated tablets. Specifically, colloidal SiO2 and/or magnesium stearate were detrimental while other lubricants/glidants were relatively less injurious. Among hydrophilic additives, freely water soluble fillers had utmost influence in lag time, whereas, comparatively less impact was observed with polymeric binders. Concisely, glidant and lubricant should be chosen to have minimal impact on lag time and further judicious selection of hydrophilic additives should be exercised for modulating lag time of pulsatile release formulations. PMID:25566928

  6. Vectran Fiber Time-Dependent Behavior and Additional Static Loading Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fette, Russell B.; Sovinski, Marjorie F.

    2004-01-01

    Vectran HS appears from literature and testing to date to be an ideal upgrade from Kevlar braided cords for many long-term, static-loading applications such as tie-downs on solar arrays. Vectran is a liquid crystalline polymer and exhibits excellent tensile properties. The material has been touted as a zero creep product. Testing discussed in this report does not support this statement, though the creep is on the order of four times slower than with similar Kevlar 49 products. Previous work with Kevlar and new analysis of Vectran testing has led to a simple predictive model for Vectran at ambient conditions. The mean coefficient of thermal expansion (negative in this case) is similar to Kevlar 49, but is not linear. A positive transition in the curve occurs near 100 C. Out-gassing tests show that the material performs well within parameters for most space flight applications. Vectran also offers increased abrasion resistance, minimal moisture regain, and similar UV degradation. The effects of material construction appear to have a dramatic effect in stress relaxation for braided Vectran. To achieve the improved relaxation rate, upgrades must also examine alternate construction or preconditioning methods. This report recommends Vectran HS as a greatly improved replacement material for applications where time-dependent relaxation is a major factor.

  7. Integrated Middle School Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the use of the TARRGET model (Tasks, Autonomy, Recognition, Resources, Grouping, Evaluation, and Time) in restructuring middle school literacy instruction in urban schools. By changing the scheduling of reading and writing instruction, using literature as a basis for reading instruction, and emphasizing comprehension…

  8. Effect of Powder Reuse Times on Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Qian, M.; Liu, N.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, G. Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-03-01

    An advantage of the powder-bed-based metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes is that the powder can be reused. The powder reuse or recycling times directly affect the affordability of the additively manufactured parts, especially for the AM of titanium parts. This study examines the influence of powder reuse times on the characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V powder, including powder composition, particle size distribution (PSD), apparent density, tap density, flowability, and particle morphology. In addition, tensile samples were manufactured and evaluated with respect to powder reuse times and sample locations in the powder bed. The following findings were made from reusing the same batch of powder 21 times for AM by selective electron beam melting: (i) the oxygen (O) content increased progressively with increasing reuse times but both the Al content and the V content remained generally stable (a small decrease only); (ii) the powder became less spherical with increasing reuse times and some particles showed noticeable distortion and rough surfaces after being reused 16 times; (iii) the PSD became narrower and few satellite particles were observed after 11 times of reuse; (iv) reused powder showed improved flowability; and (v) reused powder showed no measurable undesired influence on the AM process and the samples exhibited highly consistent tensile properties, irrespective of their locations in the powder bed. The implications of these findings were discussed.

  9. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  10. Instruction of Keyboarding Skills: A Whole Language Approach to Teaching Functional Literacy Skills to Students Who are Blind and Have Additional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauffer, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an unconventional method to teach un-contracted braille reading and writing skills to students who are blind and have additional disabilities. It includes a keyboarding curriculum that focuses on the whole language approach to literacy. A special feature is the keyboard that is adapted with braille symbols. Un-contracted…

  11. 26 CFR 301.6110-5 - Notice and time requirements; actions to restrain disclosure; actions to obtain additional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Internal Revenue Service determines that the request constitutes a request for disclosure of the... the Internal Revenue Service has determined that additional disclosure of information other than the... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice and time requirements; actions...

  12. Effect of enzyme concentration, addition of water and incubation time on increase in yield of starch from potato.

    PubMed

    Sit, Nandan; Agrawal, U S; Deka, Sankar C

    2014-05-01

    Enzymatic treatment process for starch extraction from potato was investigated using cellulase enzyme and compared with conventional process. The effects of three parameters, cellulase enzyme concentration, incubation time and addition of water were evaluated for increase in starch yield as compared to the conventional process i.e., without using enzyme. A two-level full factorial design was used to study the process. The results indicated that all the main parameters and their interactions are statistically significant. Enzyme concentration and incubation time had a positive effect on the increase in starch yield while addition of water had a negative effect. The increase in starch yield ranged from 1.9% at low enzyme concentration and incubation time and high addition of water to a maximum of 70% increase from conventional process in starch yield was achieved when enzyme concentration and incubation time were high and addition of water was low suggesting water present in the ground potato meal is sufficient for access to the enzyme with in the slurry ensuring adequate contact with the substrate. PMID:24803713

  13. 38 CFR 20.304 - Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal. 20.304 Section 20.304 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) BOARD OF VETERANS' APPEALS: RULES OF PRACTICE Filing § 20.304 Rule 304. Filing...

  14. Processing time of addition or withdrawal of single or combined balance-stabilizing haptic and visual information.

    PubMed

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Crisafulli, Oscar; Sozzi, Stefania; Schieppati, Marco

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the integration time of haptic and visual input and their interaction during stance stabilization. Eleven subjects performed four tandem-stance conditions (60 trials each). Vision, touch, and both vision and touch were added and withdrawn. Furthermore, vision was replaced with touch and vice versa. Body sway, tibialis anterior, and peroneus longus activity were measured. Following addition or withdrawal of vision or touch, an integration time period elapsed before the earliest changes in sway were observed. Thereafter, sway varied exponentially to a new steady-state while reweighting occurred. Latencies of sway changes on sensory addition ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 s across subjects, consistently longer for touch than vision, and were regularly preceded by changes in muscle activity. Addition of vision and touch simultaneously shortened the latencies with respect to vision or touch separately, suggesting cooperation between sensory modalities. Latencies following withdrawal of vision or touch or both simultaneously were shorter than following addition. When vision was replaced with touch or vice versa, adding one modality did not interfere with the effect of withdrawal of the other, suggesting that integration of withdrawal and addition were performed in parallel. The time course of the reweighting process to reach the new steady-state was also shorter on withdrawal than addition. The effects of different sensory inputs on posture stabilization illustrate the operation of a time-consuming, possibly supraspinal process that integrates and fuses modalities for accurate balance control. This study also shows the facilitatory interaction of visual and haptic inputs in integration and reweighting of stance-stabilizing inputs. PMID:26334013

  15. Exploring the Amount and Type of Writing Instruction during Language Arts Instruction in Kindergarten Classrooms

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Sidler, Jessica Folsom; Greulich, Luana

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory investigation was to examine the nature of writing instruction in kindergarten classrooms and to describe student writing outcomes at the end of the school year. Participants for this study included 21 teachers and 238 kindergarten children from nine schools. Classroom teachers were videotaped once each in the fall and winter during the 90 minute instructional block for reading and language arts to examine time allocation and the types of writing instructional practices taking place in the kindergarten classrooms. Classroom observation of writing was divided into student-practice variables (activities in which students were observed practicing writing or writing independently) and teacher-instruction variables (activities in which the teacher was observed providing direct writing instruction). In addition, participants completed handwriting fluency, spelling, and writing tasks. Large variability was observed in the amount of writing instruction occurring in the classroom, the amount of time kindergarten teachers spent on writing and in the amount of time students spent writing. Marked variability was also observed in classroom practices both within and across schools and this fact was reflected in the large variability noted in kindergartners’ writing performance. PMID:24578591

  16. Instruction in high schools: the evidence and the challenge.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Tom; Silander, Megan

    2009-01-01

    The combined effects of standards-based reforms and accountability demands arising from recent technological and economic changes, say Tom Corcoran and Megan Silander, are requiring high schools to accomplish something they have never been required to do-ensure that substantially all students achieve at a relatively high level. Meeting that challenge, say the authors, will require high schools to improve the effectiveness of their core technology-instruction. The authors first examine how organizational structures affect instruction. Most high schools, they say, organize instruction by subject or discipline, thus encouraging an isolated and independent approach to teaching rather than one in which teachers are guided by a shared vision or goals. Many schools have focused on increasing teacher collaboration, often through teaming, interdisciplinary teaching, or professional learning communities. Citing limited evidence that these reforms improve instruction and learning, Corcoran and Silander urge researchers to examine whether the changes help schools implement specific instructional reforms and support sustained efforts to improve instruction. Next the authors explore the effects on student learning of instructional strategies such as interdisciplinary teaching, cooperative learning, project-based learning, adaptive instruction, inquiry, and dialogic teaching. The evidence suggests the power of well-designed student grouping strategies, of allowing students to express their ideas and questions, and of offering students challenging tasks. But, the authors say, less than half of American high school students report working in groups, and little class time is devoted to student-centered discussions. The authors conclude that schools should promote the use of proven instructional practices. In addition, teachers should systematically monitor how students vary in what they are learning and adapt their instruction in response to students' progress and needs, in the

  17. Approaching the Golden Fleece a Molecule at a Time: Biophysical Insights into Argonaute-Instructed Nucleic Acid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Veronika A; Ameres, Stefan L

    2015-07-01

    Argonaute proteins act at the core of nucleic acid-guided interference pathways that regulate gene expression and defend organisms against foreign genetic elements in all domains of life. Here, we review recent biophysical studies on how Argonaute proteins instruct oligonucleotides in the process of target finding, binding, cleavage, and release, as measured at high spatiotemporal resolution by single-molecule approaches. In the context of previous structural, biochemical, and computational studies, a model emerges for how Argonaute proteins manipulate the thermodynamic rules for nucleic acid hybridization to convey efficiency and specificity to RNA- and DNA-guided regulatory processes. PMID:26140366

  18. Improving Instructional Assistant Effectiveness in Inclusive Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Kimberly Beth

    2010-01-01

    As of 2007, 718,119 instructional assistants were employed in the United States (National Center for Education Statistics, 2009b). Of those instructional assistants, 373,466 were classified as full-time special education instructional assistants (Data Accountability Center, 2009a). As the employment of instructional assistants continues to grow,…

  19. Literacy Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Alex L., Ed.; Kali, Alex P., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    To examine literacy instruction in light of recent research and practice, this journal issue presents five articles focusing on the creation of a literate society where people appreciate literature and can use reading and writing to enrich their lives. The first article, "Literacy Instruction: An Alternative" (A. S. Bayer), presents an alternative…

  20. Effect of ultrasound treatment, oil addition and storage time on lycopene stability and in vitro bioaccessibility of tomato pulp.

    PubMed

    Anese, Monica; Bot, Francesca; Panozzo, Agnese; Mirolo, Giorgio; Lippe, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of ultrasound processing on tomato pulp containing no sunflower oil, or increasing amounts (i.e. 2.5%, 5% and 10%), on lycopene concentration and in vitro bioaccessibility at time zero and during storage at 5 °C. Results confirmed previous findings in that ultrasonication was responsible for cell breakage and subsequent lycopene release in a highly viscous matrix. Neither the ultrasound process nor oil addition affected lycopene concentration. A decrease of approximately 35% lycopene content occurred at storage times longer than 15 days, due to isomerisation and oxidation reactions. No differences in lycopene in vitro bioaccessibility were found between the untreated and ultrasonically treated samples; this parameter decreased as a consequence of oil addition. Losses of lycopene in vitro bioaccessibility ranging between 50% and 80% occurred in the untreated and ultrasonically treated tomato pulps with and without oil during storage, mainly due to carotenoid degradation. PMID:25442608

  1. Optimizing the performance of a reactor by reducing the retention time and addition of glycerin for anaerobically digesting manure

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Maikel; Schuman, Els; van Eekert, Miriam; van Riel, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of manure is a widely accepted technology for energy production. However, only a minimal portion of the manure production in the EU is anaerobically digested and occurs predominantly in codigestion plants. There is substantial potential for biogas plants that primarily operate on manure (>90%); however, the methane yields of manure are less compared to coproducts, which is one of the reasons for manure-based biogas plants often being economically non-viable. Therefore, it is essential to begin increasing the efficiency of these biogas plants. This study investigated the effect of decreasing retention time and introducing a moderate amount of glycerin on the biogas production as methods to improve efficiency. An experiment has been conducted with two different manure types in four biogas reactors. The results of the study demonstrated that, first, it was possible to decrease the retention time to 10–15 days; however, the effect on biogas production varied per manure type. Secondly, the biogas production almost triples at a retention time of 15.6 days with an addition of 4% glycerin. The relative production-enhancing effect of glycerin did not vary significantly with both manure types. However, the absolute production-enhancing effect of glycerin differed per manure type since the biogas production per gram VS differed per manure type. Thirdly, the positive effect of the glycerin input declines with shorter retention times. Therefore, the effect of glycerin addition depends on the manure type and retention time. PMID:25401272

  2. Frequency, duration, and time devoted to elementary science instruction and the association with science achievement and science interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarode, John Taylor

    Although the United States continues to lead in many STEM areas (i.e., research and design and productivity), the Science and Engineering Indicators (NSB, 2010) suggest that the country is experiencing an erosion of its STEM advantage, ultimately losing the edge in each of these areas. Looking at trends in K-12 science, the 2010 National Science Board report indicated that the United States' position among selected countries declined in fourth grade science (NSB, 2010). This trend raises concern about the lagging student interest in the natural sciences, and thus the fate of science achievement outcomes for students in the United States. The research questions addressed in this study were: What is the pattern of growth for first-time kindergartners in science achievement from the end of third grade to the end of eighth grade? Controlling for differences in student demographics, are gains that first-time kindergartners make in science achievement from the end of third grade to the end of eighth grade associated with the frequency, duration, and time devoted to science in the third grade? Controlling for differences in student demographics is the frequency, duration, and time devoted to science in the third grade associated with the students' interest in eighth grade science? A subset of the variables contained in the ECLS-K: Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 data set and a subsample of the cohort of students in the ECLS-K data set. An unconditional growth model indicated that science achievement followed a non-linear pattern with significant individual variation in trajectories. In addition, students beginning with lower initial science achievement experience more rapid growth than those students beginning with higher initial science achievement. A conditional growth model suggested that the frequency of science in the third grade was a significant predictor of the achievement trajectory in science above and beyond demographic

  3. Effect of cycle time on fungal morphology, broth rheology, and recombinant enzyme productivity during pulsed addition of limiting carbon source.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Swapnil; Wenger, Kevin S; Rane, Kishore; Rising, Vanessa; Marten, Mark R

    2005-03-01

    For many years, high broth viscosity has remained a key challenge in large-scale filamentous fungal fermentations. In previous studies, we showed that broth viscosity could be reduced by pulsed addition of limiting carbon during fed-batch fermentation. The objective in this study was to determine how changing the frequency of pulsed substrate addition affects fungal morphology, broth rheology, and recombinant enzyme productivity. To accomplish this, a series of duplicate fed-batch fermentations were performed in 20-L fermentors with a recombinant glucoamylase producing strain of Aspergillus oryzae. The total cycle time for substrate pulsing was varied over a wide range (30-2,700 s), with substrate added only during the first 30% of each cycle. As a control, a fermentation was conducted with continuous substrate feeding, and in all fermentations the same total amount of substrate was added. Results show that the total biomass concentration remained relatively unaltered, while a substantial decrease in the mean projected area of fungal elements (i.e., average size) was observed with increasing cycle time. This led to reduced broth viscosity and increased oxygen uptake rate. However, high values of cycle time (i.e., 900-2,700 s) showed a significant increase in fungal conidia formation and significantly reduced recombinant enzyme productivity, suggesting that the fungi channeled substrate to storage compounds rather than to recombinant protein. In addition to explaining the effect of cycle time on fermentation performance, these results may aid in explaining the discrepancies observed on scale-up to larger fermentors. PMID:15643626

  4. Instructional Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samples, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Explains how learning occurs in the brain, specifically in the limbic system. Compares traditional teaching methods and diverse learning modes. Describes the characteristics of diverse instructional approaches. First published in 1994. (YDS)

  5. Three Levels of Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, M. David

    In 1969, the author proposed that a teaching team should consist of a horizontally differentiated staff with team members trained in four distinct skill areas: 1) instructional design, 2) instructional interaction, 3) interpersonal design, and 4) interpersonal interaction. The present paper proposes, in addition, a vertically differentiated staff…

  6. Instructional Technologists Discovering, Sharing, Preparing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luterbach, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    This article identifies the instructional technology programs offered in the College of Education at East Carolina University. Additionally, this article briefly discusses technological and pedagogical factors that influence work pursued in the instructional technology field today, which leads to introductions of the articles in the issue. Lastly,…

  7. The effect of exercise training with an additional inspiratory load on inspiratory muscle fatigue and time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Serina J; Smith, Joshua R; Ferguson, Christine S; Brown, Kelly R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Harms, Craig A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of moderate-intensity exercise training (ET) on inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) and if an additional inspiratory load during ET (ET+IL) would further improve inspiratory muscle strength, IMF, and time-trial performance. 15 subjects were randomly divided to ET (n=8) and ET+IL groups (n=7). All subjects completed six weeks of exercise training three days/week at ∼70%V̇O2peak for 30min. The ET+IL group breathed through an inspiratory muscle trainer (15% PImax) during exercise. 5-mile, and 30-min time-trials were performed pre-training, weeks three and six. Inspiratory muscle strength increased (p<0.05) for both groups to a similar (p>0.05) extent. ET and ET+IL groups improved (p<0.05) 5-mile time-trial performance (∼10% and ∼18%) and the ET+IL group was significantly faster than ET at week 6. ET and ET+IL groups experienced less (p<0.05) IMF compared to pre-training following the 5-mile time-trial. In conclusion, these data suggest ET leads to less IMF, ET+IL improves inspiratory muscle strength and IMF, but not different than ET alone. PMID:27195511

  8. Understanding Solidification of Polythiophene Thin Films during Spin-Coating: Effects of Spin-Coating Time and Processing Additives

    PubMed Central

    Na, Jin Yeong; Kang, Boseok; Sin, Dong Hun; Cho, Kilwon; Park, Yeong Don

    2015-01-01

    Spin-coating has been used extensively in the fabrication of electronic devices; however, the effects of the processing parameters have not been fully explored. Here, we systematically characterize the effects of the spin-coating time on the microstructure evolution during semiconducting polymer solidification in an effort to establish the relationship between this parameter and the performances of the resulting polymer field-effect transistors (FETs). We found that a short spin-coating time of a few seconds dramatically improve the morphology and molecular order in a conjugated polymer thin film because the π-π stacking structures formed by the polymer molecules grow slowly and with a greater degree of order due to the residual solvent present in the wet film. The improved ordering is correlated with improved charge carrier transport in the FETs prepared from these films. We also demonstrated the effects of various processing additives on the resulting FET characteristics as well as on the film drying behavior during spin-coating. The physical properties of the additives are found to affect the film drying process and the resulting device performance. PMID:26299676

  9. Impact of mental operation instructions.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Joël; Szeligo, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the impact of embedding mental action verbs within instructions. Experiment 1 examined the instructional effects of these verbs on response time to a visual stimulus. Significant response time differences resulted from instructing participants to engage in different mental actions. Using Multidimensional Scaling, Experiment 2 explored how people understand the relationships amongst mental action verbs, resulting in a single "level of processing" dimension. Experiment 3 was designed to further explore the relationship of these verbs to cognition and behaviour. Signal detection analysis was used to determine if participants were shifting their criterion depending on the level of processing suggested in the instruction. Results showed an effect of instruction on response time, but not on criterion, sensitivity, or accuracy. Response time effects were found that were consistent with differences in word characteristics, including meaning. PMID:19071988

  10. Performing forward-viewing endoscopy at time of pancreaticobiliary EUS and ERCP may detect additional upper gastrointestinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ashby; Vamadevan, Arunan S; Slattery, Eoin; Sejpal, Divyesh V; Trindade, Arvind J

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: It is unknown whether significant incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions are missed when using non-forward-viewing endoscopes without completing a forward-viewing exam in linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) exams. We evaluated whether significant upper GI lesions are missed during EUS and ERCP when upper endoscopy is not performed routinely with a gastroscope. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed in which an EGD with a forward-viewing gastroscope was performed after using a non-forward-viewing endoscope (linear echoendoscope, duodenoscope, or both) during a single procedure. Upper gastrointestinal tract findings were recorded separately for each procedure. Significant lesions found with a forward-viewing gastroscope were defined as findings that led to a change in the patient’s medication regimen, additional endoscopic surveillance/interventions, or the need for other imaging studies. Results: A total of 168 patients were evaluated. In 83 patients, a linear echoendoscope was used, in 52 patients a duodenoscope was used, and in 33 patients both devices were used. Clinically significant additional lesions diagnosed with a gastroscope but missed by a non-forward-viewing endoscope were found in 30 /168 patients (18 %). EGD after linear EUS resulted in additional lesion findings in 17 /83 patients (20.5 %, χ2 = 13.385, P = 0.00025). EGD after use of a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 10 /52 patients (19.2 %, χ2 = 9.987, P = 0.00157). EGD after the use of both a linear echoendoscope and a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 3/33 patients (9 %, χ2 = 3.219, P = 0.07). Conclusion: Non forward-viewing endoscopes miss a significant amount of incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions during pancreaticobiliary endoscopy. Performing an EGD with a gastroscope at the time of linear EUS or

  11. 10 CFR 35.310 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.310 Section 35.310 Energy NUCLEAR... Required § 35.310 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) A licensee shall provide radiation safety instruction, initially and at least annually, to personnel...

  12. 10 CFR 35.310 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.310 Section 35.310 Energy NUCLEAR... Required § 35.310 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) A licensee shall provide radiation safety instruction, initially and at least annually, to personnel...

  13. 10 CFR 35.310 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.310 Section 35.310 Energy NUCLEAR... Required § 35.310 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) A licensee shall provide radiation safety instruction, initially and at least annually, to personnel...

  14. 10 CFR 35.310 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.310 Section 35.310 Energy NUCLEAR... Required § 35.310 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) A licensee shall provide radiation safety instruction, initially and at least annually, to personnel...

  15. 10 CFR 35.310 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.310 Section 35.310 Energy NUCLEAR... Required § 35.310 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) A licensee shall provide radiation safety instruction, initially and at least annually, to personnel...

  16. The Role of Increased Accountability on the Use of Instructional Leadership Time by New York State Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pustolka, Elizabeth Wood

    2012-01-01

    The role of the school superintendent has evolved as a result of increased accountability, specifically under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation. Prior to NCLB, superintendents spent time the majority of their time on the managerial and political domains of leadership; however, the NCLB accountability movement combined with research on…

  17. A Primer on Instructional Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The pressure to improve the quality of instruction in schools may be higher today than at any other time in the history of U.S. education. To respond to this urgent demand, schools across the nation are hiring instructional coaches (ICs), even though there is little published research that shows what works and what does not work when it comes to…

  18. Index to Computer Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekan, Helen A., Ed.

    The computer assisted instruction (CAI) programs and projects described in this index are listed by subject matter. The index gives the program name, author, source, description, prerequisites, level of instruction, type of student, average completion time, logic and program, purpose for which program was designed, supplementary…

  19. How to Establish Instructional Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railsback, C. E.

    Establishing instructional priorities in public schools is a worthwhile and important process. Because time and money are insufficient to increase staffing in schools, setting priorities is a necessary component of successful managing. Steps to be taken in setting instructional priorities are as follows: (1) Adopt a statement of mission describing…

  20. Instructional Technology and Administrative Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eye, Glen G.; and others

    1969-01-01

    "Concerned with the spiraling problems of technology and its impact on instruction, the American Association of School Administrators (AASA) two years ago created the Committee on Technology and Instruction. Since that time the Committee has been active in investigating a number of areas relevant to the impact of technology on the public schools. …

  1. A Comparison of Variable Time Compressed Speech and Normal Rate Speech Based on Time Spent and Performance in a Course Taught by Self-Instructional Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Sarah Harvey

    The purpose of this study was to determine with precise measurements of time and carefully constructed posttests whether sighted students in a college course would save time and achieve higher scores when listening to cognitive information using variable time compressors as compared with students listening using normal speed tape recorders. The…

  2. PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KINGSTON, ALBERT J.; WASH, JAMES A.

    THE SOURCES OF CONFUSION INVOLVED IN INITIATING PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION IN THE CLASSROOM ARE LISTED--(1) SPECIALIZED VOCABULARY DEALING WITH THE FIELD, (2) TYPES OF MACHINERY WITH RANGE FROM THE HIGHLY COMPLEX TO THE VERY SIMPLE, AND (3) DIFFERENT MODES OF PROGRAMING. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF TRUE PROGRAMED FORMATS ARE GIVEN--(1) THE MATERIALS ARE…

  3. Understanding Instructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Val

    This guide is intended to help adult basic education (ABE) teachers teach their students to understand instructions in their daily lives. The 25 learning activities included all develop students' skills in the area of following directions by using basic situations drawn from everyday life. The following activities are included: sequencing pictures…

  4. Metacognitive instruction in middle school science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonney, Dianna

    The purpose of this action research project was to determine the extent to which metacognitive instruction affected students' performance in the middle-grade science classroom. Conducted with four seventh grade science classes over a three-month time period, 105 students were engaged in 21 metacognitively enhanced lessons. Both quantitative and qualitative data sources were collected for this study and analyzed according to grounded theory methodology. Quantitative data came from the Jr. Metacognitive Awareness Inventory, administered as a pre-post test. Qualitative teacher-generated data was collected in a metacognitive observation protocol containing observations and reflections while student-generated data was gathered from reflective journal entries, modified rubrics, and checklists. Analysis of the data led to the assertions that metacognitive development occurred over time through systematic and varied implementation of explicit instruction. In addition, students perceived they learned best both when working collaboratively and when making multiple connections with content material. Implications for middle-grade teachers include the need for explicit instruction of metacognitive strategies, providing for instructional variation and student collaboration, and guiding students in making connections to prior learning.

  5. Instructional Facility Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalamazoo Valley Community Coll., MI.

    Data describing campus facility use for instructional and related purposes for one week of activity in Fall 1978 were collected and evaluated at Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Four measures of space utilization were used: (1) percent of available time used; (2) percent of available space used; (3) percent of scheduled space utilized; and (4)…

  6. Individualized Instruction and Unipacs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Sylvester, Jr.

    Individualized instruction is an educational program in which grade levels and time units are designed to permit the student to work at his own pace and level with the use of unipacs. The unipac, a "unique package," is a specially designed group of learning activities based on specific behavioral objectives chosen by the student. Unipacs consist…

  7. Effects of hydraulic retention time and bioflocculant addition on membrane fouling in a sponge-submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lijuan; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Du, Bing; Wei, Qin; Tran, Ngoc Han; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Li, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of activated sludge and membrane fouling were evaluated in a sponge-submerged membrane bioreactor (SSMBR) at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (6.67, 5.33 and 4.00h). At shorter HRT, more obvious membrane fouling was caused by exacerbated cake layer formation and aggravated pore blocking. Activated sludge possessed more extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) due to excessive growth of biomass and lower protein to polysaccharide ratio in soluble microbial products (SMP). The cake layer resistance was aggravated by increased sludge viscosity together with the accumulated EPS and biopolymer clusters (BPC) on membrane surface. However, SMP showed marginal effect on membrane fouling when SSMBRs were operated at all HRTs. The SSMBR with Gemfloc® addition at the optimum HRT of 6.67h demonstrated superior sludge characteristics such as larger floc size, less SMP in mixed liquor with higher protein/polysaccharide ratio, less SMP and BPC in cake layer, thereby further preventing membrane fouling. PMID:26852274

  8. Effects of Vocabulary Instruction Using Constant Time Delay on Expository Reading of Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Youjia; Woods-Groves, Suzanne; Kaldenberg, Erica R.; Scheidecker, Bethany J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of using constant time delay (CTD) with young adults with intellectual disability on their vocabulary acquisition and retention, as well as expository reading comprehension. Four learners, ages 19 to 21 years, from a postsecondary education program for individuals with disabilities participated in the study.…

  9. Conjoint Processing of Time-Compressed Narration in Multimedia Instruction: The Effects on Recall, but Not Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Barron, Ann E.; Kealy, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Although previous research shows verbal recall of time-compressed narration is significantly enhanced when it is accompanied by a representational adjunct picture (Ritzhaupt & Barron, 2008), the reason for this increased performance remains unclear. One explanation, explored in the current study, is based on the Conjoint Retention Hypothesis…

  10. Why Should Faculty Be Involved in Supplemental Instruction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Because instructor-led Supplemental Instruction (SI) offers additional benefits in student learning and engagement over the more traditional peer-led model, in this article the author argues that faculty should consider participating in SI sessions. Benefits to participating in instructor-led SI include: students spend more time on task in…

  11. A New Diagnostic Mechanism of Instruction: A Dynamic, Real-Time and Non-Interference Quantitative Measurement Technique for Adaptive E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pi-Shan; Chang, Te-Jeng; Wu, Ming-Hsiung

    2009-01-01

    The level of learners' expertise has been used as a metric and diagnostic mechanism of instruction. This metric influences mental effort directly according to the applications of cognitive load theory. Cognitive efficiency, an optimal measurement technique of expertise, was developed by Kalyuga and Sweller to replace instructional efficiency in…

  12. Number of Instructional Days/Hours in the School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Julie

    2014-01-01

    While state requirements vary on the number of instructional days and/or hours in the school year, the majority of states require 180 days of student instruction. Most also specify the minimum length of time that constitutes an instructional day. Some states set instructional time in terms of days, some specify hours, and some provide…

  13. A Comparison of Variable Time-Compressed Speech and Normal Rate Speech Based on Time Spent and Performance in a Course Taught by Self-Instructional Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Sarah Harvey

    1977-01-01

    College students using variable rate controlled speech compressors as compared with normal speed tape recorders had an average time saving of 32 percent and an average grade increase of 4.2 points on post-test scores. (Author)

  14. TEMPEST: A three-dimensional time-dependent computer program for hydrothermal analysis: Volume 1, Numerical methods and input instructions

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.; Budden, M.J.

    1983-09-01

    This document describes the numerical methods, current capabilities, and the use of the TEMPEST (Version L, MOD 2) computer program. TEMPEST is a transient, three-dimensional, hydrothermal computer program that is designed to analyze a broad range of coupled fluid dynamic and heat transfer systems of particular interest to the Fast Breeder Reactor thermal-hydraulic design community. The full three-dimensional, time-dependent equations of motion, continuity, and heat transport are solved for either laminar or turbulent fluid flow, including heat diffusion and generation in both solid and liquid materials. 10 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Impact of Influenza on Outpatient Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths by Using a Time Series Poisson Generalized Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ru-ning; Zheng, Hui-zhen; Ou, Chun-quan; Huang, Li-qun; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Can-kun; Lin, Jin-yan; Zhong, Hao-jie; Song, Tie; Luo, Hui-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The disease burden associated with influenza in developing tropical and subtropical countries is poorly understood owing to the lack of a comprehensive disease surveillance system and information-exchange mechanisms. The impact of influenza on outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and deaths has not been fully demonstrated to date in south China. Methods A time series Poisson generalized additive model was used to quantitatively assess influenza-like illness (ILI) and influenza disease burden by using influenza surveillance data in Zhuhai City from 2007 to 2009, combined with the outpatient, inpatient, and respiratory disease mortality data of the same period. Results The influenza activity in Zhuhai City demonstrated a typical subtropical seasonal pattern; however, each influenza virus subtype showed a specific transmission variation. The weekly ILI case number and virus isolation rate had a very close positive correlation (r = 0.774, P < 0.0001). The impact of ILI and influenza on weekly outpatient visits was statistically significant (P < 0.05). We determined that 10.7% of outpatient visits were associated with ILI and 1.88% were associated with influenza. ILI also had a significant influence on the hospitalization rates (P < 0.05), but mainly in populations <25 years of age. No statistically significant effect of influenza on hospital admissions was found (P > 0.05). The impact of ILI on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was most significant (P < 0.05), with 33.1% of COPD-related deaths being attributable to ILI. The impact of influenza on the mortality rate requires further evaluation. Conclusions ILI is a feasible indicator of influenza activity. Both ILI and influenza have a large impact on outpatient visits. Although ILI affects the number of hospital admissions and deaths, we found no consistent influence of influenza, which requires further assessment. PMID:26894876

  16. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... duty for more than 30 hours. Such a crewmember is considered to be on continuous duty from the time...

  17. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... excess of seven days may be given at any time before the pilot is again scheduled for flight duty on...

  18. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... hours before beginning flight duty, one half of the time spent in deadhead transportation must...

  19. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... hours before beginning flight duty, one half of the time spent in deadhead transportation must...

  20. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... excess of seven days may be given at any time before the pilot is again scheduled for flight duty on...

  1. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... excess of seven days may be given at any time before the pilot is again scheduled for flight duty on...

  2. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... hours before beginning flight duty, one half of the time spent in deadhead transportation must...

  3. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... excess of seven days may be given at any time before the pilot is again scheduled for flight duty on...

  4. Evidence-Based Instruction Is Not Enough: Strategies for Increasing Instructional Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrad, Moira; Helf, Shawnna; Joseph, Laurice M.

    2011-01-01

    Even evidence-based instructional methods may not be sufficient for closing achievement gaps. If teachers are not maximizing instructional time, achievement gaps are likely to widen over time; therefore, instruction need not only be effective but efficient as well. The purposes of this article are to (a) provide practitioners with a broad…

  5. Accuracy of sign interpreting and real-time captioning of science videos for the delivery of instruction to deaf students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Karen L.

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively examine the impact of third-party support service providers on the quality of science information available to deaf students in regular science classrooms. Three different videotapes that were developed by NASA for high school science classrooms were selected for the study, allowing for different concepts and vocabulary to be examined. The focus was on the accuracy of translation as measured by the number of key science words included in the transcripts (captions) or videos (interpreted). Data were collected via transcripts completed by CART (computer assisted real-time captionists) or through videos of sign language interpreters. All participants were required to listen to and translate these NASA educational videos with no prior experience with this information so as not to influence their delivery. CART personnel using captions were found to be significantly more accurate in the delivery of science words as compared to the sign language interpreters in this study.

  6. Making Blended Instruction Better: Integrating the Principles of Universal Design for Instruction into Course Design and Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Lyman L., III; Koorland, Mark A.; Scott, Sally S.

    2009-01-01

    Online instruction in general and blended instruction in particular have gained a sizable and permanent foothold in postsecondary educational environments. In addition, student diversity has become the norm. Universal design for instruction is a framework that consists of nine principles for instructional design and delivery; it proposes that…

  7. Processing Instruction and Meaning-Based Output Instruction: A Response to Keating and Farley (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanPatten, Bill; Farmer, Jeffrey L.; Clardy, Caleb L.

    2009-01-01

    Research on Processing Instruction (PI) has yielded consistently positive results across a variety of measures. In addition, in comparison to other instructional interventions, PI tends to yield superior results. The one difference is comparative research with Meaning-based Output Instruction (MOI) in which in a number of studies, MOI is seen to…

  8. Instructional Program for Forest Rangers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudsen, Walter R.

    1970-01-01

    Describes program offerings, student enrollment, curriculum, employment opportunities, placement of graduates, and work experience at an institution utilizing five full-time foresters and one consultant on its instructional staff. (DM)

  9. Types of verbal interaction with instructable robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crangle, C.; Suppes, P.; Michalowski, S.

    1987-01-01

    An instructable robot is one that accepts instruction in some natural language such as English and uses that instruction to extend its basic repertoire of actions. Such robots are quite different in conception from autonomously intelligent robots, which provide the impetus for much of the research on inference and planning in artificial intelligence. Examined here are the significant problem areas in the design of robots that learn from vebal instruction. Examples are drawn primarily from our earlier work on instructable robots and recent work on the Robotic Aid for the physically disabled. Natural-language understanding by machines is discussed as well as in the possibilities and limits of verbal instruction. The core problem of verbal instruction, namely, how to achieve specific concrete action in the robot in response to commands that express general intentions, is considered, as are two major challenges to instructability: achieving appropriate real-time behavior in the robot, and extending the robot's language capabilities.

  10. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... his base and who is a pilot on an airplane that has a crew of three or more pilots and an...

  11. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... operations may schedule an airman for flight deck duty as a flight engineer, or navigator in a crew of...

  12. 14 CFR 121.521 - Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one additional airman as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.521 Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one...

  13. 14 CFR 121.521 - Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one additional airman as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.521 Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one...

  14. 14 CFR 121.521 - Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one additional airman as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.521 Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one...

  15. 14 CFR 121.521 - Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one additional airman as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.521 Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one...

  16. A Study of Peer Instruction in Large Enrollment Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark C.

    2007-10-01

    The use of Peer Instruction to enhance lectures in large enrollment introductory college science courses has become widespread. In this technique, learner responses to multiple choice questions posed by the instructor during lecture are recorded and displayed in real time by an electronic classroom response system (CRS). Peer Instruction takes place when learners are given time to discuss ideas with their neighbors before registering their individual responses. The results of this study suggest that the grading incentive instructors adopt for incorrect question responses impacts the nature and quality of the peer discussions that take place. Recommendations for more effective assessment strategies relating to Peer Instruction are discussed. Additional qualitative discourse data is also presented.

  17. Impact of instruction in the Creighton Model FertilityCare System on time to pregnancy in couples of proven fecundity: results of a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Joseph B.; Smith, Ken R.; Varner, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Creighton Model FertilityCare System (CrMS) teaches women to identify days when intercourse is likely to result in pregnancy. We sought to assess the impact of the CrMS on time to clinically identified pregnancy (TTP), via per-cycle pregnancy rates (fecundability). Methods We conducted a parallel randomised trial at the University of Utah School of Medicine, 2003–2006. Women ages 18–35, in a relationship of proven fertility, who desired to conceive, were block-randomised, stratified for age, with allocation concealment by opaque sequentially numbered sealed envelopes. The control group received the advice to have intercourse 2–3 times per week, and the intervention group received CrMS instruction. All women were asked to begin trying to conceive starting the second cycle in the study and were followed actively up to 7 cycles, without blinding of research personnel. We calculated descriptive statistics and fecundability, and estimated Cox models for TTP. Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00161395 Results There were 143 women randomised: 71 to the control group (all analysed) and 72 to the CrMS group (69 analysed). The adjusted hazard ratio for the influence of CrMS on TTP was 0.86 (95% CI: 0.53, 1.38). Fecundability in cycles with intent to conceive was 31% in controls and 36% with CrMS (p=0.32). By the first cycle, fecundability was 17% in controls, and 4% with CrMS (p=0.02). No adverse events were reported. Conclusions We found no significant impact of CrMS on TTP or fecundability, but fewer of the women receiving CrMS conceived by the first cycle. PMID:25225008

  18. The Minnesota Adaptive Instructional System: An Intelligent CBI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennyson, Robert D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Briefly reviews theoretical developments in adaptive instructional systems, defines six characteristics of intelligent computer-based management systems, and presents theory and research of Minnesota Adaptive Instructional System (MAIS). Generic programing codes for amount and sequence of instruction, instructional display time, and advisement…

  19. The Implementation of Computer Assisted Instruction in U.S. Army Basic Electronics Training. Follow-Up of a Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Alexander A.

    A follow-up was made to a feasibility study of the use of computer assisted instruction in teaching basic electronics. The study was designed to obtain additional empirical data, collected in a real time training environment, on the effectiveness of CAI as a teaching method relative to the conventional mode of instruction (CI). Four specific…

  20. Elementary Students' Retention of Environmental Science Knowledge: Connected Science Instruction versus Direct Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar; DeFranco, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study compares 3rd-grade elementary students' gain and retention of science vocabulary over time in two different classes--"connected science instruction" versus "direct instruction." Data analysis yielded that students who received connected science instruction showed less gain in science knowledge in the short term compared to students who…

  1. Do Instructional Practices Contribute to Inequality in Achievement?: The Case of Mathematics Instruction in Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodovski, Katerina; Farkas, George

    2007-01-01

    We use multilevel modeling of ECLS-K data (a nationally representative sample of American kindergartners) to describe the process and content of kindergarten mathematics instruction, as well as the associations of such instruction with achievement gaps by social class and race/ethnicity. Where instructional effectiveness is concerned, time spent…

  2. Using Task Based Writing Instruction to Provide Differentiated Instruction for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bantis, Alexandros Merkouris

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of task based writing instruction (TBwI) on English language acquisition and differentiated instruction for minority language students during the Independent Work Time instructional component of the Open Court Reading program. One teacher and 10 third grade students (8-9 years old)…

  3. Code inspection instructional validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Kay; Stancil, Shirley

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Data Systems Branch (SDSB) of the Flight Data Systems Division (FDSD) at Johnson Space Center contracted with Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to validate the effectiveness of an interactive video course on the code inspection process. The purpose of this project was to determine if this course could be effective for teaching NASA analysts the process of code inspection. In addition, NASA was interested in the effectiveness of this unique type of instruction (Digital Video Interactive), for providing training on software processes. This study found the Carnegie Mellon course, 'A Cure for the Common Code', effective for teaching the process of code inspection. In addition, analysts prefer learning with this method of instruction, or this method in combination with other methods. As is, the course is definitely better than no course at all; however, findings indicate changes are needed. Following are conclusions of this study. (1) The course is instructionally effective. (2) The simulation has a positive effect on student's confidence in his ability to apply new knowledge. (3) Analysts like the course and prefer this method of training, or this method in combination with current methods of training in code inspection, over the way training is currently being conducted. (4) Analysts responded favorably to information presented through scenarios incorporating full motion video. (5) Some course content needs to be changed. (6) Some content needs to be added to the course. SwRI believes this study indicates interactive video instruction combined with simulation is effective for teaching software processes. Based on the conclusions of this study, SwRI has outlined seven options for NASA to consider. SwRI recommends the option which involves creation of new source code and data files, but uses much of the existing content and design from the current course. Although this option involves a significant software development effort, SwRI believes this option

  4. Evaluation of gold nanoparticles as the additive in real-time polymerase chain reaction with SYBR Green I dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Mi, Lijuan; Cao, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Fan, Chunhai; Hu, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proven to be able to improve the specificity or increase the efficiency of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) when a suitable amount of AuNPs was used. However, there is still a lack of systematic evaluation of AuNPs in real-time PCR. In this study, DNA degradation and the fluorescence quenching effect of AuNPs were first tested in real-time PCR. Then two different kinds of Taq DNA polymerase, native and recombinant Taq polymerase, were employed to evaluate the AuNPs' effect on the threshold cycle (CT) values, standard curves and melting curves in real-time PCR. Different ratios of the amount of native Taq DNA polymerase to the amount of AuNPs were also tested. It was found that AuNPs could be applied in real-time PCR with correlation coefficient R2>0.989. The combination of 2.09 nM AuNPs with 3.75 U of native Taq DNA polymerase could make the amplification curves shift to the left and enhance the efficiency of the real-time PCR (0.628 39 without AuNPs compared with 0.717 89 with 2.09 nM AuNPs), thus enabling faster detection in comparison with those of control samples. However, no improvement ability of AuNPs was found in real-time PCR based on recombinant rTaq DNA polymerase. Besides, the results suggest that a complex interaction exists between AuNPs and native Taq DNA polymerase.

  5. 77 FR 23239 - Bryant Mountain, LLC; Notice of Additional Scoping Meetings, Extension of Time To File Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Time To File Comments on the PAD and Scoping Document, and Identification of Issues and Associated... comments on the Pre- Application Document (PAD) and Scoping Document 1 (SD1). b. Type of Filing: Notice of..., filed with the Commission a PAD (including a proposed process plan and schedule), pursuant to 18 CFR...

  6. Chimpanzees remember the results of one-by-one addition of food items to sets over extended time periods.

    PubMed

    Beran, Michael J; Beran, Mary M

    2004-02-01

    Four chimpanzees were highly accurate in selecting the larger of two concurrent accumulations of bananas in two opaque containers over a span of 20 min. One at a time, bananas were placed into the containers, which were outside the chimpanzees' cages. The chimpanzees never saw more than one banana at a time, and there were no cues indicating the locations of the bananas after they were placed into the containers. The performance of these animals matched that of human infants and young children in similar tests. The chimpanzees were successful even when the sets to be compared were sufficiently large (5 vs. 8, 5 vs. 10, and 6 vs. 10) to cast doubt on the possibility that the chimpanzees were using an object file mechanism. These chimpanzees are the first nonhuman animals to demonstrate extended memory for accumulated quantity. PMID:14738515

  7. Internet-based instruction in college teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flickinger, Kathleen Anne

    Distance education and Internet instruction are increasingly being used in college science teaching. In an effort to reach more students, Iowa State University's Human Anatomy and Physiology course was offered via Internet as well as via traditional lecture format. To assess the educational ramifications of this offering, three studies were conducted. In the first study, a collective case study approach was utilized to describe the learning environment created by an Internet-based college science course. In this study, three students were followed as they worked their way through the course. Collective case study methodologies were used to provide a rich description of the learning environment experienced by these students. Motivation, computer savvy, and academic and personal self-confidence appeared to impact the satisfaction level of the students enrolled in the class. To evaluate the effectiveness of the learning environment offered through the Internet-based science course, a quantitative comparison study was undertaken. In this study a comparison of achievement scores and study habits between students enrolled in the Internet-based class and those enrolled in the traditional section was made. Results from this study indicated that content understanding and retention did not appear to be effected by the type of instruction. Desirable study habits were reportedly used more frequently in the Internet section of the class than in the traditional class. To complete the description of the Internet course experience, a qualitative examination of Internet instructors' time commitment and level of teaching satisfaction was conducted. Data for this study consisted of interviews and researcher observations. Instructor time-on-task was initially quite high, and remained above the average spent on average face-to-face instruction in subsequent semesters. Additionally the role of the faculty member changed dramatically, causing some lessening of job satisfaction. Taken as

  8. Modeling of time dependent localized flow shear stress and its impact on cellular growth within additive manufactured titanium implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziyu; Yuan, Lang; Lee, Peter D; Jones, Eric; Jones, Julian R

    2014-01-01

    Bone augmentation implants are porous to allow cellular growth, bone formation and fixation. However, the design of the pores is currently based on simple empirical rules, such as minimum pore and interconnects sizes. We present a three-dimensional (3D) transient model of cellular growth based on the Navier–Stokes equations that simulates the body fluid flow and stimulation of bone precursor cellular growth, attachment, and proliferation as a function of local flow shear stress. The model's effectiveness is demonstrated for two additive manufactured (AM) titanium scaffold architectures. The results demonstrate that there is a complex interaction of flow rate and strut architecture, resulting in partially randomized structures having a preferential impact on stimulating cell migration in 3D porous structures for higher flow rates. This novel result demonstrates the potential new insights that can be gained via the modeling tool developed, and how the model can be used to perform what-if simulations to design AM structures to specific functional requirements. PMID:24664988

  9. Performance analysis for time-frequency MUSIC algorithm in presence of both additive noise and array calibration errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodja, Mohamed; Belouchrani, Adel; Abed-Meraim, Karim

    2012-12-01

    This article deals with the application of Spatial Time-Frequency Distribution (STFD) to the direction finding problem using the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC)algorithm. A comparative performance analysis is performed for the method under consideration with respect to that using data covariance matrix when the received array signals are subject to calibration errors in a non-stationary environment. An unified analytical expression of the Direction Of Arrival (DOA) error estimation is derived for both methods. Numerical results show the effect of the parameters intervening in the derived expression on the algorithm performance. It is particularly observed that for low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and high Signal to sensor Perturbation Ratio (SPR) the STFD method gives better performance, while for high SNR and for the same SPR both methods give similar performance.

  10. Zoom-TOFMS: addition of a constant-momentum-acceleration "zoom" mode to time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Elise A; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Ray, Steven J; Enke, Christie G; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the performance of a new mass spectrometry concept called zoom time-of-flight mass spectrometry (zoom-TOFMS). In our zoom-TOFMS instrument, we combine two complementary types of TOFMS: conventional, constant-energy acceleration (CEA) TOFMS and constant-momentum acceleration (CMA) TOFMS to provide complete mass-spectral coverage as well as enhanced resolution and duty factor for a narrow, targeted mass region, respectively. Alternation between CEA- and CMA-TOFMS requires only that electrostatic instrument settings (i.e., reflectron and ion optics) and ion acceleration conditions be changed. The prototype zoom-TOFMS instrument has orthogonal-acceleration geometry, a total field-free distance of 43 cm, and a direct-current glow-discharge ionization source. Experimental results demonstrate that the CMA-TOFMS "zoom" mode offers resolution enhancement of 1.6 times over single-stage acceleration CEA-TOFMS. For the atomic mass range studied here, the maximum resolving power at full-width half-maximum observed for CEA-TOFMS was 1,610 and for CMA-TOFMS the maximum was 2,550. No difference in signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio was observed between the operating modes of zoom-TOFMS when both were operated at equivalent repetition rates. For a 10-kHz repetition rate, S/N values for CEA-TOFMS varied from 45 to 990 and from 67 to 10,000 for CMA-TOFMS. This resolution improvement is the result of a linear TOF-to-mass scale and the energy-focusing capability of CMA-TOFMS. Use of CMA also allows ions outside a given m/z range to be rejected by simple ion-energy barriers to provide a substantial improvement in duty factor. PMID:24866712

  11. Perceptions of Employment and Use of Part-Time Faculty among Chief Instructional Officers at Southern Association of Colleges and Schools-Accredited Public Associate's Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Charlotte Nix

    2013-01-01

    Based on Yackee's (2000) study of the perceptions of chief instructional officers (CIOs) at community colleges accredited by North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA), this study identified, described, and compared the perceptions of CIOs at institutions accredited by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on…

  12. Self-Instructional Materials for Topics in Elementary Accounting -- A Means to the Demonstration of Pay-Offs from Individualizing Time-To-Complete. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Frank A.

    The materials in this report provide a case study of the development and validation of self-instructional lessons on four topics customarily included in a first college accounting course. For each topic, performance objectives were embodied in four criterion tests. The author provides documents relating to departmental curriculum decisions and to…

  13. TEMPEST: A three-dimensional time-dependence computer program for hydrothermal analysis: Volume 1, Numerical methods and input instructions: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    TEMPEST offers simulation capabilities over a wide range of hydrothermal problems that are definable by input instructions. These capabilities are summarized by categories as follows: modeling capabilities; program control; and I/O control. 10 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs. (LSP)

  14. Space Takes Time: Concentration Dependent Output Codes from Primary Olfactory Networks Rapidly Provide Additional Information at Defined Discrimination Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin C.; Bradley, Samual; Chapman, Phillip D.; Staudacher, Erich M.; Tiede, Regina; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    As odor concentration increases, primary olfactory network representations expand in spatial distribution, temporal complexity and duration. However, the direct relationship between concentration dependent odor representations and the psychophysical thresholds of detection and discrimination is poorly understood. This relationship is absolutely critical as thresholds signify transition points whereby representations become meaningful to the organism. Here, we matched stimulus protocols for psychophysical assays and intracellular recordings of antennal lobe (AL) projection neurons (PNs) in the moth Manduca sexta to directly compare psychophysical thresholds and the output representations they elicit. We first behaviorally identified odor detection and discrimination thresholds across an odor dilution series for a panel of structurally similar odors. We then characterized spatiotemporal spiking patterns across a population of individually filled and identified AL PNs in response to those odors at concentrations below, at, and above identified thresholds. Using spatial and spatiotemporal based analyses we observed that each stimulus produced unique representations, even at sub-threshold concentrations. Mean response latency did not decrease and the percent glomerular activation did not increase with concentration until undiluted odor. Furthermore, correlations between spatial patterns for odor decreased, but only significantly with undiluted odor. Using time-integrated Euclidean distance (ED) measures, we determined that added spatiotemporal information was present at the discrimination but not detection threshold. This added information was evidenced by an increase in integrated distance between the sub-detection and discrimination threshold concentrations (of the same odor) that was not present in comparison of the sub-detection and detection threshold. After consideration of delays for information to reach the AL we find that it takes ~120–140 ms for the AL to

  15. Bibliographic Instruction in Indiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, H. Scott, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This issue contains nine articles written by Indiana librarians involved in bibliographic instruction: (1) "Information Management Education--Beyond BI (Bibliographic Instruction)" (Gillian S. Gremmels); (2) "Dealing with the New Technology: An Instructional Primer" (Patrick Max); (3) "Librarian/Teacher Partnerships for Better Library Instruction:…

  16. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  17. Detonation of highly dilute porous explosives; II: Influence of inert additives on the structure of the front, the parameters, and the reaction time

    SciTech Connect

    Shvedov, K.K.; Aniskin, A.I.; Dremin, A.N.; Il'in, A.N.

    1982-06-01

    For the detonation of porous explosives with inert additives, as for the detonation of individual porous explosives, the basic postulates and conclusions of the modern gasdynamic theory of detonation are valid. The influence of solid, refractory inert additives on the decomposition mechanism of porous explosives depends on the individual properties of the explosives and mainly on the dispersity of the additives. With the elimination of pronounced heating of the additives in mixtures with TNT, a certain positive influence on the appearance of decomposition sources and the total reaction time is observed. In cases with hexogen, no such influence is observed, which is evidently the result of physical inhomogeneity of the porous structure of the charge and the sufficiently high detonation pressures of the mixtures. The basic influence of inert additives on the critical diameter, front structure, detonation parameters, and reaction time of porous explosives is exerted through processes of energy absorption in the reaction region and factors leading to energy losses may lead to ambiguity of the detonation conditions in a system with specified chemical potential energy. The state of the additive in the reaction region must be taken into account for reliable theoretical description of the detonation conditions of porous explosives with a large content of inert additives.

  18. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  19. 10 CFR 35.410 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.410 Section 35.410 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.410 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) The licensee shall provide radiation...

  20. 10 CFR 35.410 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.410 Section 35.410 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.410 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) The licensee shall provide radiation...

  1. 10 CFR 35.410 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.410 Section 35.410 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.410 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) The licensee shall provide radiation...

  2. 10 CFR 35.410 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.410 Section 35.410 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.410 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) The licensee shall provide radiation...

  3. 10 CFR 35.410 - Safety instruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety instruction. 35.410 Section 35.410 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.410 Safety instruction. In addition to the requirements of § 19.12 of this chapter, (a) The licensee shall provide radiation...

  4. Guidelines for Good Practice: Technology Mediated Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    Technology Mediated Instruction (TMI) is an alternate mode of instructional delivery that provides several benefits. In addition to assisting information transfer through integration of course material, TMI fosters instructor-student interaction through methods such as interactive question-answer areas, video-based office hours, e-mail, and…

  5. Scientific Writing: A Blended Instructional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, MaryAnn; Olson, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Scientific writing is composed of a unique skill set and corresponding instructional strategies are critical to foster learning. In an age of technology, the blended instructional model provides the instrumental format for student mastery of the scientific writing competencies. In addition, the course management program affords opportunities for…

  6. AV Instruction Media and Methods; Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James W., Ed.; And Others

    In addition to updating material covered in the second edition and providing more illustrative material, this edition attempts to offer a systematic approach to the integration of instructional aids into the curriculum. It discusses the use of significant new developments in instructional technology-multimedia packages or kits, programed…

  7. The impact of instruction and response cost on the modulation of response-style in children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study investigated the impact of divergent instructions and response cost on strategic cognitive control in children with ADHD. Methods Children with ADHD (N = 34), combined subtype, and control children (N = 34) performed a series of self-paced computerized visual search tasks. The tasks varied by verbal instructions: after a baseline task, children were either instructed to work as fast as possible (speed instruction) or as accurately as possible (accuracy instruction). In addition, tasks were performed with and without response cost. Results Both groups modulated latencies and errors according to instructions in a comparable way, except for latency in the accuracy - instruction without response cost, where control children showed a larger increase of response time. Response cost did not affect the modulation of response style in children with ADHD to a larger extent than in controls. However, with instructions group differences related to target criteria became clearly more accentuated compared to baseline but disappeared when response cost was added. Conclusions Delay aversion theory and motivational or state regulation models may account for different aspects of the results. Modifications related to task presentation, such as the emphasis put on different details in the verbal instruction, may lead to divergent results when comparing performances of children with ADHD and control children on a self-paced task. PMID:20525316

  8. Assessing direct analysis in real-time-mass spectrometry (DART-MS) for the rapid identification of additives in food packaging.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, L K; Noonan, G O; Begley, T H

    2009-12-01

    The ambient ionization technique direct analysis in real time (DART) was characterized and evaluated for the screening of food packaging for the presence of packaging additives using a benchtop mass spectrometer (MS). Approximate optimum conditions were determined for 13 common food-packaging additives, including plasticizers, anti-oxidants, colorants, grease-proofers, and ultraviolet light stabilizers. Method sensitivity and linearity were evaluated using solutions and characterized polymer samples. Additionally, the response of a model additive (di-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate) was examined across a range of sample positions, DART, and MS conditions (temperature, voltage and helium flow). Under optimal conditions, molecular ion (M+H+) was the major ion for most additives. Additive responses were highly sensitive to sample and DART source orientation, as well as to DART flow rates, temperatures, and MS inlet voltages, respectively. DART-MS response was neither consistently linear nor quantitative in this setting, and sensitivity varied by additive. All additives studied were rapidly identified in multiple food-packaging materials by DART-MS/MS, suggesting this technique can be used to screen food packaging rapidly. However, method sensitivity and quantitation requires further study and improvement. PMID:19753496

  9. Computer-assisted instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of a project of research and development on strategies for optimizing the instructional process, and dissemination of information about the applications of such research to the instructional medium of computer-assisted instruction. Accomplishments reported include construction of the author language INSTRUCT, construction of a practical CAI course in the area of computer science, and a number of investigations into the individualization of instruction, using the course as a vehicle.

  10. Generalized additive models with interval-censored data and time-varying covariates: application to human immunodeficiency virus infection in hemophiliacs.

    PubMed

    Bacchetti, Peter; Quale, Christopher

    2002-06-01

    We describe a method for extending smooth nonparametric modeling methods to time-to-event data where the event may be known only to lie within a window of time. Maximum penalized likelihood is used to fit a discrete proportional hazards model that also models the baseline hazard, and left-truncation and time-varying covariates are accommodated. The implementation follows generalized additive modeling conventions, allowing both parametric and smooth terms and specifying the amount of smoothness in terms of the effective degrees of freedom. We illustrate the method on a well-known interval-censored data set on time of human immunodeficiency virus infection in a multicenter study of hemophiliacs. The ability to examine time-varying covariates, not available with previous methods, allows detection and modeling of nonproportional hazards and use of a time-varying covariate that fits the data better and is more plausible than a fixed alternative. PMID:12071419

  11. Microbiological and physicochemical characterization of dry-cured Halal goat meat. Effect of salting time and addition of olive oil and paprika covering.

    PubMed

    Cherroud, Sanâa; Cachaldora, Aida; Fonseca, Sonia; Laglaoui, Amin; Carballo, Javier; Franco, Inmaculada

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work was to define a simple technological process for dry-cured Halal goat meat elaboration. The aims of this study were to analyze physicochemical parameters and to enumerate the microbial population at the end of the different manufacturing processes (two salting times and the addition of olive oil and paprika covering) on 36 units of meat product. A total of 532 strains were isolated from several selective culture media and then identified using classical and molecular methods. In general, salt effect and the addition of olive oil and paprika were significant for all the studied microbial groups as well as on NaCl content and water activity. Molecular analysis proves that staphylococci, especially Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus equorum, were the most common naturally occurring microbiota. The best manufacturing process would be obtained with a longer salting time and the addition of the olive oil and paprika covering. PMID:24950081

  12. 76 FR 14385 - Advisory Commission on Accessible Instructional Materials in Postsecondary Education for Students...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... time frame comparable to the availability of instructional materials for postsecondary nondisabled... Advisory Commission on Accessible Instructional Materials in Postsecondary Education for Students With Disabilities Meeting AGENCY: Advisory Commission on Accessible Instructional Materials in...

  13. 76 FR 36907 - Advisory Commission on Accessible Instructional Materials in Postsecondary Education for Students...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... time frame comparable to the availability of instructional materials for postsecondary nondisabled... Advisory Commission on Accessible Instructional Materials in Postsecondary Education for Students With..., Advisory Commission on Accessible Instructional Materials in Postsecondary Education for Students...

  14. Computer Literacy: An Instructional Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratekin, Ruth; And Others

    This instructional unit on computer literacy is intended for use as a 9-week course meeting five days per week for 50-minute class periods. If tied to a 9-week course in keyboarding or combined with additional materials on programming or software applications, it could also be expanded into a semester course. The following topics are covered in…

  15. 1972 Recorded Instruction for Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Great Plains National Instructional Television Library.

    All materials currently offered by Great Plains National Instructional Television Library (GRNITL) are described in this catalog. Included are more than 100 videotape recordings of courses which may be duplicated or leased by the user. In addition, materials on 16 mm. film and kinescope are included which may also be leased or purchased. Materials…

  16. Comparison between Kemp, Smith & Ragan, Dick & Carey's Instructional Design Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birgili, Bengi

    2013-01-01

    Instructional design (ID) is systematic way of suggesting a structure and giving meaning to an instructional problem by helping to visualize the problem and breaking into discrete and manageable units. In addition, ID is a systematic reflective process of applying instructional principles into plans by material, activity, resources and evaluation…

  17. Understanding and execution of discharge instructions.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Eric A; Chugh, Amita; Williams, Mark V; Grigsby, Jim; Glasheen, Jeffrey J; McKenzie, Marlene; Min, Sung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Discharge from the acute care hospital is increasingly recognized as a time of heightened vulnerability for lapses in safety and quality. The capacity of patients to understand and execute discharge instructions is critical to promote effective self-care. This study explores factors that predict understanding and execution of discharge instructions in a sample of 237 recently discharged older adults. A study nurse conducted a postdischarge home visit to ascertain patient understanding and assess execution of instructions. Health literacy, cognition, and self-efficacy were important predictors of successful understanding and execution of instructions. Neither discharge diagnosis nor complexity of discharge instructions was found to be a significant predictor of these outcomes. Results indicate a need to implement reliable protocols that identify patients at risk for poor understanding and execution of hospital discharge instructions and provide customized approaches to meet them at their respective levels. PMID:23354870

  18. Analysis of Teaching Techniques: Individualized Instruction-Programmed Instruction vs. Programmed Instruction Supplemented by Video Tape Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Claude S.; Griffin, Bennie L.

    To determine the effects of videotape supplements to the programmed instruction used in developmental mathematics at Danville Community College (Virginia), videotapes and supplements (study time record, instructions, flow chart, prefatory information, index of tapes, objectives, exercises, and summary) were produced for four units of Algebra I.…

  19. Crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in a flowing system: Influence of Cu2+ additives on induction time and crystalline phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmany, Y.; Putranto, W. A.; Bayuseno, A. P.; Muryanto, S.

    2016-04-01

    Scaling of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is commonly found in piping systems in oil, gas, desalination and other chemical processes. The scale may create technical problems, leading to the reduction of heat transfer, increase of energy consumption and unscheduled equipment shutdown. This paper presents crystallization scaling experiments and evaluation of the effect of Cu2+ additives on the induction time and calcium carbonate transformation. The crystals precursors were prepared using equimolar of CaCl2 and Na2CO3 resulted in concentrations of 3000 ppm Ca2+ in the solution. The Cu2+ in amounts of 0, 1 and 10 ppm was separately added in the solution. The flow rates (20, 35, and 60 mL/min) and elevated temperatures (27, 35 and 45°C) were selected in the study. The induction time for crystallization of CaCO3 was observed by measuring the solution conductivity over time, while the phase transformation of calcium carbonate was examined by XRD method and SEM/EDX. It was found that the conductivity remained steady for a certain period reflecting to the induction time of crystal formation, and then decreased sharply afterwards,. The induction time was increased from 34 and 48 minutes in the presence of Cu additives (1 and 10 ppm), depending on the flow rates and temperature observed. In all the experiments, the Cu2+ addition leads to the reduction of mass of crystals. Apparently, the presence of Cu2+ could inhibit the CaCO3 crystallization. In the absence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals obtained were a mixture of vaterite and calcite. In the presence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals formed were aragonite and calcite. Here, the presence of Cu2+ additives might have controlled the crystal transformation of CaCO3.

  20. A Thinking Practices Framework for Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recker, Mimi M.; Olson, Daren; Rogers, Jim; duPlessis, Jacques

    This paper examines some of the theoretical changes that have led the field of instructional and educational technology into a time of critical transactions. It begins by outlining some of the standard notions and assumptions within the field of instructional technology, and goes on to examine how they may be changing as a result of influences of…

  1. Categories for Observing Language Arts Instruction (COLAI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benterud, Julianna G.

    Designed to study individual use of time spent in reading during regularly scheduled language arts instruction in a natural classroom setting, this coding sheet consists of nine categories: (1) engagement, (2) area of language arts, (3) instructional setting, (4) partner (teacher or pupil(s)), (5) source of content, (6) type of unit, (7) assigned…

  2. Growth behavior of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2013-01-01

    The probability of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele for growing to a size NC for a range of population sizes N, sequence lengths L, selective advantages s, and measuring parameters C was calculated for a haploid, asexual population in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive selective advantage of the reversal allele over the optimal allele. The growing probability in the stochastic region was inversely proportional to the measuring parameter when C < 1 /Ns, bent when C ≈ 1/ Ns and saturated when C > 1/ Ns. The crossing time and the time dependence of the increase in relative density of the reversal allele in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was approximated using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model with the same selective advantage and corresponding effective mutation rate. The growth behavior of additional offspring with the reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was controlled by the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared to the optimal allele and could be described by using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model, in spite of there being many other alleles with lower fitness, and in spite of there being two alleles, the optimal and reversal allele, separated by a low-fitness valley with a tunable depth and width.

  3. Instructional Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Using open-ended virtual spaces can be challenging and time consuming for teachers. Fortunately, there are many resources in-world and on the web with general guidelines and specific tools to help teachers be more productive. Most of the groups that host these resources recruit professional members with experience in simulation and game-based…

  4. Interactive radio instruction: developing instructional methods.

    PubMed

    Friend, J

    1989-01-01

    The USAID has, since 1972, funded the development of a new methodology for educational radio for young children through 3 projects: the Radio Mathematics PRoject of Nicaragua, the Radio Language Arts Project of Kenya, and the Radio Science PRoject of Papua New Guinea. These projects developed math programs for grades 1-4 and English as a second language for grades 1-3; programs to teach science in grades 4-6 are now being developed. Appropriate techniques were developed to engage young children actively in the learning process. Lessons are planned as a "conversation" between the children and the radio; scripts are written as 1/2 of a dialogue, with pauses carefully timed so that written as 12 of a dialogue, with pauses carefully timed so that students can contribute their 1/2. Teaching techniques used in all 3 projects include choral responses, simultaneous individual seatwork, and activities using simple materials such as pebbles and rulers. Certain techniques were specific to the subject being taught, or to the circumstances in which the lessons were to be used. Patterned oral drill was used frequently in the English lessons, including sound-cued drills. "Deferred" oral responses were used often in the math lessons. In this method, the children are instructed to solve a problem silently, not giving the answer aloud until requested, thus allowing time for even the slower children to participate. "One-child" questions were used in both English and science: the radio asks a question to be answered by a single child, who is selected on the spot by the classroom teacher. This allows for open-ended questions, but also requires constant supervision of the classroom teacher. Songs and games were used in all programs, and extensively for didactic purposes in the teaching of English. Instructions for science activities are often more complex than in other courses, particularly when the children are using science apparatus, especially when they work in pairs to share scarce

  5. Comparing Three Innovative Instructional Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Rita; Waggoner, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    Examines the differences between three instructional systems: learning styles, neuro-linguistic programming, and "Suggestopoedia." Topics include the philosophical basis of each system; teaching methodologies; the use of multimedia; the use of time; environmental settings; and approaches to human emotion, individual sociological differences, and…

  6. The Evaluation of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanaga, Kim

    Some of the theoretical and methodological problems with current practices in evaluating instruction at the higher education level are reviewed. Controversy over the evaluation of instruction in higher education has resulted at least in part from inadequate instrumentation. The instruments for instructional rating now used include administrator…

  7. Elements of Individualized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svara, Ronald

    Although many schools claim to make use of individualized instruction, no common definition of this term has been agreed on. The author reviewed definitions of "individualized instruction" in five studies and then surveyed 30 community and junior colleges who claimed to be using this method of instruction to learn what their programs consisted of.…

  8. Instructional Design: System Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Bruce R.; Sleeman, Phillip J.

    This book is intended as a source for those who desire to apply a coherent system of instructional design, thereby insuring accountability. Chapter 1 covers the instructional design process, including: instructional technology; the role of evaluation; goal setting; the psychology of teaching and learning; task analysis; operational objectives;…

  9. Instructional System Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The manual presents a technology of instructional design and a model for developing and conducting efficient and cost effective Air Force instructional systems. Chapter 1 provides an overview of Instructional System Development (ISD). Chapters 2-6 each focus on a step of the process: analysis of system requirements; definition of…

  10. Instructional Rounds in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, John E.

    2012-01-01

    "Instructional Rounds in Action" is an invaluable guide for those involved in implementing instructional rounds as the foundation and framework for systemic improvement in schools. Over the past few years, districts across the United States, Canada, and Australia have begun implementing "instructional rounds," a set of ideas and practices for…

  11. Evaluating Instructional Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Joseph L.; Lyons, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an evaluation instrument for evaluating instructional multimedia programs. Highlights include the need to evaluate; an illustrated example; and instructions for filling out the instrument that includes compatibility for hardware and software; instructional design issues, including content and audience definition; and interface, including…

  12. Instructional Data, FY 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staatse, Holly

    These three reports present instructional data for Mercer County Community College for Summer and Fall 1980 and Spring 1981. The first report, covering summer sessions from 1974 through 1980, examines instructional hours, class size, student credit hours (SCRH), student contact hours (SCH), income/cost measures, instructional staff, full-time…

  13. Balanced Literacy Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressley, Michael; Roehrig, Alysia; Bogner, Kristen; Raphael, Lisa M.; Dolezal, Sara

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence for balanced literacy instruction in the elementary years. The case is made that the balanced instructional model is particularly appropriate and beneficial for students who have initial difficulties in learning to read and write. Key features of successful reading instruction programs are described. (Contains…

  14. Commercial Carpentry: Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Donald W.; Penner, Wayman R.

    This manual contains instructional materials which measure student performance on commercial carpentry behavioral objectives; criterion-referenced evaluation instruments are also included. Each of the manual's eleven sections consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional unit includes behavioral objectives, suggested activities…

  15. Peer-Mediated Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Peter S.

    The concept of peer-mediated instruction (PMI) grew out of the author's earlier research on applying techniques of drill and practice computer-assisted instruction (CAI) to language skills learning. Peer-mediated instruction directs pupils to work in pairs, interacting with one another according to structured pattern of dialogue. This book…

  16. Computer Assisted Instructional Design for Computer-Based Instruction. Final Report. Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Daniel M.; Pirolli, Peter

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence and the cognitive sciences have made it possible to develop successful intelligent computer-aided instructional systems for technical and scientific training. In addition, computer-aided design (CAD) environments that support the rapid development of such computer-based instruction have also been recently…

  17. CALIFORNIA JUNIOR COLLEGE FACULTY COMPENSATION FOR EXTRA-INSTRUCTIONAL ASSIGNMENTS, 1967-68.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BECKER, GEORGE L.

    THIS STUDY WAS MADE BY LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE TO SAMPLE PRACTICES IN FACULTY COMPENSATION FOR EXTRA-INSTRUCTIONAL ASSIGNMENTS. TEN JUNIOR COLLEGES RESPONDED TO A SHORT TELEPHONE QUESTIONNAIRE. A SUMMARY OF THE REPLIES SHOWS THAT (1) 75 PERCENT GRANTED COMPENSATION FOR TEACHING LARGE LECTURE SECTIONS, HALF BY ASSIGNING ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTOR TIME,…

  18. Impacts of warming and elevated CO2 on a semi-arid grassland are non-additive, shift with precipitation, and reverse over time.

    PubMed

    Mueller, K E; Blumenthal, D M; Pendall, E; Carrillo, Y; Dijkstra, F A; Williams, D G; Follett, R F; Morgan, J A

    2016-08-01

    It is unclear how elevated CO2 (eCO2 ) and the corresponding shifts in temperature and precipitation will interact to impact ecosystems over time. During a 7-year experiment in a semi-arid grassland, the response of plant biomass to eCO2 and warming was largely regulated by interannual precipitation, while the response of plant community composition was more sensitive to experiment duration. The combined effects of eCO2 and warming on aboveground plant biomass were less positive in 'wet' growing seasons, but total plant biomass was consistently stimulated by ~ 25% due to unique, supra-additive responses of roots. Independent of precipitation, the combined effects of eCO2 and warming on C3 graminoids became increasingly positive and supra-additive over time, reversing an initial shift toward C4 grasses. Soil resources also responded dynamically and non-additively to eCO2 and warming, shaping the plant responses. Our results suggest grasslands are poised for drastic changes in function and highlight the need for long-term, factorial experiments. PMID:27339693

  19. Direct Vocabulary Instruction in Kindergarten: Teaching for Breadth versus Depth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Michael D.; McCoach, D. Betsy; Loftus, Susan; Zipoli, Richard, Jr.; Kapp, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 2 methods for directly teaching word meanings to kindergarten students within storybook read-alouds that varied in instructional time and depth of instruction along with a control condition that provided students with incidental exposure to target words. Embedded instruction introduces target word meanings…

  20. An Inventory of Non-Traditional Instructional Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. Richard

    Nontraditional instructional activities are defined in this report as those based on new or unconventional forms of education, free of the constraints of time, place, or form which characterize traditional classroom instruction. The several sections of this report detail a variety of approaches to nontraditional instructional activities at Purdue…

  1. My Hopes for the Future of Instructional Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, M. David

    2014-01-01

    This article provides the rationales for three recommendations for the future of Instructional Technology: (1) instructional technology as a field seems to have reached a tipping point, where the basic approach to instructional design has stabilized to where further research at this level has waned, suggesting that it is time for instructional…

  2. Instruction set commutivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windley, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present a state property called congruence and show how it can be used to demonstrate commutivity of instructions in a modern load-store architecture. Our analysis is particularly important in pipelined microprocessors where instructions are frequently reordered to avoid costly delays in execution caused by hazards. Our work has significant implications to safety and security critical applications since reordering can easily change the meaning and an instruction sequence and current techniques are largely ad hoc. Our work is done in a mechanical theorem prover and results in a set of trustworthy rules for instruction reordering. The mechanization makes it practical to analyze the entire instruction set.

  3. Stochastic sampled-data control for synchronization of complex dynamical networks with control packet loss and additive time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, R; Sakthivel, N; Cao, Jinde

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the exponential synchronization of complex dynamical networks with control packet loss and additive time-varying delays. Additionally, sampled-data controller with time-varying sampling period is considered and is assumed to switch between m different values in a random way with given probability. Then, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) with triple integral terms is constructed and by using Jensen's inequality and reciprocally convex approach, sufficient conditions under which the dynamical network is exponentially mean-square stable are derived. When applying Jensen's inequality to partition double integral terms in the derivation of linear matrix inequality (LMI) conditions, a new kind of linear combination of positive functions weighted by the inverses of squared convex parameters appears. In order to handle such a combination, an effective method is introduced by extending the lower bound lemma. To design the sampled-data controller, the synchronization error system is represented as a switched system. Based on the derived LMI conditions and average dwell-time method, sufficient conditions for the synchronization of switched error system are derived in terms of LMIs. Finally, numerical example is employed to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:25797504

  4. Validation of the Instructional Materials Motivation Survey (IMMS) in a Self-Directed Instructional Setting Aimed at Working with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loorbach, Nicole; Peters, Oscar; Karreman, Joyce; Steehouder, Michaël

    2015-01-01

    The ARCS Model of Motivational Design has been used myriad times to design motivational instructions that focus on attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction in order to motivate students. The Instructional Materials Motivation Survey (IMMS) is a 36-item situational measure of people's reactions to instructional materials in the light…

  5. Suitability of live yeast addition to alleviate the adverse effects due to the restriction of the time of access to feed in sheep fed only pasture.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruchel, A; Repetto, J L; Cajarville, C

    2013-12-01

    The effect of yeast addition on intake and digestive utilization of pasture was studied in ovines under restricted time of access to forage. Eighteen wethers housed in metabolic cages and fed fresh forage (predominantly Lotus corniculatus) were randomly assigned to three treatments: forage available all day (AD); forage available only 6 h/day (R) and forage available only 6 h/day plus live Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (RY). Feed intake and digestibility, feeding behaviour, kinetics of passage, ruminal pH and ammonia concentration, nitrogen balance and microbial nitrogen synthesis (MNS) were determined in vivo, and ruminal liquor activity of animals was evaluated in vitro. Restricted animals consumed less than those fed all day but achieved more than 75% of the intake and spent less time ruminating (p = 0.014). Although animals without restriction consumed more feed, they had a lower rate of passage (p = 0.030). The addition of yeast did affect neither intake nor feeding behaviour, but increased digestibility. Organic matter digestibility tended to increase 11% by yeast addition (p = 0.051), mainly by a rise in NDF (27%, p = 0.032) and ADF digestibility (37%, p = 0.051). Ingested and retained N was lower in restricted animals, as MNS (p ≤ 0.045). The use of yeasts did not significantly change the N balance or MNS, but retained N tended to be higher in supplemented animals (p = 0.090). Neither ruminal pH nor ammonia concentrations were affected by the restriction, but restricted animals had a lower ruminal activity evidenced by a lower volume of gas (p = 0.020). The addition of yeast overcame this limitation, noted by a higher volume of gas of inocula from supplemented animals (p = 0.015). Yeast addition emerged as a useful tool to improve digestibility of forage cell walls in ovines under restricted time of access to forage. PMID:23020124

  6. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  7. Computer simulation for the growing probability of additional offspring with an advantageous reversal allele in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2016-01-01

    This study calculated the growing probability of additional offspring with the advantageous reversal allele in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape using the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model. The growing probability was calculated for various population sizes, N, sequence lengths, L, selective advantages, s, fitness parameters, k and measuring parameters, C. The saturated growing probability in the stochastic region was approximately the effective selective advantage, s*, when C≫1/Ns* and s*≪1. The present study suggests that the growing probability in the stochastic region in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model can be described using the theoretical formula for the growing probability in the Moran two-allele model. The selective advantage ratio, which represents the ratio of the effective selective advantage to the selective advantage, does not depend on the population size, selective advantage, measuring parameter and fitness parameter; instead the selective advantage ratio decreases with the increasing sequence length.

  8. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  9. Historical Context and Future Development of Instructional Theories: Comments Regarding Four Instructional Theories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelbecker, Glenn E.

    Some reflections are made on the historical context of instructional theory, and comments are presented on some papers from a session of the American Educational Research Association's 1998 annual meeting. A number of current innovations in instructional theory can actually be found among topics that have been discussed at various times in the…

  10. Computer-Based Instruction: Instructional Design and Terminal Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamos, Joseph P.

    Within the context of a large computer-based instructional system (CBI), the Air Forces Advanced Instructional System, instructional needs and requirements are evaluated as determinants of computer terminal design. It is shown that traditional definitions and uses of computer managed instruction (CMI) and computer assisted instruction (CAI) must…

  11. Experiences with lab-centric instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titterton, Nathaniel; Lewis, Colleen M.; Clancy, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    Lab-centric instruction emphasizes supervised, hands-on activities by substituting lab for lecture time. It combines a multitude of pedagogical techniques into the format of an extended, structured closed lab. We discuss the range of benefits for students, including increased staff interaction, frequent and varied self-assessments, integrated collaborative activities, and a systematic sequence of activities that gradually increases in difficulty. Instructors also benefit from a deeper window into student progress and understanding. We follow with discussion of our experiences in courses at U.C. Berkeley, and using data from some of these investigate the effects of lab-centric instruction on student learning, procrastination, and course pacing. We observe that the lab-centric format helped students on exams but hurt them on extended programming assignments, counter to our hypothesis. Additionally, we see no difference in self-ratings of procrastination and limited differences in ratings of course pace. We do find evidence that the students who choose to attend lab-centric courses are different in several important ways from students who choose to attend the same course in a non-lab-centric format.

  12. The Strategic Impact Model: An Integrative Approach to Performance Improvement and Instructional Systems Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenda, Michael; Pershing, James A.

    2004-01-01

    Training in business settings and instruction in academic settings have never taken place in a vacuum, but in earlier times many instructional technology professionals behaved as though they did. Models of instructional systems design (ISD) placed training and instruction at the center of the universe ignoring the impact of the external…

  13. Instructional Chains as a Method for Examining the Teaching and Learning of Argumentative Writing in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDerHeide, Jennifer; Newell, George E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose "instructional chaining" as an analytic method for capturing and describing key instructional episodes enacted by expert writing teachers to foster the recontextualization over time of the social practices of argumentative writing through process-oriented instructional approaches. The article locates instructional chaining…

  14. Learner Control versus Program Control in Interactive Videodisc Instruction: What Are the Effects in Procedural Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyu, Hsin-Yih; Brown, Scott W.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of learner-controlled instruction focuses on a study of undergraduates that compared learner control with program control in interactive videodisc instruction for making an origami crane. Student performance, self-efficacy concerning the instructional task, time on task, and student attitudes toward the instruction are examined. (32…

  15. Instruction in information structuring improves Bayesian judgment in intelligence analysts

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, David R.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the effectiveness of brief instruction in information structuring (i.e., representing and integrating information) for improving the coherence of probability judgments and binary choices among intelligence analysts. Forty-three analysts were presented with comparable sets of Bayesian judgment problems before and immediately after instruction. After instruction, analysts' probability judgments were more coherent (i.e., more additive and compliant with Bayes theorem). Instruction also improved the coherence of binary choices regarding category membership: after instruction, subjects were more likely to invariably choose the category to which they assigned the higher probability of a target's membership. The research provides a rare example of evidence-based validation of effectiveness in instruction to improve the statistical assessment skills of intelligence analysts. Such instruction could also be used to improve the assessment quality of other types of experts who are required to integrate statistical information or make probabilistic assessments. PMID:25904882

  16. Effect of addition of lycopene to calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine as intracanal medicament on fracture resistance of radicular dentin at two different time intervals: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhana, Koppolu; Archanagupta, Kasamsetty; Suneelkumar, Chinni; Lavanya, Anumula; Deepthi, Mandava

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term use of intracanal medicaments such as calcium hydroxide (CH) reduces the fracture resistance of dentin. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the fracture resistance of radicular dentin on long-term use of CH, chlorhexidine (CHX) with lycopene (LP). Aim: To compare the fracture resistance of radicular dentin when intracanal medicaments such as CH, CHX with LP were used for 1-week and 1-month time interval. Settings and Design: Sixty single-rooted extracted human permanent premolars were collected, and complete instrumentation was done. Samples were divided into three groups based on intracanal medicament used. Materials and Methods: Group 1 - no medicament was placed (CON), group 2 - mixture of 1.5 g of CH and 1 ml of 2% CHX (CHCHX), group 3 - mixture of 1.5 g of CH, 1 ml of CHX and 1 ml of 5% LP solution (CHCHXLP). After storage period of each group for 1-week and 1-month, middle 8 mm root cylinder was sectioned and tested for fracture resistance. Statistical Analysis: Results were analyzed using paired t-test. Results: At 1-month time interval, there was a statistically significant difference in fracture resistance between CHCHX and CHCHXLP groups. Conclusion: Addition of LP has not decreased the fracture resistance of radicular dentin after 1-month. PMID:26069405

  17. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  18. Diagnostic Assessment in Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forehand, Garlie A.; Rice, Myrtle W.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experimental program of interactive assessment and instruction called GUIDES to Learning and Instruction, which is designed for use in college level remedial and developmental programs in writing, reading, and study skills. Highlights include microcomputer administration of measurement; response formats; feedback; validity for…

  19. Quality in Instructional Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Wilbur, Ed.

    The result of an interdisciplinary conference on the qualities of an effective instructional television program, this book reports the ideas of various participants. Two papers by broadcasters represent the producer's view of ITV; one deals with instructional television in Sweden and the other with a Nigerian project. The scholar's view is…

  20. Computer Guided Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, M. David; Wood, Larry E.

    1984-01-01

    Describes preliminary efforts to create the Lesson Design System, a computer-guided instructional design system written in Pascal for Apple microcomputers. Its content outline, strategy, display, and online lesson editors correspond roughly to instructional design phases of content and strategy analysis, display creation, and computer programing…

  1. Electronic Library Instruction Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Marcia; And Others

    This report describes the grant proposals which funded an end-user instruction program for upper division and graduate students enrolled at a state university in California, and reviews the implementation and the evolution of the online instruction program originally funded by a $3,500 California State University Northridge Instructional…

  2. Personalized Contextual Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voltz, Deborah L.

    2003-01-01

    This article explains the combination of instructional practices called personalized contextual instruction (PCI) and illustrates its implementation by a general education teacher, a special education teacher, and a paraprofessional working together in a multiage primary inclusive classroom. The PCI approach incorporates individual learning…

  3. Presentation on Instructional Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naz, Bibi Asia

    2009-01-01

    "Learning can be defined as change in a student's capacity for performance as a result of experience" (Kenneth D. Moore). The intended changes should be specified in instructional objectives. Viewed in this context, an objective can be defined as a clear and unambiguous description of your instructional intent. An objective is not a statement of…

  4. Computer Designed Instruction & Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on computer designed instruction and testing at the college level are discussed in 13 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching at New Mexico State University. Titles and authors are as follows: "Don't Bother Me with Instructional Design, I'm Busy Programming! Suggestions for More Effective Educational…

  5. Bibliographic Instruction Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Coll. and Research Libraries, Chicago, IL.

    Based on the ACRL Guidelines for Bibliographic Instruction, this handbook is intended not only to provide guidance in the development of instruction programs, but also to stimulate discussion within the profession. It consists of the guidelines, five model statements and checklists, a glossary, and a pathfinder. The guidelines present generally…

  6. Center for Instructional Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

    The Center for Instructional Computing (CIC) at Eastern Michigan University is described in this report. The center serves as a model for making the infusion of innovative uses of microcomputers within instruction a faculty-centered effort. CIC provides a physical facility with IBM and Apple microcomputers dedicated to faculty use, both as a…

  7. Computer Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corre, Le; Jacoud, R.

    The Paris Faculty of Science is developing programs in computer-assisted instruction (CAI). Their first goal is to develop "questionnaires" (instructional sequences) administered by teletype machines which check on a student's knowledge in an area and draw his attention to basic concepts, definitions, and theorems in that area. Using an IBM 360/30…

  8. Selecting Media for Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, L. J.

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of instruction on using a formal media selection procedure on the media selection choices made by novice instructional designers. Twenty-nine male and female graduate students enrolled in a media design course at Arizona State University participated in the study. Media design problems were used…

  9. Instructions for Systemic Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seigel, Marika A.

    2009-01-01

    In the technical communication classroom, the received wisdom is that good instructions should "stay out of the way" of the users' engagement with technological systems. This article draws on Burke's concept of perspective by incongruity and on examples of instructions produced during the Women's Health Movement to demonstrate that sometimes…

  10. Valuing Differentiated Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Amy

    2006-01-01

    It is not enough to declare that differentiated instruction is going to be the order of the day. It also is not enough to call in a consultant and have teachers listen to a presentation about product, process, and assessment paradigms. Differentiated instruction is a practice that grows out of certain values that are important in the way school…

  11. Instructional Program Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Community Coll., TX.

    This document describes the 1993-94 program review process for Austin Community College (ACC), in Texas. First, the goals of program review are briefly reviewed and ACC's mission and instructional philosophy are set forth. The structure and process is then described, indicating that an Instructional Program Review Committee (PRC), formed of two…

  12. Content-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CATESOL Journal, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) journal periodical devotes entire issues to specific issues. The theme of this issue is "Content-Base Instruction." Articles include: "Syllabus Design in Content-Based Instruction" (David E. Eskey); "How Relevant Is Relevance?: An Examination of Student Needs, Interests, and Motivation in the Content-Based…

  13. Authentic Writing & Literature Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus in Change, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Reflecting some of the emerging issues sustaining debate in secondary school literature instruction and writing instruction, this newsletter presents articles that discuss the impact of E. D. Hirsch's book "Cultural Literacy,""authentic discourse," and collaborative classroom research. Articles in the newsletter are: "Rethinking Literature" (Anne…

  14. Direct Instruction News, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarver, Sara, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    These three issues of a newsletter offer diverse kinds of information deemed to be of interest to Association for Direct Instruction (ADI) members--stories of successful implementations in different settings, write-ups of ADI awards, tips on "how to" deliver direct instruction (DI) more effectively, topical articles focused on particular types of…

  15. Perceptions of Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Wade W.; Gill, Peggy B.

    2009-01-01

    Online instruction has influenced how higher education redefines teaching as universities understand the significance and move towards the paradigm of online teaching and learning. Despite the benefits of online teaching, many university faculty members tend to gravitate toward instructional practices that are most comfortable to them. The purpose…

  16. Instructional Leadership Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, James W., Ed.; Jenkins, John M., Ed.

    Instructional leadership is the principal's role in providing direction, resources, and support to teachers and students for the improvement of teaching and learning in the school. This handbook reviews factors affecting that role in four broad domains: keeping informed about trends, planning for instructional improvement, implementing…

  17. Creating Effective Multimedia Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Gregory C.

    1999-01-01

    Presents information on several critical themes related to multimedia instruction for those involved in the design, development, or use of computer delivered instruction. Addresses software product life cycle; systematic approach to design; multimedia design and development teams; production values; critical components of effective multimedia;…

  18. Evaluation of Bibliographic Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry

    Arguing that there is a current tendency among librarians to talk more about the evaluation of bibliographic instruction than to actually do anything about it, this paper examines limitations of and considerations pertaining to evaluation and includes: (1) a brief discussion of the history of bibliographic instruction; (2) discussion of types of…

  19. Preparing Instructional Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David; Lewis, Joe'l

    2011-01-01

    This publication is a "collection" of three separate manuscripts: (1) "A Paradigm Shift in Preparing Instructional Leaders" (published in December 2010); (2) "Transitions" (an introduction to the "Revisited manuscript"); and (3) "A Paradigm Shift in Preparing Instructional Leaders Revisited" (published in June 2011). The 2010 manuscript describes…

  20. The Strategies Instructional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deshler, Donald D.; Lenz, B. Keith

    1989-01-01

    The strategies instructional approach developed at the University of Kansas Institute for Research in Learning Disabilities is described. The approach teaches students strategies in the academic, social, motivational, and executive functioning areas that will enable students to meet content learning demands and modifies instructional environments…

  1. Fundamentals of Library Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Monty L.

    2012-01-01

    Being a great teacher is part and parcel of being a great librarian. In this book, veteran instruction services librarian McAdoo lays out the fundamentals of the discipline in easily accessible language. Succinctly covering the topic from top to bottom, he: (1) Offers an overview of the historical context of library instruction, drawing on recent…

  2. Content-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelliCarpini, M.; Alonso, O.

    2013-01-01

    DelliCarpini and Alonso's book "Content-Based Instruction" explores different approaches to teaching content-based instruction (CBI) in the English language classroom. They provide a comprehensive overview of how to teach CBI in an easy-to-follow guide that language teachers will find very practical for their own contexts. Topics…

  3. Medium of Instruction in Thai Science Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanjavanakul, Natpat

    The goal of this study is to compare classroom discourse in Thai 9th grade science lessons with English or Thai as a medium of instruction. This is a cross-sectional study of video recordings from five lessons in an English-medium instruction class and five lessons in a Thai- medium instruction class from a Thai secondary school. The study involved two teachers and two groups of students. The findings show the use of both English and Thai in English-medium lessons. Students tend to be more responsive to teacher questions in Thai than in English. The findings suggest the use of students' native language during English-medium lessons to help facilitate learning in certain situations. Additionally, the study provides implications for research, practice and policy for using English as a medium of instruction.

  4. Using Principles of Programmed Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Harry

    1971-01-01

    Although programmed instruction in accounting is available, it is limited in scope and in acceptance. Teachers, however, may apply principles of programming to the individualizing of instruction. (Author)

  5. Improving Visuals for Televised Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Francis M.

    1970-01-01

    To assist educators to develop improved instructional television presentations, research is needed to assess the instructional effects of stimuli emitted by various types of visual illustrations. (IR)

  6. Green technology effect of injection pressure, timing and compression ratio in constant pressure heat addition cycle by an eco-friendly material.

    PubMed

    Karthikayan, S; Sankaranarayanan, G; Karthikeyan, R

    2015-11-01

    Present energy strategies focus on environmental issues, especially environmental pollution prevention and control by eco-friendly green technologies. This includes, increase in the energy supplies, encouraging cleaner and more efficient energy management, addressing air pollution, greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change. Biofuels provide the panorama of new fiscal opportunities for people in rural area for meeting their need and also the demand of the local market. Biofuels concern protection of the environment and job creation. Renewable energy sources are self-reliance resources, have the potential in energy management with less emissions of air pollutants. Biofuels are expected to reduce dependability on imported crude oil with connected economic susceptibility, reduce greenhouse gases, other pollutants and invigorate the economy by increasing demand and prices for agricultural products. The use of neat paradise tree oil and induction of eco-friendly material Hydrogen through inlet manifold in a constant pressure heat addition cycle engine (diesel engine) with optimized engine operating parameters such as injection timing, injection pressure and compression ratio. The results shows the heat utilization efficiency for neat vegetable oil is 29% and neat oil with 15% Hydrogen as 33%. The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) for 15% of H2 share as 450°C at full load and the heat release of 80J/deg. crank angle for 15% Hydrogen energy share. PMID:26025643

  7. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  8. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  9. How are scientific thinking skills best developed? Direct instruction vs. inquiry practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David Worth, Jr.

    valid explanation, in combination) as well as most component measures of this skill. Performance of the two practice groups was superior to that of the DI-only group. Direct instruction conferred no additional benefit to the group receiving both direct instruction and practice compared to the practice-only group. Examined over an extended time interval, the merits of brief direct instruction are thus brought into question.

  10. Instructional Design and the Importance of Instructional Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights the instructional design process followed by the Maricopa Community College faculty in the creation of instructional modules in Digital Visual Literacy. The paper categorizes 10 tasks that an instructional designer, a teacher, or a trainer performs during the design phase of the instructional design process. The importance of…

  11. Modeling Instruction: The Impact of Professional Development on Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Angela T.; Frick, Tasha M.; Barker, Heather L.; Phelps, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling Instruction holds the potential for transforming science instruction and improving student achievement. Key to the success of Modeling Instruction, however, is the fidelity of implementation of its curriculum. This qualitative study examined the impact of Modeling Instruction professional development on participating teachers'…

  12. Does Digital Game-Based Learning Improve Student Time-on-Task Behavior and Engagement in Comparison to Alternative Instructional Strategies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaaf, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Digital Game-Based Learning (DGBL) activities were examined in comparison with effective, research-based learning strategies to observe any difference in student engagement and time-on task behavior. Experimental and control groups were randomly selected amongst the intermediate elementary school students ages 8 to 10 years old. Student…

  13. Evaluating College Students' Evaluations of a Professor's Teaching Effectiveness across Time and Instruction Mode (Online vs. Face-to-Face) Using a Multilevel Growth Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carle, Adam C.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Do college students' ratings of a professor's teaching effectiveness suggest that a professor's teaching improves with time? Does anything predict which instructors receive the highest ratings or improve the fastest? And, importantly, do the correlates of change differ across face-to-face and online courses? Methods: I used data from 10,392…

  14. The effect of additional noradrenergic and serotonergic depletion on a lateralised choice reaction time task in rats with nigral 6-OHDA lesions.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Hanna S; Demirbugen, Merve; Bergqvist, Filip; Lane, Emma L; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often suffer from visuospatial deficits, which have been considered a disruption of the representation of external space. The lateralised choice reaction time (CRT) task is an operant task for rodents in which similar deficits can be assessed. It has been demonstrated that specific parameters in this task is disrupted after unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which have been associated with the dopamine (DA) depletion that inevitably follows this type of lesion. However, studies have demonstrated that this type of lesion also affects the serotonergic (5HT) and noradrenergic (NA) systems. However, the impact of these systems on parameters in the CRT task had not yet been investigated. To this end, rats were pretrained on the CRT task before receiving selective lesions of the DAergic system, either alone or in combination with depletion of the NA or 5HT system. All rats with a 6-OHDA lesion displayed a gradual decline in the selection, initiation and execution of lateralised movements compared to sham-lesion controls on the side contralateral to the lesion. They also displayed a reduced number of useable trials as well as an increased number of procedural errors. Interestingly, the group with an additional noradrenergic lesion was significantly slower in reacting to lateralised stimuli throughout the testing period compared to the other two groups with a 6-OHDA lesion. There was however no difference between the three different lesion groups in the other parameters assessed in the task. These data confirm previous findings demonstrating that the majority of the parameters assessed in the lateralised CRT task are strongly dependent on DA. However, this study has also shown that the NAergic system may play an important role in contributing to the attentive performance influencing the capacity to react to the presented lateralised stimuli. PMID:24333808

  15. Writing Instructional Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Marian; Moose, Allan

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the main categories of instructional software, including drill/practice, tutorials, simulation/problem solving, games, and management, along with factors involved in their design. (Author/MBR)

  16. Diversifying Instruction and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The triarchic theory posits that intelligence has analytical, creative, and practical aspects. Instructional and assessment methods should encourage and evaluate all three kinds of abilities, a balanced approach that can reach all students. (SK)

  17. Sheltered Instruction Techniques for ELLs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pray, Lisa; Monhardt, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    The suggestions described here to adapt instruction for English Language Learners (ELLs) are based on the concept of "sheltered instruction," a model of language-support methods for instruction for ELLs derived primarily through the Sheltered Instruction Observational Protocol (SIOP) developed by Jana Echevarria, Mary Ellen Vogt, and Deborah Short…

  18. Using WebQuests to Teach Content: Comparing Instructional Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the use of WebQuests with traditional instruction. Specifically, the study examined the end-of-unit exam scores for students who completed a WebQuest on the Texas Revolution and those students completing a poster activity. Both of the instructional activities were implemented as additional enhancement to…

  19. Feedback as the Crucial Variable in Conventional Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkof, Neil J.

    This paper presents a theoretical inquiry into the potential utility of a curricular view of instruction via the heuristic vehicle of the "curriculum-in-use." It is proposed that instruction must always imply a teacher, students to be taught, a curricular subject matter to be transmitted, and an evaluative mechanism. In addition, all instruction…

  20. Distributed instruction set computer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.

    1989-01-01

    The Distributed Instruction Set Computer, or DISC for short, is an experimental computer system for fine-grained parallel processing. DISC employs a new parallel instruction set, an Early Binding and Scheduling data tagging scheme, and a distributed control mechanism to explore a software dataflow control method in a multiple-functional unit system. With zero system control overhead, multiple instructions are executed in parallel and/or out of order at the highest speed of n instructions/cycle, where n is the number of functional units. The quantitative simulation result indicates that a DISC system with 16 functional units can deliverer a maximal 7.7X performance speedup over a single functional-unit system at the same clock speed. Exploring a new parallel instruction set and distributed control mechanism, DISC represents three major breakthroughs in the domain of fine-grained parallel processing: (1) Fast multiple instruction issuing mechanism; (2) Parallel and/or out-of-order execution; (3) Software dataflow control scheme.

  1. Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bitterwolf, Thomas E.

    2014-12-09

    Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

  2. LEXIS-NEXIS Instruction at Penn State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Lynne M.; Harwell, Kevin R.

    1997-01-01

    Full-text services require more instruction and reference help than electronic bibliographic databases. To relieve pressure on reference staff, librarians at Pennsylvania State University developed weekly "Just-in-Time" demonstrations to help patrons learn how to use LEXIS-NEXIS. This article provides an overview of LEXIS-NEXIS and "Just-in-Time."…

  3. Real-Time Digital Data-Acquisition System for determining load characteristics. Volume 2. Operating, programming, and maintenance instructions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Podesto, B.; Lapointe, A.; Larose, G.; Robichaud, Y.; Vaillancourt, C.

    1981-03-01

    The work sponsored under this contract included the design and construction of a Real-Time Digital Data Acquisition System (RTDDAS) to be used in substations for on-site recording and pre-processing load response data. The gathered data can be partially processed on site to compute the apparent, active and reactive powers, voltage and current rms values, and instantaneous values of phase voltages and currents. On-site processing capability is provided for rapid monitoring of the field data to ensure that the test setup is suitable. Production analysis of field data is accomplished off-line on a central computer from data recorded on a dual-density (800/1600) magnetic tape which is IBM-compatible. Parallel channels of data can be recorded at a variable rate from 480 to 9000 samples per second per channel. The RTDDAS is housed in a 9.1 m (30-ft) trailer which is shielded from electromagnetic interference and protected by isolators from switching surges; therefore, it can operate safely in a high-voltage substation environment where the tests must sometimes be performed. Information pertaining to the installation, software operation, and maintenance of the RTDDAS designed by IREQ is presented. A list of supporting documentation supplied by Data General Corporation is given.

  4. 16 CFR 1204.5 - Manufacturer's instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be included in the manufacturer's instructions, in addition to the material required by 16 CFR 1402.4... statement required by 16 CFR 1402.4(a)(1)(ii)(A). (c) This warning statement shall be legible and... SAFETY STANDARD FOR OMNIDIRECTIONAL CITIZENS BAND BASE STATION ANTENNAS The Standard §...

  5. 16 CFR 1204.5 - Manufacturer's instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be included in the manufacturer's instructions, in addition to the material required by 16 CFR 1402.4... statement required by 16 CFR 1402.4(a)(1)(ii)(A). (c) This warning statement shall be legible and... SAFETY STANDARD FOR OMNIDIRECTIONAL CITIZENS BAND BASE STATION ANTENNAS The Standard §...

  6. 16 CFR 1204.5 - Manufacturer's instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be included in the manufacturer's instructions, in addition to the material required by 16 CFR 1402.4... statement required by 16 CFR 1402.4(a)(1)(ii)(A). (c) This warning statement shall be legible and... page, with the exception of the logo and any identification of the manufacturer, brand, model,...

  7. 16 CFR 1204.5 - Manufacturer's instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be included in the manufacturer's instructions, in addition to the material required by 16 CFR 1402.4... statement required by 16 CFR 1402.4(a)(1)(ii)(A). (c) This warning statement shall be legible and... page, with the exception of the logo and any identification of the manufacturer, brand, model,...

  8. Tic Tac Toe Math. Instructional Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Richard

    This instructional guide and set of three companion workbooks are intended for use in an arithmetic course based on the Tic Tac Toe method of addition and multiplication, which is an alternative means of learning to add and multiply that was developed for students whose learning disabilities (including difficulty in distinguishing left from right…

  9. Instructional design in a chemistry laboratory course: The impact of structure and aptitudes on performance and attitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Robert B.

    Elements of instructional design such as explicitly stated objectives, reviews, examples, questions, and feedback were incorporated into the laboratory manual and instruction for a unit on kinetics in a college laboratory course. This treatment (high structure) was given to five sections of students (N = 109), while a laboratory manual and instructions that emphasized informational content without the use of these design strategies (low structure) was given to another five sections (N = 108) taught by the same instructors. The students receiving the additional structure scored significantly higher on a quiz, took less time to solve a set of laboratory problems, and felt more satisfied with the instruction provided. There were no differences between groups in their comfort with the knowledge acquired. There were no interactions with performance outcomes, but several occurred for attitudes, treatments, and personality measures. The more conforming the students, the more satisfied they were with the instruction in the high-structured group and the less they liked it in the low-structured group. The more motivated the students, the more they liked the instruction in the high-structure treatment, and even more in the low-structure group. There was also a complex interaction among treatment, anxiety, ability, and treatment satisfaction.

  10. Development and Assessment of a Novel Training Package for Basic Maneuvering Tasks on a Flight Simulator Using Self Instruction Methods and Above Real Time Training (ARTT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia J.; Heath, Bruce e.; Crane, Peter; Ward, Marcus; Crier, Tomyka; Knighten, Tremaine; Culpepper, Christi

    2007-01-01

    One result of the relatively recent advances in computing technology has been the decreasing cost of computers and increasing computational power. This has allowed high fidelity airplane simulations to be run on personal computers (PC). Thus, simulators are now used routinely by pilots to substitute real flight hours for simulated flight hours for training for an aircraft type rating thereby reducing the cost of flight training. However, FAA regulations require that such substitution training must be supervised by Certified Flight Instructors (CFI). If the CFI presence could be reduced or eliminated for certain tasks this would mean a further cost savings to the pilot. This would require that the flight simulator have a certain level of 'intelligence' in order to provide feedback on pilot performance similar to that of a CFI. The 'intelligent' flight simulator would have at least the capability to use data gathered from the flight to create a measure for the performance of the student pilot. Also, to fully utilize the advances in computational power, the simulator would be capable of interacting with the student pilot using the best possible training interventions. This thesis reports on the two studies conducted at Tuskegee University investigating the effects of interventions on the learning of two flight maneuvers on a flight simulator and the robustness and accuracy of calculated performance indices as compared to CFI evaluations of performance. The intent of these studies is to take a step in the direction of creating an 'intelligent' flight simulator. The first study deals with the comparisons of novice pilot performance trained at different levels of above real-time to execute a level S-turn. The second study examined the effect of out-of-the-window (OTW) visual cues in the form of hoops on the performance of novice pilots learning to fly a landing approach on the flight simulator. The reliability/robustness of the computed performance metrics was assessed

  11. Compatibility of the SBIF Features with Other Research on Instruction for LEP Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikunoff, William J., Ed.

    The Significant Bilingual Instructional Features (SBIF) study identified, described, and verified features of bilingual instruction of a wide variety of limited English proficient (LEP) students. It collected data on instructional organization, time allocation, classroom language use, active teaching behaviors, academic learning time, student…

  12. In situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction of tobermorite formation in autoclaved aerated concrete: Influence of silica source reactivity and Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kunio; Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sato, Masugu

    2011-05-15

    The hydrothermal formation of tobermorite during the processing of autoclaved aerated concrete was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly developed autoclave cell and a photon-counting pixel array detector were used. To investigate the effects of the silica source, reactive quartz from chert and less-reactive quartz from quartz sand were used as starting materials. The effect of Al addition on tobermorite formation was also studied. In all cases, C-S-H, hydroxylellestadite and katoite were clearly observed as intermediates. Acceleration of tobermorite formation by Al addition was clearly observed. However, Al addition did not affect the dissolution rate of quartz. Two pathways, via C-S-H and katoite, were also observed in the Al-containing system. These results suggest that the structure of initially formed C-S-H is important for the subsequent tobermorite formation reactions.

  13. Response switching and self-efficacy in Peer Instruction classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelly; Schell, Julie; Ho, Andrew; Lukoff, Brian; Mazur, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Peer Instruction, a well-known student-centered teaching method, engages students during class through structured, frequent questioning and is often facilitated by classroom response systems. The central feature of any Peer Instruction class is a conceptual question designed to help resolve student misconceptions about subject matter. We provide students two opportunities to answer each question—once after a round of individual reflection and then again after a discussion round with a peer. The second round provides students the choice to "switch" their original response to a different answer. The percentage of right answers typically increases after peer discussion: most students who answer incorrectly in the individual round switch to the correct answer after the peer discussion. However, for any given question there are also students who switch their initially right answer to a wrong answer and students who switch their initially wrong answer to a different wrong answer. In this study, we analyze response switching over one semester of an introductory electricity and magnetism course taught using Peer Instruction at Harvard University. Two key features emerge from our analysis: First, response switching correlates with academic self-efficacy. Students with low self-efficacy switch their responses more than students with high self-efficacy. Second, switching also correlates with the difficulty of the question; students switch to incorrect responses more often when the question is difficult. These findings indicate that instructors may need to provide greater support for difficult questions, such as supplying cues during lectures, increasing times for discussions, or ensuring effective pairing (such as having a student with one right answer in the pair). Additionally, the connection between response switching and self-efficacy motivates interventions to increase student self-efficacy at the beginning of the semester by helping students develop early mastery or

  14. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  15. Improving Patient Understanding of Prescription Drug Label Instructions

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Terry C.; Federman, Alex D.; Bass, Pat F.; Jackson, Robert H.; Middlebrooks, Mark; Parker, Ruth M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Patient misunderstanding of instructions on prescription drug labels is common and a likely cause of medication error and less effective treatment. Objective To test whether the use of more explicit language to describe dose and frequency of use for prescribed drugs could improve comprehension, especially among patients with limited literacy. Design Cross-sectional study using in-person, structured interviews. Patients Three hundred and fifty-nine adults waiting for an appointment in two hospital-based primary care clinics and one federally qualified health center in Shreveport, Louisiana; Chicago, Illinois; and New York, New York, respectively. Measurement Correct understanding of each of ten label instructions as determined by a blinded panel review of patients’ verbatim responses. Results Patient understanding of prescription label instructions ranged from 53% for the least understood to 89% for the most commonly understood label. Patients were significantly more likely to understand instructions with explicit times periods (i.e., morning) or precise times of day compared to instructions stating times per day (i.e., twice) or hourly intervals (89%, 77%, 61%, and 53%, respectively,  < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, dosage instructions with specific times or time periods were significantly more likely to be understood compared to instructions stating times per day (time periods — adjusted relative risk ratio (ARR) 0.42, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.34–0.52; specific times — ARR 0.60, 95% CI 0.49–0.74). Low and marginal literacy remained statistically significant independent predictors of misinterpreting instructions (low - ARR 2.70, 95% CI 1.81–4.03; marginal -ARR 1.66, 95% CI 1.18–2.32). Conclusions Use of precise wording on prescription drug label instructions can improve patient comprehension. However, patients with limited literacy were more likely to misinterpret instructions despite use of more explicit language. PMID

  16. Student Attitudes Toward Computer-Assisted Instruction in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerlin, Lee

    1971-01-01

    High school chemistry Computer Assisted Instruction program is evaluated in terms of student attitudes and total time. CAI took less time than a classroom presentation, but students missed interaction with teacher and classmates. (DS)

  17. 5 CFR 2429.22 - Additional time for filing with the FLRA if you are filing in response to a document that has...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... effected. (c) Exception for applications for review filed under 5 CFR 2422.31. You do not get an additional 5 days to file an application for review of a Regional Director's Decision and Order under 5 CFR... rules that apply to filing exceptions to arbitration awards, see 5 CFR 2425.2(c)....

  18. 5 CFR 2429.22 - Additional time for filing with the FLRA if you are filing in response to a document that has...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... effected. (c) Exception for applications for review filed under 5 CFR 2422.31. You do not get an additional 5 days to file an application for review of a Regional Director's Decision and Order under 5 CFR... rules that apply to filing exceptions to arbitration awards, see 5 CFR 2425.2(c)....

  19. Instructions for minipill users.

    PubMed

    Reese, M; Hatcher, R A

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for women who use minipills. Minipills are low dose, progestin only oral contraceptives (OC), which are frequently prescribed for women who 1) experience estrogen related side effects if they take combined OCs; 2) are 35 years of age or older; 3) are 30 years of age or aver and smoke; 4) have a history of headaches, hypertension, or varicose veins; 5) desire immediate postpartum protection; or 6) are lactating. Minipills prevent pregnancy by inhibiting ovulation and implantation and by making the cervical mucus more impervious to sperm penetration. Minipills can be effective if they are used properly. Women who take minipills should be advised to carefully read and follow the instructions provided in the OC packet, initiate pill taking on the 1st day of menstrual bleeding, and take 1 pill every day without and breaks. A backup method should be used during the 1st month and subsequently, during each midcycle phase. If a woman misses 1 pill, she should immediately, upon remembering, take a pill, take her next day's pill at regular time, and use a backup method until menstruation reoccurs. If a woman misses 2 pills, she should immediately, upon remembering, take 2 pills, take 2 pills the following day, and use a backup method until menstruation begins. Women should be advised that many minipill users experience irregular menstural cycles, including amenorrhea and spotting between periods. If menstruation is delayed for 45 days, a pregnancy test is advisable. Women should be advised to immediately seek medical attention if they experience severe chest pain, shortness breath, severe headaches, vision problems, or severe leg pain. Minipill users should let their clinicians know if they experience and changes in mood or sexual drive. These problems can frequently be avoided by switching to another brand of minipills. PMID:12279915

  20. A Comparison of In-Context and Traditional Instructional Approaches: Total Task, Single Trial versus Backward Chaining, Multiple Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayser, Joan E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Total task (single trial instruction) and backward chaining (multiple trials instruction) were used to teach eight children with severe handicaps. Total task, single trial instruction resulted in superior acquisition of independent steps in the training setting for three students. In all cases, instructional time was substantially less for total…

  1. Peer Instruction for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul

    Peer Instruction for Astronomy is an instructor's guide to an exciting and easily-implemented enhancement for lecture classes in introductory astronomy. Application of this powerful and efficient teaching technique requires that the instructor have on hand a large number of thought-provoking, conceptual short answer questions aimed at a variety of levels. While significant numbers of such questions have been published for use in Physics, Peer Instruction for Astronomy provides the first such compilation for Astronomy, and includes hints on use of the technique and applications of the method. KEY TOPICS: Covers peer instruction, incentives, a large database of conceptual questions for use in class, and a list of readings and resources. MARKET: Ideal for introductory astronomy instructors at the undergraduate or advanced high school level.

  2. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  3. Question Driven Instruction with Classroom Response Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerace, William; Beatty, Ian

    2007-10-01

    Essentially, a classroom response system is technology that: 1) allows an instructor to present a question or problem to the class; 2) allows students to enter their answers into some kind of device; and 3) instantly aggregates and summarizes students' answers for the instructor, usually as a histogram. Most response systems provide additional functionality. Some additional names for this class of system (or for subsets of the class) are classroom communication system (CCS), audience response system (ARS), voting machine system, audience feedback system, and--most ambitiously--CATAALYST system (for ``Classroom Aggregation Technology for Activating and Assessing Learning and Your Students' Thinking''). UMPERG has been teaching with and researching classroom response systems since 1993. We find that the technology has the potential to transform the way we teach science in large lecture settings. CRSs can serve as catalysts for creating a more interactive, student-centered classroom in the lecture hall, thereby allowing students to become more actively involved in constructing and using knowledge. CRSs not only make it easier to engage students in learning activities during lecture but also enhance the communication among students, and between the students and the instructor. This enhanced communication assists the students and the instructor in assessing understanding during class time, and affords the instructor the opportunity to devise instructional interventions that target students' needs as they arise.

  4. Instruct coders' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, J.

    1971-01-01

    A manual designed both as an instructional manual for beginning coders and as a reference manual for the coding language INSTRUCT, is presented. The manual includes the major programs necessary to implement the teaching system and lists the limitation of current implementation. A detailed description is given of how to code a lesson, what buttons to push, and what utility programs to use. Suggestions for debugging coded lessons and the error messages that may be received during assembly or while running the lesson are given.

  5. One-Time Addition of Nano-TiO2 Triggers Short-Term Responses in Benthic Bacterial Communities in Artificial Streams.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Alexandra; Adams, Erin; Binh, Chu Thi Thanh; Tong, Tiezheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Gray, Kimberly A; Kelly, John J

    2016-02-01

    Nano-TiO2 is an engineered nanomaterial whose production and use are increasing rapidly. Hence, aquatic habitats are at risk for nano-TiO2 contamination due to potential inputs from urban and suburban runoff and domestic wastewater. Nano-TiO2 has been shown to be toxic to a wide range of aquatic organisms, but little is known about the effects of nano-TiO2 on benthic microbial communities. This study used artificial stream mesocosms to assess the effects of a single addition of nano-TiO2 (P25 at a final concentration of 1 mg l(-1)) on the abundance, activity, and community composition of sediment-associated bacterial communities. The addition of nano-TiO2 resulted in a rapid (within 1 day) decrease in bacterial abundance in artificial stream sediments, but bacterial abundance returned to control levels within 3 weeks. Pyrosequencing of partial 16S rRNA genes did not indicate any significant changes in the relative abundance of any bacterial taxa with nano-TiO2 treatment, indicating that nano-TiO2 was toxic to a broad range of bacterial taxa and that recovery of the bacterial communities was not driven by changes in community composition. Addition of nano-TiO2 also resulted in short-term increases in respiration rates and denitrification enzyme activity, with both returning to control levels within 3 weeks. The results of this study demonstrate that single-pulse additions of nano-TiO2 to aquatic habitats have the potential to significantly affect the abundance and activity of benthic microbial communities and suggest that interactions of TiO2 nanoparticles with environmental matrices may limit the duration of their toxicity. PMID:26156053

  6. Augmenting Instructional Animations with a Body Analogy to Help Children Learn about Physical Systems.

    PubMed

    Pouw, Wim T J L; van Gog, Tamara; Zwaan, Rolf A; Paas, Fred

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether augmenting instructional animations with a body analogy (BA) would improve 10- to 13-year-old children's learning about class-1 levers. Children with a lower level of general math skill who learned with an instructional animation that provided a BA of the physical system, showed higher accuracy on a lever problem-solving reaction time task than children studying the instructional animation without this BA. Additionally, learning with a BA led to a higher speed-accuracy trade-off during the transfer task for children with a lower math skill, which provided additional evidence that especially this group is likely to be affected by learning with a BA. However, overall accuracy and solving speed on the transfer task was not affected by learning with or without this BA. These results suggest that providing children with a BA during animation study provides a stepping-stone for understanding mechanical principles of a physical system, which may prove useful for instructional designers. Yet, because the BA does not seem effective for all children, nor for all tasks, the degree of effectiveness of body analogies should be studied further. Future research, we conclude, should be more sensitive to the necessary degree of analogous mapping between the body and physical systems, and whether this mapping is effective for reasoning about more complex instantiations of such physical systems. PMID:27375538

  7. Augmenting Instructional Animations with a Body Analogy to Help Children Learn about Physical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pouw, Wim T. J. L.; van Gog, Tamara; Zwaan, Rolf A.; Paas, Fred

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether augmenting instructional animations with a body analogy (BA) would improve 10- to 13-year-old children’s learning about class-1 levers. Children with a lower level of general math skill who learned with an instructional animation that provided a BA of the physical system, showed higher accuracy on a lever problem-solving reaction time task than children studying the instructional animation without this BA. Additionally, learning with a BA led to a higher speed–accuracy trade-off during the transfer task for children with a lower math skill, which provided additional evidence that especially this group is likely to be affected by learning with a BA. However, overall accuracy and solving speed on the transfer task was not affected by learning with or without this BA. These results suggest that providing children with a BA during animation study provides a stepping-stone for understanding mechanical principles of a physical system, which may prove useful for instructional designers. Yet, because the BA does not seem effective for all children, nor for all tasks, the degree of effectiveness of body analogies should be studied further. Future research, we conclude, should be more sensitive to the necessary degree of analogous mapping between the body and physical systems, and whether this mapping is effective for reasoning about more complex instantiations of such physical systems. PMID:27375538

  8. Struggles for Legitimacy in Mother Tongue Instruction in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganuza, Natalia; Hedman, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the pedagogical beliefs, practices and ideological assumptions of 15 teachers who work with mother tongue instruction in Sweden. Despite support through provisions in Swedish laws, mother tongue instruction is clearly a marginalized subject, not least due to its non-mandatory status, the limited time allocated for it and…

  9. Project Management in Instructional Design: ADDIE Is Not Enough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rooij, Shahron Williams

    2010-01-01

    In the digital age, instructional designers must possess both a sound instructional design knowledge base and solid project management skills that will enable them to complete courseware projects on time, on budget and in conformance with client expectations. Project management skills include the ability to apply repeatable processes, along with…

  10. General Education Teachers' Differentiated Instruction in Elementary Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deason, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion teachers at the elementary level face challenges in differentiating instruction for all students. Despite inclusion teachers' willingness to use differentiated instruction (DI), many teachers struggle implementing DI because of teachers' understanding of DI, insufficient time for planning, and insufficient training and resources. The…

  11. Some Effects of Televised Instruction on a Basic Speech Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyer, Robert S.; Harlan, Earl R.

    1967-01-01

    This study proposed to examine the effectiveness of television instruction as compared with three other methods of instruction. Twenty-six sections of Speech 116 at Purdue University were divided into five groups of five or six sections each. All sections met 3 times weekly, and the research was conducted during a consecutive 8-day period. The…

  12. Instructional Guide for Vocational Welding. V & TECC Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This trade and industrial curriculum guide for welding is designed for vocational welding programs that provide 960 hours of instruction. The introductory section provides a statement of welding philosophy, objectives, block time schedule, and recommended facilities and equipment. Following the introductory section, ten blocks of instruction are…

  13. Excellence in College Teaching and Learning: Classroom and Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, George; Nash, Susan Smith

    2007-01-01

    This book will improve the quality of instruction that college students need. It makes numerous suggestions that must be tended to when teachers instruct students. For example, the authors speculate about ways teachers can present what may at times seem to be a mountain of information without burying students under it; why teachers must…

  14. Frequency and Types of Instructor-Interactions in Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson-Shivers, Gayle V.

    2009-01-01

    Concerns for faculty time spent in online instruction are replete in the literature; some authors suggest that online instruction increases faculty work. In a specific rather than global manner, this case study focused on the frequency and types of instructor-to-student interactions that occurred in a graduate online course. Using archival…

  15. Integrated Fluency Instruction: Three Approaches for Working with Struggling Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Melanie; Rasinski, Timothy; Zimmerman, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    Effective fluency instruction should focus on reading with understanding, rather than simply reading quickly or expressively. This article outlines three research-based instructional approaches that assist students in developing accurate, automatic word recognition and prosody; at the same time, they ensure learners attend to the text's meaning as…

  16. 34 CFR 300.210 - Purchase of instructional materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purchase of instructional materials. 300.210 Section... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Local Educational Agency Eligibility § 300.210 Purchase of..., receive those instructional materials in a timely manner. (Approved by the Office of Management and...

  17. American Reading Instruction: Pre-Revolutionary Religious Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reutzel, Douglas Ray

    To provide some understanding of current reading methodology, this paper traces the history of reading instruction from ancient times to pre-Revolutionary America and examines the influences exerted upon that instruction by religion. The major portion of the paper discusses the cultures, religions, and educational systems of ancient Egypt;…

  18. Instructional Guide for Vocational Power Mechanics. V & TECC Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This trade and industrial curriculum guide for power mechanics is designed for vocational power mechanics programs that provide 960 hours of instruction. The introductory section provides a statement of philosophy, block time schedule, and the objectives for power mechanics. Following the introductory section, fourteen blocks of instruction are…

  19. A Formative Analysis of Instructional Strategies for Using Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Robin; Knaack, Liesel; Muirhead, Bill

    2009-01-01

    To date, limited research has been done examining and evaluating the instructional wrap for using learning objects effectively. The current study examined instructional strategies used by 15 teachers to integrate learning objects into 30 secondary school classrooms (510 students). Four key areas were examined: preparation time, purpose for using a…

  20. An Instructional Theory for the Post-Industrial Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reigeluth, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes instructional theory that supports post-industrial education and training systems--ones that are customized and learner-centered, in which student progress is based on learning rather than time. The author discusses the importance of problem-based instruction (PBI), identifies some problems with PBI, overviews an…

  1. Optimizing Language Instruction: Matters of Explicitness, Practice, and Cue Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Catherine A.; Bowden, Harriet Wood; Sanz, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Input exposure is essential for nonprimary language learning, but the importance of explicit instruction and corrective feedback continues to be debated. If instruction is required, how might it be optimized in terms of its nature and timing? In this study, 65 Spanish-English bilinguals were introduced to Latin through an interactive computer…

  2. Time Is Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Diana; Baete, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    One has heard it before: time is money, especially when it comes to adding time for instruction to the school day. When budgets are tight and relief is nowhere in sight, how can schools afford to implement a reform as costly as adding instructional time? It's a daunting task, yet current federal educational priorities tied to federal funding…

  3. Instructional Programming Guide For Computer Assisted Instruction. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimberlin, Donald A.

    The guidelines and procedures for the development of course materials for presentation by a computerized instructional system are described in this report. The tutorial mode of the instructional model is emphasized. The guide is intended to furnish the experienced instructional programer with a ready reference which can be used to facilitate the…

  4. Applying Learning Theories and Instructional Design Models for Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mohammed K.; Elkhider, Ihsan A.

    2016-01-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning…

  5. The Use of Instructional Technology in Direct Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Julia B.; Beck, Ann R.; Dennis, Marcia; Parette, Howard P., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    A bivalent counterbalanced within-subjects research design was used to determine the effectiveness of vocabulary instruction across two instructional conditions with 30 3 to 4-year-old at-risk preschool children. Instruction presented vocabulary words via static pictures with one subgroup and via projection and animation with the other. Conditions…

  6. Seeking Instructional Specificity: An Example from Analogical Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Eric; Wieman, Carl E.

    2015-01-01

    Broad instructional methods like "interactive engagement" have been shown to be effective, but such general characterization provides little guidance on the details of how to structure instructional materials. In this study, we seek instructional specificity by comparing two ways of using an analogy to learn a target physical principle:…

  7. Instructional Technology Innovation in the Liberal Arts Classroom: A Conversation with the Maryville College Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Gina; Berry, Chad; Nugent, Chris; Wentz, Karen; Cowan, Peggy; O'Gorman, Mark

    Maryville College's (Tennessee) first Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellows, who received funding and release time to develop technology-based instructional materials for their courses, are developing and implementing exciting projects in history, religion, freshman seminar, and political sciences courses. In this paper, the FIT Fellows…

  8. Instructional Supervision: Dollars and Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krajewski, Robert J.

    1977-01-01

    Definitions of supervision and instructional supervision are provided, along with financial and educational rationale for better quality-control of public education through the development and maintenance of an effective instructional improvement program. A suggested supervisory model is described. (MJB)

  9. Ethnographic Analysis of Instructional Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Douglas M.

    1980-01-01

    Instructional methods are operational exchanges between participants within environments that attempt to produce a learning outcome. The classroom teacher's ability to produce a learning outcome is the measure of instructional competence within that learning method. (JN)

  10. Use of Humor in Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkaus, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Provides a summary of research on the benefits and uses of subject-matter-related humor in instructional materials, and cites comments of five experts on how to use humor in the design of instruction. Thirteen references are listed. (MER)

  11. Potpourri of Instructional Technology Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles S.

    1991-01-01

    Presents brief annotations and evaluative comments on various instructional media. Discusses filmstrips, computer software, and other instructional materials. Includes materials about dinosaurs, Native Americans, Congress, and the Vietnam War. Describes new technological resources for education. Provides information on availability. (DK)

  12. Reducing Perceptions of Time Required to Complete Math Assignments by Adding Problems to Assignments: A Synthesis of the Additive Interspersal Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billington, Eric J.; Skinner, Christopher H.

    2006-01-01

    Results from nine experiments were analyzed to evaluate the relationship between relative problem completion rates (RPCR) and judgments of time involving mathematics assignments. For each experiment, control assignments contained only target mathematics computation or word problems. Matched experimental assignments contained similar target…

  13. Conservation. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  14. Solar Energy. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  15. Philosophy of Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Reading teachers need to provide for individual differences so that each pupil might attain optimally. Methods of teaching reading should be varied and thus reflect diverse philosophies of instruction. These philosophies should be analyzed and used to guide optimal pupil achievement. A philosophy of phoneme/grapheme relationships should be…

  16. Individualistic Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Mehmet Can

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes a new approach to the Instructional Design field. By the constructivism, education systems are moving from a massive structure to the more learner centered and more individualist structure. So far, ID field has adopted and digested the individualism notion partly. This paper proposes an individualistic approach to the…

  17. Italienischunterricht (Italian Instruction).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moine, Virgile; And Others

    1965-01-01

    This issue of "Schulpraxis," a Swiss journal for language teaching, is devoted to Italian instruction in Switzerland. It includes: (1) an interpretation of the poem "Le morte chitarre" by Salvatore Quasimodo, conducted in a girls' school in German Switzerland, (2) a presentation of principles for an Italian textbook to be based on modern…

  18. Grammar Instruction and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacina, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research literature from the past 25 years has supported the importance of teaching grammar in the context of writing instruction (Calkins, 1980; DiStefano & Killion, 1984; Weaver, 1996,1998). Unlike other content areas, practice does not make perfect when learning grammar. While isolated drill and practice of grammatical concepts may…

  19. Theme: Laboratory Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruening, Thomas H.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A series of theme articles discuss setting up laboratory hydroponics units, the school farm at the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico, laboratory experiences in natural resources management and urban horticulture, the development of teaching labs at Derry (PA) High School, management of instructional laboratories, and industry involvement in agricultural…

  20. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  1. Characteristics of Instructional Technologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagne, Robert M.

    A thoroughly planned program for instructional technologists--one including selection, education, and on-the-job training--must take into consideration the competencies and characteristics desirable in such technologists. Such requirements fall into three categories: attitudes or values, specialized knowledge, and intellectual skills or…

  2. Alcohol Fuels. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of the descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  3. Programing and Programed Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Susan Meyer

    The impact of programed instruction on the educational system has been minimal quantitatively and qualitatively. In the interface between education and programing there are serious weaknesses in the design of materials, severe problems in the economics of design and use, and an almost insurmountable gulf between the philosophy or point of view on…

  4. Instructional Guide for Cosmetology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    Intended as a tool for cosmetology teachers in Virginia public and private schools, the document is an instructional guide which offers 12 units of study, arranged in a three year course. Materials covered help prepare students for licensure in the State of Virginia and the guide is designed to cover the 1,500 hours required to be spent in the…

  5. Management. Teacher's Instructional Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutnyak, Dana

    This teacher's instructional guide, which is part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, is intended to assist teachers responsible for teaching one- and two-year management programs for Texas high school students. The following are among the items included: (1) introductory…

  6. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  7. Health Instruction Packages: Injections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleman, Ellie; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct nursing students in techniques and equipment utilized for intramuscular injections. The first module, "Equipment for Intramuscular Injections" by Ellie Dunkleman, presents guidelines for selecting needles of the proper length and gauge…

  8. Using Realia in Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Lloyd H.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Seven articles in this issue focus on the use of realia in instruction. Authors discuss reasons why realia effectively motivate students and enhance learning; the place of realia in supervised occupational experience programs; the importance of real-life experiences to vocational agriculture; and student teaching as a reality experience. (SK)

  9. Instructional Technology. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on implementing instructional technology in ways that benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Cruising the Web with English Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green) presents three scenarios using the World Wide Web in…

  10. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CATALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Vocational Agriculture Instructional Materials Service, Columbus.

    THE TITLE, IDENTIFICATION NUMBER, DATE OF PUBLICATION, PAGINATION, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, AND PRICE ARE GIVEN FOR EACH OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS INCLUDED IN THIS CATALOG. TOPICS COVERED ARE FIELD CORPS, HORTICULTURE, ANIMAL SCIENCE, SOILS, AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING, AND FARMING PROGRAMS. AN ORDER FORM IS INCLUDED. (JM)

  11. Instructional Microcomputer Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, B. R.

    Intended to aid teachers, administrators, and interested parents by informing them about the state of the educational microcomputer market, this report is meant to be a guide to school districts in the acquisition and maintenance of microcomputers and related instructional materials. Trends in educational computing technology are noted in relation…

  12. Instruction for Political Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, John J.

    The development process of an alternative to high school government courses included the elaboration of a two-semester course called Comparing Political Experiences. The discussion of a competency-based approach to instruction and learning used in this course specifies, in diagram and in theoretical terms, three phases in achieving political…

  13. Revisiting "Beyond Instructional Design"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Since the article "Beyond Instructional Design: Making Learning Design a Reality" (Sims, 2006) was published, much has changed in the opportunities we have for learning, and Professor Rod Sims's thinking has evolved. In this article, Professor Rod Sims reflects upon his original article, and he offers an evolved model of learning design,…

  14. Paratransit: An Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalici, Anthony

    A concept-based introduction to paratransit is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of paratransit generally refers to modes of transportation other than mass transit and solo-driven automobiles. The…

  15. Wind Power. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  16. Adaptive Computerized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Roger D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an artificially intelligent multimedia computerized instruction system capable of developing a conceptual image of what a student is learning while the student is learning it. It focuses on principles of learning and adaptive behavioral control systems theory upon which the system is designed and demonstrates multiple user modes.…

  17. Instructional Technology and Objectification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gur, Bekir S.; Wiley, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectification refers to the way in which everything (including human beings) is treated as an object, raw material, or resource to be manipulated and used. In this article, objectification refers to the way that education is often reduced to the packaging and delivery of information. A critique of objectification in instructional technology is…

  18. Learning and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Corte, Erik, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Five papers on research related to learning and instruction discuss the following: subjective competence and self-assessment; development of quantitative-relational abilities from childhood to adolescence; detecting functional relations in a computerized learning environment; developmental patterns and individual differences in word-search…

  19. Secondary Dance Instructional Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    This manual provides guidelines for dance teachers in secondary schools. A brief statement is made on the purpose and philosophy of dance education, and activities and instructional suggestions are presented for various dance forms: (1) group dance--folk/ethnic, square dance, and social dance; (2) aerobic dance; (3) jazz dance; (4) modern dance;…

  20. Principals as Instructional Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    At some level, principals always have been instructional leaders--but never before has their role been more prominent. First, the accountability movement--No Child Left Behind (NCLB) in particular--thrust principals into the spotlight on academic achievement. Then budget cuts peeled away capacity at both the district and school levels, thinning…