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Sample records for additional interfacial force

  1. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  3. Control of Metal/graphite Interfacial Energy Through the Interfacial Segregation of Alloying Additions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Utpal

    Equilibrium segregation of Ni to the interface of a solid Pb/graphite and Au/graphite was studied using a solid state wetting approach and the crater edge profiling technique on a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM). All experiments were performed under ultra high vacuum (UHV) to reduce the effects due to surface adsorption of impurities. For the Pb/graphite system, increasing amounts of Ni ranging from 0 to 0.2wt% Ni added to Pb were found to systematically lower the contact angle for samples equilibrated at 285 ^circC. No significant surface segregation of Ni was observed at the Pb surface. The reduction of the contact angle was therefore attributed entirely to the lowering of the interfacial energy by interfacial adsorption of Ni. The interfacial energy and interfacial Ni concentration were obtained as a function of bulk Ni content. The presence of excess Ni at the interface was also determined using the crater edge profiling technique on the SAM for various bulk concentrations of Ni in Pb. The temperature dependence of the segregation process was also studied using the solid state wetting approach. The contact angle of Pb(Ni)/graphite was found to vary as a function of temperature for a given Ni content. No temperature dependence was observed in the case of pure Pb/graphite. The change in interfacial energy and the interfacial Ni concentration were obtained as a function of temperature from thermodynamic considerations, and from that the enthalpy and the entropy of interfacial segregation were determined. For the Au/graphite system at 850^circC, addition of 15at%Ni to Au caused a reduction of contact angle by 7.8^circ with accompanying reduction in interfacial energy. Ni was found to segregate to both the free Au surface as well as to the Au/graphite interface. In addition C was also found to segregate to the Au surface thus lowering the surface energy. The modified surface energy was considered in the determination of the interfacial energy and interfacial Ni

  4. Non-contact atomic-level interfacial force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Fleming, J.G.

    1997-02-01

    The scanning force microscopies (notably the Atomic Force Microscope--AFM), because of their applicability to nearly all materials, are presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM uses a deflection sensor to measure sample/probe forces which suffers from an inherent mechanical instability that occurs when the rate of change of the force with respect to the interfacial separation becomes equal to the spring constant of the deflecting member. This instability dramatically limits the breadth of applicability of AFM-type techniques to materials problems. In the course of implementing a DOE sponsored basic research program in interfacial adhesion, a self-balancing force sensor concept has been developed and incorporated into an Interfacial Force Microscopy (IFM) system by Sandia scientists. This sensor eliminates the instability problem and greatly enhances the applicability of the scanning force-probe technique to a broader range of materials and materials parameters. The impact of this Sandia development was recognized in 1993 by a Department of Energy award for potential impact on DOE programs and by an R and D 100 award for one of the most important new products of 1994. However, in its present stage of development, the IFM is strictly a research-level tool and a CRADA was initiated in order to bring this sensor technology into wide-spread availability by making it accessible in the form of a commercial instrument. The present report described the goals, approach and results of this CRADA effort.

  5. Laser interferometry force-feedback sensor for an interfacial force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Houston, Jack E.; Smith, William L.

    2004-04-13

    A scanning force microscope is provided with a force-feedback sensor to increase sensitivity and stability in determining interfacial forces between a probe and a sample. The sensor utilizes an interferometry technique that uses a collimated light beam directed onto a deflecting member, comprising a common plate suspended above capacitor electrodes situated on a substrate forming an interference cavity with a probe on the side of the common plate opposite the side suspended above capacitor electrodes. The probe interacts with the surface of the sample and the intensity of the reflected beam is measured and used to determine the change in displacement of the probe to the sample and to control the probe distance relative to the surface of the sample.

  6. Mechanical property investigation of soft materials by cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung I; Boehm, Ryan D

    2013-01-01

    Cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscopy (COIFM) was applied to the investigation of the mechanical properties of soft materials to avoid the double-spring effect and snap-to-contact problem associated with atomic force microscopy (AFM). When a force was measured as a function of distance between an oxidized silicon probe and the surface of a soft hydrocarbon film, it increases nonlinearly in the lower force region below ∼10 nN, following the Herzian model with the elastic modulus of ∼50 MPa. Above ∼10 nN, it increases linearly with a small oscillatory sawtooth pattern with amplitude 1-2 nN. The pattern suggests the possible existence of the layered structure within the film. When its internal part of the film was exposed to the probe, the force depends on the distance linearly with an adhesive force of -20 nN. This linear dependence suggests that the adhesive internal material behaved like a linear spring with a spring constant of ∼1 N/m. Constant-force images taken in the repulsive and attractive contact regimes revealed additional features that were not observed in the images taken in the noncontact regime. At some locations, however, contrast inversions were observed between the two contact regimes while the average roughness remained constant. The result suggests that some embedded materials had spring constants different from those of the surrounding material. This study demonstrated that the COIFM is capable of imaging mechanical properties of local structures such as small impurities and domains at the nanometer scale, which is a formidable challenge with conventional AFM methods.

  7. Oscillating drop/bubble tensiometry: effect of viscous forces on the measurement of interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Freer, E M; Wong, H; Radke, C J

    2005-02-01

    The oscillating drop/bubble technique is increasingly popular for measuring the interfacial dilatational properties of surfactant/polymer-laden fluid/fluid interfaces. A caveat of this technique, however, is that viscous forces are important at higher oscillation frequencies or fluid viscosities; these can affect determination of the interfacial tension. Here, we experimentally quantify the effect of viscous forces on the interfacial-tension measurement by oscillating 100 and 200 cSt poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) droplets in water at small amplitudes and frequencies ranging between 0.01 and 1 Hz. Due to viscous forces, the measured interfacial tension oscillates sinusoidally with the same frequency as the oscillation of the drop volume. The tension oscillation precedes that of the drop volume, and the amplitude varies linearly with Capillary number, Ca=DeltamuomegaDeltaV/gammaa(2), where Deltamu=mu(D)-mu is the difference between the bulk Newtonian viscosities of the drop and surrounding continuous fluid, omega is the oscillation frequency of the drop, DeltaV is the amplitude of volume oscillation, gamma is the equilibrium interfacial tension between the PDMS drop and water, and a is the radius of the capillary. A simplified model of a freely suspended spherical oscillating-drop well explains these observations. Viscous forces distort the drop shape at Ca>0.002, although this criterion is apparatus dependent.

  8. Micromechanical cohesion force measurements to determine cyclopentane hydrate interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Joshi, Sanjeev E; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2012-06-15

    Hydrate aggregation and deposition are critical factors in determining where and when hydrates may plug a deepwater flowline. We present the first direct measurement of structure II (cyclopentane) hydrate cohesive forces in the water, liquid hydrocarbon and gas bulk phases. For fully annealed hydrate particles, gas phase cohesive forces were approximately twice that obtained in a liquid hydrocarbon phase, and approximately six times that obtained in the water phase. Direct measurements show that hydrate cohesion force in a water-continuous bulk may be only the product of solid-solid cohesion. When excess water was present on the hydrate surface, gas phase cohesive forces increased by a factor of three, suggesting the importance of the liquid or quasi-liquid layer (QLL) in determining cohesive force. Hydrate-steel adhesion force measurements show that, when the steel surface is coated with hydrophobic wax, forces decrease up to 96%. As the micromechanical force technique is uniquely capable of measuring hydrate-surface forces with variable contact time, the present work contains significant implications for hydrate applications in flow assurance.

  9. Two-Phase Wall and Interfacial Friction Forces in Triangle Tight Lattice Rod Bundle Subchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Akimaro; Sadatomi, Michio; Shirai, Hiroshi

    In order to obtain the data on wall and interfacial friction forces for two-phase flows in a triangle tight lattice subchannel, adiabatic experiments were conducted for single- and two-phase flows under hydrodynamic equilibrium flow conditions. In the experiment, air was used as the test gas, while water and water with a surfactant as test liquids to know the effects of the reduced surface tension on the wall and the interfacial friction forces. The data showed that both the wall and the interfacial friction forces were higher in air-water with a surfactant system than air-water one. In the analysis, the respective data have been compared with the predicted values by existing correlations, and the existing correlations were modified to improve its prediction accuracy against the present data. The modified correlations can predict well the present data on the wall and the interfacial friction forces for both air-water and air-water with a surfactant systems.

  10. Force-field dependence on the interfacial structure of oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresme, Fernando; Chacón, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the performance of different force-fields for alkanes, united (TraPPE) and all atom (OPLS-AA) models, and water (SPC/E and TIP4P-2005), in the prediction of the interfacial structure of alkane (n-octane, and n-dodecane)-water interfaces. We report an extensive comparison of the interfacial thermodynamic properties as well as the interfacial structure (translational and orientational). We use the recently introduced intrinsic sampling method, which removes the averaging effect of the interfacial capillary waves and provides a clear view of the interface structure. The alkane interfacial structure is sensitive to the environment, i.e. alkane-vapour or alkane-water interfaces, showing a stronger structure when it is in contact with the water phase. We find that this structure is fairly independent of the level of detail, full or united atom, employed to describe the alkane phase. The water surface properties show a small dependence on the water model. The dipole moment of the SPC/E model shows asymmetric fluctuations, with a tendency to point both towards the alkane and water phases. On the other hand the dipole moment of the TIP4P-2005 model shows a tendency to point towards the water phase only. Analysis of the intrinsic electrostatic field indicates that the surface water potential is confined to an interfacial region of about 8 Å. Overall we find that the intrinsic structure of alkane-water interfaces is a robust interfacial property, which is independent of the details of the force-field employed. Hence, it should provide a good reference to interpret experimental data.

  11. Calibration of an interfacial force microscope for MEMS metrology : FY08-09 activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Baker, Michael Sean; Crowson, Douglas A.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Moore, Nathan W.

    2009-10-01

    Progress in MEMS fabrication has enabled a wide variety of force and displacement sensing devices to be constructed. One device under intense development at Sandia is a passive shock switch, described elsewhere (Mitchell 2008). A goal of all MEMS devices, including the shock switch, is to achieve a high degree of reliability. This, in turn, requires systematic methods for validating device performance during each iteration of design. Once a design is finalized, suitable tools are needed to provide quality assurance for manufactured devices. To ensure device performance, measurements on these devices must be traceable to NIST standards. In addition, accurate metrology of MEMS components is needed to validate mechanical models that are used to design devices to accelerate development and meet emerging needs. Progress towards a NIST-traceable calibration method is described for a next-generation, 2D Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM) for applications in MEMS metrology and qualification. Discussed are the results of screening several suitable calibration methods and the known sources of uncertainty in each method.

  12. Interfacial structure of sugar beet pectin studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gromer, A; Kirby, A R; Gunning, A P; Morris, V J

    2009-07-21

    Unlike pectins from other origins, sugar beet pectin (SBP) acts as an emulsifier, a property which has been correlated to its more hydrophobic character and high protein content. In this work, we have investigated the structure of SBP at interfaces by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three situations were studied: the mica/water, graphite/water, and air/water interface. For the latter, the interfacial film was transferred onto mica using the Langmuir-Blodgett method. While the adsorption of individual pectin chains on mica requires the addition of divalent cations, on graphite a thin layer containing amorphous areas and rodlike chains forms spontaneously. We suggest that the layer contains proteins and pectin chains which are bound to the graphite via CH-pi interactions. SBP adsorbed at the air/water interface forms an elastic layer, as evidenced by pendant drop and surface shear rheology measurements. AFM Images reveal the layer is crippled with holes and contains rodlike chains, suggesting that the pectin chains prevent the formation of a densely packed protein layer. Nevertheless, we show that the interfacial pectin film is more resistant to displacement by surfactants than a pure protein film, possibly because of the formation of linkages between the pectin chains. In contrast, alkali treatment of the pectin appears to remove the pectin chains from the air/water interface and leaves a film that behaves similarly to pure protein. This work gives a new insight into the nanoscale organization of polysaccharides and polysaccharide-protein mixtures at macroscopic surfaces. The results gathered from the different interfaces studied permit a better understanding of the likely structure of SBP at the interface of emulsion droplets. Such knowledge might be used to modify rationally the pectin in order to improve its emulsifying properties, leading to broader commercial applications.

  13. Hydrodynamic attraction of immobile particles due to interfacial forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morthomas, Julien; Würger, Alois

    2010-05-01

    Applying the method of reflections, we derive the flow pattern around a confined colloidal particle with quasislip conditions at its surface, in powers of the ratio a/h of particle radius and wall distance. The lowest order corresponds to a single reflection at the confining wall. Significant corrections occur at higher order: the linear term in a/h modifies the amplitudes of the well-known one-reflection approximation, whereas new features arise in quadratic order. Our results agree with recent experiments where thermo-osmosis drives hydrodynamic attractive forces in confined colloids.

  14. Interfacial Force Field Characterization in a Constrained Vapor Bubble Thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DasGupta, Sunando; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in the earth's gravitational field using an image-analyzing interferometer that is based on computer-enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. These profiles are a function of the stress field. Experimentally, the augmented Young-Laplace equation is an excellent model for the force field at the solid-liquid-vapor interfaces for heptane and pentane menisci on quartz and tetradecane on SFL6. The effects of refractive indices of the solid and liquid on the measurement techniques were demonstrated. Experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressure and dispersion constants were compared to those predicted from the Dzyaloshinskii - Lifshitz - Pilaevskii theory for an ideal surface and reasonable agreements were obtained. A parameter introduced gives a quantitative measurement of the closeness of the system to equilibrium. The nonequilibrium behavior of this parameter is also presented

  15. Interfacial tension in oil-water-surfactant systems: on the role of intra-molecular forces on interfacial tension values using DPD simulations.

    PubMed

    Deguillard, E; Pannacci, N; Creton, B; Rousseau, B

    2013-04-14

    We have computed interfacial tension in oil-water-surfactant model systems using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. Oil and water molecules are modelled as single DPD beads, whereas surfactant molecules are composed of head and tail beads linked together by a harmonic potential to form a chain molecule. We have investigated the influence of the harmonic potential parameters, namely, the force constant K and the equilibrium distance r0, on the interfacial tension values. For both parameters, the range investigated has been chosen in agreement with typical values in the literature. Surprisingly, we observe a large effect on interfacial tension values, especially at large surfactant concentration. We demonstrate that, due to a subtle balance between intra-molecular and inter-molecular interactions, the local structure of surfactants at the oil-water interface is modified, the interfacial tension is changed and the interface stability is affected.

  16. Schlieren High Speed Imaging on Fluid Flow in Liquid Induced by Plasma-driven Interfacial Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Janis; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    Effective plasma-based water purification depends heavily on the transport of plasma-derived reactive species from the plasma into the liquid. Plasma interactions at the liquid-gas boundary are known to drive circulation in the bulk liquid. This forced circulation is not well understood. A 2-D plasma- in-liquid water apparatus is currently being investigated as a means to study the plasma-liquid interface to understand not only reactive species flows but to also understand plasma- driven fluid dynamic effects in the bulk fluid. Using Schlieren high speed imaging, plasma-induced density gradients near the interfacial region and into the bulk solution are measured to investigate the nature of these interfacial forces. Plasma-induced flow was also measured using particle imaging velocimetry. NSF CBET 1336375 and DOE DE-SC0001939.

  17. A survey of interfacial forces used during filing of root canals.

    PubMed

    Regan, J D; Sherriff, M; Meredith, N; Gulabivala, K

    2000-06-01

    The pattern of dentine removal during endodontic instrumentation is influenced by many factors including the interfacial forces applied by the operator. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of operators and different sizes and types of instruments on the magnitude of these interfacial forces. Single-rooted teeth were mounted on a cantilevered aluminium beam to which two pairs of single element strain gauges were joined in a half-bridge configuration and mounted at right angles to each other. The strain gauges were connected to an analogue-to-digital converter fitted in a micro-computer via conditioning amplifiers. This enabled strains to be recorded over a period of time. Twenty operators instrumented root canals using a series of hand instruments for 1 min each. The mean interfacial forces used by operators demonstrated a wide variation ranging from 9.06 g to 149.42 g (range of forces from 0-331 g) but there was a consistency in the relative magnitude for each operator. The 20 operators could be divided into 13 groups which were significantly different (alpha = 0.05) from each other. There were significant differences (alpha = 0.05) between the forces used for each of the K-Flex files (15, 25, 35, 45, and 70), the force increasing with the file size. There was also a significant difference (alpha = 0.05) in the forces used between the Flexofile (#25) and the #25 K-Flex and Hedström files. However, there was no significant difference between the K-Flex and Hedström files.

  18. Effects of ultrasonic waves on the interfacial forces between oil and water.

    PubMed

    Hamida, Tarek; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2008-04-01

    The effect of ultrasound on flow through a capillary using the pendant drop method was investigated. Water was injected into a 0.1 mm Hastelloy C-276 capillary tube submersed into several mineral oils with different viscosity, and kerosene. The average drop rate per minute was measured at several ultrasonic intensities. We observed that there exists a peak drop rate at a characteristic intensity, which strongly depends on oil viscosity and the interfacial tension between water and the oil. The semi-quantitative results reveal that the remarkable change in the interfacial forces between oil and water could be the explanation to the enhancement of oil recovery when the ultrasonic waves are applied.

  19. Coarse-Graining the Liquid-Liquid Interfaces with the MARTINI Force Field: How Is the Interfacial Tension Reproduced?

    PubMed

    Ndao, Makha; Devémy, Julien; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2015-08-11

    We report two-phase coarse-grained (CG) simulations of organic-water liquid-liquid interfaces with the MARTINI force field. We discuss the ability of the CG force field to predict quantitatively the interfacial tension of alkanes-water, benzene-water, chloroform-water, and alcohol-water systems. The performance of the prediction of the interfacial tension is evaluated through its dependence on temperature and alkane length. This study contributes to the challenging discussion about the robustness and the transferability of the MARTINI force field to interfacial properties. We have also used the distributions of the molecules along the direction normal to the interface to investigate the composition of the interfacial region and to compare the simulated densities of the coexisting phases with experiments.

  20. Interfacial properties of cell culture media with cell-protecting additives.

    PubMed

    Michaels, J D; Nowak, J E; Mallik, A K; Koczo, K; Wasan, D T; Papoutsakis, E T

    1995-08-20

    In an effort to identify key rheological properties that contribute to cell protection against shear damage, we have measured surface shear and dilatationai viscosities, dynamic surface tension, foaminess, and foam stability for media containing cell-protecting additives. In a companion article,(18) we found that cell-to-bubble attachment was decreased in media containing Methocel, Pluronic F68, or polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). In medium containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) or potyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP), attachment was increased. PEG, PVP, serum (FBS), and serum albumin (BSA) increased the surface viscosity of the air/medium surface (thus, producing a more rigid interface), whereas F68 and PVA lowered it greatly. Foaming experiments showed that Methocel, PEG, PVA, and F68 decreased the foam half-life while FBS, BSA, and PVP were foam stabilizers. Interestingly, the foam stability of CHO cell suspensions decreased significantly for cell concentrations higher than ca. 2 x 10(6) cells/mL. Nonviable CHO cells reduced foam stability further. Dynamic surface tension values of the media tested were found significantly differentfrom their static surface tension values. The interfacial properties measured and the results presented in the companion study suggest that the additives that lower dynamic surface tension the most (Methocel, F68, and PVA) correlate well with reduced cell-to-bubble attachment, and thus, cell protection. Reduced dynamic surface tension with these additives implies faster surfactant adsorption, mobile interfaces, lower surface viscosity, and foam destabilization. Because PEG and PVP resulted in increased cell-to-bubble attachment and had different interfacial properties, a different mechanism (compared with Methocel, PVP, and F68) is apparently responsible for their protective effect. Finally, cell protection offered by FBS and BSA is attributed to the foam stabilization properties provided by these additives. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons Inc.

  1. Effects of Ga Addition on Interfacial Reactions Between Sn-Based Solders and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao-Hong; Li, Kuan-Ting

    2016-12-01

    The use of Ga as a micro-alloying element in Sn-based solders can change the microstructure of solder joints to improve the mechanical properties, and even suppress the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) growth. This research investigated the effects of Ga addition (0.2-1 wt.%Ga) on the IMC formation and morphological evolution in the Sn-based solder joints with Ni substrate. In the soldering reaction at 250°C and with less than 0.2 wt.%Ga addition, the formed phase was Ni3Sn4. When the Ga addition increased to 0.5 wt.%, it changed to a thin Ni2Ga3 layer of ˜1 μm thick, which stably existed at the interface in the initial 1-h reaction. Subsequently, the whole Ni2Ga3 layer detached from the Ni substrate and drifted into the molten solder. The Ni3Sn4 phase became dominant in the later stage. Notably, the Ga addition significantly reduced the grain size of Ni3Sn4, resulting in the massive spalling of Ni3Sn4 grains. With 1 wt.%Ga addition, the Ni2Ga3 layer remained very thin with no significant growth, and it stably existed at the interface for more than 10 h. In addition, the solid-state reactions were examined at temperatures of 160°C to 200°C. With addition of 0.5 wt.%Ga, the Ni3Sn4 phase dominated the whole reaction. By contrast, with increasing to 1 wt.%Ga, only a thin Ni2Ga3 layer was found even after aging at 160°C for more than 1200 h. The 1 wt.%Ga addition in solder can effectively inhibit the Ni3Sn4 formation in soldering and the long-term aging process.

  2. Ferroelectric Thin Films for the Manipulation of Interfacial Forces in Aqueous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Robert

    Ferroelectric thin films (FETFs) offer a promising new platform for advancing liquid-phase interfacial sensing devices. FETFs are capable of expressing surface charge densities that are an order of magnitude higher than those of traditional charged surfaces in liquid environments (e.g., common oxides, self-assembled monolayers, or electrets). Furthermore, the switchable polarization state of FETFs enables patterning of charge-heterogeneous surfaces whose charge patterns persist over a range of environmental conditions. Integration of FETFs into liquid-phase interfacial sensing devices, however, requires the fabrication of films with nanometer-scale surface roughness, high remnant polarization values, and interfacial stability during prolonged exposure. The objectives of my research were to i) fabricate ferroelectric ultra-smooth lead zirconium titanate (US-PZT) thin films with nanometer-scale surface roughness, ii) establish the interfacial stability of these films after prolonged exposure to aqueous environments, iii) measure the interfacial forces as a function of film polarization and ionic strength, iv) calculate the surface potential of the US-PZT surface using electric double layer (EDL) theory, and v) demonstrate the guided deposition of charged colloidal particles onto locally polarized US-PZT thin films from solution. I demonstrate the use of ferroelectric US-PZT thin films to manipulate EDL interaction forces in aqueous environments. My work conclusively shows that the polarization state of US-PZT controls EDL formation and can be used to induce the guided deposition of charged colloidal particles in solution. I present a robust fabrication scheme for making ferroelectric US-PZT thin films from a sol-gel precursor. By optimizing critical thermal processing steps I am able to minimize the in-plane stress of the film and reliably produce US-PZT thin films on the wafer-scale with mean surface roughness values of only 2.4 nm over a 25 μm2 area. I then

  3. Estimation of additive forces and moments for supersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Stanley C., Jr.; Dillenius, Marnix F. E.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for estimating the additive forces and moments associated with supersonic, external compression inlets as a function of mass flow ratio has been developed. The technique makes use of a low order supersonic paneling method for calculating minimum additive forces at maximum mass flow conditions. A linear relationship between the minimum additive forces and the maximum values for fully blocked flow is employed to obtain the additive forces at a specified mass flow ratio. The method is applicable to two-dimensional inlets at zero or nonzero angle of attack, and to axisymmetric inlets at zero angle of attack. Comparisons with limited available additive drag data indicate fair to good agreement.

  4. Additive interfacial chiral interaction in multilayers for stabilization of small individual skyrmions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau-Luchaire, C.; Moutafis, C.; Reyren, N.; Sampaio, J.; Vaz, C. A. F.; van Horne, N.; Bouzehouane, K.; Garcia, K.; Deranlot, C.; Warnicke, P.; Wohlhüter, P.; George, J.-M.; Weigand, M.; Raabe, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A.

    2016-05-01

    Facing the ever-growing demand for data storage will most probably require a new paradigm. Nanoscale magnetic skyrmions are anticipated to solve this issue as they are arguably the smallest spin textures in magnetic thin films in nature. We designed cobalt-based multilayered thin films in which the cobalt layer is sandwiched between two heavy metals and so provides additive interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMIs), which reach a value close to 2 mJ m-2 in the case of the Ir|Co|Pt asymmetric multilayers. Using a magnetization-sensitive scanning X-ray transmission microscopy technique, we imaged small magnetic domains at very low fields in these multilayers. The study of their behaviour in a perpendicular magnetic field allows us to conclude that they are actually magnetic skyrmions stabilized by the large DMI. This discovery of stable sub-100 nm individual skyrmions at room temperature in a technologically relevant material opens the way for device applications in the near future.

  5. Experimental study of relationship between interfacial electroadhesive force and applied voltage for different substrate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Bamber, T.; Petzing, J.; Justham, L.; Jackson, M.

    2017-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the relationship between the interfacial electroadhesive force and applied voltage up to 20 kV has been presented. Normal electroadhesive forces have been obtained between a double-electrode electroadhesive pad and three optically flat and different substrate materials: glass, acrylic, and polycarbonate. The results have shown that not all substrate materials are good for the generation of electroadhesive forces. Only 15.7 Pa has been obtained between the pad and the polycarbonate substrate under 20 kV, whereas 46.3 Pa and 123.4 Pa have been obtained on the acrylic and glass substrate, respectively. Based on the experimental data, empirical models, with an adjusted R-square value above 0.995 in all cases, have been obtained for the three substrates. However, it has not been possible to develop a general empirical model which is suitable for all substrates. This further indicates the need for a large quantity of experimental data to obtain robust empirical models for different substrate materials in order to reliably use electroadhesive technologies for material handling applications.

  6. Chemical Force Microscopy: Probing Chemical Origin of Interfacial Forces and Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Vezenov, D V; Noy, A; Ashby, P

    2005-03-21

    Experimental methods of measuring intermolecular interactions have had several recent developments which have improved our understanding of chemical forces. First, they allowed direct exploration of the role that different functionalities, solvents and environmental variables play in shaping the strength of intermolecular interactions. Chemical force microscopy approach, in particular, became an extremely effective tool for exploring the contributions of each of these factors. Second, CFM studies clearly debunked the naive notion that intermolecular interaction strength is determined only by the nature of the interacting groups. These studies showed that the interaction strength between two chemical species must always considered in context of the environment surrounding these species. Third, CFM studies highlighted the critical role solvent plays in shaping intermolecular interactions in condensed phases. Emerging kinetic view of the intermolecular interactions introduced a completely new paradigm for understanding these interactions. Kinetic modeling showed that the measured interactions strength depends not only on the energy landscape of the system, but also on the loading history prior to the bond break-up. This new paradigm refocused our attention to the energy landscape as a fundamental characteristic of the interaction. Moreover, dynamic force spectroscopy, derived from kinetic models, allowed direct characterization of the geometry of the potential energy barrier, while some other methods attempt to probe the equilibrium energy landscape directly. Further investigations of the interactions in different systems, especially interactions between biomolecules, will uncover many interesting characteristics of intermolecular potentials. These studies have the potential to reveal, for the first time, a true picture of the energy landscapes of adhesion processes in complex chemical and biological systems.

  7. Interfacial force field characterization of a constrained vapor bubble thermosyphon using IAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Sunando; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in a gravitational field using IAI (image analyzing interferometer) which is based on computer enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. The experimental results for heptane and pentane menisci were analyzed using the extended Young-Laplace Equation. These isothermal results characterized the interfacial force field in-situ at the start of the heat transfer experiments by quantifying the dispersion constant for the specific liquid-solid system. The experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressures and the dispersion constants are compared to the subsequent non-isothermal experiments because one of the major variables in the heat sink capability of the CVBT is the dispersion constant. In all previous studies of micro heat pipes the value of the dispersion constant has been 'guesstimated'. The major advantages of the current glass cell is the ability to view the extended meniscus at all times. Experimentally, we find that the extended Young-Laplace Equation is an excellent model for for the force field at the solid-liquid vapor interfaces.

  8. Multiple Size Group Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in the Mold: An Analysis of Turbulence and Interfacial Force Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2015-04-01

    An inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) model based on the Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been developed to describe the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold. A laboratory scale mold has been simulated using four different turbulence closure models (modified k - ɛ, RNG k - ɛ, k - ω, and SST) with the purpose of critically comparing their predictions of bubble Sauter mean diameter distribution with previous experimental data. Furthermore, the influences of all the interfacial momentum transfer terms including drag force, lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force are investigated. The breakup and coalescence effects of the bubbles are modeled according to the bubble breakup by the impact of turbulent eddies while for bubble coalescence by the random collisions driven by turbulence and wake entrainment. It has been found that the modified k - ɛ model shows better agreement than other models in predicting the bubble Sauter mean diameter profiles. Further, simulations have also been performed to understand the sensitivity of different interfacial forces. The appropriate drag force coefficient, lift force coefficient, virtual mass force coefficient, and turbulent dispersion force coefficient are chosen in accordance with measurements of water model experiments. However, the wall lubrication force does not have much effect on the current polydispersed bubbly flow system. Finally, the MUSIG model is then used to estimate the argon bubble diameter in the molten steel of the mold. The argon bubble Sauter mean diameter generated in molten steel is predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the similar conditions.

  9. Effect of rare earth metal Ce addition to Sn-Ag solder on interfacial reactions with Cu substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeong-Won; Noh, Bo-In; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2014-05-01

    The effect of adding a small amount of rare earth cerium (Ce) element to low Ag containing Sn-1wt%Ag Pb-free solder on its interfacial reactions with Cu substrate was investigated. The growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) between three Sn-1Ag-xCe solders with different Ce contents and a Cu substrate was studied and the results were compared to those obtained for the Ce-free Sn-1Ag/Cu systems. In the solid-state reactions of the Sn-1Ag(-xCe)/Cu solder joints, the two IMC layers, Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn, grew as aging time increased. Compared to the Sn-1Ag/Cu joint, the growth of the Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn layers was depressed for the Ce-containing Sn-1Ag-xCe/Cu joint. The addition of Ce to the Sn-Ag solder reduced the growth of the interfacial Cu-Sn IMCs and prevented the IMCs from spalling from the interface. The evenly-distributed Ce elements in the solder region blocked the diffusion of Sn atoms to the interface and retarded the growth of the interfacial IMC layer.

  10. A balanced-force finite-element method for surface-tension-driven interfacial flows using interface-capturing approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    Interfacial flows with surface tension are often found in industrial and practical engineering applications, including bubbles, droplets, liquid film and jets. Accurate modelling of such flows is challenging due to their highly complex dynamics, which often involve changes of interfacial topology. We present a balanced-force finite-element method with adaptive unstructured meshes for interfacial flows. The method uses a mixed control-volume and finite element formulation, which ensures the surface tension forces, and the resulting pressure gradients, are exactly balanced, minimising the spurious velocities often found in numerical simulations of such flows. A volume-of-fluid-type method is employed for interface capturing based on a compressive control-volume advection method, and second-order finite element methods. A distance function is reconstructed from the volume fraction on the unstructured meshes, which provides accurate estimation of the curvature. Numerical examples of an equilibrium drop and dynamics of bubbles (droplets) are presented to demonstrate the capability of this method.

  11. Electrospinning of polyvinylidene difluoride with carbon nanotubes: synergistic effects of extensional force and interfacial interaction on crystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu; Yee, Wu Aik; Tjiu, Wuiwui Chauhari; Liu, Ye; Kotaki, Masaya; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy; Ma, Jan; Liu, Tianxi; Lu, Xuehong

    2008-12-02

    Polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) solutions containing a very low concentration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) of similar surface chemistry, respectively, were electrospun, and the nanofibers formed were collected using a modified rotating disk collector. The polymorphic behavior and crystal orientation of the nanofibers were studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy, while the nanotube alignment and interfacial interactions in the nanofibers were probed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the interfacial interaction between the SWCNTs and PVDF and the extensional force experienced by the nanofibers in the electrospinning and collection processes can work synergistically to induce highly oriented beta-form crystallites extensively. In contrast, the MWCNTs could not be well aligned along the nanofiber axis, which leads to a lower degree of crystal orientation.

  12. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D; Nilsson, Lennart

    2016-04-15

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all-atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs.

  13. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all‐atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26841080

  14. Towards the synthesis of hydroxyapatite/protein scaffolds with controlled porosities: bulk and interfacial shear rheology of a hydroxyapatite suspension with protein additives.

    PubMed

    Maas, Michael; Bodnar, Pedro Marcus; Hess, Ulrike; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds is essential for biomedical applications such as bone tissue engineering and replacement. One way to induce macroporosity, which is needed to support bone in-growth, is to use protein additives as foaming agents. Another reason to use protein additives is the potential to introduce a specific biofunctionality to the synthesized scaffolds. In this work, we study the rheological properties of a hydroxyapatite suspension system with additions of the proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LSZ) and fibrinogen (FIB). Both the rheology of the bulk phase as well as the interfacial shear rheology are studied. The bulk rheological data provides important information on the setting behavior of the thixotropic suspension, which we find to be faster with the addition of FIB and LSZ and much slower with BSA. Foam bubble stabilization mechanisms can be rationalized via interfacial shear rheology and we show that it depends on the growth of interfacial films at the suspension/air interface. These interfacial films support the stabilization of bubbles within the ceramic matrix and thereby introduce macropores. Due to the weak interaction of the protein molecules with the hydroxyapatite particles of the suspension, we find that BSA forms the most stable interfacial films, followed by FIB. LSZ strongly interacts with the hydroxyapatite particles and thus only forms thin films with very low elastic moduli. In summary, our study provides fundamental rheological insights which are essential for tailoring hydroxyapatite/protein suspensions in order to synthesize scaffolds with controlled porosities.

  15. Self-assembly formation of lipid bilayer coatings on bare aluminum oxide: overcoming the force of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Tabaei, Seyed R; Zhao, Zhilei; Yorulmaz, Saziye; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-01-14

    Widely used in catalysis and biosensing applications, aluminum oxide has become popular for surface functionalization with biological macromolecules, including lipid bilayer coatings. However, it is difficult to form supported lipid bilayers on aluminum oxide, and current methods require covalent surface modification, which masks the interfacial properties of aluminum oxide, and/or complex fabrication techniques with specific conditions. Herein, we addressed this issue by identifying simple and robust strategies to form fluidic lipid bilayers on aluminum oxide. The fabrication of a single lipid bilayer coating was achieved by two methods, vesicle fusion under acidic conditions and solvent-assisted lipid bilayer (SALB) formation under near-physiological pH conditions. Importantly, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring measurements determined that the hydration layer of a supported lipid bilayer on aluminum oxide is appreciably thicker than that of a bilayer on silicon oxide. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis indicated that the diffusion coefficient of lateral lipid mobility was up to 3-fold greater on silicon oxide than on aluminum oxide. In spite of this hydrodynamic coupling, the diffusion coefficient on aluminum oxide, but not silicon oxide, was sensitive to the ionic strength condition. Extended-DLVO model calculations estimated the thermodynamics of lipid-substrate interactions on aluminum oxide and silicon oxide, and predict that the range of the repulsive hydration force is greater on aluminum oxide, which in turn leads to an increased equilibrium separation distance. Hence, while a strong hydration force likely contributes to the difficulty of bilayer fabrication on aluminum oxide, it also confers advantages by stabilizing lipid bilayers with thicker hydration layers due to confined interfacial water. Such knowledge provides the basis for improved surface functionalization strategies on aluminum oxide

  16. Atomic force microscopy of crystalline insulins: the influence of sequence variation on crystallization and interfacial structure.

    PubMed Central

    Yip, C M; Brader, M L; DeFelippis, M R; Ward, M D

    1998-01-01

    The self-association of proteins is influenced by amino acid sequence, molecular conformation, and the presence of molecular additives. In the presence of phenolic additives, LysB28ProB29 insulin, in which the C-terminal prolyl and lysyl residues of wild-type human insulin have been inverted, can be crystallized into forms resembling those of wild-type insulins in which the protein exists as zinc-complexed hexamers organized into well-defined layers. We describe herein tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) studies of single crystals of rhombohedral (R3) LysB28ProB29 that reveal the influence of sequence variation on hexamer-hexamer association at the surface of actively growing crystals. Molecular scale lattice images of these crystals were acquired in situ under growth conditions, enabling simultaneous identification of the rhombohedral LysB28ProB29 crystal form, its orientation, and its dynamic growth characteristics. The ability to obtain crystallographic parameters on multiple crystal faces with TMAFM confirmed that bovine and porcine insulins grown under these conditions crystallized into the same space group as LysB28ProB29 (R3), enabling direct comparison of crystal growth behavior and the influence of sequence variation. Real-time TMAFM revealed hexamer vacancies on the (001) terraces of LysB28ProB29, and more rounded dislocation noses and larger terrace widths for actively growing screw dislocations compared to wild-type bovine and porcine insulin crystals under identical conditions. This behavior is consistent with weaker interhexamer attachment energies for LysB28ProB29 at active growth sites. Comparison of the single crystal x-ray structures of wild-type insulins and LysB28ProB29 suggests that differences in protein conformation at the hexamer-hexamer interface and accompanying changes in interhexamer bonding are responsible for this behavior. These studies demonstrate that subtle changes in molecular conformation due to a single sequence

  17. Interfacial Reactions of Zn-Al Alloys with Na Addition on Cu Substrate During Spreading Test and After Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancarz, Tomasz; Pstruś, Janusz; Berent, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    Spreading tests for Cu substrate with Zn-Al eutectic-based alloys with 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 wt.% of Na were studied using the sessile drop method in the presence of QJ201 flux. Spreading tests were performed for 1, 3, 8, 15, 30, and 60 min of contact, at the temperatures of 475, 500, 525, and 550 °C. After cleaning the flux residue from solidified samples, the spreading area of Zn-Al + Na on Cu was determined in accordance with ISO 9455-10:2013-03. Selected, solidified solder-substrate couples were cross-sectioned and subjected to scanning electron microscopy of the interfacial microstructure. The experiment was designed to demonstrate the effect of Na addition on the kinetics of formation and growth of CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4 phases, which were identified using x-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The addition of Na to eutectic Zn-Al caused the spreading area to decrease and the thickness of intermetallic compound layers at the interface to reduce. Samples after the spreading test at 500 °C for 1 min were subjected to aging for 1, 10, and 30 days at 120,170, and 250 °C. The greater thicknesses of IMC layers were obtained for a temperature of 250 °C. With increasing Na content in Zn-Al + Na alloys, the thickness reduced, which correlates to the highest value of activation energy for Zn-Al with 1% Na.

  18. Role of molecular level interfacial forces in hard biomaterial mechanics: a review.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Devendra K; Tomar, Vikas

    2010-06-01

    Biological materials have evolved over millions of years and are often found as complex composites with superior properties compared to their relatively weak original constituents. Hard biomaterials such as nacre, bone, and dentin have intrigue researchers for decades for their high stiffness and toughness, multifunctionality, and self-healing capabilities. Challenges lie in identifying nature's mechanisms behind imparting such properties and her pathways in fabricating these composites. The route frequently acquired by nature is embedding submicron- or nano-sized mineral particles in protein matrix in a well-organized hierarchical arrangement. The key here is the formation of large amount of precisely and carefully designed organic-inorganic interfaces and synergy of mechanisms acting over multiple scales to distribute loads and damage, dissipate energy, and resist change in properties owing to events such as cracking. An important aspect to focus on is the chemo-mechanics of the organic-inorganic interfaces and its correlation with overall mechanical behavior of materials. This review focuses on presenting an overview of the past work and currently ongoing work done on this aspect. Analyses focuses on understanding role played by the interfacial mechanics on overall mechanical strength of hard biomaterials. Specific attention is given to synergy between experiments and modeling at the nanoscale to understand the hard biomaterial biomechanics.

  19. Nonlinear vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in a polymer matrix aroused by interfacial van der Waals forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, M. H.; Jiang, L. Y.; Sun, X.

    2009-12-01

    This paper studies the nonlinear vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) embedded in a polymer matrix aroused by van der Waals (vdW) forces using elastic beam models. The interfacial vdW forces are described by a nonlinear function in terms of the deflection of the CNT. According to different beam end conditions, the relation between deflection amplitudes and resonant frequencies of free vibrations of the CNT is derived through harmonic balance method. This relation is found to be sensitive to end conditions, diameters, and lengths of the embedded CNT. The axial load effect upon the vibrational behavior of the CNT and postbuckling of the embedded CNT are also discussed. Due to the influence of the surrounding polymer, the prediction on the critical buckling loads and resonant frequencies for embedded CNTs is quite different from that for free-standing CNTs. In addition, the applicability and accuracy of both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam models are investigated. It is found that the Euler-Bernoulli beam model may provide comparable results as the Timoshenko beam model even for CNTs with smaller length-to-diameter ratios due to the constraint from the surrounding medium.

  20. Droplet and slug formation in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell flow channels: The role of interfacial forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Cheah, May J.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Benziger, Jay B.

    A microfluidic device is employed to emulate water droplet emergence from a porous electrode and slug formation in the gas flow channel of a PEM fuel cell. Liquid water emerges from a 50 μm pore forming a droplet; the droplet grows to span the entire cross-section of a microchannel and transitions into a slug which detaches and is swept downstream. Droplet growth, slug formation, detachment, and motion are analyzed using high-speed video images and pressure-time traces. Slug volume is controlled primarily by channel geometry, interfacial forces, and gravity. As water slugs move downstream, they leave residual micro-droplets that act as nucleation sites for the next droplet-to-slug transition. Residual liquid in the form of micro-droplets results in a significant decrease in slug volume between the very first slug formed in an initially dry channel and the ultimate "steady-state" slug. A physics-based model is presented to predict slug volumes and pressure drops for slug detachment and motion.

  1. Separating the effects of repulsive and attractive forces on the phase diagram, interfacial, and critical properties of simple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Herrera, M.; Moreno-Razo, J. A.; Guzmán, O.; López-Lemus, J.; Ibarra-Tandi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular simulations in the canonical and isothermal-isobaric ensembles were performed to study the effect of varying the shape of the intermolecular potential on the phase diagram, critical, and interfacial properties of model fluids. The molecular interactions were modeled by the Approximate Non-Conformal (ANC) theory potentials. Unlike the Lennard-Jones or Morse potentials, the ANC interactions incorporate parameters (called softnesses) that modulate the steepness of the potential in their repulsive and attractive parts independently. This feature allowed us to separate unambiguously the role of each region of the potential on setting the thermophysical properties. In particular, we found positive linear correlation between all critical coordinates and the attractive and repulsive softness, except for the critical density and the attractive softness which are negatively correlated. Moreover, we found that the physical properties related to phase coexistence (such as span of the liquid phase between the critical and triple points, variations in the P-T vaporization curve, interface width, and surface tension) are more sensitive to changes in the attractive softness than to the repulsive one. Understanding the different roles of attractive and repulsive forces on phase coexistence may contribute to developing more accurate models of liquids and their mixtures.

  2. Influence of SnO2 Nanoparticles Addition on Microstructure, Thermal Analysis, and Interfacial IMC Growth of Sn1.0Ag0.7Cu Solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ren; Sui, Yanwei; Qi, Jiqiu; Wei, Fuxiang; He, Yezeng; Chen, Xiao; Meng, Qingkun; Sun, Zhi

    2017-02-01

    A new lead-free Sn-1.0Ag-0.7Cu-xSnO2 composite solder was smelted in a vacuum arc furnace at 900°C for 30 min. This paper investigated the influence of SnO2 nanoparticles on the microstructure, melting properties and growth of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMCs) at the interface between Cu and the composite solder during isothermal aging. The results indicated that SnO2 particles effectively refined the β-Sn grains and reduced the size of Cu6Sn5. The thermal analysis data showed that nano-sized SnO2 decreased the pasty range and melting temperature. In addition, the additional nanoparticles reduced the diffusion coefficient and impeded the growth of intermetallic compounds during soldering and aging. The effect of nanoparticles on solder is closely associated with the added amount of nano-SnO2 particles. When the SnO2 concentration was 1.0 wt.%, the composite solder possessed an excellent microstructure, suitable melting properties and obvious inhibition effect on the interfacial IMCs. However, excessive addition of SnO2 particles in the solder alloys decreased the inhibition effect of the interfacial IMCs.

  3. Monitoring Method of Cutting Force by Using Additional Spindle Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhan, Ahmed Aly Diaa; Matsubara, Atsushi; Sugihara, Motoyuki; Saraie, Hidenori; Ibaraki, Soichi; Kakino, Yoshiaki

    This paper describes a monitoring method of cutting forces for end milling process by using displacement sensors. Four eddy-current displacement sensors are installed on the spindle housing of a machining center so that they can detect the radial motion of the rotating spindle. Thermocouples are also attached to the spindle structure in order to examine the thermal effect in the displacement sensing. The change in the spindle stiffness due to the spindle temperature and the speed is investigated as well. Finally, the estimation performance of cutting forces using the spindle displacement sensors is experimentally investigated by machining tests on carbon steel in end milling operations under different cutting conditions. It is found that the monitoring errors are attributable to the thermal displacement of the spindle, the time lag of the sensing system, and the modeling error of the spindle stiffness. It is also shown that the root mean square errors between estimated and measured amplitudes of cutting forces are reduced to be less than 20N with proper selection of the linear stiffness.

  4. Further evidence that interfacial water is the main "driving force" of protein dynamics: a neutron scattering study on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Combet, Sophie; Zanotti, Jean-Marc

    2012-04-14

    The fundamental role of hydration water (also called interfacial water) is widely recognized in protein flexibility, especially in the existence of the so-called protein "dynamical transition" at around 220 K. In the present study, we take advantage of perdeuterated C-phycocyanin (CPC) and elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) to distinguish between protein dynamics and interfacial water dynamics. Powders of hydrogenated (hCPC) and perdeuterated (dCPC) CPC protein have been hydrated, respectively, with D(2)O or H(2)O and measured by EINS to separately probe protein dynamics (hCPC/D(2)O) and water dynamics (dCPC/H(2)O) at different time- and length-scales. We find that "fast" (<20 ps) local mean-square displacements (MSD) of both protein and interfacial water coincide all along the temperature range, with the same dynamical transition temperature at ~220 K. On higher resolution (<400 ps), two different types of motions can be separated: (i) localized motions with the same amplitude for CPC and hydration water and two transitions at ~170 and ~240 K for both; (ii) large scale fluctuations exhibiting for both water molecules and CPC protein a single transition at ~240 K, with a significantly higher amplitude for the interfacial water than for CPC. Moreover, by comparing these motions with bulk water MSD measured under the same conditions, we show no coupling between bulk water dynamics and protein dynamics all along the temperature range. These results show that interfacial water is the main "driving force" governing both local and large scale motions in proteins.

  5. CHARMM additive and polarizable force fields for biophysics and computer-aided drug design

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Mechanics (MM) is the method of choice for computational studies of biomolecular systems owing to its modest computational cost, which makes it possible to routinely perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on chemical systems of biophysical and biomedical relevance. Scope of Review As one of the main factors limiting the accuracy of MD results is the empirical force field used, the present paper offers a review of recent developments in the CHARMM additive force field, one of the most popular bimolecular force fields. Additionally, we present a detailed discussion of the CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, anticipating a growth in the importance and utilization of polarizable force fields in the near future. Throughout the discussion emphasis is placed on the force fields’ parametrization philosophy and methodology. Major Conclusions Recent improvements in the CHARMM additive force field are mostly related to newly found weaknesses in the previous generation of additive force fields. Beyond the additive approximation is the newly available CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, which allows for MD simulations of up to 1 microsecond on proteins, DNA, lipids and carbohydrates. General Significance Addressing the limitations ensures the reliability of the new CHARMM36 additive force field for the types of calculations that are presently coming into routine computational reach while the availability of the Drude polarizable force fields offers a model that is an inherently more accurate model of the underlying physical forces driving macromolecular structures and dynamics. PMID:25149274

  6. Surfactant adsorption and interfacial tension investigations on cyclopentane hydrate.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Olcott, Kyle; Pfeiffer, Kristopher; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2013-02-26

    Gas hydrates represent an unconventional methane resource and a production/safety risk to traditional oil and gas flowlines. In both systems, hydrate may share interfaces with both aqueous and hydrocarbon fluids. To accurately model macroscopic properties, such as relative permeability in unconventional systems or dispersion viscosity in traditional systems, knowledge of hydrate interfacial properties is required. This work presents hydrate cohesive force results measured on a micromechanical force apparatus, and complementary water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension data. By combining a revised cohesive force model with experimental data, two interfacial properties of cyclopentane hydrate were estimated: hydrate-water and hydrate-cyclopentane interfacial tension values at 0.32 ± 0.05 mN/m and 47 ± 5 mN/m, respectively. These fundamental physiochemical properties have not been estimated or measured for cyclopentane hydrate to date. The addition of surfactants in the cyclopentane phase significantly reduced the cyclopentane hydrate cohesive force; we hypothesize this behavior to be the result of surfactant adsorption on the hydrate-oil interface. Surface excess quantities were estimated for hydrate-oil and water-oil interfaces using four carboxylic and sulfonic acids. The results suggest the density of adsorbed surfactant may be 2× larger for the hydrate-oil interface than the water-oil interface. Additionally, hydrate-oil interfacial tension was observed to begin decreasing from the baseline value at significantly lower surfactant concentrations (1-3 orders of magnitude) than those for the water-oil interfacial tension.

  7. Effect of cerium addition on casting/chill interfacial heat flux and casting surface profile during solidification of Al-14%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, Al-14 wt. % Si alloy was solidified against copper, brass and cast iron chills, to study the effect of Ce melt treatment on casting/chill interfacial heat flux transients and casting surface profile. The heat flux across the casting/chill interface was estimated using inverse modelling technique. On addition of 1.5% Ce, the peak heat flux increased by about 38%, 42% and 43% for copper, brass and cast iron chills respectively. The effect of Ce addition on casting surface texture was analyzed using a surface profilometer. The surface profile of the casting and the chill surfaces clearly indicated the formation of an air gap at the periphery of the casting. The arithmetic average value of the profile departure from the mean line (Ra) and arithmetical mean of the absolute departures of the waviness profile from the centre line (Wa) were found to decrease on Ce addition. The interfacial gap width formed for the unmodified and Ce treated casting surfaces at the periphery were found to be about 35µm and 13µm respectively. The enhancement in heat transfer on addition of Ce addition was attributed to the lowering of the surface tension of the liquid melt. The gap width at the interface was used to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) across the chill surface after the formation of stable solid shell. It was found that the HTC decreased along the radial direction for copper and brass chills and increased along radial direction for cast iron chills.

  8. Pairwise-additive force fields for selected aqueous monovalent ions from adaptive force matching

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Simple non-polarizable potentials were developed for Na+, K+, Cl−, and Br− using the adaptive force matching (AFM) method with ab initio MP2 method as reference. Our MP2-AFM force field predicts the solvation free energies of the four salts formed by the ions with an error of no more than 5%. Other properties such as the ion-water radial distribution functions, first solvation shell water tilt angle distributions, ion diffusion constants, concentration dependent diffusion constant of water, and concentration dependent surface tension of the solutions were calculated with this potential. Very good agreement was achieved for these properties. In particular, the diffusion constants of the ions are within 6% of experimental measurements. The model predicts bromide to be enriched at the interface in the 1.6M KBr solution but predicts the ion to be repelled for the surface at lower concentration. PMID:26590540

  9. Sufficient conditions for the additivity of stall forces generated by multiple filaments or motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bameta, Tripti; Das, Dipjyoti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments work collectively most of the time under opposing forces. This opposing force may be due to cargo carried by motors or resistance coming from the cell membrane pressing against the cytoskeletal filaments. Some recent studies have shown that the collective maximum force (stall force) generated by multiple cytoskeletal filaments or molecular motors may not always be just a simple sum of the stall forces of the individual filaments or motors. To understand this excess or deficit in the collective force, we study a broad class of models of both cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. We argue that the stall force generated by a group of filaments or motors is additive, that is, the stall force of N number of filaments (motors) is N times the stall force of one filament (motor), when the system is reversible at stall. Conversely, we show that this additive property typically does not hold true when the system is irreversible at stall. We thus present a novel and unified understanding of the existing models exhibiting such non-addivity, and generalise our arguments by developing new models that demonstrate this phenomena. We also propose a quantity similar to thermodynamic efficiency to easily predict this deviation from stall-force additivity for filament and motor collectives.

  10. Interfacial-tension-force model for the wavy stratified liquid-liquid flow pattern transition: The usage of two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Marcelo Souza; Rodriguez, Oscar Mauricio Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hydrodynamic stability of flow patterns is important in the design of equipment and pipelines for multiphase flows. The maintenance of a particular flow pattern becomes important in many applications, e.g., stratified flow pattern in heavy oil production avoiding the formation of emulsions because of the separation of phases and annular flow pattern in heat exchangers which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Flow maps are drawn to orientate engineers which flow pattern is present in a pipeline, for example. The ways how these flow maps are drawn have changed from totally experimental work, to phenomenological models, and then to stability analysis theories. In this work an experimental liquid-liquid flow map, with water and viscous oil as work fluids, drawn via subjective approach with high speed camera was used to compare to approaches of the same theory: the interfacial-tension-force model. This theory was used to drawn the wavy stratified flow pattern transition boundary. This paper presents a comparison between the two approaches of the interfacial-tension-force model for transition boundaries of liquid-liquid flow patterns: (i) solving the wave equation for the wave speed and using average values for wave number and wave speed; and (ii) solving the same equation for the wave number and then using a correlation for the wave speed. The results show that the second approach presents better results.

  11. Interfacial tension between CO 2 and brine (NaCl + CaCl 2) at elevated pressures and temperatures: The additive effect of different salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggelopoulos, C. A.; Robin, M.; Vizika, O.

    2011-04-01

    An extensive laboratory study was conducted to measure the interfacial tension (IFT) between CO 2 and brine consisting in equal molal concentrations of NaCl and CaCl 2. The experiments were repeated at various pressures, temperatures and salinities that are representative of conditions prevailing during CO 2 storage in deep saline aquifers. The dependence of CO 2/brine IFT on pressure and temperature is similar to that previously reported for the systems: CO 2/NaCl solution and CO 2/CaCl 2 solution. CO 2/brine IFT increases linearly with water salinity and the magnitude of this increase was found equal to the sum of the individual CO 2/NaCl solution and CO 2/CaCl 2 solution IFT increments, indicating a strong additive effect on IFT when the brine is composed of various salts.

  12. Deciphering the energetic barriers to calcium carbonate nucleation as a continuum of competing interfacial forces between polysaccharide chemistry and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, A. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Researchers have long-postulated that living organisms utilize organic matrices to actively guide the formation and growth of crystalline structures. The timing and placement of these features are most easily controlled during the nucleation stage. Our recent kinetic study of heterogeneous calcite nucleation found the energy barrier to formation is regulated by a systematic relationship to the competing interfacial energies between the substrate, crystal, and liquid (Giuffre et al., 2013). Chitosan presents a low energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate-crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate-crystal interfaces. These results showed calcite nucleation is regulated by substrate-crystal interactions but could not quantify the larger continuum of competing forces that must regulate calcite nucleation. To determine these relationships, we estimate the energy barriers to nucleation and crystal-liquid interfacial energies by measuring the kinetics of homogeneous calcite nucleation in NaCl solutions at ionic strengths that extend to seawater salinity (0.6 M). The data show that solutions of greater ionic strength produce faster nucleation rates, smaller crystal-liquid interfacial energies, and lower barriers to nucleation, which concurs with recent theoretical and experimental findings that background electrolytes promote ion desolvation during nucleation. By applying this relationship to heterogeneous nucleation on chitosan and heparin in future work, we will quantify the relative contributions of substrate-crystal-liquid interfacial energies. The findings reiterate a directing role for PS

  13. Understanding the effects of a multi-functionalized additive on the cathode-electrolyte interfacial stability of Ni-rich materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Taeeun; Kang, Kyoung Seok; Mun, Junyoung; Lim, Sang Hoo; Woo, Sang-Gil; Kim, Ki Jae; Park, Min-Sik; Cho, Woosuk; Song, Jun Ho; Han, Young-Kyu; Yu, Ji-Sang; Kim, Young-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Nickel-rich lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxides have received considerable attention as a promising cathode material, however, they have suffered from poor interfacial stability, especially at high temperature. Here, we suggest a bi-functionalized divinyl sulfone that enhances the applicability of a nickel-rich cathode via stabilization of the electrolyte-electrode interface. The divinyl sulfone forms a protective layer on the cathode surface by electrochemical oxidation reactions and this greatly decreases the internal pressure of the cell via stabilization of the Ni-rich cathode-electrolyte interface. The cell controlled with divinyl sulfone shows remarkable cycling performance with 91.9% capacity retention at elevated temperature even after 100 cycles. Additional electrode analyses and first-principles calculations provide critical spectroscopic evidences to demonstrate the combined effects of the sulfone and vinyl functional groups. Once the divinyl sulfone is electrochemically oxidized, the vinyl functional groups readily participate in further stabilizing sulfone-based solid electrolyte interphase intermediates and afford a durable protective layer on the nickel-rich electrode surface.

  14. Effects of circular rigid boundaries and Coriolis forces on the interfacial instability in a rotating annular Hele-Shaw cell.

    PubMed

    Abidate, Asmaa; Aniss, Said; Caballina, Ophélie; Souhar, Mohamed

    2007-04-01

    We report analytical results for the development of instability of an interface between two immiscible, Newtonian fluid layers confined in a rotating annular Hele-Shaw cell. We perform a linear stability analysis and focus our study on the influence of both Coriolis force and curvature parameters on the interface instability growth rate. The results show that the Coriolis force does not alter the stability of a disturbance with a particular wave number but reduces the maximum growth rate. The results related to the role played by the confinement of the liquid layers are also shown to provide a modification of the fastest-growing mode and its corresponding linear growth rate.

  15. Matching of additive and polarizable force fields for multiscale condensed phase simulations

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher M.; Best, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Inclusion of electronic polarization effects is one of the key aspects in which the accuracy of current biomolecular force fields may be improved. The principal drawback of such approaches is the computational cost, which typically ranges from 3 – 10 times that of the equivalent additive model, and may be greater for more sophisticated treatments of polarization or other many-body effects. Here, we present a multiscale approach which may be used to enhance the sampling in simulations with polarizable models, by using the additive model as a tool to explore configuration space. We use a method based on information theory to determine the charges for an additive model that has optimal overlap with the polarizable one, and we demonstrate the feasibility of enhancing sampling via a hybrid replica exchange scheme for several model systems. An additional advantage is that, in the process, we obtain a systematic method for deriving charges for an additive model that will be the natural complement to its polarizable parent. The additive charges are found by an effective coarse-graining of the polarizable force field, rather than by ad hoc procedures. PMID:23997691

  16. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G.; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction. PMID:25424490

  17. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  18. The force-field derivation and application of explosive/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The inter-molecular force-field across RDX/(paraffin, fluoropolymer) interfaces are derived from first-principles calculated energies under the GGA+vdW functional. Based on the force-field, the polycrystal structures of mixture explosives are obtained, and a set of thermodynamic properties are calculated, including the elastic constants, thermal expansion coefficient, heat capacity, isothermal curve and the Hugoniot curve. The results are in good agreement with the available experiments, and provide a reasonable prediction about the properties of plastic bonded explosives. We find that the thermal expansion coefficient of a multi-component explosive is not only determined by the properties of the components, but is also affected by the thermal stress at the explosive/additive interfaces.

  19. The influence of an additional load on time and force changes in the ground reaction force during the countermovement vertical jump.

    PubMed

    Vaverka, Frantisek; Jakubsova, Zlatava; Jandacka, Daniel; Zahradnik, David; Farana, Roman; Uchytil, Jaroslav; Supej, Matej; Vodicar, Janez

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how an additional load influences the force-vs-time relationship of the countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ). The participants that took part in the experiment were 18 male university students who played sport recreationally, including regular games of volleyball. They were asked to perform a CMVJ without involving the arms under four conditions: without and with additional loads of 10%, 20%, and 30% of their body weight (BW). The vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRF) was measured by a force plate. The GRF was used to calculate the durations of the preparatory, braking, and acceleration phases, the total duration of the jump, force impulses during the braking and acceleration phases, average forces during the braking and acceleration phases, and the maximum force of impact at landing. Results were evaluated using repeated-measures ANOVA. Increasing the additional load prolonged both the braking and acceleration phases of the jump, with statistically significant changes in the duration of the acceleration phase found for an additional load of 20% BW. The magnitude of the force systematically and significantly increased with the additional load. The force impulse during the acceleration phase did not differ significantly between jumps performed with loads of 20% and 30% BW. The results suggest that the optimal additional load for developing explosive strength in vertical jumping ranges from 20% to 30% of BW, with this value varying between individual subjects.

  20. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  1. Additional in-series compliance reduces muscle force summation and alters the time course of force relaxation during fixed-end contractions.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Dean L; Launikonis, Bradley S; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-11-15

    There are high mechanical demands placed on skeletal muscles in movements requiring rapid acceleration of the body or its limbs. Tendons are responsible for transmitting muscle forces, but, because of their elasticity, can manipulate the mechanics of the internal contractile apparatus. Shortening of the contractile apparatus against the stretch of tendon affects force generation according to known mechanical properties; however, the extent to which differences in tendon compliance alter force development in response to a burst of electrical impulses is unclear. To establish the influence of series compliance on force summation, we studied electrically evoked doublet contractions in the cane toad peroneus muscle in the presence and absence of a compliant artificial tendon. Additional series compliance reduced tetanic force by two-thirds, a finding predicted based on the force-length property of skeletal muscle. Doublet force and force-time integral expressed relative to the twitch were also reduced by additional series compliance. Active shortening over a larger range of the ascending limb of the force-length curve and at a higher velocity, leading to a progressive reduction in force-generating potential, could be responsible. Muscle-tendon interaction may also explain the accelerated time course of force relaxation in the presence of additional compliance. Our findings suggest that a compliant tendon limits force summation under constant-length conditions. However, high series compliance can be mechanically advantageous when a muscle-tendon unit is actively stretched, permitting muscle fibres to generate force almost isometrically, as shown during stretch-shorten cycles in locomotor activities. Restricting active shortening would likely favour rapid force development.

  2. Frequency locking in auditory hair cells: Distinguishing between additive and parametric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edri, Yuval; Bozovic, Dolores; Yochelis, Arik

    2016-10-01

    The auditory system displays remarkable sensitivity and frequency discrimination, attributes shown to rely on an amplification process that involves a mechanical as well as a biochemical response. Models that display proximity to an oscillatory onset (also known as Hopf bifurcation) exhibit a resonant response to distinct frequencies of incoming sound, and can explain many features of the amplification phenomenology. To understand the dynamics of this resonance, frequency locking is examined in a system near the Hopf bifurcation and subject to two types of driving forces: additive and parametric. Derivation of a universal amplitude equation that contains both forcing terms enables a study of their relative impact on the hair cell response. In the parametric case, although the resonant solutions are 1 : 1 frequency locked, they show the coexistence of solutions obeying a phase shift of π, a feature typical of the 2 : 1 resonance. Different characteristics are predicted for the transition from unlocked to locked solutions, leading to smooth or abrupt dynamics in response to different types of forcing. The theoretical framework provides a more realistic model of the auditory system, which incorporates a direct modulation of the internal control parameter by an applied drive. The results presented here can be generalized to many other media, including Faraday waves, chemical reactions, and elastically driven cardiomyocytes, which are known to exhibit resonant behavior.

  3. Additive protective effects of the addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on excitability and force in isolated rat skeletal muscle depressed by elevated extracellular K+

    PubMed Central

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Overgaard, Kristian; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2007-01-01

    During strenuous exercise, extracellular K+ ([K+]o) is increased, which potentially can reduce muscle excitability and force production. In addition, exercise leads to accumulation of lactate and H+ and increased levels of circulating catecholamines. Individually, reduced pH and increased catecholamines have been shown to counteract the depressing effect of elevated K+. This study examines (i) whether the effects of addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on the excitability of isolated muscles are caused by separate mechanisms and are additive and (ii) whether the effect of adding lactic acid or increasing CO2 is related to a reduction of intra- or extracellular pH. Rat soleus muscles were incubated at a [K+]o of 15 mm, which reduced tetanic force by 85%. Subsequent addition of 20 mm lactic acid or 10−5m adrenaline led to a small recovery of force, but when added together induced an almost complete force recovery. Compound action potentials showed that the force recovery was associated with recovery of muscle excitability. The improved excitability after addition of adrenaline was associated with increased Na+–K+ pump activity resulting in hyperpolarization and an increase in the chemical Na+ gradient. In contrast, addition of lactic acid had no effect on the membrane potential or the Na+–K+ pump activity, but most likely increased excitability via a reduction in intracellular pH. It is concluded that the protective effects of acidosis and adrenaline on muscle excitability and force took place via different mechanisms and were additive. The results suggest that circulating catecholamines and development of acidosis during exercise may improve the tolerance of muscles to elevated [K+]o. PMID:17347268

  4. Additive protective effects of the addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on excitability and force in isolated rat skeletal muscle depressed by elevated extracellular K+.

    PubMed

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Overgaard, Kristian; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2007-06-01

    During strenuous exercise, extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)) is increased, which potentially can reduce muscle excitability and force production. In addition, exercise leads to accumulation of lactate and H(+) and increased levels of circulating catecholamines. Individually, reduced pH and increased catecholamines have been shown to counteract the depressing effect of elevated K(+). This study examines (i) whether the effects of addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on the excitability of isolated muscles are caused by separate mechanisms and are additive and (ii) whether the effect of adding lactic acid or increasing CO(2) is related to a reduction of intra- or extracellular pH. Rat soleus muscles were incubated at a [K(+)](o) of 15 mM, which reduced tetanic force by 85%. Subsequent addition of 20 mM lactic acid or 10(-5) M adrenaline led to a small recovery of force, but when added together induced an almost complete force recovery. Compound action potentials showed that the force recovery was associated with recovery of muscle excitability. The improved excitability after addition of adrenaline was associated with increased Na(+)-K(+) pump activity resulting in hyperpolarization and an increase in the chemical Na(+) gradient. In contrast, addition of lactic acid had no effect on the membrane potential or the Na(+)-K(+) pump activity, but most likely increased excitability via a reduction in intracellular pH. It is concluded that the protective effects of acidosis and adrenaline on muscle excitability and force took place via different mechanisms and were additive. The results suggest that circulating catecholamines and development of acidosis during exercise may improve the tolerance of muscles to elevated [K(+)](o).

  5. Simulation of uphill/downhill running on a level treadmill using additional horizontal force.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Philippe; Arnal, Pierrick J; Samozino, Pierre; Millet, Guillaume Y; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2014-07-18

    Tilting treadmills allow a convenient study of biomechanics during uphill/downhill running, but they are not commonly available and there is even fewer tilting force-measuring treadmill. The aim of the present study was to compare uphill/downhill running on a treadmill (inclination of ± 8%) with running on a level treadmill using additional backward or forward pulling forces to simulate the effect of gravity. This comparison specifically focused on the energy cost of running, stride frequency (SF), electromyographic activity (EMG), leg and foot angles at foot strike, and ground impact shock. The main results are that SF, impact shock, and leg and foot angle parameters determined were very similar and significantly correlated between the two methods, the intercept and slope of the linear regression not differing significantly from zero and unity, respectively. The correlation of oxygen uptake (V̇O2) data between both methods was not significant during uphill running (r=0.42; P>0.05). V̇O2 data were correlated during downhill running (r=0.74; P<0.01) but there was a significant difference between the methods (bias=-2.51 ± 1.94 ml min(-1) kg(-1)). Linear regressions for EMG of vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, soleus and tibialis anterior were not different from the identity line but the systematic bias was elevated for this parameter. In conclusion, this method seems appropriate for the study of SF, leg and foot angle, impact shock parameters but is less applicable for physiological variables (EMG and energy cost) during uphill/downhill running when using a tilting force-measuring treadmill is not possible.

  6. Investigation of interfacial rheology & foam stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn M.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-05-01

    The rheology at gas-liquid interfaces strongly influences the stability and dynamics of foams and emulsions. Several experimental techniques are employed to characterize the rheology at liquid-gas interfaces with an emphasis on the non-Newtonian behavior of surfactant-laden interfaces. The focus is to relate the interfacial rheology to the foamability and foam stability of various aqueous systems. An interfacial stress rheometer (ISR) is used to measure the steady and dynamic rheology by applying an external magnetic field to actuate a magnetic needle suspended at the interface. Results are compared with those from a double wall ring attachment to a rotational rheometer (TA Instruments AR-G2). Micro-interfacial rheology (MIR) is also performed using optical tweezers to manipulate suspended microparticle probes at the interface to investigate the steady and dynamic rheology. Additionally, a surface dilatational rheometer (SDR) is used to periodically oscillate the volume of a pendant drop or buoyant bubble. Applying the Young-Laplace equation to the drop shape, a time-dependent surface tension can be calculated and used to determine the effective dilatational viscosity of an interface. Using the ISR, double wall ring, SDR, and MIR, a wide range of sensitivity in surface forces (fN to nN) can be explored as each experimental method has different sensitivities. Measurements will be compared to foam stability.

  7. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-11

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  8. Is functional hypertrophy and specific force coupled with the addition of myonuclei at the single muscle fiber level?

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Rizwan; Renaud, Guillaume; Morine, Kevin; Barton, Elisabeth R; Sweeney, H Lee; Larsson, Lars

    2012-03-01

    Muscle force is typically proportional to muscle size, resulting in constant force normalized to muscle fiber cross-sectional area (specific force). Mice overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) exhibit a proportional gain in muscle force and size, but not the myostatin-deficient mice. In an attempt to explore the role of the cytoplasmic volume supported by individual myonuclei [myonuclear domain (MND) size] on functional capacity of skeletal muscle, we have investigated specific force in relation to MND and the content of the molecular motor protein, myosin, at the single muscle fiber level from myostatin-knockout (Mstn(-/-)) and IGF-1-overexpressing (mIgf1(+/+)) mice. We hypothesize that the addition of extra myonuclei is a prerequisite for maintenance of specific force during muscle hypertrophy. A novel algorithm was used to measure individual MNDs in 3 dimensions along the length of single muscle fibers from the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus and the slow-twitch soleus muscle. A significant effect of the size of individual MNDs in hypertrophic muscle fibers on both specific force and myosin content was observed. This effect was muscle cell type specific and suggested there is a critical volume individual myonuclei can support efficiently. The large MNDs found in fast muscles of Mstn(-/-) mice were correlated with the decrement in specific force and myosin content in Mstn(-/-) muscles. Thus, myostatin inhibition may not be able to maintain the appropriate MND for optimal function.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of the interfacial thermal conductance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and van der Waals force induced deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Qingyuan; Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Thermal boundary resistance (TBR) plays an important role in the thermal conduction of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based materials and CNT networks (e.g., thin films, arrays, and aerogels). Although individual CNTs have extremely high thermal conductivity, interfacial resistances can dominate the overall resistance and largely influence their thermal performance. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically study the interfacial thermal conductance (ITC, the inverse of TBR) of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-substrate interfaces and MWNT-MWNT junctions, and compare the CNT-CNT junctions with graphene-graphene junctions. The results show that for CNTs with the diameter of a few nanometers, the total ITCs first decrease and then stabilize with the increase of the number of walls, mainly due to the changes of mechanical strength and adhesive energy. Increasing the CNT diameter leads to a larger total ITC and it is mainly due to a larger contact area. The area normalized ITC of CNT-CNT junctions increases and then saturates with the number of walls, and it behaves non-monotonically with the diameter. Furthermore, a trapezoidal model of multi-layer graphene-graphene junctions is used to explain the number of wall dependence of ITC. We also find that with the same adhesive energy, total ITCs of CNT-CNT junctions and graphene-graphene junctions are similar, which allows us to roughly estimate ITCs of CNT-CNT junctions without performing numerical simulations.

  10. Equilibrium capillary forces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, J; Besseling, N A M; Leermakers, F A M; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2007-09-07

    We present measurements of equilibrium forces resulting from capillary condensation. The results give access to the ultralow interfacial tensions between the capillary bridge and the coexisting bulk phase. We demonstrate this with solutions of associative polymers and an aqueous mixture of gelatin and dextran, with interfacial tensions around 10 microN/m. The equilibrium nature of the capillary forces is attributed to the combination of a low interfacial tension and a microscopic confinement geometry, based on nucleation and growth arguments.

  11. Limiting amplitudes of fully nonlinear interfacial tides and solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Gerkema, Theo

    2016-08-01

    A new two-fluid layer model consisting of forced rotation-modified Boussinesq equations is derived for studying tidally generated fully nonlinear, weakly nonhydrostatic dispersive interfacial waves. This set is a generalization of the Choi-Camassa equations, extended here with forcing terms and Coriolis effects. The forcing is represented by a horizontally oscillating sill, mimicking a barotropic tidal flow over topography. Solitons are generated by a disintegration of the interfacial tide. Because of strong nonlinearity, solitons may attain a limiting table-shaped form, in accordance with soliton theory. In addition, we use a quasi-linear version of the model (i.e. including barotropic advection but linear in the baroclinic fields) to investigate the role of the initial stages of the internal tide prior to its nonlinear disintegration. Numerical solutions reveal that the internal tide then reaches a limiting amplitude under increasing barotropic forcing. In the fully nonlinear regime, numerical experiments suggest that this limiting amplitude in the underlying internal tide extends to the nonlinear case in that internal solitons formed by a disintegration of the internal tide may not reach their table-shaped form with increased forcing, but appear limited well below that state.

  12. Addition of Electrostatic Forces to EDEM with Applications to Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos; Curry, David

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carryout experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM Tm, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. In this paper we will present overview of the theoretical calculations and experimental data and their comparison to the results of the DEM simulations. We will also discuss current plans to revise the DEM software with advanced electrodynamic and mechanical algorithms.

  13. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  14. Environmental Assessment: Construct a CDC Main Entry Addition at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    North Dakota. Purpose and Need: The purpose of the proposed action is to construct an addition to the northeast end of the Child Development Center...families. There is a companion proposal to repair the administrative support area in the northeast end of the Child Development Center (CDC), Bldg...action is to construct an addition to the northeast end of the Child Development Center (CDC), Building 168 at 1683 J St. The addition will provide

  15. SEI Formation and Interfacial Stability of a Si Electrode in a LiTDI-Salt Based Electrolyte with FEC and VC Additives for Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Fredrik; Xu, Chao; Niedzicki, Leszek; Marcinek, Marek; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Björefors, Fredrik; Edström, Kristina; Younesi, Reza

    2016-06-22

    An electrolyte based on the new salt, lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)imidazolide (LiTDI), is evaluated in combination with nano-Si composite electrodes for potential use in Li-ion batteries. The additives fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) and vinylene carbonate (VC) are also added to the electrolyte to enable an efficient SEI formation. By employing hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), the SEI formation and the development of the active material is probed during the first 100 cycles. With this electrolyte formulation, the Si electrode can cycle at 1200 mAh g(-1) for more than 100 cycles at a coulombic efficiency of 99%. With extended cycling, a decrease in Si particle size is observed as well as an increase in silicon oxide amount. As opposed to LiPF6 based electrolytes, this electrolyte or its decomposition products has no side reactions with the active Si material. The present results further acknowledge the positive effects of SEI forming additives. It is suggested that polycarbonates and a high LiF content are favorable components in the SEI over other kinds of carbonates formed by ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) decomposition. This work thus confirms that LiTDI in combination with the investigated additives is a promising salt for Si electrodes in future Li-ion batteries.

  16. Mechanobiology of interfacial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Preziosi, L.; Maugin, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    A multiscale analysis integrating biomechanics and mechanobiology is today required for deciphering the crosstalk between biochemistry, geometry and elasticity in living materials. In this paper we derive a unified thermomechanical theory coupling growth processes with mass transport phenomena across boundaries and/or material interfaces. Inside a living system made by two contiguous bodies with varying volumes, an interfacial growth mechanism is considered to force fast but continuous variations of the physical fields inside a narrow volume across the material interface. Such a phenomenon is modelled deriving homogenized surface fields on a growing non-material discontinuity, possibly including a singular edge line. A number of balance laws is derived for imposing the conservation of the thermomechanical properties of the biological system. From thermodynamical arguments we find that the normal displacement of the non-material interface is governed by the jump of a new form of material mechanical-energy flux, also involving the kinetic energies and the mass fluxes. Furthermore, the configurational balance indicates that the surface Eshelby tensor is the tangential stress measure driving the material inhomogeneities on the non-material interface. Accordingly, stress-dependent evolution laws for bulk and interfacial growth processes are derived for both volume and surface fields. The proposed thermomechanical theory is finally applied to three biological system models. The first two examples are focused on stress-free growth problems, concerning the morphogenesis of animal horns and of seashells. The third application finally deals with the stress-driven surface evolution of avascular tumours with heterogeneous structures. The results demonstrate that the proposed theory can successfully model those biological systems where growth and mass transport phenomena interact at different length-scales. Coupling biological, mechanical and geometrical factors, the proposed

  17. Surface Interaction of Water-in-Oil Emulsion Droplets with Interfacially Active Asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Zhang, Ling; Xie, Lei; Lu, Xi; Liu, Qingxia; He, Jiajun; Mantilla, Cesar A; Van den Berg, Frans G A; Zeng, Hongbo

    2017-02-07

    Adsorption of interfacially active components at the water/oil interface plays critical roles in determining the properties and behaviors of emulsion droplets. In this study, the droplet probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique was applied, for the first time, to quantitatively study the interaction mechanism between water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion droplets with interfacially adsorbed asphaltenes. The behaviors and stability of W/O emulsion droplets were demonstrated to be significantly influenced by the asphaltene concentration of organic solution where the emulsions were aged, aging time, force load, contact time, and solvent type. Bare water droplets could readily coalesce with each other in oil (i.e., toluene), while interfacially adsorbed asphaltenes could sterically inhibit droplet coalescence and induce interfacial adhesion during separation of the water droplets. For low asphaltene concentration cases, the adhesion increased with increasing asphaltene concentration (≤100 mg/L), but it significantly decreased at relatively high asphaltene concentration (e.g., 500 mg/L). Experiments in Heptol (i.e., mixture of toluene and heptane) showed that the addition of a poor solvent for asphaltenes (e.g., heptane) could enhance the interfacial adhesion between emulsion droplets at relatively low asphaltene concentration but could weaken the adhesion at relatively high asphaltene concentration. This work has quantified the interactions between W/O emulsion droplets with interfacially adsorbed asphaltenes, and the results provide useful implications into the stabilization mechanisms of W/O emulsions in oil production. The methodology in this work can be readily extended to other W/O emulsion systems with interfacially active components.

  18. Interfacial Phenomena in Al/Al, Al/Cu, and Cu/Cu Joints Soldered Using an Al-Zn Alloy with Ag or Cu Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pstruś, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The studies of soldered joints were carried out in systems: Al/solder/Al, Al/solder/Cu, Cu/solder/Cu, where the solder was (Al-Zn)EUT, (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Ag and (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Cu addition. Brazing was performed at 500 °C for 3 min. The EDS analysis indicated that the composition of the layers starting from the Cu pad was CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4, respectively. Wetting tests were performed at 500 °C for 3, 8, 15, and 30 min, respectively. Thickness of the layers and their kinetics of growth were measured based on the SEM micrographs. The formation of interlayers was not observed from the side of Al pads. On the contrary, dissolution of the Al substrate and migration of Al-rich particles into the bulk of the solder were observed.

  19. Numerical analysis of a deep drawing process with additional force transmission for an extension of the process limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.; Vucetic, M.

    2017-02-01

    By sheet metal forming processes the forming limits and part characteristics are defined through the process specific loads. In deep drawing processes the maximum deep draw ratios as well as the springback behaviour of the metal parts are depending on the stress distribution in the part material during the forming process. While exceeding the load limits, a failure in the material occurs, which can be avoided by additional force transmission activated in the deep drawing process before the forming limit of material is achieved. This contribution deals with numerical investigation of process effect caused by additional force transmission regarding the extension of the process limits. Here, the steel material HCT 600X+Z (1.0941) in thickness s 0 = 1.0 mm is analyzed numerically using the anisotropic model Hill48. This model is validated by the means of cup test by Swift. Both, the FEA of conventional and forming process with additional force transmission are carried out. The numerical results are compared with reference geometry of rectangle cup.

  20. A Delphi Study of Additive Manufacturing Applicability for United States Air Force Civil Engineer Contingency Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    This simple process is the basis for most consumer-grade desktop AM machines, commonly known as 3D printers (Pham & Gault, 1998:1270). Material...as a single purchase to decrease initial capital costs. Once the 3D printers are purchased and delivered, the selected bases can begin training...for several Questions if you would liKe to explain or elaborate on your answers. Additional information •out 3D printers and UTCs is provided as an

  1. A Comparative Kirkwood-Buff Study of Aqueous Methanol Solutions Modeled by the CHARMM Additive and Drude Polarizable Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; He, Xibing; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study on aqueous methanol solutions modeled by the CHARMM additive and Drude polarizable force fields was carried out by employing Kirkwood-Buff analysis. It was shown that both models reproduced the experimental Kirkwood-Buff integrals and excess coordination numbers adequately well over the entire concentration range. The Drude model showed significant improvement over the additive model in solution densities, partial molar volumes, excess molar volumes, concentration-dependent diffusion constants, and dielectric constants. However, the additive model performed somewhat better than the Drude model in reproducing the activity derivative, excess molar Gibbs energy and excess molar enthalpy of mixing. This is due to the additive achieving a better balance among solute-solute, solute-solvent, and solvent-solvent interactions, indicating the potential for improvements in the Drude polarizable alcohol model. PMID:23947568

  2. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; ...

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. he effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. he coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x≤1.5). he maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5 MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2 MGOe forx=1.5. he smallest domain size with a relatively short magnetic correlation length of 128 nm and largest root-mean-square phase shiftΦrmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. he optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  3. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  4. Lessons Learned at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Entry into Force of the U.S. Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Shauna A. Hoiland

    2009-07-01

    For a number of years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been preparing for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol (AP). These preparations included attending training, participating in tabletop exercises, preparing draft declarations, developing INL-specific guidance documents, preparing for and hosting a mock complementary access visit, and preparing declarations for official submittal. All of these activities, the training materials, and software developed by other U.S. DOE national laboratories (PNNL, ORNL, LANL, and BNL) were very helpful in preparing for the entry into force of the AP. As with any endeavor of this size and complexity, however, there are always instances where even the best preparations and advanced planning do not anticipate every challenge. As the DOE's lead nuclear energy research and development facility, the INL faced many unique challenges. The majority of research conducted at the INL is nuclear fuel cycle related, most of which is not protected by the National Security Exclusion. This paper describes the lessons learned from the INL’s experience of preparing for the entry into force of the AP, specifically how translating and implementing general principles into actual activities proved to be one of many challenges, and provides general suggestions on how to respond effectively and efficiently to routine annual data calls and other AP requests.

  5. Resonance scattering and radiation force calculations for an elastic cylinder using the translational addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-09-15

    The standard Resonance Scattering Theory (RST) of plane waves is extended for the case of any two-dimensional (2D) arbitrarily-shaped monochromatic beam incident upon an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location using an exact methodology based on Graf’s translational addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions. The analysis is exact as it does not require numerical integration procedures. The formulation is valid for any cylinder of finite size and material that is immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) for the incident, internal and scattered linear pressure fields are derived, and the analysis is further extended to obtain generalized expressions for the on-axis and off-axis acoustic radiation force components. The wave-fields are expressed using generalized PWSEs involving the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) and the scattering coefficients of the cylinder. The off-axial BSCs are expressed analytically in terms of an infinite PWSE with emphasis on the translational offset distance d. Numerical computations are considered for a zeroth-order quasi-Gaussian beam chosen as an example to illustrate the analysis. Acoustic resonance scattering directivity diagrams are calculated by subtracting an appropriate background from the expression of the scattered pressure field. In addition, computations for the radiation force exerted on an elastic cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of the beam, and shifted off-axially are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Change in surface properties of Microthrix parvicella upon addition of polyaluminium chloride as characterized by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hamit-Eminovski, Jildiz; Eskilsson, Krister; Arnebrant, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella causes severe separation and foaming problems at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). An effective control of the bacterium in activated sludge WWTPs can be accomplished by dosage with polyaluminium chloride (PAX-14). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether addition of PAX-14 affects surface properties such as the hydrophobicity of the bacterium and to study the exopolymers of M. parvicella that host surface-associated enzymes. To this end, force measurements by atomic force microscopy were carried out to measure the interactions between hydrophilic and hydrophobized tips and the bacterium surface. Addition of PAX-14 caused no changes in the hydrophobicity of the bacterium surface but the data indicate that it collapsed the polymeric layer likely due to electrostatic screening. It is concluded that the collapse of the polymeric layer may affect the transport of substrates (eg free fatty acids) to the bacterium and hence the competitiveness of M. parvicella compared to the other bacteria present in activated sludge.

  7. Measuring air-water interfacial areas with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Peng, Sheng; Schnaar, Gregory; Murao, Asami

    2007-03-15

    Air-water interfacial areas as a function of water saturation were measured for a sandy, natural porous medium using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. In addition, interfacial areas measured in a prior study with the gas-phase interfacial partitioning tracer-test method for the same porous medium were included for comparison. For all three methods, total air-water interfacial areas increased with decreasing water saturation. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer-test methods were generally larger than those obtained from microtomography, and the disparity increased as water saturation decreased. The interfacial areas measured by microtomography extrapolated to a value (147 cm(-1)) very similar to the specific solid surface area (151 cm(-1)) calculated using the smooth-sphere assumption, indicating that the method does not characterize the area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity (surface roughness, microporosity). This is consistent with the method resolution of approximately 12 microm. In contrast, the interfacial areas measured with the gas-phase tracer tests approached the N2/BET measured specific solid surface area (56000 cm(-1)), indicating that this method does characterize the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. The largest interfacial area measured with the aqueous-phase tracer tests was 224 cm(-1), while the extrapolated maximum interfacial area was approximately 1100 cm(-1). Both of these values are larger than the smooth-sphere specific solid surface area but much smaller than the N2/BET specific solid surface area, which suggests that the method measures a limited portion of the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. All three methods provide measures of total (capillary + film) interfacial area, a primary difference being that the film-associated area is a smooth-surface equivalent for the

  8. Examination of humidity effects on measured thickness and interfacial phenomena of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide via amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jinkins, K.; Farina, L.; Wu, Y.; Camacho, J.

    2015-12-14

    The properties of Few-Layer Graphene (FLG) change with the number of layers and Amplitude Modulation (AM) Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is commonly used to determine the thickness of FLG. However, AFM measurements have been shown to be sensitive to environmental conditions such as relative humidity (RH). In the present study, AM-AFM is used to measure the thickness and loss tangent of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) as RH is increased from 10% to 80%. We show that the measured thickness of graphene is dependent on RH. The loss tangent values of the graphene and oxide regions are both affected by humidity, with generally higher loss tangent for graphene than SiO{sub 2}. As RH increases, we observe the loss tangent of both materials approaches the same value. We hypothesize that there is a layer of water trapped between the graphene and SiO{sub 2} substrate to explain this observation. Using this interpretation, the loss tangent images also indicate movement and change in this trapped water layer as RH increases, which impacts the measured thickness of graphene using AM-AFM.

  9. Repeated forced swim stress has additive effects in anxiety behavior and in cathecolamine levels of adult rats exposed to deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Habr, Soraya F; Macrini, Daclé J; Florio, Jorge C; Bernardi, Maria M

    2014-01-01

    Deltamethrin (DTM) is a type II pyrethroid insecticide that elicits autonomic and neuroendocrine responses that indicate high levels of stress, presumably caused by the neurotoxic effect of the insecticide. This study investigated the effect of DTM exposure (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and an additional stress induced in the forced swim test (FST) in behavioral tasks related to anxiety, serum corticosterone levels, and striatal neurotransmitter levels. Open field behavior and social interaction were evaluated after DTM administration (10 mg kg(-1), p.o). DTM per se reduced rearing frequency in the open field, but no alterations in locomotion frequency or immobility duration were detected. Stress increased immobility duration compared with non-stressed animals. DTM reduced social interaction and increased corticosterone levels, and these effects were enhanced in stressed animals. Mainly stress affected dopaminergic and serotoninergic activity. In anxiety behavior and in both neurotransmitters and metabolites levels it was observed an additive effect of stress in DTM treated rat data. These results indicate that DTM enhanced the anxiogenic responses and stress had an additive effect over the DTM stress. The neurochemical data did not indicate an interaction between stress and DTM exposure. The present results maybe important for implementing pyrethroid insecticide safety standards.

  10. Functionalization enhancement on interfacial shear strength between graphene and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yikuang; Duan, Fangli; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-11-01

    Pull-out processes were simulated to investigate the interfacial mechanical properties between the functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) and polyethylene (PE) matrix by using molecular dynamics simulation with ReaxFF reactive force field. The interfacial structure of polymer and the interfacial interaction in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems were also analyzed to reveal the enhancement mechanism of interfacial shear strength. We observed the insertion of functional groups into polymer layer in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems. During the pull-out process, some interfacial chains were attached on the FGS and pulled out from the polymer matrix. The behavior of these pulled out chains was further analyzed to clarify the different traction action of functional groups applied on them. The results show that the traction effect of functional groups on the pulled-out chains is agreement with their enhancement influence on the interfacial shear strength of the FGS/PE systems. They both are basically dominated by the size of functional groups, suggesting the enhancement mechanism of mechanical interlocking. However, interfacial binding strength also exhibits an obvious influence on the interfacial shear properties of the hybrid system. Our simulation show that geometric constrains at the interface is the principal contributor to the enhancement of interfacial shear strength in the FGS/PE systems, which could be further strengthened by the wrinkled morphology of graphene in experiments.

  11. Study of polymeric additive effect on calcium oxalate dihydrate crystal growth using real-time atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Taesung; Kim, Jong-Nam; Kim, Woo-Sik; Kyun Choi, Chang

    2011-07-01

    Microscopic events associated with crystal growth and characterization of the growth hillocks on the (1 0 0) and (1 0 1) faces of COD were examined by atomic force microscopy. The (1 0 0) and (1 0 1) faces of COD developed elliptical and triangular hillocks and pits, respectively. Each face exhibited hillocks with step sites that can be assigned to specific crystal planes, enabling direct determination of the growth rates along specific crystallographic directions. The addition of macromolecules with anionic side chains, poly- L-aspartate, poly- L-glutamate, and polyacrylate resulted in inhibition of growth on the hillock step planes. The magnitude of their effect depended on the macromolecule structures and identity of the step site. The isotropic shape of the COD hillocks mimicked the shape of the resulting macroscopic COD crystals based on step-specific binding of the macromolecules to the COD crystal, with stronger step pinning along the [0 1 0] direction than in the [0 0 1] direction. Electrostatic matching between the crystal faces and additives according to the ionic array of calcium oxalate in the COD structure was found to be responsible for the preferential binding of the macromolecules to terraces.

  12. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  13. Interfacial free energy adjustable phase field crystal model for homogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Huang, Yunhao

    2016-05-18

    To describe the homogeneous nucleation process, an interfacial free energy adjustable phase-field crystal model (IPFC) was proposed by reconstructing the energy functional of the original phase field crystal (PFC) methodology. Compared with the original PFC model, the additional interface term in the IPFC model effectively can adjust the magnitude of the interfacial free energy, but does not affect the equilibrium phase diagram and the interfacial energy anisotropy. The IPFC model overcame the limitation that the interfacial free energy of the original PFC model is much less than the theoretical results. Using the IPFC model, we investigated some basic issues in homogeneous nucleation. From the viewpoint of simulation, we proceeded with an in situ observation of the process of cluster fluctuation and obtained quite similar snapshots to colloidal crystallization experiments. We also counted the size distribution of crystal-like clusters and the nucleation rate. Our simulations show that the size distribution is independent of the evolution time, and the nucleation rate remains constant after a period of relaxation, which are consistent with experimental observations. The linear relation between logarithmic nucleation rate and reciprocal driving force also conforms to the steady state nucleation theory.

  14. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  15. Interfacial bonding stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial bonding stability by in situ ellipsometry was investigated. It is found that: (1) gamma MPS is an effective primer for bonding ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) to aluminum; (2) ellipsometry is an effective in situ technique for monitoring the stability of polymer/metal interfaces; (3) the aluminized back surface of silicon wafers contain significant amounts of silicon and may have glass like properties.

  16. Modulation of organic interfacial spin polarization by interfacial angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Guang-ping; Ren, Jun-feng; Wang, Chuan-kui; Hu, Gui-chao

    2017-01-01

    Based on ab initio theory, we theoretically investigated the interfacial spin polarization by adsorbing a benzene-dithiolate molecule onto a nickel surface with different interfacial angles. A variable magnitude and even an inversion of the interfacial spin polarization are observed with the increase of the interfacial angle. The orbital analysis shows that the interfacial spin polarization is codetermined by two kinds of orbital hybridization between the molecule and the ferromagnet, the pz-d hybridization and the sp3-d hybridization, which show different dependence on the angle. These results indicate a new way to manipulate the spin polarization at organic spinterface.

  17. Specific effects of Ca2+ ions and molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin interfacial layers that drive macroscopic foam stability† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sm00636a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Zachau, Felix; Nagel, Eva; Engelhardt, Kathrin; Stoyanov, Stefan; Gochev, Georgi; Khristov, Khr.; Mileva, Elena; Exerowa, Dotchi; Miller, Reinhard; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) adsorption layers at air–water interfaces were studied in situ with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG), tensiometry, surface dilatational rheology and ellipsometry as a function of bulk Ca2+ concentration. The relation between the interfacial molecular structure of adsorbed BLG and the interactions with the supporting electrolyte is additionally addressed on higher length scales along the foam hierarchy – from the ubiquitous air–water interface through thin foam films to macroscopic foam. For concentrations <1 mM, a strong decrease in SFG intensity from O–H stretching bands and a slight increase in layer thickness and surface pressure are observed. A further increase in Ca2+ concentrations above 1 mM causes an apparent change in the polarity of aromatic C–H stretching vibrations from interfacial BLG which we associate to a charge reversal at the interface. Foam film measurements show formation of common black films at Ca2+ concentrations above 1 mM due to considerable decrease of the stabilizing electrostatic disjoining pressure. These observations also correlate with a minimum in macroscopic foam stability. For concentrations >30 mM Ca2+, micrographs of foam films show clear signatures of aggregates which tend to increase the stability of foam films. Here, the interfacial layers have a higher surface dilatational elasticity. In fact, macroscopic foams formed from BLG dilutions with high Ca2+ concentrations where aggregates and interfacial layers with higher elasticity are found, showed the highest stability with much smaller bubble sizes. PMID:27337699

  18. Interfacial phenomena and microscale transport processes in evaporating ultrathin menisci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchamgam, Sashidhar S.

    The study of interfacial phenomena in the three-phase contact line region, where a liquid-vapor interface intersects a solid surface, is of importance to many equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes. However, lack of experimental data on microscale transport processes controlled by interfacial phenomena has restricted progress. This thesis includes a high resolution image analyzing technique, based on reflectivity measurements, that accurately measures the thickness, contact angle and curvature profiles of ultrathin films, drops and curved menisci. In particular, the technique was used to emphasize measurements for thicknesses, delta < 100 nm, while studying delta < 2.5 mum. Using the "reflectivity technique", we studied fluid flow and heat transfer in a wickless, miniature heat pipe, a device which will be a very effective passive heat exchanger in a microgravity environment. The heat pipe is based on the Vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble (VCVB) concept. The broad objective was to increase the efficiency of the miniature heat pipe by enhancing the liquid flow towards the hotter region. This was achieved by understanding and manipulating the wetting and spreading characteristics of the liquid on the solid surface. By using a binary mixture (98% pentane and 2% octane by volume) instead of either pure pentane or octane, we were able to achieve a significant increase in the microscale phase change heat transfer. The experimental work was supported by numerical studies to understand the physics of the system at microscopic scale. In addition, using the reflectivity technique, we enhanced our understanding of interfacial phenomena in the contact line region. Experiments included flow instabilities in HFE-7000 meniscus on quartz (System S1), the spreading of a pentane (System S2 and S3), octane (System S4) and binary mixture menisci (System S5) during evaporation. The main objectives of the work are to present a new experimental technique, new observations, new data

  19. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  20. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  1. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  2. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  3. Curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatskiy, K. S.; Bedeaux, D.

    2014-03-01

    Nucleation is often accompanied by heat transfer between the surroundings and a nucleus of a new phase. The interface between two phases gives an additional resistance to this transfer. For small nuclei the interfacial curvature is high, which affects not only equilibrium quantities such as surface tension, but also the transport properties. In particular, high curvature affects the interfacial resistance to heat and mass transfer. We develop a framework for determining the curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer resistances. We determine the interfacial resistances as a function of a curvature. The analysis is performed for a bubble of a one-component fluid and may be extended to various nuclei of multicomponent systems. The curvature dependence of the interfacial resistances is important in modeling transport processes in multiphase systems.

  4. Nanomechanical Sensing of Biological Interfacial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wenjian

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. Cellulase is an enzyme capable of converting insoluble cellulose into soluble sugars. Cellulosic biofuel produced from such fermentable simple sugars is a promising substitute as an energy source. However, its economic feasibility is limited by the low efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase. Cellulose is insoluble and resistant to enzymatic degradation, not only because the beta-1,4-glycosidic bonds are strong covalent bonds, but also because cellulose microfibrils are packed into tightly bound, crystalline lattices. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase involves three steps--initial binding, decrystallization, and hydrolytic cleavage. Currently, the mechanism for the decrystallization has not yet been elucidated, though it is speculated to be the rate-limiting step of the overall enzymatic activity. The major technical challenge limiting the understanding of the decrystallization is the lack of an effective experimental approach capable of examining the decrystallization, an interfacial enzymatic activity on solid substrates. The work presented develops a nanomechanical sensing approach to investigate both the decrystallization and enzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cellulose. The first experimental evidence of the decrystallization is obtained by comparing the results from native cellulase and non-hydrolytic cellulase. Surface topography has been applied to examine the activities of native cellulase and non-hydrolytic cellulase on cellulose substrate. The study demonstrates additional experimental evidence of the decrystallization in the hydrolysis of cellulose. By combining simulation and monitoring technology, the current study also investigates the structural changes of cellulose at a molecular level. In particular, the study employs cellulose nanoparticles with a bilayer structure on mica sheets. By comparing results from a molecular dynamic simulation and the distance

  5. A nanoscale study of charge extraction in organic solar cells: the impact of interfacial molecular configurations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fu-Ching; Wu, Fu-Chiao; Yen, Chia-Te; Chang, Jay; Chou, Wei-Yang; Gilbert Chang, Shih-Hui; Cheng, Horng-Long

    2015-01-07

    In the optimization of organic solar cells (OSCs), a key problem lies in the maximization of charge carriers from the active layer to the electrodes. Hence, this study focused on the interfacial molecular configurations in efficient OSC charge extraction by theoretical investigations and experiments, including small molecule-based bilayer-heterojunction (sm-BLHJ) and polymer-based bulk-heterojunction (p-BHJ) OSCs. We first examined a well-defined sm-BLHJ model system of OSC composed of p-type pentacene, an n-type perylene derivative, and a nanogroove-structured poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (NS-PEDOT) hole extraction layer. The OSC with NS-PEDOT shows a 230% increment in the short circuit current density compared with that of the conventional planar PEDOT layer. Our theoretical calculations indicated that small variations in the microscopic intermolecular interaction among these interfacial configurations could induce significant differences in charge extraction efficiency. Experimentally, different interfacial configurations were generated between the photo-active layer and the nanostructured charge extraction layer with periodic nanogroove structures. In addition to pentacene, poly(3-hexylthiophene), the most commonly used electron-donor material system in p-BHJ OSCs was also explored in terms of its possible use as a photo-active layer. Local conductive atomic force microscopy was used to measure the nanoscale charge extraction efficiency at different locations within the nanogroove, thus highlighting the importance of interfacial molecular configurations in efficient charge extraction. This study enriches understanding regarding the optimization of the photovoltaic properties of several types of OSCs by conducting appropriate interfacial engineering based on organic/polymer molecular orientations. The ultimate power conversion efficiency beyond at least 15% is highly expected when the best state-of-the-art p-BHJ OSCs are combined with present arguments.

  6. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-08-07

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  7. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  8. Effects of Bi-2212 addition on the levitation force properties of bulk MgB2 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylan Koparan, E.; Savaskan, B.; Guner, S. B.; Celik, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the effects of Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8+κ (Bi-2212) adding on the levitation force and magnetic properties of bulk MgB2 obtained by hot press method. The amount of Bi-2212 was varied between 0 and 10 wt% (0, 2, 4, 6, 10 wt%) of the total MgB2. Moreover, we present MgB2 bulk samples fabricated by using different production methods including hot pressing method to our knowledge. All samples were prepared by using elemental magnesium (Mg) powder, amorphous nano-boron (B) powder and Bi-2212 powder which are produced by hot press method. As a result of hot press process, compact pellet samples were manufactured. The vertical and lateral levitation force measurements were executed at the temperatures of 20, 24 and 28 K under zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) regimes for samples with various adding levels. At 24 K and 28 K under ZFC regime, the 2 wt% Bi-2212 added sample exhibits a higher vertical levitation force than the pure sample. Bi-2212 added MgB2 samples compared to the pure sample have lower attractive force values in FC regime. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current density J c was calculated from the M-H loops for Bi-2212 added MgB2 samples. The 2 wt% Bi-2212 added sample has the best levitation and critical current density performance compared to other samples. The critical temperature ( T c ) has slightly dropped from 37.8 K for the pure MgB2 sample to 36.7 K for the 10 wt% of Bi-2212 added sample. The transition temperature slightly decreases when Bi-2212 adding level is increased.

  9. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  10. Recent Advances in Colloidal and Interfacial Phenomena Involving Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes recent advances in several areas of research involving the interfacial ordering of liquid crystals (LCs). The first advance revolves around the ordering of LCs at bio/chemically functionalized surfaces. Whereas the majority of past studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs have involved surfaces of solids that present a limited diversity of chemical functional groups (surfaces at which van der Waals forces dominate surface-induced ordering), recent studies have moved to investigate the ordering of LCs on chemically complex surfaces. For example, surfaces decorated with biomolecules (e.g. oligopeptides and proteins) and transition metal ions have been investigated, leading to an understanding of the roles that metal-ligand coordination interactions, electrical double-layers, acid-base interactions, and hydrogen bonding can have on the interfacial ordering of LCs. The opportunity to create chemically-responsive LCs capable of undergoing ordering transitions in the presence of targeted molecular events (e.g., ligand exchange around a metal center) has emerged from these fundamental studies. A second advance has focused on investigations of the ordering of LCs at interfaces with immiscible isotropic fluids, particularly water. In contrast to prior studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs on solid surfaces, LC- aqueous interfaces are deformable and molecules at these interfaces exhibit high levels of mobility and thus can reorganize in response to changes in interfacial environment. A range of fundamental investigations involving these LC-aqueous interfaces have revealed that (i) the spatial and temporal characteristics of assemblies formed from biomolecular interactions can be reported by surface-driven ordering transitions in the LCs, (ii) the interfacial phase behaviour of molecules and colloids can be coupled to (and manipulated via) the ordering (and nematic elasticity) of LCs, and (iii) confinement of LCs leads to unanticipated size

  11. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  12. Interfacial properties of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Borodin, Oleg; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2008-06-01

    The liquid-vapor interfacial properties of semifluorinated linear alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1(CH2)m-1CH3 are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical composition and the conformation of the molecules at the interface are identified and correlated with the interfacial energies. A modified form of the Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom (OPLS-AA) force field of Jorgensen and co-workers [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 106, 6638 (1984); 118, 11225 (1996); J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 4118 (2001)], which includes specific dihedral terms for H-F blocks-and corrections to the H-F nonbonded interaction, is used together with a new version of the exp-6 force field developed in this work. Both force fields yield good agreement with the available experimental liquid density and surface tension data as well as each other over significant temperature ranges and for a variety of chain lengths and compositions. The interfacial regions of semifluorinated alkanes are found to be rich in fluorinated groups compared to hydrogenated groups, an effect that decreases with increasing temperature but is independent of the fractional length of the fluorinated segments. The proliferation of fluorine at the surface substantially lowers the surface tension of the diblock copolymers, yielding values near those of perfluorinated alkanes and distinct from those of protonated alkanes of the same chain length. With decreasing temperatures within the liquid state, chains are found to preferentially align perpendicular to the interface, as previously seen.

  13. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  14. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena.

  15. Interfacial Engineering for Low-Density Graphene Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0192 Interfacial engineering for low- density graphene nanocomposites Micah Green TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY SYSTEM Final Report 07/23...98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 14-07-2014 Final April 2011 - March 2014 Interfacial engineering for low- density graphene nanocomposites and... alcohol films and electrospun fibers. The addition of pristine graphene showed substantial increases in strength and modulus at low graphene loading

  16. A CSF-SPH method for simulating drainage and imbibition at pore-scale resolution while tracking interfacial areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanesapillai, Rakulan; Falkner, Nadine; Hartmaier, Alexander; Steeb, Holger

    2016-09-01

    We present a conservative smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model to study the flow of multiple, immiscible fluid phases in porous media using direct pore-scale simulations. Particular focus is put on continuously tracking the evolution of interfacial areas, which are considered to be important morphological quantities affecting multiphase transport in porous media. In addition to solving the Navier-Stokes equations, the model accounts for the effects of capillarity at interfaces and contact lines. This is done by means of incorporating the governing interfacial mass and momentum balances using the continuum surface force (CSF) method, thus rendering model calibration routines unnecessary and minimizing the set of constitutive and kinematic assumptions. We address the application of boundary conditions at rigid solid surfaces and study the predictive capability of the model as well as optimal choices for numerical parameters using an extensive model validation procedure. We demonstrate the applicability of the model to simulate multiphase flows involving partial wettability, dynamic effects, large density ratios (up to 1000), large viscosity ratios (up to 100), as well as fragmentation and coalescence of fluid phases. The model is used to study the evolution of fluid-fluid interfacial areas during saturation-controlled primary drainage and main imbibition of heterogeneous pore spaces at low capillary numbers. A variety of pore-scale effects, such as wetting phase entrapment and fragmentation due to snap-off, are observed. Specific fluid-fluid interfacial area is observed to monotonically increase during primary drainage and hysteretic effects are apparent during main imbibition.

  17. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  18. pH gradient as an additional driving force in the renal re-absorption of phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Strévey, J; Giroux, S; Béliveau, R

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the Na+ gradient and pH on phosphate uptake were studied in brush-border membrane vesicles isolated from rat kidney cortex. The initial rates of Na(+)-dependent phosphate uptake were measured at pH 6.5, 7.5 and 8.5 in the presence of sodium gluconate. At a constant total phosphate concentration, the transport values at pH 7.5 and 8.5 were similar, but at pH 6.5 the influx was 31% of that at pH 7.5. However, when the concentration of bivalent phosphate was kept constant at all three pH values, the effect of pH was less pronounced; at pH 6.5, phosphate influx was 73% of that measured at pH 7.5. The Na(+)-dependent phosphate uptake was also influenced by a transmembrane pH difference; an outwardly directed H+ gradient stimulated the uptake by 48%, whereas an inwardly directed H+ gradient inhibited the uptake by 15%. Phosphate on the trans (intravesicular) side stimulated the Na(+)-gradient-dependent phosphate transport by 59%, 93% and 49%, and the Na(+)-gradient-independent phosphate transport by 240%, 280% and 244%, at pH 6.5, 7.5 and 8.5 respectively. However, in both cases, at pH 6.5 the maximal stimulation was seen only when the concentration of bivalent trans phosphate was the same as at pH 7.5. In the absence of a Na+ gradient, but in the presence of Na+, an outwardly directed H+ gradient provided the driving force for the transient hyperaccumulation of phosphate. The rate of uptake was dependent on the magnitude of the H+ gradient. These results indicate that: (1) the bivalent form of phosphate is the form of phosphate recognized by the carrier on both sides of the membrane; (2) protons are both activators and allosteric modulators of the phosphate carrier; (3) the combined action of both the Na+ (out/in) and H+ (in/out) gradients on the phosphate carrier contribute to regulate efficiently the re-absorption of phosphate. PMID:2244874

  19. Transport processes and interfacial phenomena in an evaporating meniscus

    SciTech Connect

    Sujanani, M.; Wayner, P.C. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    When a liquid film wets a solid surface, a contact line region is formed where the vapor, liquid and solid phases are in close proximity. The film thickness in this region varies from about 10 {mu}m (Capillary Meniscus) to less than about 100 nm (Adsorbed film). In addition to being functions of temperature and pressure (as for a bulk phase), the thermodynamic properties (e.g., chemical potential) of these thin films depend on their shape (curvature) and thickness due to surface forces. The coupled transport processes and interfacial phenomena occurring in this microscopic region are also controlled by these surface forces. The objective of this paper is to report experimental data which complement earlier analytical models of this region. The experimental setup consists of a flat silicon plate partially immersed at a small angle, {theta}, in a pool of liquid. The plate is in a closed cell and a spreading liquid (1,1,2-Trichlorotrifluoro ethane), in equilibrium with its own vapor, forms a zero contact angle with the plate. The plate can be electrically heated at the upper end by supplying power to a thin, rectangular platinum heater which is painted on the backside of the silicon wafer. The meniscus thickness profile, which is related to the effective pressure in the liquid, was used as a probe for understanding the sensitivity of the meniscus to the non-equilibrium effects associated with evaporation/condensation mechanisms. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  20. An interfacial stress sensor for biomechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundara-Rajan, K.; Bestick, A.; Rowe, G. I.; Klute, G. K.; Ledoux, W. R.; Wang, H. C.; Mamishev, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a capacitive sensor that measures interfacial forces in prostheses and is promising for other biomedical applications. These sensors can be integrated into prosthetic devices to measure both normal and shear stress simultaneously, allowing for the study of prosthetic limb fit, and ultimately for the ability to better adapt prosthetics to individual users. A sensing cell with a 1.0 cm2 spatial resolution and a measurement range of 0-220 kPa of shear and 0-2 MPa of pressure was constructed. The cell was load tested and found to be capable of isolating the applied shear and pressure forces. This paper discusses the construction of the prototype, the mechanical and electrode design, fabrication and characterization. The work presented is aimed at creating a class of adaptive prosthetic interfaces using a capacitive sensor.

  1. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  2. Role of the elasticity of pharmaceutical materials on the interfacial mechanical strength of bilayer tablets.

    PubMed

    Busignies, Virginie; Mazel, Vincent; Diarra, Harona; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2013-11-30

    The effect of the elasticity of various pharmaceutical materials on the interfacial adhesion in bilayer tablets was investigated. The elastic properties of five pharmaceutical products were characterized by their total elastic recovery. To test the interfacial strength of the bilayer tablets a new flexural test was proposed. Thanks to the test configuration, the experimental breaking force is directly correlated with the interfacial layer strength. Depending on the materials, the fracture occurred over the interface or in one of the two layers. In most cases, the highest breaking forces were obtained when the materials had close elastic recovery. On the contrary, for materials with different elastic recovery, the breaking forces were reduced. The observed changes in the interfacial mechanical strength were statistically analyzed. Such an approach has an importance in the growing interest in the Quality by Design (QbD) concept in pharmaceutical industry.

  3. Interfacial Structure, Thermodynamics, and Electrostatics of Aqueous Methanol Solutions via Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using Charge Equilibration Models

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sandeep; Zhong, Yang; Bauer, Brad A.; Davis, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from molecular dynamics simulations of methanol-water solutions using charge equilibration force fields to explicitly account for non-additive electronic interaction contributions to the potential energy. We study solutions across the concentration range from 0.1 to 0.9 methanol mole fraction. At dilute concentrations, methanol density is enhanced at the liquid-vapor interface, consistent with previous molecular dynamics and experimental studies. Interfacial thickness exhibits a monotonic increase with increasing methanol mole fraction, while surface tensions display monotonic decrease with methanol concentration, in qualitative agreement with experimental data and previous molecular dynamics predictions using polarizable force fields. In terms of interfacial structure, in keeping with predictions of traditional force fields, there is a unique preferential orientation of methanol molecules at the interface. Moreover, there is a free energetic preference for methanol molecules at the interface as evidenced by potential of mean force calculations. The pmf calculations suggest an interfacial state with 0.8 kcal/mole stability relative to the bulk, again, in qualitative agreement with previous simulation and experimental studies. Interfacial potentials based on double integration of total charge density range from −610 mV to −330 mV over the dilute to concentrated regimes, respectively. The preponderance of methanol at the interface at all mole fractions gives rise to a dominant methanol contribution to the total interfacial potential. Interestingly, there is a transition of the water surface potential contribution from negative to positive upon the transition from methanol mole fraction of 0.1 to 0.2. The dipole and quadrupole contributions to the water component of the total interfacial potential are effectively of equal magnitude and opposite sign, thus canceling one another. We compute the in-plane component of the dielectric permittivity

  4. Model colloid system for interfacial sorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salipante, Paul; Hudson, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption kinetics of nanometer scale molecules, such as proteins at interfaces, is usually determined through measurements of surface coverage. Their small size limits the ability to directly observe individual molecule behavior. To better understand the behavior of nanometer size molecules and the effect on interfacial kinetics, we use micron size colloids with a weak interfacial interaction potential as a model system. Thus, the interaction strength is comparable to many nanoscale systems (less than 10 kBT). The colloid-interface interaction potential is tuned using a combination of depletion, electrostatic, and gravitational forces. The colloids transition between an entropically trapped adsorbed state and a desorbed state through Brownian motion. Observations are made using an LED-based Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (TIRM) setup. The observed adsorption and desorption rates are compared theoretical predictions based on the measured interaction potential and near wall particle diffusivity. This experimental system also allows for the study of more complex dynamics such as nonspherical colloids and collective effects at higher concentrations.

  5. Comparison of fluid-fluid interfacial areas measured with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests for the same samples: COMPARISON OF FLUID-FLUID INTERFACIAL AREAS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure nonwetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ~5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  6. A Thermodynamic Study of Dopant Interfacial Segregation Effect on Nanostability and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Longjia

    Nanoparticles, with great surface area and high surface to volume ratio, have been widely applied in many applications due to their unique size related effects. However, this high surface area character of nanoparticles also brings great excess energy to the whole system, making the system unstable and even causing the failure of nanoparticles, especially at higher temperatures. In order to maintain nanocrystalline structure of the materials, nanostability enhancement is of great significance in nanotechnology. It is well known that the global driving force for particles growth is to eliminate the excess energy brought by surface and grain boundary. Therefore, interfacial energetics has a great influence on the nanostability of the materials. And according to previous studies, dopant interfacial segregation could be a potential way to control the interfacial energetics of the nanoparticles and possibly lead to an improved nanostability. Furthermore, the interfacial energetics even can affect mechanical properties of nano-grain ceramic materials based on recent research. The main goals of the present work were to experimentally measure the interfacial energies of nanoparticles as well as nano-grain ceramics, modify the interfacial energetics through dopant segregation effect and engineer the nanostability and mechanical properties of the nanocrystalline materials through interfacial energetics modification. To achieve this goal, Mn cation has been chosen to introduce Mn interfacial segregation on ceria nanoparticles, and La cation has been added to 12 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (12YSZ) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MAO) two-phase nano-grain ceramics to cause La interfacial segregation. Both of the dopant segregation phenomena were directly proved by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). To quantify the dopant segregation effect on the interfacial energies, high-temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry, water adsorption calorimetry and differential

  7. Mathematical problems arising in interfacial electrohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseluiko, Dmitri

    established estimates are compared with numerical solutions of the equations which in turn suggest an optimal upper bound for the radius of the absorbing ball. A scaling argument is used to explain this, and a general conjecture is made based on extensive computations. We also carry out a complete study of the nonlinear behavior of competing physical mechanisms: long wave instability above a critical Reynolds number, short wave damping due to surface tension and intermediate growth due to the electric field. Through a combination of analysis and extensive numerical experiments, we elucidate parameter regimes that support non-uniform travelling waves, time-periodic travelling waves and complex nonlinear dynamics including chaotic interfacial oscillations. It is established that a sufficiently high electric field will drive the system to chaotic oscillations, even when the Reynolds number is smaller than the critical value below which the non-electrified problem is linearly stable. A particular case of this is Stokes flow, which is known to be stable for this class of problems (an analogous statement holds for horizontally supported films also). Our theoretical results indicate that such highly stable flows can be rendered unstable by using electric fields. This opens the way for possible heat and mass transfer applications which can benefit significantly from interfacial oscillations and interfacial turbulence. For the case of a horizontal plane, a weakly nonlinear theory is not possible due to the absence of the shear flow generated by the gravitational force along the plate when the latter is inclined. We study the fully nonlinear equation, which in this case is asymptotically correct and is obtained at the leading order. The model equation describes both overlying and hanging films - in the former case gravity is stabilizing while in the latter it is destabilizing. The numerical and theoretical analysis of the fully nonlinear evolution is complicated by the fact that the

  8. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  9. Comparison of fluid-fluid interfacial areas measured with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests for the same samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure nonwetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ˜5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  10. Compound pendant drop tensiometry for interfacial tension measurement at zero bond number.

    PubMed

    Neeson, Michael J; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2014-12-30

    A widely used method to determine the interfacial tension between fluids is to quantify the pendant drop shape that is determined by gravity and interfacial tension forces. Failure of this method for small drops or small fluid density differences is a critical limitation in microfluidic applications and when only small fluid samples are available. By adding a small spherical particle to the interface to apply an axisymmetric deformation, both the particle density and the interfacial tension can be simultaneously and precisely determined, providing an accurate and elegant solution to a long-standing problem.

  11. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  12. Interfacial thermal degradation in inverted organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbank, William; Hirsch, Lionel; Wantz, Guillaume; Chambon, Sylvain

    2015-12-01

    The efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells is constantly improving; however, the lifetime of the devices still requires significant improvement if the potential of OPV is to be realised. In this study, several series of inverted OPV were fabricated and thermally aged in the dark in an inert atmosphere. It was demonstrated that all of the devices undergo short circuit current-driven degradation, which is assigned to morphology changes in the active layer. In addition, a previously unreported, open circuit voltage-driven degradation mechanism was observed that is highly material specific and interfacial in origin. This mechanism was specifically observed in devices containing MoO3 and silver as hole transporting layers and electrode materials, respectively. Devices with this combination were among the worst performing devices with respect to thermal ageing. The physical origins of this mechanism were explored by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy and an increase in roughness with thermal ageing was observed that may be partially responsible for the ageing mechanism.

  13. Interfacial thermal degradation in inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbank, William; Hirsch, Lionel; Wantz, Guillaume; Chambon, Sylvain

    2015-12-28

    The efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells is constantly improving; however, the lifetime of the devices still requires significant improvement if the potential of OPV is to be realised. In this study, several series of inverted OPV were fabricated and thermally aged in the dark in an inert atmosphere. It was demonstrated that all of the devices undergo short circuit current-driven degradation, which is assigned to morphology changes in the active layer. In addition, a previously unreported, open circuit voltage-driven degradation mechanism was observed that is highly material specific and interfacial in origin. This mechanism was specifically observed in devices containing MoO{sub 3} and silver as hole transporting layers and electrode materials, respectively. Devices with this combination were among the worst performing devices with respect to thermal ageing. The physical origins of this mechanism were explored by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy and an increase in roughness with thermal ageing was observed that may be partially responsible for the ageing mechanism.

  14. Characterisation of the interaction of lactate dehydrogenase with Tween-20 using isothermal titration calorimetry, interfacial rheometry and surface tension measurements.

    PubMed

    McAuley, William J; Jones, David S; Kett, Vicky L

    2009-08-01

    In this study the nature of the interaction between Tween-20 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). In addition the effects of the protein and surfactant on the interfacial properties were followed with interfacial rheology and surface tension measurements in order to understand the mechanism by which the surfactant prevents protein adsorption to the air-water interface. Comparisons were made with Tween-40 and Tween-80 in order to further investigate the mechanism. ITC measurements indicated a weak, probably hydrophobic, interaction between Tween-20 and LDH. Prevention of LDH adsorption to the air-water interface by the Tween surfactants was correlated with surface energy rather than surfactant CMC. While surface pressure appears to be the main driving force for the displacement of LDH from the air-water interface by Tween-20 a solubilisation mechanism may exist for other protein molecules. More generally the results of this study highlight the value of the use of ITC and interfacial measurements in characterising the surface behaviour of mixed surfactant and protein systems.

  15. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  16. Competition among Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ Monovalent Ions for DNA in Molecular Dynamics Simulations using the Additive CHARMM36 and Drude Polarizable Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we report on interactions of and competition between monovalent ions for two DNA sequences in MD simulations. Efforts included the development and validation of parameters for interactions among the first-group monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+, and DNA in the Drude polarizable and additive CHARMM36 force fields (FF). The optimization process targeted gas-phase QM interaction energies of various model compounds with ions and osmotic pressures of bulk electrolyte solutions of chemically relevant ions. The optimized ionic parameters are validated against counterion condensation theory and buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy measurements providing quantitative data on the competitive association of different monovalent ions with DNA. Comparison between experimental and MD simulation results demonstrates that, compared to the additive CHARMM36 model, the Drude FF provides an improved description of the general features of the ionic atmosphere around DNA and leads to closer agreement with experiment on the ionic competition within the ion atmosphere. Results indicate the importance of extended simulation systems on the order of 25 Å beyond the DNA surface to obtain proper convergence of ion distributions. PMID:25751286

  17. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  18. Quantitative morphological characterization of bicontinuous Pickering emulsions via interfacial curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Matthew; Stratford, Kevin; Thijssen, Job H. J.

    Bicontinuous Pickering emulsions (bijels) are a physically interesting class of soft materials with many potential applications including catalysis, microfluidics and tissue engineering. They are created by arresting the spinodal decomposition of a partially-miscible liquid with a (jammed) layer of interfacial colloids. Porosity $L$ (average interfacial separation) of the bijel is controlled by varying the radius ($r$) and volume fraction ($\\phi$) of the colloids ($L \\propto r/\\phi$). However, to optimize the bijel structure with respect to other parameters, e.g. quench rate, characterizing by $L$ alone is insufficient. Hence, we have used confocal microscopy and X-ray CT to characterize a range of bijels in terms of local and area-averaged interfacial curvatures. In addition, the curvatures of bijels have been monitored as a function of time, which has revealed an intriguing evolution up to 60 minutes after bijel formation, contrary to previous understanding.

  19. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Pande, Vijay S.; Case, David A.; Brooks, Charles L.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.

  20. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; ...

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  1. Measurement of surface and interfacial tension using pendant drop tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joseph D; Neeson, Michael J; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2015-09-15

    Pendant drop tensiometry offers a simple and elegant solution to determining surface and interfacial tension - a central parameter in many colloidal systems including emulsions, foams and wetting phenomena. The technique involves the acquisition of a silhouette of an axisymmetric fluid droplet, and iterative fitting of the Young-Laplace equation that balances gravitational deformation of the drop with the restorative interfacial tension. Since the advent of high-quality digital cameras and desktop computers, this process has been automated with high speed and precision. However, despite its beguiling simplicity, there are complications and limitations that accompany pendant drop tensiometry connected with both Bond number (the balance between interfacial tension and gravitational forces) and drop volume. Here, we discuss the process involved with going from a captured experimental image to a fitted interfacial tension value, highlighting pertinent features and limitations along the way. We introduce a new parameter, the Worthington number, Wo, to characterise the measurement precision. A fully functional, open-source acquisition and fitting software is provided to enable the reader to test and develop the technique further.

  2. Liquid metal actuation by electrical control of interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-09-01

    By combining metallic electrical conductivity with low viscosity, liquid metals and liquid metal alloys offer new and exciting opportunities to serve as reconfigurable components of electronic, microfluidic, and electromagnetic devices. Here, we review the physics and applications of techniques that utilize voltage to manipulate the interfacial tension of liquid metals; such techniques include electrocapillarity, continuous electrowetting, electrowetting-on-dielectric, and electrochemistry. These techniques lower the interfacial tension between liquid metals and a surrounding electrolyte by driving charged species (or in the case of electrochemistry, chemical species) to the interface. The techniques are useful for manipulating and actuating liquid metals at sub-mm length scales where interfacial forces dominate. We focus on metals and alloys that are liquid near or below room temperature (mercury, gallium, and gallium-based alloys). The review includes discussion of mercury—despite its toxicity—because it has been utilized in numerous applications and it offers a way of introducing several phenomena without the complications associated with the oxide layer that forms on gallium and its alloys. The review focuses on the advantages, applications, opportunities, challenges, and limitations of utilizing voltage to control interfacial tension as a method to manipulate liquid metals.

  3. Interfacial Microstructure and Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Composites Caused by Growing Generation 1-4 Dendritic Poly(amidoamine) on a Fiber Surface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Zhang, Ruliang; Gao, Fucheng; He, Maoshuai; Wang, Chengguo; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Lifen; Cui, Hongzhi

    2016-08-23

    In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites, propagation of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by in situ polymerization on a carbon fiber surface was performed. During polymerization processes, PAMAM was grafted on carbon fiber by repeated Michael addition and amidation reactions. The changes in surface microstructure and the chemical composition of carbon fibers before and after modification were investigated by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. All the results indicated that PAMAM was successfully grown on the carbon fiber surface. Such propagation could significantly increase the surface roughness and introduce sufficient polar groups onto the carbon fiber surface, enhancing the surface wettability of carbon fiber. The fractured surface of carbon fiber-reinforced composites showed a great enhancement of interfacial adhesion. Compared with those of desized fiber composites, the interlaminar shear strength and interfacial shear strength of PAMAM/fiber-reinforced composites showed increases of 55.49 and 110.94%, respectively.

  4. Elastic response of DNA molecules under the action of interfacial traction and stretching: An elastic thin rod model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Qiang, Lei; Gao, Jun

    2015-11-01

    In a multivalent salt solution, a segment of DNA is modeled as an elastic rod subjected to the interfacial traction. The shooting method is used to calculate the equilibrium configurations of condensed DNA under the action of the longitudinal end-force and interfacial traction simultaneously. The results show that the shapes of DNA are mainly determined by the competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of stretching. The change of end-to-end distance with the longitudinal end-force is consistent with the worm-like chain (WLC) model. The higher the concentration is, the stronger the condensation of DNA.

  5. Coupled dynamics of interfacial waves and bed forms in fluid muds over erodible seabeds in oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, J. H.; Traykovski, P.

    2015-08-01

    Recent field investigations of the damping of ocean surface waves over fluid muds have revealed waves on the interface between the thin layer of fluid mud and the overlying much thicker column of clear water, accompanied by bed forms on the erodible seabed beneath the fluid mud. The frequencies and wavelengths of the observed interfacial waves are qualitatively consistent with the linear dispersion relationship for long interfacial waves, but the forcing mechanism is not known. To understand the forcing, a linear model is proposed, based on the layer-averaged hydrostatic equations for the fluid mud, together with the Meyer-Peter-Mueller equation for the sediment transport within the underlying seabed, both subject to oscillatory forcing by the surface waves. If the underlying seabed is nonerodible and flat, the model indicates parametric instability to interfacial waves, but the threshold for instability is not met by the observations. If the underlying seabed is erodible, the model indicates that perturbations to the seabed elevation in the presence of the oscillatory forcing create interfacial waves, which in turn produce stresses within the fluid mud that force a net transport of sediment within the seabed toward the bed form crests, thus causing growth of both bed forms and interfacial waves. The frequencies, wavelengths, and growth rates are in qualitative agreement with the observations. A competition between mixing created by the interfacial waves and gravitational settling might control the thickness, density, and viscosity of the fluid muds during periods of strong forcing.

  6. Mechanics of interfacial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Mahadevan, L; Stone, Howard A

    2006-11-21

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered fluid/fluid interfaces can exist in stable nonspherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles. The jamming confers the interface with solidlike properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response, while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural, and mechanical properties.

  7. Elastocapillary-mediated interfacial assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Particles confined to an interface are present in a large number of industrial applications and ubiquitous in cellular biophysics. Interactions mediated by the interface, such as capillary effects in the presence of surface tension, give rise to rafts and aggregates whose structure is ultimately determined by geometric characteristics of these adsorbed particles. A common strategy for assembling interfacial structures relies on exploiting these interactions by tuning particle anisotropy, either by constructing rigid particles with heterogeneous wetting properties or fabricating particles that have a naturally anisotropic shape. Less explored, however, is the scenario where the interface causes the particles to deform. In this talk I will discuss the implications for interfacial assembly using elastocapillary-mediated interactions. The competition between surface energy and elasticity can wrinkle and buckle adsorbed soft particles, leading to complicated (but programmable) aggregates.

  8. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang; Yao, Danfeng; Christensen, Danica; Neumann, Thomas; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, assembling and functionally characterizing supramolecular interfacial architectures for bio-affinity studies and for biosensor development. All the surface interaction studies will be based on the recently introduced novel sensor platforms involving surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and -microscopy (SPFM). Emphasis will be put on documenting the distance-dependence of fluorescence intensity at the metal-dielectric interface and utilizing this principle to optimize the conformation/orientation of the interfacial supra-molecular sensor coatings. This is exemplified by a number of examples, including a layer-by-layer assembly system, antibody-antigen interactions, oligonucleotide-oligonucleotide, and oligonucleotide-PCR amplicon hybridization. For practical sensing purposes, a three-dimensionally extended surface coating is then employed to overcome the fluorescence quenching problem on a planar matrix. A commercial dextran layer is shown to be an optimized matrix for SPFS, with an example of a protein-binding study.

  9. Disclosing the distinct interfacial behaviors of structurally and configurationally diverse triazologlycolipids.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Peng; Xu, Xiaolian; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Chen, Guo-Rong; Xu, Shouhong; Liu, Honglai

    2011-08-16

    1- or 6-Triazologluco- and galactolipid derivatives bearing a lipid chain length of 16 carbons were efficiently constructed via click chemistry. The differentiation in their surface pressure-molecular area (π-A) isotherms first implies that these structurally and configurationally diverse amphiphiles adopt different distribution manner at air-water interfaces. The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of the synthesized glycoconjugates on mica surface were subsequently prepared and visualized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), which exhibited diverse topographies and possess different contact angles with water. These data further suggest that the structural variation as well as epimeric identity of triazologlycolipids may result in their distinct interfacial behaviors at the air-solid interface. Furthermore, the addition of increasing amounts of 1-triazologalactolipid 2 to poly-diacetylene (PDA) was determined to impact the π-A isotherm of the latter, prompting us to further fabricate new colorimetrically detectable mixed-type vesicles containing triazologlycolipids for biochemical studies.

  10. Interfacial Reactivity of Radionuclides: Emerging Paradigms from Molecular Level Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-08-15

    Over the past few decades use of an increasing array of molecular-level analytical probes has provided new detailed insight into mineral and radionuclide interfacial reactivity in subsurface environments. This capability has not only helped change the way mineral surface reactivity is studied but also how field-scale contaminant migration problems are addressed and ultimately resolved. Here we overview examples of relatively new interfacial reactivity paradigms with implications for future research directions. Specific examples include understanding: the role of site-to-site electron conduction at mineral surfaces and through bulk mineral phases, effects of local chemical environment on the stability of intermediate species in oxidation/reduction reactions, and the importance of mechanistic reaction pathway for defining possible reaction products and thermodynamic driving force. The discussion also includes examples of how detailed molecular/microscopic characterization of field samples has changed the way complex contaminant migration problems were conceptualized and modeled.

  11. Interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates: A molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Yu; Wei, Ning; Wang, Ce; Zhou, He; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Lu

    2015-11-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to analyze orientations of sodium branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates molecules at nonane/water interface, which is helpful to design optimal surfactant structures to achieve ultralow interfacial tension (IFT). Through the two dimensional density profiles, monolayer collapses are found when surfactant concentration continues to increase. Thus the precise scope of monolayer is certain and orientation can be analyzed. Based on the simulated results, we verdict the interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates at the oil-water interface, and discuss the effect of hydrophobic tail structure on surfactant assignment. Bigger hydrophobic size can slow the change rate of surfactant occupied area as steric hindrance, and surfactant meta hydrophobic tails have a stronger tendency to stretch to the oil phase below the collapsed concentration. Furthermore, an interfacial model with reference to collapse, increasing steric hindrance and charge repulsive force between interfacial surfactant molecules, responsible for effecting of surfactant concentration and structure has been supposed.

  12. Azo Dyes and Their Interfacial Activity: Implications for Multiphase Flow Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-04-21

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media (Neustadter 1984; Tuck et al. 1988). For instance, several dimensionless numbers have been developed to express important force ratios applicable to multiphase flow in porous media (Morrow and Songkran 1981; Chatzis and Morrow 1984; Wardlaw 1988; Pennell et al. 1996; Dawson and Roberts 1997). These force ratios emphasize the importance of interfacial properties. Our objectives are to provide chemical information regarding the dyes commonly used in multiphase flow visualization studies and to show the surface chemistry effects of the most commonly used dye, Sudan IV, in the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system

  13. Attempt to control the interfacial strength

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Subramanian, R.

    1997-11-01

    Composites consisting of a B2 iron aluminide matrix and 40 vol.% of TiB{sub 2} particles were processed by liquid phase sintering. In order to encourage segregation of B or Ti at the FeAl/TiB{sub 2} interfaces, the iron aluminide matrix was microalloyed with B or Ti, respectively. Additions of Ti degraded the mechanical properties. However, for composites microalloyed with B, room temperature flexure tests show slight increases in the maximum strength (from 1250 to 1380 MPa) and the fracture toughness. Interfacial segregation of B may have contributed to this result. Significantly improved processing of the composites would be required in order to verify the effect of B conclusively. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  15. Sustaining the Single Naval Battle: Enhancing USMC Expeditionary Logistics with the Addition of the Maritime Prepositioning Force (MPF) Auxiliary Dry Cargo / Ammunition Ships (T-AKES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-18

    of Employment. Official Message. (CMC WASHINGTON DC PPO POE), DTG: 291447Z Mar 2010. 28 Military Sealift Command, Combat Logistics Force Webpage...Ammunition Ship (F-AKE) Concept of Employment. Official Message. (CMC WASHINGTON DC PPO POE), DTG: 291447Z Mar 2010. 28 30 Headquarters u.s. Marine Corps...Maritime Prepositioning Force (MPF) Auxiliary Dry Cargo/Ammunition Ship (I’-AKE) Concept of Employment. Official Message. (CMC WASHINGTON DC PPO POE

  16. Measurement of Interfacial Area Production and Permeability within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the pore-level interactions that affect multi-phase flow in porous media is important in many subsurface engineering applications, including enhanced oil recovery, remediation of dense non-aqueous liquid contaminated sites, and geologic CO2 sequestration. Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to have several shortcomings, which might partially be overcome using a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles that includes interfacial area as an additional parameter. A few static experimental studies have been previously performed, which allowed the determination of static parameters of the model, but no information exists concerning the interfacial area dynamic parameters. A new experimental porous flow cell that was constructed using stereolithography for two-phase gas-liquid flow studies was used in conjunction with an in-house analysis code to provide information on dynamic evolution of both fluid phases and gas-liquid interfaces. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the new generalized model of two-phase flow model and describe how the stereolithography flow cell experimental setup was used to obtain the dynamic parameters for the interfacial area numerical model. In particular, the methods used to determine the interfacial area permeability and production terms are shown.

  17. Interfacial thermodynamics of water and six other liquid solvents.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A

    2014-06-05

    We examine the thermodynamics of the liquid-vapor interface by direct calculation of the surface entropy, enthalpy, and free energy from extensive molecular dynamics simulations using the two-phase thermodynamics (2PT) method. Results for water, acetonitrile, cyclohexane, dimethyl sulfoxide, hexanol, N-methyl acetamide, and toluene are presented. We validate our approach by predicting the interfacial surface tensions (IFT--excess surface free energy per unit area) in excellent agreement with the mechanical calculations using Kirkwood-Buff theory. Additionally, we evaluate the temperature dependence of the IFT of water as described by the TIP4P/2005, SPC/Ew, TIP3P, and mW classical water models. We find that the TIP4P/2005 and SPC/Ew water models do a reasonable job of describing the interfacial thermodynamics; however, the TIP3P and mW are quite poor. We find that the underprediction of the experimental IFT at 298 K by these water models results from understructured surface molecules whose binding energies are too weak. Finally, we performed depth profiles of the interfacial thermodynamics which revealed long tails that extend far into what would be considered bulk from standard Gibbs theory. In fact, we find a nonmonotonic interfacial free energy profile for water, a unique feature that could have important consequences for the absorption of ions and other small molecules.

  18. Probing adhesion forces at the molecular scale

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.C.; Houston, J.E.; Michalske, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of adhesion forces at the molecular scale, such as those discussed here, are necessary to understand macroscopic boundary-layer behavior such as adhesion, friction, wear, lubrication, and many other important phenomena. The authors` recent interfacial force microscopy (IFM) studies have provided detailed information about the mechanical response of both self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films and the underlying substrates. In addition, they recently demonstrated that the IFM is useful for studying the chemical nature of such films. In this talk, the authors discuss a new method for studying surface interactions and chemical reactions using the IFM. To quantitatively measure the work of adhesion and bond energies between two organic thin films, they modify both a Au substrate and a Au probe with self-assembling organomercaptan molecules having either the same or different end groups (-CH{sub 3}, -NH{sub 2}, and -COOH), and then analyze the force-versus-displacement curves (force profiles) that result from the approach to contact of the two surfaces. Their results show that the magnitude of the adhesive forces measured between methyl-methyl interactions are in excellent agreement with van der Waals calculations using Lifshitz theory and previous experimentally determined values. Moreover, the measured peak adhesive forces scale as expected for van der Waals, hydrogen-bonding, and acid-base interactions.

  19. Non-additive Empirical Force Fields for Short-Chain Linear Alcohols: Methanol to Butanol. Hydration Free Energetics and Kirkwood-Buff Analysis Using Charge Equilibration Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Building upon the nonadditive electrostatic force field for alcohols based on the CHARMM charge equilibration (CHEQ) formalism, we introduce atom-pair specific solute-solvent Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for alcohol-water interaction force fields targeting improved agreement with experimental hydration free energies of a series of small molecule linear alcohols as well as ab initio water-alcohol geometries and energetics. We consider short-chain, linear alcohols from methanol to butanol as they are canonical small-molecule organic model compounds to represent the hydroxyl chemical functionality for parameterizing biomolecular force fields for proteins. We discuss molecular dynamics simulations of dilute aqueous solutions of methanol and ethanol in TIP4P-FQ water, with particular discussion of solution densities, structure defined in radial distribution functions, electrostatic properties (dipole moment distributions), hydrogen bonding patterns of water, as well as a Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integral analysis. Calculation of the latter provides an assessment of how well classical force fields parameterized to at least semi-quantitatively match experimental hydration free energies capture the microscopic structures of dilute alcohol solutions; the latter translate into macroscopic thermodynamic properties through the application of KB analysis. We find that the CHEQ alcohol force fields of this work semi-quantitatively match experimental KB integrals for methanol and ethanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. The force field combination qualitatively captures the concentration dependence of the alcohol-alcohol and water-water KB integrals, but due to inadequacies in the representation of the microscopic structures in such systems (which cannot be parameterized in any systematic fashion), a priori quantitative description of alcohol-water KB integrals remains elusive. PMID:20687517

  20. Microfluidic Dynamic Interfacial Tensiometry (μDIT).

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Quentin; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-05-07

    We designed, developed and characterized a microfluidic method for the measurement of surfactant adsorption kinetics via interfacial tensiometry on a microfluidic chip. The principle of the measurement is based on the deformability of droplets as a response to hydrodynamic forcing through a series of microfluidic expansions. We focus our analysis on one perfluoro surfactant molecule of practical interest for droplet-based microfluidic applications. We show that although the adsorption kinetics is much faster than the kinetics of the corresponding pendant drop experiment, our droplet-based microfluidic system has a sufficient time resolution to obtain quantitative measurement at the sub-second time-scale on nanoliter droplet volumes, leading to both a gain by a factor of ∼10 in time resolution and a downscaling of the measurement volumes by a factor of ∼1000 compared to standard techniques. Our approach provides new insight into the adsorption of surfactant molecules at liquid-liquid interfaces in a confined environment, relevant to emulsification, encapsulation and foaming, and the ability to measure adsorption and desorption rate constants.

  1. Interfacial free energy and stiffness of aluminum during rapid solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Nicholas T.; Martinez, Enrique; Qu, Jianmin

    2017-05-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and the capillary fluctuation method, we have calculated the anisotropic crystal-melt interfacial free energy and stiffness of aluminum in a rapid solidification system where a temperature gradient is applied to enforce thermal non-equilibrium. To calculate these material properties, the standard capillary fluctuation method typically used for systems in equilibrium has been modified to incorporate a second-order Taylor expansion of the interfacial free energy term. The result is a robust method for calculating interfacial energy, stiffness and anisotropy as a function of temperature gradient using the fluctuations in the defined interface height. This work includes the calculationmore » of interface characteristics for temperature gradients ranging from 11 to 34 K/nm. The captured results are compared to a thermal equilibrium case using the same model and simulation technique with a zero gradient definition. We define the temperature gradient as the change in temperature over height perpendicular to the crystal-melt interface. The gradients are applied in MD simulations using defined thermostat regions on a stable solid-liquid interface initially in thermal equilibrium. The results of this work show that the interfacial stiffness and free energy for aluminum are dependent on the magnitude of the temperature gradient, however the anisotropic parameters remain independent of the non-equilibrium conditions applied in this analysis. As a result, the relationships of the interfacial free energy/stiffness are determined to be linearly related to the thermal gradient, and can be interpolated to find material characteristics at additional temperature gradients.« less

  2. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation.

  3. Insect flight on fluid interfaces: a chaotic interfacial oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundarajan, Haripriya; Prakash, Manu

    2013-11-01

    Flight is critical to the dominance of insect species on our planet, with about 98 percent of insect species having wings. How complex flight control systems developed in insects is unknown, and arboreal or aquatic origins have been hypothesized. We examine the biomechanics of aquatic origins of flight. We recently reported discovery of a novel mode of ``2D flight'' in Galerucella beetles, which skim along an air-water interface using flapping wing flight. This unique flight mode is characterized by a balance between capillary forces from the interface and biomechanical forces exerted by the flapping wings. Complex interactions on the fluid interface form capillary wave trains behind the insect, and produce vertical oscillations at the surface due to non-linear forces arising from deformation of the fluid meniscus. We present both experimental observations of 2D flight kinematics and a dynamic model explaining the observed phenomena. Careful examination of this interaction predicts the chaotic nature of interfacial flight and takeoff from the interface into airborne flight. The role of wingbeat frequency, stroke plane angle and body angle in determining transition between interfacial and fully airborne flight is highlighted, shedding light on the aquatic theory of flight evolution.

  4. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  5. Interfacial microstructure and properties of carbon fiber composites modified with graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Fan, Xinyu; Yan, Chun; Li, Hongzhou; Zhu, Yingdan; Li, Xiaotuo; Yu, Liping

    2012-03-01

    The performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composites is dependent to a great extent on the properties of fiber-matrix interface. To improve the interfacial properties in carbon fiber/epoxy composites, we directly introduced graphene oxide (GO) sheets dispersed in the fiber sizing onto the surface of individual carbon fibers. The applied graphite oxide, which could be exfoliated to single-layer GO sheets, was verified by atomic force microscope (AFM). The surface topography of modified carbon fibers and the distribution of GO sheets in the interfacial region of carbon fibers were detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfacial properties between carbon fiber and matrix were investigated by microbond test and three-point short beam shear test. The tensile properties of unidirectional (UD) composites were investigated in accordance with ASTM standards. The results of the tests reveal an improved interfacial and tensile properties in GO-modified carbon fiber composites. Furthermore, significant enhancement of interfacial shear strength (IFSS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), and tensile properties was achieved in the composites when only 5 wt % of GO sheets introduced in the fiber sizing. This means that an alternative method for improving the interfacial and tensile properties of carbon fiber composites by controlling the fiber-matrix interface was developed. Such multiscale reinforced composites show great potential with their improved mechanical performance to be likely applied in the aerospace and automotive industries.

  6. Interfacial tension between immiscible melts in the system K2O - FeO - Fe2O3 - Al2O3 - SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehn, J.; Veksler, I. V.; Franz, G.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2009-12-01

    Interfacial tension is a very important parameter of the kinetics of phase nucleation, dissolution and growth. Excess surface energy contributes to the energy barrier for phase nucleation, and works as the main driving force for minimization of phase contact surfaces in heterogeneous systems. Immiscible silicate melts have been found to form in a broad range of basaltic, dacitic and rhyolitic magmas (Philpotts, 1982). However, liquid-liquid interfaces remain poorly studied in comparison with crystal-melt and vapor-melt interfaces. Here we present first experimental measurements of interfacial tension between synthetic Fe-rich and silica-rich immiscible melts composed of Fe oxides, K2O, alumina and silica. According to Naslund (1983), the miscibility gap in the 5-oxide system expands with increasing fO2 and becomes widest in air (fO2 = 0.2). Our goal was to estimate the maximal liquid-liquid interfacial tension for the immiscible liquids composed of silica and Fe oxides. Therefore, we have chosen the most contrasting liquid compositions that coexist in air at and above 1465 °C. Silica-rich and Fe-rich conjugate liquids at these conditions contain 73 and 17 wt. % SiO2, and 14 and 80 wt. % FeOt, respectively. These starting compositions were synthesized by fusion of reagent-grade oxides and K2CO3 at 1600 °C. In addition to interfacial tension, we have measured density and surface tension of individual coexisting liquids. All the measurements were done at 1500, 1527 and 1550 °C. Density was measured by the Archimedean method; surface and interfacial tensions were calculated from the maximal pool on a vertical cylinder (a 3-mm Pt rod attached to a high precision balance). We found interfacial tension between the immiscible liquids to decrease with increasing temperature from 16.4±2 mN/m at 1500 °C to 8.2±0.8 mN/m at 1550 °C. These values are approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than typical interfacial tensions between silicate melts and crystals (Wanamaker

  7. Interfacial optimization of fiber-reinforced hydrogel composites for soft fibrous tissue applications.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Julianne L; Lowman, Anthony M; VanLandingham, Mark R; Palmese, Giuseppe R

    2014-08-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common orthopedic injuries to the human body, yet the current treatment of choice is a partial meniscectomy, which is known to lead to joint degeneration and osteoarthritis. As a result, there is a significant clinical need to develop materials capable of restoring function to the meniscus following an injury. Fiber-reinforced hydrogel composites are particularly suited for replicating the mechanical function of native fibrous tissues due to their ability to mimic the native anisotropic property distribution present. A critical issue with these materials, however, is the potential for the fiber-matrix interfacial properties to severely limit composite performance. In this work, the interfacial properties of an ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber-reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel are studied. A novel chemical grafting technique, confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, is used to improve UHMWPE-PVA interfacial adhesion. Interfacial shear strength is quantified using fiber pull-out tests. Results indicate significantly improved fiber-hydrogel interfacial adhesion after chemical grafting, where chemically grafted samples have an interfacial shear strength of 256.4±64.3kPa compared to 11.5±2.9kPa for untreated samples. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy of fiber surfaces after fiber pull-out reveal cohesive failure within the hydrogel matrix for treated fiber samples, indicating that the UHMWPE-PVA interface has been successfully optimized. Lastly, inter-fiber spacing is observed to have a significant effect on interfacial adhesion. Fibers spaced further apart have significantly higher interfacial shear strengths, which is critical to consider when optimizing composite design. The results in this study are applicable in developing similar chemical grafting techniques and optimizing fiber-matrix interfacial properties for other hydrogel-based composite systems.

  8. An analysis of interfacial waves and air ingestion mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, Azat

    This research was focused on developing analytical methods with which to derive the functional forms of the various interfacial forces in two-fluid models [Galimov et al., 2004], and on the Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of traveling breaking waves and plunging liquid jets. Analytical results are presented for a stable stratified wavy two-phase flow and the associated interfacial force densities of a two-fluid model. In particular, the non-drag interfacial force density [Drew & Passman, 1998], the Reynolds stress tensor, and the term ( p˜cli -pcl)∇alphacl, which drives surface waves, were derived, where p˜cli is interfacial average pressure, pcl is the average pressure, and alphacl is the volume fraction of the continuous liquid phase. These functional forms are potentially useful for developing two-fluid model closure relations for computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) numerical solvers. Moreover, it appears that this approach can be generalized to other flow regimes (e.g., annular flows). A comparison of the analytical and ensemble-averaged DNS results show good agreement, and it appears that this approach can be used to develop phenomenological flow-regime-specific closure laws for two-fluid models [Lahey & Drew, 2004], [Lahey, 2005]. A successful 2-D DNS of breaking traveling waves was performed. These calculations had periodic boundary conditions and the physical parameters for air/water flow at atmospheric pressure, including a liquid/gas density ratio of 1,000 and representative surface tension and viscosities. Detailed 3-D DNS was also made for a plunging liquid jet. The processes of forming the liquid jet, the associated air cavity, capturing an initial large donut-shaped air bubble, and developing and breaking-up this bubble into smaller bubbles due to liquid shear, were shown. These simulations showed that the inertia of the liquid jet initially depressed the pool's surface and the toroidal liquid eddy formed subsequently resulted in air

  9. Gas-liquid phase separation in oppositely charged colloids: stability and interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Andrea; Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2006-09-07

    We study the phase behavior and the interfacial tension of the screened Coulomb (Yukawa) restricted primitive model (YRPM) of oppositely charged hard spheres with diameter sigma using Monte Carlo simulations. We determine the gas-liquid and gas-solid phase transitions using free energy calculations and grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations for varying inverse Debye screening length kappa. We find that the gas-liquid phase separation is stable for kappasigmaaddition, we determine the gas-liquid interfacial tension using grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The interfacial tension decreases upon increasing the range of the interaction. In particular, we find that simple scaling can be used to relate the interfacial tension of the YRPM to that of the restricted primitive model, where particles interact with bare Coulomb interactions.

  10. Directed disassembly of an interfacial rubisco protein network.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Malcolm, Andrew S; He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2007-05-22

    We present the first study of the directed disassembly of a protein network at the air-water interface by the synergistic action of a surfactant and an enzyme. We seek to understand the fundamentals of protein network disassembly by using rubisco adsorbed at the air-water interface as a model. We propose that rubisco adsorption at the air-water interface results in the formation of a fishnet-like network of interconnected protein molecules, capable of transmitting lateral force. The mechanical properties of the rubisco network during assembly and disassembly at the air-water interface were characterized by direct measurement of laterally transmitted force through the protein network using the Cambridge interfacial tensiometer. We have shown that, when used individually, either 2 ppm of the surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzyl sulfonate (SDOBS), or 2 ppm of the enzyme, subtilisin A (SA), were insufficient to completely disassemble the rubisco network within 1 h of treatment. However, a combination of 2 ppm SDOBS and 2 ppm SA led to almost complete disassembly within 1 h. Increasing the concentration of SA in the mixture from 2 to 10 ppm, while keeping the SDOBS concentration constant, significantly decreased the time required to completely disassemble the rubisco network. Furthermore, the initial rate of network disassembly using formulations containing SDOBS was surprisingly insensitive to this increase in SA concentration. This study gives insight into the role of lateral interactions between protein molecules at interfaces in stabilizing interfacial protein networks and shows that surfactant and enzyme working in combination proves more effective at disrupting and mobilizing the interfacial protein network than the action of either agent alone.

  11. Interfacial reactions in titanium-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; Jeng, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A study of the interfacial reaction characteristics of SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide and disordered titanium alloy composites has determined that the matrix alloy compositions affect the microstructure and the distribution of the reaction products, as well as the growth kinetics of the reaction zones. The interfacial reaction products in the ordered titanium aluminide composite are more complicated than those in the disordered titanium-alloy composite. The activation energy of the interfacial reaction in the ordered titanium aluminide composite is also higher than that in the disordered titanium alloy composite. Designing an optimum interface is necessary to enhance the reliability and service life at elevated temperatures. 16 refs.

  12. Effect of the environmental humidity on the bulk, interfacial and nanoconfined properties of an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Jurado, L Andres; Kim, Hojun; Rossi, Antonella; Arcifa, Andrea; Schuh, Jonathon K; Spencer, Nicholas D; Leal, Cecilia; Ewoldt, Randy H; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2016-08-10

    With reference to our previous surface-force study on 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([HMIM] EtSO4) using an extended surface forces apparatus, which showed an ordered structure within the nanoconfined dry ionic liquid (IL) between mica surfaces that extended up to ∼60 nm from the surface, this work focuses on the influence of the environmental humidity on the bulk, interfacial and nanoconfined structure of [HMIM] EtSO4. Infrared spectroscopy and rheometry reflect the changes in chemical and physical properties of the bulk IL due to the uptake of water when exposed to ambient humidity, while wide-angle X-ray scattering shows a mild swelling of the bulk nanostructure, and the AFM sharp tip reveals an additional surface layer at the mica-IL interface. When the water-containing [HMIM] EtSO4 is nanoconfined between two mica surfaces, no long-range order is detected, in contrast to the results obtained for the dry IL, which demonstrates that the presence of water can prevent the liquid-to-solid transformation of this IL. A combination of techniques and the calculated Bjerrum length indicate that water molecules weaken interionic electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, which lessens ion-ion correlations. Our work shows that the solid-like behavior of the nanoconfined IL strongly depends on the presence of absorbed water and hence, it has implications with regard to the correct interpretation of laboratory studies and their extension to real applications in lubrication.

  13. Indirect measurement of interfacial melting from macroscopic ice observations.

    PubMed

    Saruya, Tomotaka; Kurita, Kei; Rempel, Alan W

    2014-06-01

    Premelted water that is adsorbed to particle surfaces and confined to capillary regions remains in the liquid state well below the bulk melting temperature and can supply the segregated growth of ice lenses. Using macroscopic measurements of ice-lens initiation position in step-freezing experiments, we infer how the nanometer-scale thicknesses of premelted films depend on temperature depression below bulk melting. The interfacial interactions between ice, liquid, and soda-lime glass particles exhibit a power-law behavior that suggests premelting in our system is dominated by short-range electrostatic forces. Using our inferred film thicknesses as inputs to a simple force-balance model with no adjustable parameters, we obtain good quantitative agreement between numerical predictions and observed ice-lens thickness. Macroscopic observations of lensing behavior have the potential as probes of premelting behavior in other systems.

  14. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  15. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  16. Recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, P; Hoeben, M A; van der Lans, R G J M; Kwant, G; van der Wielen, L A M

    2002-05-20

    In this article, a qualitative study of the recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning in liquid-liquid biphasic systems is presented. A range of crystallised biomolecules with varying polarities have been chosen such as glycine, phenylglycine and ampicillin. Liquid-liquid biphasic systems in a range of polarity differences were selected such as an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), water-butanol and water-hexanol. The results indicate that interfacial partitioning of crystals occurs even when their density exceeds that of the individual liquid phases. Yet, not all crystals partition to the same extent to the interface to form a stable and thick interphase layer. This indicates some degree of selectivity. From the analysis of these results in relation to the physicochemical properties of the crystals and the liquid phases, a hypothetical mechanism for the interfacial partitioning is deduced. Overall these results support the potential of interfacial partitioning as a large scale separation technology.

  17. Interfacial Instabilities on a Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Mehravaran, Kian

    2013-11-01

    The fragmentation of droplets is an essential stage of several natural and industrial applications such as fuel atomization and rain phenomena. In spite of its relatively long history, the mechanism of fragmentation is not clear yet. This is mainly due to small length and time scales as well as the non-linearity of the process. In the present study, two and three-dimensional numerical simulations have been performed to understand the early stages of the fragmentation of an initially spherical droplet. Simulations are performed for high Reynolds and a range of relatively high Weber numbers (shear breakup). To resolve the small-scale instabilities generated over the droplet, a second-order adaptive finite volume/volume of fluids (FV/VOF) method is employed, where the grid resolution is increased with the curvature of the gas-liquid interface as well as the vorticity magnitude. The study is focused on the onset and growth of interfacial instabilities. The role of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (in surface wave formation) and Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in azimuthal transverse modulation) are shown and the obtained results are compared with the linear instability theories for zero and non-zero vorticity layers. Moreover, the analogy between the fragmentation of a single drop and a co-axial liquid jet is discussed. The current results can be used for the further development of the current secondary atomization models.

  18. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  19. Design principles of interfacial thermal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Carlos; Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zhang, Jingjie; Le, Nam; Norris, Pamela; Ghosh, Avik

    We explore fundamental principles to design the thermal conductance across solid interfaces by changing the composition and disorder of an intermediate matching layer. In absence of phonon-phonon interactions, the layer addition involves two competing effects that influence the conductance. The layer can act as an impedance matching 'bridge' to increase the mode-averaged phonon transmission. However, it also reduces the relevant modes that conserve their momenta transverse to the interface, so that the net result depends on features such as the overlap of conserving modes and the dispersivity of the transverse subbands. Moving into the interacting anharmonic regime, we find that the added layer aids conductance when the decreased resistances at the contact-layer boundaries compensate for the layer resistance. In fact, we show that the maximum conductance corresponds to an exact matching of the two separate contact-layer resistances. For instance, if we vary just the atomic mass across layers, then maximum conductance happens when the intervening layer mass is the geometric mean of the contact masses. We conjecture that the best interfacial layer is one that is compositionally graded into many geometric means - in other words, an exponential variation in thermal impedance.

  20. Protein packing defects "heat up" interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Sierra, María Belén; Accordino, Sebastián R; Rodriguez-Fris, J Ariel; Morini, Marcela A; Appignanesi, Gustavo A; Fernández Stigliano, Ariel

    2013-06-01

    Ligands must displace water molecules from their corresponding protein surface binding site during association. Thus, protein binding sites are expected to be surrounded by non-tightly-bound, easily removable water molecules. In turn, the existence of packing defects at protein binding sites has been also established. At such structural motifs, named dehydrons, the protein backbone is exposed to the solvent since the intramolecular interactions are incompletely wrapped by non-polar groups. Hence, dehydrons are sticky since they depend on additional intermolecular wrapping in order to properly protect the structure from water attack. Thus, a picture of protein binding is emerging wherein binding sites should be both dehydrons rich and surrounded by easily removable water. In this work we shall indeed confirm such a link between structure and dynamics by showing the existence of a firm correlation between the degree of underwrapping of the protein chain and the mobility of the corresponding hydration water molecules. In other words, we shall show that protein packing defects promote their local dehydration, thus producing a region of "hot" interfacial water which might be easily removed by a ligand upon association.

  1. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  2. Predictions of one-group interfacial area transport in TRACE

    SciTech Connect

    Worosz, T.; Talley, J. D.; Kim, S.; Bajorek, S. M.; Ireland, A.

    2012-07-01

    In current nuclear reactor system analysis codes utilizing the two-fluid model, flow regime dependent correlations are used to specify the interfacial area concentration (a i). This approach does not capture the continuous evolution of the interfacial structures, and thus, it can pose issues near the transition boundaries. Consequently, a pilot version of the system analysis code TRACE is being developed that employs the interfacial area transport equation (IATE). In this approach, dynamic estimation of a i is provided through mechanistic models for bubble coalescence and breakup. The implementation of the adiabatic, one-group IATE into TRACE is assessed against experimental data from 50 air-water, two-phase flow conditions in pipes ranging in inner diameter from 2.54 to 20.32 cm for both vertical co-current upward and downward flows. Predictions of pressure, void fraction, bubble velocity, and a i data are made. TRACE employing the conventional flow regime-based approach is found to underestimate a i and can only predict linear trends since the calculation is governed by the pressure. Furthermore, trends opposite to that of the data are predicted for some conditions. In contrast, TRACE with the one-group IATE demonstrates a significant improvement in predicting the experimental data with an average disagreement of {+-} 13%. Additionally, TRACE with the one-group IATE is capable of predicting nonlinear axial development of a, by accounting for various bubble interaction mechanisms, such as coalescence and disintegration. (authors)

  3. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  4. Final Environmental Assessment: For Construction of an Addition to the Joint Strike Fighter Reprogramming Facility, Building 614, on Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    located approximately 0.8 miles south of Lewis Middle School . Additionally, the construction site would be fenced, preventing unauthorized access...boiler insulation, acoustical ceilings, sprayed-on fireproofing, and other material used for soundproofing or insulation. ● Lead-Based Paint – LBP

  5. Interfacial solvation and excited state photophysical properties of 7-aminocoumarins at silica/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debjani

    solvation environments. To test the role of solvent identity on the photophysical properties of adsorbed solutes, additional experiments were carried out with a nonpolar solvent (decane), a moderately polar solvent (n-decanol) and a polar aprotic solvent (acetonitrile). The results from these studies demonstrated that interfacial solvation depends sensitively on a balance of competing forces including those between the solute and substrate, the solute and solvent and the surface and adjacent solvent.

  6. Interfacial jumps and pressure bursts during fluid displacement in interacting irregular capillaries.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2012-07-01

    The macroscopically regular motion of fluid displacement fronts in porous media often results from numerous pore scale interfacial jumps and associated pressure fluctuations. Such rapid pore scale dynamics defy postulated slow viscous energy dissipation and may shape phase entrapment and subsequent macroscopic transport properties. Certain displacement characteristics are predictable from percolation theory; however, insights into rapid interfacial dynamics require mechanistic models for hydraulically interacting pores such as found along fluid displacement fronts. A model for hydraulically coupled sinusoidal capillaries was used to analyze stick-jump interfacial motions with a significant inertial component absent in Darcy-based description of fluid front displacement. High-speed camera provided measurements of rapid interfacial dynamics in sintered glass beads cell during drainage. Interfacial velocities exceeding 50 times mean front velocity were observed in good agreement with model predictions for a pair of sinusoidal capillaries. In addition to characteristic pinning-jumping behavior, interfacial dynamics were sensitive to initial positions within pores at the onset of a jump. Even for a pair of sinusoidal capillaries, minute variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions yield rich behavior of motions, highlighting challenges and potential new insights offered by consideration of pore scale mechanisms in macroscopic description of fluid displacement fronts in porous media.

  7. Air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated soils: Evaluation of interfacial domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2002-10-01

    A gas-phase miscible-displacement method, using decane as an interfacial tracer, was used to measure air-water interfacial areas for a sand with water contents ranging from ˜2% to 20%. The expected trend of decreasing interfacial areas with increasing water contents was observed. The maximum estimated interfacial area of 19,500 cm-1 appears reasonable given it is smaller than the measured surface area of the porous medium (60,888 cm-1). Comparison of the experimental data presented herein with literature data provided further insight into the characterization of the air-water interface in unsaturated porous media. Specifically, comparison of interfacial areas measured using gas-phase versus aqueous-phase methods indicates that the gas-phase method generally yields larger interfacial areas than the aqueous-phase methods, even when accounting for differences in water content and physical properties of the porous media. The observations are consistent with proposed differences in interfacial accessibility of the aqueous- and gas-phase tracers. Evaluation of the data in light of functional interfacial domains, described herein, yields the hypothesis that aqueous interfacial tracers measure primarily air-water interfaces formed by "capillary water," while gas-phase tracers measure air-water interfaces formed by both capillary and surface-adsorbed (film) water. The gas- and aqueous-phase methods may each provide interfacial area information that is more relevant to specific problems of interest. For example, gas-phase interfacial area measurements may be most relevant to contaminant transport in unsaturated systems, where retention at the air-water interface may be significant. Conversely, the aqueous-phase methods may yield information with direct bearing on multiphase flow processes that are dominated by capillary-phase behavior.

  8. Liquid/Liquid interfacial polymerization to grow single crystalline nanoneedles of various conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Nuraje, Nurxat; Su, Kai; Yang, Nan-Loh; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Single crystalline nanoneedles of polyaniline (PANI) and polypyrrole (PPY) were synthesized using an interfacial polymerization for the first time. The interfacial crystallization of conductive polymers at the liquid/liquid interface allowed PANI and PPY polymers to form single crystalline nanocrystals in a rice-like shape in the dimensions of 63 nm x 12 nm for PANI and 70 nm x 20 nm for PPY. Those crystalline nanoneedles displayed a fast conductance switching in the time scale of milliseconds. An important growth condition necessary to yield highly crystalline conductive polymers was the extended crystallization time at the liquid/liquid interfaces to increase the degree of crystallization. As compared to other interfacial polymerization methods, lower concentrations of monomer and oxidant solutions were employed to further extend the crystallization time. While other interfacial growth of conducting polymers yielded noncrystalline polymer fibers, our interfacial method produced single crystalline nanocrystals of conductive polymers. We recently reported the liquid/liquid interfacial synthesis of conducting PEDOT nanocrystals; however, this liquid/liquid interfacial method needs to be extended to other conductive polymer nanocrystal syntheses in order to demonstrate that our technique could be applied as the general fabrication procedure for the single crystalline conducting polymer growth. In this report, we showed that the liquid/liquid interfacial crystallization could yield PANI nanocrystals and PPY nanocrystals, other important conductive polymers, in addition to PEDOT nanocrystals. The resulting crystalline polymers have a fast conductance switching time between the insulating and conducting states on the order of milliseconds. This technique will be useful to synthesize conducting polymers via oxidative coupling processes in a single crystal state, which is extremely difficult to achieve by other synthetic methods.

  9. Determination of interfacial tension of binary mixtures from perturbative approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.

    2015-05-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules from direct simulation of the vapour-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with same molecular size but different dispersive energy parameter values. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček, presented recently by MacDowell and Blas and Martínez-Ruiz et al., to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of Lennard-Jones molecules with a cut-off distance rc = 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ε22/ε11, is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the less volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, a direct consequence of stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in

  10. Interfacial phase-change memory.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Fukaya, T; Krbal, M; Yagi, T; Tominaga, J

    2011-07-03

    Phase-change memory technology relies on the electrical and optical properties of certain materials changing substantially when the atomic structure of the material is altered by heating or some other excitation process. For example, switching the composite Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) alloy from its covalently bonded amorphous phase to its resonantly bonded metastable cubic crystalline phase decreases the resistivity by three orders of magnitude, and also increases reflectivity across the visible spectrum. Moreover, phase-change memory based on GST is scalable, and is therefore a candidate to replace Flash memory for non-volatile data storage applications. The energy needed to switch between the two phases depends on the intrinsic properties of the phase-change material and the device architecture; this energy is usually supplied by laser or electrical pulses. The switching energy for GST can be reduced by limiting the movement of the atoms to a single dimension, thus substantially reducing the entropic losses associated with the phase-change process. In particular, aligning the c-axis of a hexagonal Sb(2)Te(3) layer and the 〈111〉 direction of a cubic GeTe layer in a superlattice structure creates a material in which Ge atoms can switch between octahedral sites and lower-coordination sites at the interface of the superlattice layers. Here we demonstrate GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) interfacial phase-change memory (IPCM) data storage devices with reduced switching energies, improved write-erase cycle lifetimes and faster switching speeds.

  11. Risk stratification of thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology: The additional value of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chong-Ke; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Jun-Mei; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Wei; Liu, Bo-Ji; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Dan; Qu, Shen

    2017-01-01

    To assess the value of conventional ultrasound, conventional strain elastography (CSE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in differentiating likelihood of malignancy for Bethesda category III thyroid nodules. 103 thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in 103 patients were included and all were pathologically confirmed after surgery. Conventional ultrasound, CSE and ARFI elastography including ARFI imaging and point shear wave speed (SWS) measurement were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent factors associated with malignancy. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) was calculated to assess the diagnostic performance. Pathologically, 65 nodules were benign and 38 were malignant. Significant differences were found between benign and malignant nodules in ARFI. The cut-off points were ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4, SWS > 2.94 m/s and SWS ratio > 1.09, respectively. ARFI imaging (Az: 0.861) had the highest diagnostic performance to differentiate malignant from benign nodules, following by conventional ultrasound (Az: 0.606 - 0.744), CSE (Az: 0.660) and point SWS measurement (Az: 0.725 - 0.735). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4 was the most significant independent predictor. The combination of ARFI imaging with point SWS measurement significantly improved the specificity (100% vs. 80.0%) and positive predictive value (100 % vs. 72.9%) in comparison with ARFI imaging alone. ARFI elastography is a useful tool in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on FNAC. PMID:27906671

  12. Risk stratification of thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology: The additional value of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chong-Ke; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Jun-Mei; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Wei; Liu, Bo-Ji; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Dan; Qu, Shen

    2017-01-03

    To assess the value of conventional ultrasound, conventional strain elastography (CSE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in differentiating likelihood of malignancy for Bethesda category III thyroid nodules. 103 thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in 103 patients were included and all were pathologically confirmed after surgery. Conventional ultrasound, CSE and ARFI elastography including ARFI imaging and point shear wave speed (SWS) measurement were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent factors associated with malignancy. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) was calculated to assess the diagnostic performance. Pathologically, 65 nodules were benign and 38 were malignant. Significant differences were found between benign and malignant nodules in ARFI. The cut-off points were ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4, SWS > 2.94 m/s and SWS ratio > 1.09, respectively. ARFI imaging (Az: 0.861) had the highest diagnostic performance to differentiate malignant from benign nodules, following by conventional ultrasound (Az: 0.606 - 0.744), CSE (Az: 0.660) and point SWS measurement (Az: 0.725 - 0.735). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4 was the most significant independent predictor. The combination of ARFI imaging with point SWS measurement significantly improved the specificity (100% vs. 80.0%) and positive predictive value (100 % vs. 72.9%) in comparison with ARFI imaging alone. ARFI elastography is a useful tool in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on FNAC.

  13. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    also of the metal elements in the nanoparticle cores, in contrast to the bulk-exchange counterparts where these distributions were homogeneous within the nanoparticles, as manifested in contact angle, UV--vis, XPS, and TEM measurements. More interestingly, the electrocatalytic performance of the Janus nanoparticles was markedly better than the bulk-exchange ones, suggesting that the segregated distribution of the polar ligands from the apolar ones might further facilitate charge transfer from Ag to Au in the nanoparticle cores, leading to additional improvement of the adsorption and reduction of oxygen. This interfacial protocol was then adopted to prepare trimetallic Ag AuPt Neapolitan nanoparticles by two sequential galvanic exchange reactions of 1-hexanethiolate-capped silver nanoparticles with gold(I)-thiomalic acid and platinum(II)-hexanethiolate complexes. As both reactions were confined to an interface, the Au and Pt elements were situated on two opposite poles of the original Ag nanoparticles, which was clearly manifested in elemental mapping of the nanoparticles, and consistent with the damping and red-shift of the nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance. As nanoscale analogs to conventional amphiphilic molecules, the resulting Janus nanoparticles were found to form oil-in-water micelle-like or water-in-oil reverse micelle-like superparticulate structures depending on the solvent media. These unique characteristics were exploited for the effective transfer of diverse guest nanoparticles between organic and water phase. The transfer of hydrophobic nanoparticles from organic to water media or water-soluble nanoparticles to the organic phase was evidenced by TEM, DLS, UV-Vis, and PL measurements. In particular, line scans based on EDS analysis showed that the vesicle-like structures consisted of multiple layers of the Janus nanoparticles, which encapsulated the guest nanoparticles in the cores. The results highlight the unique effectiveness of using Janus

  14. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  15. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  16. Li-Doped Ionic Liquid Electrolytes: From Bulk Phase to Interfacial Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids have been proposed as candidate electrolytes for high-energy density, rechargeable batteries. We present an extensive computational analysis supported by experimental comparisons of the bulk and interfacial properties of a representative set of these electrolytes as a function of Li-salt doping. We begin by investigating the bulk electrolyte using quantum chemistry and ab initio molecular dynamics to elucidate the solvation structure of Li(+). MD simulations using the polarizable force field of Borodin and coworkers were then performed, from which we obtain an array of thermodynamic and transport properties. Excellent agreement is found with experiments for diffusion, ionic conductivity, and viscosity. Combining MD simulations with electronic structure computations, we computed the electrochemical window of the electrolytes across a range of Li(+)-doping levels and comment on the role of the liquid environment. Finally, we performed a suite of simulations of these Li-doped electrolytes at ideal electrified interfaces to evaluate the differential capacitance and the equilibrium Li(+) distribution in the double layer. The magnitude of differential capacitance is in good agreement with our experiments and exhibits the characteristic camel-shaped profile. In addition, the simulations reveal Li(+) to be highly localized to the second molecular layer of the double layer, which is supported by additional computations that find this layer to be a free energy minimum with respect to Li(+) translation.

  17. Transient Interfacial Phenomena in Miscible Polymer Systems (TIPMPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.; Bessonov, Nicholas; Volpert, Vitaly; Wilke, Hermann

    2003-01-01

    the square gradient parameter, k, and our use of the estimates in modeling of the planned TIPMPS experiments. We developed a model consisting of the heat and diffusion equations with convective terms and of the Navier-Stokes equations with an additional volume force written in the form of the Korteweg stresses arising from nonlocal interaction in the fluid. The fluid's viscosity dependence on polymer conversion and temperature was taken from measurements of poly(dodecyl acrylate). Numerical modeling demonstrated that significant flows would arise for conditions corresponding to the planned experiments.

  18. On the hierarchy of interfacial dislocation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Olson, G. B.

    1985-04-01

    Many different types of dislocations have been defined in dislocation models for grain boundaries and interphase boundaries. It is emphasized that there is no unique dislocation model for a boundary, and that the formal dislocation content depends upon the choice of the lattice correspondence relating the adjoining lattices. However, it is concluded that no problems of real physical significance arise from this lack of uniqueness. “Best≓, or most useful, descriptions often exist, and these are discussed. A hierarchy consisting of four different types of interfacial dislocations may be distinguished, which is useful in describing the dislocation content of interfaces. These entities are termed: (1) primary interfacial dislocations; (2) secondary interfacial dislocations; (3) coherency interfacial dislocations; and (4) translational interfacial dislocations. While there may be a lack of agreement on terminology in the literature, it is believed that these dislocation types are distinguishable and play unique roles in useful dislocation models for interfaces. Detailed descriptions of these dislocation types are given, and actual examples in real interfaces are presented. It is concluded that dislocation descriptions of interface structures become of purely formal significance in the limit of fully incoherent interfaces since the cores are then delocalized. The utility of various dislocation descriptions therefore depends on the degree to which various types of local coherency exist.

  19. Interfacial phenomena in hard-rod fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shundyak, K. Y.

    2004-05-01

    the isotropic-nematic (IN) coexistence and may induce (suppress) a demixing of the high-density nematic phase into two nematic phases of different composition (N1 and N2). Studies of their interfaces show an increase of the surface tension with fractionation at the IN interface, and complete wetting of the IN2 interface by the N1 phase upon approach of the triple point coexistence. In all explored cases bulk and interfacial properties of the nonadditive mixtures exhibit a surprising similarity with the properties of additive mixtures of larger diameter ratio. In Chapter VI we consider properties of a monodisperse hard-rod fluid in contact with the single wall (W). Studies of surface properties of a fluid of Onsager hard rods represent significant numerical difficulties, therefore we consider a simpler model fluid of hard rods with a restricted number of allowed orientations. Within this model, known as the Zwanzig model, we explore the thermodynamic properties of a fluid of monodisperse hard rods in contact with a model substrate represented by a hard wall with a short-ranged attractive or repulsive ``tail''. The attraction enhances the orientational ordering near the wall in both isotropic and nematic phases, and shifts the transition from uniaxial (U) to biaxial (B) symmetry in the isotropic surface layer to lower chemical potentials, whereas the wetting properties of the substrate remain similar to those of the pure hard wall. The soft repulsion reduces the density in the surface layer, which leads to the shift (or even suppression) of the UB transition, and strong modification of wetting properties. At the WI interface one always finds the wetting transition at sufficiently large repulsion, whereas a drying transition at the WN interface is observed only for sufficiently long-ranged potentials. In Chapter VII we explore some limitations of models of hard-rod fluids with a finite number of allowed orientations. Within Onsager's second virial theory we construct

  20. Interfacial closure of contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, F.; Rauer, C.; Moriceau, H.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the contact between solid surfaces is a long-standing problem which has a strong impact on the physics of many processes such as adhesion, friction, lubrication and wear. Experimentally, the investigation of solid/solid interfaces remains challenging today, due to the lack of experimental techniques able to provide sub-nanometer scale information on interfaces buried between millimeters of materials. Yet, a strong interest exists improving the modeling of contact mechanics of materials in order to adjust their interface properties (e.g., thermal transport, friction). We show here that the essential features of the residual gap between contacting surfaces can be measured using high energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity. The presence of this nano-gap is general to the contact of solids. In some special case however, it can be removed when attractive forces take over repulsive contributions, depending on both height and wavelength of asperity distributions (roughness). A criterion for this instability is established in the standard case of van der Waals attractive forces and elastic asperity compression repulsive forces (Hertz model). This collapse instability is confirmed experimentally in the case of silicon direct bonding, using high-energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity and adhesion energy measurements. The possibility to achieve fully closed interfaces at room temperature opens interesting perspectives to build stronger assemblies with smaller thermal budgets.

  1. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  2. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O(2-) migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm(-2) at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  3. Interfacial Shear Rheology of Coffee Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läuger, Jörg; Heyer, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    Both oscillatory and rotational measurements on the film formation process and on interfacial rheological properties of the final film of coffee samples with different concentrations are presented. As higher the concentration as faster the film formation process is, whereas the concentration does not have a large effect on the visco-elastic properties of the final films. Two geometries, a biconical geometry and a Du Noüy ring have been employed. The presented results show that interfacial shear rheology allows detailed investigations on coffee films. Although with a Du Noüy ring it is possible to measure the qualitative behavior and relative differences only the biconical geometry is sensitive enough to test weak films and to reveal real absolute values for the interfacial shear rheological quantities.

  4. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O2- migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm-2 at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  5. Mephisto: Interfacial Destabilization in Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favier, J. J.; Malmejac, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The destabilizing mechanisms at a solidification interface were studied to obtain information on the kinetics and morphologies in the transient and steady state, and to separate the influences of liquid phase instabilities from interfacial instabilities. A differential seebeck voltage measurements technique was developed to provide a continuous record of the solid-liquid interface temperature as the solidification rate is varied to determine the kinetic coefficients. Signal processing and noise suppression techniques allow nonovolt precision which corresponds to mK accuracy for the interfacial temperature.

  6. Francois Frenkiel Award Lecture: Thermocapillary migration of interfacial droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Edwin F.

    2010-11-01

    Thermocapillary migration of bubbles through the bulk liquid--a process in which tangential surface stresses arising from the variation of surface tension with temperature create a propulsive force on the bubble--has been extensively studied in the past. In contrast, the motion of droplets confined to the free surface of a liquid substrate has received much less attention. Recent developments in microfluidics provided new motivation to understand how applied thermal gradients can affect the motion of, and mixing inside, small aqueous droplets. In particular, the quality and speed of mixing depend rather sensitively on the flow structure inside the droplet. In this talk we describe different approaches that allow one to compute both the flow inside interfacial droplets and the flow in the layer of liquid substrate supporting the droplet and the lessons which can be learned by analyzing these flows.

  7. Non-equilibrium dynamics and structure of interfacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-07-01

    Stimulated by recent experiments [C.-Y. Ruan et al. Science 304, (2004) 81], we have performed molecular dynamics and ab initio structural studies of the laser-induced heating and restructuring processes of nanometer-scale ice on a substrate of chlorine terminated Si(1 1 1). Starting from proton disordered cubic ice configurations the thin film behavior has been characterized at several temperatures up to the melting point. The surface induces order with crystallization in the Ic lattice, but with void amorphous regions. The structure changes on the ultrashort time scale and restructures by heat dissipation depending on the relaxation time and final temperature. Our results show the general behavior observed experimentally, thus providing the nature of forces in the atomic-scale description of interfacial ice.

  8. Interfacial Charge Effects on Sticky Bubble Morphology in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Jonathan; Huang, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Many multiphase fluidic processes in small conduits, such as petroleum extraction and biochemical analysis, can encounter disastrous flow blockages due to the lodging of immiscible bubbles or droplets. The complete drainage of a thin-film lubrication layer surrounding an adhered bubble demands a significantly higher threshold pressure gradient in order to reinitiate bulk flows. In this work, we investigate bubble morphology due to the lubrication layer drainage process that results in bubble adhesion and study how an electrostatically charged bubble interface and charged channel wall may affect bubble morphology in preventing bubble adhesion. We report on our multiphysics computational analysis of an oversized gas bubble in a water-filled microchannel under the influence of surface tension and interfacial electrostatic forces. Acknowledgment is made to the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for support of this research.

  9. Mechanisms governing the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system with double ceramic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Fan, Xueling; Wang, T. J.

    2016-05-01

    A systematic study of factors affecting the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system (TBCs) with double ceramic layers (DCL) is presented. Crack driving forces for delaminations at two weak interfaces are examined. The results show that a thicker outermost ceramic layer can induce dramatic increase in crack driving force and make the interface between two ceramic coatings become more prone to delamination. The behavior is shown to be more prominent in TBCs with stiffer outmost coating. The thickness ratio of two ceramic layers is an important parameter for controlling the failure mechanisms and determining the lifetime of DCL TBCs under inservice condition. By accounting for the influences of thickness ratio of two ceramic layers and interfacial fracture toughnesses of two involved interfaces, the fracture mechanism map of DCL TBCs has been constructed, in which different failure mechanisms are identified. The results quanlitatively agree with the aviliable experimental data.

  10. The effects of excipients on protein aggregation during agitation: an interfacial shear rheology study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Qi, Wei; Schwartz, Daniel K; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the effects of excipients in solutions of keratinocyte growth factor 2 (KGF-2) on protein aggregation during agitation as well as on interfacial shear rheology at the air-water interface. Samples were incubated with or without agitation, and in the presence or absence of the excipients heparin, sucrose, or polysorbate 80 (PS80). The effect of excipients on the extent of protein aggregation was determined by UV-visible spectroscopy and micro-flow imaging. Interfacial shear rheology was used to detect the gelation time and strength of protein gels at the air-water interface. During incubation, protein particles of size ≥1 μm and insoluble aggregates formed faster for KGF-2 solutions subjected to agitation. Addition of either heparin or sucrose promoted protein aggregation during agitation. In contrast, PS80 substantially inhibited agitation-induced KGF-2 aggregation but facilitated protein particulate formation in quiescent solutions. The combination of PS80 and heparin or sucrose completely prevented protein aggregation during both nonagitated and agitated incubations. Interfacial rheological measurements showed that KGF-2 in buffer alone formed an interfacial gel within a few minutes. In the presence of heparin, KGF-2 interfacial gels formed too quickly for gelation time to be determined. KGF-2 formed gels in about 10 min in the presence of sucrose. The presence of PS80 in the formulation inhibited gelation of KGF-2. Furthermore, the interfacial gels formed by the protein in the absence of PS80 were reversible when PS80 was added to the samples after gelation. Therefore, there is a correspondence between formulations that exhibited interfacial gelation and formulations that exhibited agitation-induced aggregation.

  11. Laminar Plunging Jets - Interfacial Rupture and Inception of Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Aravind

    number, Cac = η∣Vc/sigma and viscosity ratio, η0/η in postulating an alternate approach involving scaling of the pertinent physics by using liquids as entrained fluids. The scaling approach is tested using a rotating cylinder placed at the interface between two fluids. A mesh-independence study using successively finer meshes predicted critical entrainment velocity values within about 1% of each other. Numerical predictions compared well with experimental data, with less than 1% difference in the case where exact experimental data was available, and a maximum of 6% difference for cases where experimental data was extrapolated to make the comparison. These results lend credibility to our approach. The effect of densities of the two fluids manifests as buoyancy force at the interfacial cusp. Remarkably, contrary to a priori notions, our simulation results showed that as Deltarho increased, the effect of buoyancy decreased relative to other forces at the interfacial cusp. Finally, we proposed an empirical correlation between Cac and η 0/η which allows extrapolation of critical entrainment conditions between the rotating-cylinder configuration (with liquids being entrained) to the plunging-jet configuration (with air being entrained). The primary contribution of this research is the physics-based scaling approach utilized to overcome the simulation challenges posed by the physics of interface rupture and entrainment.

  12. Interfacial & colloidal aspects of lipid digestion.

    PubMed

    Wilde, P J; Chu, B S

    2011-06-09

    chain fatty acids, particularly the very long chain n-3 fatty acids from fish oils are dependent on source and so may depend on food microstructure for optimal uptake [3]. The uptake of some poorly water soluble nutrients are enhanced by the presence of lipids, but the mechanisms are not clear. In addition, controlling the digestion of lipids can be beneficial as slower release of lipids into the bloodstream can reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, and can promote gut feedback processes that reduce appetite. This presents an opportunity to colloid and interfacial science, as there are many unanswered questions regarding the specific physicochemical mechanisms underlying the process of lipid digestion and uptake. I will review our current knowledge of lipid digestion and present examples of how fundamental research in colloidal and interface science is beginning to address these issues. These include the adsorption behaviour of physiological surfactants such as bile salts; interfacial processes by which different polar lipids can influence lipolysis; and the effect of emulsion based delivery systems on cellular uptake of lipid soluble nutrients. A fundamental understanding of these processes is required if we are to develop intelligent design strategies for foods that will deliver optimal nutrition and improved health benefits in order to address the global challenges facing the food sector in the future.

  13. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  14. NGSI student activities in open source information analysis in support of the training program of the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the additional protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M Analisa; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, Marisa N; Boyer, Brian D; Stevens, Rebecca S

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 a joint team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consisting of specialists in training of IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S. Doe laboratories for the entry into force of the Additional Protocol. As a major part of the support of the activity, LANL summer interns provided open source information analysis to the LANL-BNL mock inspection team. They were a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's (NGSI) summer intern program aimed at producing the next generation of safeguards specialists. This paper describes how they used open source information to 'backstop' the LANL-BNL team's effort to construct meaningful Additional Protocol Complementary Access training scenarios for each of the three DOE laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. Interfacial interactions between natural RBC membranes and synthetic polymeric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Brian T.; Jack Hu, Che-Ming; Fang, Ronnie H.; Dehaini, Diana; Carpenter, Cody; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-02-01

    The unique structural features and stealth properties of a recently developed red blood cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticle (RBC-NP) platform raise curiosity over the interfacial interactions between natural cellular membranes and polymeric nanoparticle substrates. Herein, several interfacial aspects of the RBC-NPs are examined, including completeness of membrane coverage, membrane sidedness upon coating, and the effects of polymeric particles' surface charge and surface curvature on the membrane cloaking process. The study shows that RBC membranes completely cover negatively charged polymeric nanoparticles in a right-side-out manner and enhance the particles' colloidal stability. The membrane cloaking process is applicable to particle substrates with a diameter ranging from 65 to 340 nm. Additionally, the study reveals that both surface glycans on RBC membranes and the substrate properties play a significant role in driving and directing the membrane-particle assembly. These findings further the understanding of the dynamics between cellular membranes and nanoscale substrates and provide valuable information toward future development and characterization of cellular membrane-cloaked nanodevices.The unique structural features and stealth properties of a recently developed red blood cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticle (RBC-NP) platform raise curiosity over the interfacial interactions between natural cellular membranes and polymeric nanoparticle substrates. Herein, several interfacial aspects of the RBC-NPs are examined, including completeness of membrane coverage, membrane sidedness upon coating, and the effects of polymeric particles' surface charge and surface curvature on the membrane cloaking process. The study shows that RBC membranes completely cover negatively charged polymeric nanoparticles in a right-side-out manner and enhance the particles' colloidal stability. The membrane cloaking process is applicable to particle substrates with a diameter ranging from

  16. Determination of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange interaction from static domain size imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Parnika; Lemesh, Ivan; Schlotter, Sarah; Beach, Geoffrey

    Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) has been identified [1-2] as a necessary ingredient for the formation of chiral spin structures such as skyrmions and Néel domain walls in perpendicularly magnetized thin films. Various simulation and experimental studies have tried to quantify DMI from domain wall and skyrmion [3-4] motion with applied currents and magnetic fields. Here, a means to quantify DMI in multilayer films using only static magnetic characterizations is proposed. Static domain structure is observed using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) in multilayer stacks of [Pt(2.5-7.5nm)/CoFeB(0.8nm)/MgO(1.5nm)]15 where the thickness tpt of the Pt layer is systematically varied from 2.5 nm to 7.5 nm. A variation of domain size from ~300 nm to ~70 nm is seen in the labyrinthine demagnetized state as tpt is decreased. It is shown that the domain size as a function of tpt can be well-fitted analytically by a model in which the domain wall energy is the sole free parameter. Additional measurements of magnetic anisotropy of the film reveal the significant contribution of interfacial DMI (~1.4 mJ/m2) to the domain wall energy.

  17. Water-ionomer interfacial interactions investigated by infrared spectroscopy and computational methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu; Aquino, Adelia J A; Korzeniewski, Carol

    2013-11-12

    Structures for interfacial water condensed in pores and channels of the fluorinated ionomer Nafion from low relative humidity atmosphere were probed through the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and support from classical and quantum chemical calculations. Modern FTIR spectra of H2O and the O-H stretching region for the deuterium-substituted HOD species interacting at the water-ionomer interface in Nafion exchanged by sodium cations are reported and compared to characteristics observed in the earlier studies that employed a dispersive infrared spectrometer and unspecified spectral resolution. Molecular simulations that examine the orientations of water molecules in the vicinity of ionomer were applied to understand the appearance of multiple free O-H stretching bands and the effect of HOD addition. One computational approach was based on a classical force field model, and the other employed density functional theory (DFT) to investigate atomic-scale interactions of water with regions of different hydrophobicity and charge on a perfluorosulfonate ionomer segment. The results suggest hydrogen bonding stabilizes the types of water-ionomer environments that can lead to multiple free O-H stretching vibrational features in experimental spectra. The studies shed light on the structure of H2O at interfaces inside ion conducting membrane materials and have potential for application in elucidating structure at different types of water interfaces.

  18. Exchange bias mediated by interfacial nanoparticles (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, A. E.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Smith, D. J.

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study on the iconic exchange-bias bilayer Permalloy/CoO has been to identify those elements of the interfacial microstructure and accompanying magnetic properties that are responsible for the exchange-bias and hysteretic properties of this bilayer. Both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples were examined. X-ray and neutron reflectometry established that there existed an interfacial region, of width ∼1 nm, whose magnetic properties differed from those of Py or CoO. A model was developed for the interfacial microstructure that predicts all the relevant properties of this system; namely; the temperature and Permalloy thickness dependence of the exchange-bias, H{sub EX}, and coercivity, H{sub C}; the much smaller measured values of H{sub EX} from what was nominally expected; the different behavior of H{sub EX} and H{sub C} in epitaxial and polycrystalline bilayers. A surprising result is that the exchange-bias does not involve direct exchange-coupling between Permalloy and CoO, but rather is mediated by CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the interfacial region.

  19. Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-13

    investigation supported by this grant moved beyond past studies of interfacial and colloidal phenomena involving isotropic liquids to explore and understand a...2010 20-May-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid...Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 liquid crystals, interfacial phenomena, colloids , amphiphiles

  20. A novel pyrene-based fluorescing amphiphile with unusual bulk and interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Anniina; Knyazev, Anton; von Bandel, Nicolas; Degrouard, Jéril; Langevin, Dominique; Drenckhan, Wiebke

    2011-01-17

    We have synthesised a new, pyrene-based, low-molecular-mass, amphiphilic molecule that displays a wealth of properties of potential interest for aggregation and interfacial applications. In order to elucidate some of the key properties of this molecule, which consists of a pyrene-containing hydrophobic head and a short PEG-based hydrophilic tail, we investigate herein some aspects of its concentration-dependent behaviour in aqueous solutions. We show that the inclusion of the hydrophobic pyrene group not only provides the molecule with intriguing bulk and interfacial properties down to low concentrations, but also with various means of assessing its aggregation behaviour by means of its well-characterised fluorescence properties. Combining a range of fluorescence techniques with microscopic imaging (optical and Cryo-TEM), interfacial tension measurements and foaming studies, we have been able to identify and characterise three concentration-dependant regimes. At low concentrations, the molecule is dissolved in monomeric form. At intermediate concentrations, labile aggregates are formed, which, at higher concentrations, give way to aggregates containing pre-associated pyrenes. Our measurements strongly imply that the latter aggregates are hexagonally close-packed tubular micelles. In this latter regime we also find a range of micron-sized precipitates. Additionally, the molecule displays strong interfacial activity, yet a surprisingly slow dynamics of interfacial adsorption. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of using it to visualize interfaces and also create reasonably stable (1 hour) and fluorescing foams.

  1. Application of nanoindentation testing to study of the interfacial transition zone in steel fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaohui Jacobsen, Stefan; He Jianying; Zhang Zhiliang; Lee, Siaw Foon; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2009-08-15

    The characteristics of the profiles of elastic modulus and hardness of the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zones in steel fiber reinforced mortars have been investigated by using nanoindentation and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), where two sets of parameters, i.e. water/binder ratio and content of silica fume were considered. Different interfacial bond conditions in the interfacial transition zones (ITZ) are discussed. For sample without silica fume, efficient interfacial bonds across the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfaces are shown in low water/binder ratio mortar; while in high water/binder ratio mortar, due to the discontinuous bleeding voids underneath the fiber, the fiber-matrix bond is not very good. On the other hand, for sample with silica fume, the addition of 10% silica fume leads to no distinct presence of weak ITZ in the steel fiber-matrix interface; but the effect of the silica fume on the steel fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zone is not obvious due to voids in the vicinity of steel fiber.

  2. Highly tunable interfacial adhesion of glass fiber by hybrid multilayers of graphene oxide and aramid nanofiber.

    PubMed

    Park, Byeongho; Lee, Wonoh; Lee, Eunhee; Min, Sa Hoon; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-02-11

    The performance of fiber-reinforced composites is governed not only by the nature of each individual component comprising the composite but also by the interfacial properties between the fiber and the matrix. We present a novel layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly for the surface modification of a glass fiber to enhance the interfacial properties between the glass fiber and the epoxy matrix. Solution-processable graphene oxide (GO) and an aramid nanofiber (ANF) were employed as active components for the LbL assembly onto the glass fiber, owing to their abundant functional groups and mechanical properties. We found that the interfacial properties of the glass fibers uniformly coated with GO and ANF multilayers, such as surface free energy and interfacial shear strength, were improved by 23.6% and 39.2%, respectively, compared with those of the bare glass fiber. In addition, the interfacial adhesion interactions between the glass fiber and the epoxy matrix were highly tunable simply by changing the composition and the architecture of layers, taking advantage of the versatility of the LbL assembly.

  3. Interfacial structure, thermodynamics, and electrostatics of aqueous methanol solutions via molecular dynamics simulations using charge equilibration models.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandeep; Zhong, Yang; Bauer, Brad A; Davis, Joseph E

    2009-07-09

    We present results from molecular dynamics simulations of methanol-water solutions using charge equilibration force fields to explicitly account for nonadditive electronic interaction contributions to the potential energy. We study solutions across the concentration range from 0.1 to 0.9 methanol mole fraction. At dilute concentrations, methanol density is enhanced at the liquid-vapor interface, consistent with previous molecular dynamics and experimental studies. Interfacial thickness exhibits a monotonic increase with increasing methanol mole fraction, while surface tensions display monotonic decrease with methanol concentration, in qualitative agreement with experimental data and previous molecular dynamics predictions using polarizable force fields. In terms of interfacial structure, in keeping with predictions of traditional force fields, there is a unique preferential orientation of methanol molecules at the interface. Moreover, there is a free energetic preference for methanol molecules at the interface as evidenced by potential of mean force calculations. The pmf calculations suggest an interfacial state with 0.8 kcal/mol stability relative to the bulk, again in qualitative agreement with previous simulation and experimental studies. Interfacial potentials based on double integration of total charge density range from -610 to -330 mV over the dilute to concentrated regimes, respectively. The preponderance of methanol at the interface at all mole fractions gives rise to a dominant methanol contribution to the total interfacial potential. Interestingly, there is a transition of the water surface potential contribution from negative to positive upon the transition from methanol mole fraction of 0.1 to 0.2. The dipole and quadrupole contributions to the water component of the total interfacial potential are effectively of equal magnitude and opposite sign, thus cancelling one another. We compute the in-plane component of the dielectric permittivity along the

  4. Self-healing sandwich structures incorporating an interfacial layer with vascular network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Peters, Kara; Li, Yulong

    2013-02-01

    A self-healing capability specifically targeted for sandwich composite laminates based on interfacial layers with built-in vascular networks is presented. The self-healing occurs at the facesheet-core interface through an additional interfacial layer to seal facesheet cracks and rebond facesheet-core regions. The efficacy of introducing the self-healing system at the facesheet-core interface is evaluated through four-point bend and edgewise compression testing of representative foam core sandwich composite specimens with impact induced damage. The self-healing interfacial layer partially restored the specific initial stiffness, doubling the residual initial stiffness as compared to the control specimen after the impact event. The restoration of the ultimate specific skin strength was less successful. The results also highlight the critical challenge in self-healing of sandwich composites, which is to rebond facesheets which have separated from the core material.

  5. Interfacial interactions between polyethylene matrix and clay layers in polyethylene/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Zurayk, R.

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene/clay nanocomposites were prepared as blown films using different formulae (clay contents (4 and 6 wt%) and compatibilizer/clay ratio (1/2, 1.0, 2.0)). Structure and mechanical behaviour were tested. It was found that blown film extrusion process decreased the tactoids size and consequently enhanced the exfoliation degree of the clay layers inside the polymer matrix, which is due to the elongational stress during extrusion. Addition of clay had some effects on mechanical behaviour. There was an increase of yield strength (max 32%). Yield strength is related to the interfacial interaction between the polymer and the clay layers in the nanocomposites, which would be enhanced by enhancing the compatibility between polymer and clay layers. Correlation analysis showed good correlation between compatibility and interfacial interaction parameters, and between parameters of interfacial interaction, structure and yield strength.

  6. Are nanometric films of liquid undercooled interfacial water bio-relevant?

    PubMed

    Möhlmann, Diedrich T F

    2009-06-01

    It is known that life processes below the melting point temperature can actively evolve and establish in micrometer-sized (and larger) veins and structures in ice and permafrost soil, filled with unfrozen water. Thermodynamic arguments and experimental results indicate the existence of much smaller nanometer sized thin films of undercooled liquid interfacial (ULI) water on surfaces of micrometer sized and larger mineral particles and microbes in icy environments far below the melting point temperature. This liquid interfacial water can be described in terms of a freezing point depression, which is due to the interfacial pressure of van der Waals forces. The physics behind the possibly also life supporting capability of nanometric films of undercooled liquid interfacial water, which also can "mantle" the surfaces of the much larger and micrometer-sized microbes, is discussed. As described, biological processes do not necessarily have to proceed in the "bulk" of the thin interfacial water, as in "vinical" water and in the micrometer sized veins e.g., but they can be supported or are even made possible already by covering thin mantles of liquid interfacial water. These can provide liquid water for metabolic processes and act as carrier for the necessary transport of nutrients and waste. ULI water supports two different and possibly biologically relevant transport processes: 2D molecular diffusion in the interfacial film, and flow-like due to regelation. ULI-water, which is "lost" by transport into microbes, e.g., will be refilled from the neighbouring ice. In this way, the nanometric liquid environment of microbes in ULI-water is comparable to that of microbes in bulk water. Another probably also biologically relevant property of ULI is, depending on the hydrophobic or hydrophilic character of the surfaces, that it is of lower density (LDL) or higher density (HDL) than bulk water. Furthermore, capillary effects and ions in ULI-water solutions can support, enhance, and

  7. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  8. Direct measurement of anisotropy of interfacial free energy from grain boundary groove morphology in transparent organic metal analong systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rustwick, Bryce A.

    2005-01-01

    Both academia and industry alike have paid close attention to the mechanisms of microstructural selection during the solidification process. The forces that give rise to and the principles which rule the natural selection of particular morphologies are important to understanding and controlling new microstructures. Interfacial properties play a very crucial role to the selection of such microstructure formation. In the solidification of a metallic alloy, the solid-liquid interface is highly mobile and responds to very minute changes in the local conditions. At this interface, the driving force must be large enough to drive solute diffusion, maintain local curvature, and overcome the kinetic barrier to move the interface. Therefore, the anisotropy of interfacial free energy with respect to crystallographic orientation is has a significant influence on the solidification of metallic systems. Although it is generally accepted that the solid-liquid interfacial free energy and its associated anisotropy are highly important to the overall selection of morphology, the confident measurement of these particular quantities remains a challenge, and reported values are scarce. Methods for measurement of the interfacial free energy include nucleation experiments and grain boundary groove experiments. The predominant method used to determine anisotropy of interfacial energy has been equilibrium shape measurement. There have been numerous investigations involving grain boundaries at a solid-liquid interface. These studies indicated the GBG could be used to describe various interfacial energy values, which affect solidification. Early studies allowed for an estimate of interfacial energy with respect to the GBG energy, and finally absolute interfacial energy in a constant thermal gradient. These studies however, did not account for the anisotropic nature of the material at the GBG. Since interfacial energy is normally dependent on orientation of the crystallographic plane of the

  9. Interfacial stress balances in structured continua and free surface flows in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Chaves, Arlex; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2014-04-15

    Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balances are obtained for a structured continuum and for the special case of a ferrofluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a Newtonian fluid. The interfacial balance equations account for the effects of surface tension and surface tension gradient, magnetic surface excess forces, antisymmetric stresses, and couple stresses in driving interfacial flows in ferrofluids. Application of the interfacial balance equations is illustrated by obtaining analytical expressions for the translational and spin velocity profiles in a thin film of ferrofluid on an infinite flat plate when a rotating magnetic field is applied with axis of rotation parallel to the ferrofluid/air interface. The cases of zero and non-zero spin viscosity are considered for small applied magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the maximum translational velocity, slope of the translational velocity profile at the ferrofluid/air interface, and volumetric flow rate are obtained and their use to test the relevance of spin viscosity and couple stresses in the flow situation under consideration is discussed.

  10. The interfacial strength of carbon nanofiber epoxy composite using single fiber pullout experiments.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, M P; Sharma, A; Desai, A V; Haque, M A; Bakis, C E; Wang, K W

    2009-07-22

    Carbon nanotubes and nanofibers are extensively researched as reinforcing agents in nanocomposites for their multifunctionality, light weight and high strength. However, it is the interface between the nanofiber and the matrix that dictates the overall properties of the nanocomposite. The current trend is to measure elastic properties of the bulk nanocomposite and then compare them with theoretical models to extract the information on the interfacial strength. The ideal experiment is single fiber pullout from the matrix because it directly measures the interfacial strength. However, the technique is difficult to apply to nanocomposites because of the small size of the fibers and the requirement for high resolution force and displacement sensing. We present an experimental technique for measuring the interfacial strength of nanofiber-reinforced composites using the single fiber pullout technique and demonstrate the technique for a carbon nanofiber-reinforced epoxy composite. The experiment is performed in situ in a scanning electron microscope and the interfacial strength for the epoxy composite was measured to be 170 MPa.

  11. Nanoscopic characterization of the water vapor-salt interfacial layer reveals a unique biphasic adsorption process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; He, Jianfeng; Shen, Yi; Li, Xiaowei; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Our quantitative understanding of water adsorption onto salt surfaces under ambient conditions is presently quite poor owing to the difficulties in directly characterizing this interfacial layer under these conditions. Here we determine the thickness of the interfacial layer on NaCl at different relative humidities (RH) based on a novel application of atomic force spectroscopy and capillary condensation theory. In particular, we take advantage of the microsecond-timescale of the capillary condensation process to directly resolve the magnitude of its contribution in the tip-sample interaction, from which the interfacial water thickness is determined. Further, to correlate this thickness with salt dissolution, we also measure surface conductance under similar conditions. We find that below 30% RH, there is essentially only the deposition of water molecules onto this surface, typical of conventional adsorption onto solid surfaces. However, above 30% RH, adsorption is simultaneous with the dissolution of ions, unlike conventional adsorption, leading to a rapid increase of surface conductance. Thus, water adsorption on NaCl is an unconventional biphasic process in which the interfacial layer not only exhibits quantitative differences in thickness but also qualitative differences in composition. PMID:27527905

  12. Two-phase flow interfacial structures in a rod bundle geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Sidharth S.

    Interfacial structure of air-water two-phase flow in a scaled nuclear reactor rod bundle geometry was studied in this research. Global and local flow regimes were obtained for the rod bundle geometry. Local two-phase flow parameters were measured at various axial locations in order to understand the transport of interfacial structures. A one-dimensional two-group interfacial area transport model was evaluated using the local parameter database. Air-water two-phase flow experiments were performed in an 8 X 8 rod bundle test section to obtain flow regime maps at various axial locations. Area averaged void fraction was measured using parallel plate type impedance void meters. The cumulative probability distribution functions of the signals from the impedance void meters were used along with a self organizing neural network to identify flow regimes. Local flow regime maps revealed the cross-sectional distribution of flow regimes in the bundle. Local parameters that characterize interfacial structure, that is, void fraction alpha, interfacial area concentration, ai, bubble Sauter mean diameter, DSm and bubble velocity, vg were measured using four sensor conductivity probe technique. The local data revealed the distribution of the interfacial structure in the radial direction, as well as its development in the axial direction. In addition to this, the effect of spacer grid on the flow structure at different gas and liquid velocities was revealed by local parameter measurements across the spacer grids. A two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) specific to rod bundle geometry was derived. The derivation of two-group IATE required certain assumption on the bubble shapes in the subchannels and the bubbles spanning more than a subchannel. It was found that the geometrical relationship between the volume and the area of a cap bubble distorted by rods was similar to the one derived for a confined channel under a specific geometrical transformation. The one

  13. Use of self-assembled monolayers to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-03-02

    The relationship between the nature and spatial distribution of fundamental interfacial interactions and fracture stress/fracture toughness of a glassy adhesive-inorganic solid joint is not understood. This relationship is important from the standpoint of designing interfacial chemistry sufficient to provide the level of mechanical strength required for a particular application. In addition, it is also important for understanding the effects of surface contamination. Different types of contamination, or different levels of contamination, likely impact joint strength in different ways. Furthermore, the relationship is also important from the standpoint of aging. If interfacial chemical bonds scission over time due to the presence of a contaminant such as water, or exposure to UV, etc, the relationship between joint strength/fracture toughness and interface strength is important for predicting reliability with time. A fundamental understanding of the relationship between joint strength and fundamental interfacial interactions will give insight into these issues.

  14. A nano-cheese-cutter to directly measure interfacial adhesion of freestanding nano-fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Najem, Johnny F.; Wong, Shing-Chung; Wan, Kai-tak

    2012-01-01

    A nano-cheese-cutter is fabricated to directly measure the adhesion between two freestanding nano-fibers. A single electrospun fiber is attached to the free end of an atomic force microscope cantilever, while a similar fiber is similarly prepared on a mica substrate in an orthogonal direction. External load is applied to deform the two fibers into complementary V-shapes, and the force measurement allows the elastic modulus to be determined. At a critical tensile load, "pull-off" occurs when the adhering fibers spontaneously detach from each other, yielding the interfacial adhesion energy. Loading-unloading cycles are performed to investigate repeated adhesion-detachment and surface degradation.

  15. Interfacial Properties of a Hydrophobic Dye in the Tetrachloroethylene-Water-Glass Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-02-23

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media. Strongly hydrophobic organic dyes, used in many experimental studies to facilitate visual observation of the phase distributions, have generally been implicitly assumed to have no influence on the interfacial properties of the various phases in porous media. Sudan IV is the most commonly used dye for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in laboratory experiments. It has also been used in at least one field experiment. The effects of this dye on the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system were investigated to test the assumption that the dye does not effect the interfacial properties and therefore PCE mobility. The results indicate that the dye does indeed change the interfacial relationships.The effect of the dye on the interfacial relationships is a complex function of the dye concentration, the solid phase composition, and the dynamic rate of new interface formation. The dye caused a slight (<10 percent) increase in interfacial tension at low concentrations (<0.1 g/L) and high rates of new interface formation. The dye reduced interfacial tension between PCE and water at low rates of new interface formation for all dye concentrations tested (0.00508 to 5.08 g/L). At the highest dye concentration, the PCE-water interfacial tension was significantly reduced regardless of the rate of new interface formation. The apparent interfacial tension increase at low dye concentrations is suspected to be an artifact of a low measured IFT value for the undyed PCE caused by leaching of rubber o-rings by the PCE prior to testing in the final drop-volume configuration.In addition to reducing interfacial tension, the dye was found to significantly alter the wetting relationship between PCE and water on a glass surface at and above the range of reported dye concentrations cited in the literature (1.1 to 1.7 g/L). The wetting relationship was rendered neutral from a water-wet initial

  16. Interfacial undercooling in solidification of colloidal suspensions: analyses with quantitative measurements

    PubMed Central

    You, Jiaxue; Wang, Lilin; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Lin, Xin; Huang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial undercooling in the complex solidification of colloidal suspensions is of significance and remains a puzzling problem. Two types of interfacial undercooling are supposed to be involved in the freezing of colloidal suspensions, i.e., solute constitutional supercooling (SCS) caused by additives in the solvent and particulate constitutional supercooling (PCS) caused by particles. However, quantitative identification of the interfacial undercooling in the solidification of colloidal suspensions, is still absent; thus, the question of which type of undercooling is dominant in this complex system remains unanswered. Here, we quantitatively measured the static and dynamic interface undercoolings of SCS and PCS in ideal and practical colloidal systems. We show that the interfacial undercooling primarily comes from SCS caused by the additives in the solvent, while PCS is minor. This finding implies that the thermodynamic effect of particles from the PCS is not the fundamental physical mechanism for pattern formation of cellular growth and lamellar structure in the solidification of colloidal suspensions, a general case of ice-templating method. Instead, the patterns in the ice-templating method can be controlled effectively by adjusting the additives. PMID:27329394

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of Interfacial Water at Selected Sulfide Mineral Surfaces under Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we report on a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) study of the behavior of interfacial water at selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions. The study revealed the interfacial water structure and wetting characteristics of the pyrite (100) surface, galena (100) surface, chalcopyrite (012) surface, sphalerite (110) surface, and molybdenite surfaces (i.e., the face, armchair-edge, and zigzag-edge surfaces), including simulated contact angles, relative number density profiles, water dipole orientations, hydrogen-bonding, and residence times. For force fields of the metal and sulfur atoms in selected sulfide minerals used in the MDS, we used the universal force field (UFF) and another set of force fields optimized by quantum chemical calculations for interactions with interfacial water molecules at selected sulfide mineral surfaces. Simulation results for the structural and dynamic properties of interfacial water molecules indicate the natural hydrophobic character for the selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions as well as the relatively weak hydrophobicity for the sphalerite (110) surface and two molybdenite edge surfaces. Part of the financial support for this study was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Basic Science Grant No. DE-FG-03-93ER14315. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE, funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES. The authors are grateful to Professor Tsun-Mei Chang for valuable discussions.

  18. Interfacial action of natural surfactants in oil/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.; Onishi, M.

    1981-09-01

    This paper concerns the tendency of a few natural surfactants at the oil/water interface to induce spontaneous emulsification. N-paraffin (n-dodecane), liquid triglycerides (oleic safflower oil and corn oil), and liquid fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) were used as the oil phase and distilled water was used as the water phase. Natural surfactants such as cholesterol, lecithin, and oleic acid were applied to the systems as the oil-soluble additives. Lecithin was the most strongly effective in reducing the interfacial tension of the oil/water systems, and cholesterol was effective at the second strength. The oil/water interface of the systems containing the oil-soluble additives changed in various ways as observed by microscopy and the unaided eye. The most remarkable change was found in the system of glycerides containing cholesterol in contact with water, in which crystals of cholesterol were formed at the interface. 13 references.

  19. Ordered mesoporous materials based on interfacial assembly and engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yue, Qin; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-04

    Ordered mesoporous materials have inspired prominent research interest due to their unique properties and functionalities and potential applications in adsorption, separation, catalysis, sensors, drug delivery, energy conversion and storage, and so on. Thanks to continuous efforts over the past two decades, great achievements have been made in the synthesis and structural characterization of mesoporous materials. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in preparing ordered mesoporous materials from the viewpoint of interfacial assembly and engineering. Five interfacial assembly and synthesis are comprehensively highlighted, including liquid-solid interfacial assembly, gas-liquid interfacial assembly, liquid-liquid interfacial assembly, gas-solid interfacial synthesis, and solid-solid interfacial synthesis, basics about their synthesis pathways, princples and interface engineering strategies.

  20. Solar-Pumping Upconversion of Interfacial Coordination Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Ayumi; Hasegawa, Miki

    2017-01-01

    An interfacial coordination nanoparticle successfully exhibited an upconversion blue emission excited by very low-power light irradiation, such as sunlight. The interfacial complex was composed of Yb ions and indigo dye, which formed a nano-ordered thin shell layer on a Tm2O3 nanoparticle. At the surface of the Tm2O3 particle, the indigo dye can be excited by non-laser excitation at 640 nm, following the intramolecular energy transfer from the indigo dye to the Yb ions. Additionally, the excitation energy of the Yb ion was upconverted to the blue emission of the Tm ion at 475 nm. This upconversion blue emission was achieved by excitation with a CW Xe lamp at an excitation power of 0.14 mW/cm2, which is significantly lower than the solar irradiation power of 1.4 mW/cm2 at 640 ± 5 nm.

  1. Solar-Pumping Upconversion of Interfacial Coordination Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Ayumi; Hasegawa, Miki

    2017-01-01

    An interfacial coordination nanoparticle successfully exhibited an upconversion blue emission excited by very low-power light irradiation, such as sunlight. The interfacial complex was composed of Yb ions and indigo dye, which formed a nano-ordered thin shell layer on a Tm2O3 nanoparticle. At the surface of the Tm2O3 particle, the indigo dye can be excited by non-laser excitation at 640 nm, following the intramolecular energy transfer from the indigo dye to the Yb ions. Additionally, the excitation energy of the Yb ion was upconverted to the blue emission of the Tm ion at 475 nm. This upconversion blue emission was achieved by excitation with a CW Xe lamp at an excitation power of 0.14 mW/cm2, which is significantly lower than the solar irradiation power of 1.4 mW/cm2 at 640 ± 5 nm. PMID:28134295

  2. Plasmonic Imaging of the Interfacial Potential Distribution on Bipolar Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hasheminejad, Meisam; Fang, Yimin; Li, Meng; Jiang, Yingyan; Wang, Wei; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    Bipolar electrochemistry is based on the gradient distribution of free-electron density along an electrically isolated electrode, which causes a positive electrode potential at one end and a negative potential at the other, allowing for wide applications in analytical chemistry and materials science. To take full advantage of its wireless and high-throughput features, various types of optical probes, such as pH indicators and fluorescence and electrochemiluminescence reagents, have often been used to indirectly monitor the interfacial electron transfer through chromogenic or fluorogenic reactions. Herein, we report the first probe-free imaging approach that can directly visualize the distribution of the interfacial potential in bipolar electrodes, providing essential information for the validation and development of the theory and applications of bipolar electrochemistry. This approach is based on the sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance imaging on the local electron density in the electrode, which enables the direct mapping of potential with a spatial resolution close to the optical diffraction limit, a temporal resolution of 50 ms, and a sensitivity of 10 mV. In addition, in contrast to previous optical readouts that relied on faradaic reactions, the present work achieved the impedance-based measurements under non-faradaic conditions. It is anticipated that this technique will greatly expand the application of bipolar electrochemistry as a platform for chemical and biosensing.

  3. Intelligent chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Richards, Gary J; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Izawa, Hironori; Hill, Jonathan P

    2010-01-01

    Of the known intelligently-operating systems, the majority can undoubtedly be classed as being of biological origin. One of the notable differences between biological and artificial systems is the important fact that biological materials consist mostly of chiral molecules. While most biochemical processes routinely discriminate chiral molecules, differentiation between chiral molecules in artificial systems is currently one of the challenging subjects in the field of molecular recognition. Therefore, one of the important challenges for intelligent man-made sensors is to prepare a sensing system that can discriminate chiral molecules. Because intermolecular interactions and detection at surfaces are respectively parts of supramolecular chemistry and interfacial science, chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts is a significant topic. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in these fields, including supramolecular hosts for color detection on chiral sensing, indicator-displacement assays, kinetic resolution in supramolecular reactions with analyses by mass spectrometry, use of chiral shape-defined polymers, such as dynamic helical polymers, molecular imprinting, thin films on surfaces of devices such as QCM, functional electrodes, FET, and SPR, the combined technique of magnetic resonance imaging and immunoassay, and chiral detection using scanning tunneling microscopy and cantilever technology. In addition, we will discuss novel concepts in recent research including the use of achiral reagents for chiral sensing with NMR, and mechanical control of chiral sensing. The importance of integration of chiral sensing systems with rapidly developing nanotechnology and nanomaterials is also emphasized.

  4. Intelligent Chiral Sensing Based on Supramolecular and Interfacial Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Richards, Gary J.; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Izawa, Hironori; Hill, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Of the known intelligently-operating systems, the majority can undoubtedly be classed as being of biological origin. One of the notable differences between biological and artificial systems is the important fact that biological materials consist mostly of chiral molecules. While most biochemical processes routinely discriminate chiral molecules, differentiation between chiral molecules in artificial systems is currently one of the challenging subjects in the field of molecular recognition. Therefore, one of the important challenges for intelligent man-made sensors is to prepare a sensing system that can discriminate chiral molecules. Because intermolecular interactions and detection at surfaces are respectively parts of supramolecular chemistry and interfacial science, chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts is a significant topic. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in these fields, including supramolecular hosts for color detection on chiral sensing, indicator-displacement assays, kinetic resolution in supramolecular reactions with analyses by mass spectrometry, use of chiral shape-defined polymers, such as dynamic helical polymers, molecular imprinting, thin films on surfaces of devices such as QCM, functional electrodes, FET, and SPR, the combined technique of magnetic resonance imaging and immunoassay, and chiral detection using scanning tunneling microscopy and cantilever technology. In addition, we will discuss novel concepts in recent research including the use of achiral reagents for chiral sensing with NMR, and mechanical control of chiral sensing. The importance of integration of chiral sensing systems with rapidly developing nanotechnology and nanomaterials is also emphasized. PMID:22163577

  5. A Noncontact Picolitor Droplet Handling by Photothermal Control of Interfacial Flow.

    PubMed

    Muto, Masakazu; Yamamoto, Makoto; Motosuke, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    We present a noncontact handling of droplets in a microfluidic platform by the Marangoni convection, interfacial tension driven flow, generated by a light-induced local temperature gradient in the surrounding liquid of the droplet. Droplets flowing in a microchannel experience a force due to the interfacial tension gradient when approaching the heated area. This method provides noncontact, selective and flexible manipulation for droplets flowing in microchannel network. In this study, an O/W emulsion system with oleic acid for the dispersed phase and a buffer solution for the continuous one was used. Trajectory control and trapping for droplets with 5 - 65 pL in volume was achieved by patterned laser irradiation. Also, we quantitatively evaluated the driving force exerted on droplets by measuring the fluidic temperature distribution around the droplet. From the balance of the drag force and the photo-induced Marangoni force, the driving force was determined using the measured temperature gradient of the droplet. From the results, the applicability of noncontact droplet manipulation using the photothermal Marangoni effect by continuous-phase heating has been demonstrated.

  6. Mesoscale Interfacial Dynamics in Magnetoelectric Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Shashank, Priya

    2009-12-14

    Biphasic composites are the key towards achieving enhanced magnetoelectric response. In order understand the control behavior of the composites and resultant symmetry of the multifunctional product tensors, we need to synthesized model material systems with the following features (i) interface formation through either deposition control or natural decomposition; (ii) a very high interphase-interfacial area, to maximize the ME coupling; and (iii) an equilibrium phase distribution and morphology, resulting in preferred crystallographic orientation relations between phases across the interphase-interfacial boundaries. This thought process guided the experimental evolution in this program. We initiated the research with the co-fired composites approach and then moved on to the thin film laminates deposited through the rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition process

  7. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  8. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  9. Interfacial thermodynamics of micro heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.W. ); Peterson, G.P. )

    1995-02-01

    Successful analysis and modeling of micro heat pipes requires a complete understanding of the vapor-liquid interface. A thermodynamic model of the vapor-liquid interface in micro heat pipes has been formulated that includes axial pressure and temperature differences, changes in local interfacial curvature, Marangoni effects, and the disjoining pressure. Relationships were developed for the interfacial mass flux in an extended meniscus, the heat transfer rate in the intrinsic meniscus, the 'thermocapillary' heat-pipe limitation, as well as the nonevaporating superheated liquid film thickness that exists between adjacent menisci and occurs during liquid dry out in the evaporator. These relationships can be used to define quantitative restrictions and/or requirements necessary for proper operation of micro heat pipes. They also provide fundamental insight into the critical mechanisms required for proper heat pipe operation. 29 refs., 6 figs.

  10. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  11. Frontiers of interfacial water research :workshop report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2005-10-01

    Water is the critical natural resource of the new century. Significant improvements in traditional water treatment processes require novel approaches based on a fundamental understanding of nanoscale and atomic interactions at interfaces between aqueous solution and materials. To better understand these critical issues and to promote an open dialog among leading international experts in water-related specialties, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored a workshop on April 24-26, 2005 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The ''Frontiers of Interfacial Water Research Workshop'' provided attendees with a critical review of water technologies and emphasized the new advances in surface and interfacial microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and computer simulation needed for the development of new materials for water treatment.

  12. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Vaz, C A F; Walker, F J; Ahn, C H; Ismail-Beigi, S

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  14. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  15. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  16. Magnetoelectric Coupling Induced by Interfacial Orbital Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bin; Song, Cheng; Mao, Haijun; Wu, Huaqiang; Li, Fan; Peng, Jingjing; Wang, Guangyue; Zeng, Fei; Pan, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Reversible orbital reconstruction driven by ferroelectric polarization modulates the magnetic performance of model ferroelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructures without onerous limitations. Mn-d(x2-y2) orbital occupancy and related interfacial exotic magnetic states are enhanced and weakened by negative and positive electric fields, respectively, filling the missing member-orbital in the mechanism of magnetoelectric coupling and advancing the application of orbitals to microelectronics.

  17. The electrochemical surface forces apparatus: the effect of surface roughness, electrostatic surface potentials, and anodic oxide growth on interaction forces, and friction between dissimilar surfaces in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Valtiner, Markus; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Greene, George W; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2012-09-11

    We present a newly designed electrochemical surface forces apparatus (EC-SFA) that allows control and measurement of surface potentials and interfacial electrochemical reactions with simultaneous measurement of normal interaction forces (with nN resolution), friction forces (with μN resolution), and distances (with Å resolution) between apposing surfaces. We describe three applications of the developed EC-SFA and discuss the wide-range of potential other applications. In particular, we describe measurements of (1) force-distance profiles between smooth and rough gold surfaces and apposing self-assembled monolayer-covered smooth mica surfaces; (2) the effective changing thickness of anodically growing oxide layers with Å-accuracy on rough and smooth surfaces; and (3) friction forces evolving at a metal-ceramic contact, all as a function of the applied electrochemical potential. Interaction forces between atomically smooth surfaces are well-described using DLVO theory and the Hogg-Healy-Fuerstenau approximation for electric double layer interactions between dissimilar surfaces, which unintuitively predicts the possibility of attractive double layer forces between dissimilar surfaces whose surface potentials have similar sign, and repulsive forces between surfaces whose surface potentials have opposite sign. Surface roughness of the gold electrodes leads to an additional exponentially repulsive force in the force-distance profiles that is qualitatively well described by an extended DLVO model that includes repulsive hydration and steric forces. Comparing the measured thickness of the anodic gold oxide layer and the charge consumed for generating this layer allowed the identification of its chemical structure as a hydrated Au(OH)(3) phase formed at the gold surface at high positive potentials. The EC-SFA allows, for the first time, one to look at complex long-term transient effects of dynamic processes (e.g., relaxation times), which are also reflected in friction

  18. Characterization of interfacial solvent in protein complexes and contribution of wet spots to the interface description.

    PubMed

    Teyra, Joan; Pisabarro, M T

    2007-06-01

    Water networks in protein interfaces can complement direct interactions contributing significantly to molecular recognition, function, and stability of protein association. Thus, water can be seen as an extension or addition of protein structural features, which may add plenty of information to protein interfacial definition. However, solvent is frequently neglected in protein interaction studies. Analysis of the interfacial information contained in the PDB is essential to achieve more accurate descriptions of protein interfaces. With this aim, we have used the SCOWLP database (http://www.scowlp.org) and applied computational geometry methods to extract and analyze interfacial information of a high-resolution nonredundant dataset of 176 protein complexes containing obligate and transient interfaces. We have identified all interfacial residues and characterized them in terms of temperature factors, secondary structure, residue composition, and pairing preferences to understand their contribution to the interface description. We have paid special attention to water-bridged residues; focusing on those that interact only mediated by a water molecule called wet spots. Our results show that 40.1% of the interfacial residues are interacting through water and that wet spots represent a 14.5% of the total, emphasizing the importance of the inclusion of solvent in protein interaction studies, and the contribution of wet spots to interfacial description. Wet spots present similar characteristics to residues binding buried water molecules in the core or cavities of proteins; being preferably located in nonregular secondary structures and establishing hydrogen bonds by their main-chains. We observe that obligate and transient interfaces present a comparable amount of solvent. Moreover, the role of solvent in both complex types differs according to the different nature of their interfaces. The information obtained in our studies will assist in the process of accomplishing more

  19. Interfacial tension and interfacial profiles: an equation-of-state approach.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2003-11-15

    A quasi-thermodynamic approach of inhomogeneous systems is used for modeling the fluid-fluid interface. It is based on the recently introduced QCHB (quasi-chemical hydrogen bonding) equation-of-state model of fluids and their mixtures, which is used for the estimation of the Helmholtz free energy density difference, Deltapsi(0), between the system with interface and another system of the same constitution but without interface. Consistent expressions for the interfacial tension and interfacial profiles for various properties are presented. The interfacial tension is proportional to the integral of Deltapsi(0) along the full height of the system, the proportionality constant being equal to 1, when no density gradient contributions are taken into consideration, 2, when the Cahn-Hilliard approximation is adopted, and 4, when the full density gradient contributions are taken into consideration. A satisfactory agreement is obtained between experimental and calculated surface tensions. Extension of the approach to mixtures is examined along with the associated problems for the numerical calculations of the interfacial profiles. A new equation is derived for the chemical potentials in the interfacial region, which facilitates very much the calculation of the composition profiles across the interface.

  20. Synergistic effect of ZnO nanoparticles and triblock copolymer surfactant on the dynamic and equilibrium oil-water interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Tahereh Fereidooni; Azizian, Saeid

    2014-09-07

    The present study reports the effects of non-ionic surfactant Pluronic F-127 on the equilibrium and dynamic oil-water interfacial tension in the presence of ZnO nanoparticles. The results show that in the presence of nanoparticles, the decrease of interfacial tension is more. The cooperative behavior of F-127 and ZnO nanoparticles especially at low concentrations increases the surfactant efficiency in lowering the interfacial tension. Statistical rate theory (SRT) and mixed diffusion-kinetic controlled model were used for modeling the dynamic interfacial tension data. The modeling results show that the mechanism of surfactant adsorption is controlled with the mixed diffusion-kinetic model. In addition, the influence of the solution pH on the interfacial tension was investigated. Finally, the effects of F-127 on the contact angle in the absence and presence of ZnO was compared.

  1. Investigation of the mechanical and interfacial properties of adenovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, William Garrett

    The ability to investigate materials at the single molecule and macromolecule level became a reality with the introduction of the atomic force microscope (AFM) by Bennig et al. in 1986. Presented in this dissertation is a modification to the AFM that facilitates imaging of delicate samples under liquids. The instrument was subsequently used to investigate a variety of material and interfacial properties of adenovirus. Firstly, the elasticity of adenovirus particles in air and in water was measured. The virus was found to be some fifty fold more compliant in water than in air, with the measured elastic modulus changing from 15 MPa to 770 MPa. Individual viruses also were translated across a variety of surfaces, and the force required to do these manipulations was recorded. A variety of behaviors were observed, including evidence for rolling of the particles. This measurement constitutes one of the first direct observations of rolling behavior on this length scale. Finally, viruses were observed to shed their capsid proteins when deposited on positively charged magnesium intercalated mica. The resulting core structure was investigated, and the uncoating process was captured in a series of images. These images represent one of the first molecular level processes to be observed at the single molecule level.

  2. Wettability and interfacial interactions in bioceramic-body-liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Agathopoulos, S; Nikolopoulos, P

    1995-04-01

    Wetting experiments, by the sessile drop technique, were carried out at 37 degrees C in air to determine the surface and interfacial interactions that take place in various solid bioceramics based on Al2O3, ZrO2(YPZ), SiO2, and TiO2 in contact with water, Ringer solution, artificial synovial fluid, calf serum, human plasma, and whole blood (+ EDTA). The surface energy of the liquids was measured by the ring method. The calculated values of the energy of interaction (work of adhesion) reveal that intermolecular forces act across the solid-liquid interfaces. The contribution of the dispersion and polar interactions to the surface energy of the polar liquids and the pure or mixed oxides was determined assuming that in the system of Mn-steel-liquids only dispersion forces act at the interface. It was found that the contribution of the polar interactions to the energy of interaction at the solid-liquid interface increases with the glassy phase content of the oxide that causes reduction of the measured contact angle.

  3. Effect of chemical treatment of Kevlar fibers on mechanical interfacial properties of composites.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Min-Kang; Ma, Tae-Jun; Lee, Douk-Rae

    2002-08-01

    In this work, the effects of chemical treatment on Kevlar 29 fibers have been studied in a composite system. The surface characteristics of Kevlar 29 fibers were characterized by pH, acid-base value, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and FT-IR. The mechanical interfacial properties of the final composites were studied by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)), and specific fracture energy (G(IC)). Also, impact properties of the composites were investigated in the context of differentiating between initiation and propagation energies and ductile index (DI) along with maximum force and total energy. As a result, it was found that chemical treatment with phosphoric acid solution significantly affected the degree of adhesion at interfaces between fibers and resin matrix, resulting in improved mechanical interfacial strength in the composites. This was probably due to the presence of chemical polar groups on Kevlar surfaces, leading to an increment of interfacial binding force between fibers and matrix in a composite system.

  4. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J M; Algaba, J; Míguez, J M; Mendiboure, B; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Piñeiro, M M; Blas, F J

    2016-04-14

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  5. Surface Tension Prediction Using Characteristics of the Density Profile Through the Interfacial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemhoff, A. P.; Carey, V. P.

    2006-03-01

    A simple surface tension estimation technique is described that is based solely upon the characteristics of the density profile in the interfacial region and the physical properties of the molecules in the fluid. This method, denoted free energy integration (FEI), links interfacial tension to known interfacial region density profile characteristics obtained via experiment or simulation. The general FEI methodology is provided here, and specific relations are derived for a methodology that incorporates the Redlich-Kwong fluid model. The Redlich-Kwong based FEI method was used to predict interfacial tension using the density profile characteristics of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of argon using the Lennard-Jones potential, diatomic nitrogen using the two-center Lennard-Jones potential, and water using the extended simple point-charge (SPC/E) model. These results for argon compare favorably to values calculated by the traditional virial approach, known values from the literature using the finite-size scaling technique, and ASHRAE recommended values. In addition, the FEI predictions agree well with ASHRAE values and predictions using the virial method for nitrogen for the simulated range of temperatures in this study, and for water for reduced temperatures above 0.7. In addition, the FEI method results agree well with other established theoretical techniques for predictions of the surface tension of sulfur hexafluoride close to the critical point.

  6. Interfacial photochemistry of retinal proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Felix T.

    1999-09-01

    Retinal proteins are membrane-bound protein pigments that contain vitamin A aldehyde (retinal) as the chromophore. They include the visual pigment rhodopsin and four additional ones in the plasma membrane of Halobacterium salinarium (formerly Halobacterium halobium). These proteins maintain a fixed and asymmetric orientation in the membranes, and respond to a light stimulus by generating vectorial charge movement, which can be detected as an electric potential across the membrane or an electric current through the membrane. These phenomena are collectively called the photoelectric effects, which defy a rigorous quantitative treatment by means of either conventional (solution phase) photochemistry or conventional electrophysiology. As an alternative to the mainstream approach, we utilize the analytic tools of electrochemical surface science and electrophysiology to analyze two molecular models of light-induced charge separation and recombination. Being tutorial in nature, this article demands no prior knowledge about the subject. A parsimonious equivalent circuit model is developed. Data obtained from reconstituted bacteriorhodopsin membranes are used to validate the theoretical model and the analytical approach. Data generated and used by critics to refute our approach is shown to actually support it. The present analysis is sufficiently general to be applicable to other pigment-containing membranes, such as the visual photoreceptor membrane and the chlorophyll-based photosynthetic membranes. It provides a coherent description of a wide range of light-induced phenomena associated with various pigment-containing membranes. In contrast, the mainstream approach has been plagued with self-contradictions and paradoxes. Last, but not least, the alternative bioelectrochemical approach also exhibits a predictive power that has hitherto been generally lacking. Comparison of the photoelectric effects is made with regard to bacteriorhodopsin, rhodopsin, and the chlorophyll

  7. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    DOE PAGES

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges.more » In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.« less

  8. Interfacial Reaction Characteristics of Au Stud/Sn/Cu Pillar Bump During Annealing and Current Stressing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Beom; Lee, Byeong-Rok; Kim, Sung-Hyuk; Park, Jong-Myeong; Park, Young-Bae

    2015-11-01

    In this work, intermetallic compound (IMC) growth behavior in Au stud/Sn/Cu pillar bumps was investigated under annealing and current stressing conditions. AuSn2 and AuSn4 IMCs formed at the interface between the Au studs and Sn after bonding. The AuSn2 phase grew significantly as the stressing time increased, causing micro-voids to form near the (Cu, Au)6Sn5, AuSn2 and AuSn4 IMC interfaces. The interfacial reactions resulting from current stressing took place quicker than observed for pure annealing. The apparent activation energies for the growth of the AuSn2 phase during annealing and current stressing were 0.52 eV and 0.47 eV, respectively, which may be closely related to the acceleration of the interfacial reaction by electron wind forces during current stressing.

  9. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  10. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  11. Atomic simulations of effects of contact size and interfacial interaction strength on superlubricity in incommensurate sliding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng-Zhe; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Ma, Tian-Bao; Li, Rui; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of contact size and interfacial interaction strength on superlubricity in incommensurate sliding interface is critically needed for the design and development of nanoscale ultra-low friction devices. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the sliding friction behaviors of an incommensurate interface consisting of a diamond slider and a silver substrate. The instantaneous relative lattice constant is proposed to quantitatively describe the commensurability of contacting surfaces in the sliding process. It is found that when the contact size is large, the slider exhibits ultra-low friction force. While for small contact size, superlubricity behavior breaks down,which is due to the transition of incommensurate-commensurate interfacial configuration in the local contact region. It is also found that when the interfacial interaction strength is reduced below a critical value, the obvious stick-slip motion observed for the small slider with large interfacial interaction strength disappears and superlubricity behavior occurs, which results from the incommensurate interfacial configuration in the contact region maintained during the sliding process. These results provide a first demonstration that the instantaneous incommensurate-commensurate transition in the local contact region can result in the breakdown of superlubricity in a realistic three-dimensional sliding system. The obtained results not only may guide the design of nanoscale ultra-low friction devices, but also provide some insights into the origins of friction at macroscopic interfaces which usually consists of many small nanoscale contacts.

  12. Interfacial inhibitors of protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2005-07-01

    This essay develops the paradigm of "Interfacial Inhibitors" (Pommier and Cherfils, TiPS, 2005, 28: 136) for inhibitory drugs beside orthosteric (competitive or non-competitive) and allosteric inhibitors. Interfacial inhibitors bind with high selectivity to a binding site involving two or more macromolecules within macromolecular complexes undergoing conformational changes. Interfacial binding traps (generally reversibly) a transition state of the complex, resulting in kinetic inactivation. The exemplary case of interfacial inhibitor of protein-DNA interface is camptothecin and its clinical derivatives. We will also provide examples generalizing the interfacial inhibitor concept to inhibitors of topoisomerase II (anthracyclines, ellipticines, epipodophyllotoxins), gyrase (quinolones, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin), RNA polymerases (alpha-amanitin and actinomycin D), and ribosomes (antibiotics such as streptomycin, hygromycin B, tetracycline, kirromycin, fusidic acid, thiostrepton, and possibly cycloheximide). We discuss the implications of the interfacial inhibitor concept for drug discovery.

  13. Interfacial motions and pressure fluctuations during fluid displacement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Moebius, F.; Mumford, K. G.; Or, D.

    2014-12-01

    Two-phase flow is of interest in many fields including microfluidic devices, geological CO2 sequestration, agriculture, filtration and contaminated site remediation. Macroscopic flow equations are often used to describe two-phase displacement flows in such systems based on constitutive relationships (e.g., capillary pressure-saturation relationships) determined under equilibrium conditions. The potential limitations of such process representation were examined in experiments with direct observation of pore scale dynamics. Transparent sintered glass beads micro-models enabled quantification of the interplay of various phenomena governing fluid flow (e.g., capillary forces, viscous forces, inertial forces). Experiments systematically evaluated the impact of pore water velocity, grain size, surface tension, viscosity and wettability on water pressure and interfacial dynamics, both during flow and after flow cessation. Particular attention was placed on high-velocity conditions, when inertial forces that are not typically considerred in porous media applications can play a larger role. Liquid pressure was quantified at the base of the system and the displacement process was imaged using a high speed camera. Characteristics of pressure fluctuations were strongly linked with interfacial properties with fluctuations manifested during displacement and following flow cessation (pressure relaxation). The patterns of pressure fluctuations varied with boundary conditions and media properties reflecting complex interactions with fluid, surface and dynamics along the displacement front.

  14. The Strong Nuclear Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-05-24

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  15. The Strong Nuclear Force

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  16. Direct handling of sharp interfacial energy for microstructural evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Hernández–Rivera, Efraín; Tikare, Veena; Noirot, Laurence; ...

    2014-08-24

    In this study, we introduce a simplification to the previously demonstrated hybrid Potts–phase field (hPPF), which relates interfacial energies to microstructural sharp interfaces. The model defines interfacial energy by a Potts-like discrete interface approach of counting unlike neighbors, which we use to compute local curvature. The model is compared to the hPPF by studying interfacial characteristics and grain growth behavior. The models give virtually identical results, while the new model allows the simulator more direct control of interfacial energy.

  17. Fully nonlinear interfacial waves in a bounded two-fluid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barannyk, Lyudmyla Leonidivna

    We study the nonlinear flow which results when two immiscible inviscid incompressible fluids of different densities and separated by an interface which is free to move and which supports surface tension, are caused to flow in a straight infinite channel. Gravity is taken into consideration and the velocities of each phase can be different, thus giving rise to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Our objective is to study the competing effects of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability coupled with a stably or unstably stratified fluid system (Rayleigh-Taylor instability) when surface tension is present to regularize the dynamics. Our approach involves the derivation of two- and three-dimensional model evolution equations using long-wave asymptotics and the ensuing analysis and computation of these models. In addition, we derive the appropriate Birkhoff-Rott integro-differential equation for two-phase inviscid flows in channels of arbitrary aspect ratios. A long wave asymptotic analysis is undertaken to develop a theory for fully nonlinear interfacial waves allowing amplitudes as large as the channel thickness. The result is a set of evolution equations for the interfacial shape and the velocity jump across the interface. Linear stability analysis reveals that capillary forces stabilize short-wave disturbances in a dispersive manner and we study their effect on the fully nonlinear dynamics described by our models. In the case of two-dimensional interfacial deflections, traveling waves of permanent form are constructed and it is shown that solitary waves are possible for a range of physical parameters. All solitary waves are expressed implicitly in terms of incomplete elliptic integrals of the third kind. When the upper layer has zero density, two explicit solitary-wave solutions have been found whose amplitudes are equal to h/4 or h/9 where 2h is the channel thickness. In the absence of gravity, solitary waves are not possible but periodic ones are. Numerically constructed

  18. Alcohol-soluble interfacial fluorenes for inverted polymer solar cells: sequence induced spatial conformation dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lie; Liu, Xiangfu; Wei, Yingkai; Wu, Feiyan; Chen, Yiwang

    2016-01-21

    Three fluorene-based alcohol-soluble organic small molecule electrolytes (SMEs) with different conjugated backbones, namely, TFTN-Br, FTFN-Br and FTTFN-Br, were designed as cathode interfacial layers for inverted polymer solar cells (i-PSCs). The insertion of SMEs to the ITO/active layer interfaces effectively lowered the energy barrier for electron transport and improved the inherent compatibility between the hydrophilic ITO and hydrophobic active layers. Due to these advantages, the device based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) with TFTN-Br as the cathode interfacial layer achieved an improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.8%, which is a 26% improvement when compared to the standard device comprising ZnO cathode interfacial layers (PCE = 3.0%). Devices with FTFN-Br and FTTFN-Br also showed an improved PCE of 3.1% and 3.5%, respectively. The variation in device performance enhancement was found to be primarily correlated with the different conformation of their assembly onto the electrode caused by the joint sequence of the polar group of the SMEs, consequently impacting the dipole moment and interface morphology. In addition, introducing SMEs as the cathode interfacial layer also produced devices with long-term stability.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zexi; Huang, Juntao; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose an interfacial scheme accompanying the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions, including conjugate conditions with or without jumps in heat and mass transfer, continuity of macroscopic variables and normal fluxes in ion diffusion in porous media with different porosity, and the Kapitza resistance in heat transfer. The construction of this scheme is based on our boundary schemes [Huang and Yong, J. Comput. Phys. 300, 70 (2015)JCTPAH0021-999110.1016/j.jcp.2015.07.045] for Robin boundary conditions on straight or curved boundaries. It gives second-order accuracy for straight interfaces and first-order accuracy for curved ones. In addition, the new scheme inherits the advantage of the boundary schemes in which only the current lattice nodes are involved. Such an interfacial scheme is highly desirable for problems with complex geometries or in porous media. The interfacial scheme is numerically validated with several examples. The results show the utility of the constructed scheme and very well support our theoretical predications.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zexi; Huang, Juntao; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose an interfacial scheme accompanying the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions, including conjugate conditions with or without jumps in heat and mass transfer, continuity of macroscopic variables and normal fluxes in ion diffusion in porous media with different porosity, and the Kapitza resistance in heat transfer. The construction of this scheme is based on our boundary schemes [Huang and Yong, J. Comput. Phys. 300, 70 (2015), 10.1016/j.jcp.2015.07.045] for Robin boundary conditions on straight or curved boundaries. It gives second-order accuracy for straight interfaces and first-order accuracy for curved ones. In addition, the new scheme inherits the advantage of the boundary schemes in which only the current lattice nodes are involved. Such an interfacial scheme is highly desirable for problems with complex geometries or in porous media. The interfacial scheme is numerically validated with several examples. The results show the utility of the constructed scheme and very well support our theoretical predications.

  1. Effect of CaF2 on Interfacial Phenomena of High Alumina Refractories with Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshy, Pramod; Gupta, Sushil; Sahajwalla, Veena; Edwards, Phil

    2008-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the interfacial phenomena between Al-alloy and industrial grade high alumina refractories containing varying contents of CaF2 at 1250 °C. Interfacial reaction products and phases formed in the heat-treated refractory samples were characterized using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively, while interfacial phenomena including dynamic wetting behavior were analyzed using the sessile drop technique. Refractories containing less than 5 wt pct CaF2 showed good resistance to reactions with the molten alloy, due to the dominance of corundum, and the presence of anorthite at the interface. However, with a further increase in the additive content, a glassy matrix of anorthite with CaF2 was formed. Formation of this phase significantly increased the intensity of reactions resulting in the buildup of an interfacial layer. The study thus revealed the strong catalytic effect of CaF2 on reactions of high alumina refractories with Al-alloy.

  2. Anisotropic interfacial free energies of the hard-sphere crystal-melt interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yan; Houk, Andrew; Song, Xueyu

    2005-04-14

    We present a reliable method to define the interfacial particles for determining the crystal-melt interface position, which is the key step for the crystal-melt interfacial free energy calculations using capillary wave approach. Using this method, we have calculated the free energies gamma of the fcc crystal-melt interfaces for the hard-sphere system as a function of crystal orientations by examining the height fluctuations of the interface using Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the average interfacial free energy gamma(0) = 0.62 +/- 0.02k(B)T/sigma(2) and the anisotropy of the interfacial free energies are weak, gamma(100) = 0.64 +/- 0.02, gamma(110) = 0.62 +/- 0.02, gamma(111) = 0.61 +/- 0.02k(B)T/sigma(2). The results are in good agreement with previous simulation results based on the calculations of the reversible work required to create the interfaces (Davidchack and Laird, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2000, 85, 4571). In addition, our results indicate gamma(100) > gamma(110) > gamma(111) for the hard-sphere system, similar to the results of the Lennard-Jones system.

  3. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  4. Interfacial supersaturation, secondary nucleation, and crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Clifford Y.; Wu, Jenn-Fang; Rousseau, Ronald W.

    1992-02-01

    A theory describing the source of nuclei in secondary nucleation is presented and used to rationalize experimental data from the literature, some of which had appeared to be conflicting. The theory rests on a model in which an adsorption layer consisting of clusters of growth units of varying size is formed on the surface of growing crystals. The existence of the layer is related to the two-resistance model of crystal growth; by varying system conditions, the relative importance of the two resistances is altered and thereby changes the interfacial supersaturation even though overall supersaturation remains constant. Interracial supersaturation and contact energy determine kinetics in a system dominated by contact nucleation.

  5. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  6. Interfacial area transport equation for bubbly to cap-bubbly transition flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worosz, Theodore S.

    To fully realize the benefit of the two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) as a constitutive model for the interfacial area concentration in the two-fluid model, it is imperative that models be developed to dynamically transition from one-group to two-group flows. With this in mind, the two-group IATE is derived in detail to establish new expansion source terms that correctly account for the effects of intergroup bubble transport. In addition to this theoretical effort, the state-of-the-art four-sensor conductivity probe is used to establish a reliable experimental database of local two-phase flow parameters to characterize one-group to two-group transition flows and to support model development. The experiments are performed in verticalupward air-water two-phase flow in a 5.08cm pipe. Additionally, the local conductivity probe is improved through systematic studies into: 1) signal "ghosting" electrical interference among probe sensors, 2) sampling frequency sensitivity, 3) measurement duration sensitivity, and 4) probe sensor orientation. Wake-dominated bubble transport characterizes the transition from onegroup to two-group flows. Therefore, the necessary intergroup and intragroup wake entrainment source terms that are required for two-group interfacial area transport in transition flows are developed. Furthermore, an approach is developed to initiate the shearing-off source and reduce the one-group interaction mechanisms as an established two-group flow develops. The new interfacial area transport model for one-group to two-group transition flows is evaluated against the experimental database. The model accurately captures the exchange of void fraction and interfacial area concentration between group-I and group-II in transition flows. Overall, the group-I void fraction and interfacial area concentration are predicted within +/-6% and +/-4%, respectively, of the experimental data. The group-II void fraction and interfacial area concentration are

  7. Dynamic interfacial behavior of viscoelastic aqueous hyaluronic acid: effects of molecular weight, concentration and interfacial velocity.

    PubMed

    Vorvolakos, Katherine; Coburn, James C; Saylor, David M

    2014-04-07

    An aqueous hyaluronic acid (HA(aq)) pericellular coat, when mediating the tactile aspect of cellular contact inhibition, has three tasks: interface formation, mechanical signal transmission and interface separation. To quantify the interfacial adhesive behavior of HA(aq), we induce simultaneous interface formation and separation between HA(aq) and a model hydrophobic, hysteretic Si-SAM surface. While surface tension γ remains essentially constant, interface formation and separation depend greatly on concentration (5 ≤ C ≤ 30 mg mL(-1)), molecular weight (6 ≤ MW ≤ 2000 kDa) and interfacial velocity (0 ≤ V ≤ 3 mm s(-1)), each of which affect shear elastic and loss moduli G′ and G′′, respectively. Viscoelasticity dictates the mode of interfacial motion: wetting-dewetting, capillary necking, or rolling. Wetting-dewetting is quantified using advancing and receding contact angles θ(A) and θ(R), and the hysteresis between them, yielding data landscapes for each C above the [MW, V] plane. The landscape sizes, shapes, and curvatures disclose the interplay, between surface tension and viscoelasticity, which governs interfacial dynamics. Gel point coordinates modulus G and angular frequency ω appear to predict wetting-dewetting (G < 75 ω0.2), capillary necking (75 ω0.2 < G < 200 ω0.075) or rolling (G > 200ω0.075). Dominantly dissipative HA(aq) sticks to itself and distorts irreversibly before separating, while dominantly elastic HA(aq) makes contact and separates with only minor, reversible distortion. We propose the dimensionless number (G′V)/(ω(r)γ), varying from 10(-5) to 10(3) in this work, as a tool to predict the mode of interface formation-separation by relating interfacial kinetics with bulk viscoelasticity. Cellular contact inhibition may be thus aided or compromised by physiological or interventional shifts in [C, MW, V], and thus in (G′V)/(ω(r)γ), which affect both mechanotransduction and interfacial dynamics. These observations

  8. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY AND INTERFACIAL PARTITIONING TRACER TEST MEASUREMENTS OF NAPL-WATER INTERFACIAL AREAS

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Janousek, Hilary; Murao, Asami; Schnaar, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial areas between an immiscible organic liquid (NAPL) and water were measured for two natural porous media using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer tests were similar to previously reported values obtained with the method. The values were, however, significantly larger than those obtained from microtomography. Analysis of microtomography data collected before and after introduction of the interfacial tracer solution indicated that the surfactant tracer had minimal impact on fluid-phase configuration and interfacial areas under conditions associated with typical laboratory application. The disparity between the tracer-test and microtomography values is attributed primarily to the inability of the microtomography method to resolve interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. This hypothesis is consistent with results recently reported for a comparison of microtomographic analysis and interfacial tracer tests conducted for an air-water system. The tracer-test method provides a measure of effective, total (capillary and film) interfacial area, whereas microtomography can be used to determine separately both capillary-associated and film-associated interfacial areas. Both methods appear to provide useful information for given applications. A key to their effective use is recognizing the specific nature of the information provided by each, as well as associated limitations. PMID:23678204

  9. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  10. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  11. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  12. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria; ...

    2016-11-21

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface’s magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. In this paper, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3/La0.8Sr0.2MnO3(PZT/LSMO)] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deteriorated and such magnetic deterioration can bemore » greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0μB/f.u., a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. Finally, these compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.« less

  13. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria; Freeland, John W.; Nichols, John; Guo, Er-Jia; Lee, Shinbuhm; Ward, T. Zac; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Fitzsimmons, Michael R.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-11-01

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface's magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. Here, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZ r0.2T i0.8O3/L a0.8S r0.2Mn O3(PZT /LSMO ) ] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deteriorated and such magnetic deterioration can be greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0 μB/f .u . , a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. These compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.

  14. Effect of surface modification on interfacial nanobubble morphology and contact line tension.

    PubMed

    Rangharajan, Kaushik K; Kwak, Kwang J; Conlisk, A T; Wu, Yan; Prakash, Shaurya

    2015-07-14

    Past research has confirmed the existence of surface nanobubbles on various hydrophobic substrates (static contact angle >90°) when imaged in air-equilibrated water. Additionally, the use of solvent exchange techniques (based on the difference in saturation levels of air in various solvents) also introduced surface nanobubbles on hydrophilic substrates (static contact angle <90°). In this work, tapping mode atomic force microscopy was used to image interfacial nanobubbles formed on bulk polycarbonate (static contact angle of 81.1°), bromo-terminated silica (BTS; static contact angle of 85.5°), and fluoro-terminated silica (FTS; static contact angle of 105.3°) surfaces when immersed in air-equilibrated water without solvent exchange. Nanobubbles formed on the above three substrates were characterized on the basis of Laplace pressure, bubble density, and contact line tension. Results reported here show that (1) the Laplace pressures of all nanobubbles formed on both BTS and polycarbonate were an order of magnitude higher than those of FTS, (2) the nanobubble number density per unit area decreased with an increase in substrate contact angle, and (3) the contact line tension of the nanobubbles was calculated to be positive for both BTS and polycarbonate (lateral radius, Rs < 50 nm for all nanobubbles), and negative for FTS (Rs > 50 nm for all nanobubbles). The nanobubble morphology and distribution before and after using the solvent exchange method (ethanol-water), on the bulk polycarbonate substrate was also characterized. Analysis for these polycarbonate surface nanobubbles showed that both the Laplace pressure and nanobubble density reduced by ≈98% after ethanol-water exchange, accompanied by a flip in the magnitude of contact line tension from positive (0.19 nN) to negative (-0.11 nN).

  15. Interfacial properties of hydrosoluble polymers. Final report, June 15, 1993--June 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    During this period, the authors treated a myriad of problems associated with the interfacial properties of macromolecules. Many of them concerned indirect interactions between surfaces engendered by intervening species. The issues ranged from colloidal forces to membrane induced coupling between embedded macromolecules (membrane-bound proteins). This report presents summaries of the following papers published as a result of this study: membrane interactions with polymers and colloids; escape transitions and force laws for compressed polymer mushrooms; interaction between finite-sized particles and end grafted polymers; one long chain among shorter chains--the Flory approach revisited; conformation of star polymers in high molecular weight solvents; membrane-induced interactions between inclusions; filled polymer brushes--a hydrodynamic analogy; polymer adsorption at liquid/air interfaces under lateral pressure; flow induced instability of the interface between a fluid and a gel at low Reynolds number; and fluctuation-induced forces in stacked fluid membranes.

  16. Effect of transcrystalline morphology on interfacial adhesion in biocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, J.; Hedenberg, P.; Felix, J.

    1995-12-01

    The efficient transfer of load from matrix to fibers is crucial for achieving good mechanical performance in composite materials. Much attention has been paid in recent years to producing strong bonds across fibers and matrix in composite materials. An attractive alternative to surface modification of fibers or the use of compatibilizing agents is creating molecular order at the interphase. In this study, the ability of natural cellulose fibers, such as cotton and wood fibers, to induce transcrystallinity in synthetic polymer such as polypropylene (PP), was utilized to create various interphase morphologies. The effect of trancrystalline layers of different thicknesses at the fiber interface on interfacial shear stress transfer was investigated using the single-fiber fragmentation test. It was found that the trancrystalline morphology at the fiber/matrix interface considerably improved the shear transfer. The fiber surface roughness as measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as well as surface crystalline structure is proposed to be responsible for creating a favorable interphase morphology. The interphase morphology of a new generation of biodegradable composites based on celluse fiber-reinforced bacteria-produced polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is currently under investigation in our laboratories.

  17. How does interfacial rheology govern soap bubble cluster dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Biance, Anne-Laure; Hohler, Reinhard

    2009-11-01

    Aqueous foams are concentrated dispersions of gas bubbles in a soapy solution. These complex fluids exhibit solid-like or liquid-like mechanical behaviors, depending on the applied shear. When it is increased beyond a yield strain, neighbor switching bubble rearrangements called T1 events are triggered and plastic flow sets in. We study experimentally the dynamics of such strain induced T1s in 3D bubble clusters that we consider as model systems of 3D foams. To determine the hydrodynamics and physico-chemistry that set the duration of T1s, we use foaming solutions of a wide range of well characterized bulk and interfacial rheological properties. At low shear rates, the T1 duration is set by a balance between surface tension and surface viscous forces in qualitative agreement with previous studies of T1s in 2D foams [1] and we present a simple physical model that explains our 3D findings. Moreover, above a characteristic shear rate, rearrangement dynamics are driven by the applied strain. By combining all our results, we link the transition from intermittent to continous flow dynamics in foams to the rheology of the gas-liquid interfaces. [4pt] [1] M. Durand, H. A. Stone, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 2226101 (2006).

  18. Optimization of residual stresses in MMC's through the variation of interfacial layer architectures and processing parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was the development of efficient, user-friendly computer codes for optimizing fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites through the use of homogeneous and heterogeneous interfacial layer architectures and processing parameter variation. To satisfy this objective, three major computer codes have been developed and delivered to the NASA-Lewis Research Center, namely MCCM, OPTCOMP, and OPTCOMP2. MCCM is a general research-oriented code for investigating the effects of microstructural details, such as layered morphology of SCS-6 SiC fibers and multiple homogeneous interfacial layers, on the inelastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composites under axisymmetric thermomechanical loading. OPTCOMP and OPTCOMP2 combine the major analysis module resident in MCCM with a commercially-available optimization algorithm and are driven by user-friendly interfaces which facilitate input data construction and program execution. OPTCOMP enables the user to identify those dimensions, geometric arrangements and thermoelastoplastic properties of homogeneous interfacial layers that minimize thermal residual stresses for the specified set of constraints. OPTCOMP2 provides additional flexibility in the residual stress optimization through variation of the processing parameters (time, temperature, external pressure and axial load) as well as the microstructure of the interfacial region which is treated as a heterogeneous two-phase composite. Overviews of the capabilities of these codes are provided together with a summary of results that addresses the effects of various microstructural details of the fiber, interfacial layers and matrix region on the optimization of fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites.

  19. Interfacial properties of binary mixtures of square-well molecules from Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ruiz, F J; Blas, F J

    2016-04-21

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical square-well molecules from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with the same molecular size and intermolecular potential range but different dispersive energy parameter values. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of square-well molecules. In particular, we determine the pressuretensor using the mechanical (virial) route and the vapor-liquid interfacial tension evaluated using the Irving-Kirkwood method. In addition to the pressuretensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. This work can be considered as the extension of our previous work [F. J. Martínez-Ruiz and F. J. Blas, Mol. Phys. 113, 1217 (2015)] to deal with mixtures of spherical molecules that interact through a discontinuous intermolecular potential. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ϵ22/ϵ11, is to sharpen the vapor-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the more volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, since there are stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in comparison with the rest of intermolecular interactions. Also, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as ϵ22/ϵ11 is larger, a direct consequence of the increasing of the cohesive energy of the system.

  20. Instability due to interfacial tension in parallel liquid-liquid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Oscar M. H.

    2016-06-01

    The frequent occurrence of multiphase flows in pipes has motivated a great research interest over the last decades. The particular case of liquid-liquid flow is commonly encountered in the petroleum industry, where a number of applications involve oil-water flow such as crude oil production in directional wells. However, it has not received the same attention when compared to gas-liquid flow. In addition, most of the available information has to do with flow in pipes. When it comes to flows in annular ducts the data are scanty. A general transition criterion has been recently proposed in order to obtain the stratified and core-annular flow-pattern transition boundaries in viscous oil-water flow. The proposed criterion was based on an one-dimensional two-fluid model of liquid-liquid two-phase flow. A stability analysis was carried out and interfacial tension is considered. A new destabilizing term arises, which is a function of the cross-section curvature of the interface. It is well accepted that interfacial tension favors the stable condition. However, the analysis of the new interfacial-tension term shows that it can actually destabilize the basic flow pattern, playing an important role in regions of extreme volumetric fractions. Such an interesting effect seems to be more pronounced in flows of viscous fluids and in annular-duct flow. The effect of interfacial tension is explored and the advantages of using a more complete model are discussed and illustrated through comparisons with experimental data from the literature. The evaluation of the effects of fluid viscosity and interfacial tension allows the correction and enhancement of transition models based essentially on data of pipe flow of low viscosity fluids.

  1. Interfacial properties of binary mixtures of square-well molecules from Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.

    2016-04-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical square-well molecules from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with the same molecular size and intermolecular potential range but different dispersive energy parameter values. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of square-well molecules. In particular, we determine the pressure tensor using the mechanical (virial) route and the vapor-liquid interfacial tension evaluated using the Irving-Kirkwood method. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. This work can be considered as the extension of our previous work [F. J. Martínez-Ruiz and F. J. Blas, Mol. Phys. 113, 1217 (2015)] to deal with mixtures of spherical molecules that interact through a discontinuous intermolecular potential. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ɛ22/ɛ11, is to sharpen the vapor-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the more volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, since there are stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in comparison with the rest of intermolecular interactions. Also, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as ɛ22/ɛ11 is larger, a direct consequence of the increasing of the cohesive energy of the system.

  2. Understanding the interfacial behavior of lysozyme on Au (111) surfaces with multiscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samieegohar, Mohammadreza; Ma, Heng; Sha, Feng; Jahan Sajib, Md Symon; Guerrero-García, G. Iván; Wei, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The understanding of the adsorption and interfacial behavior of proteins is crucial to the development of novel biosensors and biomaterials. By using bottom-up atomistic multiscale simulations, we study here the adsorption of lysozyme on Au(111) surfaces in an aqueous environment. Atomistic simulations are used to calculate the inhomogeneous polarization of the gold surface, which is induced by the protein adsorption, and by the presence of an interfacial layer of water molecules and monovalent salts. The corresponding potential of mean force between the protein and the gold surface including polarization effects is used in Langevin Dynamics simulations to study the time dependent behavior of proteins at finite concentration. These simulations display a rapid adsorption and formation of a first-layer of proteins at the interface. Proteins are initially adsorbed directly on the gold surface due to the strong protein-surface attractive interaction. A subsequent interfacial weak aggregation of proteins leading to multilayer build-up is also observed at long times.

  3. Single crystal growth and anisotropic crystal-fluid interfacial free energy in soft colloidal systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Duc; Hu, Zhibing; Schall, Peter

    2011-07-01

    We measure the anisotropy of the crystal-fluid interfacial free energy in soft colloidal systems. A temperature gradient is used to direct crystal nucleation and control the growth of large single crystals in order to achieve well-equilibrated crystal-fluid interfaces. Confocal microscopy is used to follow both the growth process and the equilibrium crystal-fluid interface at the particle scale: heterogeneous crystal nucleation, the advancing interface, and the stationary equilibrium interface. We use the measured growth velocity to determine the chemical potential difference between crystal and fluid phases. Well-equilibrated, large crystal-fluid interfaces are then used to determine the interfacial free energy and its anisotropy directly from thermally excited interface fluctuations. We find that while the measured average interfacial free energy is in good agreement with values found in simulations, the anisotropy is significantly larger than simulation values. Finally, we investigate the effect of impurities on the advancing interface. We determine the critical force needed to overcome impurity particles from the local interface curvature.

  4. Interfacial interaction between the epoxidized natural rubber and silica in natural rubber/silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tiwen; Jia, Zhixin; Luo, Yuanfang; Jia, Demin; Peng, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    The epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) as an interfacial modifier was used to improve the mechanical and dynamical mechanical properties of NR/silica composites. In order to reveal the interaction mechanism between ENR and silica, the ENR/Silica model compound was prepared by using an open mill and the interfacial interaction of ENR with silica was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and stress-strain testing. The results indicated that the ring-opening reaction occurs between the epoxy groups of ENR chains and Si-OH groups on the silica surfaces and the covalent bonds are formed between two phases, which can improve the dispersion of silica in the rubber matrix and enhance the interfacial combination between rubber and silica. The ring-opening reaction occurs not only in vulcanization process but also in mixing process, meanwhile, the latter seems to be more important due to the simultaneous effects of mechanical force and temperature.

  5. Interfacial Mechanical Properties of Graphene on Self-Assembled Monolayers: Experiments and Simulations.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qing; Kim, Ho Shin; Oweida, Thomas J; Parlak, Zehra; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Zauscher, Stefan

    2017-03-22

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been widely used to engineer the electronic properties of substrate-supported graphene devices. However, little is known about how the surface chemistry of SAMs affects the interfacial mechanical properties of graphene supported on SAMs. Fluctuations and changes in these properties affect the stress transfer between substrate and the supported graphene and thus the performance of graphene-based devices. The changes in interfacial mechanical properties can be characterized by measuring the out-of-plane elastic properties. Combining contact resonance atomic force microcopy experiments with molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the head group chemistry of a SAM, which affects the interfacial interactions, can have a significant effect on the out-of-plane elastic modulus of the graphene-SAM heterostructure. Graphene supported on hydrophobic SAMs leads to heterostructures stiffer than those of graphene supported on hydrophilic SAMs, which is largely due to fewer water molecules present at the graphene-SAM interface. Our results provide an important, and often overlooked, insight into the mechanical properties of substrate-supported graphene electronics.

  6. Optimization of interfacial properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via a modified polyacrylate emulsion sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaomin; Zhu, Bo; Cai, Xun; Liu, Jianjun; Qiao, Kun; Yu, Junwei

    2017-04-01

    The adhesion behavior of epoxy resin to carbon fibers has always been a challenge, on account of the inertness of carbon fibers and the lack of reactive functional groups. In this work, a modified polyacrylate sizing agent was prepared to modify the interface between the carbon fiber and the epoxy matrix. The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were investigated to determine chemical composition, morphology, wettability, interfacial phase analysis and interfacial adhesion. Sized carbon fibers featured improved wettability and a slightly decreased surface roughness due to the coverage of a smooth sizing layer, compared with the unsized ones. Moreover, the content of surface activated carbon atoms increased from 12.65% to 24.70% and the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber/epoxy composites raised by 14.2%, indicating a significant improvement of chemical activity and mechanical property. SEM images of the fractured surface of composites further proved that a gradient interfacial structure with increased thicknesses was formed due to the transition role of the sizing. Based on these results, a sizing mechanism consisting of chemical interaction bonding and physical force absorption was proposed, which provides an efficient and feasible method to solve the poor adhesion between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix.

  7. Review of interfacial layer's effect on thermal conductivity in nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotia, Ankit; Borkakoti, Sheeba; Deval, Piyush; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar

    2017-01-01

    An ordered liquid layer around the particle-liquid interface is called as interfacial layer. It has been observed that interfacial layer is an essential parameter for determining the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. The review attempts to summarize the prominent articles related to interfacial layer effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. First section of the paper discusses about various experimental approaches used to describe the effect of interfacial layer. Second section deals with about the mathematical models and assumed values regarding the thickness of interfacial layer by several authors. A review of previous works featuring mathematical investigations and experimental approaches seem to be suggesting that, interfacial layer have dominating effect on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids. Third section of the paper deals with various mathematical models available in open literature for interfacial layer thermal conductivity. In the last section, models for effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids considering the interfacial layer and percentage deviations in the predictions of mathematical models have been discussed.

  8. Critical-point analysis of the liquid-vapor interfacial surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvino, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial surface tension of the liquid-vapor system is analyzed near the critical point in a manner similar to bulk thermodynamic critical-point analyses. This is accomplished by a critical-point analysis of the single-phase hard-wall surface tension. Both a Landau expansion and a scaling theory equation of state are investigated. Some general exponent relations are derived and, in addition, some thermodynamically defined correlation lengths are discussed.

  9. Physical Explanation of Coupled Cell-Cell Rotational Behavior and Interfacial Morphology: A Particle Dynamics Model

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Fong Yew

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported persistent rotational behavior between adherent cell-cell pairs cultured on micropatterned substrates, and this rotation is often accompanied by a sigmoidal deflection of the cell-cell interface. Interestingly, the cell-cell rotation runs in the opposite reference frame from what could be expected of single cell locomotion. Specifically, the rotation of the cell pair consists of each individual cell protruding from the inwardly regressive arm of the cell-cell interface, and retracting from the other outwardly protrusive arm. To this author’s knowledge, the cause of this elusive behavior has not yet been clarified. Here, we propose a physical model based on particle dynamics, accounting for actomyosin forcing, viscous dissipation, and cortical tension. The results show that a correlation in actomyosin force vectors leads to both persistent rotational behavior and interfacial deflection in a simulated cell cluster. Significantly, the model, without any artificial cues, spontaneously and consistently reproduces the same rotational reference frame as experimentally observed. Further analyses show that the interfacial deflection depends predominantly on cortical tension, whereas the cluster rotation depends predominantly on actomyosin forcing. Together, these results corroborate the hypothesis that both rotational and morphological phenomena are, in fact, physically coupled by an intracellular torque of a common origin. PMID:24268142

  10. Physical explanation of coupled cell-cell rotational behavior and interfacial morphology: a particle dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Leong, Fong Yew

    2013-11-19

    Previous studies have reported persistent rotational behavior between adherent cell-cell pairs cultured on micropatterned substrates, and this rotation is often accompanied by a sigmoidal deflection of the cell-cell interface. Interestingly, the cell-cell rotation runs in the opposite reference frame from what could be expected of single cell locomotion. Specifically, the rotation of the cell pair consists of each individual cell protruding from the inwardly regressive arm of the cell-cell interface, and retracting from the other outwardly protrusive arm. To this author's knowledge, the cause of this elusive behavior has not yet been clarified. Here, we propose a physical model based on particle dynamics, accounting for actomyosin forcing, viscous dissipation, and cortical tension. The results show that a correlation in actomyosin force vectors leads to both persistent rotational behavior and interfacial deflection in a simulated cell cluster. Significantly, the model, without any artificial cues, spontaneously and consistently reproduces the same rotational reference frame as experimentally observed. Further analyses show that the interfacial deflection depends predominantly on cortical tension, whereas the cluster rotation depends predominantly on actomyosin forcing. Together, these results corroborate the hypothesis that both rotational and morphological phenomena are, in fact, physically coupled by an intracellular torque of a common origin.

  11. Interfacial energy of polypeptide complex coacervates measured via capillary adhesion.

    PubMed

    Priftis, Dimitrios; Farina, Robert; Tirrell, Matthew

    2012-06-12

    A systematic study of the interfacial energy (γ) of polypeptide complex coacervates in aqueous solution was performed using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). Poly(L-lysine hydrochloride) (PLys) and poly(L-glutamic acid sodium salt) (PGA) were investigated as a model pair of oppositely charged weak polyelectrolytes. These two synthetic polypeptides of natural amino acids have identical backbones and differ only in their charged side groups. All experiments were conducted using equal chain lengths of PLys and PGA in order to isolate and highlight effects of the interactions of the charged groups during complexation. Complex coacervates resulted from mixing very dilute aqueous salt solutions of PLys and PGA. Two phases in equilibrium evolved under the conditions used: a dense polymer-rich coacervate phase and a dilute polymer-deficient aqueous phase. Capillary adhesion, associated with a coacervate meniscus bridge between two mica surfaces, was measured upon the separation of the two surfaces. This adhesion enabled the determination of the γ at the aqueous/coacervate phase interface. Important experimental factors affecting these measurements were varied and are discussed, including the compression force (1.3-35.9 mN/m) and separation speed (2.4-33.2 nm/s). Physical parameters of the system, such as the salt concentration (100-600 mM) and polypeptide chain length (N = 30, 200, and 400) were also studied. The γ of these polypeptide coacervates was separately found to decrease with both increasing salt concentration and decreasing polypeptide chain length. In most of the above cases, γ measurements were found to be very low, <1 mJ/m(2). Biocompatible complex coacervates with low γ have a strong potential for applications in surface coatings, adhesives, and the encapsulation of a wide range of materials.

  12. Interfacial potential approach for Ag/ZnO (0001) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Quan; Shen, Jiang; Qian, Ping; Chen, Nan-Xian

    2014-12-01

    Systematic approaches are presented to extract the interfacial potentials from the ab initio adhesive energy of the interface system by using the Chen—Möbius inversion method. We focus on the interface structure of the metal (111)/ZnO (0001) in this work. The interfacial potentials of Ag—Zn and Ag—O are obtained. These potentials can be used to solve some problems about Ag/ZnO interfacial structure. Three metastable interfacial structures are investigated in order to check these potentials. Using the interfacial potentials we study the procedure of interface fracture in the Ag/ZnO (0001) interface and discuss the change of the energy, stress, and atomic structures in tensile process. The result indicates that the exact misfit dislocation reduces the total energy and softens the fracture process. Meanwhile, the formation and mobility of the vacancy near the interface are observed.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip.

  14. Combined free and forced convection laminar film condensation on an inclined circular tube with isothermal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Mosaad, M.

    1999-07-01

    Laminar film condensation on an inclined circular tube, under the condition of combined free and forced convection, is analyzed. The assumptions are as in the analysis of Shekriladze and Gomelauri (1966) for the horizontal tube case. In addition, some approximations are introduced for the determination of the interfacial shear stress. The resultant governing equation, in special cases, yields the known analytical solutions of horizontal and vertical tubes, which were obtained in previous studies. A numerically-obtained solution reveals the effects of vapor velocity and gravity force on local and mean Nusselt numbers. For the case of an infinitely-long tube, an explicit simple expression has been obtained, based on numerical results, to calculate the mean Nusselt number for the whole tube surface.

  15. Single-molecule interfacial electron transfer dynamics in solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhital, Bharat

    This dissertation work investigated the parameters affecting the interfacial electron transfer (ET) dynamics in dye-semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) system by using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging combined with electrochemistry. The influence of the molecule-substrate electronic coupling, the molecular structure, binding geometry on the surface and the molecule-attachment surface chemistry on interfacial charge transfer processes was studied on zinc porphyrin-TiO2 NP systems. The fluorescence blinking measurement on TiO2 NP demonstrated that electronic coupling regulates dynamics of charge transfer processes at the interface depending on the conformation of molecule on the surface. Moreover, semiconductor surface charge induced electronic coupling of molecule which is electrostatically adsorbed on the semiconductor surface also predominantly alters the ET dynamics. Furthermore, interfacial electric field and electron accepting state density dependent ET dynamics has been dissected in zinc porphyrin-TiO2 NP system by observing the single-molecule fluorescence blinking dynamics and fluorescence lifetime with and without applied bias. The significant difference in fluorescence fluctuation and lifetime suggested the modulation of charge transfer dynamics at the interface with external electric field perturbation. Quasi-continuous distribution of fluorescence intensity with applied negative potential was attributed to the faster charge recombination due to reduced density of electron accepting states. The driving force and electron accepting state density ET dependent dynamics has also been probed in zinc porphyrin-TiO2 NP and zinc porphyrin-indium tin oxide (ITO) systems. Study of a molecule adsorbed on two different semiconductors (ITO and TiO2), with large difference in electron densities and distinct driving forces, allows us to observe the changes in rates of back electron transfer process reflected by the suppressed fluorescence blinking of

  16. Interfacial and transport properties of nanoconstrained inorganic and organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocherlakota, Lakshmi Suhasini

    Nanoscale constraints impact the material properties of both organic and inorganic systems. The systems specifically studied here are (i) nanoconstrained polymeric systems, poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) relevant to gas separation membranes (ii) Zwitterionic polymers poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA), poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (pCBAA), and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl methacrylate) (PEGMA) brushes critical for reducing bio-fouling (iii) Surface properties of N-layer graphene sheets. Interfacial constraints in ultrathin poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) membranes yielded gas permeabilities and CO2/helium selectivities that exceed bulk PTMSP membrane transport properties by up to three-fold for membranes of submicrometer thickness. Indicative of a free volume increase, a molecular energetic mobility analysis (involving intrinsic friction analysis) revealed enhanced methyl side group mobilities in thin PTMSP membranes with maximum permeation, compared to bulk films. Aging studies conducted over the timescales relevant to the conducted experiments signify that the free volume states in the thin film membranes are highly unstable in the presence of sorbing gases such as CO2. To maintain this high free volume configuration of polymer while improving the temporal stability an "inverse" architecture to conventional polymer nanocomposites was investigated, in which the polymer phase of PTMSP and PEO were interfacially and dimensionally constrained in nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. While with this architecture the benefits of nanocomposite and ultrathin film membranes of PTMSP could be reproduced and improved upon, also the temporal stability could be enhanced substantially. The PEO-AAO nanocomposite membranes also revealed improved gas selectivity properties of CO2 over helium. In the thermal transition studies of zwitterionic pSBMA brushes a reversible critical transition temperature of 60

  17. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  18. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  19. Mapping interfacial excess in atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Felfer, Peter; Scherrer, Barbara; Demeulemeester, Jelle; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Using modern wide-angle atom probes, it is possible to acquire atomic scale 3D data containing 1000 s of nm(2) of interfaces. It is therefore possible to probe the distribution of segregated species across these interfaces. Here, we present techniques that allow the production of models for interfacial excess (IE) mapping and discuss the underlying considerations and sampling statistics. We also show, how the same principles can be used to achieve thickness mapping of thin films. We demonstrate the effectiveness on example applications, including the analysis of segregation to a phase boundary in stainless steel, segregation to a metal-ceramic interface and the assessment of thickness variations of the gate oxide in a fin-FET.

  20. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  1. Interfacial Widths of Conjugated Polymer Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    NCSU; UC Berkeley; UCSB; Advanced Light Source; Garcia, Andres; Yan, Hongping; Sohn, Karen E.; Hexemer, Alexander; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Kramer, Edward J.; Ade, Harald

    2009-08-13

    The interfaces of conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)/poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) bilayers cast from differential solvents are shown by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSoXR) to be very smooth and sharp. The chemical interdiffusion due to casting is limited to less than 0.6 nm, and the interface created is thus nearly 'molecularly' sharp. These results demonstrate for the first time and with high precision that the nonpolar MEH-PPV layer is not much disturbed by casting the CPE layer from a polar solvent. A baseline is established for understanding the role of interfacial structure in determining the performance of CPE-based polymer light-emitting diodes. More broadly, we anticipate further applications of RSoXR as an important tool in achieving a deeper understanding of other multilayer organic optoelectronic devices, including multilayer photovoltaic devices.

  2. Dynamics of deeply supercooled interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Jan; Cerveny, Silvina

    2015-01-28

    In this review we discuss the relaxation dynamics of glassy and deeply supercooled water in different types of systems. We compare the dynamics of such interfacial water in ordinary aqueous solutions, hard confinements and biological soft materials. In all these types of systems the dielectric relaxation time of the main water process exhibits a dynamic crossover from a high-temperature non-Arrhenius temperature dependence to a low-temperature Arrhenius behavior. Moreover, at large enough water content the low-temperature process is universal and exhibits the same temperature behavior in all types of systems. However, the physical nature of the dynamic crossover is somewhat different for the different types of systems. In ordinary aqueous solutions it is not even a proper dynamic crossover, since the water relaxation decouples from the cooperative α-relaxation of the solution slightly above the glass transition in the same way as all secondary (β) relaxations of glass-forming materials. In hard confinements, the physical origin of the dynamic crossover is not fully clear, but it seems to occur when the cooperative main relaxation of water at high temperatures reaches a temperature where the volume required for its cooperative motion exceeds the size of the geometrically-confined water cluster. Due to this confinement effect the α-like main relaxation of the confined water seems to transform to a more local β-relaxation with decreasing temperature. Since this low-temperature β-relaxation is universal for all systems at high water content it is possible that it can be considered as an intrinsic β-relaxation of supercooled water, including supercooled bulk water. This possibility, together with other findings for deeply supercooled interfacial water, suggests that the most accepted relaxation scenarios for supercooled bulk water have to be altered.

  3. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria; Freeland, John W.; Nichols, John; Guo, Er-Jia; Lee, Shinbuhm; Ward, T. Zac; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Fitzsimmons, Michael R.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-11-21

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface’s magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. In this paper, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3/La0.8Sr0.2MnO3(PZT/LSMO)] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deteriorated and such magnetic deterioration can be greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0μB/f.u., a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. Finally, these compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.

  4. Interfacial microstructure between Sn-3Ag-xBi alloy and Cu substrate with or without electrolytic Ni plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chi-Won; Lee, Jung-Goo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Mori, Hirotaro

    2003-02-01

    The microstructure of the interfacial phase of Sn-3Ag-xBi alloy on a Cu substrate with or without electrolytic Ni plating was evaluated. Bismuth additions into Sn-Ag alloys do not affect interfacial phase formations. Without plating, η-Cu6Sn5/ɛ-Cu3Sn interfacial phases developed as reaction products in the as-soldered condition. The η-phase Cu6Sn5 with a hexagonal close-packed structure grows about 1-µm scallops. The ɛ-phase Cu3Sn with an orthorhombic structure forms with small 100-nm grains between η-Cu6Sn5 and Cu. For Ni plating, a Ni3Sn4 layer of monoclinic structure formed as the primary reaction product, and a thin η-Ni3Sn2 layer of hexagonal close-packed structure forms between the Ni3Sn4 and Ni layer. In the Ni layer, Ni-Sn compound particles of nanosize distribute by Sn diffusion into Ni. On the total thickness of interfacial reaction layers, Sn-3Ag-6Bi joints are thicker by about 0.9 µm for the joint without Ni plating and 0.18 µm for the joint with Ni plating than Sn-3Ag joints, respectively. The thickening of interfacial reaction layers can affect the mechanical properties of strength and fatigue resistance.

  5. Scanning probe microscopies for the creation and characterization of interfacial architectures: Studies of alkyl thiolate monolayers at gold

    SciTech Connect

    Green, John -Bruce

    1997-01-10

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) offers access to the structural and material properties of interfaces, and when combined with macroscopic characterization techniques results in a powerful interfacial development tool. However, the relative infancy of SPM techniques has dictated that initial investigations concentrate on model interfacial systems as benchmarks for testing the control and characterization capabilities of SPM. One such family of model interfacial systems results from the spontaneous adsorption of alkyl thiols to gold. This dissertation examines the application of SPM to the investigation of the interfacial properties of these alkyl thiolate monolayers. Structural investigations result in a proposed explanation for counterintuitive correlations between substrate roughness and heterogeneous electron transfer barrier properties. Frictional measurements are used for characterization of the surface free energy of a series of end-group functionalized monolayers, as well as for the material properties of monolayers composed of varying chain length alkyl thiols. Additional investigations used these characterization techniques to monitor the real-time evolution of chemical and electrochemical surface reactions. The results of these investigations demonstrates the value of SPM technology to the compositional mapping of surfaces, elucidation of interfacial defects, creation of molecularly sized chemically heterogeneous architectures, as well as to the monitoring of surface reactions. However, it is the future which will demonstrate the usefulness of SPM technology to the advancement of science and technology.

  6. Quantitative Membrane Electrostatics with the Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Mayer, Kathryn M.; Hafner, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is sensitive to electric double layer interactions in electrolyte solutions, but provides only a qualitative view of interfacial electrostatics. We have fully characterized silicon nitride probe tips and other experimental parameters to allow a quantitative electrostatic analysis by AFM, and we have tested the validity of a simple analytical force expression through numerical simulations. As a test sample, we have measured the effective surface charge density of supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine membranes with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine. The resulting surface charge density and surface potential values are in quantitative agreement with those predicted by the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation, but only when the numerical analysis is employed. In addition, we demonstrate that the AFM can detect double layer forces at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by <2%. Finally, we demonstrate 50-nm resolution electrostatic mapping on heterogeneous model membranes with the AFM. This novel combination of capabilities demonstrates that the AFM is a unique and powerful probe of membrane electrostatics. PMID:17158563

  7. Calorimetric study of surface and interfacial properties of fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Melkus, T.G.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the surface/interfacial properties of fine coal, heat flux calorimeter was used to make heat of immersion (..delta..H/sub imm/) measurements. These heats have been shown to be a valuable means of investigating the chemistry and surface properties of solids as they interact with adsorbate molecules. In addition, heats of immersion can be used to characterize a solid in terms of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and estimate its relative wetting tendency. The first phase of experiments that were performed served as a basis for comparison of coal components/characteristics immersed in deionized, distilled water. The results of these experiments were found to correlate well with reported flotation trends. In the second phase of experiments, the solids that were previously investigated were immersed in various wetting media. The solids were characterized in terms of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and their relative wetting tendency was also established. Heat of immersion measurements using surfactant solutions demonstrated that preferential adsorption of the surfactant molecule occurs on the coal surface, thereby altering its surface properties. This was supported by laboratory vacuum filtration tests. Using flotation agents as the wetting medium, the heat of immersion was found to vary with kerosene concentration, pH, kaolin addition and oxidation of the solid surface. The results of these ..delta..H/sub imm/ measurements were found to correlate very well with results obtained by independent flotation experiments performed under the same conditions.

  8. Toughening mechanisms in interfacially modified HDPE/thermoplastic starch blends.

    PubMed

    Taguet, Aurélie; Bureau, Martin N; Huneault, Michel A; Favis, Basil D

    2014-12-19

    The mechanical behavior of polymer blends containing 80 wt% of HDPE and 20 wt% of TPS and compatibilized with HDPE-g-MA grafted copolymer was investigated. Unmodified HDPE/TPS blends exhibit high fracture resistance, however, the interfacial modification of those blends by addition of HDPE-g-MA leads to a dramatic drop in fracture resistance. The compatibilization of HDPE/TPS blends increases the surface area of TPS particles by decreasing their size. It was postulated that the addition of HDPE-g-MA induces a reaction between maleic anhydride and hydroxyl groups of the glycerol leading to a decrease of the glycerol content in the TPS phase. This phenomenon increases the stiffness of the modified TPS particles and stiffer TPS particles leading to an important reduction in toughness and plastic deformation, as measured by the EWF method. It is shown that the main toughening mechanism in HDPE/TPS blends is shear-yielding. This article demonstrates that stiff, low diameter TPS particles reduce shear band formation and consequently decrease the resistance to crack propagation.

  9. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Arsenlis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  10. The Stokes force on a droplet in an unbounded fluid medium due to capillary effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. Shankar

    1985-01-01

    The Stokes force on a fluid droplet is obtained when the droplet is placed in an unbounded fluid medium and motion ensues due to an arbitrary interfacial-tension gradient on the droplet surface. The force, derived here for a spherical droplet, is proportional to the integral of the interfacial-tension gradient over the droplet surface. When the interfacial-tension gradients are caused by temperature or concentration variations, the result for the force may be further specialized when convective transport effects are negligible. In this case, it is possible to express the force in terms of the gradient of the undisturbed temperature (or concentration) field evaluated at the location of the droplet center in a form analogous to Faxen's force law.

  11. Interfacial adsorption of peptides in oil-in-water emulsions costabilized by Tween 20 and antioxidative potato peptides.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Chen, Jie; Xiong, Youling L

    2014-11-26

    Previous studies have shown that soybean oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions prepared with potato protein hydrolysate (PPH) are remarkably stable against oxidative changes. It was hypothesized that partitioning of peptides at the emulsion interface plays an important role in this phenomenon. The present study was conducted to examine the structural characteristics of the interfacial membrane. As revealed by atomic force microscopy, oil droplets costabilized with PPH and Tween 20 were more uniform than those stabilized with Tween 20 only (control). Confocal laser scanning microscopy images indicated the existence of peptides directly anchored into the interfacial membrane. The adsorbed peptides were mostly short oligopeptides composed of two to seven amino acids, of which Ser-Phe-Asp-Leu(Ile)-Lys matched the sequence of patatin. The adsorption of these peptides appeared to both improve the integrity of the interface and contribute to the oxidative stability of the emulsions. Furthermore, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy illustrated the morphology of the interfacial membrane as a noncontinuous short fibril structure. Partitioning of antioxidative peptides in the interfacial membrane provided steric hindrances and electrostatic effects to inhibit oxidation.

  12. Interfacial electron and phonon scattering processes in high-powered nanoscale applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2011-10-01

    The overarching goal of this Truman LDRD project was to explore mechanisms of thermal transport at interfaces of nanomaterials, specifically linking the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary conductance to the structures and geometries of interfaces and boundaries. Deposition, fabrication, and post possessing procedures of nanocomposites and devices can give rise to interatomic mixing around interfaces of materials leading to stresses and imperfections that could affect heat transfer. An understanding of the physics of energy carrier scattering processes and their response to interfacial disorder will elucidate the potentials of applying these novel materials to next-generation high powered nanodevices and energy conversion applications. An additional goal of this project was to use the knowledge gained from linking interfacial structure to thermal transport in order to develop avenues to control, or 'tune' the thermal transport in nanosystems.

  13. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  14. Propagating phase interface with intermediate interfacial phase: Phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-05-01

    An advanced three-phase phase field approach (PFA) is suggested for a nonequilibrium phase interface that contains an intermediate phase, in particular, a solid-solid interface with a nanometer-sized intermediate melt (IM). A thermodynamic potential in the polar order parameters is developed that satisfies all thermodynamic equilibrium and stability conditions. The special form of the gradient energy allowed us to include the interaction of two solid-melt interfaces via an intermediate melt and obtain a well-posed problem and mesh-independent solutions. It is proved that for stationary 1D solutions to two Ginzburg-Landau equations for three phases, the local energy at each point is equal to the gradient energy. Simulations are performed for β ↔δ phase transformations (PTs) via IM in an HMX energetic material. The obtained energy IM width dependence is described by generalized force-balance models for short- and long-range interaction forces between interfaces but not far from the melting temperature. A force-balance model is developed that describes phase field results even 100 K below the melting temperature. The effects of the ratios of width and energies of solid-solid and solid-melt interfaces, temperature, and the parameter characterizing interaction of two solid-melt interfaces, on the structure, width, energy of the IM and interface velocity are determined by finite element method. Depending on parameters, the IM may appear by continuous or discontinuous barrierless disordering or via critical nucleus due to thermal fluctuations. The IM may appear during heating and persist during cooling at temperatures well below than it follows from sharp-interface approach. On the other hand, for some parameters when IM is expected, it does not form, producing an IM-free gap. The developed PFA represents a quite general three-phase model and can be extended to other physical phenomena, such as martensitic PTs, surface-induced premelting and PTs, premelting

  15. Interfacial Assembly of Graphene Oxide Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Laura J.

    Scientific interest in graphene oxide (GO) sheets, the product of chemical oxidation and exfoliation of graphite powder, has resurged in recent years because GO is considered a promising precursor for the bulk production of graphene-based sheets for a variety of applications. In addition, GO can be viewed as an unconventional type of soft material as it is characterized by two abruptly different length scales. Its thickness is of typical molecular dimensions, measured to be about 1 nm by atomic force microscopy, but its lateral dimensions are that of common colloidal particles, ranging from nanometers to tens of microns. This high anisotropy leads to interesting fundamental colloidal interactions between the soft sheets which have practical implications in the solution processing and assembly of the material. This research therefore aims to use a variety of techniques to control these inter-sheet interactions to gain an understanding of the processing-structure relationships which ultimately determine the overall properties of the bulk GO assembly. GO is identified as a two-dimensional amphiphile with a unique edge-to-center arrangement of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, which has led to the demonstration of its pH- and size-dependent surface activity. The water surface is then utilized, as in the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, as an ideal substrate to tile up the GO sheets and study the interactions between them. Sheet-sheet interaction morphologies were successfully altered between wrinkled and overlapped states by pH tuning of sheet charge density, and the resulting structure-property relationships are explored. In addition, a novel flash-reduction and assembly process is described in which a simple photographic camera flash can rapidly and cleanly turn an insulating, well-stacked GO paper to a more open and fluffy conducting film. Lastly, the use of these research results as educational outreach platforms is highlighted. A variety of outlets, such as You

  16. Tunable interfacial properties of epitaxial graphene on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Chendong; Hu, Hao; Yang, Rong; Lu, Hongliang; Cai, Jinming; Du, Shixuan; Liu, Feng; Gao, H.-J.

    2010-02-01

    We report on tuning interfacial properties of epitaxially-grown graphenes with different kinds of metal substrates based on scanning tunneling microscopy experiments and density functional theory calculations. Three kinds of metal substrates, Ni(111), Pt(111), and Ru(0001), show different interactions with the epitaxially grown graphene at the interfaces. The different interfacial interaction making graphene n-type and p-type doped, leads to the polarity change of the thermoelectric property of the graphene/metal systems. These findings may give further insights to the interfacial interactions in the graphene/metal systems and promote the use of graphene-based heterostructures in devices.

  17. Interfacial micromechanics in fibrous composites: design, evaluation, and models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given.

  18. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  19. Interfacial effects in oxide-polymer laminar composite thin film dielectrics for capacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, Pratyush

    surface polarity of functionalized SiO 2 surface and interfacial surface tension between functionalized SiO 2 and Parylene C. Impedance spectroscopy measurements of laminar composites with functionalized SiO2 surface suggested a coupling between interfacial dipole and interfacial charge transportation mechanism. Electrical properties of medium permittivity composite comprising, solution cast P(VDF-TrFE) film on sputtered ZrO2 thin films, were found to be controlled by P(VDF-TrFE) in high frequency region and by ZrO2 thin film in low frequency region. Impedance spectroscopy and equivalent circuit modeling showed that additional polarization in ZrO2-P(VDF-TrFE) composites, shown as a difference in experimentally measured and theoretically calculated real part of permittivity using series mixing rule, was primarily due to large scale structural modification of interfacial P(VDF-TrFE) grown on ZrO2 thin films. Presence of additional polarization mechanism in ZrO2-P(VDF-TrFE) laminar composite was found to be consistent with enhanced polarization observed in ZrO2-fuloropolymer particulate composites.

  20. Interfacial Engineering for Highly Efficient-Conjugated Polymer-Based Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Jen; David Ginger; Christine Luscombe; Hong Ma

    2012-04-02

    The aim of our proposal is to apply interface engineering approach to improve charge extraction, guide active layer morphology, improve materials compatibility, and ultimately allow the fabrication of high efficiency tandem cells. Specifically, we aim at developing: i. Interfacial engineering using small molecule self-assembled monolayers ii. Nanostructure engineering in OPVs using polymer brushes iii. Development of efficient light harvesting and high mobility materials for OPVs iv. Physical characterization of the nanostructured systems using electrostatic force microscopy, and conducting atomic force microscopy v. All-solution processed organic-based tandem cells using interfacial engineering to optimize the recombination layer currents vi. Theoretical modeling of charge transport in the active semiconducting layer The material development effort is guided by advanced computer modeling and surface/ interface engineering tools to allow us to obtain better understanding of the effect of electrode modifications on OPV performance for the investigation of more elaborate device structures. The materials and devices developed within this program represent a major conceptual advancement using an integrated approach combining rational molecular design, material, interface, process, and device engineering to achieve solar cells with high efficiency, stability, and the potential to be used for large-area roll-to-roll printing. This may create significant impact in lowering manufacturing cost of polymer solar cells for promoting clean renewable energy use and preventing the side effects from using fossil fuels to impact environment.

  1. Interface feature characterization and Schottky interfacial layer confirmation of TiO2 nanotube array film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongchao; Tang, Ningxin; Yang, Hongzhi; Leng, Xian; Zou, Jianpeng

    2015-11-01

    We report here characterization of the interfacial microstructure and properties of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube array films fabricated by anodization. Field effect scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nanoindentation, atomic force microscopy (AFM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to characterize the interface of the film. With increasing annealing temperature from 200 °C to 800 °C, the interfacial fusion between the film and the Ti substrate increased. The phase transformation of the TiO2 nanotube film from amorphous to anatase to rutile took place gradually; as the phase transformation progressed, the force needed to break the film increased. The growth of TiO2 nanotube arrays occurs in four stages: barrier layer formation, penetrating micropore formation, regular nanotube formation, and nanofiber formation. The TiO2 nanotubes grow from the Schottky interface layer rather than from the Ti substrate. The Schottky interface layer's thickness of 35-45 nm was identified as half the diameter of the corresponding nanotube, which shows good agreement to the Schottky interface layer growth model. The TiO2 nanotube film was amorphous and the Ti substrate was highly crystallized with many dislocation walls.

  2. Kinetic pathway for interfacial electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ke; Blair, Amber D.; Piechota, Eric J.; Schauer, Phil A.; Sampaio, Renato N.; Parlane, Fraser G. L.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Berlinguette, Curtis P.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular approaches to solar-energy conversion require a kinetic optimization of light-induced electron-transfer reactions. At molecular-semiconductor interfaces, this optimization has previously been accomplished through control of the distance between the semiconductor donor and the molecular acceptor and/or the free energy that accompanies electron transfer. Here we show that a kinetic pathway for electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecular acceptor also exists and provides an alternative method for the control of interfacial kinetics. The pathway was identified by the rational design of molecules in which the distance and the driving force were held near parity and only the geometric torsion about a xylyl- or phenylthiophene bridge was varied. Electronic coupling through the phenyl bridge was a factor of ten greater than that through the xylyl bridge. Comparative studies revealed a significant bridge dependence for electron transfer that could not be rationalized by a change in distance or driving force. Instead, the data indicate an interfacial electron-transfer pathway that utilizes the aromatic bridge orbitals.

  3. Interfacial strength analyses of Al/Mg compounds using bending tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, T.; Kirbach, C.; Müller, J.; Stockmann, M.; Ihlemann, J.

    2017-03-01

    In the Collaborative Research Center 692, subproject B3 Al/Mg compounds are investigated. The hydrostatic co-extruded compounds presented in this paper were further manufactured by the forging process Rising. To continue the first investigations of Rising specimens regarding interface strength, a bending test developed in a previous project period was used. The specific load case and the bending specimen geometry considers the requirements concerning the special geometry of the Rising specimen. Based on experimentally determined failure forces (maximum forces), the stress state for the investigation of the interface strength was calculated by means of the elementary bending theory extended with a numerical determined correction factor. The numerical analyses were based on a parametric FE model of the load case. Crack initiation was caused by the maximum interlaminar interfacial tension stress. In the demonstrated investigations co-extruded compounds with different ratio of core material (Mg) in the transversal cross sectional area of the initial billet were analyzed. A particular feature of the investigations is the interfacial strength analysis of a subset of Rising specimens in different areas of the transversal cross section. This was enabled by using compounds with larger sleeve thickness due to a lower Mg ratio. Thus, in this case a more extensive characterization could be performed. The results show higher strength values for Rising specimens with the largest sleeve thickness compared to the other investigated configurations.

  4. Effect of molecular flexibility of Lennard-Jones chains on vapor-liquid interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Blas, F J; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Algaba, J; Martínez-Ruiz, F J; MacDowell, L G

    2014-03-21

    We have determined the interfacial properties of short fully flexible chains formed from tangentially bonded Lennard-Jones monomeric units from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The results obtained are compared with those corresponding to rigid-linear chains formed from the same chain length, previously determined in the literature [F. J. Blas, A. I. M.-V. Bravo, J. M. Míguez, M. M. Piñeiro, and L. G. MacDowell, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 084706 (2012)]. The full long-range tails of the potential are accounted for by means of an improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček [J. Phys. Chem. B 129, 6264 (2006)] proposed recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2008)] valid for spherical as well as for rigid and flexible molecular systems. Three different model systems comprising of 3, 5, and 6 monomers per molecule are considered. The simulations are performed in the canonical ensemble, and the vapor-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using the test-area method. In addition to the surface tension, we also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature and density, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying particular attention to the effect of the chain length and rigidity on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the chain length (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapor-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as the molecular chains get longer. Comparison between predictions for fully flexible and rigid-linear chains, formed by the same number of monomeric units, indicates that the main effects of increasing the flexibility, i.e., passing from a rigid-linear to a fully flexible chain, are: (a) to decrease the difference between the liquid and vapor densities; (b) to decrease the critical temperature and

  5. Interfacial tension based on-chip extraction of microparticles confined in microfluidic Stokes flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haishui; He, Xiaoming

    2014-10-01

    Microfluidics involving two immiscible fluids (oil and water) has been increasingly used to produce hydrogel microparticles with wide applications. However, it is difficult to extract the microparticles out of the microfluidic Stokes flows of oil that have a Reynolds number (the ratio of inertia to viscous force) much less than one, where the dominant viscous force tends to drive the microparticles to move together with the surrounding oil. Here, we present a passive method for extracting hydrogel microparticles in microfluidic Stokes flow from oil into aqueous extracting solution on-chip by utilizing the intrinsic interfacial tension between oil and the microparticles. We further reveal that the thickness of an "extended confining layer" of oil next to the interface between oil and aqueous extracting solution must be smaller than the radius of microparticles for effective extraction. This method uses a simple planar merging microchannel design that can be readily fabricated and further integrated into a fluidic system to extract microparticles for wide applications.

  6. Final Project Report for "Interfacial Thermal Resistance of Carbon Nanotubes”

    SciTech Connect

    Cumings, John

    2016-04-15

    This report describes an ongoing project to comprehensively study the interfacial thermal boundary resistance (Kapitza resistance) of carbon nanotubes. It includes a list of publications, personnel supported, the overall approach, accomplishments and future plans.

  7. Interfacial patterns in magnetorheological fluids: Azimuthal field-induced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Eduardo O.; Lira, Sérgio A.; Miranda, José A.

    2015-08-01

    Despite their practical and academic relevance, studies of interfacial pattern formation in confined magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been largely overlooked in the literature. In this work, we present a contribution to this soft matter research topic and investigate the emergence of interfacial instabilities when an inviscid, initially circular bubble of a Newtonian fluid is surrounded by a MR fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell apparatus. An externally applied, in-plane azimuthal magnetic field produced by a current-carrying wire induces interfacial disturbances at the two-fluid interface, and pattern-forming structures arise. Linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear theory, and a vortex sheet approach are used to access early linear and intermediate nonlinear time regimes, as well as to determine stationary interfacial shapes at fully nonlinear stages.

  8. Microcapsule Buckling Triggered by Compression-Induced Interfacial Phase Change.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Andrew Roy; Parker, Richard M; Groombridge, Alexander S; Maestro, Armando; Coulston, Roger J; Hegemann, Jonas; Kierfeld, Jan; Scherman, Oren A; Abell, Chris

    2016-10-04

    There is an emerging trend towards the fabrication of microcapsules at liquid interfaces. In order to control the parameters of such capsules, the interfacial processes governing their formation must be understood. Here, poly(vinyl alcohol) films are assembled at the interface of water-in-oil microfluidic droplets. The polymer is cross-linked using cucurbit[8]uril ternary supramolecular complexes. It is shown that compression-induced phase change causes the onset of buckling in the interfacial film. On evaporative compression, the interfacial film both increases in density and thickens, until it reaches a critical density and a phase change occurs. We show that this increase in density can be simply related to the film Poisson ratio and area compression. This description captures fundamentals of many compressive interfacial phase changes and can also explain the observation of a fixed thickness-to-radius ratio at buckling, (T/R)buck.

  9. Blind Prediction of Interfacial Water Positions in CAPRI

    PubMed Central

    Moal, Iain H.; Bates, Paul A.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Melquiond, Adrien S.J.; Karaca, Ezgi; Schmitz, Christophe; van Dijk, Marc; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Eisenstein, Miriam; Jiménez-García, Brian; Grosdidier, Solène; Solernou, Albert; Pérez-Cano, Laura; Pallara, Chiara; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Xu, Jianqing; Muthu, Pravin; Kilambi, Krishna Praneeth; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Grudinin, Sergei; Derevyanko, Georgy; Mitchell, Julie C.; Wieting, John; Kanamori, Eiji; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Murakami, Yoichi; Sarmiento, Joy; Standley, Daron M.; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki; Chavent, Matthieu; Ritchie, David W.; Park, Hahnbeom; Ko, Junsu; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok; Shen, Yang; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.; Pierce, Brian G.; Hwang, Howook; Vreven, Thom; Weng, Zhiping; Buch, Idit; Farkash, Efrat; Wolfson, Haim J.; Zacharias, Martin; Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Huang, Shen-You; Zou, Xiaoqin; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Kleanthous, Colin; Wodak, Shoshana J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first assessment of blind predictions of water positions at protein-protein interfaces, performed as part of the CAPRI (Critical Assessment of Predicted Interactions) community-wide experiment. Groups submitting docking predictions for the complex of the DNase domain of colicin E2 and Im2 immunity protein (CAPRI target 47), were invited to predict the positions of interfacial water molecules using the method of their choice. The predictions – 20 groups submitted a total of 195 models – were assessed by measuring the recall fraction of water-mediated protein contacts. Of the 176 high or medium quality docking models – a very good docking performance per se – only 44% had a recall fraction above 0.3, and a mere 6% above 0.5. The actual water positions were in general predicted to an accuracy level no better than 1.5 Å, and even in good models about half of the contacts represented false positives. This notwithstanding, three hotspot interface water positions were quite well predicted, and so was one of the water positions that is believed to stabilize the loop that confers specificity in these complexes. Overall the best interface water predictions was achieved by groups that also produced high quality docking models, indicating that accurate modelling of the protein portion is a determinant factor. The use of established molecular mechanics force fields, coupled to sampling and optimization procedures also seemed to confer an advantage. Insights gained from this analysis should help improve the prediction of protein-water interactions and their role in stabilizing protein complexes. PMID:24155158

  10. An Interfacial Characterization of Pd-Ag-CuO Reactive Air Joints with Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Darsell, Jens T.

    2005-05-26

    A new ceramic brazing technique referred to as reactive air brazing (RAB) is currently under development that has potential applications in high temperature devices such as gas concentrators, solid oxide fuel cells, gas turbines, and combustion engines. Currently, the technique utilizes a silver-copper oxide system. We have previously increased the operating temperature of this system by adding palladium. In this paper, we report the effects of palladium addition on the wetting properties of the resulting braze relative to alumina. Specifically, we will discuss the apparent correlation between braze wettability and interfacial microstructure between the braze and alumina, both with and without palladium additions.

  11. The impact of additives found in industrial formulations of TCE on the wettability of sandstone.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Gavin; Lerner, David N; Leharne, Stephen A

    2005-11-01

    The wettability of aquifer rocks is a key physical parameter which exerts an important control on the transport, residual trapping, distribution and eventual fate of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents (CHSs) released into the subsurface. Typically chlorinated solvents are assumed to be non-wetting in water saturated rocks and unconsolidated sediments. However industrially formulated solvent products are often combined with basic additives such as alkylamines to improve their performance; and the mineral surfaces of aquifer rocks and sediments usually possess a range of acid and hydrogen-bonding adsorption sites. The presence of these sites provides a mechanism whereby the basic additives in CHSs can be adsorbed at the solvent phase/solid phase interface. Given the amphiphilic molecular structure of these additives, this may result in changes in the wetting conditions of the solid phase. The aim of this study was therefore to test this conjecture for two classes of additives (alkylamines and quaternary ammonium salts) that are often encountered in industrial solvent formulations. Wettability assessments were made on sandstone cores by means of measurements of spontaneous and forced water drainage and spontaneous and forced water imbibition and through contact angle measurements on a smooth quartz surface. No solvent/additive combination produced solvent wetting conditions, though dodecylamine and octadecylamine significantly reduced the water wetting preference of sandstone which frequently resulted in neutral wetting conditions. The large volume of spontaneous water drainage observed in wettability experiments involving cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, suggested that the sandstone cores in these tests remained strongly water wetting. However equilibrium static contact angles of around 60 degrees were measured on quartz suggesting that the sandstone surfaces should be close to neutral wetting conditions. This paradox was finally

  12. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M. R. V. L.; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya. M.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Caviglia, Andrea D.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  13. Interfacial properties of stanene-metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Pan, Feng; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Han; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two-dimensional buckled honeycomb stanene has been manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Free-standing stanene is predicted to have a sizable opened band gap of 100 meV at the Dirac point due to spin-orbit coupling (SOC), resulting in many fascinating properties such as quantum spin Hall effect, quantum anomalous Hall effect, and quantum valley Hall effect. In the first time, we systematically study the interfacial properties of stanene-metal interfaces (metals = Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pd, Pt, Ir, and Ni) by using ab initio electronic structure calculations considering the SOC effects. The honeycomb structure of stanene is preserved on the metal supports, but the buckling height is changed. The buckling of stanene on the Au, Al, Ag, and Cu metal supports is higher than that of free-standing stanene. By contrast, a planar graphene-like structure is stabilized for stanene on the Ir, Pd, Pt, and Ni metal supports. The band structure of stanene is destroyed on all the metal supports, accompanied by a metallization of stanene because the covalent bonds between stanene and the metal supports are formed and the structure of stanene is distorted. Besides, no tunneling barrier exists between stanene and the metal supports. Therefore, stanene and the eight metals form a good vertical Ohmic contact.

  14. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M R V L; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya M; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Caviglia, Andrea D

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  15. Interfacial Layer Optimization in Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litofsky, Joshua; Lafalce, Evan; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2014-03-01

    Organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) based on benchmark π - conjugated polymer polythiophene and electron acceptor PCBM are made up of a sandwich-like structure of multifunctional layers. Interfacial layers (IL) facilitate charge transport between the charge generation layer and the electrodes and enhance charge extraction. Optimizing the IL thus provides one mean of maximizing the efficiency of OPVs. Various electron transport layers such as ZnO and LiF were used, and hole transport layers included PEDOT:PSS and V2O5. Two different device architectures were explored: conventional structure with ITO serving as an anode and inverted structure when ITO acts as a cathode. Using various deposition techniques, we worked to optimize IL thickness and film formation methods. By analyzing device shunt and series resistances using a standard diode equation, we were able to identify the optimal parameters for device performance. The combination of thin IL with electrodes of appropriate work function yielded much better results compared to the control device with no IL. We can use these results and techniques to further optimize future OPV devices based on other novel material systems. This work was supported by the NSF REU grant # DMR-1263066: REU Site in Applied Physics at USF.

  16. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  17. Development of a Front Tracking Method for Two-Phase Micromixing of Incompressible Viscous Fluids with Interfacial Tension in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yijie; Lim, Hyun-Kyung; de Almeida, Valmor F; Navamita, Ray; Wang, Shuqiang; Glimm, James G; Li, Xiao-lin; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2012-06-01

    This progress report describes the development of a front tracking method for the solution of the governing equations of motion for two-phase micromixing of incompressible, viscous, liquid-liquid solvent extraction processes. The ability to compute the detailed local interfacial structure of the mixture allows characterization of the statistical properties of the two-phase mixture in terms of droplets, filaments, and other structures which emerge as a dispersed phase embedded into a continuous phase. Such a statistical picture provides the information needed for building a consistent coarsened model applicable to the entire mixing device. Coarsening is an undertaking for a future mathematical development and is outside the scope of the present work. We present here a method for accurate simulation of the micromixing dynamics of an aqueous and an organic phase exposed to intense centrifugal force and shearing stress. The onset of mixing is the result of the combination of the classical Rayleigh- Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. A mixing environment that emulates a sector of the annular mixing zone of a centrifugal contactor is used for the mathematical domain. The domain is small enough to allow for resolution of the individual interfacial structures and large enough to allow for an analysis of their statistical distribution of sizes and shapes. A set of accurate algorithms for this application requires an advanced front tracking approach constrained by the incompressibility condition. This research is aimed at designing and implementing these algorithms. We demonstrate verification and convergence results for one-phase and unmixed, two-phase flows. In addition we report on preliminary results for mixed, two-phase flow for realistic operating flow parameters.

  18. Internal photoemission in molecular junctions: parameters for interfacial barrier determinations.

    PubMed

    Fereiro, Jerry A; Kondratenko, Mykola; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard L

    2015-01-28

    The photocurrent spectra for large-area molecular junctions are reported, where partially transparent copper top contacts permit illumination by UV-vis light. The effect of variation of the molecular structure and thickness are discussed. Internal photoemission (IPE), a process involving optical excitation of hot carriers in the contacts followed by transport across internal system barriers, is dominant when the molecular component does not absorb light. The IPE spectrum contains information regarding energy level alignment within a complete, working molecular junction, with the photocurrent sign indicating transport through either the occupied or unoccupied molecular orbitals. At photon energies where the molecular layer absorbs, a secondary phenomenon is operative in addition to IPE. In order to distinguish IPE from this secondary mechanism, we show the effect of the source intensity as well as the thickness of the molecular layer on the observed photocurrent. Our results clearly show that the IPE mechanism can be differentiated from the secondary mechanism by the effects of variation of experimental parameters. We conclude that IPE can provide valuable information regarding interfacial energetics in intact, working molecular junctions, including clear discrimination of charge transport mediated by electrons through unoccupied system orbitals from that mediated by hole transport through occupied system orbitals.

  19. Interfacial Behavior of Polymers: Using Interfaces to Manipulate Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-02-26

    most rapid solvent removal process drives the copolymer film to below its glass transition temperature, freezing in the lateral order. We have quantitatively described the ordering and the parameters influencing the disruption of the ordering in these studies. We have also used e-beam lithography to generate shallow trench patterns on planar surface where the topographic patterning provides an additional constraint on the self-assembly of the block copolymer. The pitches of the trenches were varied while the depth and the trench width of patterns were maintained by constant at 89 and 30nm, respectively. Unidirectional PS-b-PEO line patterns over large area on the shallow trench patterns were obtained by solvent vapor annealing. We extended the solvent annealing process to an in-line coating process using a mini-slot die coater developed in our laboratories. This coater uses minimal materials with operating parameters that can mimic actual industrial processing on a roll-to-roll line. Most important, with this mini-slot die coater, it could also characterize the structure of the film using grazing incidence x-ray scattering. Using the fundamental characterization of the ordering of the block copolymers, we could optimize the coating conditions to enhance lateral ordering of block copolymer in a well-defined manner. The structures produced in this process are directly transferable to flexible electronics where the arrays of block copolymer microdomains can be used for the fabrication of nanostructured components. We have also controlled the orientation of BCP microdomains at the air and substrate interfaces by manipulating the interfacial interactions with selective solvents. This has enabled us to generate nanoporous membranes where the size of the pores is dictated by the size of the bloc copolymer microdomains. We have produced robust nanoporous membranes that can tolerate high pressures and have high throughput using thick films of block copolymers. Exceptional size

  20. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  1. Interfacial exchange coupling and magnetization reversal in perpendicular [Co/Ni]N/TbCo composite structures.

    PubMed

    Tang, M H; Zhang, Zongzhi; Tian, S Y; Wang, J; Ma, B; Jin, Q Y

    2015-06-15

    Interfacial exchange coupling and magnetization reversal characteristics in the perpendicular heterostructures consisting of an amorphous ferrimagnetic (FI) TbxCo(100-x) alloy layer exchange-coupled with a ferromagnetic (FM) [Co/Ni]N multilayer have been investigated. As compared with pure TbxCo(100-x) alloy, the magnetization compensation composition of the heterostructures shift to a higher Tb content, implying Co/Ni also serves to compensate the Tb moment in TbCo layer. The net magnetization switching field Hc⊥ and interlayer interfacial coupling field Hex, are not only sensitive to the magnetization and thickness of the switched TbxCo(100-x) or [Co/Ni]N layer, but also to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy strength of the pinning layer. By tuning the layer structure we achieve simultaneously both large Hc⊥ = 1.31 T and Hex = 2.19 T. These results, in addition to the fundamental interest, are important to understanding of the interfacial coupling interaction in the FM/FI heterostructures, which could offer the guiding of potential applications in heat-assisted magnetic recording or all-optical switching recording technique.

  2. Shear Wave Propagation Across Filled Joints with the Effect of Interfacial Shear Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Liu, T. T.; Li, H. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liu, B.; Xia, X.

    2015-07-01

    The thin-layer interface model for filled joints is extended to analyze shear wave propagation across filled rock joints when the interfacial shear strength between the filling material and the rocks is taken into account. During the wave propagation process, the two sides of the filled joint are welded with the adjacent rocks first and slide on each other when the shear stress on the joint is greater than the interfacial shear strength. By back analysis, the relation between the shear stress and the relative tangential deformation of the filled joints is obtained from the present approach, which is shown as a cycle parallelogram. Comparison between the present approach and the existing method based on the zero-thickness interface model indicates that the present approach is efficient to analyze shear wave propagation across rock joints with slippery behavior. The calculation results show that the slippery behavior of joints is related to the interfacial failure. In addition, the interaction between the shear stress wave and the two sides of the filling joint influences not only the wave propagation process but also the dynamic response of the filled joint.

  3. Interface investigation of the alcohol-/water-soluble conjugated polymer PFN as cathode interfacial layer in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shu; Wang, Rui; Ying Mao, Hong; He, Zhicai; Wu, Hongbin; Chen, Wei; Cao, Yong

    2013-09-01

    In this work, in situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were used to investigate the working mechanism of an alcohol-/water-soluble conjugated polymer poly [(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode interfacial layer in organic solar cells from the view of interfacial energy level alignment. Fullerene (C60) was chosen as the model acceptor material in contact with PFN as well as two other cathode interfacial layers ZnO and TiO2 in the configuration of an inverted solar cell structure. Significant charge transfer between PFN modified ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode and C60 is observed due to the low work function of PFN. This results in the Fermi level of the substrate pinned very close to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of C60 as well as an additional electric field at the cathode/acceptor interface. Both of them facilitate the electron extraction from the acceptor C60 to the ITO cathode, as confirmed by the electrical measurements of the electron-only devices with PFN modification. The better electron extraction originated from the Fermi level pinning and the additional interface electric field are believed to contribute to the efficiency enhancement of the inverted organic solar cells employing PFN as cathode interfacial layer.

  4. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume II. Chapters 6-10)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  5. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume I. Chapters 1-5)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  6. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  7. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume IV. Chapters 15-19)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  8. Do the interfacial fluidities of cationic reverse micelles enhance with an increase in the water content?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, K. S.; Dutt, G. B.

    2009-11-01

    The role of cosurfactant and water on the interfacial fluidities of reverse micelles formed with the cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has been examined by measuring the fluorescence anisotropies of two structurally similar ionic solutes, rhodamine 110 and fluorescein. For this purpose, reverse micellar systems with (CTAB/1-pentanol/cyclohexane/water) and without a cosurfactant (CTAB/chloroform-isooctane/water) have been chosen. In this study, the mole ratio of water to surfactant W has been varied in the region of 4-25. Experimental results indicate that the average reorientation time of the probe, which is a measure of the fluidity near the interfacial region, decreases by a factor of 1.5 and 1.4 for rhodamine 110 and fluorescein, respectively, as W goes up from 5 to 25 in CTAB/1-pentanol/cyclohexane/water reverse micellar system. In contrast, the average reorientation time, remains invariant for both the probe molecules in CTAB/chloroform-isooctane/water reverse micellar system despite an increase in W from 4 to 24. In case of CTAB/1-pentanol/cyclohexane/water reverse micellar system, the added water binds to bromide counter ions and also the hydroxyl groups of the cosurfactant, 1-pentanol, which results in an increase in the effective head group area. Such an increase in the effective head group area leads to a decrease in the packing parameter, and hence an increase in the interfacial fluidity. On the other hand, in CTAB/chloroform-isooctane/water system, the added water merely hydrates the bromide ions, thereby leaving the effective head group area unchanged. Thus, the interfacial fluidities remain invariant upon the addition of water in the absence of a cosurfactant.

  9. Interaction of pepsin-[C16mim]Br system: interfacial dilational rheology and conformational studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Chong; Liu, Zi-lin; Li, Yang; Du, Feng-pei

    2014-09-21

    The interfacial rheological property is closely related to the stabilities of foams and emulsions, yet there have been limited studies on the interaction between proteins with ionic liquid-type imidazolium surfactants at the decane-water interface as well as in the bulk. Herein, we investigated the interfacial and bulk properties of pepsin (PEP) and an ionic liquid (IL), 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide, [C(16)mim]Br. The interfacial pressure and dilational rheology studies were performed to describe the formation of [C(16)mim]Br-pepsin complexes. The influence of the oscillating frequency and the bulk concentration of [C(16)mim]Br on the dilational properties were explored. The conformational changes were studied by monitoring the fluorescence and far UV-CD spectra. The results reveal that the globular structure of pepsin is one of the decisive factors controlling the nature of the interfacial film. The monotonous increase in the dilational elastic modulus of pepsin-[C(16)mim]Br solutions with the surface age indicates that no loops and tails had formed. Interestingly, with an increase in the concentration of [C(16)mim]Br, the εd-c curve first passes through a plateau value due to steric hindrance and the electrostatic barrier of already absorbed tenacious pepsin-[C(16)mim]Br complexes. With the further addition of [C(16)mim]Br, the remarkable decrease in dilational elastic modulus indicates that the compact structure is destroyed gradually. The results of the fluorescence spectra and far UV-CD spectra confirm that [C(16)mim]Br did not produce perceptible changes in pepsin at the concentrations studied in the dilational experiment. Possible schematic programs of the pepsin-[C(16)mim]Br interaction model at the interface and in bulk phase are proposed.

  10. Closing the loop in the boundary layer: water slippage, interfacial viscosity and wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, Elisa; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Kim, Suenne

    2013-03-01

    Understanding and manipulating fluids at the nanoscale is a matter of growing scientific and technological interest. Here, we present experiments showing that the interfacial viscosity of water depends drastically on the wetting properties of the confining surfaces. By using an atomic force microscope (AFM), we have measured the lateral viscous force experienced in water by a nano-size AFM tip while it is sheared in parallel to a smooth solid surface, as a function of the tip-surface distance. The viscous force curves, FL(d), have been measured for five surfaces with various wettabilities. In particular, the experiments indicate that in water lower forces are required to shear a tip very close to a slippery non-wetting surface, yielding to a lower effective viscosity. A modified form of the Newtonian definition of viscosity, which includes slippage, is used to successfully predict the measured shear forces in the boundary layer as a function of surface wettability, and slippage. We prove that this effect is general and can be applied in different contexts such as in explaining the relationship between dissipation and surface wettability for a nano-tip vibrating in proximity of a surface in water. DOE (DE-FG02-06ER46293)/NSF (DMR-0120967 and DMR-0706031)

  11. A polymeric flame retardant additive for rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.; Maiti, S.

    1993-12-31

    Synthesis of a polyphosphonate by the interfacial polymerization of bisphenol-A (BPA) and dichloro-phenyl phosphine oxide (DCPO) using cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TMAC) as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) was reported. The polyphosphonate was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, DSC and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The flame retardancy of the polymer was done by OI study. The polymer was used as a fire retardant additive to rubbers such as natural rubber (NR), styrene-butadiene rubber(SBR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR). The efficiency of the fire retardant property of this additive was determined by LOI measurements of the various rubber samples.

  12. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  13. Tuning the Interfacial Thermal Conductance between Polystyrene and Sapphire by Controlling the Interfacial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Sun, Fangyuan; Tian, Xia; Zhu, Jie; Ma, Yongmei; Tang, Dawei; Wang, Fosong

    2015-10-28

    In polymer-based electric microdevices, thermal transport across polymer/ceramic interface is essential for heat dissipation, which limits the improvement of the device performance and lifetime. In this work, four sets of polystyrene (PS) thin films/sapphire samples were prepared with different interface adhesion values, which was achieved by changing the rotation speeds in the spin-coating process. The interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) between the PS films and the sapphire were measured by time domain thermoreflectance method, and the interfacial adhesion between the PS films and the sapphire, as measured by a scratch tester, was found to increase with the rotation speed from 2000 to 8000 rpm. The ITC shows a similar dependence on the rotation speed, increasing up to a 3-fold from 7.0 ± 1.4 to 21.0 ± 4.2 MW/(m(2) K). This study demonstrates the role of spin-coating rotation speed in thermal transport across the polymer/ceramic interfaces, evoking a much simpler mechanical method for tuning this type of ITC. The findings of enhancement of the ITC of polymer/ceramic interface can shed some light on the thermal management and reliability of macro- and microelectronics, where polymeric and hybrid organic-inorganic nano films are employed.

  14. Acoustic force mapping in a hybrid acoustic-optical micromanipulation device supporting high resolution optical imaging† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information about 1D model calculations for a piezoelectric transducer. See DOI: 10.1039/c6lc00182c Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Craig; MacDonald, Michael Peter; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in the life-sciences demand non-contact manipulation tools for forceful but nevertheless delicate handling of various types of sample. Moreover, the system should support high-resolution optical imaging. Here we present a hybrid acoustic/optical manipulation system which utilizes a transparent transducer, making it compatible with high-NA imaging in a microfluidic environment. The powerful acoustic trapping within a layered resonator, which is suitable for highly parallel particle handling, is complemented by the flexibility and selectivity of holographic optical tweezers, with the specimens being under high quality optical monitoring at all times. The dual acoustic/optical nature of the system lends itself to optically measure the exact acoustic force map, by means of direct force measurements on an optically trapped particle. For applications with (ultra-)high demand on the precision of the force measurements, the position of the objective used for the high-NA imaging may have significant influence on the acoustic force map in the probe chamber. We have characterized this influence experimentally and the findings were confirmed by model simulations. We show that it is possible to design the chamber and to choose the operating point in such a way as to avoid perturbations due to the objective lens. Moreover, we found that measuring the electrical impedance of the transducer provides an easy indicator for the acoustic resonances. PMID:27025398

  15. Formation of periodic interfacial misfit dislocation array at the InSb/GaAs interface via surface anion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bo Wen; Tan, Kian Hua; Loke, Wan Khai; Wicaksono, Satrio; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between growth temperature and the formation of periodic interfacial misfit (IMF) dislocations via the anion exchange process in InSb/GaAs heteroepitaxy was systematically investigated. The microstructural and electrical properties of the epitaxial layer were characterized using atomic force microscope, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Hall resistance measurement. The formation of interfacial misfit (IMF) dislocation arrays depended on growth temperature. A uniformly distributed IMF array was found in a sample grown at 310 °C, which also exhibited the lowest threading dislocation density. The analysis suggested that an incomplete As-for-Sb anion exchange process impeded the formation of IMF on sample grown above 310 °C. At growth temperature below 310 °C, island coalescence led to the formation of 60° dislocations and the disruption of periodic IMF array. All samples showed higher electron mobility at 300 K than at 77 K.

  16. First-order mean-spherical approximation for interfacial phenomena: a unified method from bulk-phase equilibria study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yiping

    2005-11-22

    The recently proposed first-order mean-spherical approximation (FMSA) [Y. Tang, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 10605 (2004)] for inhomogeneous fluids is extended to the study of interfacial phenomena. Computation is performed for the Lennard-Jones fluid, in which all phase equilibria properties and direct correlation function for density-functional theory are developed consistently and systematically from FMSA. Three functional methods, including fundamental measure theory for the repulsive force, local-density approximation, and square-gradient approximation, are applied in this interfacial investigation. Comparisons with the latest computer simulation data indicate that FMSA is satisfactory in predicting surface tension, density profile, as well as relevant phase equilibria. Furthermore, this work strongly suggests that FMSA is very capable of unifying homogeneous and inhomogeneous fluids, as well as those behaviors outside and inside the critical region within one framework.

  17. Nature-Inspired One-Step Green Procedure for Enhancing the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Behavior of a Chitin Film: Controlled Interfacial Assembly of Tannic Acid onto a Chitin Film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuntao; Li, Jing; Li, Bin

    2016-07-20

    The final goal of this study was to develop antimicrobial food-contact materials based on a natural phenolic compound (tannic acid) and chitin, which is the second most abundant polysaccharide on earth, using an interfacial assembly approach. Chitin film has poor antibacterial and antioxidant ability, which limits its application in industrial fields such as active packaging. Therefore, in this study, a novel one-step green procedure was applied to introduce antibacterial and antioxidant properties into a chitin film simultaneously by incorporation of tannic acid into the chitin film through interfacial assembly. The antibacterial and antioxidant behavior of chitin film has been greatly enhanced. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction were found to be the main driving forces for interfacial assembly. Therefore, controlled interfacial assembly of tannic acid onto a chitin film demonstrated a good way to develop functional materials that can be potentially applied in industry.

  18. Theoretical modeling of CHF for near-saturated pool boiling and flow boiling from short heaters using the interfacial lift-off criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Mudawar, I.; Galloway, J.E.; Gersey, C.O.

    1995-12-31

    Pool boiling and flow boiling were examined for near-saturated bulk conditions in order to determine the critical heat flux (CHF) trigger mechanism for each. Photographic studies of the wall region revealed features common to both situations. At fluxes below CHF, the vapor coalesces into a wavy layer which permits wetting only in wetting fronts, the portions of the liquid-vapor interface which contact the wall as a result of the interfacial waviness. Close examination of the interfacial features revealed the waves are generated from the lower edge of the heater in pool boiling and the heater`s upstream region in flow boiling. Wavelengths follow predictions based upon the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability criterion. Critical heat flux in both cases occurs when the pressure force exerted upon the interface due to interfacial curvature, which tends to preserve interfacial contact with the wall prior to CHF, is overcome by the momentum of vapor at the site of the first wetting front, causing the interface to lift away from the wall. It is shown this interfacial lift-off criterion facilitates accurate theoretical modeling of CHF in pool boiling and in flow boiling in both straight and curved channels.

  19. Effect of Mg Addition on the Refinement and Homogenized Distribution of Inclusions in Steel with Different Al Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linzhu; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Zhang, Shuo; Ju, Jiantao

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of Mg addition on the refinement and homogenized distribution of inclusions, deoxidized experiments with different amounts of aluminum and magnesium addition were carried out at 1873 K (1600 °C) under the condition of no fluid flow. The size distribution of three-dimensional inclusions obtained by applying the modified Schwartz-Saltykov transformation from the observed planar size distribution, and degree of homogeneity in inclusion dispersion quantified by measuring the inter-surface distance of inclusions, were studied as a function of the amount of Mg addition and holding time. The nucleation and growth of inclusions based on homogeneous nucleation theory and Ostwald ripening were discussed with the consideration of supersaturation degree and interfacial energy between molten steel and inclusions. The average attractive force acted on inclusions in experimental steels was estimated according to Paunov's theory. The results showed that in addition to increasing the Mg addition, increasing the oxygen activity at an early stage of deoxidation and lowering the dissolved oxygen content are conductive to the increase of nucleation rate as well as to the refinement of inclusions Moreover, it was found that the degree of homogeneity in inclusion dispersion decreases with an increase of the attractive force acted on inclusions, which is largely dependent on the inclusion composition and volume fraction of inclusions.

  20. Effect of Mg Addition on the Refinement and Homogenized Distribution of Inclusions in Steel with Different Al Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linzhu; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Zhang, Shuo; Ju, Jiantao

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of Mg addition on the refinement and homogenized distribution of inclusions, deoxidized experiments with different amounts of aluminum and magnesium addition were carried out at 1873 K (1600 °C) under the condition of no fluid flow. The size distribution of three-dimensional inclusions obtained by applying the modified Schwartz-Saltykov transformation from the observed planar size distribution, and degree of homogeneity in inclusion dispersion quantified by measuring the inter-surface distance of inclusions, were studied as a function of the amount of Mg addition and holding time. The nucleation and growth of inclusions based on homogeneous nucleation theory and Ostwald ripening were discussed with the consideration of supersaturation degree and interfacial energy between molten steel and inclusions. The average attractive force acted on inclusions in experimental steels was estimated according to Paunov's theory. The results showed that in addition to increasing the Mg addition, increasing the oxygen activity at an early stage of deoxidation and lowering the dissolved oxygen content are conductive to the increase of nucleation rate as well as to the refinement of inclusions Moreover, it was found that the degree of homogeneity in inclusion dispersion decreases with an increase of the attractive force acted on inclusions, which is largely dependent on the inclusion composition and volume fraction of inclusions.

  1. Effects of metallic nanoparticle doped flux on the interfacial intermetallic compounds between lead-free solder ball and copper substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sujan, G.K. Haseeb, A.S.M.A. Afifi, A.B.M.

    2014-11-15

    Lead free solders currently in use are prone to develop thick interfacial intermetallic compound layers with rough morphology which are detrimental to the long term solder joint reliability. A novel method has been developed to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers between lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder ball and copper substrate by doping a water soluble flux with metallic nanoparticles. Four types of metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, molybdenum and titanium) were used to investigate their effects on the wetting behavior and interfacial microstructural evaluations after reflow. Nanoparticles were dispersed manually with a water soluble flux and the resulting nanoparticle doped flux was placed on copper substrate. Lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder balls of diameter 0.45 mm were placed on top of the flux and were reflowed at a peak temperature of 240 °C for 45 s. Angle of contact, wetting area and interfacial microstructure were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was observed that the angle of contact increased and wetting area decreased with the addition of cobalt, molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles to flux. On the other hand, wettability improved with the addition of nickel nanoparticles. Cross-sectional micrographs revealed that both nickel and cobalt nanoparticle doping transformed the morphology of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} from a typical scallop type to a planer one and reduced the intermetallic compound thickness under optimum condition. These effects were suggested to be related to in-situ interfacial alloying at the interface during reflow. The minimum amount of nanoparticles required to produce the planer morphology was found to be 0.1 wt.% for both nickel and cobalt. Molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles neither appear to undergo alloying during reflow nor have any influence at the solder/substrate interfacial reaction. Thus, doping

  2. A relationship between three-dimensional surface hydration structures and force distribution measured by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Watkins, Matthew; Shluger, Alexander L.; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent tip approximation (STA) model and from explicit molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the simulated STA force map describes the major features of the experimentally obtained force image. The agreement between the STA data and the experiment establishes the correspondence between the water density used as an input to the STA model and the experimental hydration structure and thus provides a tool to bridge the experimental force data and atomistic solvation structures. Further applications of this method should improve the accuracy and reliability of both interpretation of 3D-SFM force maps and atomistic simulations in a wide range of solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent

  3. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  4. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    DOE PAGES

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; ...

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface.more » The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical

  5. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface. The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical strength.

  6. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Interfacial Mechanics of Crystalline Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qingquan

    ultimate tensile strength were found to all increased as the NW diameter decreased. For the temperature effect study, a brief review on brittle-to-ductile transition (BDT) of silicon (Si) is presented. BDT temperature shows decreasing trend as size of the sample decrease. However, controversial results have been reported in terms of brittle or ductile behaviors for Si NWs at room temperature. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) thermal actuator (ETA) was designed to test NW without involving external heating. To circumvent undesired heating of the end effector, heat sink beams that can be co-fabricated with the thermal actuator were introduced. A combined modeling and experimental study was conducted to access the effect of such heat sink beams. Temperature distribution was measured and simulated using Raman scattering and multiphysics finite element method, respectively. Our results demonstrated that heat sink beams are effective in reducing the temperature of the thermal actuator. To get elevated temperature in a controllable fashion, a comb drive actuator was designed with separating actuation and heating mechanisms. Multiphysics finite element analysis (coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical) was used to optimize structure design and minimize undesired thermal loading/unloading. A Si NW with diameter of 50 nm was tested on the device under different temperatures. Stress strain curves at different temperatures revealed that plastic deformation occurs at temperature of 55 °C. For interfacial mechanics, we report an experimental study on the friction between Ag and ZnO NW tips (ends) and a gold substrate. An innovative experimental method based on column buckling theory was developed for the friction measurements. Direct measurements of the static friction force and interfacial shear strength between Si NWs and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is reported. The static friction and shear strength were found to increase rapidly and then decrease with the increasing

  7. Load sharing in bioinspired fibrillar adhesives with backing layer interactions and interfacial misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacca, Mattia; Booth, Jamie A.; Turner, Kimberly L.; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2016-11-01

    Bio-inspired fibrillar adhesives rely on the utilization of short-range intermolecular forces harnessed by intimate contact at fibril tips. The combined adhesive strength of multiple fibrils can only be utilized if equal load sharing (ELS) is obtained at detachment. Previous investigations have highlighted that mechanical coupling of fibrils through a compliant backing layer gives rise to load concentration and the nucleation and propagation of interfacial flaws. However, misalignment of the adhesive and contacting surface has not been considered in theoretical treatments of load sharing with backing layer interactions. Alignment imperfections are difficult to avoid for a flat-on-flat interfacial configuration. In this work we demonstrate that interfacial misalignment can significantly alter load sharing and the kinematics of detachment in a model adhesive system. Load sharing regimes dominated by backing layer interactions and misalignment are revealed, the transition between which is controlled by the misalignment angle, fibril separation, and fibril compliance. In the regime dominated by misalignment, backing layer deformation can counteract misalignment giving rise to improved load sharing when compared to an identical fibrillar array with a rigid backing layer. This result challenges the conventional belief that stiffer (and thinner) backing layers consistently reduce load concentration among fibrils. Finally, we obtain analytically the fibril compliance distribution required to harness backing layer interactions to obtain ELS. Through fibril compliance optimization, ELS can be obtained even with misalignment. However, since misalignment is typically not deterministic, it is of greater practical significance that the array optimized for perfect alignment exhibits load sharing superior to that of a homogeneous array subject to misalignment. These results inform the design of fibrillar arrays with graded compliance capable of exhibiting improved load sharing

  8. Load and Time Dependence of Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kaiwen; Gosvami, Nitya N.; Goldsby, David L.; Liu, Yun; Szlufarska, Izabela; Carpick, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are widely used empirical relationships that describe the macroscale frictional behavior of a broad range of materials, including rocks found in the seismogenic zone of Earth's crust. A fundamental aspect of the RSF laws is frictional "aging," where friction increases with the time of stationary contact due to asperity creep and/or interfacial strengthening. Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments and simulations found that nanoscale silica contacts exhibit aging due to the progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds. The role of normal load (and, thus, normal stress) on this interfacial chemical bond-induced (ICBI) friction is predicted to be significant but has not been examined experimentally. Here, we show using AFM that, for nanoscale ICBI friction of silica-silica interfaces, aging (the difference between the maximum static friction and the kinetic friction) increases approximately linearly with the product of the normal load and the log of the hold time. This behavior is attributed to the approximately linear dependence of the contact area on the load in the positive load regime before significant wear occurs, as inferred from sliding friction measurements. This implies that the average pressure, and thus the average bond formation rate, is load independent within the accessible load range. We also consider a more accurate nonlinear model for the contact area, from which we extract the activation volume and the average stress-free energy barrier to the aging process. Our work provides an approach for studying the load and time dependence of contact aging at the nanoscale and further establishes RSF laws for nanoscale asperity contacts.

  9. Air Force Security Forces Professionalism: Useful Insights for Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    perceived ground force within an air force also renders its development analysis worthy. By careful study of Security Forces history , both written and...social science works, historical accounts of each period, and personal interviews. Additionally, Defenders of the Force: The History of the United...29 years in this period hold remarkably significant events in US history , they also hold events significant to the professionalization of Air Police

  10. Simultaneous interfacial rheology and microstructure measurement of densely aggregated particle laden interfaces using a modified double wall ring interfacial rheometer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sourav; Christopher, Gordon F

    2014-08-19

    The study of particle laden interfaces has increased significantly due to the increasing industrial use of particle stabilized foams and Pickering emulsions, whose bulk rheology and stability are highly dependent on particle laden interface's interfacial rheology, which is a function of interfacial microstructure. To understand the physical mechanisms that dictate interfacial rheology of particle laden interfaces requires correlating rheology to microstructure. To achieve this goal, a double wall ring interfacial rheometer has been modified to allow real time, simultaneous interfacial visualization and shear rheology measurements. The development of this tool is outlined, and its ability to provide novel and unique measurements is demonstrated on a sample system. This tool has been used to examine the role of microstructure on the steady shear rheology of densely packed, aggregated particle laden interfaces at three surface concentrations. Through examination of the rheology and analysis of interfacial microstructure response to shear, a transition from shear thinning due to aggregated cluster breakup to yielding at a slip plane within the interface has been identified. Interestingly, it is found that aggregated interfaces transition to yielding well before they reached a jammed state. Furthermore, these systems undergo significant shear induced order when densely packed. These results indicate that the mechanics of these interfaces are not simply jammed or unjammed and that the interfacial rheology relationship with microstructure can give us significant insight into understanding how to engineer particle laden interfaces in the future. By examining both rheology and microstructure, the mechanisms that dictate observed rheology are now understood and can be used to predict and control the rheology of the interface.

  11. Specific effects of Ca(2+) ions and molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin interfacial layers that drive macroscopic foam stability.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Björn; Schulze-Zachau, Felix; Nagel, Eva; Engelhardt, Kathrin; Stoyanov, Stefan; Gochev, Georgi; Khristov, Khr; Mileva, Elena; Exerowa, Dotchi; Miller, Reinhard; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-07-06

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) adsorption layers at air-water interfaces were studied in situ with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG), tensiometry, surface dilatational rheology and ellipsometry as a function of bulk Ca(2+) concentration. The relation between the interfacial molecular structure of adsorbed BLG and the interactions with the supporting electrolyte is additionally addressed on higher length scales along the foam hierarchy - from the ubiquitous air-water interface through thin foam films to macroscopic foam. For concentrations <1 mM, a strong decrease in SFG intensity from O-H stretching bands and a slight increase in layer thickness and surface pressure are observed. A further increase in Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM causes an apparent change in the polarity of aromatic C-H stretching vibrations from interfacial BLG which we associate to a charge reversal at the interface. Foam film measurements show formation of common black films at Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM due to considerable decrease of the stabilizing electrostatic disjoining pressure. These observations also correlate with a minimum in macroscopic foam stability. For concentrations >30 mM Ca(2+), micrographs of foam films show clear signatures of aggregates which tend to increase the stability of foam films. Here, the interfacial layers have a higher surface dilatational elasticity. In fact, macroscopic foams formed from BLG dilutions with high Ca(2+) concentrations where aggregates and interfacial layers with higher elasticity are found, showed the highest stability with much smaller bubble sizes.

  12. Force cycles and force chains.

    PubMed

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Walker, David M; Lin, Qun

    2010-01-01

    We examine the coevolution of N cycles and force chains as part of a broader study which is designed to quantitatively characterize the role of the laterally supporting contact network to the evolution of force chains. Here, we elucidate the rheological function of these coexisting structures, especially in the lead up to failure. In analogy to force chains, we introduce the concept of force cycles: N cycles whose contacts each bear above average force. We examine their evolution around force chains in a discrete element simulation of a dense granular material under quasistatic biaxial loading. Three-force cycles are shown to be stabilizing structures that inhibit relative particle rotations and provide strong lateral support to force chains. These exhibit distinct behavior from other cycles. Their population decreases rapidly during the initial stages of the strain-hardening regime-a trend that is suddenly interrupted and reversed upon commencement of force chain buckling prior to peak shear stress. Results suggest that the three-force cycles are called upon for reinforcements to ward off failure via shear banding. Ultimately though, the resistance to buckling proves futile; buckling wins under the combined effects of dilatation and increasing compressive load. The sudden increase in three-force cycles may thus be viewed as an indicator of imminent failure via shear bands.

  13. Some Aspects of Interfacial Phenomena in Steelmaking and Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. J.; Viswanathan, N. N.; Muhmood, L.; Kapilashrami, E.; Seetharaman, S.

    2016-08-01

    Unique experiments were designed to study the surface phenomena in steelmaking reactions. The concept of surface sulfide capacities and an understanding of the surface accumulation of surface-active species, based on experimental results, are presented. In order to understand the flow phenomenon at slag/metal interface, experiments were designed to measure the interfacial velocity of S on the surface of an iron drop immersed in an aluminosilicate slag using the X-ray sessile drop method. The oscillation of the iron drop in the slag due to the change in the surface concentration of sulfur at the slag-metal interface was monitored by X-ray imaging. From the observations, the interfacial velocity of sulfur was evaluated. Similar experiments were performed to measure the interfacial velocity of oxygen at the interface as well as the impact of oxygen potential on the interfacial velocity of sulfur. The interfacial shear viscosity and the dilatational modulus were also evaluated. In a study of the wetting of alumina base by iron drop at constant oxygen pressure under isothermal condition, the contact angle was found to be decreased with the progress of the reaction leading to the formation of hercynite as an intermediate layer creating non-wetting conditions. In the case of silica substrate, an intermediate liquid fayalite layer was formed.

  14. Interfacial and emulsifying properties of designed β-strand peptides.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Annette F

    2010-12-07

    The structural and surfactant properties of a series of amphipathic β-strand peptides have been studied as a function of pH. Each nine-residue peptide has a framework of hydrophobic proline and phenylalanine amino acid residues, alternating with acidic or basic amino acids to give a sequence closely related to known β-sheet formers. Surface activity, interfacial mechanical properties, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), droplet sizing and zeta potential measurements were used to gain an overview of the peptide behavior as the molecular charge varied from ±4 to 0 with pH. ECD data suggest that the peptides form polyproline-type helices in bulk aqueous solution when highly charged, but may fold to β-hairpins rather than β-sheets when uncharged. In the uncharged state, the peptides adsorb readily at a macroscopic fluid interface to form mechanically strong interfacial films, but tend to give large droplet sizes on emulsification, apparently due to flocculation at a low droplet zeta potential. In contrast, highly charged peptide states gave a low interfacial coverage, but retained good emulsifying activity as judged by droplet size. Best emulsification was generally seen for intermediate charged states of the peptides, possibly representing a compromise between droplet zeta potential and interfacial binding affinity. The emulsifying properties of β-strand peptides have not been previously reported. Understanding the interfacial properties of such peptides is important to their potential development as biosurfactants.

  15. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  16. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  17. The role of electrostatic interactions in protease surface diffusion and the consequence for interfacial biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Feller, Bob E; Kellis, James T; Cascão-Pereira, Luis G; Robertson, Channing R; Frank, Curtis W

    2010-12-21

    This study examines the influence of electrostatic interactions on enzyme surface diffusion and the contribution of diffusion to interfacial biocatalysis. Surface diffusion, adsorption, and reaction were investigated on an immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) multilayer substrate over a range of solution ionic strength values. Interfacial charge of the enzyme and substrate surface was maintained by performing the measurements at a fixed pH; therefore, electrostatic interactions were manipulated by changing the ionic strength. The interfacial processes were investigated using a combination of techniques: fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy. We used an enzyme charge ladder with a net charge ranging from -2 to +4 with respect to the parent to systematically probe the contribution of electrostatics in interfacial enzyme biocatalysis on a charged substrate. The correlation between reaction rate and adsorption was determined for each charge variant within the ladder, each of which displayed a maximum rate at an intermediate surface concentration. Both the maximum reaction rate and adsorption value at which this maximum rate occurs increased in magnitude for the more positive variants. In addition, the specific enzyme activity increased as the level of adsorption decreased, and for the lowest adsorption values, the specific enzyme activity was enhanced compared to the trend at higher surface concentrations. At a fixed level of adsorption, the specific enzyme activity increased with positive enzyme charge; however, this effect offers diminishing returns as the enzyme becomes more highly charged. We examined the effect of electrostatic interactions on surface diffusion. As the binding affinity was reduced by increasing the solution ionic strength, thus weakening electrostatic interaction, the rate of surface diffusion increased considerably. The enhancement in specific activity achieved at

  18. Optimization of Surfactant Mixtures and Their Interfacial Behavior for Advanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, Prof. P.

    2002-03-04

    The objective of this project was to develop a knowledge base that is helpful for the design of improved processes for mobilizing and producing oil left untapped using conventional techniques. The main goal was to develop and evaluate mixtures of new or modified surfactants for improved oil recovery. In this regard, interfacial properties of novel biodegradable n-alkyl pyrrolidones and sugar-based surfactants have been studied systematically. Emphasis was on designing cost-effective processes compatible with existing conditions and operations in addition to ensuring minimal reagent loss.

  19. Combined in-situ dilatometer and contact angle studies of interfacial reaction kinetics in brazing.

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, V. R.; Javernick, D. A.; Thoma, D. J.; Cola, M. J.; Hollis, K. J.; Smith, F. M.; Dauelsberg, L. B.

    2001-01-01

    Multi-component dissimilar material braze joints as shown in Figure 1 consisting of dissimilar base materials, filler materials and wetting agents are of tantamount importance in a wide variely of applications. This work combines dilatometry and contact angle measurements to characterize in-situ the multiple interfacial reaction pathways that occur in such systems. Whereas both of these methods are commonly used tools in metallurgical investigation, their combined use within the context of brazing studies is new and offers considerable additional insight. Applications are discussed to joints made between Beryllium and Monel with TiH{sub 2} as the wetting agent and Cu-28%Ag as the filler material.

  20. Interfacial Modifiers for Enhanced Stability and Reduced Degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Ina T.; Oyster, Tricia M.; Mansfield, Lorelle M.; Matthews, Rachael; Pentzer, Emily B.; French, Roger H.; Peshek, Timothy J.

    2016-11-21

    Transparent conductive oxide (TCO) degradation is a known failure mode in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices through mechanisms such as resistivity increase and delamination. Here we apply thin interfacial modifiers to aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) to mitigate damp heat induced degradation of electrical performance. Additionally, we demonstrate that these modifiers can be applied to the AZO front contact of a Cu(In, Ga)Se2 device without significantly degrading the device performance, a promising step towards improving the lifetime performance.

  1. Facile Control of Interfacial Energy-Barrier Scattering in Antimony Telluride Electrodeposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jiwon; Jung, Hyunsung; Lim, Jae-Hong; Myung, Nosang V.

    2017-04-01

    The augmented thermoelectric performance of nanocrystalline antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) films is investigated by introducing interfacial energy-barrier scattering (i.e., barrier heights), which occurs at both the grain boundaries and the interfaces with embedded second phases. It is postulated that the barriers created at both the interfaces and boundaries filter the low-energy carriers, thus favoring a high Seebeck coefficient. A facile, but high-precision composition-controlled electrodeposition technique is employed to synthesize single-phase nanocrystalline Sb2Te3 and nanocomposite Te/Sb2Te3. Both the initial composition of the Sb-Te solid solution and the post-annealing profiles are varied to control the grain size, as well as the formation of second-phase Te. The electrical and thermoelectric properties are measured and correlated with the physical properties, where an enhanced Seebeck coefficient at a fixed carrier concentration is interpreted as indicating that the energy-dependent carrier filtering effect is in force. On a promising note, modification of the Sb2Te3 film physical properties and formation of the second phase affect the interfacial energy-barrier scattering and yields an enhanced power factor. Thus, Sb2Te3 film is a promising p-type thermoelectric material for a room-temperature-operational micro-thermoelectric power generator.

  2. Water nano-hydrodynamics: The interplay between interfacial viscosity, slip and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2012-02-01

    The understanding and the ability to manipulate fluids at the nanoscale is a matter of continuously growing scientific and technological interest. Fluid flow in nano-confined geometries is relevant for biology, polymer science and geophysics. The applications range from gene sequencing to protein segregation, cell sorting, sensors, nanotribology and diffusion through porous media. Here, we present experiments which show how the interfacial viscosity of water strongly depends on the wetting properties of the confining surfaces. This dependence is fully explained by considering water slippage at the stationary solid surface. The interfacial viscous forces as a function of six surfaces with different wettability are fitted with a modified form of the Newtonian definition of viscosity, which takes into consideration the fluid slip. This simple relationship can explain the viscosity measurements and permits us to extract a ``slip parameter'' for each investigated surface. This slip parameter is found to increase with the static contact angle of the solid surface as expected from previous work, bringing clear evidence of the relationship between viscosity and slip.

  3. Manipulation and control of the interfacial polarization in organic light-emitting diodes by dipolar doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Lars; Schmidt, Tobias D.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Most of the commonly used electron transporting materials in organic light-emitting diodes exhibit interfacial polarization resulting from partially aligned permanent dipole moments of the molecules. This property modifies the internal electric field distribution of the device and therefore enables an earlier flat band condition for the hole transporting side, leading to improved charge carrier injection. Recently, this phenomenon was studied with regard to different materials and degradation effects, however, so far the influence of dilution has not been investigated. In this paper we focus on dipolar doping of the hole transporting material 4,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]-biphenyl (NPB) with the polar electron transporting material tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate) aluminum (Alq3). Impedance spectroscopy reveals that changes of the hole injection voltage do not scale in a simple linear fashion with the effective thickness of the doped layer. In fact, the measured interfacial polarization reaches a maximum value for a 1:1 blend. Taking the permanent dipole moment of Alq3 into account, an increasing degree of dipole alignment is found for decreasing Alq3 concentration. This observation can be explained by the competition between dipole-dipole interactions leading to dimerization and the driving force for vertical orientation of Alq3 dipoles at the surface of the NPB layer.

  4. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of interfacial water at single bond limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying

    Hydrogen bond is one of the most important weak interactions in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. The conventional methods for studying hydrogen-bonding interaction are all based on spectroscopic or diffraction techniques. However, those techniques have poor spatial resolution and only measure the average properties of many hydrogen bonds, which are susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. The spatial variation and inter-bond coupling of the hydrogen bonds leads to significant spectral broadening, which prohibits the accurate understanding of the experimental data. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with unprecedentedly high sensitivity and resolution, for addressing weak inter- and intra-molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. Based on a qPlus sensor, we have succeeded to push the real-space study of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded system, i.e. water, down to single bond limit. Combined with state-of-the-arts quantum simulations, we have discovered exotic nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) in interfacial water and revealed the quantum nature of the hydrogen bond from a completely new perspective

  5. In situ analysis of the interfacial reactions between MCMB electrode and organic electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morigaki, Ken-ichi

    The interfacial phenomena between graphite (mesocarbon-microbeads (MCMB)) electrode and organic electrolyte solution were analyzed by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The influence of lithium salts (anion species), LiPF 6, LiBF 4, and LiClO 4, on the interfacial reaction, including lithium intercalation into graphite, was investigated in EC+DMC solutions. In situ AFM observation disclosed that morphological changes are quite different from one another depending on the kind of lithium salt (anion). A large expansion of MCMB particle was observed particularly in LiPF 6/EC+DMC. An expansion of MCMB particle started above 1.0 V versus Li/Li + and this expansion seemed to be caused by the decomposition of ternary graphite intercalation compound (GIC) ( C nLi(sol) y), because the expansion remained after de-intercalation of lithium. IRAS spectra of each electrolyte solution showed different behaviors and different reduction products of solvents. double modulation FTIR (DMFTIR) spectra on graphite electrode, which emphasize the surface species, indicated relatively small changes after cathodic polarization. Therefore, the observed morphological changes were caused mainly by the expansion of graphene layers and not by the precipitation of reduction products.

  6. Silicon-wall interfacial free energy via thermodynamics integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Wan; Pan, Heng

    2016-11-01

    We compute the interfacial free energy of a silicon system in contact with flat and structured walls by molecular dynamics simulation. The thermodynamics integration method, previously applied to Lennard-Jones potentials [R. Benjamin and J. Horbach, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044707 (2012)], has been extended and implemented in Tersoff potentials with two-body and three-body interactions taken into consideration. The thermodynamic integration scheme includes two steps. In the first step, the bulk Tersoff system is reversibly transformed to a state where it interacts with a structureless flat wall, and in a second step, the flat structureless wall is reversibly transformed into an atomistic SiO2 wall. Interfacial energies for liquid silicon-wall interfaces and crystal silicon-wall interfaces have been calculated. The calculated interfacial energies have been employed to predict the nucleation mechanisms in a slab of liquid silicon confined by two walls and compared with MD simulation results.

  7. Fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion in natural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, L. Q. N.; Yuan, X. W.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Fuentes, C.; van Vuure, A. W.; Verpoest, I.

    2015-04-01

    The interface between natural fibers and thermoplastic matrices is studied, in which fiber-matrix wetting analysis and interfacial adhesion are investigated to obtain a systematic understanding of the interface. In wetting analysis, the surface energies of the fibers and the matrices are estimated using their contact angles in test liquids. Work of adhesion is calculated for each composite system. For the interface tests, transverse three point bending tests (3PBT) on unidirectional (UD) composites are performed to measure interfacial strength. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization on the fibers is also carried out to obtain more information about the surface chemistry of the fibers. UD composites are examined to explore the correlation between the fiber-matrix interface and the final properties of the composites. The results suggest that the higher interfacial adhesion of the treated fiber composites compared to untreated fiber composites can be attributed to higher fiber-matrix physico-chemical interaction corresponding with the work of adhesion.

  8. Interfacial waves generated by electrowetting-driven contact line motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jonghyun; Park, Jaebum; Kim, Yunhee; Shin, Bongsu; Bae, Jungmok; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-10-01

    The contact angle of a liquid-fluid interface can be effectively modulated by the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) technology. Rapid movement of the contact line can be achieved by swift changes of voltage at the electrodes, which can give rise to interfacial waves under the strong influence of surface tension. Here we experimentally demonstrate EWOD-driven interfacial waves of overlapping liquids and compare their wavelength and decay length with the theoretical results obtained by a perturbation analysis. Our theory also allows us to predict the temporal evolution of the interfacial profiles in either rectangular or cylindrical containers, as driven by slipping contact lines. This work builds a theoretical framework to understand and predict the dynamics of capillary waves of a liquid-liquid interface driven by EWOD, which has practical implications on optofluidic devices used to guide light.

  9. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  10. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  11. Solid/liquid interfacial free energies in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nason, D.; Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a semiquantitative technique for predicting the segregation characteristics of smooth interfaces between binary solid and liquid solutions in terms of readily available thermodynamic parameters of the bulk solutions. A lattice-liquid interfacial model and a pair-bonded regular solution model are employed in the treatment with an accommodation for liquid interfacial entropy. The method is used to calculate the interfacial segregation and the free energy of segregation for solid-liquid interfaces between binary solutions for the (111) boundary of fcc crystals. The zone of compositional transition across the interface is shown to be on the order of a few atomic layers in width, being moderately narrower for ideal solutions. The free energy of the segregated interface depends primarily upon the solid composition and the heats of fusion of the component atoms, the composition difference of the solutions, and the difference of the heats of mixing of the solutions.

  12. A transferable force field to predict phase equilibria and surface tension of ethers and glycol ethers.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Nicolas; Lachet, Véronique; Pérez-Pellitero, Javier; Mackie, Allan D; Malfreyt, Patrice; Boutin, Anne

    2011-09-15

    We propose a new transferable force field to simulate phase equilibrium and interfacial properties of systems involving ethers and glycol ethers. On the basis of the anisotropic united-atom force field, only one new group is introduced: the ether oxygen atom. The optimized Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of this atom are identical whatever the molecule simulated (linear ether, branched ether, cyclic ether, aromatic ether, diether, or glycol ether). Accurate predictions are achieved for pure compound saturated properties, critical properties, and surface tensions of the liquid-vapor interface, as well as for pressure-composition binary mixture diagrams. Multifunctional molecules (1,2-dimethoxyethane, 2-methoxyethanol, diethylene glycol) have also been studied using a recently proposed methodology for the calculation of the intramolecular electrostatic energy avoiding the use of additional empirical parameters. This new force field appears transferable for a wide variety of molecules and properties. It is furthermore worth noticing that binary mixtures have been simulated without introducing empirical binary parameters, highlighting also the transferability to mixtures. Hence, this new force field gives future opportunities to simulate complex systems of industrial interest involving molecules with ether functions.

  13. Nonequilibrium Interfacial Tension in Simple and Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truzzolillo, Domenico; Mora, Serge; Dupas, Christelle; Cipelletti, Luca

    2016-10-01

    Interfacial tension between immiscible phases is a well-known phenomenon, which manifests itself in everyday life, from the shape of droplets and foam bubbles to the capillary rise of sap in plants or the locomotion of insects on a water surface. More than a century ago, Korteweg generalized this notion by arguing that stresses at the interface between two miscible fluids act transiently as an effective, nonequilibrium interfacial tension, before homogenization is eventually reached. In spite of its relevance in fields as diverse as geosciences, polymer physics, multiphase flows, and fluid removal, experiments and theoretical works on the interfacial tension of miscible systems are still scarce, and mostly restricted to molecular fluids. This leaves crucial questions unanswered, concerning the very existence of the effective interfacial tension, its stabilizing or destabilizing character, and its dependence on the fluid's composition and concentration gradients. We present an extensive set of measurements on miscible complex fluids that demonstrate the existence and the stabilizing character of the effective interfacial tension, unveil new regimes beyond Korteweg's predictions, and quantify its dependence on the nature of the fluids and the composition gradient at the interface. We introduce a simple yet general model that rationalizes nonequilibrium interfacial stresses to arbitrary mixtures, beyond Korteweg's small gradient regime, and show that the model captures remarkably well both our new measurements and literature data on molecular and polymer fluids. Finally, we briefly discuss the relevance of our model to a variety of interface-driven problems, from phase separation to fracture, which are not adequately captured by current approaches based on the assumption of small gradients.

  14. The two-phase flow IPTT method for measurement of nonwetting-wetting liquid interfacial areas at higher nonwetting saturations in natural porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hua; El Ouni, Asma; Lin, Dan; Wang, Bingguo; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial areas between nonwetting-wetting (NW-W) liquids in natural porous media were measured using a modified version of the interfacial partitioning tracer test (IPTT) method that employed simultaneous two-phase flow conditions, which allowed measurement at NW saturations higher than trapped residual saturation. Measurements were conducted over a range of saturations for a well-sorted quartz sand under three wetting scenarios of primary drainage (PD), secondary imbibition (SI), and secondary drainage (SD). Limited sets of experiments were also conducted for a model glass-bead medium and for a soil. The measured interfacial areas were compared to interfacial areas measured using the standard IPTT method for liquid-liquid systems, which employs residual NW saturations. In addition, the theoretical maximum interfacial areas estimated from the measured data are compared to specific solid surface areas measured with the N2/BET method and estimated based on geometrical calculations for smooth spheres. Interfacial areas increase linearly with decreasing W-phase (water) saturation over the range of saturations employed. The maximum interfacial areas determined for the glass beads, which have no surface roughness, are 32 ± 4 and 36 ± 5 cm-1 for PD and SI cycles, respectively. The values are similar to the geometric specific solid surface area (31 ± 2 cm-1) and the N2/BET solid surface area (28 ± 2 cm-1). The maximum interfacial areas are 274 ± 38, 235 ± 27, and 581 ± 160 cm-1 for the sand for PD, SI, and SD cycles, respectively, and ˜7625 cm-1 for the soil for PD and SI. The maximum interfacial areas for the sand and soil are significantly larger than the estimated smooth-sphere specific solid surface areas (107 ± 8 cm-1 and 152 ± 8 cm-1, respectively), but much smaller than the N2/BET solid surface area (1387 ± 92 cm-1 and 55224 cm-1, respectively). The NW-W interfacial areas measured with the two-phase flow method compare well to values measured using the

  15. Generation of internal solitary waves by frontally forced intrusions in geophysical flows.

    PubMed

    Bourgault, Daniel; Galbraith, Peter S; Chavanne, Cédric

    2016-12-06

    Internal solitary waves are hump-shaped, large-amplitude waves that are physically analogous to surface waves except that they propagate within the fluid, along density steps that typically characterize the layered vertical structure of lakes, oceans and the atmosphere. As do surface waves, internal solitary waves may overturn and break, and the process is thought to provide a globally significant source of turbulent mixing and energy dissipation. Although commonly observed in geophysical fluids, the origins of internal solitary waves remain unclear. Here we report a rarely observed natural case of the birth of internal solitary waves from a frontally forced interfacial gravity current intruding into a two-layer and vertically sheared background environment. The results of the analysis carried out suggest that fronts may represent additional and unexpected sources of internal solitary waves in regions of lakes, oceans and atmospheres that are dynamically similar to the situation examined here in the Saguenay Fjord, Canada.

  16. Generation of internal solitary waves by frontally forced intrusions in geophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgault, Daniel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Chavanne, Cédric

    2016-12-01

    Internal solitary waves are hump-shaped, large-amplitude waves that are physically analogous to surface waves except that they propagate within the fluid, along density steps that typically characterize the layered vertical structure of lakes, oceans and the atmosphere. As do surface waves, internal solitary waves may overturn and break, and the process is thought to provide a globally significant source of turbulent mixing and energy dissipation. Although commonly observed in geophysical fluids, the origins of internal solitary waves remain unclear. Here we report a rarely observed natural case of the birth of internal solitary waves from a frontally forced interfacial gravity current intruding into a two-layer and vertically sheared background environment. The results of the analysis carried out suggest that fronts may represent additional and unexpected sources of internal solitary waves in regions of lakes, oceans and atmospheres that are dynamically similar to the situation examined here in the Saguenay Fjord, Canada.

  17. Generation of internal solitary waves by frontally forced intrusions in geophysical flows

    PubMed Central

    Bourgault, Daniel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Chavanne, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Internal solitary waves are hump-shaped, large-amplitude waves that are physically analogous to surface waves except that they propagate within the fluid, along density steps that typically characterize the layered vertical structure of lakes, oceans and the atmosphere. As do surface waves, internal solitary waves may overturn and break, and the process is thought to provide a globally significant source of turbulent mixing and energy dissipation. Although commonly observed in geophysical fluids, the origins of internal solitary waves remain unclear. Here we report a rarely observed natural case of the birth of internal solitary waves from a frontally forced interfacial gravity current intruding into a two-layer and vertically sheared background environment. The results of the analysis carried out suggest that fronts may represent additional and unexpected sources of internal solitary waves in regions of lakes, oceans and atmospheres that are dynamically similar to the situation examined here in the Saguenay Fjord, Canada. PMID:27922007

  18. Dynamics of ultrasonic additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a solid-state technology for joining similar and dissimilar metal foils near room temperature by scrubbing them together with ultrasonic vibrations under pressure. Structural dynamics of the welding assembly and work piece influence how energy is transferred during the process and ultimately, part quality. To understand the effect of structural dynamics during UAM, a linear time-invariant model is proposed to relate the inputs of shear force and electric current to resultant welder velocity and voltage. Measured frequency response and operating performance of the welder under no load is used to identify model parameters. Using this model and in-situ measurements, shear force and welder efficiency are estimated to be near 2000N and 80% when welding Al 6061-H18 weld foil, respectively. Shear force and welder efficiency have never been estimated before in UAM. The influence of processing conditions, i.e., welder amplitude, normal force, and weld speed, on shear force and welder efficiency are investigated. Welder velocity was found to strongly influence the shear force magnitude and efficiency while normal force and weld speed showed little to no influence. The proposed model is used to describe high frequency harmonic content in the velocity response of the welder during welding operations and coupling of the UAM build with the welder.

  19. Interfacial Stability in a Two-Layer Benard Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    STABILITY IN A TWO-LAYER BENARD PROBLEM Yuriko Renardy Technical Summary Report #2814 April 1985 I cti- Work Unit Number 2 - Physical Mathematics...34•"• -••’-’• ^ ••’••• VI , •• W -•- • •- ’•"• INTERFACIAL STABILITY IN A TWO-LAYER BENARD PROBLEM Yuriko Renardy I. INTRODUCTION Two layers of fluids are...Subtltl») INTERFACIAL STABILITY IN A TWO-LAYER BENARD PROBLEM 7. AUTMORf.; Yuriko Renardy »• PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS

  20. Anomalous enhancement in interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy through uphill diffusion.

    PubMed

    Das, Tanmay; Kulkarni, Prabhanjan D; Purandare, S C; Barshilia, Harish C; Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Chowdhury, Prasanta

    2014-06-17

    We observed interfacial chemical sharpening due to uphill diffusion in post annealed ultrathin multilayer stack of Co and Pt, which leads to enhanced interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). This is surprising as these elements are considered as perfectly miscible. This chemical sharpening was confirmed through quantitative energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and intensity distribution of images taken on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopic (STEM) mode. This observation demonstrates an evidence of miscibility gap in ultrathin coherent Co/Pt multilayer stacks.

  1. The ensemble switch method for computing interfacial tensions

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter

    2015-04-14

    We present a systematic thermodynamic integration approach to compute interfacial tensions for solid-liquid interfaces, which is based on the ensemble switch method. Applying Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling techniques, we obtain results for hard spheres, which are in agreement with previous computations. The case of solid-liquid interfaces in a variant of the effective Asakura-Oosawa model and of liquid-vapor interfaces in the Lennard-Jones model are discussed as well. We demonstrate that a thorough finite-size analysis of the simulation data is required to obtain precise results for the interfacial tension.

  2. Estimating interfacial thermal conductivity in metamaterials through heat flux mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Canbazoglu, Fatih M.; Vemuri, Krishna P.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2015-04-06

    The variability of the thickness as well as the thermal conductivity of interfaces in composites may significantly influence thermal transport characteristics and the notion of a metamaterial as an effective medium. The consequent modulations of the heat flux passage are analytically and experimentally examined through a non-contact methodology using radiative imaging, on a model anisotropic thermal metamaterial. It was indicated that a lower Al layer/silver interfacial epoxy ratio of ∼25 compared to that of a Al layer/alumina interfacial epoxy (of ∼39) contributes to a smaller deviation of the heat flux bending angle.

  3. The ensemble switch method for computing interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter

    2015-04-14

    We present a systematic thermodynamic integration approach to compute interfacial tensions for solid-liquid interfaces, which is based on the ensemble switch method. Applying Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling techniques, we obtain results for hard spheres, which are in agreement with previous computations. The case of solid-liquid interfaces in a variant of the effective Asakura-Oosawa model and of liquid-vapor interfaces in the Lennard-Jones model are discussed as well. We demonstrate that a thorough finite-size analysis of the simulation data is required to obtain precise results for the interfacial tension.

  4. Interfacial Effects in Polymer Membranes for Clean Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soles, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Polymeric membranes are critical components in several emerging clean energy technologies. Examples include proton exchange membranes for hydrogen fuel cells, anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells, flow batteries, and even block copolymer membranes for solid electrolytes/separators in lithium ion and other battery technologies. In all of these examples the function of the membrane is to physically separate two reactive electrodes or reactants, but allow the transport or exchange of specific ions through the membrane between the active electrodes. The flow of the charged ionic species between the electrodes can be used to balance the flow of electrons through an external electrical circuit that connects the electrodes, thereby storing or delivering charge electrochemically. In this presentation I will review the use of polymeric membranes in electrochemical energy storage technologies and discuss the critical issues related to the membranes that hinder these technologies. In particular I will also focus on the role the polymer membrane interface on device performance. At some point the polymer membrane must be interfaced with an active electrode or catalyst and the nature of this interface can significantly impact performance. Simulations of device performance based on bulk membrane transport properties often fail to predict the actual performance and empirical interfacial impedance terms usually added to capture the device performance. In this presentation I will explore the origins of this interfacial impedance in the different types of fuel cell membranes (proton and alkaline) by creating model thin film membranes where all of the membrane can be considered interfacial. We then use these thin films as a surrogate for the interfacial regions of a bulk membrane and then quantify the structure, dynamics, and transport properties of water and ions in the confined interfacial films. Using neutron reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and

  5. Interfacial molecular interactions based on the conformation recognition between the insoluble antitumor drug AD-1 and DSPC.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tian; Cao, Xiuxiu; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Jian; Shi, Caihong; Su, Jia; Zhang, Yu; Gou, Jingxin; He, Haibing; Guo, Haiyan; Tang, Xing; Zhao, Yuqing

    2016-10-01

    In this study, molecular interactions between the anti-cancer agent 20(R)-25-methoxyl-dammarane-3β, 12β, 20-triol (AD-1) and phospholipid 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) were investigated using the Langmuir film balance technique. The characteristics of binary Langmuir monolayers consisting of DSPC and AD-1 were conducted on the basis of the surface pressure-area per molecule (π-A) isotherms. It was found that the drug was able to become efficiently inserted into preformed DSPC monolayers, indicating a preferential interaction between AD-1 and DSPC. For the examined lateral pressure at 20mN/m, the largest negative values of ΔGex were found for the AD-1/DSPC monolayer, which should be the most stable. Based on the calculated values of ΔGex, we found that the AD-1/DSPC systems exhibited the best mixed characteristics when the molar fraction of the AD-1 was 0.8; at that relative concentration, the AD-1 molecules can mix better and interact with the phospholipid molecules. In addition, the drug-DSPC binary supramolecular structure was also deposited on the mica plates as shown by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Finally, molecular docking calculations explained satisfactorily that, based on the conformations interactions (conformation recognition), even at an AD-1/DSPC molar ratio as high as 8:2, the interfacial stabilization of the AD-1/DSPC system was fairly strong due to hydrophobic interactions. A higher loading capacity of DSPC might be possible, as it is associated with a more flexible geometrical environment, which allows these supramolecular structures to accept larger increases in drug loading upon steric binding.

  6. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  7. The crystal-fluid interfacial free energy and nucleation rate of NaCl from different simulation methods.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Jorge R; Vega, Carlos; Valeriani, Chantal; Sanz, Eduardo

    2015-05-21

    In this work, we calculate the crystal-fluid interfacial free energy, γ(cf), for the Tosi-Fumi model of NaCl using three different simulation techniques: seeding, umbrella sampling, and mold integration. The three techniques give an orientationaly averaged γ(cf) of about 100 mJ/m(2). Moreover, we observe that the shape of crystalline clusters embedded in the supercooled fluid is spherical. Using the mold integration technique, we compute γ(cf) for four different crystal orientations. The obtained interfacial free energies range from 100 to 114 mJ/m(2), being (100) and (111) the crystal planes with the lowest and highest γ(cf), respectively. Within the accuracy of our calculations, the interfacial free energy either does not depend on temperature or changes very smoothly with it. Combining the seeding technique with classical nucleation theory, we also estimate nucleation free energy barriers and nucleation rates for a wide temperature range (800-1040 K). The obtained results compare quite well with brute force calculations and with previous results obtained with umbrella sampling [Valeriani et al., J. Chem. Phys, 122, 194501 (2005)].

  8. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    DOE PAGES

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; ...

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured propertiesmore » is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.« less

  9. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured properties is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.

  10. Imaging interfacial micro- and nano-bubbles by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhao, Binyu; Xue, Lian; Guo, Zhi; Dong, Yaming; Fang, Haiping; Tai, Renzhong; Hu, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Synchrotron-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM) with nanometer resolution was used to investigate the existence and behavior of interfacial gas nanobubbles confined between two silicon nitride windows. The observed nanobubbles of SF6 and Ne with diameters smaller than 2.5 µm were quite stable. However, larger bubbles became unstable and grew during the soft X-ray imaging, indicating that stable nanobubbles may have a length scale, which is consistent with a previous report using atomic force microscopy [Zhang et al. (2010), Soft Matter, 6, 4515-4519]. Here, it is shown that STXM is a promising technique for studying the aggregation of gases near the solid/water interfaces at the nanometer scale.

  11. Domain walls in finite-width nanowires with interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJong, M. D.; Livesey, K. L.

    2017-02-01

    It is widely known that the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) may stabilize Néel walls rather than Bloch walls in magnetic thin films. When the DMI is weak, it results in a "tilted" Bloch wall. However, for most applications, domain walls are in nanowires rather than thin films. Here we present a semianalytic two-parameter calculation for the static domain wall in a nanowire of finite width and thickness, with DMI. The DMI strength that is needed to force a Néel wall is smaller in nanowires than in films due to demagnetizing energy. Even nanowires that are hundreds of nanometers wide may have different domain wall solutions than thin films and so their finite size must be considered. The impact of this result on current experiments is briefly discussed. We extend the model to show that applying a weak magnetic field allows the domain wall type to be tuned.

  12. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  13. Biomolecular simulations of membranes: Physical properties from different force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Shirley W. I.; Vácha, Robert; Jungwirth, Pavel; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2008-03-01

    Phospholipid force fields are of ample importance for the simulation of artificial bilayers, membranes, and also for the simulation of integral membrane proteins. Here, we compare the two most applied atomic force fields for phospholipids, the all-atom CHARMM27 and the united atom Berger force field, with a newly developed all-atom generalized AMBER force field (GAFF) for dioleoylphosphatidylcholine molecules. Only the latter displays the experimentally observed difference in the order of the C2 atom between the two acyl chains. The interfacial water dynamics is smoothly increased between the lipid carbonyl region and the bulk water phase for all force fields; however, the water order and with it the electrostatic potential across the bilayer showed distinct differences between the force fields. Both Berger and GAFF underestimate the lipid self-diffusion. GAFF offers a consistent force field for the atomic scale simulation of biomembranes.

  14. Interfacial rheology: an overview of measuring techniques and its role in dispersions and electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Pelipenko, Jan; Kristl, Julijana; Rošic, Romana; Baumgartner, Saša; Kocbek, Petra

    2012-06-01

    Interfacial rheological properties have yet to be thoroughly explored. Only recently, methods have been introduced that provide sufficient sensitivity to reliably determine viscoelastic interfacial properties. In general, interfacial rheology describes the relationship between the deformation of an interface and the stresses exerted on it. Due to the variety in deformations of the interfacial layer (shear and expansions or compressions), the field of interfacial rheology is divided into the subcategories of shear and dilatational rheology. While shear rheology is primarily linked to the long-term stability of dispersions, dilatational rheology provides information regarding short-term stability. Interfacial rheological characteristics become relevant in systems with large interfacial areas, such as emulsions and foams, and in processes that lead to a large increase in the interfacial area, such as electrospinning of nanofibers.

  15. Investigation of optical and interfacial properties of Ag/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} metal dielectric multilayer structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, P. Jena, S.; Tokas, R. B.; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.; Rao, K. D.; Misal, J. S.; Prathap, C.

    2015-06-24

    One-dimensional periodic metal-dielectric multilayer thin film structures consisting of Ag and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} alternating layers are deposited on glass substrate using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The spectral property of the multilayers has been investigated using spectrophotometry technique. The optical parameters such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, band gap etc., along with film thickness as well as the interfacial layer properties which influence these properties have been probed with spectroscopic ellipsometry technique. Atomic force microscopy has been employed to characterize morphological properties of this metal-dielectric multilayer.

  16. A perspective on the interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George

    2012-11-01

    century by Gibbs and then promoted by Tolman) with a microscopic DFT treatment allows for a direct and unambiguous description of the interfacial properties of drops of arbitrary size; DFT provides all of the bulk and surface characteristics of the system that are required to uniquely define its thermodynamic properties. In this vein, we propose a non-local mean-field DFT for Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluids to examine drops of varying size. A comparison of the predictions of our DFT with recent simulation data based on a second-order fluctuation analysis (Sampayo et al 2010 J. Chem. Phys. 132 141101) reveals the consistency of the two treatments. This observation highlights the significance of fluctuation effects in small drops, which give rise to additional entropic (thermal non-mechanical) contributions, in contrast to what one observes in the case of planar interfaces which are governed by the laws of mechanical equilibrium. A small negative Tolman length (which is found to be about a tenth of the molecular diameter) and a non-monotonic behaviour of the surface tension with the drop radius are predicted for the LJ fluid. Finally, the limits of the validity of the Tolman approach, the effect of the range of the intermolecular potential, and the behaviour of bubbles are briefly discussed.

  17. Formation of Lamellar Pores for Splats via Interfacial or Sub-interfacial Delamination at Chemically Bonded Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2017-02-01

    To comprehensively understand the formation mechanism of lamellar pores in splats, the delamination morphologies and crack patterns of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and lanthanum zirconia splats were examined. Results showed that both types of splats grew epitaxially on well-polished YSZ substrates, evidently confirming the formation of chemical bonding between splats and substrate. However, the interfacial or sub-interfacial delamination was observed in all kinds of splats in this study. Residual vertical cracks passing through delaminated domains (on bare substrate) were also observed, which clearly indicated that transverse delamination followed vertical cracking. Mechanical analysis about delamination was addressed, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  18. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  19. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  20. Thermodynamics of interfacial changes in a protein-protein complex.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-03-04

    Recent experiments with biomacromolecular complexes suggest that structural modifications at the interfaces are vital for stability of the complexes and the functions of the biomacromolecules. Although several qualitative aspects about such interfaces are known from structural data, quantification of the interfacial changes is lacking. In this work, we study the thermodynamic changes at the interface in the complex between an enzyme, Nuclease A (NucA), and a specific inhibitor protein, NuiA. We calculate the conformational free energy and conformational entropy costs from histograms of the dihedral angles generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the complex and the free proteins. We extract the conformational thermodynamic parameters for changes in the tertiary structure of NuiA. We show that the binding is dominated by the interfacial changes, where the basic residues of NucA and acidic residues of NuiA are highly ordered and stabilized via strong electrostatic interactions. Our results correlate well with known information from structural studies. The tight interfacial structure is reflected in the significant changes in the structure and dynamics of the water molecules at the enzyme-inhibitor interface. The interfacial water molecules contribute significantly to the entropy loss for the overall complexation.

  1. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  2. Interfacial tension measurements using MRI drop shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Vogt, S J; Honari, A; Hollingsworth, K G; Sederman, A J; Mitchell, J; Johns, M L

    2014-02-18

    Accurate interfacial tension data for fluid systems such as hydrocarbons and water is essential to many applications such as reservoir oil and gas recovery predictions. Conventional interfacial tension measurement techniques typically use optical images to analyze droplet shapes but require that the continuous-phase fluid be optically transparent and that the fluids are not refractive index matched. Magnetic resonance images obtain contrast between fluids using other mechanisms such as magnetic relaxation weighting, so systems that are impossible to measure with optical methods may be analyzed. In this article, we present high-field (9.4 T) MRI images of various droplets analyzed with axisymmetric drop shape analysis. The resultant interfacial tension data show good agreement with literature data. The method is subsequently demonstrated using both opaque continuous phases and refractive-index-matched fluids. We conclude with a brief consideration of the potential to extrapolate the methodology to lower magnetic fields (0.3 T), featuring more accessible hardware; although droplet imaging is possible, resolution and stability do not currently permit accurate interfacial tension measurements.

  3. Biomineralization mechanisms: a kinetics and interfacial energy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nancollas, George H.; Wu, Wenju

    2000-04-01

    The calcium phosphates and oxalates are among the most frequently encountered biomineral phases and numerous kinetics studies have been made of their crystallization and dissolution in supersaturated and undersaturated solutions, respectively. These have focused mainly on parameters such as solution composition, ionic strength, pH, temperature, and solid surface characteristics. There is considerable interest in extending such studies to solutions more closely simulating the biological milieu. The constant composition method is especially useful for investigating the mechanisms of these reactions, and in the present work, the interfacial tensions between water and each of these surfaces have been calculated from measured contact angles using surface tension component theory. Values for the calcium phosphate phases such as dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), octacalcium phosphate (OCP), hydroxyapatite (HAP), and fluorapatite (FAP) may be compared with data calculated from dissolution kinetics experiments invoking different reaction mechanisms. Agreement between the directly measured interfacial energies and those calculated from the kinetics experiments provides valuable corroborative information about individual growth and dissolution mechanisms. For the calcium phosphates, the much smaller interfacial tensions of OCP and DCPD in contact with water as compared with those of HAP and FAP support the suggestion that the former phases are precursors in HAP and FAP biomineralization. The ability of a surface to nucleate mineral phases is closely related to the magnitude of the interfacial energies. Constant composition studies have also shown that HAP is an effective nucleator of calcium oxalate monohydrate, both of which are frequently observed in renal stones.

  4. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  5. The Hydrophobic Effect in Solute Partitioning and Interfacial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the partitioning of hydrophobic solutes between water and nonpolar solvents provide estimates for the energy cost of creating hydrophobic-water contacts. This energy is a factor of three lower than the work of adhesion derived from interfacial tension measurements. This discrepancy noted by Tanford in 1979 is widely viewed as a serious challenge to our understanding of hydrophobic interactions. However, the interfacial energy of a water-alkane interface depends on chain length. A simple analysis of published data shows that the loss of rotational freedom of an alkane chain at an interface accounts quantitatively for the length-dependent contribution to interfacial tension, leaving a length-independent contribution very close to the free energy of transfer per unit of solvent accessible surface area. This analysis thus clarifies the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and interfacial tension measurements of hydrophobic interaction energy. Alkanes do not loose rotational freedom when transferred between two different liquid phases but they do at an interface. This reconciles the difference between microscopic and macroscopic measurements. Like the partitioning free energy, the work of adhesion also has a large entropy and small enthalpy at 20 oC.

  6. Identifying mechanisms of interfacial dynamics using single-molecule tracking.

    PubMed

    Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2012-08-28

    The "soft" (i.e., noncovalent) interactions between molecules and surfaces are complex and highly varied (e.g., hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, and ionic), often leading to heterogeneous interfacial behavior. Heterogeneity can arise either from the spatial variation of the surface/interface itself or from molecular configurations (i.e., conformation, orientation, aggregation state, etc.). By observing the adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual fluorescent molecules, single-molecule tracking can characterize these types of heterogeneous interfacial behavior in ways that are inaccessible to traditional ensemble-averaged methods. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity or emission wavelength (in resonance energy transfer experiments) can be used to track the molecular configuration and simultaneously directly relate this to the resulting interfacial mobility or affinity. In this feature article, we review recent advances involving the use of single-molecule tracking to characterize heterogeneous molecule-surface interactions including multiple modes of diffusion and desorption associated with both internal and external molecular configuration, Arrhenius-activated interfacial transport, spatially dependent interactions, and many more.

  7. Bcc crystal-fluid interfacial free energy in Yukawa systems.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, V; Mijailović, A; Achim, C V; Ala-Nissila, T; Rozas, R E; Horbach, J; Löwen, H

    2013-01-28

    We determine the orientation-resolved interfacial free energy between a body-centered-cubic (bcc) crystal and the coexisting fluid for a many-particle system interacting via a Yukawa pair potential. For two different screening strengths, we compare results from molecular dynamics computer simulations, density functional theory, and a phase-field-crystal approach. Simulations predict an almost orientationally isotropic interfacial free energy of 0.12k(B)T/a(2) (with k(B)T denoting the thermal energy and a the mean interparticle spacing), which is independent of the screening strength. This value is in reasonable agreement with our Ramakrishnan-Yussouff density functional calculations, while a high-order fitted phase-field-crystal approach gives about 2-3 times higher interfacial free energies for the Yukawa system. Both field theory approaches also give a considerable anisotropy of the interfacial free energy. Our result implies that, in the Yukawa system, bcc crystal-fluid free energies are a factor of about 3 smaller than face-centered-cubic crystal-fluid free energies.

  8. Meter-long multiblock copolymer microfibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Han; Remy, Roddel A.; Deng, Fei; Mackay, Michael E.; Fox, Joseph M.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2015-01-01

    High molecular weight multiblock copolymers are synthesized as robust polymer fibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization employing the rapid cycloaddition of s-tetrazines with strained trans-cyclooctenes. When cell-adhesive peptide was incorporated in the tetrazine monomer, the resulting protein-mimetic polymer fibers provide guidance cues for cell attachment and elongation. PMID:25824805

  9. Measurement of interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.; Neilson, George F.; Baertlein, Carl; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion is given of a containerless microgravity experiment aimed at measuring the interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs using a compound drop rotation method. The reasons for the failure to execute such experiments in microgravity are described. Also, the results of post-flight analyses used to confirm our arguments are presented.

  10. Photon Upconversion Through Tb(3+) -Mediated Interfacial Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Yang, Weifeng; Han, Sanyang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-28

    A strategy of interfacial energy transfer upconversion is demonstrated through the use of a terbium (Tb(3+) ) dopant as energy donor or energy migrator in core-shell-structured nanocrystals. This mechanistic investigation presents a new pathway for photon upconversion, and, more importantly, contributes to the better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale.

  11. Recent progress in interfacial tissue engineering approaches for osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Hacking, S Adam; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-08-01

    This review provides a brief synopsis of the anatomy and physiology of the osteochondral interface, scaffold-based and non-scaffold based approaches for engineering both tissues independently as well as recent developments in the manufacture of gradient constructs. Novel manufacturing techniques and nanotechnology will be discussed with potential application in osteochondral interfacial tissue engineering.

  12. Identifying Mechanisms of Interfacial Dynamics Using Single-Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    The “soft” (i.e. non-covalent) interactions between molecules and surfaces are complex and highly-varied (e.g. hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, ionic) often leading to heterogeneous interfacial behavior. Heterogeneity can arise either from spatial variation of the surface/interface itself or from molecular configurations (i.e. conformation, orientation, aggregation state, etc.). By observing adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual fluorescent molecules, single-molecule tracking can characterize these types of heterogeneous interfacial behavior in ways that are inaccessible to traditional ensemble-averaged methods. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity or emission wavelength (in resonance energy transfer experiments) can be used to simultaneously track molecular configuration and directly relate this to the resulting interfacial mobility or affinity. In this feature article, we review recent advances involving the use of single-molecule tracking to characterize heterogeneous molecule-surface interactions including: multiple modes of diffusion and desorption associated with both internal and external molecular configuration, Arrhenius activated interfacial transport, spatially dependent interactions, and many more. PMID:22716995

  13. Ion beam-induced interfacial growth in Si and silicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, F.; Nédellec, P.; Ruault, M. O.; Bernas, H.; Lin, X. W.; Boucaud, P.

    1995-12-01

    We review the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam-induced epitaxial crystallization (IBIEC) in the transition metal- or rare earth-implanted {aSi}/{cSi} systems, as determined from in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) during irradiation, combined with channeling, high resolution TEM and optical measurements. IBIEC experiments on nm-size crystals confirm previously measured low values of interface roughness in IBIEC. We have performed interfacial growth simulations which indicate that the IBIEC process is, in fact, interface roughness-limited. They also suggest that interfacial growth processes are similar in several respects to surface growth processes, and that they largely determine (i) the growth habit of silicide precipitation, which is dominated by the interfacial energy, (ii) the possibility of trapping a large fraction of the impurities in non-equilibrium sites, leading to significant supersaturation. A consequence of this effect is to allow incorporation of large (over 300-fold supersaturation) Er concentrations in the substitutional sites of the Si lattice, leading to room-temperature photoluminescence (without any oxygen co-implantation). Evidence of a new, thermally induced instability in interfacial growth is presented: it displays both intermittency and very high growth rates, and is strongly affected by ion irradiation.

  14. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Modules for Probing Gold Nanoparticle Interfacial Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karunanayake, Akila G.; Gunatilake, Sameera R.; Ameer, Fathima S.; Gadogbe, Manuel; Smith, Laura; Mlsna, Deb; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Three gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) undergraduate experiment modules that are focused on nanoparticles interfacial phenomena have been developed. Modules 1 and 2 explore the synthesis and characterization of AuNPs of different sizes but with the same total gold mass. These experiments enable students to determine how particle size affects the AuNP…

  15. Interfacial Reactions Between ZnAl(Ge) Solders on Cu and Ni Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautiainen, Antti; Vuorinen, Vesa; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi

    2017-04-01

    Reactions between zinc-aluminum-germanium solder and copper/nickel substrates were investigated after 30 min of soldering at 420°C that simulates a wafer-level bonding process, and the results were compared to a eutectic zinc-aluminum solder. The ZnAlGe system (81.4 at.% Zn, 13.1 at.% Al, 5.5 at.% Ge) was selected in order to decrease the eutectic temperature of the ZnAleut (88.7 at.% Zn, 11.3 at.% Al) for high-temperature lead-free solder applications. In addition, a standard high temperature storage test at 150°C was performed up to 3000 h in order to investigate the evolution of the interconnection microstructures. Extensive copper dissolution was discovered during the soldering process. Germanium did not participate in any of the interfacial reactions on a copper substrate. On a nickel substrate, rapid formation of intermetallic compounds was discovered with both solders, and all the aluminum from the 500 μm thick solder was consumed by the formation of the Al3Ni2 phase during bonding. Germanium was observed to dissolve in the Al3Ni2 phase, but the addition of germanium to the solder was not found to affect markedly the interfacial microstructure. Based on the results, isothermal sections at 150°C of Al-Cu-Zn and Al-Ni-Zn systems are presented with superimposed diffusion paths.

  16. Interface states of Ag/(110)GaAs Schottky diodes without and with interfacial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Platen, W.; Schmutzler, H.; Kohl, D.; Brauchle, K.; Wolter, K.

    1988-07-01

    GaAs(110) faces with different preparations: ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) cleaved, polished and etched, polished and sputtered: are prepared as Schottky diodes by the deposition of Ag. Diodes based on UHV-cleaved faces do show homogeneously distributed EL2 and EL5 states in deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). On polished and etched samples an additional interface state (IS) distribution with a density of 9 x 10/sup 11/ eV/sup -1/ cm/sup -2/ at the DLTS maximum appears. These states can be caused by defects at the oxidic interfacial layer. Polishing and sputtering also evokes the IS distribution. The absence of a DLTS signal from metal-induced gap states (MIGS) which pin the Fermi level at 0.49 eV above the valence-band maximum is related to the absence of an interfacial layer in the UHV prepared Schottky diodes. The sputter process increases the electron density in a thin layer below the interface by an As excess. The corresponding smaller extent of the barrier causes an additional electron emission via tunneling processes from the IS distribution. Furthermore, a near-interface state, EL6 (V/sub Ga/-V/sub As/), shows up. Its concentration at the interface attains N/sub EL6/ = 2.5 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ comparable to the shallow donor concentration.

  17. Studies on the disbonding initiation of interfacial cracks.

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, Brian J.; Pearson, Raymond A.

    2005-08-01

    With the continuing trend of decreasing feature sizes in flip-chip assemblies, the reliability tolerance to interfacial flaws is also decreasing. Small-scale disbonds will become more of a concern, pointing to the need for a better understanding of the initiation stage of interfacial delamination. With most accepted adhesion metric methodologies tailored to predict failure under the prior existence of a disbond, the study of the initiation phenomenon is open to development and standardization of new testing procedures. Traditional fracture mechanics approaches are not suitable, as the mathematics assume failure to originate at a disbond or crack tip. Disbond initiation is believed to first occur at free edges and corners, which act as high stress concentration sites and exhibit singular stresses similar to a crack tip, though less severe in intensity. As such, a 'fracture mechanics-like' approach may be employed which defines a material parameter--a critical stress intensity factor (K{sub c})--that can be used to predict when initiation of a disbond at an interface will occur. The factors affecting the adhesion of underfill/polyimide interfaces relevant to flip-chip assemblies were investigated in this study. The study consisted of two distinct parts: a comparison of the initiation and propagation phenomena and a comparison of the relationship between sub-critical and critical initiation of interfacial failure. The initiation of underfill interfacial failure was studied by characterizing failure at a free-edge with a critical stress intensity factor. In comparison with the interfacial fracture toughness testing, it was shown that a good correlation exists between the initiation and propagation of interfacial failures. Such a correlation justifies the continuing use of fracture mechanics to predict the reliability of flip-chip packages. The second aspect of the research involved fatigue testing of tensile butt joint specimens to determine lifetimes at sub

  18. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  19. In situ measurement of interfacial tension of Fe-S and Fe-P liquids under high pressure using X-ray radiography and tomography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Funakoshi, K.; Nishiyama, N.; Wang, Y.; Nishida, K.; Sakamaki, T.; Suzuki, A.; Ohtani, E.

    2009-05-01

    Interfacial tension is one of the most important properties of the liquid iron alloy that controls the core formation process in the early history of the Earth and planets. In this study, we made high-pressure X-ray radiography and micro-tomography measurements to determine the interfacial tension between liquid iron alloys and silicate melt using the sessile drop method. The measured interfacial tension of liquid Fe-S decreased significantly (802-112 mN/m) with increasing sulphur content (0-40 at%) at 1.5 GPa. In contrast, the phosphorus content of Fe had an almost negligible effect on the interfacial tension of liquid iron. These tendencies in the effects of light elements are consistent with those measured at ambient pressure. Our results suggest that the effect of sulphur content on the interfacial tension of liquid Fe-S (690 mN/m reduction with the addition of 40 at% S) is large compared with the effect of temperature (˜273 mN/m reduction with an increase of 200 K). The three-dimensional structure of liquid Fe-S was obtained at ˜2 GPa and 1373-1873 K with a high-pressure tomography technique. The Fe-S droplet was quite homogeneous when evaluated in a slice of the three-dimensional image.

  20. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  1. Self-tuning interfacial architecture for Estradiol detection by surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Boltovets, Praskoviya; Shinkaruk, Svitlana; Vellutini, Luc; Snopok, Borys

    2017-04-15

    This study reports the operation principles for reusable SPR biosensors utilizing nanoscale-specific electrostatic levitation phenomena in their sensitive layer design. Functional macromolecular building blocks localized near the "charged" surface by a variety of weak electrostatic interactions create a flexible and structurally variable architecture. A proof-of-concept is demonstrated by an immunospecific detection of 17β-Estradiol (E2) following the competitive inhibition format. The sensing interfacial architecture is based on the BSA-E2 conjugate within the BSA matrix immobilized on the "charged" (as a result of guanidine thiocyanate treatment) gold surface at pH 5.0. Kinetic analysis for different E2 concentrations shows that using parameter β of the stretched exponential function ~(1-exp(-(t/τ)(β)) as an analyte-specific response measure allows one to substantially decrease the low detection limit (down to 10(-3)ng/ml) and increase the dynamic range (10(-3)-10(3)ng/ml) of the SPR biosensor. Finally, it's concluded that the created interfacial architecture is a typical complex system, where SPR response is formed by the stochastic interactions within the whole variety of processes in the system. The E2 addition destroys the uniformity of the reaction space (where an interaction of the antibody (Ab) and the analog of E2 in the self-tuneable matrix takes place) by the redistribution of the immunospecific complexes Ab(E2)x (x=0, 1, 2) dependent on E2 concentration. Binding dynamics changes are reflected in the values of β which summarize in compact form all "hidden" information specific for the evolving distributed interfacial system.

  2. Shear Strength and Interfacial Toughness Characterization of Sapphire-Epoxy Interfaces for Nacre-Inspired Composites.

    PubMed

    Behr, Sebastian; Jungblut, Laura; Swain, Michael V; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-10-12

    The common tensile lap-shear test for adhesive joints is inappropriate for brittle substrates such as glasses or ceramics where stress intensifications due to clamping and additional bending moments invalidate results. Nevertheless, bonding of glasses and ceramics is still important in display applications for electronics, in safety glass and ballistic armor, for dental braces and restoratives, or in recently developed bioinspired composites. To mechanically characterize adhesive bondings in these fields nonetheless, a novel approach based on the so-called Schwickerath test for dental sintered joints is used. This new method not only matches data from conventional analysis but also uniquely combines the accurate determination of interfacial shear strength and toughness in one simple test. The approach is verified for sapphire-epoxy joints that are of interest for bioinspired composites. For these, the procedure not only provides quantitative interfacial properties for the first time, it also exemplarily suggests annealing of sapphire at 1000 °C for 10 h for mechanically and economically effective improvements of the interfacial bond strength and toughness. With increases of strength and toughness from approximately 8 to 29 MPa and from 2.6 to 35 J/m(2), respectively, this thermal modification drastically enhances the properties of unmodified sapphire-epoxy interfaces. At the same time, it is much more convenient than wet-chemical approaches such as silanization. Hence, besides the introduction of a new testing procedure for adhesive joints of brittle or expensive substrates, a new and facile annealing process for improvements of the adhesive properties of sapphire is suggested and quantitative data for the mechanical properties of sapphire-epoxy interfaces that are common in synthetic nacre-inspired composites are provided for the first time.

  3. Causal reasoning with forces

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Phillip; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Causal composition allows people to generate new causal relations by combining existing causal knowledge. We introduce a new computational model of such reasoning, the force theory, which holds that people compose causal relations by simulating the processes that join forces in the world, and compare this theory with the mental model theory (Khemlani et al., 2014) and the causal model theory (Sloman et al., 2009), which explain causal composition on the basis of mental models and structural equations, respectively. In one experiment, the force theory was uniquely able to account for people's ability to compose causal relationships from complex animations of real-world events. In three additional experiments, the force theory did as well as or better than the other two theories in explaining the causal compositions people generated from linguistically presented causal relations. Implications for causal learning and the hierarchical structure of causal knowledge are discussed. PMID:25653611

  4. Water-in-model oil emulsions studied by small-angle neutron scattering: interfacial film thickness and composition.

    PubMed

    Verruto, Vincent J; Kilpatrick, Peter K

    2008-11-18

    The ever-increasing worldwide demand for energy has led to the upgrading of heavy crude oil and asphaltene-rich feedstocks becoming viable refining options for the petroleum industry. Traditional problems associated with these feedstocks, particularly stable water-in-petroleum emulsions, are drawing increasing attention. Despite considerable research on the interfacial assembly of asphaltenes, resins, and naphthenic acids, much about the resulting interfacial films is not well understood. Here, we describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate interfacial film properties from model emulsion systems. Modeling the SANS data with both a polydisperse core/shell form factor as well as a thin sheet approximation, we have deduced the film thickness and the asphaltenic composition within the stabilizing interfacial films of water-in-model oil emulsions prepared in toluene, decalin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. Film thicknesses were found to be 100-110 A with little deviation among the three solvents. By contrast, asphaltene composition in the film varied significantly, with decalin leading to the most asphaltene-rich films (30% by volume of the film), while emulsions made in toluene and methylnaphthalene resulted in lower asphaltenic contents (12-15%). Through centrifugation and dilatational rheology, we found that trends of decreasing water resolution (i.e., increasing emulsion stability) and increasing long-time dilatational elasticity corresponded with increasing asphaltene composition in the film. In addition to the asphaltenic composition of the films, here we also deduce the film solvent and water content. Our analyses indicate that 1:1 (O/W) emulsions prepared with 3% (w/w) asphaltenes in toluene and 1 wt % NaCl aqueous solutions at pH 7 and pH 10 resulted in 80-90 A thick films, interfacial areas around 2600-3100 cm (2)/mL, and films that were roughly 25% (v/v) asphaltenic, 60-70% toluene, and 8-12% water. The increased asphaltene and water film

  5. Toward mechanistic understanding of nuclear reprocessing chemistries by quantifying lanthanide solvent extraction kinetics via microfluidics with constant interfacial area and rapid mixing.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kevin P; Pompano, Rebecca R; Li, Liang; Gelis, Artem V; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2011-10-05

    The closing of the nuclear fuel cycle is an unsolved problem of great importance. Separating radionuclides produced in a nuclear reactor is useful both for the storage of nuclear waste and for recycling of nuclear fuel. These separations can be performed by designing appropriate chelation chemistries and liquid-liquid extraction schemes, such as in the TALSPEAK process (Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes). However, there are no approved methods for the industrial scale reprocessing of civilian nuclear fuel in the United States. One bottleneck in the design of next-generation solvent extraction-based nuclear fuel reprocessing schemes is a lack of interfacial mass transfer rate constants obtained under well-controlled conditions for lanthanide and actinide ligand complexes; such rate constants are a prerequisite for mechanistic understanding of the extraction chemistries involved and are of great assistance in the design of new chemistries. In addition, rate constants obtained under conditions of known interfacial area have immediate, practical utility in models required for the scaling-up of laboratory-scale demonstrations to industrial-scale solutions. Existing experimental techniques for determining these rate constants suffer from two key drawbacks: either slow mixing or unknown interfacial area. The volume of waste produced by traditional methods is an additional, practical concern in experiments involving radioactive elements, both from disposal cost and experimenter safety standpoints. In this paper, we test a plug-based microfluidic system that uses flowing plugs (droplets) in microfluidic channels to determine absolute interfacial mass transfer rate constants under conditions of both rapid mixing and controlled interfacial area. We utilize this system to determine, for the first time, the rate constants for interfacial transfer of all lanthanides, minus promethium, plus yttrium, under TALSPEAK

  6. New insights into the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in thin film solar cells: Formation and properties of the MoSe2 interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkert, T.; Theys, B.; Patriarche, G.; Jubault, M.; Donsanti, F.; Guillemoles, J.-F.; Lincot, D.

    2016-10-01

    Being at the origin of an ohmic contact, the MoSe2 interfacial layer at the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and related compounds) based solar cells has allowed for very high light-to-electricity conversion efficiencies up to 22.3%. This article gives new insights into the formation and the structural properties of this interfacial layer. Different selenization-steps of a Mo covered glass substrate prior to the CIGS deposition by co-evaporation led to MoSe2 interfacial layers with varying thickness and orientation, as observed by x-ray diffraction and atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. A novel model based on the anisotropy of the Se diffusion coefficient in MoSe2 is proposed to explain the results. While the series resistance of finished CIGS solar cells is found to correlate with the MoSe2 orientation, the adhesion forces between the CIGS absorber layer and the Mo substrate stay constant. Their counter-intuitive non-correlation with the configuration of the MoSe2 interfacial layer is discussed and related to work from the literature.

  7. New insights into the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in thin film solar cells: Formation and properties of the MoSe2 interfacial layer.

    PubMed

    Klinkert, T; Theys, B; Patriarche, G; Jubault, M; Donsanti, F; Guillemoles, J-F; Lincot, D

    2016-10-21

    Being at the origin of an ohmic contact, the MoSe2 interfacial layer at the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and related compounds) based solar cells has allowed for very high light-to-electricity conversion efficiencies up to 22.3%. This article gives new insights into the formation and the structural properties of this interfacial layer. Different selenization-steps of a Mo covered glass substrate prior to the CIGS deposition by co-evaporation led to MoSe2 interfacial layers with varying thickness and orientation, as observed by x-ray diffraction and atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. A novel model based on the anisotropy of the Se diffusion coefficient in MoSe2 is proposed to explain the results. While the series resistance of finished CIGS solar cells is found to correlate with the MoSe2 orientation, the adhesion forces between the CIGS absorber layer and the Mo substrate stay constant. Their counter-intuitive non-correlation with the configuration of the MoSe2 interfacial layer is discussed and related to work from the literature.

  8. Effects on Undercooling and Interfacial Reactions with Cu Substrates of Adding Bi and In to Sn-3Ag Solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yu-Yan; Cheng, Robbin; Wu, Albert T.

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of adding Bi and In to Sn-3Ag Pb-free solder on undercooling, interfacial reactions with Cu substrates, and the growth kinetics of intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The amount of Sn dominates the undercooling, regardless of the amount or species of further additives. The interfacial IMC that formed in Sn-Ag-Bi-In and Sn-In-Bi solders is Cu6Sn5, while that in Sn-Ag-In solders is Cu6(Sn,In)5, since Bi enhances the solubility of In in Sn matrices. The activation energy for the growth of IMCs in Sn-Ag-Bi-In is nearly double that in Sn-Ag-In solders, because Bi in the solder promotes Cu dissolution. The bright particles that form inside the Sn-Ag-In bulk solders are the ζ-phase.

  9. Improvement in the breakdown endurance of high-κ dielectric by utilizing stacking technology and adding sufficient interfacial layer.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chin-Sheng; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in the time-zero dielectric breakdown (TZDB) endurance of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor with stacking structure of Al/HfO2/SiO2/Si is demonstrated in this work. The misalignment of the conduction paths between two stacking layers is believed to be effective to increase the breakdown field of the devices. Meanwhile, the resistance of the dielectric after breakdown for device with stacking structure would be less than that of without stacking structure due to a higher breakdown field and larger breakdown power. In addition, the role of interfacial layer (IL) in the control of the interface trap density (D it) and device reliability is also analyzed. Device with a thicker IL introduces a higher breakdown field and also a lower D it. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) of the samples with different IL thicknesses is provided to confirm that IL is needed for good interfacial property.

  10. Interfacial electron transfer of P3HT/PDI/ZnO nanocomposite and its application in visible-light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lina; Lin, Hongtao; Wu, Yishi; Zhuo, Shuping

    2016-09-01

    Photoinduced interfacial electron transfer plays a key role in photoactive organic/inorganic hybrid nanomaterials and remains elusive with regard to interfacial energy level alignment. In this study, n-type organic semiconductor 1,6,7,12-tetrachloro-3,4,9,10-Perylenetetracarboxylicdiimide (PDI) molecules bearing carboxylic acid groups at nitrogen positions were grafted onto the surface of the Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, and then blended with p-type poly (3-hexylthiophene) P3HT. The addition of PDI facilitates the charge transfer process from P3HT to ZnO, which was characterized by steady-state spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. High performance visible-light detector based on P3HT/PDI/ZnO has been fabricated. This provides guidelines for the construction of optoelectronic devices.

  11. Interfacial film formation: influence on oil spreading rates in lab basin tests and dispersant effectiveness testing in a wave tank.

    PubMed

    King, Thomas L; Clyburne, Jason A C; Lee, Kenneth; Robinson, Brian J

    2013-06-15

    Test facilities such as lab basins and wave tanks are essential when evaluating the use of chemical dispersants to treat oil spills at sea. However, these test facilities have boundaries (walls) that provide an ideal environment for surface (interfacial) film formation on seawater. Surface films may form from surfactants naturally present in crude oil as well as dispersant drift/overspray when applied to an oil spill. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of surface film formation on oil spreading rates in a small scale lab basin and on dispersant effectiveness conducted in a large scale wave tank. The process of crude oil spreading on the surface of the basin seawater was influenced in the presence of a surface film as shown using a 1st order kinetic model. In addition, interfacial film formation can greatly influence chemically dispersed crude oil in a large scale dynamic wave tank.

  12. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  13. Investigation of the interfacial condition between bioceramic coatings and metallic substrates using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Ong, Chuon-Szen

    2001-04-01

    The work reported here is on the characterization of the interfacial properties between plasma-sprayed Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates as used in cement-less hip orthopaedic implants. The phase velocity dispersion for the first Rayleigh-type mode for the coating-substrate system has been shown to be sensitive to the interfacial stiffness. Different interfacial conditions between the coating and substrate have been obtained by cyclic loading of the specimens in a four-point bend fatigue machine. The measured interfacial stiffness is then correlated with the interfacial fracture strength obtained by standard destructive shear tests.

  14. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  15. Liquid-liquid interfacial properties of a symmetrical Lennard-Jones binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ruiz, F J; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Blas, F J

    2015-09-14

    We determine the interfacial properties of a symmetrical binary mixture of equal-sized spherical Lennard-Jones molecules, σ11 = σ22, with the same dispersive energy between like species, ϵ11 = ϵ22, but different dispersive energies between unlike species low enough to induce phase separation. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janec̆ek [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] and Martínez-Ruiz et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 184701 (2014)], to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of the symmetrical mixture with different cut-off distances rc and in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The liquid-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures that exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles and coexistence densities and compositions as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cut-off distance rc is to sharpen the liquid-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative minimum in the total density profiles of the symmetrical mixture. This minimum is related with a desorption of the molecules

  16. Liquid-liquid interfacial properties of a symmetrical Lennard-Jones binary mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.

    2015-09-14

    We determine the interfacial properties of a symmetrical binary mixture of equal-sized spherical Lennard-Jones molecules, σ{sub 11} = σ{sub 22}, with the same dispersive energy between like species, ϵ{sub 11} = ϵ{sub 22}, but different dispersive energies between unlike species low enough to induce phase separation. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janecek [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] and Martínez-Ruiz et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 184701 (2014)], to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of the symmetrical mixture with different cut-off distances r{sub c} and in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The liquid-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures that exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles and coexistence densities and compositions as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cut-off distance r{sub c} is to sharpen the liquid-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative minimum in the total density profiles of the symmetrical mixture. This minimum is related

  17. Liquid-liquid interfacial properties of a symmetrical Lennard-Jones binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.; Blas, F. J.

    2015-09-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of a symmetrical binary mixture of equal-sized spherical Lennard-Jones molecules, σ11 = σ22, with the same dispersive energy between like species, ɛ11 = ɛ22, but different dispersive energies between unlike species low enough to induce phase separation. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janec̆ek [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] and Martínez-Ruiz et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 184701 (2014)], to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of the symmetrical mixture with different cut-off distances rc and in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The liquid-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures that exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles and coexistence densities and compositions as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cut-off distance rc is to sharpen the liquid-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative minimum in the total density profiles of the symmetrical mixture. This minimum is related with a desorption of the molecules

  18. Forced Snaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponedel, Benjamin; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-11-01

    We study spatial localization in the real subcritical Ginzburg-Landau equation ut =m0 u +m1 cos2/π l x u +uxx +d | u | 2 u -| u | 4 u with spatially periodic forcing. When d > 0 and m1 = 0 this equation exhibits bistability between the trivial state u = 0 and a homogeneous nontrivial state u =u0 with stationary localized structures which accumulate at the Maxwell point m0 = - 3d2 / 16 . When spatial forcing is included its wavelength is imprinted on u0 creating conditions favorable to front pinning and hence spatial localization. We use numerical continuation to show that under appropriate conditions such forcing generates a sequence of localized states organized within a snakes-and-ladders structure centered on the Maxwell point, and refer to this phenomenon as forced snaking. We determine the stability properties of these states and show that longer lengthscale forcing leads to stationary trains consisting of a finite number of strongly localized, weakly interacting pulses exhibiting foliated snaking.

  19. Effect of Interfacial Forces on Evaporative Heat Transfer in a Meniscus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    fed beat transfer cell was used to study fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer in the contact line region of an evaporating meniscus. Using...8/80 e angle of inclination, apparent contact angle K dimensionless parameter (see Eq. 4.23) x dimensionless length (see Eq. 4.29) v kinematic...theoretical part of the study, the contact line region of the meniscus, which is a small (in general, thickness less than the order of 5 gi) but critical

  20. Interfacial enhancement of polypropylene composites modified with sorbitol derivatives and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzyńska-Mizera, Monika; Dutkiewicz, Michał; Sterzyński, Tomasz; Di Lorenzo, Maria Laura

    2015-12-01

    Composites based on polypropylene (iPP) modified with a sorbitol derivative (NX8000) and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin (SiOPh) containing maleated polypropylene (MAPP) as compatibilizer were prepared by melt extrusion. Calorimetric investigations were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), whereas the morphological and mechanical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and static tensile tests. DSC measurements revealed no influence of SiOPh and a slight effect of MAPP addition on the crystallization kinetics of polypropylene. Additionally, the introduction of MAPP into the iPP+NX8000+SiOPh composites increased plastic properties of the samples. All the above was attributed to the compatibilizing effect of MAPP which improved interfacial adhesion between iPP, NX8000 and SiOPh. This phenomenon was also confirmed by the SEM images illustrating more homogenous distribution of the filler in the compatibilized samples.

  1. Interfacial enhancement of polypropylene composites modified with sorbitol derivatives and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrzyńska-Mizera, Monika Sterzyński, Tomasz; Dutkiewicz, Michał; Di Lorenzo, Maria Laura

    2015-12-17

    Composites based on polypropylene (iPP) modified with a sorbitol derivative (NX8000) and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin (SiOPh) containing maleated polypropylene (MAPP) as compatibilizer were prepared by melt extrusion. Calorimetric investigations were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), whereas the morphological and mechanical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and static tensile tests. DSC measurements revealed no influence of SiOPh and a slight effect of MAPP addition on the crystallization kinetics of polypropylene. Additionally, the introduction of MAPP into the iPP+NX8000+SiOPh composites increased plastic properties of the samples. All the above was attributed to the compatibilizing effect of MAPP which improved interfacial adhesion between iPP, NX8000 and SiOPh. This phenomenon was also confirmed by the SEM images illustrating more homogenous distribution of the filler in the compatibilized samples.

  2. Interfacial Area Transport of Vertical Upward Bubbly Flow in an Annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Takashi Hibiki; Ye Mi; Rong Situ; Mamoru Ishii; Michitsugu Mori

    2002-07-01

    In relation to the development of the interfacial area transport equation, hydrodynamic separate tests without phase change were performed in an adiabatic air-water bubbly flow in a vertical annulus to identify the effect of bubble coalescence and breakup on the interfacial area transport. A total of 20 data sets on axial developments of local void fraction, interfacial area concentration, and interfacial velocity were acquired by using the double-sensor conductivity probe method in an extensive bubbly flow region. The detailed discussion was given for the mechanism of the axial development of the local flow parameters. The one-dimensional interfacial area transport equation could reproduce proper trends of the interfacial area concentration change along the flow direction and good agreement between predicted and measured interfacial area concentration was obtained with an average relative deviation of {+-}8.96 %. (authors)

  3. Improvement of interfacial protein stability by CHAPS.

    PubMed

    Sah, Hongkee; Kim, Kil-Soo

    2006-04-01

    Emulsification of aqueous protein solutions in methylene chloride triggered the formation of water-insoluble aggregates at a water/methylene chloride interface. As a result, the amounts of beta-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin recovered in water were 36 and 44%, respectively. Addition of 5 mM: CHAPS in the aqueous phase raised the degree of beta-lactoglobulin recovery to 96%. Sodium taurocholate, however, failed to improve protein recovery. The stabilizing effect of CHAPS was also protein-specific and concentration-dependent: at >or=5 mM: , the surfactant caused unfolding of ovalbumin to make a water-soluble oligomer. CHAPS thus stabilizes proteins at an interface.

  4. Intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, A D

    1975-11-06

    The nature of molecular interactions is examined. Intermolecular forces are divided into long-range and short-range components; the former operate at distances where the effects of electron exchange are negligible and decrease as an inverse power of the separation. The long-range interactions may be subdividied into electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions, where the electrostatic component is the interaction of the permanent charge distributions and the others originate in the fluctuations in the distributions. Typical magnitudes of the various contributions are given. The forces between macroscopic bodies are briefly considered, as are the effects of a medium. Some of the manifestations of molecular interactions are discussed.

  5. Direct evidence of anomalous interfacial magnetization in metamagnetic Pd doped FeRh thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, S. P.; Ambaye, H.; Lee, H.; LeClair, P.; Mankey, G. J.; Lauter, V.

    2015-03-16

    Palladium doped iron rhodium is a magnetic material of significant interest for it’s close to room temperature magnetostructural phase transition from antiferromagnetic (AF) to ferromagnetic (FM) ordering. Here we report on the peculiarities of the magnetization distribution in thin films of FeRh(Pd) probed by Polarized Neutron Reflectometry. Remarkably, we’ve found thin interfacial regions with strong magnetization that have unique thermomagnetic properties as compared to the rest of the system. These regions exist at the top and bottom interfaces of the films while the central regions behave similarly to the bulk with a clear AF-FM order transition. Further we explore the impact of an additional Pt interlayer introduced in the middle of the FeRh(Pd) film and reveal that it serves to replicate the strong interfacial magnetization found at the top and bottom interfaces. In conclusion, these results are of great value both in understanding the fundamental physics of such an order transition, and in considering FeRh(Pd) for magnetic media and spintronics applications.

  6. Direct evidence of anomalous interfacial magnetization in metamagnetic Pd doped FeRh thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Bennett, S. P.; Ambaye, H.; Lee, H.; ...

    2015-03-16

    Palladium doped iron rhodium is a magnetic material of significant interest for it’s close to room temperature magnetostructural phase transition from antiferromagnetic (AF) to ferromagnetic (FM) ordering. Here we report on the peculiarities of the magnetization distribution in thin films of FeRh(Pd) probed by Polarized Neutron Reflectometry. Remarkably, we’ve found thin interfacial regions with strong magnetization that have unique thermomagnetic properties as compared to the rest of the system. These regions exist at the top and bottom interfaces of the films while the central regions behave similarly to the bulk with a clear AF-FM order transition. Further we explore themore » impact of an additional Pt interlayer introduced in the middle of the FeRh(Pd) film and reveal that it serves to replicate the strong interfacial magnetization found at the top and bottom interfaces. In conclusion, these results are of great value both in understanding the fundamental physics of such an order transition, and in considering FeRh(Pd) for magnetic media and spintronics applications.« less

  7. Emergence of noncollinear anisotropies from interfacial magnetic frustration in exchange-bias systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, E.; Camarero, J.; Sort, J.; Nogues, J.; Mikuszeit, N.; Garcia-Martin, J. M.; Hoffmann, A.; Dieny, B.; Miranda, R.; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona; Inst. de Microelectronica de Madrid; SPINTEC

    2009-01-01

    Exchange bias, referred to the interaction between a ferromagnet (FM) and an antiferromagnet (AFM), is a fundamental interfacial magnetic phenomenon, which is key to current and future applications. The effect was discovered half a century ago, and it is well established that the spin structures at the FM/AFM interface play an essential role. However, currently, ad hoc phenomenological anisotropies are often postulated without microscopic justification or sufficient experimental evidence to address magnetization-reversal behavior in exchange-bias systems. We advance toward a detailed microscopic understanding of the magnetic anisotropies in exchange-bias FM/AFM systems by showing that symmetry-breaking anisotropies leave a distinct fingerprint in the asymmetry of the magnetization reversal and we demonstrate how these emerging anisotropies are correlated with the intrinsic anisotropy. Angular and vectorial resolved Kerr hysteresis loops from FM/AFM bilayers with varying degree of ferromagnetic anisotropy reveal a noncollinear anisotropy, which becomes important for ferromagnets with vanishing intrinsic anisotropy. Numerical simulations show that this anisotropy naturally arises from the inevitable spin frustration at an atomically rough FM/AFM interface. As a consequence, we show in detail how the differences observed for different materials during magnetization reversal can be understood in general terms as originating from the interplay between interfacial frustration and intrinsic anisotropies. This understanding will certainly open additional avenues to tailor future advanced magnetic materials.

  8. Reactive wetting of amorphous silica by molten Al-Mg alloys and their interfacial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Laixin; Shen, Ping; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Qichuan

    2016-07-01

    The reactive wetting of amorphous silica substrates by molten Al-Mg alloys over a wide composition range was studied using a dispensed sessile drop method in a flowing Ar atmosphere. The effects of the nominal Mg concentration and temperature on the wetting and interfacial microstructures were discussed. The initial contact angle for pure Al on the SiO2 surface was 115° while that for pure Mg was 35° at 1073 K. For the Al-Mg alloy drop, it decreased with increasing nominal Mg concentration. The reaction zone was characterized by layered structures, whose formation was primarily controlled by the variation in the alloy concentration due to the evaporation of Mg and the interfacial reaction from the viewpoint of thermodynamics as well as by the penetration or diffusion of Mg, Al and Si from the viewpoint of kinetics. In addition, the effects of the reaction and the evaporation of Mg on the movement of the triple line were examined. The spreading of the Al-Mg alloy on the SiO2 surface was mainly attributed to the formation of Mg2Si at the interface and the recession of the triple line to the diminishing Mg concentration in the alloy.

  9. Grafting of polyethylenimine onto cellulose nanofibers for interfacial enhancement in their epoxy nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiangqi; Li, Qingye; Zhang, Xiaofang; Xiao, Meijie; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Canhui

    2017-02-10

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) were surface-modified with polyethyleneimine (PEI), which brought plentiful amine groups on the surface of CNFs, leading to a reduced hydrogen bond density between CNFs and consequently less CNFs agglomerates. The amine groups could also react with the epoxy as an effective curing agent that could increase the interfacial crosslinking density and strengthen interfacial adhesion. The tensile strength and Young's modulus of CNFs-PEI/Epoxy nanocomposites were 88.1% and 237.6% higher than those of neat epoxy, respectively. The tensile storage modulus of the nanocomposites also increased significantly at the temperature either below or above the Tg. The coefficient of thermal expansion for the CNFs-PEI/Epoxy nanocomposites was 22.2ppmK(-1), much lower than that of the neat epoxy (88.6ppmK(-1)). In addition, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites was observed to increase as well. The exceptional and balanced properties may provide the nanocomposites promising applications in automotive, construction and electronic devices.

  10. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  11. Interfacial structure and wetting properties of water droplets on graphene under a static electric field.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongru; Zhang, Leining; Li, Xiongying; Li, Yifan; Wu, Weikang; Li, Hui

    2015-09-28

    The behavior of water droplets located on graphene in the presence of various external electric fields (E-fields) is investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We explore the effect of E-field on mass density distribution, water polarization as well as hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) to gain insight into the wetting properties of water droplets on graphene and their interfacial structure under uniform E-fields. The MD simulation results reveal that the equilibrium water droplets present a hemispherical, a conical and an ordered cylindrical shape with the increase of external E-field intensity. Accompanied by the shape variation of water droplets, the dipole orientation of water molecules experiences a remarkable change from a disordered state to an ordered state because of the polarization of water molecules induced by static E-field. The distinct two peaks in mass density and H-bond distribution profiles demonstrate that water has a layering structure in the interfacial region, which sensitively depends on the strong E-field (>0.8 V nm(-1)). In addition, when the external E-field is parallel to the substrate, the E-field would make the contact angle of the water droplets become small and increase its wettability. Our findings provide the possibility to control the structure and wetting properties of water on graphene by tuning the direction and intensity of external E-field which is of importance for relevant industrial processes on the solid surface.

  12. Dynamic Ordering Transitions of Liquid Crystals Driven by Interfacial Complexes Formed Between Polyanions and Amphiphilic Polyamines

    PubMed Central

    Kinsinger, Michael I.; Buck, Maren E.; Campos, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    We report the design of an amphiphilic polyamine based on poly(2-alkenyl azlactone) (polymer 1) that strongly couples the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes at aqueous/liquid crystal (LC) interfaces to ordering transitions in the LC. We demonstrate that the addition of a strong anionic polyelectrolyte to aqueous solutions in contact with polymer 1-laden LC interfaces (prepared by Langmuir-Schaefer transfer of monolayers of polymer 1 onto micrometer-thick films of nematic LC) triggers ordering transitions in the LCs. We further demonstrate that changes in the ordering of the LCs (i) are driven by electrostatic interactions between the polyelectrolytes, (ii) involve multivalent interactions between the polyelectrolytes, and (iii) are triggered by reorganization of the hydrophobic side chains of amphiphilic polymer 1 upon formation of the interfacial complexes. The results presented in this paper lead us to conclude that ordering transitions in LCs can be used to provide insights into the structure and dynamics of interfacial complexes formed between polyelectrolytes. PMID:18991416

  13. Influence of silane surface modification of veneer on interfacial adhesion of wood-plastic plywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Lu; Chang, Liang; Guo, Wen-jing; Chen, Yongping; Wang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, wood-plastic plywood was fabricated with high density polyethylene (HDPE) film and poplar veneer by hot-pressing. To improve the interfacial adhesion between the wood veneer and HDPE film, silane A-171 (vinyltrimethoxysilane) was used to treat the surface of poplar veneer by spraying. The effects of silane agent on the veneer surface properties as well as the physical-mechanical performance of wood-plastic plywood were evaluated. The adsorption of several prehydrolyzed alkoxysilanes onto the veneer surface and the existence of a covalent bonding between the wood veneer and silane agent were confirmed using FTIR, XPS and contact angle. Silane surface treatment resulted in enhancement of shear strength and water resistance. When one layer HDPE film was used as adhesive, it caused 293.2% increase in shear strength, 34.6% and 40.8% reduction in water absorption and th