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Sample records for additional interfacial force

  1. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Interfacial force microscopy: Application to polymer surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    HOUSTON,JACK E.; WINTER,R.M.

    2000-05-16

    Scanning-probe microscopies (SPM) are presently widely used in remarkably diverse applications and, as evidenced by this symposium these techniques are rapidly expanding into the important areas of polymer surfaces and interfaces. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM's range of application suffers from an inherent mechanical instability in its deflection force sensor. The instability problem has been overcome by the development of the Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM), which utilizes a force-feedback sensor concept. In the following, the authors present several examples of polymer applications to illustrate the utility of the IFM sensor concept.

  3. Non-contact atomic-level interfacial force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Fleming, J.G.

    1997-02-01

    The scanning force microscopies (notably the Atomic Force Microscope--AFM), because of their applicability to nearly all materials, are presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM uses a deflection sensor to measure sample/probe forces which suffers from an inherent mechanical instability that occurs when the rate of change of the force with respect to the interfacial separation becomes equal to the spring constant of the deflecting member. This instability dramatically limits the breadth of applicability of AFM-type techniques to materials problems. In the course of implementing a DOE sponsored basic research program in interfacial adhesion, a self-balancing force sensor concept has been developed and incorporated into an Interfacial Force Microscopy (IFM) system by Sandia scientists. This sensor eliminates the instability problem and greatly enhances the applicability of the scanning force-probe technique to a broader range of materials and materials parameters. The impact of this Sandia development was recognized in 1993 by a Department of Energy award for potential impact on DOE programs and by an R and D 100 award for one of the most important new products of 1994. However, in its present stage of development, the IFM is strictly a research-level tool and a CRADA was initiated in order to bring this sensor technology into wide-spread availability by making it accessible in the form of a commercial instrument. The present report described the goals, approach and results of this CRADA effort.

  4. Laser interferometry force-feedback sensor for an interfacial force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Houston, Jack E.; Smith, William L.

    2004-04-13

    A scanning force microscope is provided with a force-feedback sensor to increase sensitivity and stability in determining interfacial forces between a probe and a sample. The sensor utilizes an interferometry technique that uses a collimated light beam directed onto a deflecting member, comprising a common plate suspended above capacitor electrodes situated on a substrate forming an interference cavity with a probe on the side of the common plate opposite the side suspended above capacitor electrodes. The probe interacts with the surface of the sample and the intensity of the reflected beam is measured and used to determine the change in displacement of the probe to the sample and to control the probe distance relative to the surface of the sample.

  5. Additive empirical force field for hexopyranose monosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Guvench, Olgun; Greene, Shannon N.; Kamath, Ganesh; Brady, John W.; Venable, Richard M.; Pastor, Richard W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    We present an all-atom additive empirical force field for the hexopyranose monosaccharide form of glucose and its diastereomers allose, altrose, galactose, gulose, idose, mannose, and talose. The model is developed to be consistent with the CHARMM all-atom biomolecular force fields, and the same parameters are used for all diastereomers, including both the α- and β-anomers of each monosaccharide. The force field is developed in a hierarchical manner and reproduces the gas-phase and condensed-phase properties of small-molecule model compounds corresponding to fragments of pyranose monosaccharides. The resultant parameters are transferred to the full pyranose monosaccharides and additional parameter development is done to achieve a complete hexopyranose monosaccharide force field. Parametrization target data include vibrational frequencies, crystal geometries, solute – water interaction energies, molecular volumes, heats of vaporization, and conformational energies, including those for over 1800 monosaccharide conformations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-31G(d) level of theory. Though not targeted during parametrization, free energies of aqueous solvation for the model compounds compare favorably with experimental values. Also well-reproduced are monosaccharide crystal unit cell dimensions and ring pucker, densities of concentrated aqueous glucose systems, and the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the exocyclic torsion in dilute aqueous systems. The new parameter set expands the CHARMM additive force field to allow for simulation of heterogeneous systems that include hexopyranose monosaccharides in addition to proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. PMID:18470966

  6. Calibration of an interfacial force microscope for MEMS metrology : FY08-09 activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Baker, Michael Sean; Crowson, Douglas A.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Moore, Nathan W.

    2009-10-01

    Progress in MEMS fabrication has enabled a wide variety of force and displacement sensing devices to be constructed. One device under intense development at Sandia is a passive shock switch, described elsewhere (Mitchell 2008). A goal of all MEMS devices, including the shock switch, is to achieve a high degree of reliability. This, in turn, requires systematic methods for validating device performance during each iteration of design. Once a design is finalized, suitable tools are needed to provide quality assurance for manufactured devices. To ensure device performance, measurements on these devices must be traceable to NIST standards. In addition, accurate metrology of MEMS components is needed to validate mechanical models that are used to design devices to accelerate development and meet emerging needs. Progress towards a NIST-traceable calibration method is described for a next-generation, 2D Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM) for applications in MEMS metrology and qualification. Discussed are the results of screening several suitable calibration methods and the known sources of uncertainty in each method.

  7. Interfacial structure of sugar beet pectin studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gromer, A; Kirby, A R; Gunning, A P; Morris, V J

    2009-07-21

    Unlike pectins from other origins, sugar beet pectin (SBP) acts as an emulsifier, a property which has been correlated to its more hydrophobic character and high protein content. In this work, we have investigated the structure of SBP at interfaces by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three situations were studied: the mica/water, graphite/water, and air/water interface. For the latter, the interfacial film was transferred onto mica using the Langmuir-Blodgett method. While the adsorption of individual pectin chains on mica requires the addition of divalent cations, on graphite a thin layer containing amorphous areas and rodlike chains forms spontaneously. We suggest that the layer contains proteins and pectin chains which are bound to the graphite via CH-pi interactions. SBP adsorbed at the air/water interface forms an elastic layer, as evidenced by pendant drop and surface shear rheology measurements. AFM Images reveal the layer is crippled with holes and contains rodlike chains, suggesting that the pectin chains prevent the formation of a densely packed protein layer. Nevertheless, we show that the interfacial pectin film is more resistant to displacement by surfactants than a pure protein film, possibly because of the formation of linkages between the pectin chains. In contrast, alkali treatment of the pectin appears to remove the pectin chains from the air/water interface and leaves a film that behaves similarly to pure protein. This work gives a new insight into the nanoscale organization of polysaccharides and polysaccharide-protein mixtures at macroscopic surfaces. The results gathered from the different interfaces studied permit a better understanding of the likely structure of SBP at the interface of emulsion droplets. Such knowledge might be used to modify rationally the pectin in order to improve its emulsifying properties, leading to broader commercial applications.

  8. Hydrodynamic attraction of immobile particles due to interfacial forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morthomas, Julien; Würger, Alois

    2010-05-01

    Applying the method of reflections, we derive the flow pattern around a confined colloidal particle with quasislip conditions at its surface, in powers of the ratio a/h of particle radius and wall distance. The lowest order corresponds to a single reflection at the confining wall. Significant corrections occur at higher order: the linear term in a/h modifies the amplitudes of the well-known one-reflection approximation, whereas new features arise in quadratic order. Our results agree with recent experiments where thermo-osmosis drives hydrodynamic attractive forces in confined colloids.

  9. Interfacial aqueous solutions dielectric constant measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Ceotto, G.; de Souza, E. F.

    2000-08-01

    The exchange of the volume of a region of the electric double layer of a mica surface immersed in aqueous solutions, with a dielectric constant ɛDL, by a nanosized radius tip, with a dielectric constant ɛTip, is responsible for the repulsion at large distances from the surface (starting at ˜100 nm, diffuse layer) and followed by an attraction when the tip is immersed in the inner layer (˜10 nm). The calculated dielectric constant as a function of the distance to the charged interface obtained by fitting the force versus distance curves, allows the mapping of the inner layer dielectric constant profiles with a nanometer resolution.

  10. Adhesive force measurement between HOPG and zinc oxide as an indicator for interfacial bonding of carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brendan A; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-07-22

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires have recently been utilized as an interphase to increase the interfacial strength of carbon fiber composites. It was shown that the interaction between the carbon fiber and the ZnO nanowires was a critical parameter in adhesion; however, fiber based testing techniques are dominated by local defects and cannot be used to effectively study the bonding interaction directly. Here, the strength of the interface between ZnO and graphitic carbon is directly measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using oxygen plasma treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and an AFM tip coated with ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is used to compare the surface chemistry of HOPG and carbon fiber and to quantify the presence of various oxygen functional groups. An indirect measurement of the interfacial strength is then performed through single fiber fragmentation testing (SFF) on functionalized carbon fibers coated with ZnO nanowires to validate the AFM measurements. The SFF and AFM methods showed the same correlation, demonstrating the capacity of the AFM method to study the interfacial properties in composite materials. Additionally, the chemical interactions between oxygen functional groups and the ionic structure of ZnO suggest that intermolecular forces at the interface are responsible for the strong interface.

  11. Interfacial Force Field Characterization in a Constrained Vapor Bubble Thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DasGupta, Sunando; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in the earth's gravitational field using an image-analyzing interferometer that is based on computer-enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. These profiles are a function of the stress field. Experimentally, the augmented Young-Laplace equation is an excellent model for the force field at the solid-liquid-vapor interfaces for heptane and pentane menisci on quartz and tetradecane on SFL6. The effects of refractive indices of the solid and liquid on the measurement techniques were demonstrated. Experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressure and dispersion constants were compared to those predicted from the Dzyaloshinskii - Lifshitz - Pilaevskii theory for an ideal surface and reasonable agreements were obtained. A parameter introduced gives a quantitative measurement of the closeness of the system to equilibrium. The nonequilibrium behavior of this parameter is also presented

  12. Interfacial force field characterization in a constrained vapor bubble thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    DasGupta, S.; Plawsky, J.L.; Wayner, P.C. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in the earth`s gravitational field using an image analyzing interferometer that is based on computer-enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. These profiles are a function of the stress field. Experimentally, the augmented Young-Laplace equation is an excellent model for the force field at the solid-liquid-vapor interfaces for heptane and pentane menisci on quartz and tetradecane on SFL6. Effects of refractive indices of the solid and liquid on the measurement techniques were demonstrated. Experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressure and dispersion constants were compared to those predicted from the Dzyaloshinskii-Lifshitz-Pitaevskii theory for an ideal surface and reasonable agreements were obtained. A parameter introduced gives a quantitative measurement of the closeness of the system to equilibrium. The nonequilibrium behavior of this parameter is also presented.

  13. Molecular orientation transition of organic thin films on graphite: the effect of intermolecular electrostatic and interfacial dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Han; Thye, Andrew; Wee, Shen

    2008-09-28

    In situ low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy investigation reveals a molecular orientation transition of organic thin films of pentacene and p-sexiphenyl on graphite, arising from the delicate balance between the intermolecular electrostatic and interfacial dispersion forces.

  14. Interfacial water dielectric-permittivity-profile measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Ceotto, G.; de Souza, E. F.

    2001-07-01

    The arrangement of water molecules at charged aqueous interfaces is an important question in biology, electrochemistry, and geochemistry. Theoretical studies suggest that the molecules become arranged in several layers adjacent to a solid interface. Using atomic force microscopy we have measured the water dielectric-permittivity profile perpendicular to mica surfaces. The measured variable permittivity profile starting at ɛ~4 at the interface and increasing to ɛ=80 about 10 nm from the surface suggests a reorientation of water molecule dipoles in the presence of the mica interfacial charge.

  15. Interfacial water dielectric-permittivity-profile measurements using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teschke, O; Ceotto, G; de Souza, E F

    2001-07-01

    The arrangement of water molecules at charged aqueous interfaces is an important question in biology, electrochemistry, and geochemistry. Theoretical studies suggest that the molecules become arranged in several layers adjacent to a solid interface. Using atomic force microscopy we have measured the water dielectric-permittivity profile perpendicular to mica surfaces. The measured variable permittivity profile starting at epsilon approximately 4 at the interface and increasing to epsilon=80 about 10 nm from the surface suggests a reorientation of water molecule dipoles in the presence of the mica interfacial charge. PMID:11461268

  16. Hofmeister effect on the interfacial free energy of aliphatic and aromatic surfaces studied by chemical force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Patete, Jonathan; Petrofsky, John M; Stepan, Jeffery; Waheed, Abdul; Serafin, Joseph M

    2009-01-15

    This work describes chemical force microscopy (CFM) studies of specific-ion effects on the aqueous interfacial free energy of hydrophobic monolayers. CFM measurements allow for the characterization of interfacial properties on length scales below 100 nm. The ions chosen span the range of the Hofmeister series, from the kosmotropic Na(2)SO(4) to the chaotropic NaSCN. The salt concentrations used are typical of many laboratory processes such as protein crystallization, 2-3 M. Both aliphatic (terminal methyl) and aromatic (terminal phenyl) monolayers were examined, and rather pronounced differences were observed between the two cases. The specific-ion dependence of the aliphatic monolayer closely follows the Hofmeister series, namely the chaotropic ions lowered the interfacial free energy and the kosmotropic ions increased the interfacial free energy. However, the aromatic monolayer had significant deviations from the Hofmeister series. Possible origins for this difference are discussed.

  17. Reliable measurements of interfacial slip by colloid probe atomic force microscopy. II. Hydrodynamic force measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liwen; Attard, Phil; Neto, Chiara

    2011-06-01

    Here we report a new study on the boundary conditions for the flow of a simple liquid in a confined geometry obtained by measuring hydrodynamic drainage forces with colloid probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). In this work, we provide experimental data obtained using a best practice experimental protocol and fitted with a new theoretical calculation (Zhu, L.; Attard, P.; Neto, C. Langmuir 2010, submitted for publication, preceding paper). We investigated the hydrodynamic forces acting on a silica colloid probe approaching a hydrophobized silicon surface in a single-component viscous Newtonian liquid (di-n-octylphthalate), a partially wetting system. The measured average slip lengths were in the range of 24-31 nm at approach velocities of between 10 and 80 μm/s. Using our experimental approach, the presence of nanoparticle contaminants in the system can be indentified, which is important because it has been shown that nanoparticles lead to a large apparent slip length. Under our stringent control of experimental conditions, the measurement of the slip length is reproducible and independent of the spring constant of the cantilever.

  18. Effects of Ga Addition on Interfacial Reactions Between Sn-Based Solders and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao-Hong; Li, Kuan-Ting

    2016-07-01

    The use of Ga as a micro-alloying element in Sn-based solders can change the microstructure of solder joints to improve the mechanical properties, and even suppress the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) growth. This research investigated the effects of Ga addition (0.2-1 wt.%Ga) on the IMC formation and morphological evolution in the Sn-based solder joints with Ni substrate. In the soldering reaction at 250°C and with less than 0.2 wt.%Ga addition, the formed phase was Ni3Sn4. When the Ga addition increased to 0.5 wt.%, it changed to a thin Ni2Ga3 layer of ˜1 μm thick, which stably existed at the interface in the initial 1-h reaction. Subsequently, the whole Ni2Ga3 layer detached from the Ni substrate and drifted into the molten solder. The Ni3Sn4 phase became dominant in the later stage. Notably, the Ga addition significantly reduced the grain size of Ni3Sn4, resulting in the massive spalling of Ni3Sn4 grains. With 1 wt.%Ga addition, the Ni2Ga3 layer remained very thin with no significant growth, and it stably existed at the interface for more than 10 h. In addition, the solid-state reactions were examined at temperatures of 160°C to 200°C. With addition of 0.5 wt.%Ga, the Ni3Sn4 phase dominated the whole reaction. By contrast, with increasing to 1 wt.%Ga, only a thin Ni2Ga3 layer was found even after aging at 160°C for more than 1200 h. The 1 wt.%Ga addition in solder can effectively inhibit the Ni3Sn4 formation in soldering and the long-term aging process.

  19. Chemical Force Microscopy: Probing Chemical Origin of Interfacial Forces and Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Vezenov, D V; Noy, A; Ashby, P

    2005-03-21

    Experimental methods of measuring intermolecular interactions have had several recent developments which have improved our understanding of chemical forces. First, they allowed direct exploration of the role that different functionalities, solvents and environmental variables play in shaping the strength of intermolecular interactions. Chemical force microscopy approach, in particular, became an extremely effective tool for exploring the contributions of each of these factors. Second, CFM studies clearly debunked the naive notion that intermolecular interaction strength is determined only by the nature of the interacting groups. These studies showed that the interaction strength between two chemical species must always considered in context of the environment surrounding these species. Third, CFM studies highlighted the critical role solvent plays in shaping intermolecular interactions in condensed phases. Emerging kinetic view of the intermolecular interactions introduced a completely new paradigm for understanding these interactions. Kinetic modeling showed that the measured interactions strength depends not only on the energy landscape of the system, but also on the loading history prior to the bond break-up. This new paradigm refocused our attention to the energy landscape as a fundamental characteristic of the interaction. Moreover, dynamic force spectroscopy, derived from kinetic models, allowed direct characterization of the geometry of the potential energy barrier, while some other methods attempt to probe the equilibrium energy landscape directly. Further investigations of the interactions in different systems, especially interactions between biomolecules, will uncover many interesting characteristics of intermolecular potentials. These studies have the potential to reveal, for the first time, a true picture of the energy landscapes of adhesion processes in complex chemical and biological systems.

  20. Interfacial shear strength estimates of NiTi-Al matrix composites fabricated via ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehr, Adam; Pritchard, Joshua; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand and improve the interfacial shear strength of metal matrix composites fabricated via very high power (VHP) ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM). VHP-UAM NiTi-Al composites have shown a dramatic decrease in thermal expansion compared to Al, yet thermal blocking stresses developed during thermal cycling have been found to degrade and eventually cause interface failure. Consequently, to improve understanding of the interface and guide the development of stronger NiTi- Al composites, the interface strength was investigated through the use of single ber pullout tests. It was found that the matrix yielded prior to the interface breaking since adhered aluminum was consistently observed on all pullout samples. Additionally, measured pullout loads were utilized as an input to a nite element model for stress and shear lag analysis, which, in turn showed that the Al matrix experienced a peak shear stress near 230 MPa. This stress is above the Al matrix's ultimate shear strength of 150-200 MPa, thus this large stress corroborates with matrix failure observed during testing. The in uence of various ber surface treatments on bond mechanisms was also studied with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  1. Interfacial force field characterization of a constrained vapor bubble thermosyphon using IAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Sunando; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in a gravitational field using IAI (image analyzing interferometer) which is based on computer enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. The experimental results for heptane and pentane menisci were analyzed using the extended Young-Laplace Equation. These isothermal results characterized the interfacial force field in-situ at the start of the heat transfer experiments by quantifying the dispersion constant for the specific liquid-solid system. The experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressures and the dispersion constants are compared to the subsequent non-isothermal experiments because one of the major variables in the heat sink capability of the CVBT is the dispersion constant. In all previous studies of micro heat pipes the value of the dispersion constant has been 'guesstimated'. The major advantages of the current glass cell is the ability to view the extended meniscus at all times. Experimentally, we find that the extended Young-Laplace Equation is an excellent model for for the force field at the solid-liquid vapor interfaces.

  2. Erythorbyl laurate as a potential food additive with multi-functionalities: Interfacial characteristics and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min Joo; Jo, Su-Kyung; Choi, Seung Jun; Lee, JaeHwan; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2017-01-15

    The interfacial characteristics and antioxidant activities of erythorbyl laurate were investigated to provide information on practical applications as a multi-functional food additive. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of erythorbyl laurate was 0.101mM and its foam stability was three times (half-life 24.33±0.94h) higher than that of Tween 20 (8.00±1.63h). In free radical scavenging assay, the negligible decrease in EC50 of erythorbyl laurate compared to erythorbic acid manifested that C-5 selective esterification of erythorbic acid with an acyl group (lauric acid) did not reduce the inherent antioxidant activity of the donor (erythorbic acid). Erythorbyl laurate formed lipid peroxides slower (i.e. retarded oxidation) in an emulsion system than did erythorbic acid. The localization of erythorbyl laurate as an emulsifier allowed the antioxidant molecules to be concentrated at the oil-water interface where oxidation is prevalent, which led to more effective retardation of lipid oxidation. PMID:27542455

  3. Erythorbyl laurate as a potential food additive with multi-functionalities: Interfacial characteristics and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min Joo; Jo, Su-Kyung; Choi, Seung Jun; Lee, JaeHwan; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2017-01-15

    The interfacial characteristics and antioxidant activities of erythorbyl laurate were investigated to provide information on practical applications as a multi-functional food additive. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of erythorbyl laurate was 0.101mM and its foam stability was three times (half-life 24.33±0.94h) higher than that of Tween 20 (8.00±1.63h). In free radical scavenging assay, the negligible decrease in EC50 of erythorbyl laurate compared to erythorbic acid manifested that C-5 selective esterification of erythorbic acid with an acyl group (lauric acid) did not reduce the inherent antioxidant activity of the donor (erythorbic acid). Erythorbyl laurate formed lipid peroxides slower (i.e. retarded oxidation) in an emulsion system than did erythorbic acid. The localization of erythorbyl laurate as an emulsifier allowed the antioxidant molecules to be concentrated at the oil-water interface where oxidation is prevalent, which led to more effective retardation of lipid oxidation.

  4. Multiple Size Group Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in the Mold: An Analysis of Turbulence and Interfacial Force Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2015-04-01

    An inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) model based on the Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been developed to describe the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold. A laboratory scale mold has been simulated using four different turbulence closure models (modified k - ɛ, RNG k - ɛ, k - ω, and SST) with the purpose of critically comparing their predictions of bubble Sauter mean diameter distribution with previous experimental data. Furthermore, the influences of all the interfacial momentum transfer terms including drag force, lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force are investigated. The breakup and coalescence effects of the bubbles are modeled according to the bubble breakup by the impact of turbulent eddies while for bubble coalescence by the random collisions driven by turbulence and wake entrainment. It has been found that the modified k - ɛ model shows better agreement than other models in predicting the bubble Sauter mean diameter profiles. Further, simulations have also been performed to understand the sensitivity of different interfacial forces. The appropriate drag force coefficient, lift force coefficient, virtual mass force coefficient, and turbulent dispersion force coefficient are chosen in accordance with measurements of water model experiments. However, the wall lubrication force does not have much effect on the current polydispersed bubbly flow system. Finally, the MUSIG model is then used to estimate the argon bubble diameter in the molten steel of the mold. The argon bubble Sauter mean diameter generated in molten steel is predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the similar conditions.

  5. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all‐atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26841080

  6. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D; Nilsson, Lennart

    2016-04-15

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all-atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs. PMID:26841080

  7. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D; Nilsson, Lennart

    2016-04-15

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all-atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs.

  8. Nonlinearly Additive Forces in Multivalent Ligand Binding to a Single Protein Revealed with Force Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T V; Rudd, R E; Langry, K C; Balhorn, R L; McElfresh, M W

    2005-07-15

    We present evidence of multivalent interactions between a single protein molecule and multiple carbohydrates at a pH where the protein can bind four ligands. The evidence is based not only on measurements of the force required to rupture the bonds formed between ConcanavalinA (ConA) and {alpha}-D-mannose, but also on an analysis of the polymer-extension force curves to infer the polymer architecture that binds the protein to the cantilever and the ligands to the substrate. We find that although the rupture forces for multiple carbohydrate connections to a single protein are larger than the rupture force for a single connection, they do not scale additively with increasing number. Specifically, the most common rupture forces are approximately 46, 66, and 85 pN, which we argue corresponds to 1, 2, and 3 ligands being pulled simultaneously from a single protein as corroborated by an analysis of the linkage architecture. As in our previous work polymer tethers allow us to discriminate between specific and non-specific binding. We analyze the binding configuration (i.e. serial versus parallel connections) through fitting the polymer stretching data with modified Worm-Like Chain (WLC) models that predict how the effective stiffness of the tethers is affected by multiple connections. This analysis establishes that the forces we measure are due to single proteins interacting with multiple ligands, the first force spectroscopy study that establishes single-molecule multivalent binding unambiguously.

  9. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, Tigran M; Snyder, James A; Yancey, Jeremy A; Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG-X-GTGT host-guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard-Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid-liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  10. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Abramyan, Tigran M.; Snyder, James A.; Yancey, Jeremy A.; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG–X–GTGT host–guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard–Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid–liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  11. Towards the synthesis of hydroxyapatite/protein scaffolds with controlled porosities: bulk and interfacial shear rheology of a hydroxyapatite suspension with protein additives.

    PubMed

    Maas, Michael; Bodnar, Pedro Marcus; Hess, Ulrike; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds is essential for biomedical applications such as bone tissue engineering and replacement. One way to induce macroporosity, which is needed to support bone in-growth, is to use protein additives as foaming agents. Another reason to use protein additives is the potential to introduce a specific biofunctionality to the synthesized scaffolds. In this work, we study the rheological properties of a hydroxyapatite suspension system with additions of the proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LSZ) and fibrinogen (FIB). Both the rheology of the bulk phase as well as the interfacial shear rheology are studied. The bulk rheological data provides important information on the setting behavior of the thixotropic suspension, which we find to be faster with the addition of FIB and LSZ and much slower with BSA. Foam bubble stabilization mechanisms can be rationalized via interfacial shear rheology and we show that it depends on the growth of interfacial films at the suspension/air interface. These interfacial films support the stabilization of bubbles within the ceramic matrix and thereby introduce macropores. Due to the weak interaction of the protein molecules with the hydroxyapatite particles of the suspension, we find that BSA forms the most stable interfacial films, followed by FIB. LSZ strongly interacts with the hydroxyapatite particles and thus only forms thin films with very low elastic moduli. In summary, our study provides fundamental rheological insights which are essential for tailoring hydroxyapatite/protein suspensions in order to synthesize scaffolds with controlled porosities.

  12. Self-assembly formation of lipid bilayer coatings on bare aluminum oxide: overcoming the force of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Tabaei, Seyed R; Zhao, Zhilei; Yorulmaz, Saziye; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-01-14

    Widely used in catalysis and biosensing applications, aluminum oxide has become popular for surface functionalization with biological macromolecules, including lipid bilayer coatings. However, it is difficult to form supported lipid bilayers on aluminum oxide, and current methods require covalent surface modification, which masks the interfacial properties of aluminum oxide, and/or complex fabrication techniques with specific conditions. Herein, we addressed this issue by identifying simple and robust strategies to form fluidic lipid bilayers on aluminum oxide. The fabrication of a single lipid bilayer coating was achieved by two methods, vesicle fusion under acidic conditions and solvent-assisted lipid bilayer (SALB) formation under near-physiological pH conditions. Importantly, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring measurements determined that the hydration layer of a supported lipid bilayer on aluminum oxide is appreciably thicker than that of a bilayer on silicon oxide. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis indicated that the diffusion coefficient of lateral lipid mobility was up to 3-fold greater on silicon oxide than on aluminum oxide. In spite of this hydrodynamic coupling, the diffusion coefficient on aluminum oxide, but not silicon oxide, was sensitive to the ionic strength condition. Extended-DLVO model calculations estimated the thermodynamics of lipid-substrate interactions on aluminum oxide and silicon oxide, and predict that the range of the repulsive hydration force is greater on aluminum oxide, which in turn leads to an increased equilibrium separation distance. Hence, while a strong hydration force likely contributes to the difficulty of bilayer fabrication on aluminum oxide, it also confers advantages by stabilizing lipid bilayers with thicker hydration layers due to confined interfacial water. Such knowledge provides the basis for improved surface functionalization strategies on aluminum oxide

  13. Self-assembly formation of lipid bilayer coatings on bare aluminum oxide: overcoming the force of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Tabaei, Seyed R; Zhao, Zhilei; Yorulmaz, Saziye; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-01-14

    Widely used in catalysis and biosensing applications, aluminum oxide has become popular for surface functionalization with biological macromolecules, including lipid bilayer coatings. However, it is difficult to form supported lipid bilayers on aluminum oxide, and current methods require covalent surface modification, which masks the interfacial properties of aluminum oxide, and/or complex fabrication techniques with specific conditions. Herein, we addressed this issue by identifying simple and robust strategies to form fluidic lipid bilayers on aluminum oxide. The fabrication of a single lipid bilayer coating was achieved by two methods, vesicle fusion under acidic conditions and solvent-assisted lipid bilayer (SALB) formation under near-physiological pH conditions. Importantly, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring measurements determined that the hydration layer of a supported lipid bilayer on aluminum oxide is appreciably thicker than that of a bilayer on silicon oxide. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis indicated that the diffusion coefficient of lateral lipid mobility was up to 3-fold greater on silicon oxide than on aluminum oxide. In spite of this hydrodynamic coupling, the diffusion coefficient on aluminum oxide, but not silicon oxide, was sensitive to the ionic strength condition. Extended-DLVO model calculations estimated the thermodynamics of lipid-substrate interactions on aluminum oxide and silicon oxide, and predict that the range of the repulsive hydration force is greater on aluminum oxide, which in turn leads to an increased equilibrium separation distance. Hence, while a strong hydration force likely contributes to the difficulty of bilayer fabrication on aluminum oxide, it also confers advantages by stabilizing lipid bilayers with thicker hydration layers due to confined interfacial water. Such knowledge provides the basis for improved surface functionalization strategies on aluminum oxide

  14. Atomic force microscopy of crystalline insulins: the influence of sequence variation on crystallization and interfacial structure.

    PubMed Central

    Yip, C M; Brader, M L; DeFelippis, M R; Ward, M D

    1998-01-01

    The self-association of proteins is influenced by amino acid sequence, molecular conformation, and the presence of molecular additives. In the presence of phenolic additives, LysB28ProB29 insulin, in which the C-terminal prolyl and lysyl residues of wild-type human insulin have been inverted, can be crystallized into forms resembling those of wild-type insulins in which the protein exists as zinc-complexed hexamers organized into well-defined layers. We describe herein tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) studies of single crystals of rhombohedral (R3) LysB28ProB29 that reveal the influence of sequence variation on hexamer-hexamer association at the surface of actively growing crystals. Molecular scale lattice images of these crystals were acquired in situ under growth conditions, enabling simultaneous identification of the rhombohedral LysB28ProB29 crystal form, its orientation, and its dynamic growth characteristics. The ability to obtain crystallographic parameters on multiple crystal faces with TMAFM confirmed that bovine and porcine insulins grown under these conditions crystallized into the same space group as LysB28ProB29 (R3), enabling direct comparison of crystal growth behavior and the influence of sequence variation. Real-time TMAFM revealed hexamer vacancies on the (001) terraces of LysB28ProB29, and more rounded dislocation noses and larger terrace widths for actively growing screw dislocations compared to wild-type bovine and porcine insulin crystals under identical conditions. This behavior is consistent with weaker interhexamer attachment energies for LysB28ProB29 at active growth sites. Comparison of the single crystal x-ray structures of wild-type insulins and LysB28ProB29 suggests that differences in protein conformation at the hexamer-hexamer interface and accompanying changes in interhexamer bonding are responsible for this behavior. These studies demonstrate that subtle changes in molecular conformation due to a single sequence

  15. Sliding/rolling phobic droplets along a fiber: measurement of interfacial forces.

    PubMed

    Mead-Hunter, Ryan; Bergen, Tanja; Becker, Thomas; O'Leary, Rebecca A; Kasper, Gerhard; Mullins, Benjamin J

    2012-02-21

    Phobic droplet-fiber systems possess complex geometries, which have made full characterization of such systems difficult. This work has used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure droplet-fiber forces for oil droplets on oleophobic fibers over a range of fiber diameters. The work adapted a previous method and a theoretical model developed by the authors for philic droplet-fiber systems. A Bayesian statistical model was also used to account for the influence of surface roughness on the droplet-fiber force. In general, it has been found that the force required to move a liquid droplet along an oleophobic filter fiber will be less than that required to move a droplet along an oleophilic fiber. However, because of the effects of pinning and/or wetting behavior, this difference may be less than would otherwise be expected. Droplets with a greater contact angle (~110°) were observed to roll along the fiber, whereas droplets with a lesser contact angle (<90°) would slide. PMID:22260243

  16. Sliding/rolling phobic droplets along a fiber: measurement of interfacial forces.

    PubMed

    Mead-Hunter, Ryan; Bergen, Tanja; Becker, Thomas; O'Leary, Rebecca A; Kasper, Gerhard; Mullins, Benjamin J

    2012-02-21

    Phobic droplet-fiber systems possess complex geometries, which have made full characterization of such systems difficult. This work has used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure droplet-fiber forces for oil droplets on oleophobic fibers over a range of fiber diameters. The work adapted a previous method and a theoretical model developed by the authors for philic droplet-fiber systems. A Bayesian statistical model was also used to account for the influence of surface roughness on the droplet-fiber force. In general, it has been found that the force required to move a liquid droplet along an oleophobic filter fiber will be less than that required to move a droplet along an oleophilic fiber. However, because of the effects of pinning and/or wetting behavior, this difference may be less than would otherwise be expected. Droplets with a greater contact angle (~110°) were observed to roll along the fiber, whereas droplets with a lesser contact angle (<90°) would slide.

  17. Interfacial Reactions of Zn-Al Alloys with Na Addition on Cu Substrate During Spreading Test and After Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancarz, Tomasz; Pstruś, Janusz; Berent, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    Spreading tests for Cu substrate with Zn-Al eutectic-based alloys with 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 wt.% of Na were studied using the sessile drop method in the presence of QJ201 flux. Spreading tests were performed for 1, 3, 8, 15, 30, and 60 min of contact, at the temperatures of 475, 500, 525, and 550 °C. After cleaning the flux residue from solidified samples, the spreading area of Zn-Al + Na on Cu was determined in accordance with ISO 9455-10:2013-03. Selected, solidified solder-substrate couples were cross-sectioned and subjected to scanning electron microscopy of the interfacial microstructure. The experiment was designed to demonstrate the effect of Na addition on the kinetics of formation and growth of CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4 phases, which were identified using x-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The addition of Na to eutectic Zn-Al caused the spreading area to decrease and the thickness of intermetallic compound layers at the interface to reduce. Samples after the spreading test at 500 °C for 1 min were subjected to aging for 1, 10, and 30 days at 120,170, and 250 °C. The greater thicknesses of IMC layers were obtained for a temperature of 250 °C. With increasing Na content in Zn-Al + Na alloys, the thickness reduced, which correlates to the highest value of activation energy for Zn-Al with 1% Na.

  18. Interfacial Reactions of Zn-Al Alloys with Na Addition on Cu Substrate During Spreading Test and After Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancarz, Tomasz; Pstruś, Janusz; Berent, Katarzyna

    2016-04-01

    Spreading tests for Cu substrate with Zn-Al eutectic-based alloys with 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 wt.% of Na were studied using the sessile drop method in the presence of QJ201 flux. Spreading tests were performed for 1, 3, 8, 15, 30, and 60 min of contact, at the temperatures of 475, 500, 525, and 550 °C. After cleaning the flux residue from solidified samples, the spreading area of Zn-Al + Na on Cu was determined in accordance with ISO 9455-10:2013-03. Selected, solidified solder-substrate couples were cross-sectioned and subjected to scanning electron microscopy of the interfacial microstructure. The experiment was designed to demonstrate the effect of Na addition on the kinetics of formation and growth of CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4 phases, which were identified using x-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The addition of Na to eutectic Zn-Al caused the spreading area to decrease and the thickness of intermetallic compound layers at the interface to reduce. Samples after the spreading test at 500 °C for 1 min were subjected to aging for 1, 10, and 30 days at 120,170, and 250 °C. The greater thicknesses of IMC layers were obtained for a temperature of 250 °C. With increasing Na content in Zn-Al + Na alloys, the thickness reduced, which correlates to the highest value of activation energy for Zn-Al with 1% Na.

  19. Separating the effects of repulsive and attractive forces on the phase diagram, interfacial, and critical properties of simple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Herrera, M.; Moreno-Razo, J. A.; Guzmán, O.; López-Lemus, J.; Ibarra-Tandi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular simulations in the canonical and isothermal-isobaric ensembles were performed to study the effect of varying the shape of the intermolecular potential on the phase diagram, critical, and interfacial properties of model fluids. The molecular interactions were modeled by the Approximate Non-Conformal (ANC) theory potentials. Unlike the Lennard-Jones or Morse potentials, the ANC interactions incorporate parameters (called softnesses) that modulate the steepness of the potential in their repulsive and attractive parts independently. This feature allowed us to separate unambiguously the role of each region of the potential on setting the thermophysical properties. In particular, we found positive linear correlation between all critical coordinates and the attractive and repulsive softness, except for the critical density and the attractive softness which are negatively correlated. Moreover, we found that the physical properties related to phase coexistence (such as span of the liquid phase between the critical and triple points, variations in the P-T vaporization curve, interface width, and surface tension) are more sensitive to changes in the attractive softness than to the repulsive one. Understanding the different roles of attractive and repulsive forces on phase coexistence may contribute to developing more accurate models of liquids and their mixtures.

  20. CHARMM additive and polarizable force fields for biophysics and computer-aided drug design

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Mechanics (MM) is the method of choice for computational studies of biomolecular systems owing to its modest computational cost, which makes it possible to routinely perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on chemical systems of biophysical and biomedical relevance. Scope of Review As one of the main factors limiting the accuracy of MD results is the empirical force field used, the present paper offers a review of recent developments in the CHARMM additive force field, one of the most popular bimolecular force fields. Additionally, we present a detailed discussion of the CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, anticipating a growth in the importance and utilization of polarizable force fields in the near future. Throughout the discussion emphasis is placed on the force fields’ parametrization philosophy and methodology. Major Conclusions Recent improvements in the CHARMM additive force field are mostly related to newly found weaknesses in the previous generation of additive force fields. Beyond the additive approximation is the newly available CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, which allows for MD simulations of up to 1 microsecond on proteins, DNA, lipids and carbohydrates. General Significance Addressing the limitations ensures the reliability of the new CHARMM36 additive force field for the types of calculations that are presently coming into routine computational reach while the availability of the Drude polarizable force fields offers a model that is an inherently more accurate model of the underlying physical forces driving macromolecular structures and dynamics. PMID:25149274

  1. More About Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Del Signore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional discussion of technique for measuring interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Technique described in "Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids" (LEW-15855).

  2. CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF): A force field for drug-like molecules compatible with the CHARMM all-atom additive biological force fields

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.; Hatcher, E.; Acharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Zhong, S.; Shim, J.; Darian, E.; Guvench, O.; Lopes, P.; Vorobyov, I.; MacKerell, A. D.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used CHARMM additive all-atom force field includes parameters for proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates. In the present paper an extension of the CHARMM force field to drug-like molecules is presented. The resulting CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) covers a wide range of chemical groups present in biomolecules and drug-like molecules, including a large number of heterocyclic scaffolds. The parametrization philosophy behind the force field focuses on quality at the expense of transferability, with the implementation concentrating on an extensible force field. Statistics related to the quality of the parametrization with a focus on experimental validation are presented. Additionally, the parametrization procedure, described fully in the present paper in the context of the model systems, pyrrolidine, and 3-phenoxymethylpyrrolidine will allow users to readily extend the force field to chemical groups that are not explicitly covered in the force field as well as add functional groups to and link together molecules already available in the force field. CGenFF thus makes it possible to perform “all-CHARMM” simulations on drug-target interactions thereby extending the utility of CHARMM force fields to medicinally relevant systems. PMID:19575467

  3. Research Updates: Epitaxial strain relaxation and associated interfacial reconstructions: The driving force for creating new structures with integrated functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Aiping; Zhou, Honghui; Zhang, Wenrui; Narayan, Jagdish; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi; Wang, Haiyan

    2013-11-01

    Here, we report detailed strain mapping analysis at heterointerfaces of a new multiferroic complex oxide Bi3Fe2Mn2Ox(BFMO322) supercell and related layered structures. The state-of-the-art aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM) and the modified geometric phase analysis (GPA) have been used to characterize the self-assembled transitional layers, misfit defects, and, in particular, the biaxial lattice strain distributions. We found that not only a sufficient lattice misfit is required through substrate selection and to be preserved in initial coherent epilayer growth, but also an appropriate interfacial reconstruction is crucial for triggering the growth of the new BFMO322 supercell structure. The observation of new transitional interfacial phases behaving like coherent film layers within the critical thickness challenges the conventional understanding in existing epitaxial growth model.

  4. Research Updates: Epitaxial strain relaxation and associated interfacial reconstructions: The driving force for creating new structures with integrated functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Wenrui; Chen, Aiping; Zhou, Honghui; Narayan, Jagdish; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi; Wang, Haiyan

    2013-11-01

    Here, we report detailed strain mapping analysis at heterointerfaces of a new multiferroic complex oxide Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}O{sub x}(BFMO322) supercell and related layered structures. The state-of-the-art aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM) and the modified geometric phase analysis (GPA) have been used to characterize the self-assembled transitional layers, misfit defects, and, in particular, the biaxial lattice strain distributions. We found that not only a sufficient lattice misfit is required through substrate selection and to be preserved in initial coherent epilayer growth, but also an appropriate interfacial reconstruction is crucial for triggering the growth of the new BFMO322 supercell structure. The observation of new transitional interfacial phases behaving like coherent film layers within the critical thickness challenges the conventional understanding in existing epitaxial growth model.

  5. Interfacial-tension-force model for the wavy stratified liquid-liquid flow pattern transition: The usage of two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Marcelo Souza; Rodriguez, Oscar Mauricio Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hydrodynamic stability of flow patterns is important in the design of equipment and pipelines for multiphase flows. The maintenance of a particular flow pattern becomes important in many applications, e.g., stratified flow pattern in heavy oil production avoiding the formation of emulsions because of the separation of phases and annular flow pattern in heat exchangers which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Flow maps are drawn to orientate engineers which flow pattern is present in a pipeline, for example. The ways how these flow maps are drawn have changed from totally experimental work, to phenomenological models, and then to stability analysis theories. In this work an experimental liquid-liquid flow map, with water and viscous oil as work fluids, drawn via subjective approach with high speed camera was used to compare to approaches of the same theory: the interfacial-tension-force model. This theory was used to drawn the wavy stratified flow pattern transition boundary. This paper presents a comparison between the two approaches of the interfacial-tension-force model for transition boundaries of liquid-liquid flow patterns: (i) solving the wave equation for the wave speed and using average values for wave number and wave speed; and (ii) solving the same equation for the wave number and then using a correlation for the wave speed. The results show that the second approach presents better results.

  6. Effect of cerium addition on casting/chill interfacial heat flux and casting surface profile during solidification of Al-14%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, Al-14 wt. % Si alloy was solidified against copper, brass and cast iron chills, to study the effect of Ce melt treatment on casting/chill interfacial heat flux transients and casting surface profile. The heat flux across the casting/chill interface was estimated using inverse modelling technique. On addition of 1.5% Ce, the peak heat flux increased by about 38%, 42% and 43% for copper, brass and cast iron chills respectively. The effect of Ce addition on casting surface texture was analyzed using a surface profilometer. The surface profile of the casting and the chill surfaces clearly indicated the formation of an air gap at the periphery of the casting. The arithmetic average value of the profile departure from the mean line (Ra) and arithmetical mean of the absolute departures of the waviness profile from the centre line (Wa) were found to decrease on Ce addition. The interfacial gap width formed for the unmodified and Ce treated casting surfaces at the periphery were found to be about 35µm and 13µm respectively. The enhancement in heat transfer on addition of Ce addition was attributed to the lowering of the surface tension of the liquid melt. The gap width at the interface was used to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) across the chill surface after the formation of stable solid shell. It was found that the HTC decreased along the radial direction for copper and brass chills and increased along radial direction for cast iron chills.

  7. Deciphering the energetic barriers to calcium carbonate nucleation as a continuum of competing interfacial forces between polysaccharide chemistry and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, A. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Researchers have long-postulated that living organisms utilize organic matrices to actively guide the formation and growth of crystalline structures. The timing and placement of these features are most easily controlled during the nucleation stage. Our recent kinetic study of heterogeneous calcite nucleation found the energy barrier to formation is regulated by a systematic relationship to the competing interfacial energies between the substrate, crystal, and liquid (Giuffre et al., 2013). Chitosan presents a low energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate-crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate-crystal interfaces. These results showed calcite nucleation is regulated by substrate-crystal interactions but could not quantify the larger continuum of competing forces that must regulate calcite nucleation. To determine these relationships, we estimate the energy barriers to nucleation and crystal-liquid interfacial energies by measuring the kinetics of homogeneous calcite nucleation in NaCl solutions at ionic strengths that extend to seawater salinity (0.6 M). The data show that solutions of greater ionic strength produce faster nucleation rates, smaller crystal-liquid interfacial energies, and lower barriers to nucleation, which concurs with recent theoretical and experimental findings that background electrolytes promote ion desolvation during nucleation. By applying this relationship to heterogeneous nucleation on chitosan and heparin in future work, we will quantify the relative contributions of substrate-crystal-liquid interfacial energies. The findings reiterate a directing role for PS

  8. Tris(trimethylsilyl)borate as an electrolyte additive for improving interfacial stability of high voltage layered lithium-rich oxide cathode/carbonate-based electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianhui; Xing, Lidan; Zhang, Ruiqin; Chen, Min; Wang, Zaisheng; Xu, Mengqing; Li, Weishan

    2015-07-01

    Tris(trimethylsilyl)borate (TMSB) is used as an electrolyte additive for high voltage lithium-rich oxide cathode of lithium ion battery. The interfacial natures of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2/carbonate-based electrolyte are investigated with a combination of electrochemical measurements and physical characterizations. Charge/discharge tests show that the cyclic performance of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 in a mixed carbonate electrolyte is significantly improved by using TMSB. After 200 cycles between 2 V and 4.8 V (vs. Li/Li+) at 0.5 C rate, the capacity retention of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 is only 19% in the blank electrolyte, while it is improved to 74% when 0.5% TMSB is applied. The results from physical characterizations demonstrate that this excellent cyclic performance is attributed to the improved interfacial stability of Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2/electrolyte due to the thin and protective film generated by TMSB.

  9. DIGIT FORCE ADJUSTMENTS DURING FINGER ADDITION/REMOVAL IN MULTI-DIGIT PREHENSION

    PubMed Central

    Budgeon, Mark K.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2008-01-01

    We explored adjustments in multi-digit coordinated action on a hand-held object with finger addition and removal. The subjects (n= 7) kept a vertically oriented handle at rest using a prismatic grasp as if holding a glass of liquid and then either added one finger to the grasp—the index (I) or little (L) finger—or removed one finger. Three external torques were applied on the apparatus: clockwise, counterclockwise, and no torque. The individual digit forces and moments were recorded with 6-component sensors. The change in grasping force depended on the function of the manipulated finger, i.e. on whether the finger resisted external torque (torque agonist) or assisted it (torque antagonist). There was a significant increase of the grasping force when an antagonist was added or when an agonist was removed. These force increases were not necessary for slipping prevention: the normal forces prior to the manipulation were large enough to prevent slipping. All other finger manipulations exhibited no significant change in the grip force, except for the antagonist removal during the supination efforts (after removing the I finger the grasping force decreased). In contrast, the changes in the tangential force depended on the manipulated finger, not on the finger function with respect to external torque. There was a significant thumb force increase when the I finger was added or when the L finger was removed; opposite changes were seen when the L finger was added or the I finger was removed. The changes of the virtual finger (VF) tangential force were equal and opposite to the thumb tangential force alterations; these opposite changes caused changes in the moments these forces generated. The changes in the moments of the tangential forces were counterbalanced by the opposite changes in the moments of normal forces such that the total moment remained constant and the handle orientation was maintained. At the level of individual finger (IF) forces two strategies of error

  10. Improvement in topology measurement accuracy of atomic force microscope using additional sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yeomin; Jeong, Jiseong; Kim, Junsup; Park, Kyihwan

    2015-07-01

    The topology image of an atomic force microscope is obtained by picking up a controlled output of a force-feedback loop that is proportional to the height of a sample under the assumption that no dynamics in a z-axis actuator exist. However, the dynamic effects such as hysteresis and creep in a PZT driving z-axis actuator cannot be ignored. To solve this problem, a strain-gage sensor is used as an additional sensor, which enables measurement of the absolute displacement of a z-axis PZT nano scanner. The advantage of using an additional sensor is experimentally provided and validated in topology images.

  11. Effects of circular rigid boundaries and Coriolis forces on the interfacial instability in a rotating annular Hele-Shaw cell.

    PubMed

    Abidate, Asmaa; Aniss, Said; Caballina, Ophélie; Souhar, Mohamed

    2007-04-01

    We report analytical results for the development of instability of an interface between two immiscible, Newtonian fluid layers confined in a rotating annular Hele-Shaw cell. We perform a linear stability analysis and focus our study on the influence of both Coriolis force and curvature parameters on the interface instability growth rate. The results show that the Coriolis force does not alter the stability of a disturbance with a particular wave number but reduces the maximum growth rate. The results related to the role played by the confinement of the liquid layers are also shown to provide a modification of the fastest-growing mode and its corresponding linear growth rate.

  12. Additive manufacturing of a monolithic optical force sensor based on polarization modulation.

    PubMed

    Nierenberger, Mathieu; Lecler, Sylvain; Pfeiffer, Pierre; Geiskopf, François; Guilhem, Mathieu; Renaud, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    One of the specific interests of optical sensors is their compatibility with harsh environments. The polarization modulated force sensor we propose offers this advantage, in addition to low cost and ease of manufacturing thanks to its acrylate 3D printed monolithic design. All the polarization control is indeed achieved using the geometry of a single component making unnecessary future alignments. The complex geometry of the transducer is obtained thanks to the 3D printing process. This process and the resulting material optical properties are described. The sensor concept and the fabrication method are experimentally investigated. A monolithic force sensor in the required range of 20 N is exhibited for application in the field of MR-compatible robotics. The potentiality of 3D printing for optical application in the design of the force sensor is illustrated.

  13. Statistical geometric models of hard-sphere colloidal dispersions: Application to interfacial thermodynamics and the calculation of depletion forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siderius, Daniel William

    Despite the lack of attractive interaction potentials in hard-sphere (HS) colloidal dispersions, a colloid immersed in a solvent of smaller hard-spheres may still experience a net force toward a surface due to imbalanced collisions. Consequently, depletion forces may be utilized to control self-assembly of colloidal structures on various surfaces or control aggregation of colloidal dispersions. To begin to better understand the ability of depletion forces to generate colloidal structures, guide colloidal motion, and control aggregation, accurate theoretical descriptions of depletion forces are necessary. Here, we discuss models of HS colloidal dispersions based on the ideas of Scaled Particle Theory (SPT) to provide methods of computing both HS thermophysical properties and depletion forces in HS fluids. We begin by introducing a new SPT interpolation that accurately provides many HS fluid properties, including the surface tension. We then further develop the inhomogeneous SPT (I-SPT) that describes cavities grown near a planar surface that confines a HS fluid, thereby providing a complete description of cavities near a planar surface, i.e., cavities that are centered at any position relative to the wall. The surface thermodynamics of HS cavities are then reexamined using a Gibbs dividing surface analysis, which produces thermodynamic expressions related to, among other things, the line tension of a HS cavity. Subsequently, we utilize I-SPT to compute the HS line tension and explore its behavior for different cavity locations. Using the accurate description of HS surface thermodynamics from SPT and I-SPT, we then construct a geometric model of depletion forces that is generalizable to many different surface structures and is based on different thermodynamic approximations. Versions of the geometric model based on HS surface thermodynamics (including the line tension) are demonstrated to be highly accurate, though simpler versions based on ideal gas arguments are

  14. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Their description as an inherently quantum mechanical phenomenon was developed for single atoms and homogeneous macroscopic bodies by London, Casimir, and Lifshitz. For intermediate-sized objects like organic molecules an atomistic description is required, but explicit first principles calculations are very difficult since correlations between many interacting electrons have to be considered. Hence, semi-empirical correction schemes are often used that simplify the vdW interaction to a sum over atom-pair potentials. A similar gap exists between successful measurements of vdW and Casimir forces for single atoms on the one hand and macroscopic bodies on the other, as comparable experiments for molecules are absent. I will present experiments in which long-range vdW potentials between a series of related molecules and a metal surface have been determined experimentally. The experiments rely on the extremely sensitive force detection of an atomic force microscope in combination with its molecular manipulation capabilities. The results allow us to confirm the asymptotic force law and to quantify the non-additive part of the vdW interaction which is particularly challenging for theory. In the present case, cooperative effects account for 10% of the total interaction. This effect is of general validity in molecules and thus relevant at the intersection of chemistry, physics, biology, and materials science.

  15. Resonant-pattern formation induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Ke; Ouyang, Qi

    2006-09-01

    We report frequency-locked resonant patterns induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion Brusselator model. In the regime of 2:1 frequency-locking and homogeneous oscillation, the introduction of additive noise, which is colored in time and white in space, generates and sustains resonant patterns of hexagons, stripes, and labyrinths which oscillate at half of the forcing frequency. Both the noise strength and the correlation time control the pattern formation. The system transits from homogeneous to hexagons, stripes, and to labyrinths successively as the noise strength is adjusted. Good frequency-locked patterns are only sustained by the colored noise and a finite time correlation is necessary. At the limit of white noise with zero temporal correlation, irregular patterns which are only nearly resonant come out as the noise strength is adjusted. The phenomenon induced by colored noise in the forced reaction-diffusion system is demonstrated to correspond to noise-induced Turing instability in the corresponding forced complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  16. Resonant-pattern formation induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Ke; Ouyang, Qi

    2006-09-01

    We report frequency-locked resonant patterns induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion Brusselator model. In the regime of 2:1 frequency-locking and homogeneous oscillation, the introduction of additive noise, which is colored in time and white in space, generates and sustains resonant patterns of hexagons, stripes, and labyrinths which oscillate at half of the forcing frequency. Both the noise strength and the correlation time control the pattern formation. The system transits from homogeneous to hexagons, stripes, and to labyrinths successively as the noise strength is adjusted. Good frequency-locked patterns are only sustained by the colored noise and a finite time correlation is necessary. At the limit of white noise with zero temporal correlation, irregular patterns which are only nearly resonant come out as the noise strength is adjusted. The phenomenon induced by colored noise in the forced reaction-diffusion system is demonstrated to correspond to noise-induced Turing instability in the corresponding forced complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. PMID:17025732

  17. Matching of additive and polarizable force fields for multiscale condensed phase simulations

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher M.; Best, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Inclusion of electronic polarization effects is one of the key aspects in which the accuracy of current biomolecular force fields may be improved. The principal drawback of such approaches is the computational cost, which typically ranges from 3 – 10 times that of the equivalent additive model, and may be greater for more sophisticated treatments of polarization or other many-body effects. Here, we present a multiscale approach which may be used to enhance the sampling in simulations with polarizable models, by using the additive model as a tool to explore configuration space. We use a method based on information theory to determine the charges for an additive model that has optimal overlap with the polarizable one, and we demonstrate the feasibility of enhancing sampling via a hybrid replica exchange scheme for several model systems. An additional advantage is that, in the process, we obtain a systematic method for deriving charges for an additive model that will be the natural complement to its polarizable parent. The additive charges are found by an effective coarse-graining of the polarizable force field, rather than by ad hoc procedures. PMID:23997691

  18. Understanding the effects of a multi-functionalized additive on the cathode-electrolyte interfacial stability of Ni-rich materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Taeeun; Kang, Kyoung Seok; Mun, Junyoung; Lim, Sang Hoo; Woo, Sang-Gil; Kim, Ki Jae; Park, Min-Sik; Cho, Woosuk; Song, Jun Ho; Han, Young-Kyu; Yu, Ji-Sang; Kim, Young-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Nickel-rich lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxides have received considerable attention as a promising cathode material, however, they have suffered from poor interfacial stability, especially at high temperature. Here, we suggest a bi-functionalized divinyl sulfone that enhances the applicability of a nickel-rich cathode via stabilization of the electrolyte-electrode interface. The divinyl sulfone forms a protective layer on the cathode surface by electrochemical oxidation reactions and this greatly decreases the internal pressure of the cell via stabilization of the Ni-rich cathode-electrolyte interface. The cell controlled with divinyl sulfone shows remarkable cycling performance with 91.9% capacity retention at elevated temperature even after 100 cycles. Additional electrode analyses and first-principles calculations provide critical spectroscopic evidences to demonstrate the combined effects of the sulfone and vinyl functional groups. Once the divinyl sulfone is electrochemically oxidized, the vinyl functional groups readily participate in further stabilizing sulfone-based solid electrolyte interphase intermediates and afford a durable protective layer on the nickel-rich electrode surface.

  19. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G.; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction. PMID:25424490

  20. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F Stefan

    2014-11-26

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction.

  1. The force-field derivation and application of explosive/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The inter-molecular force-field across RDX/(paraffin, fluoropolymer) interfaces are derived from first-principles calculated energies under the GGA+vdW functional. Based on the force-field, the polycrystal structures of mixture explosives are obtained, and a set of thermodynamic properties are calculated, including the elastic constants, thermal expansion coefficient, heat capacity, isothermal curve and the Hugoniot curve. The results are in good agreement with the available experiments, and provide a reasonable prediction about the properties of plastic bonded explosives. We find that the thermal expansion coefficient of a multi-component explosive is not only determined by the properties of the components, but is also affected by the thermal stress at the explosive/additive interfaces.

  2. Influence of Polarization on Carbohydrate Hydration: A Comparative Study Using Additive and Polarizable Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Poonam; Mallajosyula, Sairam S

    2016-07-14

    Carbohydrates are known to closely modulate their surrounding solvent structures and influence solvation dynamics. Spectroscopic investigations studying far-IR regions (below 1000 cm(-1)) have observed spectral shifts in the libration band (around 600 cm(-1)) of water in the presence of monosaccharides and polysaccharides. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to gain atomistic insight into carbohydrate-water interactions and to specifically highlight the differences between additive (nonpolarizable) and polarizable simulations. A total of six monosaccharide systems, α and β anomers of glucose, galactose, and mannose, were studied using additive and polarizable Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) carbohydrate force fields. Solvents were modeled using three additive water models TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP5P in additive simulations and polarizable water model SWM4 in polarizable simulations. The presence of carbohydrate has a significant effect on the microscopic water structure, with the effects being pronounced for proximal water molecules. Notably, disruption of the tetrahedral arrangement of proximal water molecules was observed due to the formation of strong carbohydrate-water hydrogen bonds in both additive and polarizable simulations. However, the inclusion of polarization resulted in significant water-bridge occupancies, improved ordered water structures (tetrahedral order parameter), and longer carbohydrate-water H-bond correlations as compared to those for additive simulations. Additionally, polarizable simulations also allowed the calculation of power spectra from the dipole-dipole autocorrelation function, which corresponds to the IR spectra. From the power spectra, we could identify spectral signatures differentiating the proximal and bulk water structures, which could not be captured from additive simulations. PMID:27266974

  3. Influence of Additional Tensile Force on Springback of Tube Under Rotary Draw Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Daxin; Guan, Zhiping; Chen, Jisheng

    2012-11-01

    According to the characteristics of tube under rotary draw bending, the formulae were derived to calculate the springback angles of tubes subjected to combined bending and additional tension. Especially, as the neutral layer (NL) moves to the inner concave surface of the bend, the analytical values agree very well with the experimental results. The analysis shows that the additional tensile force causes the movement of the NL toward the bending center and makes the deformation behavior under rotary draw bending or numerically controlled (NC) bending different with that under pure bending, and also it could enlarge the springback angle if taking the movement of the NL into consideration. In some range, the springback angle would increase slightly with larger wall thickness/diameter ratio and decrease with wall thinning. The investigation could provide reference for the analysis of rotary draw bending, the design of NC tube bender and the related techniques.

  4. Note: vibration reduction control of an atomic force microscope using an additional cantilever.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulsoo; Jung, Jongkyu; Park, Kyihwan

    2011-11-01

    Since an atomic force microscope is used to measure sub-nanometer level precision, it is sensitive to external vibration. If the vibration can be measured by using an additional sensor, we can obtain the vibration-free signal by subtracting the vibration signal from the signal containing the vibration. To achieve a highly effective vibration rejection ratio, it is important to decide where to locate the additional sensor. This is because the vibration measured at the sensing position should have the same phase as that of the vibration in the signal. Vibration reduction control using this electrical sensing method is verified through time domain analysis and topology images of a standard grid sample.

  5. Transferability and additivity of dihedral parameters in polarizable and nonpolarizable empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Rosnik, Andreana M; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-09-30

    Recent advances in polarizable force fields have revealed that major reparameterization is necessary when the polarization energy is treated explicitly. This study is focused on the torsional parameters, which are crucial for the accurate description of conformational equilibria in biomolecules. In particular, attention is paid to the influence of polarization on the (i) transferability of dihedral terms between molecules, (ii) transferability between different environments, and (iii) additivity of dihedral energies. To this end, three polarizable force fields based on the induced point dipole model designed for use in AMBER are tested, including two recent ff02 reparameterizations. Attention is paid to the contributions due to short range interactions (1-2, 1-3, and 1-4) within the four atoms defining the dihedral angle. The results show that when short range 1-2 and 1-3 polarization interactions are omitted, as for instance in ff02, the 1-4 polarization contribution is rather small and unlikely to improve the description of the torsional energy. Conversely, when screened 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are included, the polarization contribution is sizeable and shows potential to improve the transferability of parameters between different molecules and environments as well as the additivity of dihedral terms. However, to reproduce intramolecular polarization effects accurately, further fine-tuning of the short range damping of polarization is necessary.

  6. Transferability and additivity of dihedral parameters in polarizable and nonpolarizable empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Rosnik, Andreana M; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-09-30

    Recent advances in polarizable force fields have revealed that major reparameterization is necessary when the polarization energy is treated explicitly. This study is focused on the torsional parameters, which are crucial for the accurate description of conformational equilibria in biomolecules. In particular, attention is paid to the influence of polarization on the (i) transferability of dihedral terms between molecules, (ii) transferability between different environments, and (iii) additivity of dihedral energies. To this end, three polarizable force fields based on the induced point dipole model designed for use in AMBER are tested, including two recent ff02 reparameterizations. Attention is paid to the contributions due to short range interactions (1-2, 1-3, and 1-4) within the four atoms defining the dihedral angle. The results show that when short range 1-2 and 1-3 polarization interactions are omitted, as for instance in ff02, the 1-4 polarization contribution is rather small and unlikely to improve the description of the torsional energy. Conversely, when screened 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are included, the polarization contribution is sizeable and shows potential to improve the transferability of parameters between different molecules and environments as well as the additivity of dihedral terms. However, to reproduce intramolecular polarization effects accurately, further fine-tuning of the short range damping of polarization is necessary. PMID:26224547

  7. Simulation of uphill/downhill running on a level treadmill using additional horizontal force.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Philippe; Arnal, Pierrick J; Samozino, Pierre; Millet, Guillaume Y; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2014-07-18

    Tilting treadmills allow a convenient study of biomechanics during uphill/downhill running, but they are not commonly available and there is even fewer tilting force-measuring treadmill. The aim of the present study was to compare uphill/downhill running on a treadmill (inclination of ± 8%) with running on a level treadmill using additional backward or forward pulling forces to simulate the effect of gravity. This comparison specifically focused on the energy cost of running, stride frequency (SF), electromyographic activity (EMG), leg and foot angles at foot strike, and ground impact shock. The main results are that SF, impact shock, and leg and foot angle parameters determined were very similar and significantly correlated between the two methods, the intercept and slope of the linear regression not differing significantly from zero and unity, respectively. The correlation of oxygen uptake (V̇O2) data between both methods was not significant during uphill running (r=0.42; P>0.05). V̇O2 data were correlated during downhill running (r=0.74; P<0.01) but there was a significant difference between the methods (bias=-2.51 ± 1.94 ml min(-1) kg(-1)). Linear regressions for EMG of vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, soleus and tibialis anterior were not different from the identity line but the systematic bias was elevated for this parameter. In conclusion, this method seems appropriate for the study of SF, leg and foot angle, impact shock parameters but is less applicable for physiological variables (EMG and energy cost) during uphill/downhill running when using a tilting force-measuring treadmill is not possible.

  8. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  9. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  10. The additive effects of quinine on antidepressant drugs in the forced swimming test in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, W Y; Todd, K G; Bourin, M; Hascoet, M

    1995-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if quinine plus antidepressant drugs (ADS) leads to an additive effect in the forced swimming test. Quinine (0.125, 0.5 mg/kg) and ADS (subactive doses) were given IP 45 and 30 min, respectively, before the test. When combined with QUIN, all drugs that act via inhibition of 5-HT uptake (imipramine, amitriptyline, citalopram, paroxetine, fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) significantly increased the swimming time of mice. Among trazodone, mianserin and iprindole (atypical ADS), only iprindole combined with quinine decreased the immobility (increased swimming) of the animals. The specific noradrenaline (NA) uptake inhibitors, desipramine and viloxazine, but not maprotiline, were also found to reduce the immobility time when pretreated with quinine. The mixed monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor (pargyline) and MAO-A inhibitor (moclobemide) also shortened the period of immobility whereas the MAO-B inhibitor (nialamide) and the dopamine (DA) uptake inhibitor (bupropion) did not. Quinine's additive effects on several types of ADS is likely a result of blockade of potassium channels.

  11. Lattice-Boltzmann modeling of experimental fluid displacement patterns, interfacial area and capillary trapped CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. L.; Kang, Q.; Tarimala, S.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Backhaus, S.; Carey, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Successful sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers presents an enormous challenge that requires fundamental understanding of reactive-multiphase flow and transport across many temporal and spatial scales. Of critical importance is accurately predicting the efficiency of CO2 trapping mechanisms. At the pore scale (e.g., microns to millimeters) the interfacial area between CO2 and brine, as well as CO2 and the solid phase, directly influences the amount of CO2 trapped due to capillary forces, dissolution and mineral precipitation. In this work, we model immiscible displacement micromodel experiments using the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method. We focus on quantifying interfacial area as a function of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios typically encountered in CO2 sequestration operations. We show that the LB model adequately predicts the steady-state experimental flow patterns and interfacial area measurements. Based on the steady-state agreement, we use the LB model to investigate interfacial dynamics (e.g., fluid-fluid interfacial velocity and the rate of production of fluid-fluid interfacial area). In addition, we quantify the amount of interfacial area and the interfacial dynamics associated with the capillary trapped nonwetting phase. This is expected to be important for predicting the amount of nonwetting phase subsequently trapped due to dissolution and mineral precipitation.

  12. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-19

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. PMID:27545849

  13. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies.

  14. Additive effects of clonidine and antidepressant drugs in the mouse forced-swimming test.

    PubMed

    Malinge, M; Bourin, M; Colombel, M C; Larousse, C

    1988-01-01

    In the mouse forced-swimming model, dose-dependent reversal of immobility was induced by the alpha-agonist clonidine given IP 30 min before testing. In addition, three preferential inhibitors of 5-HT uptake (citalopram, indalpine and fluvoxamine) had similar activity in the dose range 8-16 mg/kg as did the 5-HT1 agonist 8-OH-DPAT (1-4 mg/kg). Pretreatment with alpha-methyl-paratyrosine (100 mg/kg) did not prevent clonidine (1 mg/kg) action, suggesting that there was mediation by alpha post-junctional receptors. The effect of clonidine was unaltered by prazosin (2 mg/kg) and reversed by yohimbine (4 mg/kg) and 5-MeODMT (1 mg/kg), whereas it was potentiated by reserpine (2.5 mg/kg), methysergide (2 mg/kg) and ketanserin (8 mg/kg). Moreover, an ineffective dose of clonidine (0.06 mg/kg at 45 min pre-testing) made active subthreshold doses of various antidepressants (given at 30 min pre-testing): imipramine (4 mg/kg), amitriptyline (1 mg/kg), maprotiline (8 mg/kg), citalopram (2 mg/kg), indalpine, fluvoxamine and mianserin (4 mg/kg), viloxazine (2 mg/kg). Similar interactions were found with iprindole and nialamide (32 mg/kg), which were inactive alone up to 64 mg/kg, and 8-OH-DPAT (0.5 mg/kg) but not with major and minor tranquillizers. It is suggested that one effect of antidepressants might be the triggering of different relationships between alpha-2 and 5-HT mechanisms.

  15. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  16. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-11

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  17. Investigation of interfacial rheology & foam stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn M.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-05-01

    The rheology at gas-liquid interfaces strongly influences the stability and dynamics of foams and emulsions. Several experimental techniques are employed to characterize the rheology at liquid-gas interfaces with an emphasis on the non-Newtonian behavior of surfactant-laden interfaces. The focus is to relate the interfacial rheology to the foamability and foam stability of various aqueous systems. An interfacial stress rheometer (ISR) is used to measure the steady and dynamic rheology by applying an external magnetic field to actuate a magnetic needle suspended at the interface. Results are compared with those from a double wall ring attachment to a rotational rheometer (TA Instruments AR-G2). Micro-interfacial rheology (MIR) is also performed using optical tweezers to manipulate suspended microparticle probes at the interface to investigate the steady and dynamic rheology. Additionally, a surface dilatational rheometer (SDR) is used to periodically oscillate the volume of a pendant drop or buoyant bubble. Applying the Young-Laplace equation to the drop shape, a time-dependent surface tension can be calculated and used to determine the effective dilatational viscosity of an interface. Using the ISR, double wall ring, SDR, and MIR, a wide range of sensitivity in surface forces (fN to nN) can be explored as each experimental method has different sensitivities. Measurements will be compared to foam stability.

  18. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam® 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure® 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure® 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure® 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure® 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam® 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure® 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  19. Impact of interfacial tension on residual CO2 clusters in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We develop a numerical simulation that uses the lattice Boltzmann method to directly calculate the characteristics of residual nonwetting-phase clusters to quantify capillary trapping mechanisms in real sandstone. For this purpose, a digital-rock-pore model reconstructed from micro-CT-scanned images of Berea sandstone is filtered and segmented into a binary file. The residual-cluster distribution is generated following simulation of the drainage and imbibition processes. The characteristics of the residual cluster in terms of size distribution, major length, interfacial area, and sphericity are investigated under conditions of different interfacial tension (IFT). Our results indicate that high interfacial tension increases the residual saturation and leads to a large size distribution of residual clusters. However, low interfacial tension results in a larger interfacial area, which is beneficial for dissolution and reaction processes during geological carbon storage. Analysis of the force balance acting on the residual clusters demonstrates that trapping stability is higher in high interfacial tension case, and the interfacial tension should be a controlling factor for the trapping stability in addition to the pore geometry and connectivity. The proposed numerical method can handle the complex displacement of multicomponent systems in porous media. By using this method, we can obtain residual-cluster distributions under different conditions for optimizing the storage capacity of carbon-storage projects.

  20. Changes in the nanoparticle aggregation rate due to the additional effect of electrostatic and magnetic forces on mass transport coefficients.

    PubMed

    Rosická, Dana; Sembera, Jan

    2013-01-01

    : The need may arise to be able to simulate the migration of groundwater nanoparticles through the ground. Transportation velocities of nanoparticles are different from that of water and depend on many processes that occur during migration. Unstable nanoparticles, such as zero-valent iron nanoparticles, are especially slowed down by aggregation between them. The aggregation occurs when attracting forces outweigh repulsive forces between the particles. In the case of iron nanoparticles that are used for remediation, magnetic forces between particles contribute to attractive forces and nanoparticles aggregate rapidly. This paper describes the addition of attractive magnetic forces and repulsive electrostatic forces between particles (by 'particle', we mean both single nanoparticles and created aggregates) into a basic model of aggregation which is commonly used. This model is created on the basis of the flow of particles in the proximity of observed particles that gives the rate of aggregation of the observed particle. By using a limit distance that has been described in our previous work, the flow of particles around one particle is observed in larger spacing between the particles. Attractive magnetic forces between particles draw the particles into closer proximity and result in aggregation. This model fits more closely with rapid aggregation which occurs between magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. Addition of Electrostatic Forces to EDEM with Applications to Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos; Curry, David

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carryout experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM Tm, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. In this paper we will present overview of the theoretical calculations and experimental data and their comparison to the results of the DEM simulations. We will also discuss current plans to revise the DEM software with advanced electrodynamic and mechanical algorithms.

  2. CHARMM additive all-atom force field for carbohydrate derivatives and its utility in polysaccharide and carbohydrate-protein modeling

    PubMed Central

    Guvench, Olgun; Mallajosyula, Sairam S.; Raman, E. Prabhu; Hatcher, Elizabeth; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Foster, Theresa J.; Jamison, Francis W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    Monosaccharide derivatives such as xylose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GlaNAc), glucuronic acid, iduronic acid, and N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) are important components of eukaryotic glycans. The present work details development of force-field parameters for these monosaccharides and their covalent connections to proteins via O-linkages to serine or threonine sidechains and via N-linkages to asparagine sidechains. The force field development protocol was designed to explicitly yield parameters that are compatible with the existing CHARMM additive force field for proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and small molecules. Therefore, when combined with previously developed parameters for pyranose and furanose monosaccharides, for glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and for proteins, the present set of parameters enables the molecular simulation of a wide variety of biologically-important molecules such as complex carbohydrates and glycoproteins. Parametrization included fitting to quantum mechanical (QM) geometries and conformational energies of model compounds, as well as to QM pair interaction energies and distances of model compounds with water. Parameters were validated in the context of crystals of relevant monosaccharides, as well NMR and/or x-ray crystallographic data on larger systems including oligomeric hyaluronan, sialyl Lewis X, O- and N-linked glycopeptides, and a lectin:sucrose complex. As the validated parameters are an extension of the CHARMM all-atom additive biomolecular force field, they further broaden the types of heterogeneous systems accessible with a consistently-developed force-field model. PMID:22125473

  3. Additive effect of lithium and clonidine with 5-HT1A agonists in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Hascoet, M; Bourin, M; Khimake, S

    1994-03-01

    1. The aim of the present work was to demonstrate the possible additive effect of lithium and clonidine with 5-HT1a agonists in the forced swimming test. 2. Anti-depressant like effects of 5-HT1a agonists was investigated using forced swimming test. When administered alone, only 8-OH-DPAT reduced the immobility time in mice. 3. 5-HT1a agonists were then tested in combination with clonidine or lithium. Only gepirone and ipsapirone pretreated by either lithium or clonidine reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test. 4. The authors conclude that lithium and clonidine might be useful to predict antidepressant-like activity of new compounds.

  4. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; Sellmyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. he effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. he coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x≤1.5). he maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5 MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2 MGOe forx=1.5. he smallest domain size with a relatively short magnetic correlation length of 128 nm and largest root-mean-square phase shiftΦrmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. he optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  5. Interfacial tension of complex coacervated mussel adhesive protein according to the Hofmeister series.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonghye; Moon, Dustin; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kang, In Seok; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-02-01

    Complex coacervation is a liquid-liquid phase separation in a colloidal system of two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes or colloids. The interfacial tension of the coacervate phase is the key parameter for micelle formation and interactions with the encapsulating material. However, the relationship between interfacial tensions and various salt solutions is poorly understood in complex coacervation. In the present work, the complex coacervate dynamics of recombinant mussel adhesive protein (MAP) with hyaluronic acid (HA) were determined in the presence of Hofmeister series salt ions. Using measurements of absorbance, hydrodynamic diameter, capillary force, and receding contact angle in the bulk phase, the interfacial tensions of complex coacervated MAP/HA were determined to be 0.236, 0.256, and 0.287 mN/m in 250 mM NaHCOO, NaCl, and NaNO3 solutions, respectively. The sequences of interfacial tensions and contact angles of the complex coacervates in the presence of three sodium salts with different anions were found to follow the Hofmeister ordering. The tendency of interfacial tension between the coacervate and dilute phases in the presence of different types of Hofmeister salt ions could provide a better understanding of Hofmeister effects on complex coacervated materials based on the protein-polysaccharide system. This information can also be utilized for microencapsulation and adsorption by controlling intramolecular interactions. In addition, the injection molding dynamics of mussel byssus formation was potentially explained based on the measured interfacial tension of coacervated MAP. PMID:24490867

  6. Limiting amplitudes of fully nonlinear interfacial tides and solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Gerkema, Theo

    2016-08-01

    A new two-fluid layer model consisting of forced rotation-modified Boussinesq equations is derived for studying tidally generated fully nonlinear, weakly nonhydrostatic dispersive interfacial waves. This set is a generalization of the Choi-Camassa equations, extended here with forcing terms and Coriolis effects. The forcing is represented by a horizontally oscillating sill, mimicking a barotropic tidal flow over topography. Solitons are generated by a disintegration of the interfacial tide. Because of strong nonlinearity, solitons may attain a limiting table-shaped form, in accordance with soliton theory. In addition, we use a quasi-linear version of the model (i.e. including barotropic advection but linear in the baroclinic fields) to investigate the role of the initial stages of the internal tide prior to its nonlinear disintegration. Numerical solutions reveal that the internal tide then reaches a limiting amplitude under increasing barotropic forcing. In the fully nonlinear regime, numerical experiments suggest that this limiting amplitude in the underlying internal tide extends to the nonlinear case in that internal solitons formed by a disintegration of the internal tide may not reach their table-shaped form with increased forcing, but appear limited well below that state.

  7. Enzymatically activated emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanofibre networks.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Inês P; Sasselli, Ivan Ramos; Cannon, Daniel A; Hughes, Meghan; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Tuttle, Tell; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-03-01

    We report on-demand formation of emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanoscale networks. These are formed through biocatalytic dephosphorylation and self-assembly of Fmoc(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)dipeptide amphiphiles in aqueous/organic mixtures. This is achieved by using alkaline phosphatase which transforms surfactant-like phosphorylated precursors into self-assembling aromatic peptide amphiphiles (Fmoc-tyrosine-leucine, Fmoc-YL) that form nanofibrous networks. In biphasic organic/aqueous systems, these networks form preferentially at the interface thus providing a means of emulsion stabilisation. We demonstrate on-demand emulsification by enzyme addition, even after storage of the biphasic mixture for several weeks. Experimental (Fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) and computational techniques (atomistic molecular dynamics) are used to characterise the interfacial self-assembly process. PMID:26905042

  8. SEI Formation and Interfacial Stability of a Si Electrode in a LiTDI-Salt Based Electrolyte with FEC and VC Additives for Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Fredrik; Xu, Chao; Niedzicki, Leszek; Marcinek, Marek; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Björefors, Fredrik; Edström, Kristina; Younesi, Reza

    2016-06-22

    An electrolyte based on the new salt, lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)imidazolide (LiTDI), is evaluated in combination with nano-Si composite electrodes for potential use in Li-ion batteries. The additives fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) and vinylene carbonate (VC) are also added to the electrolyte to enable an efficient SEI formation. By employing hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), the SEI formation and the development of the active material is probed during the first 100 cycles. With this electrolyte formulation, the Si electrode can cycle at 1200 mAh g(-1) for more than 100 cycles at a coulombic efficiency of 99%. With extended cycling, a decrease in Si particle size is observed as well as an increase in silicon oxide amount. As opposed to LiPF6 based electrolytes, this electrolyte or its decomposition products has no side reactions with the active Si material. The present results further acknowledge the positive effects of SEI forming additives. It is suggested that polycarbonates and a high LiF content are favorable components in the SEI over other kinds of carbonates formed by ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) decomposition. This work thus confirms that LiTDI in combination with the investigated additives is a promising salt for Si electrodes in future Li-ion batteries. PMID:27220376

  9. Optimization of the CHARMM additive force field for DNA: Improved treatment of the BI/BII conformational equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Hart, Katarina; Foloppe, Nicolas; Baker, Christopher M; Denning, Elizabeth J; Nilsson, Lennart; Mackerell, Alexander D

    2012-01-10

    The B-form of DNA can populate two different backbone conformations: BI and BII, defined by the difference between the torsion angles ε and ζ (BI = ε-ζ < 0 and BII = ε-ζ > 0). BI is the most populated state, but the population of the BII state, which is sequence dependent, is significant and accumulating evidence shows that BII affects the overall structure of DNA, and thus influences protein-DNA recognition. This work presents a reparametrization of the CHARMM27 additive nucleic acid force field to increase the sampling of the BII form in MD simulations of DNA. In addition, minor modifications of sugar puckering were introduced to facilitate sampling of the A form of DNA under the appropriate environmental conditions. Parameter optimization was guided by quantum mechanical data on model compounds, followed by calculations on several DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The selected optimized parameters were then validated against a number of DNA duplexes, with the most extensive tests performed on the EcoRI dodecamer, including comparative calculations using the Amber Parm99bsc0 force field. The new CHARMM model better reproduces experimentally observed sampling of the BII conformation, including sampling as a function of sequence. In addition, the model reproduces the A form of the 1ZF1 duplex in 75 % ethanol, and yields a stable Z-DNA conformation of duplex (GTACGTAC) in its crystal environment. The resulting model, in combination with a recent reoptimization of the CHARMM27 force field for RNA, will be referred to as CHARMM36.

  10. Lessons Learned at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Entry into Force of the U.S. Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Shauna A. Hoiland

    2009-07-01

    For a number of years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been preparing for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol (AP). These preparations included attending training, participating in tabletop exercises, preparing draft declarations, developing INL-specific guidance documents, preparing for and hosting a mock complementary access visit, and preparing declarations for official submittal. All of these activities, the training materials, and software developed by other U.S. DOE national laboratories (PNNL, ORNL, LANL, and BNL) were very helpful in preparing for the entry into force of the AP. As with any endeavor of this size and complexity, however, there are always instances where even the best preparations and advanced planning do not anticipate every challenge. As the DOE's lead nuclear energy research and development facility, the INL faced many unique challenges. The majority of research conducted at the INL is nuclear fuel cycle related, most of which is not protected by the National Security Exclusion. This paper describes the lessons learned from the INL’s experience of preparing for the entry into force of the AP, specifically how translating and implementing general principles into actual activities proved to be one of many challenges, and provides general suggestions on how to respond effectively and efficiently to routine annual data calls and other AP requests.

  11. Resonance scattering and radiation force calculations for an elastic cylinder using the translational addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-09-15

    The standard Resonance Scattering Theory (RST) of plane waves is extended for the case of any two-dimensional (2D) arbitrarily-shaped monochromatic beam incident upon an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location using an exact methodology based on Graf’s translational addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions. The analysis is exact as it does not require numerical integration procedures. The formulation is valid for any cylinder of finite size and material that is immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) for the incident, internal and scattered linear pressure fields are derived, and the analysis is further extended to obtain generalized expressions for the on-axis and off-axis acoustic radiation force components. The wave-fields are expressed using generalized PWSEs involving the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) and the scattering coefficients of the cylinder. The off-axial BSCs are expressed analytically in terms of an infinite PWSE with emphasis on the translational offset distance d. Numerical computations are considered for a zeroth-order quasi-Gaussian beam chosen as an example to illustrate the analysis. Acoustic resonance scattering directivity diagrams are calculated by subtracting an appropriate background from the expression of the scattered pressure field. In addition, computations for the radiation force exerted on an elastic cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of the beam, and shifted off-axially are analyzed and discussed.

  12. Resonance scattering and radiation force calculations for an elastic cylinder using the translational addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-09-01

    The standard Resonance Scattering Theory (RST) of plane waves is extended for the case of any two-dimensional (2D) arbitrarily-shaped monochromatic beam incident upon an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location using an exact methodology based on Graf's translational addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions. The analysis is exact as it does not require numerical integration procedures. The formulation is valid for any cylinder of finite size and material that is immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) for the incident, internal and scattered linear pressure fields are derived, and the analysis is further extended to obtain generalized expressions for the on-axis and off-axis acoustic radiation force components. The wave-fields are expressed using generalized PWSEs involving the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) and the scattering coefficients of the cylinder. The off-axial BSCs are expressed analytically in terms of an infinite PWSE with emphasis on the translational offset distance d. Numerical computations are considered for a zeroth-order quasi-Gaussian beam chosen as an example to illustrate the analysis. Acoustic resonance scattering directivity diagrams are calculated by subtracting an appropriate background from the expression of the scattered pressure field. In addition, computations for the radiation force exerted on an elastic cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of the beam, and shifted off-axially are analyzed and discussed.

  13. Interfacial tension of aluminum in cryolite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utigard, T.; Toguri, J. M.

    1985-06-01

    The interfacial tension between aluminum and cryolite melts containing different salt additions has been measured based on a combination of the sessile drop and X-ray radiographie technique. A computer program was used to calculate the interfacial tension from approximately twenty randomly measured coordinate points of the drop profile. Aluminum and salt mixtures containing different amounts of Na3AlF6, A1F3, NaF, A12O3, CaF2, KF, LiF, and NaCl were melted in a graphite or alumina crucible in a graphite resistor furnace under an argon atmosphere. The interfacial tension was found to be strongly dependent on the NaF/AlF3 ratio. At the cryolite composition the interfacial tension was 481 mN/m at 1304 K, while it was 650 mN/m when the NaF/AlF3 ratio was equal to 1.5. The change in interfacial tension with composition is explained by sodium enrichment of the Al/melt interface. Additions of A12O3 increased the interfacial tension for a given NaF/AlF3 ratio. KF was found to be surface active, while CaF2, LiF, and NaCl slightly increased the interfacial tension by decreasing the sodium activity.

  14. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  15. Examination of humidity effects on measured thickness and interfacial phenomena of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide via amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jinkins, K.; Farina, L.; Wu, Y.; Camacho, J.

    2015-12-14

    The properties of Few-Layer Graphene (FLG) change with the number of layers and Amplitude Modulation (AM) Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is commonly used to determine the thickness of FLG. However, AFM measurements have been shown to be sensitive to environmental conditions such as relative humidity (RH). In the present study, AM-AFM is used to measure the thickness and loss tangent of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) as RH is increased from 10% to 80%. We show that the measured thickness of graphene is dependent on RH. The loss tangent values of the graphene and oxide regions are both affected by humidity, with generally higher loss tangent for graphene than SiO{sub 2}. As RH increases, we observe the loss tangent of both materials approaches the same value. We hypothesize that there is a layer of water trapped between the graphene and SiO{sub 2} substrate to explain this observation. Using this interpretation, the loss tangent images also indicate movement and change in this trapped water layer as RH increases, which impacts the measured thickness of graphene using AM-AFM.

  16. A swarm of Stokeslets with interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Ludwig C.; Schaflinger, Uwe

    2001-06-01

    A formal analogy between sedimenting drops in Stokes flow and a swarm of Stokeslets [Machu et al., J. Fluid Mech. (in press)] is extended to include interfacial tension. Using a cohesive potential, mean curvature is extended as a meaningful quantity off the interface, allowing the boundary-integral formulation to be rewritten in volumetric form. A prescription for assigning forces to the Stokeslets comprising the swarm incorporates the action of interfacial tension without having to identify a boundary surface. Numerical simulations agree with linear small-deformation theory, and reproduce the spontaneous coalescense of two touching drops.

  17. Additive effects of glyburide and antidepressants in the forced swimming test: evidence for the involvement of potassium channel blockade.

    PubMed

    Guo, W; Todd, K; Bourin, M; Hascoet, M; Kouadio, F

    1996-08-01

    Evidence in the literature suggests that the modulatory effects of antidepressant drugs (ADS) on neuronal excitability, via the inhibition of K+ channels, may be the final common pathway of pharmacological action. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that combining the ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker glyburide with a variety of ADS would produce an additive effect and decrease the immobility time of mice in the forced swimming test (FST). Glyburide (GLY, IP, 30 and 50 mg/kg) and subactive doses of ADS were administered 45 and 30 min, respectively, prior to behavioral testing. Results showed that when combined with GLY, ADS whose main pharmacological effect is one of 5-HT uptake blockade (imipramine, amitriptyline, citalopram, paroxetine, fluoxetine, and fluvoxamine) were more effective in decreasing the amount of time mice were immobile, than when these drugs were administered alone. Some noradrenaline uptake inhibiting ADS (desipramine and viloxazine, but not maprotiline) were also significantly more effective in decreasing immobility time when combined with GLY than when administered alone. Pretreatment with GLY was found to have no effect on the dopamine uptake inhibitor bupropion, and out of the atypical ADS tested (trazodone, mianserine and iprindole), only coadministration with iprindole decreased the immobility time. Only the specific MAO-A inhibitor moclobemide was observed to have an antiimmobility effect when combined with GLY. Neither MAO-B specific (RO 16 6491) nor mixed MAO inhibitors (nialamide and pargyline) interacted with GLY to produce antiimmobility effects. These results corroborate and extend our previous report of the ADS enhancing effects of quinine in the same behavioral model, and suggest that the additive effects of quinine and GLY on ADS in FST are a result of K+ channel blockade.

  18. Forced and natural carbonation of lime-based mortars with and without additives: Mineralogical and textural changes

    SciTech Connect

    Cultrone, G.

    2005-12-15

    We have studied the carbonation process in different types of mortars, with and without pozzolana or air-entraining additives, subject to a CO{sub 2}-rich atmosphere and compared the results with those of similar naturally carbonated mortars. We used X-ray diffraction technique to demonstrate that high CO{sub 2} concentrations favour a faster, more complete carbonation process with 8 days being sufficient to convert portlandite into 90 wt.% calcite. Full carbonation, however, is not reached during the life-span of the tests, not even in forced carbonation experiments. This could be due to at least one of the following phenomena: a premature drying of samples during carbonation reaction, the temperature at which the carbonation process was carried out or the reduction of pore volume occupied by newly formed calcite crystals. This last option seems to be the least probable. We observed a more prolific development of calcite crystals in the pores and fissures through which the carbonic anhydride flows. Under natural conditions, carbonation is much slower and similar levels are not reached for 6 months. These differences suggest that the carbonation process is influenced by the amount of CO{sub 2} used. Both the mineralogy and texture of mortars vary depending on the type of additive used but the speed of the portlandite-calcite transformation does not change significantly. Pozzolana produces hydraulic mortars although the quantity of calcium aluminosilicate crystals is low. The air-entraining agent significantly alters the texture of the mortars creating rounded pores and eliminating or reducing the drying cracks.

  19. Functionalization enhancement on interfacial shear strength between graphene and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yikuang; Duan, Fangli; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-11-01

    Pull-out processes were simulated to investigate the interfacial mechanical properties between the functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) and polyethylene (PE) matrix by using molecular dynamics simulation with ReaxFF reactive force field. The interfacial structure of polymer and the interfacial interaction in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems were also analyzed to reveal the enhancement mechanism of interfacial shear strength. We observed the insertion of functional groups into polymer layer in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems. During the pull-out process, some interfacial chains were attached on the FGS and pulled out from the polymer matrix. The behavior of these pulled out chains was further analyzed to clarify the different traction action of functional groups applied on them. The results show that the traction effect of functional groups on the pulled-out chains is agreement with their enhancement influence on the interfacial shear strength of the FGS/PE systems. They both are basically dominated by the size of functional groups, suggesting the enhancement mechanism of mechanical interlocking. However, interfacial binding strength also exhibits an obvious influence on the interfacial shear properties of the hybrid system. Our simulation show that geometric constrains at the interface is the principal contributor to the enhancement of interfacial shear strength in the FGS/PE systems, which could be further strengthened by the wrinkled morphology of graphene in experiments.

  20. Effect of interfacial serum proteins on melanoma cell adhesion to biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) microspheres coated with hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Takuya; Fukasawa, Tomonori; Fujii, Syuji; Maeda, Hayata; Okada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2013-08-01

    We have measured the interaction forces between a murine melanoma cell and a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) microsphere coated with/without hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles (i.e., an HAp/PLLA or a bare PLLA microsphere) in a serum-free culture medium, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with colloid probe technique, in order to investigate how the HAp-nanoparticle coating as well as interfacial serum proteins influence the cell-microsphere adhesion. The cell adhesion force of the HAp/PLLA microspheres was 1.4-fold stronger than that of the bare PLLA microspheres. When the microspheres were pretreated with a culture medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, the cell adhesion force of the HAp/PLLA microspheres was increased by a factor of 2.1; in contrast, no change was observed in the cell adhesion force of the bare PLLA microspheres before/after the pretreatment. Indeed, the cell adhesion force of the HAp/PLLA was 2.8-fold larger than that of the bare PLLA after the pretreatment. Additionally, we have investigated the effect of interfacial serum proteins on the zeta potentials of these microspheres. On the basis of the obtained results, possible mechanism of cell adhesion to the HAp/PLLA and bare PLLA microspheres in the presence/absence of the interfacial serum proteins is discussed.

  1. Effect of interfacial serum proteins on melanoma cell adhesion to biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) microspheres coated with hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Takuya; Fukasawa, Tomonori; Fujii, Syuji; Maeda, Hayata; Okada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2013-08-01

    We have measured the interaction forces between a murine melanoma cell and a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) microsphere coated with/without hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles (i.e., an HAp/PLLA or a bare PLLA microsphere) in a serum-free culture medium, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with colloid probe technique, in order to investigate how the HAp-nanoparticle coating as well as interfacial serum proteins influence the cell-microsphere adhesion. The cell adhesion force of the HAp/PLLA microspheres was 1.4-fold stronger than that of the bare PLLA microspheres. When the microspheres were pretreated with a culture medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, the cell adhesion force of the HAp/PLLA microspheres was increased by a factor of 2.1; in contrast, no change was observed in the cell adhesion force of the bare PLLA microspheres before/after the pretreatment. Indeed, the cell adhesion force of the HAp/PLLA was 2.8-fold larger than that of the bare PLLA after the pretreatment. Additionally, we have investigated the effect of interfacial serum proteins on the zeta potentials of these microspheres. On the basis of the obtained results, possible mechanism of cell adhesion to the HAp/PLLA and bare PLLA microspheres in the presence/absence of the interfacial serum proteins is discussed. PMID:23524077

  2. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  3. Interfacial free energy adjustable phase field crystal model for homogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Huang, Yunhao

    2016-05-18

    To describe the homogeneous nucleation process, an interfacial free energy adjustable phase-field crystal model (IPFC) was proposed by reconstructing the energy functional of the original phase field crystal (PFC) methodology. Compared with the original PFC model, the additional interface term in the IPFC model effectively can adjust the magnitude of the interfacial free energy, but does not affect the equilibrium phase diagram and the interfacial energy anisotropy. The IPFC model overcame the limitation that the interfacial free energy of the original PFC model is much less than the theoretical results. Using the IPFC model, we investigated some basic issues in homogeneous nucleation. From the viewpoint of simulation, we proceeded with an in situ observation of the process of cluster fluctuation and obtained quite similar snapshots to colloidal crystallization experiments. We also counted the size distribution of crystal-like clusters and the nucleation rate. Our simulations show that the size distribution is independent of the evolution time, and the nucleation rate remains constant after a period of relaxation, which are consistent with experimental observations. The linear relation between logarithmic nucleation rate and reciprocal driving force also conforms to the steady state nucleation theory.

  4. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  5. Effects of Bi-2212 addition on the levitation force properties of bulk MgB2 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylan Koparan, E.; Savaskan, B.; Guner, S. B.; Celik, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the effects of Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8+κ (Bi-2212) adding on the levitation force and magnetic properties of bulk MgB2 obtained by hot press method. The amount of Bi-2212 was varied between 0 and 10 wt% (0, 2, 4, 6, 10 wt%) of the total MgB2. Moreover, we present MgB2 bulk samples fabricated by using different production methods including hot pressing method to our knowledge. All samples were prepared by using elemental magnesium (Mg) powder, amorphous nano-boron (B) powder and Bi-2212 powder which are produced by hot press method. As a result of hot press process, compact pellet samples were manufactured. The vertical and lateral levitation force measurements were executed at the temperatures of 20, 24 and 28 K under zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) regimes for samples with various adding levels. At 24 K and 28 K under ZFC regime, the 2 wt% Bi-2212 added sample exhibits a higher vertical levitation force than the pure sample. Bi-2212 added MgB2 samples compared to the pure sample have lower attractive force values in FC regime. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current density J c was calculated from the M-H loops for Bi-2212 added MgB2 samples. The 2 wt% Bi-2212 added sample has the best levitation and critical current density performance compared to other samples. The critical temperature ( T c ) has slightly dropped from 37.8 K for the pure MgB2 sample to 36.7 K for the 10 wt% of Bi-2212 added sample. The transition temperature slightly decreases when Bi-2212 adding level is increased.

  6. Universal nanopatternable interfacial bonding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Garland, Shaun; Howland, Michael; Revzin, Alexander; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-12-01

    A nanopatternable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oligomer layer is demonstrated as an interfacial adhesive for its intrinsic transferability and universal adhesiveness. Utilizing the well-established surface modification and bonding techniques of PDMS surfaces, irreversible bonding is formed (up to 400 kPa) between a wide range of substrate pairs, representing ones within and across different materials categories, including metals, ceramics, thermoset, and thermoplastic polymers.

  7. Specific effects of Ca2+ ions and molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin interfacial layers that drive macroscopic foam stability† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sm00636a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Zachau, Felix; Nagel, Eva; Engelhardt, Kathrin; Stoyanov, Stefan; Gochev, Georgi; Khristov, Khr.; Mileva, Elena; Exerowa, Dotchi; Miller, Reinhard; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) adsorption layers at air–water interfaces were studied in situ with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG), tensiometry, surface dilatational rheology and ellipsometry as a function of bulk Ca2+ concentration. The relation between the interfacial molecular structure of adsorbed BLG and the interactions with the supporting electrolyte is additionally addressed on higher length scales along the foam hierarchy – from the ubiquitous air–water interface through thin foam films to macroscopic foam. For concentrations <1 mM, a strong decrease in SFG intensity from O–H stretching bands and a slight increase in layer thickness and surface pressure are observed. A further increase in Ca2+ concentrations above 1 mM causes an apparent change in the polarity of aromatic C–H stretching vibrations from interfacial BLG which we associate to a charge reversal at the interface. Foam film measurements show formation of common black films at Ca2+ concentrations above 1 mM due to considerable decrease of the stabilizing electrostatic disjoining pressure. These observations also correlate with a minimum in macroscopic foam stability. For concentrations >30 mM Ca2+, micrographs of foam films show clear signatures of aggregates which tend to increase the stability of foam films. Here, the interfacial layers have a higher surface dilatational elasticity. In fact, macroscopic foams formed from BLG dilutions with high Ca2+ concentrations where aggregates and interfacial layers with higher elasticity are found, showed the highest stability with much smaller bubble sizes. PMID:27337699

  8. Parallel inhibition of active force and relaxed fiber stiffness by caldesmon fragments at physiological ionic strength and temperature conditions: additional evidence that weak cross-bridge binding to actin is an essential intermediate for force generation.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, T; Chalovich, J M; Yu, L C; Brenner, B

    1995-01-01

    Previously we showed that stiffness of relaxed fibers and active force generated in single skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle are inhibited in parallel by actin-binding fragments of caldesmon, an actin-associated protein of smooth muscle, under conditions in which a large fraction of cross-bridges is weakly attached to actin (ionic strength of 50 mM and temperature of 5 degrees C). These results suggested that weak cross-bridge attachment to actin is essential for force generation. The present study provides evidence that this is also true for physiological ionic strength (170 mM) at temperatures up to 30 degrees C, suggesting that weak cross-bridge binding to actin is generally required for force generation. In addition, we show that the inhibition of active force is not a result of changes in cross-bridge cycling kinetics but apparently results from selective inhibition of weak cross-bridge binding to actin. Together with our previous biochemical, mechanical, and structural studies, these findings support the proposal that weak cross-bridge attachment to actin is an essential intermediate on the path to force generation and are consistent with the concept that isometric force mainly results from an increase in strain of the attached cross-bridge as a result of a structural change associated with the transition from a weakly bound to a strongly bound actomyosin complex. This mechanism is different from the processes responsible for quick tension recovery that were proposed by Huxley and Simmons (Proposed mechanism of force generation in striated muscle. Nature. 233:533-538.) to represent the elementary mechanism of force generation. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7647245

  9. Interfacial phenomena and microscale transport processes in evaporating ultrathin menisci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchamgam, Sashidhar S.

    The study of interfacial phenomena in the three-phase contact line region, where a liquid-vapor interface intersects a solid surface, is of importance to many equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes. However, lack of experimental data on microscale transport processes controlled by interfacial phenomena has restricted progress. This thesis includes a high resolution image analyzing technique, based on reflectivity measurements, that accurately measures the thickness, contact angle and curvature profiles of ultrathin films, drops and curved menisci. In particular, the technique was used to emphasize measurements for thicknesses, delta < 100 nm, while studying delta < 2.5 mum. Using the "reflectivity technique", we studied fluid flow and heat transfer in a wickless, miniature heat pipe, a device which will be a very effective passive heat exchanger in a microgravity environment. The heat pipe is based on the Vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble (VCVB) concept. The broad objective was to increase the efficiency of the miniature heat pipe by enhancing the liquid flow towards the hotter region. This was achieved by understanding and manipulating the wetting and spreading characteristics of the liquid on the solid surface. By using a binary mixture (98% pentane and 2% octane by volume) instead of either pure pentane or octane, we were able to achieve a significant increase in the microscale phase change heat transfer. The experimental work was supported by numerical studies to understand the physics of the system at microscopic scale. In addition, using the reflectivity technique, we enhanced our understanding of interfacial phenomena in the contact line region. Experiments included flow instabilities in HFE-7000 meniscus on quartz (System S1), the spreading of a pentane (System S2 and S3), octane (System S4) and binary mixture menisci (System S5) during evaporation. The main objectives of the work are to present a new experimental technique, new observations, new data

  10. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  11. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  12. Interfacial friction and adhesion of cross-linked polymer thin films swollen with linear chains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Archer, Lynden A

    2007-07-01

    The preparation and interfacial properties of a new type of tethered, thin-film lubricant coating are presented. These coatings are composed of three components: a dense self-assembled monolayer (SAM) underlayer that presents reactive vinyl groups at its surface; a cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) overlayer that is covalently tethered to the SAM; and free, mobile linear PDMS chains dispersed in the network. We investigate the influence of the molecular weight (Ms) and concentration of the free PDMS chains on the structure and equilibrium swelling properties of the cross-linked films. Using a bead-probe lateral force microscopy measurement technique, we also quantify the interfacial friction and adhesion characteristics of surfaces functionalized with these coatings. We find that both the volume fraction and the molecular weight of free PDMS molecules in the coatings influence their interfacial friction and adhesion properties. For example, the addition of short PDMS chains in dry, cross-linked PDMS thin films yields tethered surface coatings with ultralow friction coefficients (mu = 5.2 x 10(-3)). An analysis based on classical lubrication theory suggests that the reduction in friction force produced by free polymer is a consequence of the gradual separation of asperities on opposing surfaces and the consequent substitution of solid-solid friction by viscous drag of the free polymer chains in the network.

  13. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  14. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  15. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  16. A nanoscale study of charge extraction in organic solar cells: the impact of interfacial molecular configurations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fu-Ching; Wu, Fu-Chiao; Yen, Chia-Te; Chang, Jay; Chou, Wei-Yang; Gilbert Chang, Shih-Hui; Cheng, Horng-Long

    2015-01-01

    In the optimization of organic solar cells (OSCs), a key problem lies in the maximization of charge carriers from the active layer to the electrodes. Hence, this study focused on the interfacial molecular configurations in efficient OSC charge extraction by theoretical investigations and experiments, including small molecule-based bilayer-heterojunction (sm-BLHJ) and polymer-based bulk-heterojunction (p-BHJ) OSCs. We first examined a well-defined sm-BLHJ model system of OSC composed of p-type pentacene, an n-type perylene derivative, and a nanogroove-structured poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (NS-PEDOT) hole extraction layer. The OSC with NS-PEDOT shows a 230% increment in the short circuit current density compared with that of the conventional planar PEDOT layer. Our theoretical calculations indicated that small variations in the microscopic intermolecular interaction among these interfacial configurations could induce significant differences in charge extraction efficiency. Experimentally, different interfacial configurations were generated between the photo-active layer and the nanostructured charge extraction layer with periodic nanogroove structures. In addition to pentacene, poly(3-hexylthiophene), the most commonly used electron-donor material system in p-BHJ OSCs was also explored in terms of its possible use as a photo-active layer. Local conductive atomic force microscopy was used to measure the nanoscale charge extraction efficiency at different locations within the nanogroove, thus highlighting the importance of interfacial molecular configurations in efficient charge extraction. This study enriches understanding regarding the optimization of the photovoltaic properties of several types of OSCs by conducting appropriate interfacial engineering based on organic/polymer molecular orientations. The ultimate power conversion efficiency beyond at least 15% is highly expected when the best state-of-the-art p-BHJ OSCs are combined with present arguments.

  17. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  18. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  19. Additive effects of lithium and antidepressants in the forced swimming test: further evidence for involvement of the serotoninergic system.

    PubMed

    Nixon, M K; Hascoet, M; Bourin, M; Colombel, M C

    1994-06-01

    In the mouse forced swimming test (FST) pretreatment with a subactive dose of lithium (1 mEq/kg), given IP 45 min before the test, facilitated the antidepressant activity of iprindole, fluoxetine, and moclobemide (given IP 30 min before the test). These antidepressants (ADS) were not active alone in the FST in this study. Moreover, when subactive lithium was combined with a wide range of ADS, each given at subactive doses, those ADS with serotoninergic properties (e.g. imipramine, citalopram, paroxetine, fluoxetine, trazodone, mianserin, and moclobemide) significantly reduced immobility times. ADS acting primarily on noradrenaline (NA) or dopamine (DA) systems (desipramine, maprotiline, viloxazine, and bupropion) did not significantly decrease immobility when given in combination with lithium. This was also the case for RO 16 6491 [a reversible, B specific monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI)], nialamide, and pargyline (both irreversible, mixed MAOIs). The anti-immobility effect of iprindole in combination with lithium suggests either a direct or indirect action on the serotonin (5HT) system by this ADS whose mechanism of action remains obscure. These results, using an animal behavioral model of depression and combining our present knowledge of the acute action of various ADS, support the hypothesis that the potentiation by lithium of ADS is via direct 5HT mechanisms, indirectly via a NA/5HT link, and/or by second messenger systems. Lithium may also facilitate the expression of antidepressant activity of ADS not active by themselves in the FST.

  20. Lessons learned during the training exercise for the entry into force of the U.S. additional protocol in the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 in anticipation of the United States bringing into force the Additional Protocol in early 2009 DOE/NNSA planned and executed training exercises in the conduct of Additional Protocol complementary access activities. Brookhaven National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory together produced the exercises designed to prepare the following types of DOE laboratories for complementary access - weapons laboratories, nuclear engineering laboratories, and science laboratories. This panel provides a forum to discuss and summarize the results and lessons learned from the 2008 exercise.

  1. Interfacial Bioorthogonal Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is interfacial bioorthogonal cross-linking, the use of bioorthogonal chemistry to create and pattern biomaterials through diffusion-controlled gelation at the liquid-gel interface. The basis is a rapid (k2 284000 M–1 s–1) reaction between strained trans-cyclooctene (TCO) and tetrazine (Tz) derivatives. Syringe delivery of Tz-functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-Tz) to a bath of bis-TCO cross-linker instantly creates microspheres with a cross-linked shell through which bis-TCO diffuses freely to introduce further cross-linking at the interface. Tags can be introduced with 3D resolution without external triggers or templates. Water-filled hydrogel channels were prepared by simply reversing the order of addition. Prostate cancer cells encapsulated in the microspheres have 99% viability, proliferate readily, and form aggregated clusters. This process is projected to be useful in the fabrication of cell-instructive matrices for in vitro tissue models. PMID:25177528

  2. Interfacial behaviours of smart composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Chi-Kin

    The success of conventional fiber reinforced composites (FRC) relies on the quality of bonding between fibers and matrix. A review of literatures shows that there is a lack of theoretical models and experimental findings on the interfacial behaviours of the SMA-composites. In the past, the operation limit as well as the ideal actuation condition of SMA inclusions could not be predicted accurately during the design stage and the SMA-composite structures may therefore suffer a potential risk of sudden failure due to overloading or over-actuation. The theoretical models developed in this research provide a study basis for the prediction of internal stresses and interfacial strength of the SMA-composites. Martensite volume fraction is considered as a critical parameter which determines the material properties and shape memory effect (SME) of the SMA inclusions. The proposed model reproduce the SMA behaviour inside a substrate, evolutions of martensite volume fraction and elastic modulus of SMA, and the internal stresses along the embedded length in different loading and actuation scenarios. The concepts of 'constant martensite volume fraction region (CMR)' and 'constant axial stress region (CASR)' are proposed to justify the desired SMA actuation. In addition, substantial improvement of the initial debond stress is predicted with the increase of the actuation temperature. The 'Optimum Actuation Condition (OAC)' that ensures the reinforcement of SMA composite but avoids the failure of composite interface due to over-actuation is also defined to optimize the application of SME in the composite structure within a safety actuation limit. A simplified OAC (SOAC) is also developed to provide an analytical solution of OAC and thus the ideal actuation temperature for achieving such specific actuation condition can be estimated more easily. Single fiber pullout test and finite element analysis (FEA) are employed to evaluate the interfacial behaviours and analyze the stress

  3. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  4. Recent Advances in Colloidal and Interfacial Phenomena Involving Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes recent advances in several areas of research involving the interfacial ordering of liquid crystals (LCs). The first advance revolves around the ordering of LCs at bio/chemically functionalized surfaces. Whereas the majority of past studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs have involved surfaces of solids that present a limited diversity of chemical functional groups (surfaces at which van der Waals forces dominate surface-induced ordering), recent studies have moved to investigate the ordering of LCs on chemically complex surfaces. For example, surfaces decorated with biomolecules (e.g. oligopeptides and proteins) and transition metal ions have been investigated, leading to an understanding of the roles that metal-ligand coordination interactions, electrical double-layers, acid-base interactions, and hydrogen bonding can have on the interfacial ordering of LCs. The opportunity to create chemically-responsive LCs capable of undergoing ordering transitions in the presence of targeted molecular events (e.g., ligand exchange around a metal center) has emerged from these fundamental studies. A second advance has focused on investigations of the ordering of LCs at interfaces with immiscible isotropic fluids, particularly water. In contrast to prior studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs on solid surfaces, LC- aqueous interfaces are deformable and molecules at these interfaces exhibit high levels of mobility and thus can reorganize in response to changes in interfacial environment. A range of fundamental investigations involving these LC-aqueous interfaces have revealed that (i) the spatial and temporal characteristics of assemblies formed from biomolecular interactions can be reported by surface-driven ordering transitions in the LCs, (ii) the interfacial phase behaviour of molecules and colloids can be coupled to (and manipulated via) the ordering (and nematic elasticity) of LCs, and (iii) confinement of LCs leads to unanticipated size

  5. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  6. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  7. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  8. A CSF-SPH method for simulating drainage and imbibition at pore-scale resolution while tracking interfacial areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanesapillai, Rakulan; Falkner, Nadine; Hartmaier, Alexander; Steeb, Holger

    2016-09-01

    We present a conservative smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model to study the flow of multiple, immiscible fluid phases in porous media using direct pore-scale simulations. Particular focus is put on continuously tracking the evolution of interfacial areas, which are considered to be important morphological quantities affecting multiphase transport in porous media. In addition to solving the Navier-Stokes equations, the model accounts for the effects of capillarity at interfaces and contact lines. This is done by means of incorporating the governing interfacial mass and momentum balances using the continuum surface force (CSF) method, thus rendering model calibration routines unnecessary and minimizing the set of constitutive and kinematic assumptions. We address the application of boundary conditions at rigid solid surfaces and study the predictive capability of the model as well as optimal choices for numerical parameters using an extensive model validation procedure. We demonstrate the applicability of the model to simulate multiphase flows involving partial wettability, dynamic effects, large density ratios (up to 1000), large viscosity ratios (up to 100), as well as fragmentation and coalescence of fluid phases. The model is used to study the evolution of fluid-fluid interfacial areas during saturation-controlled primary drainage and main imbibition of heterogeneous pore spaces at low capillary numbers. A variety of pore-scale effects, such as wetting phase entrapment and fragmentation due to snap-off, are observed. Specific fluid-fluid interfacial area is observed to monotonically increase during primary drainage and hysteretic effects are apparent during main imbibition.

  9. Magnetic microwire probes for the magnetic rod interfacial stress rheometer.

    PubMed

    Tajuelo, J; Pastor, J M; Martínez-Pedrero, F; Vázquez, M; Ortega, F; Rubio, R G; Rubio, M A

    2015-02-01

    The magnetic needle interfacial shear rheometer is a valuable tool for the study of the mechanical properties of thin fluid films or monolayers. However, it is difficult to differentiate the interfacial and subphase contributions to the drag on the needle. In principle, the problem can be addressed by decreasing the needle diameter, which decreases the bulk contribution while the interfacial contribution remains essentially the same. Here we show the results obtained when using a new type of needle, that of magnetic microwires with diameter approximately 10 times thinner than for commercial needles. We show that the lower inertia of the microwires calls for a new calibration procedure. We propose such a new calibration procedure based on the flow field solution around the needle introduced in refs 1 and 2. By measuring thin silicone oil films with well-controlled interfacial viscosities as well as eicosanol (C20) and pentadecanoic acid (PDA, C15) Langmuir monolayers, we show that the new calibration method works well for standard needles as well as for the microwire probes. Moreover, we show that the analysis of the force terms contributing to the force on the needle helps to ascertain whether the measurements obtained are reliable for given surface shear viscosity values. We also show that the microwire probes have at least a 10-fold-lower resolution limit, allowing one to measure interfacial viscosities as low as 10(-7) N·m/s. PMID:25495270

  10. Magnetic microwire probes for the magnetic rod interfacial stress rheometer.

    PubMed

    Tajuelo, J; Pastor, J M; Martínez-Pedrero, F; Vázquez, M; Ortega, F; Rubio, R G; Rubio, M A

    2015-02-01

    The magnetic needle interfacial shear rheometer is a valuable tool for the study of the mechanical properties of thin fluid films or monolayers. However, it is difficult to differentiate the interfacial and subphase contributions to the drag on the needle. In principle, the problem can be addressed by decreasing the needle diameter, which decreases the bulk contribution while the interfacial contribution remains essentially the same. Here we show the results obtained when using a new type of needle, that of magnetic microwires with diameter approximately 10 times thinner than for commercial needles. We show that the lower inertia of the microwires calls for a new calibration procedure. We propose such a new calibration procedure based on the flow field solution around the needle introduced in refs 1 and 2. By measuring thin silicone oil films with well-controlled interfacial viscosities as well as eicosanol (C20) and pentadecanoic acid (PDA, C15) Langmuir monolayers, we show that the new calibration method works well for standard needles as well as for the microwire probes. Moreover, we show that the analysis of the force terms contributing to the force on the needle helps to ascertain whether the measurements obtained are reliable for given surface shear viscosity values. We also show that the microwire probes have at least a 10-fold-lower resolution limit, allowing one to measure interfacial viscosities as low as 10(-7) N·m/s.

  11. Interfacial microfluidic transport on micropatterned superhydrophobic textile.

    PubMed

    Xing, Siyuan; Jiang, Jia; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-05-21

    Textile-enabled interfacial microfluidics, utilizing fibrous hydrophilic yarns (e.g., cotton) to guide biological reagent flows, has been extended to various biochemical analyses recently. The restricted capillary-driving mechanism, however, persists as a major challenge for continuous and facilitated biofluidic transport. In this paper, we have first introduced a novel interfacial microfluidic transport principle to drive three-dimensional liquid flows on a micropatterned superhydrophobic textile (MST) platform in a more autonomous and controllable manner. Specifically, the MST system utilizes the surface tension-induced Laplace pressure to facilitate the liquid motion along the hydrophilic yarn, in addition to the capillarity present in the fibrous structure. The fabrication of MST is simply accomplished by stitching hydrophilic cotton yarn into a superhydrophobic fabric substrate (contact angle 140 ± 3°), from which well-controlled wetting patterns are established for interfacial microfluidic operations. The geometric configurations of the stitched micropatterns, e.g., the lengths and diameters of the yarn and bundled arrangement, can all influence the transport process, which is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Two operation modes, discrete and continuous transport, are also presented in detail. In addition, the gravitational effect as well as the droplet removal process have been also considered and quantitatively analysed during the transport process. As a demonstration, an MST design has been implemented on an artificial skin surface to collect and remove sweat in a highly efficient and facilitated means. The results have illustrated that the novel interfacial transport on the textile platform can be potentially extended to a variety of biofluidic collection and removal applications.

  12. The effects of a soluble surfactant on the interfacial dynamics of stationary bubbles in inclined tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanagh, Daniel P.; Eckmann, David M.

    2002-10-01

    We have experimentally examined the effects of a common soluble surfactant on gas bubbles in liquid flows in inclined tubes. Air bubbles of known size ([lambda] = 0.8, 1.0, 1.5) are held stationary under minimum flow conditions in tubes inclined at fixed angles ([omega] = 25°, 45°, 65°, 90°). Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) is infused into the bulk flow at two bulk concentrations (C = 10% or 100% critical micelle concentration (CMC)). In addition to recording pressure and flow waveforms, we capture video images of bubbles before and during exposure to the surfactant. Modification of the interfacial properties by the surfactant results in extremely dynamic bubble behaviour including interfacial deformation, deformation plus axial translation, and bubble detachment from the wall plus translation. We measure the corresponding time-dependent pressure gradient within the tube. The surfactant mediated responses observed are dependent upon the interrelated effects of C, [lambda] and [omega]. A high bulk concentration of surfactant may produce more rapid modification of bubble shape and influence wetting, thus increasing the potential for bubble detachment. The likelihood that detachment will occur increases further as bubble volume in increased. In both vertical tubes in which contact forces are absent and in non-vertical tubes, the infusion of surfactant may result in axial translation either in the direction of, or opposite to, the direction of the bulk flow. Critical to the translation and/or detachment of the bubble is the surfactant-mediated modification of contact line mechanics. Contact line velocities corresponding to rates of shrinkage of dewetted surface area are extracted from experimental data. We also explore the potential effects of surfactants on interfacial remobilization. This investigation demonstrates the potential use of surfactants to be used for dislodging dewetted gas bubbles by the intentional manipulation of interfacial properties.

  13. Anion Effects on Interfacial Absorption of Gases in Ionic Liquids. A Molecular Dynamics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2011-06-02

    Molecular dynamics simulations with many-body interactions were carried out to systematic study the effect of anion type, tetrafluoroborate [BF4] or hexafluorophosphate [PF6], paired with the cation 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium [bmim], on the interfacial absorption of gases in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). The potentials of mean force (PMF) of CO2 and H2O at 350 K were calculated across the air-liquid interfaces of [bmim][BF4] and [bmim][PF6]. We found that the PMFs for H2O exhibited no interfacial minima at both interfaces, while the corresponding PMFs for CO2 had significant free energy minima there. However, the PMFs for H2O showed a much higher interfacial free energy than in the bulk for [bmim][BF4], but only a slightly higher interfacial free energy for [bmim][PF6] than in bulk. The reason for this was due to the more hydrophilic nature of the [BF4] anion, and the fact that [BF4] was found to have little propensity for the interface. Our results show that H2O is much more likely to be found at the air-[bmim][PF6] interface than at the air-[bmim][BF4] interface. The free energies of solvation were found to be more negative for [bmim][BF4] than [bmim][PF6] for water and similar for CO2. This observation is consistent with experimental Henry’s law coefficients. Our results show that anion type, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into RTILs, should also significantly influence the uptake mechanism. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  14. Impact of 2'-hydroxyl sampling on the conformational properties of RNA: update of the CHARMM all-atom additive force field for RNA.

    PubMed

    Denning, Elizabeth J; Priyakumar, U Deva; Nilsson, Lennart; Mackerell, Alexander D

    2011-07-15

    Here, we present an update of the CHARMM27 all-atom additive force field for nucleic acids that improves the treatment of RNA molecules. The original CHARMM27 force field parameters exhibit enhanced Watson-Crick base pair opening which is not consistent with experiment, whereas analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show the 2'-hydroxyl moiety to almost exclusively sample the O3' orientation. Quantum mechanical (QM) studies of RNA related model compounds indicate the energy minimum associated with the O3' orientation to be too favorable, consistent with the MD results. Optimization of the dihedral parameters dictating the energy of the 2'-hydroxyl proton targeting the QM data yielded several parameter sets, which sample both the base and O3' orientations of the 2'-hydroxyl to varying degrees. Selection of the final dihedral parameters was based on reproduction of hydration behavior as related to a survey of crystallographic data and better agreement with experimental NMR J-coupling values. Application of the model, designated CHARMM36, to a collection of canonical and noncanonical RNA molecules reveals overall improved agreement with a range of experimental observables as compared to CHARMM27. The results also indicate the sensitivity of the conformational heterogeneity of RNA to the orientation of the 2'-hydroxyl moiety and support a model whereby the 2'-hydroxyl can enhance the probability of conformational transitions in RNA.

  15. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  16. Numerical simulation of toughening of alumina particulate glass matrix composite by interfacial precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, K.; Enoki, M.; Kishi, T.

    1994-12-31

    Strengthening and toughening by interfacial precipitation are strongly connected with crack bowing and deflection. In the present study, three dimensional numerical simulation of these events was performed on ceramics particulate glass matrix composites with interfacial precipitation by calculating the equations for a crack bowing and deflection. This numerical simulation revealed that fracture toughness and strength increased with the addition of interfacial precipitation because a crack bowing emerged. These results are in agreement with experimental data for fracture toughness.

  17. Interfacial activity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Marcos; Leal, L Gary

    2007-12-01

    A systematic study of the interfacial activity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles was performed with the use of a computer-controlled four-roll mill. The nanoparticle locality within the polymeric domains (bulk or interface) was controlled by means of a mixture of polymeric ligands grafted to the gold nanoparticle core. The bulk polymers were polybutadiene (PBd) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Monoterminated PDMS and PBd ligands were synthesized on the basis of the esterification of reactive groups (such as hydroxyl or amino groups) with lipoic acid anhydride. The formation of polymer-coated nanoparticles using these lipoic acid-functionalized polymers was confirmed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their interfacial activity was manifested as a reduction of the interfacial tension and in the enhanced stability of thin films (as seen via the inhibition of coalescence). The nanoparticles showed an equal, if not superior, ability to reduce the interfacial tension when compared to previous studies on the effect of insoluble surfactants; however, these particles proved not to be as effective at inhibiting coalescence as their surfactant counterpart. We suggest that this effect may be caused by an increase in the attractive van der Waals forces created by the presence of metal-core nanoparticles. Experimental measurements using the four-roll mill allow us to explore the relationship between nanoparticle concentration at the interface and interfacial tension. In particular, we have found evidence that the interface concentration can be increased relative to the equilibrium value achieved by diffusion alone, and thus the interfacial tension can be systematically reduced if the interfacial area is increased temporarily via drop deformation or breakup followed by recoalescence. PMID:17973410

  18. Additional hemodynamic measurements with an esophageal Doppler monitor: a preliminary report of compliance, force, kinetic energy, and afterload in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Glen; Brealey, David; Dhar, Sunil; Dikta, Gerhard; Singer, Meryvn

    2012-12-01

    The esophageal Doppler monitor (EDM) is a minimally-invasive hemodynamic device which evaluates both cardiac output (CO), and fluid status, by estimating stroke volume (SV) and calculating heart rate (HR). The measurement of these parameters is based upon a continuous and accurate approximation of distal thoracic aortic blood flow. Furthermore, the peak velocity (PV) and mean acceleration (MA), of aortic blood flow at this anatomic location, are also determined by the EDM. The purpose of this preliminary report is to examine additional clinical hemodynamic calculations of: compliance (C), kinetic energy (KE), force (F), and afterload (TSVR(i)). These data were derived using both velocity-based measurements, provided by the EDM, as well as other contemporaneous physiologic parameters. Data were obtained from anesthetized patients undergoing surgery or who were in a critical care unit. A graphical inspection of these measurements is presented and discussed with respect to each patient's clinical situation. When normalized to each of their initial values, F and KE both consistently demonstrated more discriminative power than either PV or MA. The EDM offers additional applications for hemodynamic monitoring. Further research regarding the accuracy, utility, and limitations of these parameters is therefore indicated.

  19. Competition among Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ Monovalent Ions for DNA in Molecular Dynamics Simulations using the Additive CHARMM36 and Drude Polarizable Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we report on interactions of and competition between monovalent ions for two DNA sequences in MD simulations. Efforts included the development and validation of parameters for interactions among the first-group monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+, and DNA in the Drude polarizable and additive CHARMM36 force fields (FF). The optimization process targeted gas-phase QM interaction energies of various model compounds with ions and osmotic pressures of bulk electrolyte solutions of chemically relevant ions. The optimized ionic parameters are validated against counterion condensation theory and buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy measurements providing quantitative data on the competitive association of different monovalent ions with DNA. Comparison between experimental and MD simulation results demonstrates that, compared to the additive CHARMM36 model, the Drude FF provides an improved description of the general features of the ionic atmosphere around DNA and leads to closer agreement with experiment on the ionic competition within the ion atmosphere. Results indicate the importance of extended simulation systems on the order of 25 Å beyond the DNA surface to obtain proper convergence of ion distributions. PMID:25751286

  20. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; et al

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  1. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Pande, Vijay S.; Case, David A.; Brooks, Charles L.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.

  2. Interfacial assembly of Graphene Oxide at oil/water and polymer/polymer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiwei; Feng, Tao; Russell, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Amphiphilic structure of graphene oxide makes it a candidate ``surfactant'' to preferentially segregate to the interface between different fluids. The affinity of graphene oxide towards different phases was tuned by grafting with polystyrene (PS-NH2) through hydrogen bonding, and its interfacial behavior, both in toluene/water and polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate), was studied. The surface tension of the toluene/water interface decreases in the presence of PS-NH2 grafted graphene oxide, indicating that graphene oxide flakes can be forced to the toluene/water interface when grafted with PS-NH2. Transmission electron microscopy shows that graphene oxide can even be forced into a ``jammed'' state at the water/toluene interface. In addition, polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) were blended with graphene oxide, its morphology changes from island type to co-continuous structure, but the mechanism of this behavior is still not clear. These interfacial sheets may provide a model system to study buckling and crumpling behavior at interfaces.

  3. The relaxation of intrinsic compressive stress in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors by additional N ion implantation treatment with atomic force microscope-Raman stress extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, M.-H.; Chen, C.-H.; Chang, L.-C.; Yang, C.; Kao, S.-C.

    2012-05-01

    Based on the stress extraction and measurement by atomic force microscope-Raman technique with the nanometer level space resolution, the high compressive stress about 550 MPa on the Si active region (OD) is observed for the current complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistor. During the thermal budget for the standard manufacture process of the current CMOS transistor, the difference of thermal expansion coefficients between Si and Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) oxide results in this high compressive stress in Si OD and further degrades the electron carrier mobility seriously. In order to relax this intrinsic processed compressive stress in Si OD and try to recover this performance loss, the novel process is proposed in this work in addition to the usage of one-side pad SiN layer. With this novel process of additional N-ion implantation (IMP) treatment in STI oxide, it can be found that the less compressive stress about 438 MPa in Si OD can be achieved by the smaller difference of thermal expansion coefficients between Si and N-doped SiO2 STI oxide. The formation of Si-N bonding in N-doped SiO2 STI region can be monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra and thermal expansion coefficients for Si, SiO2, and SiN are 2.6 ppm/K, 0.4 ppm/K, and 2.87 ppm/K, respectively. The effective relaxation of intrinsic processed compressive stress in Si OD about 112 MPa (from 550 MPa to 438 MPa) by this proposed additional N IMP treatment contributes ˜14% electron carrier mobility enhancement/recovery. The experimental electrical data agree well with the theoretical piezoelectricity calculation for the strained-Si theory.

  4. Charged Surfaces and Interfacial Ions.

    PubMed

    Kallay; Zalac

    2000-10-01

    Interfacial charge in a solid/liquid system is due to interactions of ions with surface sites affected by the electrostatic potential that is a consequence of their accumulation. The present theoretical approach is based on the so-called Surface Complexation Model that has several modifications known as either the 1-pK, the 2-pK, or the "MUSIC" model. These models assume different surface reactions and their equilibrium constants, taking into account electrostatic interactions. For that purpose the relationships between potentials affecting the state of interfacial ions and their surface densities need to be known, so that a certain model of the electrical interfacial layer should be introduced. The complexity of the problem results in the use of a variety of different theoretical approaches that cannot be distinguished experimentally. This article discusses several aspects of the problem, such as counterion association, structure of the electrical interfacial layer, potential-charge relationships, surface potentials, the zero charge condition, enthalpy of surface reactions, and the influence of the interfacial ionic equilibrium on the colloid stability. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10998282

  5. Interfacial models of nerve fiber cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Malev, V V; Gromov, D B; Komissarchik YaYu; Brudnaya, M S

    1992-01-01

    A new approach, basing on a resemblance between cytoskeleton structures associated with plasma membranes and interfacial layers of coexisting phases, is proposed. In particular, a lattice model, similar to those of the theory of surface properties of pure liquids and nonelectrolyte solutions (Ono, S., and S. Kondo. 1960. Handbuch der Physik.), has been developed to describe nerve fiber cytoskeleton. The preliminary consideration of the model shows the existence of submembrane cytoskeleton having increased peripheral densities of microtubules (compared with the bulk density) which is in qualitative agreement with the data in literature. Some additional possibilities of the approach proposed are briefly discussed. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420929

  6. A Thermodynamic Study of Dopant Interfacial Segregation Effect on Nanostability and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Longjia

    Nanoparticles, with great surface area and high surface to volume ratio, have been widely applied in many applications due to their unique size related effects. However, this high surface area character of nanoparticles also brings great excess energy to the whole system, making the system unstable and even causing the failure of nanoparticles, especially at higher temperatures. In order to maintain nanocrystalline structure of the materials, nanostability enhancement is of great significance in nanotechnology. It is well known that the global driving force for particles growth is to eliminate the excess energy brought by surface and grain boundary. Therefore, interfacial energetics has a great influence on the nanostability of the materials. And according to previous studies, dopant interfacial segregation could be a potential way to control the interfacial energetics of the nanoparticles and possibly lead to an improved nanostability. Furthermore, the interfacial energetics even can affect mechanical properties of nano-grain ceramic materials based on recent research. The main goals of the present work were to experimentally measure the interfacial energies of nanoparticles as well as nano-grain ceramics, modify the interfacial energetics through dopant segregation effect and engineer the nanostability and mechanical properties of the nanocrystalline materials through interfacial energetics modification. To achieve this goal, Mn cation has been chosen to introduce Mn interfacial segregation on ceria nanoparticles, and La cation has been added to 12 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (12YSZ) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MAO) two-phase nano-grain ceramics to cause La interfacial segregation. Both of the dopant segregation phenomena were directly proved by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). To quantify the dopant segregation effect on the interfacial energies, high-temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry, water adsorption calorimetry and differential

  7. Mathematical problems arising in interfacial electrohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseluiko, Dmitri

    established estimates are compared with numerical solutions of the equations which in turn suggest an optimal upper bound for the radius of the absorbing ball. A scaling argument is used to explain this, and a general conjecture is made based on extensive computations. We also carry out a complete study of the nonlinear behavior of competing physical mechanisms: long wave instability above a critical Reynolds number, short wave damping due to surface tension and intermediate growth due to the electric field. Through a combination of analysis and extensive numerical experiments, we elucidate parameter regimes that support non-uniform travelling waves, time-periodic travelling waves and complex nonlinear dynamics including chaotic interfacial oscillations. It is established that a sufficiently high electric field will drive the system to chaotic oscillations, even when the Reynolds number is smaller than the critical value below which the non-electrified problem is linearly stable. A particular case of this is Stokes flow, which is known to be stable for this class of problems (an analogous statement holds for horizontally supported films also). Our theoretical results indicate that such highly stable flows can be rendered unstable by using electric fields. This opens the way for possible heat and mass transfer applications which can benefit significantly from interfacial oscillations and interfacial turbulence. For the case of a horizontal plane, a weakly nonlinear theory is not possible due to the absence of the shear flow generated by the gravitational force along the plate when the latter is inclined. We study the fully nonlinear equation, which in this case is asymptotically correct and is obtained at the leading order. The model equation describes both overlying and hanging films - in the former case gravity is stabilizing while in the latter it is destabilizing. The numerical and theoretical analysis of the fully nonlinear evolution is complicated by the fact that the

  8. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  9. Surfactants and interfacial phenomena, 2nd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen

    1989-01-01

    The second edition of this monograph on surfactants has been updated to reflect recent advances in our knowledge of theory and practices. New applications run the gamut from microelectronics and magnetic recording, to biotechnology and nonconventional energy conversion. There is a new chapter on the interactions between surfactants. New sections have been added, and original sections expanded, on such topics as ultralow liquid-liquid interfacial tension; microemulsions, miniemulsions, and multiple emulsions; liquid crystal formation; hydrotropy; and steric forces in the stabilization of dispersions. There is also new material on lime soap dispersing agents; fabric softeners, adsorption and wetting of solid surfaces, both equilibrium and none-equilibrium; the relationship between adsorption and micellation in aqueous solutions and its effect on surface tension reduction; and factors determining micellar structure and shape.

  10. Comparison of fluid-fluid interfacial areas measured with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests for the same samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure nonwetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ˜5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  11. Interfacial thermal degradation in inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbank, William; Hirsch, Lionel; Wantz, Guillaume; Chambon, Sylvain

    2015-12-28

    The efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells is constantly improving; however, the lifetime of the devices still requires significant improvement if the potential of OPV is to be realised. In this study, several series of inverted OPV were fabricated and thermally aged in the dark in an inert atmosphere. It was demonstrated that all of the devices undergo short circuit current-driven degradation, which is assigned to morphology changes in the active layer. In addition, a previously unreported, open circuit voltage-driven degradation mechanism was observed that is highly material specific and interfacial in origin. This mechanism was specifically observed in devices containing MoO{sub 3} and silver as hole transporting layers and electrode materials, respectively. Devices with this combination were among the worst performing devices with respect to thermal ageing. The physical origins of this mechanism were explored by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy and an increase in roughness with thermal ageing was observed that may be partially responsible for the ageing mechanism.

  12. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  13. Interfacial rheology in complex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Hudson, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Multiphase liquid systems are omnipresent in and essential to everyday life, e.g. foods, pharmaceutics, cosmetics, paints, oil recovery, etc. The morphology and stability of such systems depend on dynamic interfacial properties and processes. Typical methods utilized to measure such interfacial properties often employ drops that are much larger and flows that are much simpler than those encountered in typical processing applications. A microfluidic approach is utilized to measure dynamic structure and kinetics in multiphase systems with drop sizes comparable to those encountered in applications and flow complexity that is easily adjustable. The internal circulation and deformation of an aqueous droplet in clear mineral oil is measured using particle tracers and a detailed shape analysis, which is capable of measuring sub-micron deviations in drop shape. Deformation dynamics, detailed drop shape, interfacial tension, and internal circulation patterns and velocities are measured in Poiseuille and transient elongational flows. Flow kinematics are adjusted by varying the microchannel geometry, relative drop size, and drop height. The effects of confinement on interfacial dynamics and circulation patterns and velocities are also explored.

  14. Correlated Single Quantum Dot Blinking and Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengye; Hsiang, Jung-Cheng; Zhu, Haiming; Song, Nianhui; Dickson, Robert M; Lian, Tianquan

    2010-08-31

    The electron transfer (ET) dynamics from core/multi-shell (CdSe/CdS(3ML)ZnCdS(2ML)ZnS(2ML)) quantum dots (QDs) to adsorbed Fluorescein (F27) molecules have been studied by single particle spectroscopy to probe the relationship between single QD interfacial electron transfer and blinking dynamics. Electron transfer from the QD to F27 and the subsequent recombination were directly observed by ensemble-averaged transient absorption spectroscopy. Single QD-F27 complexes show correlated fluctuation of fluorescence intensity and lifetime, similar to those observed in free QDs. With increasing ET rate (controlled by F27-to-QD ratio), the lifetime of on states decreases and relative contribution of off states increases. It was shown that ET is active for QDs in on states, the excited state lifetime of which reflects the ET rate, whereas in the off state QD excitons decay by Auger relaxation and ET is not a competitive quenching pathway. Thus, the blinking dynamics of single QDs modulate their interfacial ET activity. Furthermore, interfacial ET provides an additional pathway for generating off states, leading to correlated single QD interfacial ET and blinking dynamics in QD-acceptor complexes. Because blinking is a general phenomenon of single QDs, it appears that the correlated interfacial ET and blinking and the resulting intermittent ET activity are general phenomena for single QDs.

  15. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  16. Atomistic simulation of surface functionalization on the interfacial properties of graphene-polymer nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. C.; Lai, Z. B.; Galpaya, D.; Yan, C.; Hu, N.; Zhou, L. M.

    2014-03-28

    Graphene has been increasingly used as nano sized fillers to create a broad range of nanocomposites with exceptional properties. The interfaces between fillers and matrix play a critical role in dictating the overall performance of a composite. However, the load transfer mechanism along graphene-polymer interface has not been well understood. In this study, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of surface functionalization and layer length on the interfacial load transfer in graphene-polymer nanocomposites. The simulation results show that oxygen-functionalized graphene leads to larger interfacial shear force than hydrogen-functionalized and pristine ones during pull-out process. The increase of oxygen coverage and layer length enhances interfacial shear force. Further increase of oxygen coverage to about 7% leads to a saturated interfacial shear force. A model was also established to demonstrate that the mechanism of interfacial load transfer consists of two contributing parts, including the formation of new surface and relative sliding along the interface. These results are believed to be useful in development of new graphene-based nanocomposites with better interfacial properties.

  17. Interfacial inhibition of macromolecular interactions: nature's paradigm for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2005-03-01

    One of nature's strategies for interfering with molecular interactions is to trap macromolecules in transition states with their partners in dead-end complexes that are unable to complete their biological function. This type of inhibition, which we refer to as "interfacial inhibition", is illustrated by two natural inhibitors, brefeldin A (BFA) and camptothecin (CPT), whose modes of action have been elucidated fully in structural studies. Interfacial inhibition occurs at the protein-protein interface in the case of BFA and at the protein-DNA interface in the case of CPT. In both systems, the drugs take advantage of transient structural and energetic conditions created by the macromolecular complex, which give rise to "hot-spots" for drug binding. In addition to these examples, several natural compounds such as forskolin, tubulin inhibitors and immunophilins target protein interfaces. We propose that interfacial inhibition is a paradigm for the discovery of drugs that interfere with macromolecular complexes.

  18. Quantitative morphological characterization of bicontinuous Pickering emulsions via interfacial curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Matthew; Stratford, Kevin; Thijssen, Job H. J.

    Bicontinuous Pickering emulsions (bijels) are a physically interesting class of soft materials with many potential applications including catalysis, microfluidics and tissue engineering. They are created by arresting the spinodal decomposition of a partially-miscible liquid with a (jammed) layer of interfacial colloids. Porosity $L$ (average interfacial separation) of the bijel is controlled by varying the radius ($r$) and volume fraction ($\\phi$) of the colloids ($L \\propto r/\\phi$). However, to optimize the bijel structure with respect to other parameters, e.g. quench rate, characterizing by $L$ alone is insufficient. Hence, we have used confocal microscopy and X-ray CT to characterize a range of bijels in terms of local and area-averaged interfacial curvatures. In addition, the curvatures of bijels have been monitored as a function of time, which has revealed an intriguing evolution up to 60 minutes after bijel formation, contrary to previous understanding.

  19. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  20. Interfacial phenomena, evaporation and stress in a constrained capillary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, S.; Kim, I. Y.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    The heat transfer and interfacial characteristics of a small constrained system under stress in the form of an evaporating extended meniscus at the exit of a slot feeder were evaluated. The stress level in the completely wetting fluid-solid system was increased by decreasing the overall size of the film and thereby increasing the relative importance of interfacial phenomena. Recent data concerning the effect of interfacial phenomena on transport processes in a constrained capillary system will be presented. The liquid thickness profile, which was representative of the pressure field in the extended meniscus was measured using ellipsometry and microcomputer enhanced video mciroscopy. The analysis demonstrates that the capillary and disjoining pressures are coupled and they lead to fluid flow and a reduction in vapor pressure. The interfacial forces have a large effect on the heat transfer characteristics. A model equation based on the augmented Young-Laplace equation was numerically solved and compared with the film thickness data to determine the Hamaker constant, in situ. The effects of system resistance on the mass and the heat flux distribution were also investigated.

  1. Liquid metal actuation by electrical control of interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-09-01

    By combining metallic electrical conductivity with low viscosity, liquid metals and liquid metal alloys offer new and exciting opportunities to serve as reconfigurable components of electronic, microfluidic, and electromagnetic devices. Here, we review the physics and applications of techniques that utilize voltage to manipulate the interfacial tension of liquid metals; such techniques include electrocapillarity, continuous electrowetting, electrowetting-on-dielectric, and electrochemistry. These techniques lower the interfacial tension between liquid metals and a surrounding electrolyte by driving charged species (or in the case of electrochemistry, chemical species) to the interface. The techniques are useful for manipulating and actuating liquid metals at sub-mm length scales where interfacial forces dominate. We focus on metals and alloys that are liquid near or below room temperature (mercury, gallium, and gallium-based alloys). The review includes discussion of mercury—despite its toxicity—because it has been utilized in numerous applications and it offers a way of introducing several phenomena without the complications associated with the oxide layer that forms on gallium and its alloys. The review focuses on the advantages, applications, opportunities, challenges, and limitations of utilizing voltage to control interfacial tension as a method to manipulate liquid metals.

  2. Measurement of surface and interfacial tension using pendant drop tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joseph D; Neeson, Michael J; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2015-09-15

    Pendant drop tensiometry offers a simple and elegant solution to determining surface and interfacial tension - a central parameter in many colloidal systems including emulsions, foams and wetting phenomena. The technique involves the acquisition of a silhouette of an axisymmetric fluid droplet, and iterative fitting of the Young-Laplace equation that balances gravitational deformation of the drop with the restorative interfacial tension. Since the advent of high-quality digital cameras and desktop computers, this process has been automated with high speed and precision. However, despite its beguiling simplicity, there are complications and limitations that accompany pendant drop tensiometry connected with both Bond number (the balance between interfacial tension and gravitational forces) and drop volume. Here, we discuss the process involved with going from a captured experimental image to a fitted interfacial tension value, highlighting pertinent features and limitations along the way. We introduce a new parameter, the Worthington number, Wo, to characterise the measurement precision. A fully functional, open-source acquisition and fitting software is provided to enable the reader to test and develop the technique further.

  3. Interfacial Microstructure and Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Composites Caused by Growing Generation 1-4 Dendritic Poly(amidoamine) on a Fiber Surface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Zhang, Ruliang; Gao, Fucheng; He, Maoshuai; Wang, Chengguo; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Lifen; Cui, Hongzhi

    2016-08-23

    In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites, propagation of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by in situ polymerization on a carbon fiber surface was performed. During polymerization processes, PAMAM was grafted on carbon fiber by repeated Michael addition and amidation reactions. The changes in surface microstructure and the chemical composition of carbon fibers before and after modification were investigated by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. All the results indicated that PAMAM was successfully grown on the carbon fiber surface. Such propagation could significantly increase the surface roughness and introduce sufficient polar groups onto the carbon fiber surface, enhancing the surface wettability of carbon fiber. The fractured surface of carbon fiber-reinforced composites showed a great enhancement of interfacial adhesion. Compared with those of desized fiber composites, the interlaminar shear strength and interfacial shear strength of PAMAM/fiber-reinforced composites showed increases of 55.49 and 110.94%, respectively.

  4. Large-scale compensation of errors in pairwise-additive empirical force fields: comparison of AMBER intermolecular terms with rigorous DFT-SAPT calculations.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Otyepka, Michal; Sponer, Jirí; Hobza, Pavel; Jurecka, Petr

    2010-09-21

    The intermolecular interaction energy components for several molecular complexes were calculated using force fields available in the AMBER suite of programs and compared with Density Functional Theory-Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (DFT-SAPT) values. The extent to which such comparison is meaningful is discussed. The comparability is shown to depend strongly on the intermolecular distance, which means that comparisons made at one distance only are of limited value. At large distances the coulombic and van der Waals 1/r(6) empirical terms correspond fairly well with the DFT-SAPT electrostatics and dispersion terms, respectively. At the onset of electronic overlap the empirical values deviate from the reference values considerably. However, the errors in the force fields tend to cancel out in a systematic manner at equilibrium distances. Thus, the overall performance of the force fields displays errors an order of magnitude smaller than those of the individual interaction energy components. The repulsive 1/r(12) component of the van der Waals expression seems to be responsible for a significant part of the deviation of the force field results from the reference values. We suggest that further improvement of the force fields for intermolecular interactions would require replacement of the nonphysical 1/r(12) term by an exponential function. Dispersion anisotropy and its effects are discussed. Our analysis is intended to show that although comparing the empirical and non-empirical interaction energy components is in general problematic, it might bring insights useful for the construction of new force fields. Our results are relevant to often performed force-field-based interaction energy decompositions.

  5. Elastic response of DNA molecules under the action of interfacial traction and stretching: An elastic thin rod model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ye; Huang, Zaixing; Qiang, Lei; Gao, Jun

    2015-11-01

    In a multivalent salt solution, a segment of DNA is modeled as an elastic rod subjected to the interfacial traction. The shooting method is used to calculate the equilibrium configurations of condensed DNA under the action of the longitudinal end-force and interfacial traction simultaneously. The results show that the shapes of DNA are mainly determined by the competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of stretching. The change of end-to-end distance with the longitudinal end-force is consistent with the worm-like chain (WLC) model. The higher the concentration is, the stronger the condensation of DNA.

  6. Probing adhesion forces at the molecular scale

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.C.; Houston, J.E.; Michalske, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of adhesion forces at the molecular scale, such as those discussed here, are necessary to understand macroscopic boundary-layer behavior such as adhesion, friction, wear, lubrication, and many other important phenomena. The authors` recent interfacial force microscopy (IFM) studies have provided detailed information about the mechanical response of both self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films and the underlying substrates. In addition, they recently demonstrated that the IFM is useful for studying the chemical nature of such films. In this talk, the authors discuss a new method for studying surface interactions and chemical reactions using the IFM. To quantitatively measure the work of adhesion and bond energies between two organic thin films, they modify both a Au substrate and a Au probe with self-assembling organomercaptan molecules having either the same or different end groups (-CH{sub 3}, -NH{sub 2}, and -COOH), and then analyze the force-versus-displacement curves (force profiles) that result from the approach to contact of the two surfaces. Their results show that the magnitude of the adhesive forces measured between methyl-methyl interactions are in excellent agreement with van der Waals calculations using Lifshitz theory and previous experimentally determined values. Moreover, the measured peak adhesive forces scale as expected for van der Waals, hydrogen-bonding, and acid-base interactions.

  7. Coupled dynamics of interfacial waves and bed forms in fluid muds over erodible seabeds in oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, J. H.; Traykovski, P.

    2015-08-01

    Recent field investigations of the damping of ocean surface waves over fluid muds have revealed waves on the interface between the thin layer of fluid mud and the overlying much thicker column of clear water, accompanied by bed forms on the erodible seabed beneath the fluid mud. The frequencies and wavelengths of the observed interfacial waves are qualitatively consistent with the linear dispersion relationship for long interfacial waves, but the forcing mechanism is not known. To understand the forcing, a linear model is proposed, based on the layer-averaged hydrostatic equations for the fluid mud, together with the Meyer-Peter-Mueller equation for the sediment transport within the underlying seabed, both subject to oscillatory forcing by the surface waves. If the underlying seabed is nonerodible and flat, the model indicates parametric instability to interfacial waves, but the threshold for instability is not met by the observations. If the underlying seabed is erodible, the model indicates that perturbations to the seabed elevation in the presence of the oscillatory forcing create interfacial waves, which in turn produce stresses within the fluid mud that force a net transport of sediment within the seabed toward the bed form crests, thus causing growth of both bed forms and interfacial waves. The frequencies, wavelengths, and growth rates are in qualitative agreement with the observations. A competition between mixing created by the interfacial waves and gravitational settling might control the thickness, density, and viscosity of the fluid muds during periods of strong forcing.

  8. Interfacial Nonlinear Dynamics, Phenomena, and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping

    The dynamics of an optical switch based on a dielectric -clad nonlinear film is presented. Two transition processes of the optical switching, from total internal reflection (TIR) to transmission (Tr) and from Tr to TIR, are investigated in theory as well as experiment. Nonlinear dynamic layered transfer matrix theory is developed to study the transition process from TIR to Tr at a nonlinear thin film due to the optically induced refractive index change. A simple theoretical model based on a dynamic nonlinear Fabry-Perot etalon is given for the analysis of the switching process from Tr to TIR. The quantitative analysis can be used for the design and optimization of an optical sensor protector and other devices. Experiments have been done on both the processes of TIR to Tr and Tr to TIR switching for visible as well as infrared wavelengths. A theory for the design of an optimal anti-reflection coating is proposed in order to aid the design and optimization of a nonlinear interfacial switch. Furthermore, a detailed study of the dynamic optical tunneling through the nonlinear interface indicates that the reflected wave would undergo an additional dynamic nonlinear phase shift which is a novel nonlinear interfacial phenomenon, first revealed by this study.

  9. Turbulence and Interfacial Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, James; Li, Xiaolin

    2005-03-15

    The authors study mix from analytical and numerical points of view. These investigations are linked. The analytical studies (in addition to laboratory experiments) provide bench marks for the direct simulation of mix. However, direct simulation is too detailed to be useful and to expensive to be practical. They also consider averaged equations. Here the major issue is the validation of the closure assumptions. They appeal to the direct simulation methods for this step. They have collaborated with several NNSA teams; moreover, Stony Brook alumni (former students, faculty and research collaborators) presently hold staff positions in NNSA laboratories.

  10. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang; Yao, Danfeng; Christensen, Danica; Neumann, Thomas; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, assembling and functionally characterizing supramolecular interfacial architectures for bio-affinity studies and for biosensor development. All the surface interaction studies will be based on the recently introduced novel sensor platforms involving surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and -microscopy (SPFM). Emphasis will be put on documenting the distance-dependence of fluorescence intensity at the metal-dielectric interface and utilizing this principle to optimize the conformation/orientation of the interfacial supra-molecular sensor coatings. This is exemplified by a number of examples, including a layer-by-layer assembly system, antibody-antigen interactions, oligonucleotide-oligonucleotide, and oligonucleotide-PCR amplicon hybridization. For practical sensing purposes, a three-dimensionally extended surface coating is then employed to overcome the fluorescence quenching problem on a planar matrix. A commercial dextran layer is shown to be an optimized matrix for SPFS, with an example of a protein-binding study.

  11. Mechanics of interfacial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Mahadevan, L; Stone, Howard A

    2006-11-21

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered fluid/fluid interfaces can exist in stable nonspherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles. The jamming confers the interface with solidlike properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response, while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural, and mechanical properties.

  12. Evaluation of the interfacial mechanical properties in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Wereszczak, A.A.; Riester, L.; Lowden, R.A.; Chawla, K.K.

    1993-06-01

    The present study examined the application of a micro-indentation technique to the measurement of interfacial properties in fiber reinforced ceramic composites. Specific fiber/matrix systems included SiC/glass, SiC/macro-defect-free (MDF) cement, SiC/SiC, and mullite/glass. The effect of fiber coatings upon the interfacial properties was also investigated. These properties, which included the debond strength, interfacial shear stress, and residual axial fiber stress, were evaluated by measuring the force-displacement curves generated during load-unload cycles. Estimates of these three stress values were obtained by matching the experimental force-displacement curves with data predicted from an existing model. In general the SiC/glass composites exhibited the lowest values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses. The sliding characteristics of the SiC/MDF cement and SiC/SiC composites were strongly influenced by the residual axial stress and the nature of the fiber coating. In the case of the mullite/glass composite, the high values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses reduced the measurement sensitivity, thereby increasing the uncertainty in the estimates of the interfacial properties. 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab.

  13. Stationary patterns in centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Gabriel D; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A

    2014-12-01

    A vortex sheet formalism is used to search for equilibrium shapes in the centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering problem. We study the development of interfacial instabilities when a viscous fluid surrounded by another of smaller density flows in the confined environment of a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. The peculiarity of the situation is associated to the fact that, due to a chemical reaction, the two-fluid boundary becomes an elastic layer. The interplay between centrifugal and elastic forces leads to the formation of a rich variety of stationary shapes. Visually striking equilibrium morphologies are obtained from the numerical solution of a nonlinear differential equation for the interface curvature (the shape equation), determined by a zero vorticity condition. Classification of the various families of shapes is made via two dimensionless parameters: an effective bending rigidity (ratio of elastic to centrifugal effects) and a geometrical radius of gyration. PMID:25615189

  14. Stationary patterns in centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Gabriel D.; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A.

    2014-12-01

    A vortex sheet formalism is used to search for equilibrium shapes in the centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering problem. We study the development of interfacial instabilities when a viscous fluid surrounded by another of smaller density flows in the confined environment of a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. The peculiarity of the situation is associated to the fact that, due to a chemical reaction, the two-fluid boundary becomes an elastic layer. The interplay between centrifugal and elastic forces leads to the formation of a rich variety of stationary shapes. Visually striking equilibrium morphologies are obtained from the numerical solution of a nonlinear differential equation for the interface curvature (the shape equation), determined by a zero vorticity condition. Classification of the various families of shapes is made via two dimensionless parameters: an effective bending rigidity (ratio of elastic to centrifugal effects) and a geometrical radius of gyration.

  15. Interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates: A molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Yu; Wei, Ning; Wang, Ce; Zhou, He; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Lu

    2015-11-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to analyze orientations of sodium branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates molecules at nonane/water interface, which is helpful to design optimal surfactant structures to achieve ultralow interfacial tension (IFT). Through the two dimensional density profiles, monolayer collapses are found when surfactant concentration continues to increase. Thus the precise scope of monolayer is certain and orientation can be analyzed. Based on the simulated results, we verdict the interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates at the oil-water interface, and discuss the effect of hydrophobic tail structure on surfactant assignment. Bigger hydrophobic size can slow the change rate of surfactant occupied area as steric hindrance, and surfactant meta hydrophobic tails have a stronger tendency to stretch to the oil phase below the collapsed concentration. Furthermore, an interfacial model with reference to collapse, increasing steric hindrance and charge repulsive force between interfacial surfactant molecules, responsible for effecting of surfactant concentration and structure has been supposed.

  16. The balanced-force volume tracking algorithm and global embedded interface formulation for droplet dynamics with mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Marianne M; Carlson, Neil N

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the complex interaction of droplet dynamics with mass transfer and chemical reactions is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction. High-fidelity numerical simulation of droplet dynamics with interfacial mass transfer is particularly challenging because the position of the interface between the fluids and the interface physics need to be predicted as part of the solution of the flow equations. In addition, the discontinuity in fluid density, viscosity and species concentration at the interface present additional numerical challenges. In this work, we extend our balanced-force volume-tracking algorithm for modeling surface tension force (Francois et al., 2006) and we propose a global embedded interface formulation to model the interfacial conditions of an interface in thermodynamic equilibrium. To validate our formulation, we perform simulations of pure diffusion problems in one- and two-dimensions. Then we present two and three-dimensional simulations of a single droplet dynamics rising by buoyancy with mass transfer.

  17. Numerical investigation of the factors affecting interfacial stresses in an MOD restored tooth by auto-meshed finite element method.

    PubMed

    Lin, C L; Chang, C H; Wang, C H; Ko, C C; Lee, H E

    2001-06-01

    Many researches have addressed the high correlation between the fracture of restored teeth and the prepared cavity geometry. In addition, concerns about bonding versus debonding dental materials from cavity walls and different occlusal force conditions could also alter the mechanical responses in a restored tooth. This study employed an automatic mesh procedure to investigate the mechanical interactions between different interfacial conditions and cavity parameters such as pulpal wall depth under different chewing functions. The results indicated that when occlusal force was applied directly on the tooth, it could increase unfavourable stress dramatically. When interfacial fixation was simulated as the contact condition between the tooth tissue and restorative material, it might increase the fracture potential exponentially compared with the bonded interface. For pulpal wall depth analyses, greater risks of fracture for the remaining tooth were observed in deeper cavity of mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) restorations and the existence of a pulpal wall is essential even it is only 1 mm above the gingival wall. PMID:11422677

  18. [Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.

    1993-09-01

    A joint research program funded by the DOE/BES at Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has been underway. The main efforts of the Purdue program were concentrated on the following tasks. Development of Four Sensor Measurement Method; Experimental Study of Axial Changes of Transverse Void and Interfacial Area Profiles in Bubbly Flow; Modeling of the Probe-Particle Interaction Using Monte Carlo Numerical Simulation; and Experimental Study of the Stability of Interface of Very Large Bubbles. Highlights of these research results are reported.

  19. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  20. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I.

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  1. Interfacial thermodynamics of water and six other liquid solvents.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A

    2014-06-01

    We examine the thermodynamics of the liquid-vapor interface by direct calculation of the surface entropy, enthalpy, and free energy from extensive molecular dynamics simulations using the two-phase thermodynamics (2PT) method. Results for water, acetonitrile, cyclohexane, dimethyl sulfoxide, hexanol, N-methyl acetamide, and toluene are presented. We validate our approach by predicting the interfacial surface tensions (IFT--excess surface free energy per unit area) in excellent agreement with the mechanical calculations using Kirkwood-Buff theory. Additionally, we evaluate the temperature dependence of the IFT of water as described by the TIP4P/2005, SPC/Ew, TIP3P, and mW classical water models. We find that the TIP4P/2005 and SPC/Ew water models do a reasonable job of describing the interfacial thermodynamics; however, the TIP3P and mW are quite poor. We find that the underprediction of the experimental IFT at 298 K by these water models results from understructured surface molecules whose binding energies are too weak. Finally, we performed depth profiles of the interfacial thermodynamics which revealed long tails that extend far into what would be considered bulk from standard Gibbs theory. In fact, we find a nonmonotonic interfacial free energy profile for water, a unique feature that could have important consequences for the absorption of ions and other small molecules.

  2. Manipulating Ordering Transitions in Interfacially Modified Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N.; Tureau, M; Epps, T

    2009-01-01

    We report a synthetic strategy that allows us to manipulate the interfacial region between blocks and control ordering transitions in poly(isoprene-b-styrene) [P(I-S)] block copolymers. This interfacial modification is accomplished by combining a semi-batch feed with anionic polymerization techniques. Using this approach, we are able to control the segmental composition and molecular interactions in our phase-separated block copolymers, independent of molecular weight and block constituents. A library of copolymers is prepared with various interfacial modifications to examine the effect of interfacial composition on copolymer self-assembly. The morphological characteristics of the self-assembled structures are investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Normal and inverse tapered block copolymers, containing approximately 15-35 vol% tapered material, show a measurable decrease in the order-disorder transition temperature (TODT) relative to the corresponding non-tapered diblock copolymers, with the inverse tapered materials showing the greatest deviation in TODT. Additionally, TODT was inversely related to the volume fraction of the tapered region in both normal and inverse tapered copolymer materials.

  3. Measurement of Interfacial Area Production and Permeability within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the pore-level interactions that affect multi-phase flow in porous media is important in many subsurface engineering applications, including enhanced oil recovery, remediation of dense non-aqueous liquid contaminated sites, and geologic CO2 sequestration. Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to have several shortcomings, which might partially be overcome using a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles that includes interfacial area as an additional parameter. A few static experimental studies have been previously performed, which allowed the determination of static parameters of the model, but no information exists concerning the interfacial area dynamic parameters. A new experimental porous flow cell that was constructed using stereolithography for two-phase gas-liquid flow studies was used in conjunction with an in-house analysis code to provide information on dynamic evolution of both fluid phases and gas-liquid interfaces. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the new generalized model of two-phase flow model and describe how the stereolithography flow cell experimental setup was used to obtain the dynamic parameters for the interfacial area numerical model. In particular, the methods used to determine the interfacial area permeability and production terms are shown.

  4. Interfacial tension between aluminum and chloride-fluoride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Silny, A.; Utigard, T.A.

    1996-11-01

    Scrap and recycled aluminum have to be remelted and refined before being made into useful new products. This often involves melting the aluminum under a molten salt cover in order to prevent oxidation and to enhance the coalescence and recovery of the molten metal. A technique was developed for the measurement of the interfacial tension between liquid metals and molten salts at elevated temperatures. The technique is based on the measurement of the capillary depression occurring when a capillary, which is moved vertically down through the molten salt layer, passes through the salt/metal interface. The depression is measured by simultaneous video recording of the immersion height of the alumina capillary and the position of a liquid meniscus in a horizontal tube connected to the alumina capillary. The interfacial tension was measured for (a) aluminum and an equimolar melt of NaCl + KCl with several salt additions at 1,000 K, (b) aluminum and NaCl + NaF at 1,123 K, and (c) aluminum and NaCl + KF at 1,123 K. It was found that the interfacial tension decreases with increasing amount of NaF, increases with the increasing amount of MgCl{sub 2} additions, remains unchanged with AlF{sub 3} additions, and slightly decreases with the addition of MgF{sub 2} and Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6}.

  5. Nanotube attachment for prevention of interfacial delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.; Karumuri, Anil K.

    2010-09-01

    A new approach to suppressing interfacial delamination in composites has been investigated. It involves growing strongly attached nanotubes on the surface of the core phase prior to matrix infiltration. Unusually durable interfaces between epoxy and graphite have been demonstrated using this technique. Two types of graphitic core materials have been studied: complex cellular foams having open-interconnected porosity and highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) providing a model flat interface. When untreated foam is infiltrated with epoxy, the resulting composite is brittle, and shatters before 10% compression. However, when carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on the foam prior to epoxy infiltration, the specimen becomes pliable, and visibly flattens out rather than fracturing. Model studies on a flat graphite-epoxy interface were performed by joining two HOPG specimens with a thin layer of epoxy, and testing the flexural response of the 'seam' using the three-point bend test. The untreated HOPG sandwich fails easily, whereas nanotube-attached HOPG sandwich shows an over three times increase in flexural load-carrying capacity, close to that of seamless monolithic graphite having identical dimensions. Microscopic evaluations of fractured interfaces indicate that, in all geometries, CNT grafting prevents delamination at the graphite-epoxy interface, and forces any crack(s) to propagate through the graphitic phase. This added inter-laminar strength and toughness can be related to the hierarchical morphology of the interface created by CNT attachment, and unprecedented composite structures can be envisioned.

  6. Penetration of surfactin into phospholipid monolayers: nanoscale interfacial organization.

    PubMed

    Eeman, M; Berquand, A; Dufrêne, Y F; Paquot, M; Dufour, S; Deleu, M

    2006-12-19

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with surface pressure-area isotherms were used to probe the interfacial behavior of phospholipid monolayers following penetration of surfactin, a cyclic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis strains. Prior to penetration experiments, interfacial behavior of different surfactin molecules (cyclic surfactins with three different aliphatic chain lengths--S13, S14, and S15--and a linear surfactin obtained by chemical cleavage of the cycle of the surfactin S15) has been investigated. A more hydrophobic aliphatic chain induces greater surface-active properties of the lipopeptide. The opening of the peptide ring reduces the surface activity. The effect of phospholipid acyl chain length (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine- (DPPC), and distearoylphosphatidylcholine) and phospholipid polar head (DPPC, dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine) on monolayer penetration properties of the surfactin S15 has been explored. Results showed that while the lipid monolayer thickness and the presence of electrostatic repulsions from the interfacial film do not significantly influence surfactin insertion, these parameters strongly modulate the ability of the surfactin to alter the nanoscale organization of the lipid films. We also probed the effect of surfactin structure (influence of the aliphatic chain length and of the cyclic structure of the peptide ring) on the behavior of DPPC monolayers. AFM images and isotherms showed that surfactin penetration is promoted by longer lipopeptide chain length and a cyclic polar head. This indicates that hydrophobic interactions are of main importance for the penetration power of surfactin molecules.

  7. Insect flight on fluid interfaces: a chaotic interfacial oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundarajan, Haripriya; Prakash, Manu

    2013-11-01

    Flight is critical to the dominance of insect species on our planet, with about 98 percent of insect species having wings. How complex flight control systems developed in insects is unknown, and arboreal or aquatic origins have been hypothesized. We examine the biomechanics of aquatic origins of flight. We recently reported discovery of a novel mode of ``2D flight'' in Galerucella beetles, which skim along an air-water interface using flapping wing flight. This unique flight mode is characterized by a balance between capillary forces from the interface and biomechanical forces exerted by the flapping wings. Complex interactions on the fluid interface form capillary wave trains behind the insect, and produce vertical oscillations at the surface due to non-linear forces arising from deformation of the fluid meniscus. We present both experimental observations of 2D flight kinematics and a dynamic model explaining the observed phenomena. Careful examination of this interaction predicts the chaotic nature of interfacial flight and takeoff from the interface into airborne flight. The role of wingbeat frequency, stroke plane angle and body angle in determining transition between interfacial and fully airborne flight is highlighted, shedding light on the aquatic theory of flight evolution.

  8. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation.

  9. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation. PMID:26337962

  10. Interfacial Layer Properties of a Polyaromatic Compound and its Role in Stabilizing Water-in-Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jiebin; Yang, Fan; Harbottle, David; Pensini, Erica; Tchoukov, Plamen; Simon, Sébastien; Sjöblom, Johan; Dabros, Tadek; Czarnecki, Jan; Liu, Qingxia; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-09-29

    Physical properties of interfacial layers formed at the xylene-water interface by the adsorption of a polyaromatic organic compound, N-(1-hexylheptyl)-N'-(5-carbonylicpentyl) perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic bisimide (in brief, C5Pe), were studied systematically. The deprotonation of the carboxylic group of C5Pe at alkaline pH made it highly interfacially active, significantly reducing the xylene-water interfacial tension. Thin liquid film experiments showed a continuous buildup of heterogeneous C5Pe interfacial layers at the xylene-water interfaces, which contributed to the formation of stable W/O emulsions. Continual accumulation and rearrangement of C5Pe aggregates at the xylene-water interface to form a thick layer was confirmed by in situ Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The rheology measurement of the interfacial layer by double-wall ring interfacial rheometry under oscillatory shear showed that the interfacial layers formed from C5Pe solutions of high concentrations were substantially more elastic and rigid. The presence of elastically dominant interfacial layers of C5Pe led to the formation of stable water-in-xylene emulsions.

  11. Logarithmic finite-size effects on interfacial free energies: phenomenological theory and Monte Carlo studies.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-07-01

    The computation of interfacial free energies between coexisting phases (e.g., saturated vapor and liquid) by computer simulation methods is still a challenging problem due to the difficulty of an atomistic identification of an interface and interfacial fluctuations on all length scales. The approach to estimate the interfacial tension from the free-energy excess of a system with interfaces relative to corresponding single-phase systems does not suffer from the first problem but still suffers from the latter. Considering d-dimensional systems with interfacial area L(d-1) and linear dimension L(z) in the direction perpendicular to the interface, it is argued that the interfacial fluctuations cause logarithmic finite-size effects of order ln(L)/L(d-1) and order ln(L(z))/L(d-1), in addition to regular corrections (with leading-order const/L(d-1)). A phenomenological theory predicts that the prefactors of the logarithmic terms are universal (but depend on the applied boundary conditions and the considered statistical ensemble). The physical origin of these corrections are the translational entropy of the interface as a whole, "domain breathing" (coupling of interfacial fluctuations to the bulk order parameter fluctuations of the coexisting domains), and capillary waves. Using a new variant of the ensemble switch method, interfacial tensions are found from Monte Carlo simulations of d = 2 and d = 3 Ising models and a Lennard-Jones fluid. The simulation results are fully consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  12. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  13. Hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

    PubMed

    Abel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles such as hydrated ions and transient hydrated electrons, the simplest anionic reducing agents in water, and the special hydronium and hydroxide ions at water interfaces play an important role in many fields of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, radiation chemistry, and biology, as well as biochemistry. This article focuses on these species near hydrophobic interfaces of water, such as the air or vacuum interface of water or water protein/membrane interfaces. Ions at interfaces as well as solvated electrons have been reviewed frequently during the past decade. Although all species have been known for some time with seemingly familiar features, recently the picture in all cases became increasingly diffuse rather than clearer. The current account gives a critical state-of-the art overview of what is known and what remains to be understood and investigated about hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

  14. Interfacial instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Madison

    2015-11-01

    Determining the critera for onset and amplitude growth of instabilities is one of the central problems of fluid mechanics. We develop a parallel between the Kapitsa effect, in which a pendulum subject to high-frequency low-amplitude vibrations becomes stable in the inverted position, and interfaces separating fluids of different density. It has long been known that such interfaces can be stabilized by vibrations, even when the denser fluid is on top. We demonstrate that the stability diagram for these fluid interfaces is identical to the stability diagram for an appopriate Kapitsa pendulum. We expand the robust, ``dictionary''-type relationship between Kapitsa pendula and interfacial instabilities by considering the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Plateau instabilities, as well as less-canonical examples ranging in scale from the micron to the width of a galaxy.

  15. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  16. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  17. Interfacial phenomena in foam flooding process for heavy oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.K.; Shah, D.O.

    1983-08-01

    The ability of pure and commercial foaming agents to generate in situ foams and their effects on air mobility, breakthrough time, fluid recovery and oil displacement efficiency have been studied. These parameters were correlated with the interfacial properties of foaming agents. A striking decrease in the air mobility was observed with increasing temperature as well as pressure which in turn increased the effectiveness of foams to displace additional fluid. It was observed that the chain length compatibility and molecular packing at the air-liquid interface strikingly influenced the interfacial properties of foaming agents, microscopic characteristics and behavior of foams. From the studies on mixed surfactant systems, a minimum in surface tension, a maximum in surface viscosity, a minimum in bubble size and a maximum in heavy oil displacement efficiency in a porous medium were observed when both the components of the foaming system had equal chain length.

  18. Computational micromechanics analysis of electron hopping and interfacial damage induced piezoresistive response in carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, A. K.; Ren, X.; Seidel, G. D.

    2014-07-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit an effective macroscale piezoresistive response, i.e., change in macroscale resistivity when subjected to applied deformation. The macroscale piezoresistive response of CNT-polymer nanocomposites leads to deformation/strain sensing capabilities. It is believed that the nanoscale phenomenon of electron hopping is the major driving force behind the observed macroscale piezoresistivity of such nanocomposites. Additionally, CNT-polymer nanocomposites provide damage sensing capabilities because of local changes in electron hopping pathways at the nanoscale because of initiation/evolution of damage. The primary focus of the current work is to explore the effect of interfacial separation and damage at the nanoscale CNT-polymer interface on the effective macroscale piezoresistive response. Interfacial separation and damage are allowed to evolve at the CNT-polymer interface through coupled electromechanical cohesive zones, within a finite element based computational micromechanics framework, resulting in electron hopping based current density across the separated CNT-polymer interface. The macroscale effective material properties and gauge factors are evaluated using micromechanics techniques based on electrostatic energy equivalence. The impact of the electron hopping mechanism, nanoscale interface separation and damage evolution on the effective nanocomposite electrostatic and piezoresistive response is studied in comparison with the perfectly bonded interface. The effective electrostatic/piezoresistive response for the perfectly bonded interface is obtained based on a computational micromechanics model developed in the authors’ earlier work. It is observed that the macroscale effective gauge factors are highly sensitive to strain induced formation/disruption of electron hopping pathways, interface separation and the initiation/evolution of interfacial damage.

  19. Interfacial Shear Strength of Multilayer Graphene Oxide Films.

    PubMed

    Daly, Matthew; Cao, Changhong; Sun, Hao; Sun, Yu; Filleter, Tobin; Singh, Chandra Veer

    2016-02-23

    Graphene oxide (GO) is considered as one of the most promising layered materials with tunable physical properties and applicability in many important engineering applications. In this work, the interfacial behavior of multilayer GO films was directly investigated via GO-to-GO friction force microscopy, and the interfacial shear strength (ISS) was measured to be 5.3 ± 3.2 MPa. Based on high resolution atomic force microscopy images and the available chemical data, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the influence of functional structure, topological defects, and interlayer registry on the shear response of the GO films. Theoretical values for shear strength ranging from 17 to 132 MPa were predicted for the different structures studied, providing upper bounds for the ISS. Computational results also revealed the atomic origins of the stochastic nature of friction measurements. Specifically, the wide scatter in experimental measurements was attributed to variations in functional structure and topological defects within the sliding volume. The findings of this study provide important insight for understanding the significant differences in strength between monolayer and bulk graphene oxide materials and can be useful for engineering topological structures with tunable mechanical properties.

  20. Effect of the environmental humidity on the bulk, interfacial and nanoconfined properties of an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Jurado, L Andres; Kim, Hojun; Rossi, Antonella; Arcifa, Andrea; Schuh, Jonathon K; Spencer, Nicholas D; Leal, Cecilia; Ewoldt, Randy H; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2016-08-10

    With reference to our previous surface-force study on 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([HMIM] EtSO4) using an extended surface forces apparatus, which showed an ordered structure within the nanoconfined dry ionic liquid (IL) between mica surfaces that extended up to ∼60 nm from the surface, this work focuses on the influence of the environmental humidity on the bulk, interfacial and nanoconfined structure of [HMIM] EtSO4. Infrared spectroscopy and rheometry reflect the changes in chemical and physical properties of the bulk IL due to the uptake of water when exposed to ambient humidity, while wide-angle X-ray scattering shows a mild swelling of the bulk nanostructure, and the AFM sharp tip reveals an additional surface layer at the mica-IL interface. When the water-containing [HMIM] EtSO4 is nanoconfined between two mica surfaces, no long-range order is detected, in contrast to the results obtained for the dry IL, which demonstrates that the presence of water can prevent the liquid-to-solid transformation of this IL. A combination of techniques and the calculated Bjerrum length indicate that water molecules weaken interionic electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, which lessens ion-ion correlations. Our work shows that the solid-like behavior of the nanoconfined IL strongly depends on the presence of absorbed water and hence, it has implications with regard to the correct interpretation of laboratory studies and their extension to real applications in lubrication. PMID:27430333

  1. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Haghighatpanah, Shayesteh; Bohlén, Martin; Bolton, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular mechanics (MM) methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polyethylene and SWNT-polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the SWNT with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1 to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the SWNT wall. PMID:25229056

  2. Indirect measurement of interfacial melting from macroscopic ice observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saruya, Tomotaka; Kurita, Kei; Rempel, Alan W.

    2014-06-01

    Premelted water that is adsorbed to particle surfaces and confined to capillary regions remains in the liquid state well below the bulk melting temperature and can supply the segregated growth of ice lenses. Using macroscopic measurements of ice-lens initiation position in step-freezing experiments, we infer how the nanometer-scale thicknesses of premelted films depend on temperature depression below bulk melting. The interfacial interactions between ice, liquid, and soda-lime glass particles exhibit a power-law behavior that suggests premelting in our system is dominated by short-range electrostatic forces. Using our inferred film thicknesses as inputs to a simple force-balance model with no adjustable parameters, we obtain good quantitative agreement between numerical predictions and observed ice-lens thickness. Macroscopic observations of lensing behavior have the potential as probes of premelting behavior in other systems.

  3. Indirect measurement of interfacial melting from macroscopic ice observations.

    PubMed

    Saruya, Tomotaka; Kurita, Kei; Rempel, Alan W

    2014-06-01

    Premelted water that is adsorbed to particle surfaces and confined to capillary regions remains in the liquid state well below the bulk melting temperature and can supply the segregated growth of ice lenses. Using macroscopic measurements of ice-lens initiation position in step-freezing experiments, we infer how the nanometer-scale thicknesses of premelted films depend on temperature depression below bulk melting. The interfacial interactions between ice, liquid, and soda-lime glass particles exhibit a power-law behavior that suggests premelting in our system is dominated by short-range electrostatic forces. Using our inferred film thicknesses as inputs to a simple force-balance model with no adjustable parameters, we obtain good quantitative agreement between numerical predictions and observed ice-lens thickness. Macroscopic observations of lensing behavior have the potential as probes of premelting behavior in other systems.

  4. Improvement of interfacial adhesion of biodegradable polymers coated on metal surface by nanocoupling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyeon; Cho, Seong Bae; Lee, Bong Soo; Joung, Yoon Ki; Park, Kwideok; Han, Dong Keun

    2011-12-01

    A method of securing the adhesion of biodegradable polymer coating was investigated for drug-eluting metal stents, using surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization (SI-ROP) of L-lactide. Introduction of oligolactide on the stainless steel (SS) surface was successful and the thickness of the oligolactide grafts remained on the nanometer scale, as determined by ellipsometry. The presence of an oligolactide graft was also identified using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). On top of the grafts, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) coating was carried out on different substrates such as SS control, plasma-treated SS, and lactide-grafted (referred to as a nanocoupled) SS using electrospraying. When the adhesion forces were measured with a scratch tester, the nanocoupled SS showed the strongest interfacial adhesion between polymer coating layer and metal substrate. The outcome of the peel-off test was also consistent with the result of the scratch test. When degradation behavior of the polymer coating in vitro was examined for up to 4 weeks in a continuous fluid flow, the SEM images demonstrated that polymer degradation was obvious due to hydration and swelling of the polymer matrix. Although the matrix completely disappeared after 4 weeks for SS control and plasma-treated substrates, the nanocoupled SS was persistent with some polymer matrix. In addition, the release profiles of SRL-loaded PLGA coating appeared slightly different between control and nanocoupled groups. This work suggested that the concept of nanocoupling remarkably improved the interfacial adhesion stability between metal surface and polymer layer and controlled drug release, and showed the feasibility of drug-eluting stents.

  5. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  6. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  7. Interfacial optimization of tungsten fibre-reinforced copper for high-temperature heat sink material for fusion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, A.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Bolt, H.

    2009-04-01

    W fibre-reinforced Cu shows great promise to improve the mechanical performance at high-temperatures compared to conventional Cu-based alloys. Focus was placed on the optimization of the interface to achieve an enhanced adhesion between W fibre and Cu matrix. The interfacial properties were investigated through pull-out measurements of single matrix-coated fibres for different interfacial concepts. The interfacial adhesion of W and Cu is determined solely through mechanical interlocking. Interdiffusion and segregations experiment showed that there are no interface reactions between W and Cu at elevated temperatures. From the investigated interfacial concepts, a stepwise graded transition interface with additional heat treatment was found to achieve the highest interfacial shear strength. The thermal stability of the MMC in thermal cycling tests can be assured by depositing a stepwise graded transition between W fibre and Cu matrix.

  8. Interfacial adsorption in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Cruz, M.O. de la; Voorhees, P.W.

    1999-11-26

    Interfaces of A-B-C ternary alloys decomposed into two and three phases are studied. The effect of the gradient energy coefficients {bar {kappa}}{sub II}, I = A, B, C, on the interface composition profiles of ternary alloys is examined. The adsorption of component C in ternary alloys is obtained numerically by finding steady-state solutions of the nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard equations and by solving the two Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from minimizing the interfacial energy, and analytically near the critical point. It is found that the solutions from both numerical methods are identical for a two-phase system. In symmetric ternary systems (equal interaction energy between each pair of components) with a minority component C, the gradient energy coefficient of C, {bar {kappa}}{sub CC}, can have a very strong influence on the degree of adsorption. In the {alpha} and {beta} two-phase regions, where {alpha} and {beta} are the phases rich in the majority components A and B, respectively, as {bar {kappa}}{sub CC} increases, the adsorption of the minority component C in the {alpha} and {beta} interfaces decreases. Near a critical point, however, the degree of adsorption of minority component C is independent of the gradient energy coefficient.

  9. Interfacial engineering for silica nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, David; Hui, Yue; Middelberg, Anton P J; Zhao, Chun-Xia

    2016-10-01

    Silica nanocapsules have attracted significant interest due to their core-shell hierarchical structure. The core domain allows the encapsulation of various functional components such as drugs, fluorescent and magnetic nanoparticles for applications in drug delivery, imaging and sensing, and the silica shell with its unique properties including biocompatibility, chemical and physical stability, and surface-chemistry tailorability provides a protection layer for the encapsulated cargo. Therefore, significant effort has been directed to synthesize silica nanocapsules with engineered properties, including size, composition and surface functionality, for various applications. This review provides a comprehensive overview of emerging methods for the manufacture of silica nanocapsules, with a special emphasis on different interfacial engineering strategies. The review starts with an introduction of various manufacturing approaches of silica nanocapsules highlighting surface engineering of the core template nanomaterials (solid nanoparticles, liquid droplets, and gas bubbles) using chemicals or biomolecules which are able to direct nucleation and growth of silica at the boundary of two-phase interfaces (solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and gas-liquid). Next, surface functionalization of silica nanocapsules is presented. Furthermore, strategies and challenges of encapsulating active molecules (pre-loading and post-loading approaches) in these capsular systems are critically discussed. Finally, applications of silica nanocapsules in controlled release, imaging, and theranostics are reviewed. PMID:27522646

  10. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  11. Design principles of interfacial thermal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Carlos; Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zhang, Jingjie; Le, Nam; Norris, Pamela; Ghosh, Avik

    We explore fundamental principles to design the thermal conductance across solid interfaces by changing the composition and disorder of an intermediate matching layer. In absence of phonon-phonon interactions, the layer addition involves two competing effects that influence the conductance. The layer can act as an impedance matching 'bridge' to increase the mode-averaged phonon transmission. However, it also reduces the relevant modes that conserve their momenta transverse to the interface, so that the net result depends on features such as the overlap of conserving modes and the dispersivity of the transverse subbands. Moving into the interacting anharmonic regime, we find that the added layer aids conductance when the decreased resistances at the contact-layer boundaries compensate for the layer resistance. In fact, we show that the maximum conductance corresponds to an exact matching of the two separate contact-layer resistances. For instance, if we vary just the atomic mass across layers, then maximum conductance happens when the intervening layer mass is the geometric mean of the contact masses. We conjecture that the best interfacial layer is one that is compositionally graded into many geometric means - in other words, an exponential variation in thermal impedance.

  12. Quantitative morphological characterization of bicontinuous Pickering emulsions via interfacial curvatures.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Matthew; Stratford, Kevin; Thijssen, Job H J

    2016-05-14

    Bicontinuous Pickering emulsions (bijels) are a physically interesting class of soft materials with many potential applications including catalysis, microfluidics and tissue engineering. They are created by arresting the spinodal decomposition of a partially-miscible liquid with a (jammed) layer of interfacial colloids. Porosity L (average interfacial separation) of the bijel is controlled by varying the radius (r) and volume fraction (ϕ) of the colloids (L∝r/ϕ). However, to optimize the bijel structure with respect to other parameters, e.g. quench rate, characterizing by L alone is insufficient. Hence, we have used confocal microscopy and X-ray CT to characterize a range of bijels in terms of local and area-averaged interfacial curvatures; we further demonstrate that bijels are bicontinuous using an image-analysis technique known as 'region growing'. In addition, the curvatures of bijels have been monitored as a function of time, which has revealed an intriguing evolution up to 60 minutes after bijel formation, contrary to previous understanding. PMID:27035101

  13. Quantitative morphological characterization of bicontinuous Pickering emulsions via interfacial curvatures.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Matthew; Stratford, Kevin; Thijssen, Job H J

    2016-05-14

    Bicontinuous Pickering emulsions (bijels) are a physically interesting class of soft materials with many potential applications including catalysis, microfluidics and tissue engineering. They are created by arresting the spinodal decomposition of a partially-miscible liquid with a (jammed) layer of interfacial colloids. Porosity L (average interfacial separation) of the bijel is controlled by varying the radius (r) and volume fraction (ϕ) of the colloids (L∝r/ϕ). However, to optimize the bijel structure with respect to other parameters, e.g. quench rate, characterizing by L alone is insufficient. Hence, we have used confocal microscopy and X-ray CT to characterize a range of bijels in terms of local and area-averaged interfacial curvatures; we further demonstrate that bijels are bicontinuous using an image-analysis technique known as 'region growing'. In addition, the curvatures of bijels have been monitored as a function of time, which has revealed an intriguing evolution up to 60 minutes after bijel formation, contrary to previous understanding.

  14. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  15. Interfacial destabilization and atomization driven by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Aisha; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2008-07-01

    Surface acoustic wave atomization is a rapid means for generating micron and submicron aerosol droplets. Little, however, is understood about the mechanisms by which these droplets form due to the complex hydrodynamic processes that occur across widely varying length and time scales. Through experiments, scaling theory, and simple numerical modeling, we elucidate the interfacial destabilization mechanisms that lead to droplet formation. Using a millimeter-order fluid drop exposed to surface acoustic waves as it sits atop a single-crystal lithium niobate piezoelectric substrate, large aerosol droplets on the length scale of the parent drop dimension are ejected through a whipping and pinch-off phenomenon, which occurs at the asymmetrically formed crest of the drop due to leakage of acoustic radiation at the Rayleigh angle. Smaller micron order droplets, on the other hand, are formed due to the axisymmetric breakup of cylindrical liquid jets that are ejected as a consequence of interfacial destabilization. The 10μm droplet dimension correlates with the jet radius and the instability wavelength, both determined from a simple scaling argument involving a viscous-capillary dominant force balance. The results are further supported by numerical solution of the evolution equation governing the interfacial profile of a sessile drop along which an acoustic pressure wave is imposed. Viscous and capillary forces dominate in the bulk of the parent drop, but inertia is dominant in the ejected jets and within a thin boundary layer adjacent to the substrate where surface and interfacial accelerations are large. With the specific exception of parent drops that spread into thin films with thicknesses on the order of the boundary layer dimension prior to atomization, the free surface of the drop is always observed to vibrate at the capillary-viscous resonance frequency—even if the exciting frequency of the surface acoustic wave is several orders of magnitude larger—contrary to

  16. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  17. NGSI student activities in open source information analysis in support of the training program of the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the additional protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M Analisa; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, Marisa N; Boyer, Brian D; Stevens, Rebecca S

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 a joint team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consisting of specialists in training of IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S. Doe laboratories for the entry into force of the Additional Protocol. As a major part of the support of the activity, LANL summer interns provided open source information analysis to the LANL-BNL mock inspection team. They were a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's (NGSI) summer intern program aimed at producing the next generation of safeguards specialists. This paper describes how they used open source information to 'backstop' the LANL-BNL team's effort to construct meaningful Additional Protocol Complementary Access training scenarios for each of the three DOE laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  18. Determination of interfacial tension of binary mixtures from perturbative approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.

    2015-05-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules from direct simulation of the vapour-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with same molecular size but different dispersive energy parameter values. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček, presented recently by MacDowell and Blas and Martínez-Ruiz et al., to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of Lennard-Jones molecules with a cut-off distance rc = 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ε22/ε11, is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the less volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, a direct consequence of stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in

  19. Polyfluorene Electrolytes Interfacial Layer for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells: Controllably Interfacial Dipoles by Regulation of Polar Groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Hu, Lin; Wu, Feiyan; Chen, Lie; Chen, Yiwang

    2016-04-20

    The polar groups in the conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) can create the favorable dipoles at the electrode/active layer interface, which is critical for the CPEs to minimize the interfacial energy barrier in polymer solar cells (PSCs). Herein, a series of CPEs based on poly [(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-co-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] derivates (PFNs) (PFN30, PFN50, PFN70, and PFN100) with different mole ratio of polar groups (-N(C2H5)2) were designed and synthesized to investigate the effect of the numbers of polar groups on the interfacial dipoles. Controllably interfacial dipoles could be readily achieved by only tuning the numbers of -N(C2H5)2 in PFNs, as revealed by the work function of the PFNs modified ITO gradually reduced as the loadings of the -N(C2H5)2 increased. In addition, increasing the numbers of -N(C2H5)2 in PFNs were also favorable for developing the smooth and homogeneous morphology of the active layer. As a result, the content of the polar amine in the PFNs exerted great influence on the performance of polymer solar cells. Increasing the numbers of the pendent -N(C2H5)2 could effectively improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the devices. Among these PFNs, PFN100 with the highest content of -N(C2H5)2 polar groups delivered the device with the best PCE of 3.27%. It indicates tailoring the content of the polar groups in the CPEs interlayer is a facial and promising approach for interfacial engineering to developing high performance PSCs.

  20. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    also of the metal elements in the nanoparticle cores, in contrast to the bulk-exchange counterparts where these distributions were homogeneous within the nanoparticles, as manifested in contact angle, UV--vis, XPS, and TEM measurements. More interestingly, the electrocatalytic performance of the Janus nanoparticles was markedly better than the bulk-exchange ones, suggesting that the segregated distribution of the polar ligands from the apolar ones might further facilitate charge transfer from Ag to Au in the nanoparticle cores, leading to additional improvement of the adsorption and reduction of oxygen. This interfacial protocol was then adopted to prepare trimetallic Ag AuPt Neapolitan nanoparticles by two sequential galvanic exchange reactions of 1-hexanethiolate-capped silver nanoparticles with gold(I)-thiomalic acid and platinum(II)-hexanethiolate complexes. As both reactions were confined to an interface, the Au and Pt elements were situated on two opposite poles of the original Ag nanoparticles, which was clearly manifested in elemental mapping of the nanoparticles, and consistent with the damping and red-shift of the nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance. As nanoscale analogs to conventional amphiphilic molecules, the resulting Janus nanoparticles were found to form oil-in-water micelle-like or water-in-oil reverse micelle-like superparticulate structures depending on the solvent media. These unique characteristics were exploited for the effective transfer of diverse guest nanoparticles between organic and water phase. The transfer of hydrophobic nanoparticles from organic to water media or water-soluble nanoparticles to the organic phase was evidenced by TEM, DLS, UV-Vis, and PL measurements. In particular, line scans based on EDS analysis showed that the vesicle-like structures consisted of multiple layers of the Janus nanoparticles, which encapsulated the guest nanoparticles in the cores. The results highlight the unique effectiveness of using Janus

  1. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2002-03-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  2. Li-Doped Ionic Liquid Electrolytes: From Bulk Phase to Interfacial Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids have been proposed as candidate electrolytes for high-energy density, rechargeable batteries. We present an extensive computational analysis supported by experimental comparisons of the bulk and interfacial properties of a representative set of these electrolytes as a function of Li-salt doping. We begin by investigating the bulk electrolyte using quantum chemistry and ab initio molecular dynamics to elucidate the solvation structure of Li(+). MD simulations using the polarizable force field of Borodin and coworkers were then performed, from which we obtain an array of thermodynamic and transport properties. Excellent agreement is found with experiments for diffusion, ionic conductivity, and viscosity. Combining MD simulations with electronic structure computations, we computed the electrochemical window of the electrolytes across a range of Li(+)-doping levels and comment on the role of the liquid environment. Finally, we performed a suite of simulations of these Li-doped electrolytes at ideal electrified interfaces to evaluate the differential capacitance and the equilibrium Li(+) distribution in the double layer. The magnitude of differential capacitance is in good agreement with our experiments and exhibits the characteristic camel-shaped profile. In addition, the simulations reveal Li(+) to be highly localized to the second molecular layer of the double layer, which is supported by additional computations that find this layer to be a free energy minimum with respect to Li(+) translation.

  3. Interfacial Behavior of Polymer Coated Nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Luqing; Shamsijazeyi, Hadi; Mann, Jason; Verduzco, Rafael; Hirasaki, George; Rice University Team

    2015-03-01

    Oxidized carbon black (OCB) nanoparticle is functionalized with different coatings, i.e. alkyl group, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and partially sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol (sPVA). In oil and water systems, the functionalized nanoparticle is found to have a versatile dispersion i.e. in lower aqueous phase, in upper oil phase, or in middle phase microemulsion. Oil substitute n-octane and commercial oil IOSPAR have been test as oil phase; series of commercially available surfactant, C12-4,5 orthoxylene sulfonate(OXS), i-C13-(PO)7 -SO4Na (S13B), surfactant blend of anionic Alfoterra with nonionic Tergitol have been test as additive to help with the OCB dispersion. It is found that the OCB with sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol attachment (sPVA-OCB) stays in microemulsion; with the increase of salinity, it follows the microemulsion to go from lower phase, to middle phase, and to upper phase. The dispersion of sPVA and alkyl functionalized OCB (Cn-OCB-sPVA) is the balance of the length of alkyl and sPVA and the degree of sulfonation of PVA, depending on which, it can either disperse into microemulsion or form a separate layer. The sPVA-OCB also indicates a tolerance of high salinity; this is shown by the stable dispersion of it in blend surfactant solution of anionic Alfoterra and nonionic Tergitol at high salinity API brine(8% NaCl and 2% CaCl2). The study of different functionality on OCB dispersion can help design appropriate modified nanoparticle as additive for enhanced oil recovery either to reduce the interfacial tension between oil and water, or to stabilize microemulsion.

  4. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  5. Interfacial rheometry of polymer at a water-oil interface by intra-pair magnetophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, Stefano; de Jong, Arthur M; Baudry, Jean; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-07-01

    We describe an interfacial rheometry technique based on pairs of micrometer-sized magnetic particles at a fluid-fluid interface. The particles are repeatedly attracted and repelled by well-controlled magnetic dipole-dipole forces, so-called interfacial rheometry by intra-pair magnetophoresis (IPM). From the forces (∼pN), displacements (∼μm) and velocities (∼μm s(-1)) of the particles we are able to quantify the interfacial drag coefficient of particles within a few seconds and over very long timescales. The use of local dipole-dipole forces makes the system insensitive to fluid flow and suited for simultaneously recording many particles in parallel over a long period of time. We apply IPM to study the time-dependent adsorption of an oil-soluble amino-modified silicone polymer at a water-oil interface using carboxylated magnetic particles. At low polymer concentration the carboxylated particles remain on the water side of the water-oil interface, while at high polymer concentrations the particles transit into the oil phase. Both conditions show a drag coefficient that does not depend on time. However, at intermediate polymer concentrations data show an increase of the interfacial drag coefficient as a function of time, with an increase over more than three orders of magnitude (10(-7) to 10(-4) N s m(-1)), pointing to a strong polymer-polymer interaction at the interface. The time-dependence of the interfacial drag appears to be highly sensitive to the polymer concentration and to the ionic strength of the aqueous phase. We foresee that IPM will be a very convenient technique to study fluid-fluid interfaces for a broad range of materials systems. PMID:27253322

  6. Transient Interfacial Phenomena in Miscible Polymer Systems (TIPMPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.; Bessonov, Nicholas; Volpert, Vitaly; Wilke, Hermann

    2003-01-01

    the square gradient parameter, k, and our use of the estimates in modeling of the planned TIPMPS experiments. We developed a model consisting of the heat and diffusion equations with convective terms and of the Navier-Stokes equations with an additional volume force written in the form of the Korteweg stresses arising from nonlocal interaction in the fluid. The fluid's viscosity dependence on polymer conversion and temperature was taken from measurements of poly(dodecyl acrylate). Numerical modeling demonstrated that significant flows would arise for conditions corresponding to the planned experiments.

  7. Assessment of measurement techniques to determine the interfacial properties of bilayer dental ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anunmana, Chuchai

    The clinical success of all-ceramic dental restorations depends on the quality of interfacial bonding between ceramic layers. In addition, the residual stress in the structure that developed during ceramic processing is one of the important factors that contributes to the quality of the bond. Because all-ceramic restorations are usually fabricated as bilayer or trilayer structures and failures of all-ceramic restorations have been frequently reported as chipping or delamination of the veneer layers, the interfacial quality of bilayer dental ceramic restorations was investigated. However, most of the published bond test data reflect strength values that are inversely related to cross-sectional areas and failure locations are frequently disregarded or bond strength values are misinterpreted. In addition, residual tensile stresses that develop in the structures because of thermal expansion/contraction mismatches may also adversely affect interfacial fracture resistance. The first objective of this study was to determine the interfacial toughness of bonded bilayer ceramics using two different approaches. The results indicate that the short-bar chevron-notch test and a controlled-flaw microtensile test can induce interfacial failure that represents true bonding quality. The second objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that residual stresses estimated from an indentation technique are not significantly different from residual stresses that are calculated based on fractography and flexural strength. The indentation technique may be useful as a simplified method to determine residual stresses in bilayer dental ceramics. The results of this study demonstrate that there is no significant difference in mean residual stresses determined from the two techniques. Because of relationship between residual stresses and apparent interfacial toughness, estimates of residual stresses can now be estimated more rapidly by measuring the apparent interfacial toughness of

  8. Effect of polycarboxylate ether comb-type polymer on viscosity and interfacial properties of kaolinite clay suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Lu, Qingye; Xu, Zhenghe; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2012-07-15

    The interactions between kaolinite clay particles and a comb-type polymer (polycarboxylate ether or PCE), so-called PCE super-plasticizer, were investigated through viscosity and surface forces measurements by a rheometer and a Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA). The addition of PCE shows a strong impact on the viscosity of concentrated kaolinite suspensions in alkaline solutions (pH=8.3) but a weak effect under acidic conditions (pH=3.4). In acidic solutions, the high viscosity measured is attributed to the strong electrostatic interaction between negatively charged basal planes and positively charged edge surfaces of clay particles. Under the alkaline condition, the suspension viscosity was found to first increase significantly and then decrease with increasing PCE dosages. The results from surface forces measurement show that PCE molecules at low dosages can bridge the kaolinite particles in the concentrated suspensions via hydrogen bonding, leading to the formation of a kaolinite-PCE "network" and hence an increased suspension viscosity. At high PCE dosages, clay particles are fully covered by PCE molecules, leading to a more dispersed kaolinite suspensions and hence lower suspension viscosity due to steric repulsion between the adsorbed PCE molecules. The insights derived from measuring viscosity and interfacial properties of kaolinite suspensions containing varying amount of comb-type super-plasticizer PCE at different pH provide the foundation for many engineering applications and optimizing industrial processes. PMID:22591681

  9. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  10. Interfacial closure of contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, F.; Rauer, C.; Moriceau, H.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the contact between solid surfaces is a long-standing problem which has a strong impact on the physics of many processes such as adhesion, friction, lubrication and wear. Experimentally, the investigation of solid/solid interfaces remains challenging today, due to the lack of experimental techniques able to provide sub-nanometer scale information on interfaces buried between millimeters of materials. Yet, a strong interest exists improving the modeling of contact mechanics of materials in order to adjust their interface properties (e.g., thermal transport, friction). We show here that the essential features of the residual gap between contacting surfaces can be measured using high energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity. The presence of this nano-gap is general to the contact of solids. In some special case however, it can be removed when attractive forces take over repulsive contributions, depending on both height and wavelength of asperity distributions (roughness). A criterion for this instability is established in the standard case of van der Waals attractive forces and elastic asperity compression repulsive forces (Hertz model). This collapse instability is confirmed experimentally in the case of silicon direct bonding, using high-energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity and adhesion energy measurements. The possibility to achieve fully closed interfaces at room temperature opens interesting perspectives to build stronger assemblies with smaller thermal budgets.

  11. Microfluidic ultralow interfacial tensiometry with magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Scott S H; Wexler, Jason S; Wan, Jiandi; Stone, Howard A

    2013-01-01

    We describe a technique that measures ultralow interfacial tensions using paramagnetic spheres in a co-flow microfluidic device designed with a magnetic section. Our method involves tuning the distance between the co-flowing interface and the magnet's center, and observing the behavior of the spheres as they approach the liquid-liquid interface-the particles either pass through or are trapped by the interface. Using threshold values of the magnet-to-interface distance, we make estimates of the two-fluid interfacial tension. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique for measuring very low interfacial tensions, O(10(-6)-10(-5)) N m(-1), by testing solutions of different surfactant concentrations, and we show that our results are comparable with measurements made using a spinning drop tensiometer. PMID:23154819

  12. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  13. Monitoring of interfacial tensions by drop counting

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Boring, C.P.; McLaughlin, J.F.; Harless, D.P.

    1988-11-01

    A capillary tube device was shown to provide a rapid means of measuring the interfacial tension between water and Freon-113. The measurement technique is based on counting the number of drops that form when a fixed volume of water passes through the capillary tube into the bulk Freon. The interfacial tension is predicted to be proportional to the number of drops to the negative 2/3 power. Calibration curves were obtained for Freon-water samples containing known concentrations of a surfactant. A standard Gibbs adsorption curve was obtained. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Mechanisms governing the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system with double ceramic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Fan, Xueling; Wang, T. J.

    2016-05-01

    A systematic study of factors affecting the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system (TBCs) with double ceramic layers (DCL) is presented. Crack driving forces for delaminations at two weak interfaces are examined. The results show that a thicker outermost ceramic layer can induce dramatic increase in crack driving force and make the interface between two ceramic coatings become more prone to delamination. The behavior is shown to be more prominent in TBCs with stiffer outmost coating. The thickness ratio of two ceramic layers is an important parameter for controlling the failure mechanisms and determining the lifetime of DCL TBCs under inservice condition. By accounting for the influences of thickness ratio of two ceramic layers and interfacial fracture toughnesses of two involved interfaces, the fracture mechanism map of DCL TBCs has been constructed, in which different failure mechanisms are identified. The results quanlitatively agree with the aviliable experimental data.

  15. Francois Frenkiel Award Lecture: Thermocapillary migration of interfacial droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Edwin F.

    2010-11-01

    Thermocapillary migration of bubbles through the bulk liquid--a process in which tangential surface stresses arising from the variation of surface tension with temperature create a propulsive force on the bubble--has been extensively studied in the past. In contrast, the motion of droplets confined to the free surface of a liquid substrate has received much less attention. Recent developments in microfluidics provided new motivation to understand how applied thermal gradients can affect the motion of, and mixing inside, small aqueous droplets. In particular, the quality and speed of mixing depend rather sensitively on the flow structure inside the droplet. In this talk we describe different approaches that allow one to compute both the flow inside interfacial droplets and the flow in the layer of liquid substrate supporting the droplet and the lessons which can be learned by analyzing these flows.

  16. Non-equilibrium dynamics and structure of interfacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-07-01

    Stimulated by recent experiments [C.-Y. Ruan et al. Science 304, (2004) 81], we have performed molecular dynamics and ab initio structural studies of the laser-induced heating and restructuring processes of nanometer-scale ice on a substrate of chlorine terminated Si(1 1 1). Starting from proton disordered cubic ice configurations the thin film behavior has been characterized at several temperatures up to the melting point. The surface induces order with crystallization in the Ic lattice, but with void amorphous regions. The structure changes on the ultrashort time scale and restructures by heat dissipation depending on the relaxation time and final temperature. Our results show the general behavior observed experimentally, thus providing the nature of forces in the atomic-scale description of interfacial ice.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of the microstructure of the aluminum/alumina interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Hai; Liu, Qiwen; Liu, Lisheng; Lai, Xin; She, Wuchang; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    The atomic structure and charge distribution pattern of the Al/α-Al2O3 interface were studied utilizing molecular dynamics simulations. In order to accurately describe the interactions between the atoms around the interface, the charge transfer ionic and embedded atom method potential was used. Energetically preferable Al/α-Al2O3 interface systems were first determined to study the layer structures of the interface systems. Two energetically preferable Al/α-Al2O3 interface systems with a [ 1 bar 1 0 ](1 1 1) Al ∥ [ 1 0 1 bar 0 ](0 0 0 1) Al2O3 orientation relationship were obtained, corresponding to the atop-O Al-terminated and atop-O O-terminated relaxed models, respectively. Further studies revealed the presence of an interfacial layer, which is consistent with experimental results. The models predict a thickness of the interfacial layer between 12.14 Å and 16.82 Å. It is composed of aluminum suboxide (with an Al to O atomic ratio between 1:1.07 and 1:1.17). In addition, both the combination between the interfacial layer and the metallic Al layer and the interfacial layer and the ceramic α-Al2O3 were perfect. In order to further study the atomic structure of the Al/α-Al2O3 interfacial layer, it was isolated from the system and modeled separately. An analysis of the radial distribution function revealed that the interfacial layer inherits its structure from the α-Al2O3 moiety. The study of the charge distributions in the interface systems indicates that the charge of the Al atoms in the interfacial layer is mainly in the range from +2.1 e to +2.6 e while the charge of the O atoms is at the saturated state of -2e.

  18. Compositing polyetherimide with polyfluorene wrapped carbon nanotubes for enhanced interfacial interaction and conductivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Tao, Jing; Li, Song; Khashab, Niveen M

    2014-06-25

    A novel approach to chemically functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for making superior polyetherimide (PEI) nanocomposites with polyfluorene polymer is presented. In this approach, MWCNTs are non-covalently functionalized with poly(9,9-dioctyfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) through π-π stacking as confirmed by UV-vis, fluorescence, and Raman spectra. Atomic force microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy shows the PFO coated MWCNTs, which provides excellent dispersion of the latter in both solvent and PEI matrix. The strong interaction of PFO with PEI chains, as evidenced from fluorescence spectra, supports the good adhesion of dispersed MWCNTs to PEI leading to stronger interfacial interactions. As a result, the addition of as little as 0.25 wt % of modified MWCNTs to PEI matrix can strongly improve the mechanical properties of the composite (increase of 46% in storage modulus). Increasing the amount of MWCNTs to 2.0 wt % (0.5 wt % PFO loading) affords a great increase of 119% in storage modulus. Furthermore, a sharp decrease of 12 orders of magnitude in volume resistivity of PEI composite is obtained with only 0.5 wt % of PFO modified MWCNT. PMID:24479496

  19. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  20. Direct Measurement of the Interfacial Attractions between Functionalized Graphene and Polymers in Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.; Glover, A. J.; Wallin, T. J.; Kranbuehl, D. E.; Schniepp, H. C.

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize and thereby achieve a fundamental scientific understanding at the molecular level of the relationship of the inter molecular forces measured at the nano scale between an individual nano particle and a polymer system. In this paper, we developed a method to directly characterize and measure the relative strength of the interfacial attractive forces between graphene nano particles and the polymer on the nano length scale of an individual particle using AFM techniques. The method was successfully applied to study the interfacial attractive strength in graphene polymer nano-composites. Two polymers poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were studied. The results support that this method is capable of characterizing the interfacial attractive forces directly at the nano-scale of graphene with a macromolecule material. The method can be applied to other nano particle macromolecular systems allowing determination of the interaction strength between nano-particles and the macromolecular material. This information paves the way to characterize, then to predict and finally optimize a nano particle, macromolecular system's performance properties.

  1. Direct measurement of anisotropy of interfacial free energy from grain boundary groove morphology in transparent organic metal analong systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rustwick, Bryce A.

    2005-01-01

    Both academia and industry alike have paid close attention to the mechanisms of microstructural selection during the solidification process. The forces that give rise to and the principles which rule the natural selection of particular morphologies are important to understanding and controlling new microstructures. Interfacial properties play a very crucial role to the selection of such microstructure formation. In the solidification of a metallic alloy, the solid-liquid interface is highly mobile and responds to very minute changes in the local conditions. At this interface, the driving force must be large enough to drive solute diffusion, maintain local curvature, and overcome the kinetic barrier to move the interface. Therefore, the anisotropy of interfacial free energy with respect to crystallographic orientation is has a significant influence on the solidification of metallic systems. Although it is generally accepted that the solid-liquid interfacial free energy and its associated anisotropy are highly important to the overall selection of morphology, the confident measurement of these particular quantities remains a challenge, and reported values are scarce. Methods for measurement of the interfacial free energy include nucleation experiments and grain boundary groove experiments. The predominant method used to determine anisotropy of interfacial energy has been equilibrium shape measurement. There have been numerous investigations involving grain boundaries at a solid-liquid interface. These studies indicated the GBG could be used to describe various interfacial energy values, which affect solidification. Early studies allowed for an estimate of interfacial energy with respect to the GBG energy, and finally absolute interfacial energy in a constant thermal gradient. These studies however, did not account for the anisotropic nature of the material at the GBG. Since interfacial energy is normally dependent on orientation of the crystallographic plane of the

  2. Interfacial stress balances in structured continua and free surface flows in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Chaves, Arlex; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2014-04-15

    Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balances are obtained for a structured continuum and for the special case of a ferrofluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a Newtonian fluid. The interfacial balance equations account for the effects of surface tension and surface tension gradient, magnetic surface excess forces, antisymmetric stresses, and couple stresses in driving interfacial flows in ferrofluids. Application of the interfacial balance equations is illustrated by obtaining analytical expressions for the translational and spin velocity profiles in a thin film of ferrofluid on an infinite flat plate when a rotating magnetic field is applied with axis of rotation parallel to the ferrofluid/air interface. The cases of zero and non-zero spin viscosity are considered for small applied magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the maximum translational velocity, slope of the translational velocity profile at the ferrofluid/air interface, and volumetric flow rate are obtained and their use to test the relevance of spin viscosity and couple stresses in the flow situation under consideration is discussed.

  3. Interfacial stress balances in structured continua and free surface flows in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Arlex; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balances are obtained for a structured continuum and for the special case of a ferrofluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a Newtonian fluid. The interfacial balance equations account for the effects of surface tension and surface tension gradient, magnetic surface excess forces, antisymmetric stresses, and couple stresses in driving interfacial flows in ferrofluids. Application of the interfacial balance equations is illustrated by obtaining analytical expressions for the translational and spin velocity profiles in a thin film of ferrofluid on an infinite flat plate when a rotating magnetic field is applied with axis of rotation parallel to the ferrofluid/air interface. The cases of zero and non-zero spin viscosity are considered for small applied magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the maximum translational velocity, slope of the translational velocity profile at the ferrofluid/air interface, and volumetric flow rate are obtained and their use to test the relevance of spin viscosity and couple stresses in the flow situation under consideration is discussed.

  4. Nanoscopic characterization of the water vapor-salt interfacial layer reveals a unique biphasic adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; He, Jianfeng; Shen, Yi; Li, Xiaowei; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Our quantitative understanding of water adsorption onto salt surfaces under ambient conditions is presently quite poor owing to the difficulties in directly characterizing this interfacial layer under these conditions. Here we determine the thickness of the interfacial layer on NaCl at different relative humidities (RH) based on a novel application of atomic force spectroscopy and capillary condensation theory. In particular, we take advantage of the microsecond-timescale of the capillary condensation process to directly resolve the magnitude of its contribution in the tip-sample interaction, from which the interfacial water thickness is determined. Further, to correlate this thickness with salt dissolution, we also measure surface conductance under similar conditions. We find that below 30% RH, there is essentially only the deposition of water molecules onto this surface, typical of conventional adsorption onto solid surfaces. However, above 30% RH, adsorption is simultaneous with the dissolution of ions, unlike conventional adsorption, leading to a rapid increase of surface conductance. Thus, water adsorption on NaCl is an unconventional biphasic process in which the interfacial layer not only exhibits quantitative differences in thickness but also qualitative differences in composition. PMID:27527905

  5. Nanoscopic characterization of the water vapor-salt interfacial layer reveals a unique biphasic adsorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; He, Jianfeng; Shen, Yi; Li, Xiaowei; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-08-01

    Our quantitative understanding of water adsorption onto salt surfaces under ambient conditions is presently quite poor owing to the difficulties in directly characterizing this interfacial layer under these conditions. Here we determine the thickness of the interfacial layer on NaCl at different relative humidities (RH) based on a novel application of atomic force spectroscopy and capillary condensation theory. In particular, we take advantage of the microsecond-timescale of the capillary condensation process to directly resolve the magnitude of its contribution in the tip-sample interaction, from which the interfacial water thickness is determined. Further, to correlate this thickness with salt dissolution, we also measure surface conductance under similar conditions. We find that below 30% RH, there is essentially only the deposition of water molecules onto this surface, typical of conventional adsorption onto solid surfaces. However, above 30% RH, adsorption is simultaneous with the dissolution of ions, unlike conventional adsorption, leading to a rapid increase of surface conductance. Thus, water adsorption on NaCl is an unconventional biphasic process in which the interfacial layer not only exhibits quantitative differences in thickness but also qualitative differences in composition.

  6. Simulation of direct contact condensation of steam jets based on interfacial instability theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, David; Schulenberg, Thomas; Class, Andreas; Behnke, Lars

    2014-11-01

    A simulation model for the direct contact condensation of steam in subcooled water is presented that allows to determine major parameters of the process such as the jet penetration length. Entrainment of water by the steam jet is modeled based on the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instability theories. Primary atomization due to acceleration of interfacial waves and secondary atomization due to aerodynamic forces account for the initial size of entrained droplets. The resulting steam-water two-phase flow is simulated based on a one-dimensional two-fluid model. An interfacial area transport equation is used to track changes of the interfacial area density due to droplet entrainment and steam condensation. Interfacial heat and mass transfer rates during condensation are calculated using the two-resistance model. The resulting two-phase flow equations constitute a system of ordinary differential equations which is discretized by means of an explicit Runge-Kutta method. The simulation results are in good agreement with published experimental data over a wide range of pool temperatures and mass flow rates. funded by RWE Power AG.

  7. Nanoscopic characterization of the water vapor-salt interfacial layer reveals a unique biphasic adsorption process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; He, Jianfeng; Shen, Yi; Li, Xiaowei; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Our quantitative understanding of water adsorption onto salt surfaces under ambient conditions is presently quite poor owing to the difficulties in directly characterizing this interfacial layer under these conditions. Here we determine the thickness of the interfacial layer on NaCl at different relative humidities (RH) based on a novel application of atomic force spectroscopy and capillary condensation theory. In particular, we take advantage of the microsecond-timescale of the capillary condensation process to directly resolve the magnitude of its contribution in the tip-sample interaction, from which the interfacial water thickness is determined. Further, to correlate this thickness with salt dissolution, we also measure surface conductance under similar conditions. We find that below 30% RH, there is essentially only the deposition of water molecules onto this surface, typical of conventional adsorption onto solid surfaces. However, above 30% RH, adsorption is simultaneous with the dissolution of ions, unlike conventional adsorption, leading to a rapid increase of surface conductance. Thus, water adsorption on NaCl is an unconventional biphasic process in which the interfacial layer not only exhibits quantitative differences in thickness but also qualitative differences in composition. PMID:27527905

  8. Two-phase flow interfacial structures in a rod bundle geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Sidharth S.

    Interfacial structure of air-water two-phase flow in a scaled nuclear reactor rod bundle geometry was studied in this research. Global and local flow regimes were obtained for the rod bundle geometry. Local two-phase flow parameters were measured at various axial locations in order to understand the transport of interfacial structures. A one-dimensional two-group interfacial area transport model was evaluated using the local parameter database. Air-water two-phase flow experiments were performed in an 8 X 8 rod bundle test section to obtain flow regime maps at various axial locations. Area averaged void fraction was measured using parallel plate type impedance void meters. The cumulative probability distribution functions of the signals from the impedance void meters were used along with a self organizing neural network to identify flow regimes. Local flow regime maps revealed the cross-sectional distribution of flow regimes in the bundle. Local parameters that characterize interfacial structure, that is, void fraction alpha, interfacial area concentration, ai, bubble Sauter mean diameter, DSm and bubble velocity, vg were measured using four sensor conductivity probe technique. The local data revealed the distribution of the interfacial structure in the radial direction, as well as its development in the axial direction. In addition to this, the effect of spacer grid on the flow structure at different gas and liquid velocities was revealed by local parameter measurements across the spacer grids. A two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) specific to rod bundle geometry was derived. The derivation of two-group IATE required certain assumption on the bubble shapes in the subchannels and the bubbles spanning more than a subchannel. It was found that the geometrical relationship between the volume and the area of a cap bubble distorted by rods was similar to the one derived for a confined channel under a specific geometrical transformation. The one

  9. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  10. Interfacial activity of acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at the fluid-fluid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tao; Russell, Thomas; Hoagland, David

    2013-03-01

    Interfacial assembly of acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes at the oil/water interface is achieved by the addition of low molecular weight (MW) amino-terminated polystyrene in the oil phase. The surface activity of carboxylated SWCNTs is strongly influenced by the end-group chemistry and molecular weight of the polystyrene component, the concentrations of this component and the SWCNTs, along with the degree of functionalization of the SWCNTs. The prerequisites for interfacial trapping are amino termini on chains with MW less than 5K and 6 hours or longer incubation of pristine SWCNTs to achieve their carboxylation. Plummets in interfacial tension resembling those for surfactants were observed at critical bulk concentrations of both SWCNTs and PS-NH2. In dried droplets, SWCNTs densely packed with associated PS-NH2 form a bird nest-like interfacial structure, with the SWCNTs preferentially oriented perpendicular to the original interface. Advisor

  11. Use of self-assembled monolayers to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-03-02

    The relationship between the nature and spatial distribution of fundamental interfacial interactions and fracture stress/fracture toughness of a glassy adhesive-inorganic solid joint is not understood. This relationship is important from the standpoint of designing interfacial chemistry sufficient to provide the level of mechanical strength required for a particular application. In addition, it is also important for understanding the effects of surface contamination. Different types of contamination, or different levels of contamination, likely impact joint strength in different ways. Furthermore, the relationship is also important from the standpoint of aging. If interfacial chemical bonds scission over time due to the presence of a contaminant such as water, or exposure to UV, etc, the relationship between joint strength/fracture toughness and interface strength is important for predicting reliability with time. A fundamental understanding of the relationship between joint strength and fundamental interfacial interactions will give insight into these issues.

  12. A nano-cheese-cutter to directly measure interfacial adhesion of freestanding nano-fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Najem, Johnny F.; Wong, Shing-Chung; Wan, Kai-tak

    2012-01-01

    A nano-cheese-cutter is fabricated to directly measure the adhesion between two freestanding nano-fibers. A single electrospun fiber is attached to the free end of an atomic force microscope cantilever, while a similar fiber is similarly prepared on a mica substrate in an orthogonal direction. External load is applied to deform the two fibers into complementary V-shapes, and the force measurement allows the elastic modulus to be determined. At a critical tensile load, "pull-off" occurs when the adhering fibers spontaneously detach from each other, yielding the interfacial adhesion energy. Loading-unloading cycles are performed to investigate repeated adhesion-detachment and surface degradation.

  13. Salinity Influence on Interfacial Area, Wettability, and NAPL Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Valenta, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    wettability status. Water with 8%, 4%, 2%, 0% wt NaCl salinity was used to displace NAPL from the sand column sequentially. The interfacial tension (IFT) between the salinity water and the ANS oil was monitored. The residual oil saturations indicated that the fraction of NAPL retained in the column increased after water flushing as the salinity in the displacing water increased from 0 to 8%, clearly confirming the earlier findings that lower salinity may cause additional oil to be released. The NAPL-water interfacial area, anw, does not show a monotonic dependence on salinity; instead, anw shows an increasing trend with increasing salinity in the lower salinity range, and the opposite trend at high salinity values. The maximum anw was obtained in systems flushed with 2% salinity water. This trend appears to be consistent with a similar nonlinear dependence of interfacial tension on salinity, and might be an indication of wettability alternation. The observation of this research shread lights on the optimum operation in NAPL removal. The IFT change between NAPL and the salinity water might be attributed to the enhanced NAPL recovery.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of Interfacial Water at Selected Sulfide Mineral Surfaces under Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we report on a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) study of the behavior of interfacial water at selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions. The study revealed the interfacial water structure and wetting characteristics of the pyrite (100) surface, galena (100) surface, chalcopyrite (012) surface, sphalerite (110) surface, and molybdenite surfaces (i.e., the face, armchair-edge, and zigzag-edge surfaces), including simulated contact angles, relative number density profiles, water dipole orientations, hydrogen-bonding, and residence times. For force fields of the metal and sulfur atoms in selected sulfide minerals used in the MDS, we used the universal force field (UFF) and another set of force fields optimized by quantum chemical calculations for interactions with interfacial water molecules at selected sulfide mineral surfaces. Simulation results for the structural and dynamic properties of interfacial water molecules indicate the natural hydrophobic character for the selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions as well as the relatively weak hydrophobicity for the sphalerite (110) surface and two molybdenite edge surfaces. Part of the financial support for this study was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Basic Science Grant No. DE-FG-03-93ER14315. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE, funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES. The authors are grateful to Professor Tsun-Mei Chang for valuable discussions.

  15. Interfacial undercooling in solidification of colloidal suspensions: analyses with quantitative measurements

    PubMed Central

    You, Jiaxue; Wang, Lilin; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Lin, Xin; Huang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial undercooling in the complex solidification of colloidal suspensions is of significance and remains a puzzling problem. Two types of interfacial undercooling are supposed to be involved in the freezing of colloidal suspensions, i.e., solute constitutional supercooling (SCS) caused by additives in the solvent and particulate constitutional supercooling (PCS) caused by particles. However, quantitative identification of the interfacial undercooling in the solidification of colloidal suspensions, is still absent; thus, the question of which type of undercooling is dominant in this complex system remains unanswered. Here, we quantitatively measured the static and dynamic interface undercoolings of SCS and PCS in ideal and practical colloidal systems. We show that the interfacial undercooling primarily comes from SCS caused by the additives in the solvent, while PCS is minor. This finding implies that the thermodynamic effect of particles from the PCS is not the fundamental physical mechanism for pattern formation of cellular growth and lamellar structure in the solidification of colloidal suspensions, a general case of ice-templating method. Instead, the patterns in the ice-templating method can be controlled effectively by adjusting the additives. PMID:27329394

  16. Interfacial undercooling in solidification of colloidal suspensions: analyses with quantitative measurements.

    PubMed

    You, Jiaxue; Wang, Lilin; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Lin, Xin; Huang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial undercooling in the complex solidification of colloidal suspensions is of significance and remains a puzzling problem. Two types of interfacial undercooling are supposed to be involved in the freezing of colloidal suspensions, i.e., solute constitutional supercooling (SCS) caused by additives in the solvent and particulate constitutional supercooling (PCS) caused by particles. However, quantitative identification of the interfacial undercooling in the solidification of colloidal suspensions, is still absent; thus, the question of which type of undercooling is dominant in this complex system remains unanswered. Here, we quantitatively measured the static and dynamic interface undercoolings of SCS and PCS in ideal and practical colloidal systems. We show that the interfacial undercooling primarily comes from SCS caused by the additives in the solvent, while PCS is minor. This finding implies that the thermodynamic effect of particles from the PCS is not the fundamental physical mechanism for pattern formation of cellular growth and lamellar structure in the solidification of colloidal suspensions, a general case of ice-templating method. Instead, the patterns in the ice-templating method can be controlled effectively by adjusting the additives. PMID:27329394

  17. Interfacial Properties of a Hydrophobic Dye in the Tetrachloroethylene-Water-Glass Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-02-23

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media. Strongly hydrophobic organic dyes, used in many experimental studies to facilitate visual observation of the phase distributions, have generally been implicitly assumed to have no influence on the interfacial properties of the various phases in porous media. Sudan IV is the most commonly used dye for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in laboratory experiments. It has also been used in at least one field experiment. The effects of this dye on the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system were investigated to test the assumption that the dye does not effect the interfacial properties and therefore PCE mobility. The results indicate that the dye does indeed change the interfacial relationships.The effect of the dye on the interfacial relationships is a complex function of the dye concentration, the solid phase composition, and the dynamic rate of new interface formation. The dye caused a slight (<10 percent) increase in interfacial tension at low concentrations (<0.1 g/L) and high rates of new interface formation. The dye reduced interfacial tension between PCE and water at low rates of new interface formation for all dye concentrations tested (0.00508 to 5.08 g/L). At the highest dye concentration, the PCE-water interfacial tension was significantly reduced regardless of the rate of new interface formation. The apparent interfacial tension increase at low dye concentrations is suspected to be an artifact of a low measured IFT value for the undyed PCE caused by leaching of rubber o-rings by the PCE prior to testing in the final drop-volume configuration.In addition to reducing interfacial tension, the dye was found to significantly alter the wetting relationship between PCE and water on a glass surface at and above the range of reported dye concentrations cited in the literature (1.1 to 1.7 g/L). The wetting relationship was rendered neutral from a water-wet initial

  18. Interfacial action of natural surfactants in oil/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.; Onishi, M.

    1981-09-01

    This paper concerns the tendency of a few natural surfactants at the oil/water interface to induce spontaneous emulsification. N-paraffin (n-dodecane), liquid triglycerides (oleic safflower oil and corn oil), and liquid fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) were used as the oil phase and distilled water was used as the water phase. Natural surfactants such as cholesterol, lecithin, and oleic acid were applied to the systems as the oil-soluble additives. Lecithin was the most strongly effective in reducing the interfacial tension of the oil/water systems, and cholesterol was effective at the second strength. The oil/water interface of the systems containing the oil-soluble additives changed in various ways as observed by microscopy and the unaided eye. The most remarkable change was found in the system of glycerides containing cholesterol in contact with water, in which crystals of cholesterol were formed at the interface. 13 references.

  19. Ordered mesoporous materials based on interfacial assembly and engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yue, Qin; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-01

    Ordered mesoporous materials have inspired prominent research interest due to their unique properties and functionalities and potential applications in adsorption, separation, catalysis, sensors, drug delivery, energy conversion and storage, and so on. Thanks to continuous efforts over the past two decades, great achievements have been made in the synthesis and structural characterization of mesoporous materials. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in preparing ordered mesoporous materials from the viewpoint of interfacial assembly and engineering. Five interfacial assembly and synthesis are comprehensively highlighted, including liquid-solid interfacial assembly, gas-liquid interfacial assembly, liquid-liquid interfacial assembly, gas-solid interfacial synthesis, and solid-solid interfacial synthesis, basics about their synthesis pathways, princples and interface engineering strategies.

  20. Effect of electrostatic boundary conditions and system size on the interfacial properties of water and aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohr, E.

    1997-10-01

    The consequences of the choice of electrostatic boundary conditions on the interfacial properties of water and on the free energy of ion adsorption from aqueous solution have been investigated. The Ewald summation method for lattices, which are periodic in two dimensions, is considered to be the most adequate method in slabs of finite thickness in one dimension. In agreement with the physics of the problem a field-free region in the bulk phases is observed. The use of spherical truncation methods like the shifted-force method leads to unphysical results. The electrostatic potential depends on the size of the system. Ewald summation methods for three-dimensional lattices lead to results in qualitative agreement with the corresponding two-dimensional lattice sum. The computed value of the electrostatic potential depends on an additional parameter, namely the lattice constant c in the direction perpendicular to the interface. The results for Ewald summation in three dimensions converge to the results for Ewald summation in two dimensions for large c, the shifted-force results converge to the same limit, when the surface area of the simulation cell becomes very large and the cut-off distance increases accordingly.

  1. Intelligent chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Richards, Gary J; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Izawa, Hironori; Hill, Jonathan P

    2010-01-01

    Of the known intelligently-operating systems, the majority can undoubtedly be classed as being of biological origin. One of the notable differences between biological and artificial systems is the important fact that biological materials consist mostly of chiral molecules. While most biochemical processes routinely discriminate chiral molecules, differentiation between chiral molecules in artificial systems is currently one of the challenging subjects in the field of molecular recognition. Therefore, one of the important challenges for intelligent man-made sensors is to prepare a sensing system that can discriminate chiral molecules. Because intermolecular interactions and detection at surfaces are respectively parts of supramolecular chemistry and interfacial science, chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts is a significant topic. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in these fields, including supramolecular hosts for color detection on chiral sensing, indicator-displacement assays, kinetic resolution in supramolecular reactions with analyses by mass spectrometry, use of chiral shape-defined polymers, such as dynamic helical polymers, molecular imprinting, thin films on surfaces of devices such as QCM, functional electrodes, FET, and SPR, the combined technique of magnetic resonance imaging and immunoassay, and chiral detection using scanning tunneling microscopy and cantilever technology. In addition, we will discuss novel concepts in recent research including the use of achiral reagents for chiral sensing with NMR, and mechanical control of chiral sensing. The importance of integration of chiral sensing systems with rapidly developing nanotechnology and nanomaterials is also emphasized.

  2. Intelligent Chiral Sensing Based on Supramolecular and Interfacial Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Richards, Gary J.; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Izawa, Hironori; Hill, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Of the known intelligently-operating systems, the majority can undoubtedly be classed as being of biological origin. One of the notable differences between biological and artificial systems is the important fact that biological materials consist mostly of chiral molecules. While most biochemical processes routinely discriminate chiral molecules, differentiation between chiral molecules in artificial systems is currently one of the challenging subjects in the field of molecular recognition. Therefore, one of the important challenges for intelligent man-made sensors is to prepare a sensing system that can discriminate chiral molecules. Because intermolecular interactions and detection at surfaces are respectively parts of supramolecular chemistry and interfacial science, chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts is a significant topic. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in these fields, including supramolecular hosts for color detection on chiral sensing, indicator-displacement assays, kinetic resolution in supramolecular reactions with analyses by mass spectrometry, use of chiral shape-defined polymers, such as dynamic helical polymers, molecular imprinting, thin films on surfaces of devices such as QCM, functional electrodes, FET, and SPR, the combined technique of magnetic resonance imaging and immunoassay, and chiral detection using scanning tunneling microscopy and cantilever technology. In addition, we will discuss novel concepts in recent research including the use of achiral reagents for chiral sensing with NMR, and mechanical control of chiral sensing. The importance of integration of chiral sensing systems with rapidly developing nanotechnology and nanomaterials is also emphasized. PMID:22163577

  3. Thermoplastic starch/wood composites: interfacial interactions and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Müller, Péter; Renner, Károly; Móczó, János; Fekete, Erika; Pukánszky, Béla

    2014-02-15

    Thermoplastic starch (TPS)/wood composites were prepared from starch plasticized with 36 wt% glycerol. The components were homogenized by dry-blending, extruded and injection molded to tensile bars. Tensile properties, structure, deformation, water adsorption and shrinkage were determined as a function of wood content, which changed between 0 and 40 vol% in 7 steps. The modification of TPS with wood particles improves several properties considerably. Stiffness and strength increases, and the effect is stronger for fibers with larger aspect ratio. Wood fibers reinforce TPS considerably due to poor matrix properties and strong interfacial interactions, the latter resulting in the decreased mobility of starch molecules and in the fracture of large wood particles during deformation. Strong interfacial adhesion leads to smaller water absorption than predicted from additivity, but water uptake remains relatively large even in the presence of wood particles. The shrinkage of injection molded TPS parts is very large, around 10%, and dimensional changes occur on a very long timescale of several hundred hours. Shrinkage decreases to a low level already at 15-20 vol% wood content rendering the composites good dimensional stability. PMID:24507352

  4. Interfacial Microstructure and Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Composites Caused by Growing Generation 1-4 Dendritic Poly(amidoamine) on a Fiber Surface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Zhang, Ruliang; Gao, Fucheng; He, Maoshuai; Wang, Chengguo; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Lifen; Cui, Hongzhi

    2016-08-23

    In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites, propagation of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by in situ polymerization on a carbon fiber surface was performed. During polymerization processes, PAMAM was grafted on carbon fiber by repeated Michael addition and amidation reactions. The changes in surface microstructure and the chemical composition of carbon fibers before and after modification were investigated by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. All the results indicated that PAMAM was successfully grown on the carbon fiber surface. Such propagation could significantly increase the surface roughness and introduce sufficient polar groups onto the carbon fiber surface, enhancing the surface wettability of carbon fiber. The fractured surface of carbon fiber-reinforced composites showed a great enhancement of interfacial adhesion. Compared with those of desized fiber composites, the interlaminar shear strength and interfacial shear strength of PAMAM/fiber-reinforced composites showed increases of 55.49 and 110.94%, respectively. PMID:27472250

  5. Consequences of anode interfacial layer deletion. HCl-treated ITO in P3HT:PCBM-based bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Michael D; Liu, Jun; Leever, Benjamin J; Servaites, Jonathan D; Hersam, Mark C; Durstock, Michael F; Marks, Tobin J

    2010-02-16

    In studies to simplify the fabrication of bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, it was found that when glass/tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) substrates are treated with dilute aqueous HCl solutions, followed by UV ozone (UVO), and then used to fabricate devices of the structure glass/ITO/P3HT:PCBM/LiF/Al, device performance is greatly enhanced. Light-to-power conversion efficiency (Eff) increases from 2.4% for control devices in which the ITO surface is treated only with UVO to 3.8% with the HCl + UVO treatment--effectively matching the performance of an identical device having a PEDOT:PSS anode interfacial layer. The enhancement originates from increases in V(OC) from 463 to 554 mV and FF from 49% to 66%. The modified-ITO device also exhibits a 4x enhancement in thermal stability versus an identical device containing a PEDOT:PSS anode interfacial layer. To understand the origins of these effects, the ITO surface is analyzed as a function of treatment by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy work function measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic composition analysis, and atomic force microscopic topography and conductivity imaging. Additionally, a diode-based device model is employed to further understand the effects of ITO surface treatment on device performance.

  6. Mesoscale Interfacial Dynamics in Magnetoelectric Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Shashank, Priya

    2009-12-14

    Biphasic composites are the key towards achieving enhanced magnetoelectric response. In order understand the control behavior of the composites and resultant symmetry of the multifunctional product tensors, we need to synthesized model material systems with the following features (i) interface formation through either deposition control or natural decomposition; (ii) a very high interphase-interfacial area, to maximize the ME coupling; and (iii) an equilibrium phase distribution and morphology, resulting in preferred crystallographic orientation relations between phases across the interphase-interfacial boundaries. This thought process guided the experimental evolution in this program. We initiated the research with the co-fired composites approach and then moved on to the thin film laminates deposited through the rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition process

  7. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  8. Frontiers of interfacial water research :workshop report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2005-10-01

    Water is the critical natural resource of the new century. Significant improvements in traditional water treatment processes require novel approaches based on a fundamental understanding of nanoscale and atomic interactions at interfaces between aqueous solution and materials. To better understand these critical issues and to promote an open dialog among leading international experts in water-related specialties, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored a workshop on April 24-26, 2005 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The ''Frontiers of Interfacial Water Research Workshop'' provided attendees with a critical review of water technologies and emphasized the new advances in surface and interfacial microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and computer simulation needed for the development of new materials for water treatment.

  9. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  10. Interfacial transport in lithium-ion conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaofei, Wang; Liquan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Physical models of ion diffusion at different interfaces are reviewed. The use of impedance spectroscopy (IS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) techniques are also discussed. The diffusion of ions is fundamental to the operation of lithium-ion batteries, taking place not only within the grains but also across different interfaces. Interfacial ion transport usually contributes to the majority of the resistance in lithium-ion batteries. A greater understanding of the interfacial diffusion of ions is crucial to improving battery performance. Project supported by the Beijing S&T Project, China (Grant No. Z13111000340000), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51325206 and 11234013) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB932900).

  11. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  12. Azide functional monolayers grafted to a germanium surface: model substrates for ATR-IR studies of interfacial click reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Koberstein, Jeffrey T

    2012-01-10

    High-quality azide-functional substrates are prepared by a low temperature reaction of 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane with UV-ozone-treated germanium ATR-IR plates followed by nucleophilic substitution of the terminal bromine by addition of sodium azide. The resulting monolayer films are characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), and ellipsometry. XPS and ellipsometric thickness data correspond well to the results of molecular model calculations confirming the formation of a densely packed azide-functional monolayer. These azide-functional substrates enable interfacial "click" reactions with complementary alkyne-functional molecules to be studied in situ by ATR-IR. To illustrate their potential utility for kinetic studies we show that, in the presence of copper(I) catalyst, the azide-modified surfaces react rapidly and quantitatively with 5-chloro-pentyne to form triazoles via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Time-resolved ATR-IR measurements indicate that the interfacial click reaction is initially first order in azide concentration as expected from the reaction mechanism, with a rate constant of 0.034 min(-1), and then transitions to apparent second order dependence, with a rate constant of 0.017 min(-1)/(chains/nm(2)), when the surface azide and triazole concentrations become similar, as predicted by Oyama et al. The reaction achieves an ultimate conversion of 50% consistent with the limit expected due to steric hindrance of the 5-chloro-pentyne reactant at the surface. PMID:22081885

  13. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  14. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  15. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, C. A. F.; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.; Ismail-Beigi, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  16. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Microstructural Evolution Based on Fundamental Interfacial Properties

    SciTech Connect

    A. D. Rollett; D. J. Srolovitz; A. Karma

    2003-07-11

    This first CMSN project has been operating since the summer of 1999. The main achievement of the project was to bring together a community of materials scientists, physicists and mathematicians who share a common interest in the properties of interfaces and the impact of those properties on microstructural evolution. Six full workshops were held at Carnegie Mellon (CMU), Northwestern (NWU), Santa Fe, Northeastern University (NEU), National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), Ames Laboratory, and at the University of California in San Diego (UCSD) respectively. Substantial scientific results were obtained through the sustained contact between the members of the project. A recent issue of Interface Science (volume 10, issue 2/3, July 2002) was dedicated to the output of the project. The results include: the development of methods for extracting anisotropic boundary energy and mobility from molecular dynamics simulations of solid/liquid interfaces in nickel; the extraction of anisotropic energies and mobilities in aluminum from similar MD simulations; the application of parallel computation to the calculation of interfacial properties; the development of a method to extract interfacial properties from the fluctuations in interface position through consideration of interfacial stiffness; the use of anisotropic interface properties in studies of abnormal grain growth; the discovery of abnormal grain growth from random distributions of orientation in subgrain networks; the direct comparison at the scale of individual grains between experimentally observed grain growth and simulations, which confirmed the importance of including anisotropic interfacial properties in the simulations; the classification of a rich variety of dendritic morphologies based on slight variations in the anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface; development of phase field methods that permit both solidification and grain growth to be simulated within the same framework.

  18. Effect of chemical treatment of Kevlar fibers on mechanical interfacial properties of composites.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Min-Kang; Ma, Tae-Jun; Lee, Douk-Rae

    2002-08-01

    In this work, the effects of chemical treatment on Kevlar 29 fibers have been studied in a composite system. The surface characteristics of Kevlar 29 fibers were characterized by pH, acid-base value, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and FT-IR. The mechanical interfacial properties of the final composites were studied by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)), and specific fracture energy (G(IC)). Also, impact properties of the composites were investigated in the context of differentiating between initiation and propagation energies and ductile index (DI) along with maximum force and total energy. As a result, it was found that chemical treatment with phosphoric acid solution significantly affected the degree of adhesion at interfaces between fibers and resin matrix, resulting in improved mechanical interfacial strength in the composites. This was probably due to the presence of chemical polar groups on Kevlar surfaces, leading to an increment of interfacial binding force between fibers and matrix in a composite system.

  19. Effect of periodic surface cracks on the interfacial fracture of thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, X. L.; Xu, R.; Zhang, W. X.; Wang, T. J.

    2012-10-01

    Periodic surface cracks and interfacial debonding in thermal barrier coating (TBC) system may be induced during cooling process. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of periodic surface cracks on the interfacial fracture of TBC system. The finite element method (FEM) incorporating cohesive zone model is used in analysis. It is found that surface crack spacing has significant effect on the initiation and propagation of short interface crack. Three different regions are identified for describing the effect of surface crack spacing. In Region I the interface crack driving force is dramatically reduced due to high surface crack density. In this case, the initiation of interfacial delamination can be delayed. Region II applies as the surface crack spacing is moderate. Analysis of this transition zone brings to the definition of normalized critical surface crack spacing. Region III arises for sufficient large surface crack spacing. In this case, the interface crack driving force reaches a steady state, where the effects of adjacent surface cracks are relatively insignificant and can be ignored. It can be concluded that an appropriately high surface crack density can enhance the durability of TBC system.

  20. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, Alexander; Borchers, Julie; Kirby, Brian; He, Chunyong; Arenholz, Elke; Vailionis, Arturas; Flint, Charles; Suzuki, Yuri

    Atomically precise complex oxide heterostructures provide model systems for the discovery of new emergent phenomena since their magnetism, structure and electronic properties are strongly coupled. Octahedral tilts and rotations have been shown to alter the magnetic properties of complex oxide heterostructures, but typically induce small, gradual magnetic changes. Here, we demonstrate sharp switching between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order at the emergent ferromagnetic interfaces of CaRuO3/CaMnO3 superlattices. Through synchrotron X-ray diffraction and neutron reflectometry, we show that octahedral distortions in superlattices with an odd number of CaMnO3 unit cells in each layer are symmetry mismatched across the interface. In this case, the rotation symmetry switches across the interface, reducing orbital overlap, suppressing charge transfer from Ru to Mn, and disrupting the interfacial double exchange. This disruption switches half of the interfaces from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic and lowers the saturation magnetic of the superlattice from 1.0 to 0.5 μB/interfacial Mn. By targeting a purely interfacial emergent magnetic system, we achieve drastic alterations to the magnetic ground state with extremely small changes in layer thickness.

  1. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. PMID:27410747

  2. Interfacial tension measurement of Ni-S liquid using high-pressure X-ray micro-tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Funakoshi, K.; Wang, Y.; Shibazaki, Y.; Sanehira, T.; Ueda, Y.; Ohtani, E.

    2008-11-12

    High-pressure, high-temperature X-ray tomography experiments have been carried out using a large volume toroidal cell, which is optimized for interfacial tension measurements. A wide anvil gap, which corresponds to a field of view in the radiography imaging, was successively maintained to high pressures and temperatures using a composite plastic gasket. Obtained interfacial tensions of Ni-S liquid against Na, K-disilicate melt, were 414 and 336 mN/m at 1253 and 1293 K, respectively. Three-dimensional tomography images revealed that the sample had an irregular shape at the early stage of melting, suggesting either non-equilibrium in sample texture and force balance or partial melting of surrounding silicate. This information cannot always be obtained from two-dimensional radiographic imaging techniques. Therefore, a three-dimensional tomography measurement is appropriate for the precise interfacial measurements.

  3. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, J. M.; Algaba, J.; Míguez, J. M.; Mendiboure, B.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.; Piñeiro, M. M.; Blas, F. J.

    2016-04-01

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  4. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J M; Algaba, J; Míguez, J M; Mendiboure, B; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Piñeiro, M M; Blas, F J

    2016-04-14

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  5. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  6. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  7. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    DOE PAGES

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges.more » In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.« less

  8. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    SciTech Connect

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges. In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip.

  10. Interfacial fracture between highly crosslinked polymer networks and a solid surface: Effect of interfacial bond density

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-03-23

    For highly crosslinked, polymer networks bonded to a solid surface, the effect of interfacial bond density as well as system size on interfacial fracture is studied molecular dynamics simulations. The correspondence between the stress-strain curve and the sequence of molecular deformations is obtained. The failure strain for a fully bonded surface is equal to the strain necessary to make taut the average minimal path through the network from the bottom solid surface to the top surface. At bond coverages less than full, nanometer scale cavities form at the surface yielding an inhomogeneous strain profile. The failure strain and stress are linearly proportional to the number of bonds at the interface unless the number of bonds is so few that van der Waals interactions dominate. The failure is always interfacial due to fewer bonds at the interface than in the bulk.

  11. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  12. Interfacial motions and pressure fluctuations during fluid displacement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Moebius, F.; Mumford, K. G.; Or, D.

    2014-12-01

    Two-phase flow is of interest in many fields including microfluidic devices, geological CO2 sequestration, agriculture, filtration and contaminated site remediation. Macroscopic flow equations are often used to describe two-phase displacement flows in such systems based on constitutive relationships (e.g., capillary pressure-saturation relationships) determined under equilibrium conditions. The potential limitations of such process representation were examined in experiments with direct observation of pore scale dynamics. Transparent sintered glass beads micro-models enabled quantification of the interplay of various phenomena governing fluid flow (e.g., capillary forces, viscous forces, inertial forces). Experiments systematically evaluated the impact of pore water velocity, grain size, surface tension, viscosity and wettability on water pressure and interfacial dynamics, both during flow and after flow cessation. Particular attention was placed on high-velocity conditions, when inertial forces that are not typically considerred in porous media applications can play a larger role. Liquid pressure was quantified at the base of the system and the displacement process was imaged using a high speed camera. Characteristics of pressure fluctuations were strongly linked with interfacial properties with fluctuations manifested during displacement and following flow cessation (pressure relaxation). The patterns of pressure fluctuations varied with boundary conditions and media properties reflecting complex interactions with fluid, surface and dynamics along the displacement front.

  13. Weighing graphene with QCM to monitor interfacial mass changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Balci, Osman; Salihoglu, Omer; Hur, Seung Hyun; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter, we experimentally determined the mass density of graphene using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as a mechanical resonator. We developed a transfer printing technique to integrate large area single-layer graphene on QCM. By monitoring the resonant frequency of an oscillating quartz crystal loaded with graphene, we were able to measure the mass density of graphene as ˜118 ng/cm2, which is significantly larger than the ideal graphene (˜76 ng/cm2) mainly due to the presence of wrinkles and organic/inorganic residues on graphene sheets. High sensitivity of the quartz crystal resonator allowed us to determine the number of graphene layers in a particular sample. Additionally, we extended our technique to probe interfacial mass variation during adsorption of biomolecules on graphene surface and plasma-assisted oxidation of graphene.

  14. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect

    Machleidt, R.

    2013-06-10

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  15. Direct handling of sharp interfacial energy for microstructural evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández–Rivera, Efraín; Tikare, Veena; Noirot, Laurence; Wang, Lumin

    2014-08-24

    In this study, we introduce a simplification to the previously demonstrated hybrid Potts–phase field (hPPF), which relates interfacial energies to microstructural sharp interfaces. The model defines interfacial energy by a Potts-like discrete interface approach of counting unlike neighbors, which we use to compute local curvature. The model is compared to the hPPF by studying interfacial characteristics and grain growth behavior. The models give virtually identical results, while the new model allows the simulator more direct control of interfacial energy.

  16. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  17. Alcohol-soluble interfacial fluorenes for inverted polymer solar cells: sequence induced spatial conformation dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lie; Liu, Xiangfu; Wei, Yingkai; Wu, Feiyan; Chen, Yiwang

    2016-01-21

    Three fluorene-based alcohol-soluble organic small molecule electrolytes (SMEs) with different conjugated backbones, namely, TFTN-Br, FTFN-Br and FTTFN-Br, were designed as cathode interfacial layers for inverted polymer solar cells (i-PSCs). The insertion of SMEs to the ITO/active layer interfaces effectively lowered the energy barrier for electron transport and improved the inherent compatibility between the hydrophilic ITO and hydrophobic active layers. Due to these advantages, the device based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) with TFTN-Br as the cathode interfacial layer achieved an improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.8%, which is a 26% improvement when compared to the standard device comprising ZnO cathode interfacial layers (PCE = 3.0%). Devices with FTFN-Br and FTTFN-Br also showed an improved PCE of 3.1% and 3.5%, respectively. The variation in device performance enhancement was found to be primarily correlated with the different conformation of their assembly onto the electrode caused by the joint sequence of the polar group of the SMEs, consequently impacting the dipole moment and interface morphology. In addition, introducing SMEs as the cathode interfacial layer also produced devices with long-term stability.

  18. The influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the directionally solidified structures in hypermonotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandlin, A. C.; Andrews, J. B.; Curreri, P. A.

    1988-11-01

    Several Cu-Pb-Al alloys were directionally solidified under one-g conditions and alternating high-g/low-g conditions in order to determine the influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the resulting microstructures. The low-g conditions were obtained through use of NASA's KC-135 aircraft. In the Cu-Pb-Al system, changes in the Al content are known to result in variations in the interfacial energy relationships between the phases. Theory predicts that this should lead to a transition from an irregular to a regular, aligned microstructure in monotectic composition alloys. Four different hypermonotectic alloy compositions were used in this study in order to vary systematically the interfacial energies between the phases. Preliminary results indicate microstructural variations between control and flight samples and samples processed at different rates under both one-g and high-g/low-g conditions. In addition, directional solidification of low Al content alloys resulted in samples with coarse, irregular microstructures, as compared to finer, more aligned microstructures in alloys with high Al contents. This was seen in samples processed under both one-g and high-g/low-g conditions. The resulting structures have been related to interfacial energies, growth rates, and gravitational levels.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zexi; Huang, Juntao; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose an interfacial scheme accompanying the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions, including conjugate conditions with or without jumps in heat and mass transfer, continuity of macroscopic variables and normal fluxes in ion diffusion in porous media with different porosity, and the Kapitza resistance in heat transfer. The construction of this scheme is based on our boundary schemes [Huang and Yong, J. Comput. Phys. 300, 70 (2015), 10.1016/j.jcp.2015.07.045] for Robin boundary conditions on straight or curved boundaries. It gives second-order accuracy for straight interfaces and first-order accuracy for curved ones. In addition, the new scheme inherits the advantage of the boundary schemes in which only the current lattice nodes are involved. Such an interfacial scheme is highly desirable for problems with complex geometries or in porous media. The interfacial scheme is numerically validated with several examples. The results show the utility of the constructed scheme and very well support our theoretical predications.

  20. Alcohol-soluble interfacial fluorenes for inverted polymer solar cells: sequence induced spatial conformation dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lie; Liu, Xiangfu; Wei, Yingkai; Wu, Feiyan; Chen, Yiwang

    2016-01-21

    Three fluorene-based alcohol-soluble organic small molecule electrolytes (SMEs) with different conjugated backbones, namely, TFTN-Br, FTFN-Br and FTTFN-Br, were designed as cathode interfacial layers for inverted polymer solar cells (i-PSCs). The insertion of SMEs to the ITO/active layer interfaces effectively lowered the energy barrier for electron transport and improved the inherent compatibility between the hydrophilic ITO and hydrophobic active layers. Due to these advantages, the device based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) with TFTN-Br as the cathode interfacial layer achieved an improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.8%, which is a 26% improvement when compared to the standard device comprising ZnO cathode interfacial layers (PCE = 3.0%). Devices with FTFN-Br and FTTFN-Br also showed an improved PCE of 3.1% and 3.5%, respectively. The variation in device performance enhancement was found to be primarily correlated with the different conformation of their assembly onto the electrode caused by the joint sequence of the polar group of the SMEs, consequently impacting the dipole moment and interface morphology. In addition, introducing SMEs as the cathode interfacial layer also produced devices with long-term stability. PMID:26694627

  1. Interfacial welding of dynamic covalent network polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Shi, Qian; Li, Hao; Jabour, John; Yang, Hua; Dunn, Martin L.; Wang, Tiejun; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic covalent network (or covalent adaptable network) polymers can rearrange their macromolecular chain network by bond exchange reactions (BERs) where an active unit replaces a unit in an existing bond to form a new bond. Such macromolecular events, when they occur in large amounts, can attribute to unusual properties that are not seen in conventional covalent network polymers, such as shape reforming and surface welding; the latter further enables the important attributes of material malleability and powder-based reprocessing. In this paper, a multiscale modeling framework is developed to study the surface welding of thermally induced dynamic covalent network polymers. At the macromolecular network level, a lattice model is developed to describe the chain density evolution across the interface and its connection to bulk stress relaxation due to BERs. The chain density evolution rule is then fed into a continuum level interfacial model that takes into account surface roughness and applied pressure to predict the effective elastic modulus and interfacial fracture energy of welded polymers. The model yields particularly accessible results where the moduli and interfacial strength of the welded samples as a function of temperature and pressure can be predicted with four parameters, three of which can be measured directly. The model identifies the dependency of surface welding efficiency on the applied thermal and mechanical fields: the pressure will affect the real contact area under the consideration of surface roughness of dynamic covalent network polymers; the chain density increment on the real contact area of interface is only dependent on the welding time and temperature. The modeling approach shows good agreement with experiments and can be extended to other types of dynamic covalent network polymers using different stimuli for BERs, such as light and moisture etc.

  2. The mechanism of deceleration of nucleation and crystal growth by the small addition of transition metals to lithium disilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieme, Katrin; Avramov, Isak; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-05-01

    The addition of small amounts of niobium or tantalum oxide to lithium disilicate glass provokes a drastic decrease of the steady-state nucleation rates and the crystal growth velocities. The viscosity of the residual glassy matrix is considered as a function of the crystallization degree in the course of a non-isothermal crystallization. For simplification, a homogeneous distribution of the added oxides in the glass matrix is assumed. While the viscosity initially decreases, it significantly increases again for higher crystallization degrees hindering crystal growth. However, it was shown that the additives are enriched at the crystal interface. Several possible reasons for the inhibition of nucleation and growth kinetics such as viscosity, interfacial energy crystal/glassy phase, thermodynamic driving force or impingement rate are discussed. Since the crystallization front is blocked by the additives the impingement rate is decreased with increasing additive concentration. Since small concentrations of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 have a drastic effect on the nucleation, these components should be enriched at the interface crystal/glass. This will only take place, if it leads to a decrease in the interfacial energy. Since this effect alone should result in an increase of the nucleation rate, it must be overcompensated by kinetic effects.

  3. The mechanism of deceleration of nucleation and crystal growth by the small addition of transition metals to lithium disilicate glasses

    PubMed Central

    Thieme, Katrin; Avramov, Isak; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of niobium or tantalum oxide to lithium disilicate glass provokes a drastic decrease of the steady-state nucleation rates and the crystal growth velocities. The viscosity of the residual glassy matrix is considered as a function of the crystallization degree in the course of a non-isothermal crystallization. For simplification, a homogeneous distribution of the added oxides in the glass matrix is assumed. While the viscosity initially decreases, it significantly increases again for higher crystallization degrees hindering crystal growth. However, it was shown that the additives are enriched at the crystal interface. Several possible reasons for the inhibition of nucleation and growth kinetics such as viscosity, interfacial energy crystal/glassy phase, thermodynamic driving force or impingement rate are discussed. Since the crystallization front is blocked by the additives the impingement rate is decreased with increasing additive concentration. Since small concentrations of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 have a drastic effect on the nucleation, these components should be enriched at the interface crystal/glass. This will only take place, if it leads to a decrease in the interfacial energy. Since this effect alone should result in an increase of the nucleation rate, it must be overcompensated by kinetic effects. PMID:27150844

  4. The mechanism of deceleration of nucleation and crystal growth by the small addition of transition metals to lithium disilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Katrin; Avramov, Isak; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of niobium or tantalum oxide to lithium disilicate glass provokes a drastic decrease of the steady-state nucleation rates and the crystal growth velocities. The viscosity of the residual glassy matrix is considered as a function of the crystallization degree in the course of a non-isothermal crystallization. For simplification, a homogeneous distribution of the added oxides in the glass matrix is assumed. While the viscosity initially decreases, it significantly increases again for higher crystallization degrees hindering crystal growth. However, it was shown that the additives are enriched at the crystal interface. Several possible reasons for the inhibition of nucleation and growth kinetics such as viscosity, interfacial energy crystal/glassy phase, thermodynamic driving force or impingement rate are discussed. Since the crystallization front is blocked by the additives the impingement rate is decreased with increasing additive concentration. Since small concentrations of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 have a drastic effect on the nucleation, these components should be enriched at the interface crystal/glass. This will only take place, if it leads to a decrease in the interfacial energy. Since this effect alone should result in an increase of the nucleation rate, it must be overcompensated by kinetic effects. PMID:27150844

  5. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  6. Rheology of interfacial protein-polysaccharide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.

    2013-05-01

    The morphology and mechanical properties of protein adsorption layers can significantly be altered by the presence of surfactants, lipids, particles, other proteins, and polysaccharides. In food emulsions, polysaccharides are primarily considered as bulk thickener but can under appropriate environmental conditions stabilize or destabilize the protein adsorption layer and, thus, the entire emulsion system. Despite their ubiquitous usage as stabilization agent, relatively few investigations focus on the interfacial rheology of composite protein/polysaccharide adsorption layers. The manuscript provides a brief review on both main stabilization mechanisms, thermodynamic phase separation and electrostatic interaction and discusses the rheological response in light of the environmental conditions such as ionic strength and pH.

  7. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  8. Effect of the nature of the components of extraction systems used to extract radionuclides on interfacial tension. V. Radiation polymerization products of tri-n-butyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S.D.; Shmidt, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of the polymerization products of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) on stratification of normal and inverse emulsions and the interfacial tension in systems of 30% TBP in n-dodecane with water, 5% aqueous solution Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and a solution of 3 moles/liter HNO/sub 3/. It is shown that in these systems there is a direct correlation between the interfacial tension and the phase stratification rate. Small additions of a neutral fraction of the polymerization products do not exert any appreciable effect on the interfacial tension and the phase stratification rate in the investigated systems.

  9. Direct observation of minority carrier lifetime improvement in InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice photodiodes via interfacial layer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Daniel; Qiao, Pengfei; Wasserman, Daniel; Lien Chuang, Shun

    2013-04-01

    We present improved performance in strain-balanced InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice photodetectors grown using InSb interfacial layers, measured using a cross-sectional electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique to obtain minority carrier diffusion characteristics. We detail a modified EBIC model that accounts for the long absorber regions in photodetectors and fit the experimental data. We find a significant increase in the minority hole lifetime (up to 157 ns) and increased minority electron lifetime due to the interfacial layers. Additionally, electrical characterization of the device temperature-dependent resistance-area product reveals that the interfacial treatment improves the device dark current at lower temperatures.

  10. Interfacial properties of hydrosoluble polymers. Final report, June 15, 1993--June 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    During this period, the authors treated a myriad of problems associated with the interfacial properties of macromolecules. Many of them concerned indirect interactions between surfaces engendered by intervening species. The issues ranged from colloidal forces to membrane induced coupling between embedded macromolecules (membrane-bound proteins). This report presents summaries of the following papers published as a result of this study: membrane interactions with polymers and colloids; escape transitions and force laws for compressed polymer mushrooms; interaction between finite-sized particles and end grafted polymers; one long chain among shorter chains--the Flory approach revisited; conformation of star polymers in high molecular weight solvents; membrane-induced interactions between inclusions; filled polymer brushes--a hydrodynamic analogy; polymer adsorption at liquid/air interfaces under lateral pressure; flow induced instability of the interface between a fluid and a gel at low Reynolds number; and fluctuation-induced forces in stacked fluid membranes.

  11. Effect of surface modification on interfacial nanobubble morphology and contact line tension.

    PubMed

    Rangharajan, Kaushik K; Kwak, Kwang J; Conlisk, A T; Wu, Yan; Prakash, Shaurya

    2015-07-14

    Past research has confirmed the existence of surface nanobubbles on various hydrophobic substrates (static contact angle >90°) when imaged in air-equilibrated water. Additionally, the use of solvent exchange techniques (based on the difference in saturation levels of air in various solvents) also introduced surface nanobubbles on hydrophilic substrates (static contact angle <90°). In this work, tapping mode atomic force microscopy was used to image interfacial nanobubbles formed on bulk polycarbonate (static contact angle of 81.1°), bromo-terminated silica (BTS; static contact angle of 85.5°), and fluoro-terminated silica (FTS; static contact angle of 105.3°) surfaces when immersed in air-equilibrated water without solvent exchange. Nanobubbles formed on the above three substrates were characterized on the basis of Laplace pressure, bubble density, and contact line tension. Results reported here show that (1) the Laplace pressures of all nanobubbles formed on both BTS and polycarbonate were an order of magnitude higher than those of FTS, (2) the nanobubble number density per unit area decreased with an increase in substrate contact angle, and (3) the contact line tension of the nanobubbles was calculated to be positive for both BTS and polycarbonate (lateral radius, Rs < 50 nm for all nanobubbles), and negative for FTS (Rs > 50 nm for all nanobubbles). The nanobubble morphology and distribution before and after using the solvent exchange method (ethanol-water), on the bulk polycarbonate substrate was also characterized. Analysis for these polycarbonate surface nanobubbles showed that both the Laplace pressure and nanobubble density reduced by ≈98% after ethanol-water exchange, accompanied by a flip in the magnitude of contact line tension from positive (0.19 nN) to negative (-0.11 nN). PMID:26041331

  12. Wetting on a spherical wall: influence of liquid-gas interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Nold, Andreas; Malijevský, Alexandr; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2011-08-01

    We study the equilibrium of a liquid film on an attractive spherical substrate for an intermolecular interaction model exhibiting both fluid-fluid and fluid-wall long-range forces. We first reexamine the wetting properties of the model in the zero-curvature limit, i.e., for a planar wall, using an effective interfacial Hamiltonian approach in the framework of the well known sharp-kink approximation (SKA). We obtain very good agreement with a mean-field density functional theory (DFT), fully justifying the use of SKA in this limit. We then turn our attention to substrates of finite curvature and appropriately modify the so-called soft-interface approximation (SIA) originally formulated by Napiórkowski and Dietrich [Phys. Rev. B34, 6469 (1986)] for critical wetting on a planar wall. A detailed asymptotic analysis of SIA confirms the SKA functional form for the film growth. However, it turns out that the agreement between SKA and our DFT is only qualitative. We then show that the quantitative discrepancy between the two is due to the overestimation of the liquid-gas surface tension within SKA. On the other hand, by relaxing the assumption of a sharp interface, with, e.g., a simple "smoothing" of the density profile there, markedly improves the predictive capability of the theory, making it quantitative and showing that the liquid-gas surface tension plays a crucial role when describing wetting on a curved substrate. In addition, we show that in contrast to SKA, SIA predicts the expected mean-field critical exponent of the liquid-gas surface tension.

  13. Effect of surface modification on interfacial nanobubble morphology and contact line tension.

    PubMed

    Rangharajan, Kaushik K; Kwak, Kwang J; Conlisk, A T; Wu, Yan; Prakash, Shaurya

    2015-07-14

    Past research has confirmed the existence of surface nanobubbles on various hydrophobic substrates (static contact angle >90°) when imaged in air-equilibrated water. Additionally, the use of solvent exchange techniques (based on the difference in saturation levels of air in various solvents) also introduced surface nanobubbles on hydrophilic substrates (static contact angle <90°). In this work, tapping mode atomic force microscopy was used to image interfacial nanobubbles formed on bulk polycarbonate (static contact angle of 81.1°), bromo-terminated silica (BTS; static contact angle of 85.5°), and fluoro-terminated silica (FTS; static contact angle of 105.3°) surfaces when immersed in air-equilibrated water without solvent exchange. Nanobubbles formed on the above three substrates were characterized on the basis of Laplace pressure, bubble density, and contact line tension. Results reported here show that (1) the Laplace pressures of all nanobubbles formed on both BTS and polycarbonate were an order of magnitude higher than those of FTS, (2) the nanobubble number density per unit area decreased with an increase in substrate contact angle, and (3) the contact line tension of the nanobubbles was calculated to be positive for both BTS and polycarbonate (lateral radius, Rs < 50 nm for all nanobubbles), and negative for FTS (Rs > 50 nm for all nanobubbles). The nanobubble morphology and distribution before and after using the solvent exchange method (ethanol-water), on the bulk polycarbonate substrate was also characterized. Analysis for these polycarbonate surface nanobubbles showed that both the Laplace pressure and nanobubble density reduced by ≈98% after ethanol-water exchange, accompanied by a flip in the magnitude of contact line tension from positive (0.19 nN) to negative (-0.11 nN).

  14. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  15. Interfacial shear stress measurement using high spatial resolution multiphase PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-06-01

    In multiphase flows, form drag and viscous shear stress transfer momentum between phases. For numerous environmental and man-made flows, it is of primary importance to predict this transfer at a liquid-gas interface. In its general expression, interfacial shear stress involves local velocity gradients as well as surface velocity, curvature, and surface tension gradients. It is therefore a challenging quantity to measure experimentally or compute numerically. In fact, no experimental work to date has been able to directly resolve all the terms contributing to the shear stress in the case of curved and moving surfaces. In an attempt to fully resolve the interface shear stress when surface tension gradients are negligible, high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data are acquired simultaneously on both sides of a water-air interface. The flow consists of a well-conditioned uniform and homogeneous water jet discharging in quiescent air, which exhibits two-dimensional surface waves as a result of a shear layer instability below the surface. PIV provides velocity fields in both phases, while planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to track the interface and obtain its curvature. To compute the interfacial shear stress from the data, several processing schemes are proposed and compared, using liquid and/or gas phase data. Vorticity at the surface, which relates to the shear stress through the dynamic boundary condition at the surface, is also computed and provides additional strategies for estimating the shear. The various schemes are in agreement within the experimental uncertainties, validating the methodology for experimentally resolving this demanding quantity.

  16. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    PubMed Central

    Haghighatpanah, Shayesteh; Bohlén, Martin; Bolton, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular mechanics (MM) methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)—polyethylene and SWNT—polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the SWNT with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1 to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the SWNT wall. PMID:25229056

  17. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighatpanah, Shayesteh; Bohlén, Martin; Bolton, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube - polyethylene and single walled carbon nanotube - polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the single walled carbon nanotubes with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1% to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the single walled carbon nanotube wall.

  18. How does interfacial rheology govern soap bubble cluster dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Biance, Anne-Laure; Hohler, Reinhard

    2009-11-01

    Aqueous foams are concentrated dispersions of gas bubbles in a soapy solution. These complex fluids exhibit solid-like or liquid-like mechanical behaviors, depending on the applied shear. When it is increased beyond a yield strain, neighbor switching bubble rearrangements called T1 events are triggered and plastic flow sets in. We study experimentally the dynamics of such strain induced T1s in 3D bubble clusters that we consider as model systems of 3D foams. To determine the hydrodynamics and physico-chemistry that set the duration of T1s, we use foaming solutions of a wide range of well characterized bulk and interfacial rheological properties. At low shear rates, the T1 duration is set by a balance between surface tension and surface viscous forces in qualitative agreement with previous studies of T1s in 2D foams [1] and we present a simple physical model that explains our 3D findings. Moreover, above a characteristic shear rate, rearrangement dynamics are driven by the applied strain. By combining all our results, we link the transition from intermittent to continous flow dynamics in foams to the rheology of the gas-liquid interfaces. [4pt] [1] M. Durand, H. A. Stone, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 2226101 (2006).

  19. Interfacial velocities and capillary pressure gradients during Haines jumps.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ryan T; Berg, Steffen

    2013-10-01

    Drainage is typically understood as a process where the pore space is invaded by a nonwetting phase pore-by-pore, the controlling parameters of which are represented by capillary number and mobility ratio. However, what is less understood and where experimental data are lacking is direct knowledge of the dynamics of pore drainage and the associated intrinsic time scales since the rate dependencies often observed with displacement processes are potentially dependent on these time scales. Herein, we study pore drainage events with a high speed camera in a micromodel system and analyze the dependency of interfacial velocity on bulk flow rate and spatial fluid configurations. We find that pore drainage events are cooperative, meaning that capillary pressure differences which extend over multiple pores directly affect fluid topology and menisci dynamics. Results suggest that not only viscous forces but also capillarity acts in a nonlocal way. Lastly, the existence of a pore morphological parameter where pore drainage transitions from capillary to inertial and/or viscous dominated is discussed followed by a discussion on capillary dispersion and time scale dependencies. We show that the displacement front is disperse when volumetric flow rate is less than the intrinsic time scale for a pore drainage event and becomes sharp when the flow rate is greater than the intrinsic time scale (i.e., overruns the pore drainage event), which clearly shows how pore-scale parameters influence macroscale flow behavior. PMID:24229279

  20. Effect of transcrystalline morphology on interfacial adhesion in biocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, J.; Hedenberg, P.; Felix, J.

    1995-12-01

    The efficient transfer of load from matrix to fibers is crucial for achieving good mechanical performance in composite materials. Much attention has been paid in recent years to producing strong bonds across fibers and matrix in composite materials. An attractive alternative to surface modification of fibers or the use of compatibilizing agents is creating molecular order at the interphase. In this study, the ability of natural cellulose fibers, such as cotton and wood fibers, to induce transcrystallinity in synthetic polymer such as polypropylene (PP), was utilized to create various interphase morphologies. The effect of trancrystalline layers of different thicknesses at the fiber interface on interfacial shear stress transfer was investigated using the single-fiber fragmentation test. It was found that the trancrystalline morphology at the fiber/matrix interface considerably improved the shear transfer. The fiber surface roughness as measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as well as surface crystalline structure is proposed to be responsible for creating a favorable interphase morphology. The interphase morphology of a new generation of biodegradable composites based on celluse fiber-reinforced bacteria-produced polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is currently under investigation in our laboratories.

  1. Interfacial interaction between the epoxidized natural rubber and silica in natural rubber/silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tiwen; Jia, Zhixin; Luo, Yuanfang; Jia, Demin; Peng, Zheng

    2015-02-01

    The epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) as an interfacial modifier was used to improve the mechanical and dynamical mechanical properties of NR/silica composites. In order to reveal the interaction mechanism between ENR and silica, the ENR/Silica model compound was prepared by using an open mill and the interfacial interaction of ENR with silica was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and stress-strain testing. The results indicated that the ring-opening reaction occurs between the epoxy groups of ENR chains and Si-OH groups on the silica surfaces and the covalent bonds are formed between two phases, which can improve the dispersion of silica in the rubber matrix and enhance the interfacial combination between rubber and silica. The ring-opening reaction occurs not only in vulcanization process but also in mixing process, meanwhile, the latter seems to be more important due to the simultaneous effects of mechanical force and temperature.

  2. Particle trapping at an advancing solidification front with interfacial-curvature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Worster, M. G.

    2001-03-01

    We predict the maximum solidification rate, or critical velocity, Vc at which an insoluble particle suspended in a melt is pushed ahead of an advancing solidification front by intermolecular forces. At higher solidification rates the particle is incorporated within the solid. The net intermolecular force pushing the particle and the viscous resistance opposing it are both significantly influenced by the shape of the front as it conforms to the particle in response to interfacial pre-melting. We predict the entire shape of the front, within a thin-film approximation, accounting for the freezing-point depression due to curvature. We show how the interface shape varies with the magnitude of the surface energy and the closeness of the particle, and compare these to previous, ad hoc representations of the interface. We confirm the scaling results of previous, more approximate, analyses for the case in which the intermolecular forces are dominated by non-retarded van der Waals interactions, and provide new results for other power-law interactions. We examine how the particle behaviour changes as its radius increases so that the effect of interfacial curvature is diminished.

  3. Optimization of residual stresses in MMC's through the variation of interfacial layer architectures and processing parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was the development of efficient, user-friendly computer codes for optimizing fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites through the use of homogeneous and heterogeneous interfacial layer architectures and processing parameter variation. To satisfy this objective, three major computer codes have been developed and delivered to the NASA-Lewis Research Center, namely MCCM, OPTCOMP, and OPTCOMP2. MCCM is a general research-oriented code for investigating the effects of microstructural details, such as layered morphology of SCS-6 SiC fibers and multiple homogeneous interfacial layers, on the inelastic response of unidirectional metal matrix composites under axisymmetric thermomechanical loading. OPTCOMP and OPTCOMP2 combine the major analysis module resident in MCCM with a commercially-available optimization algorithm and are driven by user-friendly interfaces which facilitate input data construction and program execution. OPTCOMP enables the user to identify those dimensions, geometric arrangements and thermoelastoplastic properties of homogeneous interfacial layers that minimize thermal residual stresses for the specified set of constraints. OPTCOMP2 provides additional flexibility in the residual stress optimization through variation of the processing parameters (time, temperature, external pressure and axial load) as well as the microstructure of the interfacial region which is treated as a heterogeneous two-phase composite. Overviews of the capabilities of these codes are provided together with a summary of results that addresses the effects of various microstructural details of the fiber, interfacial layers and matrix region on the optimization of fabrication-induced residual stresses in metal matrix composites.

  4. Instability due to interfacial tension in parallel liquid-liquid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Oscar M. H.

    2016-06-01

    The frequent occurrence of multiphase flows in pipes has motivated a great research interest over the last decades. The particular case of liquid-liquid flow is commonly encountered in the petroleum industry, where a number of applications involve oil-water flow such as crude oil production in directional wells. However, it has not received the same attention when compared to gas-liquid flow. In addition, most of the available information has to do with flow in pipes. When it comes to flows in annular ducts the data are scanty. A general transition criterion has been recently proposed in order to obtain the stratified and core-annular flow-pattern transition boundaries in viscous oil-water flow. The proposed criterion was based on an one-dimensional two-fluid model of liquid-liquid two-phase flow. A stability analysis was carried out and interfacial tension is considered. A new destabilizing term arises, which is a function of the cross-section curvature of the interface. It is well accepted that interfacial tension favors the stable condition. However, the analysis of the new interfacial-tension term shows that it can actually destabilize the basic flow pattern, playing an important role in regions of extreme volumetric fractions. Such an interesting effect seems to be more pronounced in flows of viscous fluids and in annular-duct flow. The effect of interfacial tension is explored and the advantages of using a more complete model are discussed and illustrated through comparisons with experimental data from the literature. The evaluation of the effects of fluid viscosity and interfacial tension allows the correction and enhancement of transition models based essentially on data of pipe flow of low viscosity fluids.

  5. Interfacial properties of binary mixtures of square-well molecules from Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.

    2016-04-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical square-well molecules from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with the same molecular size and intermolecular potential range but different dispersive energy parameter values. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of square-well molecules. In particular, we determine the pressure tensor using the mechanical (virial) route and the vapor-liquid interfacial tension evaluated using the Irving-Kirkwood method. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. This work can be considered as the extension of our previous work [F. J. Martínez-Ruiz and F. J. Blas, Mol. Phys. 113, 1217 (2015)] to deal with mixtures of spherical molecules that interact through a discontinuous intermolecular potential. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ɛ22/ɛ11, is to sharpen the vapor-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the more volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, since there are stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in comparison with the rest of intermolecular interactions. Also, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as ɛ22/ɛ11 is larger, a direct consequence of the increasing of the cohesive energy of the system.

  6. Interfacial properties of binary mixtures of square-well molecules from Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ruiz, F J; Blas, F J

    2016-04-21

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical square-well molecules from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with the same molecular size and intermolecular potential range but different dispersive energy parameter values. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of square-well molecules. In particular, we determine the pressuretensor using the mechanical (virial) route and the vapor-liquid interfacial tension evaluated using the Irving-Kirkwood method. In addition to the pressuretensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. This work can be considered as the extension of our previous work [F. J. Martínez-Ruiz and F. J. Blas, Mol. Phys. 113, 1217 (2015)] to deal with mixtures of spherical molecules that interact through a discontinuous intermolecular potential. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ϵ22/ϵ11, is to sharpen the vapor-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the more volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, since there are stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in comparison with the rest of intermolecular interactions. Also, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as ϵ22/ϵ11 is larger, a direct consequence of the increasing of the cohesive energy of the system. PMID:27389232

  7. Preface: Special Topic on Interfacial and Confined Water

    SciTech Connect

    Molinero, Valeria; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-11-14

    This Special Topic on the Chemical Physics of Interfacial and Confined Water contains a collection of original research papers that showcase recent theoretical and experimental advances in the field. These papers provide a timely discussion of fundamental aspects of interfacial and confined water that are important in both natural environments and engineered applications.

  8. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  9. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  10. Strong interfacial attrition developed by oleate/layered double hydroxide nanoplatelets dispersed into poly(butylene succinate).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Verney, Vincent; Commereuc, Sophie; Chin, In-Joo; Leroux, Fabrice

    2010-09-01

    Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) nanocomposite structure was studied as a function of the filler percentage loading. The resulting state of dispersion was evaluated by XRD and TEM, and the interfacial attrition between PBS chain and lamellar platelets by the melt rheological properties. Hybrid organic inorganic (O/I) layered double hydroxide (LDH) organo-modified by oleate anions was used as filler. It was found that the confinement supplied by the LDH framework forces the interleaved organic molecule to be more distant from each other than in the case of oleate salt, this having as an effect to decrease strongly the homonuclear intermolecular (1)H(1)H dipolar interaction. An additional consequence of this relatively free molecular rotation, affecting the (13)C CPMAS response as well, is to facilitate the delamination of the 2D-stacked layers during extrusion since an quasi-exfoliated PBS:Mg(2)Al/oleate structure is observed for filler loading lower than 5% w/w. This is in association to a non-linear viscoelasticity in the low-omega region and the observed shear-thinning tendency compares better than other PBS:silicate nanocomposite derivatives and is here explained by the presence of a percolated LDH nanoparticle network. Indeed the plastic deformation in the low-omega region is found to be restricted by well-dispersed LDH tactoids in association with a rather strong attrition phenomenon between tethered oleate anions and PBS chains.

  11. Interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a glass surface - A combined experimental and cohesive zone modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Safari, Ashkan; Tukovic, Zeljko; Cardiff, Philip; Walter, Maik; Casey, Eoin; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2016-02-01

    A good understanding of the mechanical stability of biofilms is essential for biofouling management, particularly when mechanical forces are used. Previous biofilm studies lack a damage-based theoretical model to describe the biofilm separation from a surface. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a rigid glass substrate using a combined experimental and numerical modelling approach. In the current work, the biofilm-glass interfacial separation process was investigated under tensile and shear stresses at the macroscale level, known as modes I and II failure mechanisms respectively. The numerical simulations were performed using a Finite Volume (FV)-based simulation package (OpenFOAM®) to predict the separation initiation using the cohesive zone model (CZM). Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based retraction curve was used to obtain the separation properties between the biofilm and glass colloid at microscale level, where the CZM parameters were estimated using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. In this study CZM is introduced as a reliable method for the investigation of interfacial separation between a biofilm and rigid substrate, in which a high local stress at the interface edge acts as an ultimate stress at the crack tip.This study demonstrated that the total interfacial failure energy measured at the macroscale, was significantly higher than the pure interfacial separation energy obtained by AFM at the microscale, indicating a highly ductile deformation behaviour within the bulk biofilm matrix. The results of this study can significantly contribute to the understanding of biofilm detachments.

  12. Interfacial and transport properties of nanoconstrained inorganic and organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocherlakota, Lakshmi Suhasini

    Nanoscale constraints impact the material properties of both organic and inorganic systems. The systems specifically studied here are (i) nanoconstrained polymeric systems, poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) relevant to gas separation membranes (ii) Zwitterionic polymers poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA), poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (pCBAA), and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl methacrylate) (PEGMA) brushes critical for reducing bio-fouling (iii) Surface properties of N-layer graphene sheets. Interfacial constraints in ultrathin poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) membranes yielded gas permeabilities and CO2/helium selectivities that exceed bulk PTMSP membrane transport properties by up to three-fold for membranes of submicrometer thickness. Indicative of a free volume increase, a molecular energetic mobility analysis (involving intrinsic friction analysis) revealed enhanced methyl side group mobilities in thin PTMSP membranes with maximum permeation, compared to bulk films. Aging studies conducted over the timescales relevant to the conducted experiments signify that the free volume states in the thin film membranes are highly unstable in the presence of sorbing gases such as CO2. To maintain this high free volume configuration of polymer while improving the temporal stability an "inverse" architecture to conventional polymer nanocomposites was investigated, in which the polymer phase of PTMSP and PEO were interfacially and dimensionally constrained in nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. While with this architecture the benefits of nanocomposite and ultrathin film membranes of PTMSP could be reproduced and improved upon, also the temporal stability could be enhanced substantially. The PEO-AAO nanocomposite membranes also revealed improved gas selectivity properties of CO2 over helium. In the thermal transition studies of zwitterionic pSBMA brushes a reversible critical transition temperature of 60

  13. Scanning probe microscopies for the creation and characterization of interfacial architectures: Studies of alkyl thiolate monolayers at gold

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.

    1997-01-10

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) offers access to the structural and material properties of interfaces, and when combined with macroscopic characterization techniques results in a powerful interfacial development tool. However, the relative infancy of SPM techniques has dictated that initial investigations concentrate on model interfacial systems as benchmarks for testing the control and characterization capabilities of SPM. One such family of model interfacial systems results from the spontaneous adsorption of alkyl thiols to gold. This dissertation examines the application of SPM to the investigation of the interfacial properties of these alkyl thiolate monolayers. Structural investigations result in a proposed explanation for counterintuitive correlations between substrate roughness and heterogeneous electron transfer barrier properties. Frictional measurements are used for characterization of the surface free energy of a series of end-group functionalized monolayers, as well as for the material properties of monolayers composed of varying chain length alkyl thiols. Additional investigations used these characterization techniques to monitor the real-time evolution of chemical and electrochemical surface reactions. The results of these investigations demonstrates the value of SPM technology to the compositional mapping of surfaces, elucidation of interfacial defects, creation of molecularly sized chemically heterogeneous architectures, as well as to the monitoring of surface reactions. However, it is the future which will demonstrate the usefulness of SPM technology to the advancement of science and technology.

  14. One Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald R.

    2002-04-01

    There is only one entity that can extend force and couple through space; and it should be apparent that Electromagnetism is that entity. In the cases of the nuclear strong force and the nuclear weak force, this is the same fundamental Electromagnetism manifesting itself in two different ways in the nucleus. It remains the same basic Electromagnetism. On the other hand, General Relativity fails to produce force at a distance, fails the Cavendish experiment, and does not allow an apple to fall to the ground. The result shows there is only Electromagnetism that functions through physical nature providing gravity, actions in the nucleus, as well as all other physical actions universally, including Gravity and Gravitation. There are many direct proofs of this, the same proofs as in NUCLEAR QUANTUM GRAVITATION. In contrast, General Relativity plainly relies on fallacy abstract and incoherent proofs; proofs which have now been mostly disproved. In the past it was deemed necessary by some to have an "ether" to propagate Electromagnetic waves. The fallacy concept of time space needs "space distortions" in order to cause gravity. However, Electromagnetic gravity does not have this problem. Clearly there is only ONE FORCE that causes Gravity, Electromagnetism, the Nuclear Strong Force, and the Nuclear Weak Force, and that ONE FORCE is Electromagnetism.

  15. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  16. Orientational anisotropy and interfacial transport in polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, M. M.; Rickman, J. M.; Harmer, M. P.; Chan, H. M.

    2016-04-01

    Interfacial diffusion is governed to a large degree by geometric parameters that are determined by crystallographic orientation. In this study, we assess the impact of orientational anisotropy on mass transport at internal interfaces, focusing on the role of preferred crystallographic orientation (i.e., texture) on mass diffusion in a polycrystal. More specifically, we perform both numerical and analytical studies of steady-state diffusion for polycrystals having various grain-orientation distributions. By relating grain misorientation to grain-boundary energies and, via the Borisov relation, to the diffusivity, we link microstructure variability to kinetics. Our aim is to correlate shape features of the orientation distribution, such as the location and shapes of peaks, with the calculated effective diffusivity. Finally, we discuss the role of crystallographic constraints, such as those associated with grain junctions, in determining the effective diffusivity of a polycrystal.

  17. Nucleation and interfacial adsorption in ternary systems.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T

    2015-03-01

    Nucleation is studied in incompressible ternary fluids by examining the topology of the overall landscape of the energy surface. Minimum free energy paths for nucleation (MFEPs) of a single nucleus in an infinite matrix are computed with the string method in the framework of the continuum theory of nucleation for the regular solution. Properties of the critical nucleus are compared with the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. MFEPs are found to exhibit complex nucleation pathways with non-monotonic variations of compositions in the interfacial region, specifically adsorption of a component. In the symmetric regular solution, the minority component is found to segregate at the interface during nucleation with a concomitant depletion of the nucleus core, resulting in unpredicted partition of the non-selective component. Despite increasing the gradient energy, such inhomogeneity in composition is shown to lower the nucleation barrier. PMID:25747088

  18. Wear and interfacial transport of material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Bonding across the interface for two solids in contact and the subsequent transfer of material from one surface to another is a direct result of the interfacial bonds being stronger than the cohesive bonds in either of the two solids. Surface tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe are used to examine adhesive contacts and to determine the direction, nature, quantity of material transfer and properties of the solids which effect transfer and wear. The electronic nature, cohesive binding energies, surface structure, lattice disregistry and distribution of species in surface layers are all found to effect adhesion and transfer or transport for clean surfaces in solid state contact. The influence of adsorbed and reacted surface films from fractions of a monolayer to multilayer reactive films are considered. It is shown that even fractions of a monolayer of surface active species such as oxygen and sulfur can markedly inhibit adhesion and transport.

  19. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  20. Interfacial stress transfer in graphene oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheling; Young, Robert J; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-01-23

    Raman spectroscopy has been used for the first time to monitor interfacial stress transfer in poly(vinyl alcohol) nanocomposites reinforced with graphene oxide (GO). The graphene oxide nanocomposites were prepared by a simple mixing method and casting from aqueous solution. They were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and polarized Raman spectroscopy and their mechanical properties determined by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. It was found that GO was fully exfoliated during the nanocomposite preparation process and that the GO nanoplatelets tended align in the plane of the films. The stiffness and yield stress of the nanocomposites were found to increase with GO loading but the extension to failure decreased. It was shown that the Raman D band at ~1335 cm(-1) downshifted as the nanocomposites were strained as a result of the interfacial stress transfer between the polymer matrix and GO reinforcement. From knowledge of the Grüneisen parameter for graphene, it was possible to estimate the effective Young's modulus of the GO from the Raman D band shift rate per unit strain to be of the order of 120 GPa. A similar value of effective modulus was found from the tensile mechanical data using the "rule of mixtures" that decreased with GO loading. The accepted value of Young's modulus for GO is in excess of 200 GPa and it is suggested that the lower effective Young's modulus values determined may be due to a combination of finite flake dimensions, waviness and wrinkles, aggregation, and misalignment of the GO flakes.

  1. Stokes-Flow Destabilization by Interfacial Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, Alexander; Halpern, David

    2002-11-01

    We consider the infinitesimal-disturbance stability of a plane Couette-Poiseuille flow of two Newtonian fluids with an insoluble surfactant at the interface, with gravity being excluded to isolate the Marangoni effect of the surfactant-dependent surface-tension. The principal result is that, in contrast to the (well-studied) surfactantless cases of such flows, there is instability (for certain ranges of parameters), for which inertia plays no role, but the non-zero shear of basic velocity at (both sides of) the interface is necessary. A quadratic equation is found for the complex wave-speed of the "interfacial" normal modes of disturbances. Hence, the growth-rate is available as an elementary function of five variables--the wavenumber and the four dimensionless parameters of the problem: the Marangoni number, the viscosity ratio, the interfacial shear-rate of basic velocity, and the thickness ratio. The comparative simplicity of the growth-rate function allows for a rather extensive characterization of instability (by asymptotic and numerical means) over the entire parameter space and for all wavenumbers. In particular, it is long-wave in most cases, but has a "mid-wave" character for some ranges of parameters. The growth rate approaches zero at small wavenumbers. It decreases (linearly) toward negative infinity in the limit of infinitly large wavenumbers. The maximum (over all wavenumbers) growth rate approaches zero in both the limits of small and large Marangoni numbers. Among the different asymptotic limits, the only singular one is the zero limit of surface tension at zero surfactant concentration; only in this (probably, non-physical) case, the instability is short-wave. Finally, the critical (instability-onset) hypersurface in the parameter space is ascertained.

  2. Dynamics of deeply supercooled interfacial water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Jan; Cerveny, Silvina

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the relaxation dynamics of glassy and deeply supercooled water in different types of systems. We compare the dynamics of such interfacial water in ordinary aqueous solutions, hard confinements and biological soft materials. In all these types of systems the dielectric relaxation time of the main water process exhibits a dynamic crossover from a high-temperature non-Arrhenius temperature dependence to a low-temperature Arrhenius behavior. Moreover, at large enough water content the low-temperature process is universal and exhibits the same temperature behavior in all types of systems. However, the physical nature of the dynamic crossover is somewhat different for the different types of systems. In ordinary aqueous solutions it is not even a proper dynamic crossover, since the water relaxation decouples from the cooperative α-relaxation of the solution slightly above the glass transition in the same way as all secondary (β) relaxations of glass-forming materials. In hard confinements, the physical origin of the dynamic crossover is not fully clear, but it seems to occur when the cooperative main relaxation of water at high temperatures reaches a temperature where the volume required for its cooperative motion exceeds the size of the geometrically-confined water cluster. Due to this confinement effect the α-like main relaxation of the confined water seems to transform to a more local β-relaxation with decreasing temperature. Since this low-temperature β-relaxation is universal for all systems at high water content it is possible that it can be considered as an intrinsic β-relaxation of supercooled water, including supercooled bulk water. This possibility, together with other findings for deeply supercooled interfacial water, suggests that the most accepted relaxation scenarios for supercooled bulk water have to be altered.

  3. Synergistic behaviour of ZnO nanoparticles and gemini surfactants on the dynamic and equilibrium oil/water interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Fereidooni Moghadam, Tahereh; Azizian, Saeid; Wettig, Shawn

    2015-03-21

    In this work the effect of ZnO nanoparticles on the interfacial behaviour of gemini surfactants (12-3-12 and 14-3-14) at the oil/water interface was investigated. Equilibrium and dynamic interfacial tension in the absence and presence of ZnO was measured and compared. The results show that the synergistic interactions between the surfactants and nanoparticles decrease the interfacial tension beyond that observed for each component, alone. Modelling of dynamic data with two different models indicates that the mechanism of surfactant migration (with and without ZnO) is mixed diffusion-kinetic-control. The Gibbs free energy of micellization and the Gibbs free energy of adsorption in the absence and presence of ZnO were calculated and compared. Finally the effect of addition of ZnO nanoparticles on emulsion stability was also examined.

  4. Influences of thermal annealing on P3HT/PCBM interfacial properties and charge dynamics in polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng-En; Dinelli, Franco; Yu, Chen-Te; Shih, Hwa-Wei; Pei, Zingway; Chang, Chen-Shiung; Shih-Sen Chien, Forest

    2015-12-01

    The effects of thermal annealing on the interfacial properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and on the charge dynamics in P3HT:PCBM polymer solar cells (PSCs) are investigated. This study determines that an effective phase separation of the P3HT and PCBM caused by thermal annealing achieves a larger interfacial area for efficient exciton dissociation and a well-defined pn junction with few defect levels at the P3HT/PCBM interface. Additionally, thermal annealing creates a compositional gradient across the P3HT:PCBM films, which enhances the charge transit ability significantly. These improved interfacial properties and efficiency in charge transit ability account for the better power conversion efficiency of P3HT:PCBM PSCs treated with thermal annealing.

  5. Acoustic force mapping in a hybrid acoustic-optical micromanipulation device supporting high resolution optical imaging† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information about 1D model calculations for a piezoelectric transducer. See DOI: 10.1039/c6lc00182c Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Craig; MacDonald, Michael Peter; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in the life-sciences demand non-contact manipulation tools for forceful but nevertheless delicate handling of various types of sample. Moreover, the system should support high-resolution optical imaging. Here we present a hybrid acoustic/optical manipulation system which utilizes a transparent transducer, making it compatible with high-NA imaging in a microfluidic environment. The powerful acoustic trapping within a layered resonator, which is suitable for highly parallel particle handling, is complemented by the flexibility and selectivity of holographic optical tweezers, with the specimens being under high quality optical monitoring at all times. The dual acoustic/optical nature of the system lends itself to optically measure the exact acoustic force map, by means of direct force measurements on an optically trapped particle. For applications with (ultra-)high demand on the precision of the force measurements, the position of the objective used for the high-NA imaging may have significant influence on the acoustic force map in the probe chamber. We have characterized this influence experimentally and the findings were confirmed by model simulations. We show that it is possible to design the chamber and to choose the operating point in such a way as to avoid perturbations due to the objective lens. Moreover, we found that measuring the electrical impedance of the transducer provides an easy indicator for the acoustic resonances. PMID:27025398

  6. Traceable periodic force calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Ch; Kieckenap, G.; Glöckner, B.; Buß, A.; Kumme, R.

    2012-06-01

    A procedure for dynamic force calibration using sinusoidal excitations of force transducers is described. The method is based on a sinusoidal excitation of force transducers equipped with an additional top mass excited with an electrodynamic shaker system. The acting dynamic force can in this way be determined according to Newton's law as mass times acceleration, whereby the acceleration is measured on the surface of the top mass with the aid of laser interferometers. The dynamic sensitivity, which is the ratio of the electrical output signal of the force transducer and the acting dynamic force, is the main point of interest of such a dynamic calibration. In addition to the sensitivity, the parameter stiffness and damping of the transducer can also be determined. The first part of the paper outlines a mathematical model to describe the dynamic behaviour of a transducer. This is followed by a presentation of the traceability of the measured quantities involved and their uncertainties. The paper finishes with an example calibration of a 25 kN strain gauge force transducer.

  7. Toughening mechanisms in interfacially modified HDPE/thermoplastic starch blends.

    PubMed

    Taguet, Aurélie; Bureau, Martin N; Huneault, Michel A; Favis, Basil D

    2014-12-19

    The mechanical behavior of polymer blends containing 80 wt% of HDPE and 20 wt% of TPS and compatibilized with HDPE-g-MA grafted copolymer was investigated. Unmodified HDPE/TPS blends exhibit high fracture resistance, however, the interfacial modification of those blends by addition of HDPE-g-MA leads to a dramatic drop in fracture resistance. The compatibilization of HDPE/TPS blends increases the surface area of TPS particles by decreasing their size. It was postulated that the addition of HDPE-g-MA induces a reaction between maleic anhydride and hydroxyl groups of the glycerol leading to a decrease of the glycerol content in the TPS phase. This phenomenon increases the stiffness of the modified TPS particles and stiffer TPS particles leading to an important reduction in toughness and plastic deformation, as measured by the EWF method. It is shown that the main toughening mechanism in HDPE/TPS blends is shear-yielding. This article demonstrates that stiff, low diameter TPS particles reduce shear band formation and consequently decrease the resistance to crack propagation. PMID:25263885

  8. Interfacial activity and leaching patterns of Leptospirillum ferrooxidans on pyrite.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Chapana, José A; Tributsch, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The leaching ability of Leptospirillum ferrooxidans goes beyond the mere oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). Addition of these bacteria to pyrite triggers interfacial phenomena that lead to bacterial attachment and local forms of corrosion (surface pitting). As the leaching process proceeds, bacterial cells undergo changes, characterized by the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the uptake and storage of electro-dense nanoparticles. The latter are embedded in an exopolymeric capsule, which coats the bacterial surface leading to distinctive biomineralized assemblages. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses, quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray measurements and electron diffraction established that the embedded electron-dense nanoparticles comprise pyrite with a well-defined stoichiometry. Addition of Fe(3+) alone did not induce any form of local corrosion on pyrite, which indicates that the reactions taking place between the attached bacteria and the underlying pyrite surface are responsible for the leaching patterns observed in this study. The observed corrosion process resembles that of 'electrochemical machining', because it uses a corrosion promoter, namely the locally concentrated Fe(3+) in the biofilm environment, formed by the attached cells. PMID:19712343

  9. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Arsenlis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  10. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  11. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  12. Interfacial spin-orbit torque without bulk spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emori, Satoru; Nan, Tianxiang; Belkessam, Amine M.; Wang, Xinjun; Matyushov, Alexei D.; Babroski, Christopher J.; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Sun, Nian X.

    2016-05-01

    An electric current in the presence of spin-orbit coupling can generate a spin accumulation that exerts torques on a nearby magnetization. We demonstrate that, even in the absence of materials with strong bulk spin-orbit coupling, a torque can arise solely due to interfacial spin-orbit coupling, namely, Rashba-Eldestein effects at metal/insulator interfaces. In magnetically soft NiFe sandwiched between a weak spin-orbit metal (Ti) and insulator (Al2O3 ), this torque appears as an effective field, which is significantly larger than the Oersted field and qualitatively modified by inserting an additional layer between NiFe and Al2O3 . Our findings point to unconventional routes for tuning spin-orbit torques by engineering interfacial electric dipoles.

  13. Interfacial electron and phonon scattering processes in high-powered nanoscale applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2011-10-01

    The overarching goal of this Truman LDRD project was to explore mechanisms of thermal transport at interfaces of nanomaterials, specifically linking the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary conductance to the structures and geometries of interfaces and boundaries. Deposition, fabrication, and post possessing procedures of nanocomposites and devices can give rise to interatomic mixing around interfaces of materials leading to stresses and imperfections that could affect heat transfer. An understanding of the physics of energy carrier scattering processes and their response to interfacial disorder will elucidate the potentials of applying these novel materials to next-generation high powered nanodevices and energy conversion applications. An additional goal of this project was to use the knowledge gained from linking interfacial structure to thermal transport in order to develop avenues to control, or 'tune' the thermal transport in nanosystems.

  14. Interfacial degradation effects of aqueous solution-processed molybdenum trioxides on the stability of organic solar cells evaluated by a differential method

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Yan-Hui; Wang, Zhao-Kui E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Yuan, Da-Xing; Liao, Liang-Sheng E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-15

    The authors investigate the influence of two hole interfacial materials poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly (styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and aqueous solution-processed MoO{sub 3} (sMoO{sub 3}) on cell stability. sMoO{sub 3}-based device demonstrated obviously improved stability compared to PEDOT:PSS-based one. Current-voltage characteristics analysis is carried out to investigate the effect of the hole interfacial layers on the cell stability. The formation of additional trap states at the interfaces between the hole interfacial layer and the active layer in degraded devices is verified by a differential method. Improved cell stability is attributed to a relatively stable sMoO{sub 3} interfacial layer compared to PEDOT:PSS by comparing their different trap states distributions.

  15. Interfacial Aspects of Polymer Based Photovoltaic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Controlling thin film morphology is key in optimizing the efficiency of polymer-based photovoltaic (PV) devices. Poly(3- hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-penyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) based solar cell performance is dictated by nanostructure of the active layer, the interfaces between the active layer and the electrodes, and the P3HT chain orientation in the thin film. The above parameters were systematically studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning force microscopy, optical microscopy, grazing incident angle x- ray diffraction., dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The influence of thermal annealing on the morphology, interfaces and crystal structure was investigated in films that were either initially confined by two electrodes or confined by only one electrode. While the bulk morphology in these films were identical, significant differences in the concentration of components at the electrode interfaces were found, giving rise to a marked difference in performance. In addition, a model was established, based on the crystallization of the P3HTand the diffusion of the PCBM to describe the origins of the nanoscale morphology found in the active layer. The device performance parameters were quantitatively studied. In collaboration with D. Chen, H. Liu, Y. Gu and F. Lu at UMass Amherst, A. Nakahara at Kuraray Co., D. Wei at Carl Zeiss NTS LLC, D. Nordlund at SSRL and supported by the DOE-supported EFRC at the UMass Amherst (DE-PS02-08ER15944).

  16. Origin of interfacial nanoscopic gaseous domains and formation of dense gas layer at hydrophobic solid-water interface.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Birkett, Greg R; Nguyen, Anh V

    2013-12-10

    Interfacial gas enrichment (IGE) covering the entire area of hydrophobic solid-water interface has recently been detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and hypothesized to be responsible for the unexpected stability and anomalous contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles and the significant change from DLVO to non-DLVO forces. In this paper, we provide further proof of the existence of IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) by molecular dynamic simulation. Nitrogen gas adsorption at the water-graphite interface is investigated using molecular dynamic simulation at 300 K and 1 atm normal pressure. The results show that a DGL with a density equivalent to a gas at pressure of 500 atm is formed and equilibrated with a normal pressure of 1 atm. By varying the number of gas molecules in the system, we observe several types of dense gas domains: aggregates, cylindrical caps, and DGLs. Spherical cap gas domains form during the simulation but are unstable and always revert to another type of gas domain. Furthermore, the calculated surface potential of the DGL-water interface, -17.5 mV, is significantly closer to 0 than the surface potential, -65 mV, of normal gas bubble-water interface. This result supports our previously stated hypothesis that the change in surface potential causes the switch from repulsion to attraction for an AFM tip when the graphite surface is covered by an IGE layer. The change in surface potential comes from the structure change of water molecules at the DGL-water interface as compared with the normal gas-water interface. In addition, the contact angle of the cylindrical cap high density nitrogen gas domains is 141°. This contact angle is far greater than 85° observed for water on graphite at ambient conditions and much closer to the 150° contact angle observed for nanobubbles in experiments.

  17. Interfacial Assembly of Graphene Oxide Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Laura J.

    Scientific interest in graphene oxide (GO) sheets, the product of chemical oxidation and exfoliation of graphite powder, has resurged in recent years because GO is considered a promising precursor for the bulk production of graphene-based sheets for a variety of applications. In addition, GO can be viewed as an unconventional type of soft material as it is characterized by two abruptly different length scales. Its thickness is of typical molecular dimensions, measured to be about 1 nm by atomic force microscopy, but its lateral dimensions are that of common colloidal particles, ranging from nanometers to tens of microns. This high anisotropy leads to interesting fundamental colloidal interactions between the soft sheets which have practical implications in the solution processing and assembly of the material. This research therefore aims to use a variety of techniques to control these inter-sheet interactions to gain an understanding of the processing-structure relationships which ultimately determine the overall properties of the bulk GO assembly. GO is identified as a two-dimensional amphiphile with a unique edge-to-center arrangement of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, which has led to the demonstration of its pH- and size-dependent surface activity. The water surface is then utilized, as in the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, as an ideal substrate to tile up the GO sheets and study the interactions between them. Sheet-sheet interaction morphologies were successfully altered between wrinkled and overlapped states by pH tuning of sheet charge density, and the resulting structure-property relationships are explored. In addition, a novel flash-reduction and assembly process is described in which a simple photographic camera flash can rapidly and cleanly turn an insulating, well-stacked GO paper to a more open and fluffy conducting film. Lastly, the use of these research results as educational outreach platforms is highlighted. A variety of outlets, such as You

  18. Interfacial phospholipids inhibit ozone-reactive absorption-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Connor, Lydia M; Ballinger, Carol A; Albrecht, Thomas B; Postlethwait, Edward M

    2004-06-01

    The intrapulmonary distribution of inhaled ozone (O(3)) and induction of site-specific cell injury are related to complex interactions among airflow patterns, local gas-phase concentrations, and the rates of O(3) flux into, and reaction and diffusion within, the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Recent studies demonstrated that interfacial phospholipid films appreciably inhibited NO(2) absorption. Because surface-active phospholipids are present on alveolar and airway interfaces, we investigated the effects of interfacial films on O(3)-reactive absorption and acute cell injury. Compressed films of dipalmitoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and rat lung lavage lipids significantly reduced O(3)-reactive absorption by ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, and uric acid. Conversely, unsaturated phosphatidylcholine films did not inhibit O(3) absorption. We evaluated O(3)-mediated cell injury using a human lung fibroblast cell culture system, an intermittent tilting exposure regimen to produce a thin covering layer, and nuclear fluorochrome permeability. Exposure produced negligible injury in cells covered with MEM. However, addition of AH(2) produced appreciable (<50%) cell injury. Film spreading of DPPC monolayers necessitated the use of untilted regimens. Induction of acute cell injury in untilted cultures required both AH(2) plus very high O(3) concentrations. Addition of DPPC films significantly reduced cell injury. We conclude that acute cell injury likely results from O(3) reaction with ELF substrates. Furthermore, interfacial films of surface-active, saturated phospholipids reduce the local dose of O(3)-derived reaction products. Finally, because O(3) local dose and tissue damage likely correlate, we propose that interfacial phospholipids may modulate intrapulmonary distribution of inhaled O(3) and the extent of site-specific cell injury.

  19. Interfacial Micromechanics in Fibrous Composites: Design, Evaluation, and Models

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given. PMID:24977189

  20. Interfacial micromechanics in fibrous composites: design, evaluation, and models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given. PMID:24977189

  1. Interfacial tension in immiscible mixtures of alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Vera; Rukavishnikova, Irina V; Stepanov, Victor P; Tkachev, Nikolai K

    2010-02-01

    The interfacial tension of the liquid-phase interface in seven immiscible reciprocal ternary mixtures of lithium fluoride with the following alkali halides: CsCl, KBr, RbBr, CsBr, KI, RbI, and CsI was measured using the cylinder weighing method over a wide temperature range. It was shown that for all mixtures the interfacial tension gradually decreases with growing temperature. The interfacial tension of the reciprocal ternary mixtures at a given temperature increases both with the alkali cation radius (K(+) < Rb(+) < Cs(+)) and with the radius of the halogen anion (Cl(-) < Br(-) < I(-)). PMID:20094678

  2. Kinetic pathway for interfacial electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecule.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke; Blair, Amber D; Piechota, Eric J; Schauer, Phil A; Sampaio, Renato N; Parlane, Fraser G L; Meyer, Gerald J; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2016-09-01

    Molecular approaches to solar-energy conversion require a kinetic optimization of light-induced electron-transfer reactions. At molecular-semiconductor interfaces, this optimization has previously been accomplished through control of the distance between the semiconductor donor and the molecular acceptor and/or the free energy that accompanies electron transfer. Here we show that a kinetic pathway for electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecular acceptor also exists and provides an alternative method for the control of interfacial kinetics. The pathway was identified by the rational design of molecules in which the distance and the driving force were held near parity and only the geometric torsion about a xylyl- or phenylthiophene bridge was varied. Electronic coupling through the phenyl bridge was a factor of ten greater than that through the xylyl bridge. Comparative studies revealed a significant bridge dependence for electron transfer that could not be rationalized by a change in distance or driving force. Instead, the data indicate an interfacial electron-transfer pathway that utilizes the aromatic bridge orbitals. PMID:27554412

  3. Kinetic pathway for interfacial electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ke; Blair, Amber D.; Piechota, Eric J.; Schauer, Phil A.; Sampaio, Renato N.; Parlane, Fraser G. L.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Berlinguette, Curtis P.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular approaches to solar-energy conversion require a kinetic optimization of light-induced electron-transfer reactions. At molecular–semiconductor interfaces, this optimization has previously been accomplished through control of the distance between the semiconductor donor and the molecular acceptor and/or the free energy that accompanies electron transfer. Here we show that a kinetic pathway for electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecular acceptor also exists and provides an alternative method for the control of interfacial kinetics. The pathway was identified by the rational design of molecules in which the distance and the driving force were held near parity and only the geometric torsion about a xylyl- or phenylthiophene bridge was varied. Electronic coupling through the phenyl bridge was a factor of ten greater than that through the xylyl bridge. Comparative studies revealed a significant bridge dependence for electron transfer that could not be rationalized by a change in distance or driving force. Instead, the data indicate an interfacial electron-transfer pathway that utilizes the aromatic bridge orbitals.

  4. Interfacial Engineering for Highly Efficient-Conjugated Polymer-Based Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Jen; David Ginger; Christine Luscombe; Hong Ma

    2012-04-02

    The aim of our proposal is to apply interface engineering approach to improve charge extraction, guide active layer morphology, improve materials compatibility, and ultimately allow the fabrication of high efficiency tandem cells. Specifically, we aim at developing: i. Interfacial engineering using small molecule self-assembled monolayers ii. Nanostructure engineering in OPVs using polymer brushes iii. Development of efficient light harvesting and high mobility materials for OPVs iv. Physical characterization of the nanostructured systems using electrostatic force microscopy, and conducting atomic force microscopy v. All-solution processed organic-based tandem cells using interfacial engineering to optimize the recombination layer currents vi. Theoretical modeling of charge transport in the active semiconducting layer The material development effort is guided by advanced computer modeling and surface/ interface engineering tools to allow us to obtain better understanding of the effect of electrode modifications on OPV performance for the investigation of more elaborate device structures. The materials and devices developed within this program represent a major conceptual advancement using an integrated approach combining rational molecular design, material, interface, process, and device engineering to achieve solar cells with high efficiency, stability, and the potential to be used for large-area roll-to-roll printing. This may create significant impact in lowering manufacturing cost of polymer solar cells for promoting clean renewable energy use and preventing the side effects from using fossil fuels to impact environment.

  5. Kinetic pathway for interfacial electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ke; Blair, Amber D.; Piechota, Eric J.; Schauer, Phil A.; Sampaio, Renato N.; Parlane, Fraser G. L.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Berlinguette, Curtis P.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular approaches to solar-energy conversion require a kinetic optimization of light-induced electron-transfer reactions. At molecular-semiconductor interfaces, this optimization has previously been accomplished through control of the distance between the semiconductor donor and the molecular acceptor and/or the free energy that accompanies electron transfer. Here we show that a kinetic pathway for electron transfer from a semiconductor to a molecular acceptor also exists and provides an alternative method for the control of interfacial kinetics. The pathway was identified by the rational design of molecules in which the distance and the driving force were held near parity and only the geometric torsion about a xylyl- or phenylthiophene bridge was varied. Electronic coupling through the phenyl bridge was a factor of ten greater than that through the xylyl bridge. Comparative studies revealed a significant bridge dependence for electron transfer that could not be rationalized by a change in distance or driving force. Instead, the data indicate an interfacial electron-transfer pathway that utilizes the aromatic bridge orbitals.

  6. The impact of additives found in industrial formulations of TCE on the wettability of sandstone.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Gavin; Lerner, David N; Leharne, Stephen A

    2005-11-01

    The wettability of aquifer rocks is a key physical parameter which exerts an important control on the transport, residual trapping, distribution and eventual fate of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents (CHSs) released into the subsurface. Typically chlorinated solvents are assumed to be non-wetting in water saturated rocks and unconsolidated sediments. However industrially formulated solvent products are often combined with basic additives such as alkylamines to improve their performance; and the mineral surfaces of aquifer rocks and sediments usually possess a range of acid and hydrogen-bonding adsorption sites. The presence of these sites provides a mechanism whereby the basic additives in CHSs can be adsorbed at the solvent phase/solid phase interface. Given the amphiphilic molecular structure of these additives, this may result in changes in the wetting conditions of the solid phase. The aim of this study was therefore to test this conjecture for two classes of additives (alkylamines and quaternary ammonium salts) that are often encountered in industrial solvent formulations. Wettability assessments were made on sandstone cores by means of measurements of spontaneous and forced water drainage and spontaneous and forced water imbibition and through contact angle measurements on a smooth quartz surface. No solvent/additive combination produced solvent wetting conditions, though dodecylamine and octadecylamine significantly reduced the water wetting preference of sandstone which frequently resulted in neutral wetting conditions. The large volume of spontaneous water drainage observed in wettability experiments involving cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, suggested that the sandstone cores in these tests remained strongly water wetting. However equilibrium static contact angles of around 60 degrees were measured on quartz suggesting that the sandstone surfaces should be close to neutral wetting conditions. This paradox was finally

  7. Effect of molecular flexibility of Lennard-Jones chains on vapor-liquid interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Blas, F J; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Algaba, J; Martínez-Ruiz, F J; MacDowell, L G

    2014-03-21

    We have determined the interfacial properties of short fully flexible chains formed from tangentially bonded Lennard-Jones monomeric units from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The results obtained are compared with those corresponding to rigid-linear chains formed from the same chain length, previously determined in the literature [F. J. Blas, A. I. M.-V. Bravo, J. M. Míguez, M. M. Piñeiro, and L. G. MacDowell, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 084706 (2012)]. The full long-range tails of the potential are accounted for by means of an improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček [J. Phys. Chem. B 129, 6264 (2006)] proposed recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2008)] valid for spherical as well as for rigid and flexible molecular systems. Three different model systems comprising of 3, 5, and 6 monomers per molecule are considered. The simulations are performed in the canonical ensemble, and the vapor-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using the test-area method. In addition to the surface tension, we also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature and density, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying particular attention to the effect of the chain length and rigidity on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the chain length (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapor-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as the molecular chains get longer. Comparison between predictions for fully flexible and rigid-linear chains, formed by the same number of monomeric units, indicates that the main effects of increasing the flexibility, i.e., passing from a rigid-linear to a fully flexible chain, are: (a) to decrease the difference between the liquid and vapor densities; (b) to decrease the critical temperature and

  8. Interfacial tension based on-chip extraction of microparticles confined in microfluidic Stokes flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haishui; He, Xiaoming

    2014-10-01

    Microfluidics involving two immiscible fluids (oil and water) has been increasingly used to produce hydrogel microparticles with wide applications. However, it is difficult to extract the microparticles out of the microfluidic Stokes flows of oil that have a Reynolds number (the ratio of inertia to viscous force) much less than one, where the dominant viscous force tends to drive the microparticles to move together with the surrounding oil. Here, we present a passive method for extracting hydrogel microparticles in microfluidic Stokes flow from oil into aqueous extracting solution on-chip by utilizing the intrinsic interfacial tension between oil and the microparticles. We further reveal that the thickness of an "extended confining layer" of oil next to the interface between oil and aqueous extracting solution must be smaller than the radius of microparticles for effective extraction. This method uses a simple planar merging microchannel design that can be readily fabricated and further integrated into a fluidic system to extract microparticles for wide applications.

  9. Interfacial adhesion for microelectronics and MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Marian Siobhan

    2007-12-01

    The reliability of thin film systems is important to the continued development of microelectronic and micro-electro-mechanical systems. Most often, reliability of these systems is tied to the ability of the films to remain adhered to its substrate. By measuring the amount of energy to separate the film, interfacial fracture energy, and prediciting trends researchers can predicts film lifetimes. Recent work to measure this energy has resulted in several different testing techniques including spontaneous buckling, indentation induced delamination and four point bending. Literature has shown good agreement between delamination test methods, but only when energy dissipation into the substrate is minimized. Using a W/Si system, the effect of energy dissipation was shown to decrease from 0.6 J/m2 to 0.2 J/m2 between different methods; one where the only fracture was along the interface and the other where cracking also occurred in the film and substrate. For systems where fracture only occurs along the interface, such as Au/Si, the calculated fracture energies are identical if the energy put into the system is kept near the needed strain energy to cause delamination. Overlayers of different stresses and thickness on Au/Si showed that the adhesion energies could change by a factor of three (Chapter 3). This dependence on applied energy is also shown when comparisons of four point bending and stressed overlayer test methods were completed on Pt/Si systems. The fracture energies of Pt/Ti/SiO2 were studied using four-point bending and compressive overlayers. Varying the thickness of the Ti film from 2 to 17 nm in a Pt/Ti/SiO2 system, both test methods showed an increase of adhesion energy until the nominal Ti thickness was 12nm. Then this adhesion energy began to decrease. This decrease was due to an increase in the Pt grain size after a nominal 12nm thickness (Chapter 4 and 5). While the trends in energy release rate are similar, the magnitude of the toughness between the

  10. Development of a Front Tracking Method for Two-Phase Micromixing of Incompressible Viscous Fluids with Interfacial Tension in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yijie; Lim, Hyun-Kyung; de Almeida, Valmor F; Navamita, Ray; Wang, Shuqiang; Glimm, James G; Li, Xiao-lin; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2012-06-01

    This progress report describes the development of a front tracking method for the solution of the governing equations of motion for two-phase micromixing of incompressible, viscous, liquid-liquid solvent extraction processes. The ability to compute the detailed local interfacial structure of the mixture allows characterization of the statistical properties of the two-phase mixture in terms of droplets, filaments, and other structures which emerge as a dispersed phase embedded into a continuous phase. Such a statistical picture provides the information needed for building a consistent coarsened model applicable to the entire mixing device. Coarsening is an undertaking for a future mathematical development and is outside the scope of the present work. We present here a method for accurate simulation of the micromixing dynamics of an aqueous and an organic phase exposed to intense centrifugal force and shearing stress. The onset of mixing is the result of the combination of the classical Rayleigh- Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. A mixing environment that emulates a sector of the annular mixing zone of a centrifugal contactor is used for the mathematical domain. The domain is small enough to allow for resolution of the individual interfacial structures and large enough to allow for an analysis of their statistical distribution of sizes and shapes. A set of accurate algorithms for this application requires an advanced front tracking approach constrained by the incompressibility condition. This research is aimed at designing and implementing these algorithms. We demonstrate verification and convergence results for one-phase and unmixed, two-phase flows. In addition we report on preliminary results for mixed, two-phase flow for realistic operating flow parameters.

  11. Blind Prediction of Interfacial Water Positions in CAPRI

    PubMed Central

    Moal, Iain H.; Bates, Paul A.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Melquiond, Adrien S.J.; Karaca, Ezgi; Schmitz, Christophe; van Dijk, Marc; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Eisenstein, Miriam; Jiménez-García, Brian; Grosdidier, Solène; Solernou, Albert; Pérez-Cano, Laura; Pallara, Chiara; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Xu, Jianqing; Muthu, Pravin; Kilambi, Krishna Praneeth; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Grudinin, Sergei; Derevyanko, Georgy; Mitchell, Julie C.; Wieting, John; Kanamori, Eiji; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Murakami, Yoichi; Sarmiento, Joy; Standley, Daron M.; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki; Chavent, Matthieu; Ritchie, David W.; Park, Hahnbeom; Ko, Junsu; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok; Shen, Yang; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.; Pierce, Brian G.; Hwang, Howook; Vreven, Thom; Weng, Zhiping; Buch, Idit; Farkash, Efrat; Wolfson, Haim J.; Zacharias, Martin; Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Huang, Shen-You; Zou, Xiaoqin; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Kleanthous, Colin; Wodak, Shoshana J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first assessment of blind predictions of water positions at protein-protein interfaces, performed as part of the CAPRI (Critical Assessment of Predicted Interactions) community-wide experiment. Groups submitting docking predictions for the complex of the DNase domain of colicin E2 and Im2 immunity protein (CAPRI target 47), were invited to predict the positions of interfacial water molecules using the method of their choice. The predictions – 20 groups submitted a total of 195 models – were assessed by measuring the recall fraction of water-mediated protein contacts. Of the 176 high or medium quality docking models – a very good docking performance per se – only 44% had a recall fraction above 0.3, and a mere 6% above 0.5. The actual water positions were in general predicted to an accuracy level no better than 1.5 Å, and even in good models about half of the contacts represented false positives. This notwithstanding, three hotspot interface water positions were quite well predicted, and so was one of the water positions that is believed to stabilize the loop that confers specificity in these complexes. Overall the best interface water predictions was achieved by groups that also produced high quality docking models, indicating that accurate modelling of the protein portion is a determinant factor. The use of established molecular mechanics force fields, coupled to sampling and optimization procedures also seemed to confer an advantage. Insights gained from this analysis should help improve the prediction of protein-water interactions and their role in stabilizing protein complexes. PMID:24155158

  12. Characterization of interfacial bonding using a scanning Kelvin probe

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Li, D.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Interfaces play a crucial role in determining the ultimate properties and service life of coating and film materials. However, the characterization and measurement of interfacial bonding, in particular of the local strength, is difficult. The high sensitivity of the electron work function (EWF) to surface conditions has attracted increasing interest in applications of the Kelvin probing technique to investigate the mechanical behavior of materials. In this study, the Kelvin method was used to characterize the interfacial bond formed between pure copper and brass after annealing in argon gas. It was demonstrated that low EWF values, small EWF fluctuations, and narrow fluctuation ranges in interfacial regions corresponded to good bonding. Furthermore, there was a strong correlation between the EWF and the interfacial strength determined by the microindentation method using a universal microtribometer. The Kelvin probing technique could be a powerful tool for studying the local property and structure of interfaces.

  13. Interfacial patterns in magnetorheological fluids: Azimuthal field-induced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Eduardo O.; Lira, Sérgio A.; Miranda, José A.

    2015-08-01

    Despite their practical and academic relevance, studies of interfacial pattern formation in confined magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been largely overlooked in the literature. In this work, we present a contribution to this soft matter research topic and investigate the emergence of interfacial instabilities when an inviscid, initially circular bubble of a Newtonian fluid is surrounded by a MR fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell apparatus. An externally applied, in-plane azimuthal magnetic field produced by a current-carrying wire induces interfacial disturbances at the two-fluid interface, and pattern-forming structures arise. Linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear theory, and a vortex sheet approach are used to access early linear and intermediate nonlinear time regimes, as well as to determine stationary interfacial shapes at fully nonlinear stages.

  14. Interfacial patterns in magnetorheological fluids: Azimuthal field-induced structures.

    PubMed

    Dias, Eduardo O; Lira, Sérgio A; Miranda, José A

    2015-08-01

    Despite their practical and academic relevance, studies of interfacial pattern formation in confined magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been largely overlooked in the literature. In this work, we present a contribution to this soft matter research topic and investigate the emergence of interfacial instabilities when an inviscid, initially circular bubble of a Newtonian fluid is surrounded by a MR fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell apparatus. An externally applied, in-plane azimuthal magnetic field produced by a current-carrying wire induces interfacial disturbances at the two-fluid interface, and pattern-forming structures arise. Linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear theory, and a vortex sheet approach are used to access early linear and intermediate nonlinear time regimes, as well as to determine stationary interfacial shapes at fully nonlinear stages. PMID:26382499

  15. Roles of interfacial reaction on mechanical properties of solder interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pilin

    This study investigated roles of interfacial reaction in fracture and fatigue of solder interconnects. The interfacial reaction phases in the as-reflowed and after aging were examined by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) while interfacial mechanical properties were determined from a flexural peel fracture mechanics technique. Because of their widespread uses in microelectronic packaging, SnPb solder interfaces, and Bi-containing Pb-free solder interfaces were chosen as the subjects of this study. In the interfacial reaction study, we observed a complicated micro structural evolution during solid-state aging of electroless-Ni(P)/SnPb solder interconnects. In as-reflowed condition, the interfacial reaction produced Ni3Sn 4 and P-rich layers. Following overaging, the interfacial microstructure degenerated into a complex multilayer structure consisting of multiple layers of Ni-Sn compounds and transformed Ni-P phases. In SnPb solder interfacial system, fatigue study showed that the overaging of the high P electroless Ni-P/SnPb interconnects resulted in a sharp reduction in the fatigue resistance of the interface in the high crack growth rate regime. Fracture mechanism analysis indicated that the sharp drop in fatigue resistance was triggered by the brittle fracture of the Ni3Sn2 intermetallic phase developed at the overaged interface. The fatigue behavior was strongly dependent on P concentration in electroless Ni. Kirkendall voids were found in the interfacial region after aging, but they did not cause premature fracture of the solder interfaces. In Bi-containing solder interfacial system, we found that Bi segregated to the Cu-intermetallic interface during aging in SnBi/Cu interconnect. This caused serious embrittlement of Sn-Bi/Cu interface. Further aging induced numerous voids along the Cu3Sn/Cu interface. These interfacial voids were different from Kirkendall voids. Their formation was explained on basis of vacancy condensation at the

  16. A polymeric flame retardant additive for rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.; Maiti, S.

    1993-12-31

    Synthesis of a polyphosphonate by the interfacial polymerization of bisphenol-A (BPA) and dichloro-phenyl phosphine oxide (DCPO) using cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TMAC) as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) was reported. The polyphosphonate was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, DSC and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The flame retardancy of the polymer was done by OI study. The polymer was used as a fire retardant additive to rubbers such as natural rubber (NR), styrene-butadiene rubber(SBR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR). The efficiency of the fire retardant property of this additive was determined by LOI measurements of the various rubber samples.

  17. Bulk and interfacial glass transitions of water.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Payne, Candace N; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2011-06-16

    Fast scanning calorimetry (FSC) was employed to investigate glass softening dynamics in bulk-like and ultrathin glassy water films. Bulk-like water samples were prepared by vapor-deposition on the surface of a tungsten filament near 140 K where vapor-deposition results in low enthalpy glassy water films. The vapor-deposition approach was also used to grow multiple nanoscale (approximately 50 nm thick) water films alternated with benzene and methanoic films of similar dimensions. When heated from cryogenic temperatures, the ultrathin water films underwent a well manifested glass softening transition at temperatures 20 K below the onset of crystallization. However, no such transition was observed in bulk-like samples prior to their crystallization. These results indicate that thin-film water demonstrates glass softening dynamics that are dramatically distinct from those of the bulk phase. We attribute these differences to water's interfacial glass transition, which occurs at temperatures tens of degrees lower than that in the bulk. Implications of these findings for past studies of glass softening dynamics in various glassy water samples are discussed. PMID:21401034

  18. Modeling interfacial liquid layers on environmental ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, M. H.; Moussa, S. G.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-09-01

    Interfacial layers on ice significantly influence air-ice chemical interactions. In solute-containing aqueous systems, a liquid brine may form upon freezing due to the exclusion of impurities from the ice crystal lattice coupled with freezing point depression in the concentrated brine. The brine may be segregated to the air-ice interface where it creates a surface layer, in micropockets, or at grain boundaries or triple junctions. We present a model for brines and their associated liquid layers in environmental ice systems that is valid over a wide range of temperatures and solute concentrations. The model is derived from fundamental equlibrium thermodynamics and takes into account nonideal solution behavior in the brine, partitioning of the solute into the ice matrix, and equilibration between the brine and the gas phase for volatile solutes. We find that these phenomena are important to consider when modeling brines in environmental ices, especially at low temperatures. We demonstrate its application for environmentally important volatile and nonvolatile solutes including NaCl, HCl, and HNO3. The model is compared to existing models and experimental data from literature where available. We also identify environmentally relevant regimes where brine is not predicted to exist, but the QLL may significantly impact air-ice chemical interactions. This model can be used to improve the representation of air-ice chemical interactions in polar atmospheric chemistry models.

  19. Interfacial phase transitions in conducting fluids.

    PubMed

    Freyland, Werner

    2008-02-21

    We present a review, largely based on recent experimental work of our group, on phase transitions at interfaces of fluid metals, alloys and ionic liquids. After a brief analysis of possible experimental errors and limitations of surface sensitive methods, we first deal with first-order wetting transitions at the liquid/vapour and liquid/wall interface in systems such as Ga-based alloys, K-KCl melts, and fluid Hg. The following chapter refers to surface freezing or surface induced crystallization in different metal alloys. The respective surface phase diagrams are discussed in comparison with their bulk counterpart. In the last part we present very recent investigations of ionic liquid interfaces, including order-disorder transitions at the liquid/vapour interface and examples of two-dimensional phase transitions at the electrified ionic liquid/metal interface. Finally, a simple electrowetting experiment with an ionic liquid droplet under vacuum is described which gives new insight into the contact angle saturation problem. The article ends up with a few perspective remarks on open problems and potential impact of interfacial phenomena on applied research. PMID:18259631

  20. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M. R. V. L.; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya. M.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Caviglia, Andrea D.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  1. Nanofiber Scaffold Gradients for Interfacial Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Young, Marian F.; Thomas, Vinoy; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Tison, Christopher K.; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Miles, William C.; Simon, Carl G.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed a 2-spinnerette device that can directly electrospin nanofiber scaffolds containing a gradient in composition that can be used to engineer interfacial tissues such as ligament and tendon. Two types of nanofibers are simultaneously electrospun in an overlapping pattern to create a nonwoven mat of nanofibers containing a composition gradient. The approach is an advance over previous methods due to its versatility - gradients can be formed from any materials that can be electrospun. A dye was used to characterize the 2-spinnerette approach and applicability to tissue engineering was demonstrated by fabricating nanofibers with gradients in amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (nACP). Adhesion and proliferation of osteogenic cells (MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblasts) on gradients was enhanced on the regions of the gradients that contained higher nACP content yielding a graded osteoblast response. Since increases in soluble calcium and phosphate ions stimulate osteoblast function, we measured their release and observed significant release from nanofibers containing nACP. The nanofiber-nACP gradients fabricated herein can be applied to generate tissues with osteoblast gradients such as ligaments or tendons. In conclusion, these results introduce a versatile approach for fabricating nanofiber gradients that can have application for engineering graded tissues. PMID:22286209

  2. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries. PMID:26781172

  3. Interfacial properties of stanene-metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Pan, Feng; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Han; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two-dimensional buckled honeycomb stanene has been manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Free-standing stanene is predicted to have a sizable opened band gap of 100 meV at the Dirac point due to spin-orbit coupling (SOC), resulting in many fascinating properties such as quantum spin Hall effect, quantum anomalous Hall effect, and quantum valley Hall effect. In the first time, we systematically study the interfacial properties of stanene-metal interfaces (metals = Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pd, Pt, Ir, and Ni) by using ab initio electronic structure calculations considering the SOC effects. The honeycomb structure of stanene is preserved on the metal supports, but the buckling height is changed. The buckling of stanene on the Au, Al, Ag, and Cu metal supports is higher than that of free-standing stanene. By contrast, a planar graphene-like structure is stabilized for stanene on the Ir, Pd, Pt, and Ni metal supports. The band structure of stanene is destroyed on all the metal supports, accompanied by a metallization of stanene because the covalent bonds between stanene and the metal supports are formed and the structure of stanene is distorted. Besides, no tunneling barrier exists between stanene and the metal supports. Therefore, stanene and the eight metals form a good vertical Ohmic contact.

  4. Interfacial properties of stanene–metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Pan, Feng; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Han; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two-dimensional buckled honeycomb stanene has been manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Free-standing stanene is predicted to have a sizable opened band gap of 100 meV at the Dirac point due to spin–orbit coupling (SOC), resulting in many fascinating properties such as quantum spin Hall effect, quantum anomalous Hall effect, and quantum valley Hall effect. In the first time, we systematically study the interfacial properties of stanene–metal interfaces (metals = Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pd, Pt, Ir, and Ni) by using ab initio electronic structure calculations considering the SOC effects. The honeycomb structure of stanene is preserved on the metal supports, but the buckling height is changed. The buckling of stanene on the Au, Al, Ag, and Cu metal supports is higher than that of free-standing stanene. By contrast, a planar graphene-like structure is stabilized for stanene on the Ir, Pd, Pt, and Ni metal supports. The band structure of stanene is destroyed on all the metal supports, accompanied by a metallization of stanene because the covalent bonds between stanene and the metal supports are formed and the structure of stanene is distorted. Besides, no tunneling barrier exists between stanene and the metal supports. Therefore, stanene and the eight metals form a good vertical Ohmic contact.

  5. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  6. Interfacial assembly of dendritic microcapsules with host-guest chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu; Yu, Ziyi; Parker, Richard M.; Wu, Yuchao; Abell, Chris; Scherman, Oren A.

    2014-12-01

    The self-assembly of nanoscale materials to form hierarchically ordered structures promises new opportunities in drug delivery, as well as magnetic materials and devices. Herein, we report a simple means to promote the self-assembly of two polymers with functional groups at a water-chloroform interface using microfluidic technology. Two polymeric layers can be assembled and disassembled at the droplet interface using the efficiency of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) host-guest supramolecular chemistry. The microcapsules produced are extremely monodisperse in size and can encapsulate target molecules in a robust, well-defined manner. In addition, we exploit a dendritic copolymer architecture to trap a small hydrophilic molecule in the microcapsule skin as cargo. This demonstrates not only the ability to encapsulate small molecules but also the ability to orthogonally store both hydrophilic and hydrophobic cargos within a single microcapsule. The interfacially assembled supramolecular microcapsules can benefit from the diversity of polymeric materials, allowing for fine control over the microcapsule properties.

  7. Causal reasoning with forces

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Phillip; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Causal composition allows people to generate new causal relations by combining existing causal knowledge. We introduce a new computational model of such reasoning, the force theory, which holds that people compose causal relations by simulating the processes that join forces in the world, and compare this theory with the mental model theory (Khemlani et al., 2014) and the causal model theory (Sloman et al., 2009), which explain causal composition on the basis of mental models and structural equations, respectively. In one experiment, the force theory was uniquely able to account for people's ability to compose causal relationships from complex animations of real-world events. In three additional experiments, the force theory did as well as or better than the other two theories in explaining the causal compositions people generated from linguistically presented causal relations. Implications for causal learning and the hierarchical structure of causal knowledge are discussed. PMID:25653611

  8. Epitaxial Cubic Ce2O3 Films via Ce-CeO2 Interfacial Reaction.

    PubMed

    Stetsovych, Vitalii; Pagliuca, Federico; Dvořák, Filip; Duchoň, Tomáš; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Aulická, Marie; Lachnitt, Jan; Schernich, Stefan; Matolínová, Iva; Veltruská, Kateřina; Skála, Tomáš; Mazur, Daniel; Mysliveček, Josef; Libuda, Jörg; Matolín, Vladimír

    2013-03-21

    Thin films of reduced ceria supported on metals are often applied as substrates in model studies of the chemical reactivity of ceria based catalysts. Of special interest are the properties of oxygen vacancies in ceria. However, thin films of ceria prepared by established methods become increasingly disordered as the concentration of vacancies increases. Here, we propose an alternative method for preparing ordered reduced ceria films based on the physical vapor deposition and interfacial reaction of Ce with CeO2 films. The method yields bulk-truncated layers of cubic c-Ce2O3. Compared to CeO2 these layers contain 25% of perfectly ordered vacancies in the surface and subsurface allowing well-defined measurements of the properties of ceria in the limit of extreme reduction. Experimentally, c-Ce2O3(111) layers are easily identified by a characteristic 4 × 4 surface reconstruction with respect to CeO2(111). In addition, c-Ce2O3 layers represent an experimental realization of a normally unstable polymorph of Ce2O3. During interfacial reaction, c-Ce2O3 nucleates on the interface between CeO2 buffer and Ce overlayer and is further stabilized most likely by the tetragonal distortion of the ceria layers on Cu. The characteristic kinetics of the metal-oxide interfacial reactions may represent a vehicle for making other metastable oxide structures experimentally available.

  9. Quantifying Interfacial Electric Fields and Local Crystallinity in Polymer-Fullerene Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gearba, Raluca I.; Mills, Travis; Morris, Josh; Pindak, Ron; Black, Charles T.; Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of experimentally probing the physical and electronic structures of the highly intermixed organic semiconductor blends that comprise active layers in high-performance organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells ultimately limit the fundamental understanding of the device performance. We use Fourier-transform IR (FTIR)-absorption spectroscopy to quantitatively determine the interfacial electric field in blended poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl- C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) thin films. The interfacial electric field is ≈0.2 V nm-1 in the as-spun film and blends annealing at temperatures as high as 150 °C, which is the optimal annealing temperature in terms of OPV performance. The field decreases to a negligible value upon further annealing to 170 °C, at which temperature PCBM changes from amorphous to crystalline and the open-circuit voltage of the solar cell decreases from 0.62 to 0.4 V. In addition, our measurements also allow determination of the absolute degree of crystallinity within the acceptor material. The roles of interfacial field and local crystallinity in OPV device performance are discussed.

  10. Interfacial Behavior of Polymers: Using Interfaces to Manipulate Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-02-26

    most rapid solvent removal process drives the copolymer film to below its glass transition temperature, freezing in the lateral order. We have quantitatively described the ordering and the parameters influencing the disruption of the ordering in these studies. We have also used e-beam lithography to generate shallow trench patterns on planar surface where the topographic patterning provides an additional constraint on the self-assembly of the block copolymer. The pitches of the trenches were varied while the depth and the trench width of patterns were maintained by constant at 89 and 30nm, respectively. Unidirectional PS-b-PEO line patterns over large area on the shallow trench patterns were obtained by solvent vapor annealing. We extended the solvent annealing process to an in-line coating process using a mini-slot die coater developed in our laboratories. This coater uses minimal materials with operating parameters that can mimic actual industrial processing on a roll-to-roll line. Most important, with this mini-slot die coater, it could also characterize the structure of the film using grazing incidence x-ray scattering. Using the fundamental characterization of the ordering of the block copolymers, we could optimize the coating conditions to enhance lateral ordering of block copolymer in a well-defined manner. The structures produced in this process are directly transferable to flexible electronics where the arrays of block copolymer microdomains can be used for the fabrication of nanostructured components. We have also controlled the orientation of BCP microdomains at the air and substrate interfaces by manipulating the interfacial interactions with selective solvents. This has enabled us to generate nanoporous membranes where the size of the pores is dictated by the size of the bloc copolymer microdomains. We have produced robust nanoporous membranes that can tolerate high pressures and have high throughput using thick films of block copolymers. Exceptional size

  11. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues. PMID:27627333

  12. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  13. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues.

  14. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues.

  15. Interface investigation of the alcohol-/water-soluble conjugated polymer PFN as cathode interfacial layer in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shu; Wang, Rui; Ying Mao, Hong; He, Zhicai; Wu, Hongbin; Chen, Wei; Cao, Yong

    2013-09-01

    In this work, in situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were used to investigate the working mechanism of an alcohol-/water-soluble conjugated polymer poly [(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) as the cathode interfacial layer in organic solar cells from the view of interfacial energy level alignment. Fullerene (C60) was chosen as the model acceptor material in contact with PFN as well as two other cathode interfacial layers ZnO and TiO2 in the configuration of an inverted solar cell structure. Significant charge transfer between PFN modified ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode and C60 is observed due to the low work function of PFN. This results in the Fermi level of the substrate pinned very close to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of C60 as well as an additional electric field at the cathode/acceptor interface. Both of them facilitate the electron extraction from the acceptor C60 to the ITO cathode, as confirmed by the electrical measurements of the electron-only devices with PFN modification. The better electron extraction originated from the Fermi level pinning and the additional interface electric field are believed to contribute to the efficiency enhancement of the inverted organic solar cells employing PFN as cathode interfacial layer.

  16. Interfacial load transfer in polymer/carbon nanotube nanocomposites with a nanohybrid shish kebab modification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Min; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Fisher, Frank T

    2014-09-10

    Interfacial properties are known to have a critical effect on the mechanical properties of a nanocomposite material system. Here, the interfacial load transfer in a carbon nanotube (CNT)/nylon-11 composite was studied with a CNT/nylon-11 nanohybrid shish kebab (NHSK) structure modification using Raman spectroscopy. Characterization of the polymer crystal in the NHSK using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for the first time indicates that the NHSK structure formed a more perfect crystal structure than the bulk polymer. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy and DSC results, a new growth model for the NHSK crystal is hypothesized, indicating the formation of an initial uniform crystal layer on the CNT prior to the crystallization of the kebabs. Characterization of the nanocomposites using Raman spectroscopy, with the samples heated to introduce interfacial shear stress caused by thermal expansion mismatch, found that the D* band of the CNT in the NHSK/nylon-11 composite displayed a more pronounced shift with an increase in temperature, which is attributed to the NHSK structure being more effective at transferring load from the nylon matrix to the nanotube inclusions. The NHSK structure was also used to fabricate composites with two amorphous polymers, polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate), to investigate the load transfer mechanism. It was found that when the compatibility between the polymer in the NHSK structure and the bulk polymer matrix at the molecular level is sufficiently high, the ensuing mechanical interlocking effect further enhances the interfacial load transfer for polymer nanocomposites. Additional mechanical characterization of polymer nanocomposites with 0.1 wt % NHSK reinforcement demonstrates how the moduli and ultimate tensile strength of the nanocomposites can be improved via this NHSK structure.

  17. Interfacial load transfer in polymer/carbon nanotube nanocomposites with a nanohybrid shish kebab modification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Min; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Fisher, Frank T

    2014-09-10

    Interfacial properties are known to have a critical effect on the mechanical properties of a nanocomposite material system. Here, the interfacial load transfer in a carbon nanotube (CNT)/nylon-11 composite was studied with a CNT/nylon-11 nanohybrid shish kebab (NHSK) structure modification using Raman spectroscopy. Characterization of the polymer crystal in the NHSK using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for the first time indicates that the NHSK structure formed a more perfect crystal structure than the bulk polymer. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy and DSC results, a new growth model for the NHSK crystal is hypothesized, indicating the formation of an initial uniform crystal layer on the CNT prior to the crystallization of the kebabs. Characterization of the nanocomposites using Raman spectroscopy, with the samples heated to introduce interfacial shear stress caused by thermal expansion mismatch, found that the D* band of the CNT in the NHSK/nylon-11 composite displayed a more pronounced shift with an increase in temperature, which is attributed to the NHSK structure being more effective at transferring load from the nylon matrix to the nanotube inclusions. The NHSK structure was also used to fabricate composites with two amorphous polymers, polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate), to investigate the load transfer mechanism. It was found that when the compatibility between the polymer in the NHSK structure and the bulk polymer matrix at the molecular level is sufficiently high, the ensuing mechanical interlocking effect further enhances the interfacial load transfer for polymer nanocomposites. Additional mechanical characterization of polymer nanocomposites with 0.1 wt % NHSK reinforcement demonstrates how the moduli and ultimate tensile strength of the nanocomposites can be improved via this NHSK structure. PMID:25134606

  18. Establishing a quantitative functional relationship between capillary pressure, saturation and interfacial area. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Montemagno, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    'There is a fundamental knowledge gap associated with the in situ remediation of non-aqueous phase pollutants. Currently it is not possible to accurately determine the interfacial surface area of non-aqueous contaminants. As a result it is impossible to (1) accurately establish the health and environmental risk associated with the pollution: (2) precisely quantify and evaluate the potential efficacy of various in situ treatment technologies; and (3) conduct reliable performance assessments of the applied remediation technology during and after the clean-up. The global goal of this investigation is to try to remedy these shortcomings through the development of a formalized functional relationship between interfacial area (a), phase saturation (S) and capillary pressure (P). The development of this relationship will allow the direct determination of the fluid-fluid interfacial area from field measurements. Quantitative knowledge of the surface area of the non-aqueous phase pollutant facilitates accurate predictions of both the rate of dissolution and the contact area available for treatment. In addition. if saturation and capillary pressure measurements are made during the remediation process. both the spatial and temporal effectiveness of the remediation technology can be quantified. This information can then be used to optimize the restoration program. The project objective will be achieved through an integrated and focused research program that is comprised of theoretical computational and experimental efforts. These efforts are organized into a framework of four tasks: (1) improve on newly developed laboratory techniques to quantify and directly measure the functional relationship between phase interfacial area (a), saturation (S) and capillary pressure (P). (2) Develop new computational algorithms in conjunction with laboratory measurements to predict P, S and a. (3) Test existing theory and develop new theory to describe the relationship between P, S and a at

  19. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume IV. Chapters 15-19)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  20. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  1. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume I. Chapters 1-5)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  2. Novel Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Epifluorescence Microscopy for Visualization of Leaching Bacteria on Pyrite▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangold, Stefanie; Harneit, Kerstin; Rohwerder, Thore; Claus, Günter; Sand, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Bioleaching of metal sulfides is an interfacial process comprising the interactions of attached bacterial cells and bacterial extracellular polymeric substances with the surface of a mineral sulfide. Such processes and the associated biofilms can be investigated at high spatial resolution using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Therefore, we visualized biofilms of the meso-acidophilic leaching bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain A2 on the metal sulfide pyrite with a newly developed combination of AFM with epifluorescence microscopy (EFM). This novel system allowed the imaging of the same sample location with both instruments. The pyrite sample, as fixed on a shuttle stage, was transferred between AFM and EFM devices. By staining the bacterial DNA with a specific fluorescence dye, bacterial cells were labeled and could easily be distinguished from other topographic features occurring in the AFM image. AFM scanning in liquid caused deformation and detachment of cells, but scanning in air had no effect on cell integrity. In summary, we successfully demonstrate that the new microscopic system was applicable for visualizing bioleaching samples. Moreover, the combination of AFM and EFM in general seems to be a powerful tool for investigations of biofilms on opaque materials and will help to advance our knowledge of biological interfacial processes. In principle, the shuttle stage can be transferred to additional instruments, and combinations of AFM and EFM with other surface-analyzing devices can be proposed. PMID:18039818

  3. Influence of Water on the Interfacial Nanostructure and Wetting of [Rmim][NTf2] Ionic Liquids at Mica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhantao; Li, Hua; Atkin, Rob; Priest, Craig

    2016-09-01

    The effect of water concentration on the interfacial nanostructure and wetting behavior of a family of ionic liquids (ILs), 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [Rmim][NTf2], at the surface of mica was investigated by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM reveals that interfacial layers of ILs observed at the surface of mica for "dry" ILs are not present for water-saturated ILs. The interaction of the IL ions of [Rmim][NTf2] with water molecules through hydrogen bonding is suspected to disrupt IL ion layering and precursor film growth on mica. Without the IL precursor film, contact angle relaxation of "wet" ILs on mica is less significant and ambient vapor adsorption becomes more important in determining the macroscopic wetting behavior. PMID:27486675

  4. Influence of Water on the Interfacial Nanostructure and Wetting of [Rmim][NTf2] Ionic Liquids at Mica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhantao; Li, Hua; Atkin, Rob; Priest, Craig

    2016-09-01

    The effect of water concentration on the interfacial nanostructure and wetting behavior of a family of ionic liquids (ILs), 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [Rmim][NTf2], at the surface of mica was investigated by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM reveals that interfacial layers of ILs observed at the surface of mica for "dry" ILs are not present for water-saturated ILs. The interaction of the IL ions of [Rmim][NTf2] with water molecules through hydrogen bonding is suspected to disrupt IL ion layering and precursor film growth on mica. Without the IL precursor film, contact angle relaxation of "wet" ILs on mica is less significant and ambient vapor adsorption becomes more important in determining the macroscopic wetting behavior.

  5. Interfacial reaction of silver ultra-thin film deposited on interpenetrating polymer network substrate by liquor-phase reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dongyan; Guo, Yudi; Zhang, Xiaohong; Yin, Yuelong

    2010-08-01

    The interfacial reaction, metal transformations, and nonmetal bond types of silver ultra-thin film deposited on polyurethane (PU) based interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) substrate by the liquor-phase reduction at room temperatures were studied by atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The IPN substrate was prepared by dip-pulling precursors onto a silicon wafer or a glass plate, followed by solidification at room temperature. The interpenetrate structures of IPN with two crosslinked networks restricted the aggregation of silver during the reduction and deposition. The devised -OH terminal group in PU simplified the determination of reactive site in IPN and reinforced the adhesion between IPN and silver through interfacial reaction. The XPS results, which matched well with the ATR-FTIR results, verified the chemical reactive site of PU in IPN with silver in the oxide state.

  6. Nature-Inspired One-Step Green Procedure for Enhancing the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Behavior of a Chitin Film: Controlled Interfacial Assembly of Tannic Acid onto a Chitin Film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuntao; Li, Jing; Li, Bin

    2016-07-20

    The final goal of this study was to develop antimicrobial food-contact materials based on a natural phenolic compound (tannic acid) and chitin, which is the second most abundant polysaccharide on earth, using an interfacial assembly approach. Chitin film has poor antibacterial and antioxidant ability, which limits its application in industrial fields such as active packaging. Therefore, in this study, a novel one-step green procedure was applied to introduce antibacterial and antioxidant properties into a chitin film simultaneously by incorporation of tannic acid into the chitin film through interfacial assembly. The antibacterial and antioxidant behavior of chitin film has been greatly enhanced. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction were found to be the main driving forces for interfacial assembly. Therefore, controlled interfacial assembly of tannic acid onto a chitin film demonstrated a good way to develop functional materials that can be potentially applied in industry.

  7. Theoretical modeling of CHF for near-saturated pool boiling and flow boiling from short heaters using the interfacial lift-off criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Mudawar, I.; Galloway, J.E.; Gersey, C.O.

    1995-12-31

    Pool boiling and flow boiling were examined for near-saturated bulk conditions in order to determine the critical heat flux (CHF) trigger mechanism for each. Photographic studies of the wall region revealed features common to both situations. At fluxes below CHF, the vapor coalesces into a wavy layer which permits wetting only in wetting fronts, the portions of the liquid-vapor interface which contact the wall as a result of the interfacial waviness. Close examination of the interfacial features revealed the waves are generated from the lower edge of the heater in pool boiling and the heater`s upstream region in flow boiling. Wavelengths follow predictions based upon the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability criterion. Critical heat flux in both cases occurs when the pressure force exerted upon the interface due to interfacial curvature, which tends to preserve interfacial contact with the wall prior to CHF, is overcome by the momentum of vapor at the site of the first wetting front, causing the interface to lift away from the wall. It is shown this interfacial lift-off criterion facilitates accurate theoretical modeling of CHF in pool boiling and in flow boiling in both straight and curved channels.

  8. Tuning the Interfacial Thermal Conductance between Polystyrene and Sapphire by Controlling the Interfacial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Sun, Fangyuan; Tian, Xia; Zhu, Jie; Ma, Yongmei; Tang, Dawei; Wang, Fosong

    2015-10-28

    In polymer-based electric microdevices, thermal transport across polymer/ceramic interface is essential for heat dissipation, which limits the improvement of the device performance and lifetime. In this work, four sets of polystyrene (PS) thin films/sapphire samples were prepared with different interface adhesion values, which was achieved by changing the rotation speeds in the spin-coating process. The interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) between the PS films and the sapphire were measured by time domain thermoreflectance method, and the interfacial adhesion between the PS films and the sapphire, as measured by a scratch tester, was found to increase with the rotation speed from 2000 to 8000 rpm. The ITC shows a similar dependence on the rotation speed, increasing up to a 3-fold from 7.0 ± 1.4 to 21.0 ± 4.2 MW/(m(2) K). This study demonstrates the role of spin-coating rotation speed in thermal transport across the polymer/ceramic interfaces, evoking a much simpler mechanical method for tuning this type of ITC. The findings of enhancement of the ITC of polymer/ceramic interface can shed some light on the thermal management and reliability of macro- and microelectronics, where polymeric and hybrid organic-inorganic nano films are employed.

  9. Effects of metallic nanoparticle doped flux on the interfacial intermetallic compounds between lead-free solder ball and copper substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sujan, G.K. Haseeb, A.S.M.A. Afifi, A.B.M.

    2014-11-15

    Lead free solders currently in use are prone to develop thick interfacial intermetallic compound layers with rough morphology which are detrimental to the long term solder joint reliability. A novel method has been developed to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers between lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder ball and copper substrate by doping a water soluble flux with metallic nanoparticles. Four types of metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, molybdenum and titanium) were used to investigate their effects on the wetting behavior and interfacial microstructural evaluations after reflow. Nanoparticles were dispersed manually with a water soluble flux and the resulting nanoparticle doped flux was placed on copper substrate. Lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder balls of diameter 0.45 mm were placed on top of the flux and were reflowed at a peak temperature of 240 °C for 45 s. Angle of contact, wetting area and interfacial microstructure were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was observed that the angle of contact increased and wetting area decreased with the addition of cobalt, molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles to flux. On the other hand, wettability improved with the addition of nickel nanoparticles. Cross-sectional micrographs revealed that both nickel and cobalt nanoparticle doping transformed the morphology of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} from a typical scallop type to a planer one and reduced the intermetallic compound thickness under optimum condition. These effects were suggested to be related to in-situ interfacial alloying at the interface during reflow. The minimum amount of nanoparticles required to produce the planer morphology was found to be 0.1 wt.% for both nickel and cobalt. Molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles neither appear to undergo alloying during reflow nor have any influence at the solder/substrate interfacial reaction. Thus, doping

  10. The impact of interfacial tension on multiphase flow in the CO2-brine-sandstone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. A.; Blunt, M. J.; Krevor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Two dominant controls on continuum scale multiphase flow properties are interfacial tension (IFT) and wetting. In hydrocarbon-brine systems, relative permeability is known to increase with decreasing IFT, while residual trapping is controlled by the wetting properties of a permeable rock and the hysteresis between drainage and imbibtion (Amaefule & Handy, 1982; Bardon & Longeron, 1980; Juanes et al., 2006). Fluid properties of the CO2-brine system, such as viscosity, density and interfacial tension, are well characterised and have known dependencies on temperature, pressure and brine salinity. Interest in this particular fluid system is motivated by CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery. Despite increased interest in CO2 storage, the response of the CO2-brine relative permeability to varying IFT has yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Additionally the wide range of thermophysical properties (density, viscosity etc.) that exist across a relatively small range of pressures and temperatures makes it an ideal system with which to investigate the physics of multiphase flow in general. This is the first systematic study to investigate the impact of IFT on drainage and imbibition relative permeability for the CO2-brine-sandstone system. The experimental design has been adapted from a traditional steady state core flood in two ways. First, while conditions may be easily selected to obtain a range of interfacial tensions, isolating the independent impact of interfacial tension on relative permeability is less simple. Thus experimental conditions are selected so as to vary interfacial tension, while minimising the variation in viscosity ratio between CO2 and brine. Second, in order to attribute the impacts of changing conditions, it is necessary to have precise results such that small shifts in observations can be identified. Multiphase flow theory is used to both design the conditions of the test and interpret the observations, leading to a much higher precision in

  11. Theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2015-04-10

    A particular attempt to improve the efficiency of a dye sensitized solar cell is it's decoration with metal nano-particles (MNP). The MNP-plasmon induced enhancement of the local field enlarges the photoexcitation of the dyes and a subsequent improvement of the charge separation efficiency may result. In a recent work (2014 J. Phys. Chem. C 118 2812) we presented a theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer for perylene attached to a TiO2 surface and placed in the proximity of a spherical MNP. These earlier studies are generalized here to the coupling of to up to four MNPs and to the use of somewhat altered molecular parameters. If the MNPs are placed close to each other strong hybridization of plasmon excitations appears and a broad resonance to which molecular excitations are coupled is formed. To investigate this situation the whole charge injection dynamics is described in the framework of the density matrix theory. The approach accounts for optical excitation of the dye coupled to the MNPs and considers subsequent electron injection into the rutile TiO2-cluster. Using a tight-binding model for the TiO2-system with about 10(5) atoms the electron motion in the cluster is described. We again consider short optical excitation which causes an intermediate steady state with a time-independent overall probability to have the electron injected into the cluster. This probability is used to introduce an enhancement factor which rates the influence of the MNP. Values larger than 500 are obtained. PMID:25764984

  12. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  13. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface. The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical strength.

  14. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    DOE PAGES

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface.more » The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical

  15. Development and applications of the interfacial tension between water and organic or biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    van Oss, Carel Jan

    2007-01-15

    The interfacial tension (gamma(SW)) between a condensed-phase material (S) and water (W) is one of the most important terms occurring (directly or indirectly) in the major surface thermodynamic combining rules, such as the different variants of the Dupré equation, as well as the Young and the Young-Dupré equations. Since the late 1950s, gamma(SL) (where L stands for liquid in general) could be correctly expressed, as long as one only took van der Waals attractions and electrical double layer repulsions into account, i.e., as long as both S and L were apolar. However for interfacial interactions taking place in water among apolar as well as polar solutes, particles or surfaces, gamma(SW) was not properly worked out until the late 1980s, due in particular to uncertainties about the treatment of the polar properties of liquid water and other condensed-phase materials. In this review the historical development of the understanding of these polar properties is outlined and the polar equation for gamma(SW), as well as the equations derived there from for the free energies of interaction between apolar or polar entities, immersed in water (deltaG(SWS)) are discussed. Also discussed is the role of the various terms of deltaG(SWS), in hydrophobic attraction (the "hydrophobic effect"), hydrophilic repulsion ("hydration forces") and in the quantitative expression of hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity. The DLVO theory of attractive and repulsive free energies between particles immersed in liquids, as a function of distance between suspended particles, was extended to allow its use in the expression of the polar interactions occurring in water. Finally, the free energy term, deltaG(SWS) and the related gamma(SW), have been directly linked to the aqueous solubility of organic and biological solutes, which allows the determination of interfacial tensions between such solutes and water from their solubilities. PMID:16842983

  16. Development and applications of the interfacial tension between water and organic or biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    van Oss, Carel Jan

    2007-01-15

    The interfacial tension (gamma(SW)) between a condensed-phase material (S) and water (W) is one of the most important terms occurring (directly or indirectly) in the major surface thermodynamic combining rules, such as the different variants of the Dupré equation, as well as the Young and the Young-Dupré equations. Since the late 1950s, gamma(SL) (where L stands for liquid in general) could be correctly expressed, as long as one only took van der Waals attractions and electrical double layer repulsions into account, i.e., as long as both S and L were apolar. However for interfacial interactions taking place in water among apolar as well as polar solutes, particles or surfaces, gamma(SW) was not properly worked out until the late 1980s, due in particular to uncertainties about the treatment of the polar properties of liquid water and other condensed-phase materials. In this review the historical development of the understanding of these polar properties is outlined and the polar equation for gamma(SW), as well as the equations derived there from for the free energies of interaction between apolar or polar entities, immersed in water (deltaG(SWS)) are discussed. Also discussed is the role of the various terms of deltaG(SWS), in hydrophobic attraction (the "hydrophobic effect"), hydrophilic repulsion ("hydration forces") and in the quantitative expression of hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity. The DLVO theory of attractive and repulsive free energies between particles immersed in liquids, as a function of distance between suspended particles, was extended to allow its use in the expression of the polar interactions occurring in water. Finally, the free energy term, deltaG(SWS) and the related gamma(SW), have been directly linked to the aqueous solubility of organic and biological solutes, which allows the determination of interfacial tensions between such solutes and water from their solubilities.

  17. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Interfacial Mechanics of Crystalline Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qingquan

    ultimate tensile strength were found to all increased as the NW diameter decreased. For the temperature effect study, a brief review on brittle-to-ductile transition (BDT) of silicon (Si) is presented. BDT temperature shows decreasing trend as size of the sample decrease. However, controversial results have been reported in terms of brittle or ductile behaviors for Si NWs at room temperature. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) thermal actuator (ETA) was designed to test NW without involving external heating. To circumvent undesired heating of the end effector, heat sink beams that can be co-fabricated with the thermal actuator were introduced. A combined modeling and experimental study was conducted to access the effect of such heat sink beams. Temperature distribution was measured and simulated using Raman scattering and multiphysics finite element method, respectively. Our results demonstrated that heat sink beams are effective in reducing the temperature of the thermal actuator. To get elevated temperature in a controllable fashion, a comb drive actuator was designed with separating actuation and heating mechanisms. Multiphysics finite element analysis (coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical) was used to optimize structure design and minimize undesired thermal loading/unloading. A Si NW with diameter of 50 nm was tested on the device under different temperatures. Stress strain curves at different temperatures revealed that plastic deformation occurs at temperature of 55 °C. For interfacial mechanics, we report an experimental study on the friction between Ag and ZnO NW tips (ends) and a gold substrate. An innovative experimental method based on column buckling theory was developed for the friction measurements. Direct measurements of the static friction force and interfacial shear strength between Si NWs and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is reported. The static friction and shear strength were found to increase rapidly and then decrease with the increasing

  18. Effect of interfacial ion structuring on range and magnitude of electric double layer, hydration, and adhesive interactions between mica surfaces in 0.05-3 M Li⁺ and Cs⁺ electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Baimpos, Theodoros; Shrestha, Buddha R; Raman, Sangeetha; Valtiner, Markus

    2014-04-22

    Ions and water structuring at charged-solid/electrolyte interfaces and forces arising from interfacial structuring in solutions above 100 mM concentrations dominate structure and functionality in many physiological, geological, and technological systems. In these concentrations, electrolyte structuring occurs within the range of molecular dimensions. Here, we quantitatively measure and describe electric double layer (EDL) and adhesive interactions at mica-interfaces in aqueous CsCl and LiCl solutions with concentrations ranging from 50 mM to 3 M. Complementarily, using atomic force microscopy and surface forces apparatus experiments we characterize concentration-dependent stark differences in the inner and outer EDL force profiles, and discuss differences between the used methods. From 50 mM to 1 M concentrations, interactions forces measured in CsCl-solutions exhibit strong hydration repulsions, but no diffuse EDL-repulsions beyond the Stern layer. In confinement the weakly hydrated Cs(+) ions condensate into the mica-lattice screening the entire surface charge within the Stern layer. In contrast, strongly hydrated Li(+) ions only partially compensate the surface charge within the Stern layer, leading to the formation of a diffuse outer double layer with DLVO behavior. Both LiCl and CsCl solutions exhibit oscillatory ion-hydration forces at surface separations from 2.2 nm to 4-8 Å. Below 4-8 Å the force profiles are dominated in both cases by forces originating from water and/or ion confinement at the solid/electrolyte/solid interface. Adhesive minima and their location vary strongly with the electrolyte and its concentration due to specific ion correlations across the interface, while dispersion forces between the surfaces are overpowered. Highly concentrated 3 M solutions exhibit solidification of the inner EDL structure and an unexpected formation of additional diffuse EDL forces with an increasing range, as recently measured in ionic liquids. Our results may

  19. Endocytic vesicle scission by lipid phase boundary forces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Kaksonen, Marko; Drubin, David G.; Oster, George

    2006-01-01

    Endocytosis in budding yeast is thought to occur in several phases. First, the membrane invaginates and then elongates into a tube. A vesicle forms at the end of the tube, eventually pinching off to form a “free” vesicle. Experiments show that actin polymerization is an active participant in the endocytic process, along with a number of membrane-associated proteins. Here we investigate the possible roles of these components in driving vesiculation by constructing a quantitative model of the process beginning at the stage where the membrane invagination has elongated into a tube encased in a sheath of membrane-associated protein. This protein sheath brings about the scission step where the vesicle separates from the tube. When the protein sheath is dynamin, it is commonly assumed that scission is brought about by the constriction of the sheath. Here, we show that an alternative scenario can work as well: The protein sheath acts as a “filter” to effect a phase separation of lipid species. The resulting line tension tends to minimize the interface between the tube region and the vesicle region. Interestingly, large vesicle size can further facilitate the reduction of the interfacial diameter down to a few nanometers, small enough so that thermal fluctuations can fuse the membrane and pinch off the vesicle. To deform the membrane into the tubular vesicle shape, the membrane elastic resistance forces must be balanced by some additional forces that we show can be generated by actin polymerization and/or myosin I. These active forces are shown to be important in successful scission processes as well. PMID:16801551

  20. Probing the Interfacial Interaction in Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures: A Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Yongjun; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Ma, Ding; Sun, Xu-Hui; Zhong, Jun

    2015-04-22

    We have stabilized the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of various sizes on layered carbon materials (Fe-oxide/C) that show excellent catalytic performance. From the characterization of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), a strong interfacial interaction in the Fe-oxide/C hybrids has been observed between the small iron oxide NPs and layered carbon in contrast to the weak interaction in the large iron oxide NPs. The interfacial interaction between the NPs and layered carbon is found to link with the improved catalytic performance. In addition, the Fe L-edge XMCD spectra show that the large iron oxide NPs are mainly γ-Fe2O3 with a strong ferromagnetic property, whereas the small iron oxide NPs with strong interfacial interaction are mainly α-Fe2O3 or amorphous Fe2O3 with a nonmagnetic property. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial interaction plays a key role for the catalytic performance, and the experimental findings may provide guidance toward rational design of high-performance catalysts. PMID:25839786

  1. Investigation of fiber/matrix interfacial mechanical behavior in ceramic matrix composites by cyclic fiber push-in testing

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, J.I.; Bhatt, R.T.; Bansal, N.P.; Olmstead, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Cyclic fiber push-in testing is used to examine the stability of interfacial frictional sliding stresses and fiber debond lengths with continued push-in load/unload cycles. The measured response to applying load cycling to a single fiber reveals the susceptibility of the fiber/matrix interface to degrade under cyclic loading conditions, and thus, helps evaluate the contribution of the interface to the cyclic fatigue behavior of the composite after the occurrence of matrix cracks. From cyclic push-in testing in room temperature air, decreasing interfacial sliding stresses and increasing debond lengths are observed with continued load cycling for SCS-6 SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SCS-6/RBSN), whereas stable interfacial sliding stresses and no increase in debond lengths are observed with continued load cycling for SCS-6 SiC fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate (SCS-6/SAS). These results indicate that fiber-bridged matrix cracks should be stable under cyclic fatigue loading conditions in SCS-6/SAS, but should exhibit increasing crack opening displacements and fiber pull-out with continued cycling in SCS-6/RBSN. In addition, changing the test environment from room air to nitrogen significantly affects the cyclic push-in test results for SCS-6/RBSN, but not for SCS-6/SAS. The different responses to this change in test environment are attributed to different locations of interfacial failure.

  2. Specific effects of Ca(2+) ions and molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin interfacial layers that drive macroscopic foam stability.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Björn; Schulze-Zachau, Felix; Nagel, Eva; Engelhardt, Kathrin; Stoyanov, Stefan; Gochev, Georgi; Khristov, Khr; Mileva, Elena; Exerowa, Dotchi; Miller, Reinhard; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) adsorption layers at air-water interfaces were studied in situ with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG), tensiometry, surface dilatational rheology and ellipsometry as a function of bulk Ca(2+) concentration. The relation between the interfacial molecular structure of adsorbed BLG and the interactions with the supporting electrolyte is additionally addressed on higher length scales along the foam hierarchy - from the ubiquitous air-water interface through thin foam films to macroscopic foam. For concentrations <1 mM, a strong decrease in SFG intensity from O-H stretching bands and a slight increase in layer thickness and surface pressure are observed. A further increase in Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM causes an apparent change in the polarity of aromatic C-H stretching vibrations from interfacial BLG which we associate to a charge reversal at the interface. Foam film measurements show formation of common black films at Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM due to considerable decrease of the stabilizing electrostatic disjoining pressure. These observations also correlate with a minimum in macroscopic foam stability. For concentrations >30 mM Ca(2+), micrographs of foam films show clear signatures of aggregates which tend to increase the stability of foam films. Here, the interfacial layers have a higher surface dilatational elasticity. In fact, macroscopic foams formed from BLG dilutions with high Ca(2+) concentrations where aggregates and interfacial layers with higher elasticity are found, showed the highest stability with much smaller bubble sizes.

  3. Probing the Interfacial Interaction in Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures: A Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Gao, Yongjun; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Ma, Ding; Sun, Xu-Hui; Zhong, Jun

    2015-04-22

    We have stabilized the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of various sizes on layered carbon materials (Fe-oxide/C) that show excellent catalytic performance. From the characterization of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (XMCD), a strong interfacial interaction in the Fe-oxide/C hybrids has been observed between the small iron oxide NPs and layered carbon in contrast to the weak interaction in the large iron oxide NPs. The interfacial interaction between the NPs and layered carbon is found to link with the improved catalytic performance. In addition, the Fe L-edge XMCD spectra show that the large iron oxide NPs are mainly γ-Fe2O3 with a strong ferromagnetic property, whereas the small iron oxide NPs with strong interfacial interaction are mainly α-Fe2O3 or amorphous Fe2O3 with a nonmagnetic property. The results strongly suggest that the interfacial interaction plays a key role for the catalytic performance, and the experimental findings may provide guidance toward rational design of high-performance catalysts.

  4. Molecular modeling directed by an interfacial test apparatus for the evaluation of protein and polymer ingredient function in situ.

    PubMed

    Collins, George W; Patel, Avani; Dilley, Alan; Sarker, Dipak K

    2008-05-28

    A simplified apparatus is described that measures the damping of a suspended measuring device. The movement of the device (bob) is damped by the properties of the air-water surface adsorbed material. Its value lies in describing the surface chemomechanical properties of ingredients and excipients used in food, nutraceutical, cosmetic (cosmeceutical), and natural drug-food product formulations that traverse the food sciences. Two surfactants, two food and drug-grade polymers, and five naturally occurring food and serum proteins were tested and used to estimate and model interfacial viscoelasticity. Equilibration times of >15 min were found to give sufficiently stable interfaces for routine assessment. The viscoelasticity of the air-water interface was estimated with reference to model solutions. These model solutions and associated self-assembled interfacial nanostructured adsorbed layers were fabricated using a preliminary screening process with the aid of a specialized foaming apparatus ( C(300) values), surface tension measurements (23-73 mN/m), and referential surface shear and dilation experiments. The viscoelasticity measured as a percentage of surface damping ( D) of a pendulum was found to range from 1.0 to 22.4% across the samples tested, and this represented interfacial viscosities in the range of 0-4630 microNs/m. The technique can distinguish between interfacial compositions and positions itself as an easily accessible valuable addition to tensiometric and analytical biochemistry-based techniques.

  5. Improvement of interfacial property between PBO fibers and epoxy resin by surface grafting of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Meng, L. H.; Huang, Y. D.

    2012-10-01

    PBO fiber as reinforced material has been widely applied in various fields such as aerospace, automobile and sport apparatus due to excellent mechanic property during past two decades. However, poor interfacial adhesion limits the further application of PBO fiber. To solve this problem, plenty of work has been done. In the present study, the surface of PBO fibers was treated through surface grafting of polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxanes (POSS). The effect of POSS grafting on bulk mechanic property and interfacial property of PBO fiber were studied. Surface chemical composition, surface morphologies, surface free energy, single-fiber tensile strength of untreated and treated PBO fiber were characterized. The results show that POSS nanoparticles were grafted on the fiber surface successfully. The surface characteristics of treated PBO fiber were different from that of untreated one. Oxygen-containing polar functional groups, elemental ratio of oxygen to carbon, surface roughness and surface free energy increased significantly. In addition, interfacial shear strength between treated PBO fibers and epoxy resin increased to 54.9 MPa comparative with untreated one. Meanwhile tensile strength of treated PBO fibers only very little decreased. Therefore, POSS surface grafting can be utilized to enhance the interfacial adhesion between PBO fibers and epoxy resin matrix.

  6. Strategic forces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Air Force now plans to retain the Minuteman II and III missile force through fiscal year 2008. Introduced about 25 years ago, these missiles have served as a nuclear deterrence for longer than initially envisioned. Over the extended lives of the systems, questions have arisen over their continued reliability and operational effectiveness, particularly the Minuteman II system. Limited flight testing, due to a shortage of test missiles, and reduced reliability caused by age-related deterioration of guidance computers and propulsion motors are two factors undermining confidence in the Minuteman II. GAO believes that the Minuteman II could be retired before 1998 as presently contemplated under an assumption of a Strategic Arms Reduction Talks agreement. An alternative would be to reinstate the Air Force's plans to replace deteriorated missile components and acquire the assets needed to resume flight testing at rates necessary to restore and sustain confidence in the system's performance through fiscal year 2008. However, on the basis of current test schedules, GAO is concerned that components to test the missile's warheads will be depleted by about 1999.

  7. Measurement of interfacial tension by automated video techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, V.A.; Miller, R.L.; Watkins, A.D.; Ward, M.B.; Barrett, K.B.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a simple automated system for measuring interfacial tension using the pendant or sessile drop method. The size and shape of a transparent or opaque drop of one fluid immersed in a second, transparent, fluid is recorded with a CCD video camera and digitized and stored by a computer-controlled system. Custom software determines various droplet shape factors and computes the interfacial tension. A limited number of video frames can be stored on disc, or longer runs can be stored on video tape for later digitization. Alternatively, only the shape factor and interfacial tension data are stored to reduce demands on the storage medium. The first application of the system was measurement of the interfacial tension of crude oil interacting with various bacterial agents in aqueous suspension. Some of these agents can greatly influence the effective interfacial tension of the crude oil and potentially improve recovery rates from oil reserves, particularly of the heavier'' or more viscous oils. 11 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  9. Temporal interfacial instability in vertical gas-liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Ó Náraigh, Lennon; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Valluri, Prashant

    2015-11-01

    We consider onset and dynamics of interfacial instability in gas-liquid flows, using two-dimensional channel flow of a thin falling film sheared by counter-current gas as a model. Our methodology consists of linear stability theory together with DNS of the two-phase flow in the case of nonlinear disturbances. We study the influence of three main flow parameters (density contrast between liquid and gas, film thickness, pressure drop applied to drive the gas stream) on the interfacial dynamics. Energy budget analyses based on Orr-Sommerfeld theory reveal coexisting unstable modes (interfacial, shear, internal) in the case of high density contrast, resulting in mode coalescence and mode competition, but only one dynamically relevant unstable interfacial mode for low density contrast. DNS of this scenario shows that linear theory holds up remarkably well upon the onset of large-amplitude waves as well as the existence of weakly nonlinear waves. In comparison, although linear stability theory successfully determines the most-dominant features in the interfacial wave dynamics at early-to-intermediate times in a high-density-contrast case, short waves selected by linear theory undergo secondary instability and the wave train is no longer regular but rather exhibits chaotic.

  10. Effect of interfacial coupling on rectification in organic spin rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gui-Chao; Zuo, Meng-Ying; Li, Ying; Zhang, Zhao; Ren, Jun-Feng; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2015-07-01

    The effect of interfacial coupling on rectification in an organic co-oligomer spin diode is investigated theoretically by considering spin-independent and spin-resolved couplings respectively. In the case of spin-independent coupling, an optimal interfacial coupling strength with a significant enhanced rectification ratio is found, whose value depends on the structural asymmetry of the molecule. In the case of spin-resolved coupling, we found that only the variation of the interfacial coupling with specific spin is effective to modulate the rectification, which is due to the spin-filtering property of the central asymmetric magnetic molecule. A transition of the spin-current rectification between parallel spin-current rectification and antiparallel spin-current rectification may be observed with the variation of the spin-resolved interfacial coupling. The interfacial effect on rectification is further analyzed from the spin-dependent transmission spectrum at different biases. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 1374195), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2014AM017), and the Excellent Young Scholars Research Fund of Shandong Normal University, China.

  11. Some Aspects of Interfacial Phenomena in Steelmaking and Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. J.; Viswanathan, N. N.; Muhmood, L.; Kapilashrami, E.; Seetharaman, S.

    2016-08-01

    Unique experiments were designed to study the surface phenomena in steelmaking reactions. The concept of surface sulfide capacities and an understanding of the surface accumulation of surface-active species, based on experimental results, are presented. In order to understand the flow phenomenon at slag/metal interface, experiments were designed to measure the interfacial velocity of S on the surface of an iron drop immersed in an aluminosilicate slag using the X-ray sessile drop method. The oscillation of the iron drop in the slag due to the change in the surface concentration of sulfur at the slag-metal interface was monitored by X-ray imaging. From the observations, the interfacial velocity of sulfur was evaluated. Similar experiments were performed to measure the interfacial velocity of oxygen at the interface as well as the impact of oxygen potential on the interfacial velocity of sulfur. The interfacial shear viscosity and the dilatational modulus were also evaluated. In a study of the wetting of alumina base by iron drop at constant oxygen pressure under isothermal condition, the contact angle was found to be decreased with the progress of the reaction leading to the formation of hercynite as an intermediate layer creating non-wetting conditions. In the case of silica substrate, an intermediate liquid fayalite layer was formed.

  12. The role of electrostatic interactions in protease surface diffusion and the consequence for interfacial biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Feller, Bob E; Kellis, James T; Cascão-Pereira, Luis G; Robertson, Channing R; Frank, Curtis W

    2010-12-21

    This study examines the influence of electrostatic interactions on enzyme surface diffusion and the contribution of diffusion to interfacial biocatalysis. Surface diffusion, adsorption, and reaction were investigated on an immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) multilayer substrate over a range of solution ionic strength values. Interfacial charge of the enzyme and substrate surface was maintained by performing the measurements at a fixed pH; therefore, electrostatic interactions were manipulated by changing the ionic strength. The interfacial processes were investigated using a combination of techniques: fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy. We used an enzyme charge ladder with a net charge ranging from -2 to +4 with respect to the parent to systematically probe the contribution of electrostatics in interfacial enzyme biocatalysis on a charged substrate. The correlation between reaction rate and adsorption was determined for each charge variant within the ladder, each of which displayed a maximum rate at an intermediate surface concentration. Both the maximum reaction rate and adsorption value at which this maximum rate occurs increased in magnitude for the more positive variants. In addition, the specific enzyme activity increased as the level of adsorption decreased, and for the lowest adsorption values, the specific enzyme activity was enhanced compared to the trend at higher surface concentrations. At a fixed level of adsorption, the specific enzyme activity increased with positive enzyme charge; however, this effect offers diminishing returns as the enzyme becomes more highly charged. We examined the effect of electrostatic interactions on surface diffusion. As the binding affinity was reduced by increasing the solution ionic strength, thus weakening electrostatic interaction, the rate of surface diffusion increased considerably. The enhancement in specific activity achieved at

  13. Interfacial Friction of PDMS Network Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landherr, Lucas J. T.; Cohen, Claude; Archer, Lynden A.

    2008-07-01

    This study focuses on developing a surface-attached lubricant that would significantly decrease friction and wear. Vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane chains are spincoated with a crosslinking agent and platinum catalyst onto silicon wafers covered with a self-assembling monolayer. Atomic force microscopy is used to analyze the coefficient of friction (COF) of the PDMS-SAM surface tethered network. Model networks with microscale thicknesses have COFs approximately three times larger than the thinner networks.

  14. Optimization of Surfactant Mixtures and Their Interfacial Behavior for Advanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, Prof. P.

    2002-03-04

    The objective of this project was to develop a knowledge base that is helpful for the design of improved processes for mobilizing and producing oil left untapped using conventional techniques. The main goal was to develop and evaluate mixtures of new or modified surfactants for improved oil recovery. In this regard, interfacial properties of novel biodegradable n-alkyl pyrrolidones and sugar-based surfactants have been studied systematically. Emphasis was on designing cost-effective processes compatible with existing conditions and operations in addition to ensuring minimal reagent loss.

  15. Combined in-situ dilatometer and contact angle studies of interfacial reaction kinetics in brazing.

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, V. R.; Javernick, D. A.; Thoma, D. J.; Cola, M. J.; Hollis, K. J.; Smith, F. M.; Dauelsberg, L. B.

    2001-01-01

    Multi-component dissimilar material braze joints as shown in Figure 1 consisting of dissimilar base materials, filler materials and wetting agents are of tantamount importance in a wide variely of applications. This work combines dilatometry and contact angle measurements to characterize in-situ the multiple interfacial reaction pathways that occur in such systems. Whereas both of these methods are commonly used tools in metallurgical investigation, their combined use within the context of brazing studies is new and offers considerable additional insight. Applications are discussed to joints made between Beryllium and Monel with TiH{sub 2} as the wetting agent and Cu-28%Ag as the filler material.

  16. Viscosity and interfacial properties in a mussel-inspired adhesive coacervate.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dong Soo; Zeng, Hongbo; Srivastava, Aasheesh; Krogstad, Daniel V; Tirrell, Matthew; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2010-07-21

    The chemistry of mussel adhesion has commanded the focus of much recent research activity on wet adhesion. By comparison, the equally critical adhesive processing by marine organisms has been little examined. Using a mussel-inspired coacervate formed by mixing a recombinant mussel adhesive protein (fp-151-RGD) with hyaluronic acid (HA), we have examined the nanostructure, viscosity, friction, and interfacial energy of fluid-fluid phase-separated coacervates using the surface forces apparatus and microscopic techniques. At mixing ratios of fp-151-RGD:HA resulting in marginal coacervation, the coacervates showed shear-thickening viscosity and no structure by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). However, at the mixing ratio producing maximum coacervation, the coacervate showed shear-thinning viscosity and a transition to a bicontinuous phase by cryo-TEM. The shear-thinning viscosity, high friction coefficient (>1.2), and low interfacial energy (<1 mJ m(-2)) observed at the optimal mixing ratio for coacervation are promising delivery, spreading and adhesion properties for future wet adhesive and coating technologies.

  17. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of interfacial water at single bond limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying

    Hydrogen bond is one of the most important weak interactions in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. The conventional methods for studying hydrogen-bonding interaction are all based on spectroscopic or diffraction techniques. However, those techniques have poor spatial resolution and only measure the average properties of many hydrogen bonds, which are susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. The spatial variation and inter-bond coupling of the hydrogen bonds leads to significant spectral broadening, which prohibits the accurate understanding of the experimental data. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with unprecedentedly high sensitivity and resolution, for addressing weak inter- and intra-molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. Based on a qPlus sensor, we have succeeded to push the real-space study of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded system, i.e. water, down to single bond limit. Combined with state-of-the-arts quantum simulations, we have discovered exotic nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) in interfacial water and revealed the quantum nature of the hydrogen bond from a completely new perspective

  18. Fine Adjustment of Interfacial Potential between pH-Responsive Hydrogels and Cell-Sized Particles.

    PubMed

    Monzel, Cornelia; Veschgini, Mariam; Madsen, Jeppe; Lewis, Andrew L; Armes, Steven P; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-08-11

    We quantitatively determined interfacial potentials between cell-sized particles and stimulus-responsive hydrogels using a microinterferometer. The hydrogel is based on physically interconnected ABA triblock copolymer micelles comprising an inner biocompatible PMPC block and two outer pH-responsive PDPA blocks. The out-of-plane temporal fluctuation in the position of the cell-sized particles was calculated from changes in the interference pattern measured by Reflection Interference Contrast Microscopy (RICM), thus yielding the particle-substrate interaction potential V (Δh). Measurements in pH buffers ranging from 7.0 to 7.8 resulted in a systematic reduction in height of the potential minima ⟨Δh⟩ and a concomitant increase in the potential curvature V″ (Δh). The experimental data were analyzed by applying the modified Ross and Pincus model for polyelectrolytes, while accounting for gravitation, lubrication and van der Waals interactions. Elastic moduli calculated from V″ (Δh) were in good agreement with those measured by Atomic Force Microscopy. The ability to fine-tune both the gel elasticity and the interfacial potential at around physiological pH makes such triblock copolymer hydrogels a promising biocompatible substrate for dynamic switching of cell-material interactions. PMID:26190346

  19. Lateral actuation of an organic droplet on conjugated polymer electrodes via imbalanced interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xu, Jian; Li, Xin; Tian, Ye; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2016-08-17

    This paper presents a new mechanism for the controlled lateral actuation of organic droplets on dodecylbenzenesulfonate-doped polypyrrole (PPy(DBS)) electrodes at low voltages (∼0.9 V) in an aqueous environment. The droplet actuation is based on the tunable surface wetting properties of the polymer electrodes induced by electrochemical redox reactions. The contact angle of a dichloromethane (DCM) droplet on the PPy(DBS) surface switches between ∼119° upon oxidation (0.6 V) and ∼150° upon reduction (-0.9 V) in 0.1 M NaNO3 solution. The droplet placed across the reduced and oxidized PPy(DBS) electrodes experiences imbalanced interfacial tensions, which prompt the actuation of the droplet from the reduced electrode to the oxidized electrode. The lateral actuation of DCM droplets on two PPy(DBS) electrodes is demonstrated, and the actuation process is studied. The driving force due to the imbalanced interfacial tensions is estimated to be approximately 10(-7) N for a 6 μL droplet. PMID:27426489

  20. Manipulation and control of the interfacial polarization in organic light-emitting diodes by dipolar doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Lars; Schmidt, Tobias D.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Most of the commonly used electron transporting materials in organic light-emitting diodes exhibit interfacial polarization resulting from partially aligned permanent dipole moments of the molecules. This property modifies the internal electric field distribution of the device and therefore enables an earlier flat band condition for the hole transporting side, leading to improved charge carrier injection. Recently, this phenomenon was studied with regard to different materials and degradation effects, however, so far the influence of dilution has not been investigated. In this paper we focus on dipolar doping of the hole transporting material 4,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]-biphenyl (NPB) with the polar electron transporting material tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate) aluminum (Alq3). Impedance spectroscopy reveals that changes of the hole injection voltage do not scale in a simple linear fashion with the effective thickness of the doped layer. In fact, the measured interfacial polarization reaches a maximum value for a 1:1 blend. Taking the permanent dipole moment of Alq3 into account, an increasing degree of dipole alignment is found for decreasing Alq3 concentration. This observation can be explained by the competition between dipole-dipole interactions leading to dimerization and the driving force for vertical orientation of Alq3 dipoles at the surface of the NPB layer.

  1. Thermodynamics of interfacial energy in binary metallic systems: influence of adsorption on dihedral angles

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, I. . E-mail: ichiko@eps.s.u-tiokyo.ac.jp; Takei, Y.

    2005-02-01

    The solid-liquid interfacial energy (or interfacial tension) was investigated by the lattice-liquid statistical calculation and by the Cahn-Hilliard theory of interface. Interfacial energies in binary metallic systems were estimated from a few bulk thermodynamic properties, i.e., melting temperature, entropy of fusion, and the critical temperature of the liquid phase. In eutectic systems, interfacial energy gradually increases with decreasing concentration of the solid species in the liquid. In monotectic systems, interfacial thickening occurs and interfacial energy is reduced around the liquid immiscibility gap. The results of calculation explain the experimental data of dihedral angles fairly well.

  2. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  3. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  4. Graphene as an efficient interfacial layer for electrochromic devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Bult, Justin B; Nanayakkara, Sanjini; Dillon, Anne C; Richards, Ryan M; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Engtrakul, Chaiwat

    2015-06-01

    This study presents an interfacial modification strategy to improve the performance of electrochromic films that were fabricated by a magnetron sputtering technique. High-quality graphene sheets, synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, were used to modify fluorine-doped tin oxide substrates, followed by the deposition of high-performance nanocomposite nickel oxide electrochromic films. Electrochromic cycling results revealed that a near-complete monolayer graphene interfacial layer improves the electrochromic performance in terms of switching kinetics, activation period, coloration efficiency, and bleached-state transparency, while maintaining ∼100% charge reversibility. The present study offers an alternative route for improving the interfacial properties between electrochromic and transparent conducting oxide films without relying on conventional methods such as nanostructuring or thin film composition control. PMID:25950270

  5. Solid/liquid interfacial free energies in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nason, D.; Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a semiquantitative technique for predicting the segregation characteristics of smooth interfaces between binary solid and liquid solutions in terms of readily available thermodynamic parameters of the bulk solutions. A lattice-liquid interfacial model and a pair-bonded regular solution model are employed in the treatment with an accommodation for liquid interfacial entropy. The method is used to calculate the interfacial segregation and the free energy of segregation for solid-liquid interfaces between binary solutions for the (111) boundary of fcc crystals. The zone of compositional transition across the interface is shown to be on the order of a few atomic layers in width, being moderately narrower for ideal solutions. The free energy of the segregated interface depends primarily upon the solid composition and the heats of fusion of the component atoms, the composition difference of the solutions, and the difference of the heats of mixing of the solutions.

  6. The Chemically Driven Interfacial Convection (CDIC) experiment on MASER 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ying; Eckert, Kerstin; Heinze, Armin; Acker, Margret

    2005-08-01

    We present a sounding rocket experiment studying the interplay between chemistry and interfacial-tension-driven hydrodynamic instabilities. The system on hand is a combination of two immiscible liquids separated along an initially plane interface at which an interfacial reaction takes place. The reaction leads to an in-situ formation of a surface-active product. This system is studied using an integrated Hele-Shaw cell concept developed in the project. With onset of the microgravity phase four Hele-Shaw cells are filled manually. Basic diagnostic tools are two shadowgraph visualization systems of high resolution and two differential interferometer, each of them containing one cell. The experiment shows an intriguing dynamic interplay between cellular Marangoni convection, thin film dynamics and interfacial deformations.

  7. Environmental Applications of Interfacial Materials with Special Wettability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhangxin; Elimelech, Menachem; Lin, Shihong

    2016-03-01

    Interfacial materials with special wettability have become a burgeoning research area in materials science in the past decade. The unique surface properties of materials and interfaces generated by biomimetic approaches can be leveraged to develop effective solutions to challenging environmental problems. This critical review presents the concept, mechanisms, and fabrication techniques of interfacial materials with special wettability, and assesses the environmental applications of these materials for oil-water separation, membrane-based water purification and desalination, biofouling control, high performance vapor condensation, and atmospheric water collection. We also highlight the most promising properties of interfacial materials with special wettability that enable innovative environmental applications and discuss the practical challenges for large-scale implementation of these novel materials.

  8. Interfacial waves generated by electrowetting-driven contact line motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jonghyun; Park, Jaebum; Kim, Yunhee; Shin, Bongsu; Bae, Jungmok; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-10-01

    The contact angle of a liquid-fluid interface can be effectively modulated by the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) technology. Rapid movement of the contact line can be achieved by swift changes of voltage at the electrodes, which can give rise to interfacial waves under the strong influence of surface tension. Here we experimentally demonstrate EWOD-driven interfacial waves of overlapping liquids and compare their wavelength and decay length with the theoretical results obtained by a perturbation analysis. Our theory also allows us to predict the temporal evolution of the interfacial profiles in either rectangular or cylindrical containers, as driven by slipping contact lines. This work builds a theoretical framework to understand and predict the dynamics of capillary waves of a liquid-liquid interface driven by EWOD, which has practical implications on optofluidic devices used to guide light.

  9. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  10. First-Principles Prediction of Liquid/Liquid Interfacial Tension.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M P; Bennetzen, M V; Klamt, A; Stipp, S L S

    2014-08-12

    The interfacial tension between two liquids is the free energy per unit surface area required to create that interface. Interfacial tension is a determining factor for two-phase liquid behavior in a wide variety of systems ranging from water flooding in oil recovery processes and remediation of groundwater aquifers contaminated by chlorinated solvents to drug delivery and a host of industrial processes. Here, we present a model for predicting interfacial tension from first principles using density functional theory calculations. Our model requires no experimental input and is applicable to liquid/liquid systems of arbitrary compositions. The consistency of the predictions with experimental data is significant for binary, ternary, and multicomponent water/organic compound systems, which offers confidence in using the model to predict behavior where no data exists. The method is fast and can be used as a screening technique as well as to extend experimental data into conditions where measurements are technically too difficult, time consuming, or impossible.

  11. Probing model tumor interfacial properties using piezoelectric cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2010-01-01

    Invasive malignant breast cancers are typically branchy and benign breast tumors are typically smooth. It is of interest to characterize tumor branchiness (roughness) to differentiate invasive malignant breast cancer from noninvasive ones. In this study, we examined the shear modulus (G) to elastic modulus (E) ratio, G∕E, as a quantity to describe model tumor interfacial roughness using a piezoelectric cantilever capable of measuring both tissue elastic modulus and tissue shear modulus. The piezoelectric cantilever used had two lead zirconate titanate layers to facilitate all-electrical elastic (shear) modulus measurements using one single device. We constructed model tissues with tumors by embedding one-dimensional (1D) corrugated inclusions and three-dimensional (3D) spiky-ball inclusions made of modeling clay in gelatin. We showed that for smooth inclusions, G∕E was 0.3 regardless of the shear direction. In contrast, for a 1D corrugated rough inclusion G∕E was 0.3 only when the shear was parallel to corrugation and G∕E increased with an increasing angle between the shear direction and the corrugation. When the shear was perpendicular to corrugation, G∕E became >0.7. For 3D isotropic spiky-ball inclusions we showed that the G∕E depended on the degree of the roughness. Using the ratio s∕r of the spike length (s) to the overall inclusion radius (r) as a roughness parameter, we showed that for inclusions with s∕r larger than or equal to 0.28, the G∕E ratio over the inclusions was larger than 0.7 whereas for inclusions with s∕r less than 0.28, the G∕E decreased with decreasing s∕r to around 0.3 at s∕r=0. In addition, we showed that the depth limit of the G∕E measurement is twice the width of the probe area of the piezoelectric cantilever. PMID:20887005

  12. Interfacial molecular interactions based on the conformation recognition between the insoluble antitumor drug AD-1 and DSPC.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tian; Cao, Xiuxiu; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Jian; Shi, Caihong; Su, Jia; Zhang, Yu; Gou, Jingxin; He, Haibing; Guo, Haiyan; Tang, Xing; Zhao, Yuqing

    2016-10-01

    In this study, molecular interactions between the anti-cancer agent 20(R)-25-methoxyl-dammarane-3β, 12β, 20-triol (AD-1) and phospholipid 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) were investigated using the Langmuir film balance technique. The characteristics of binary Langmuir monolayers consisting of DSPC and AD-1 were conducted on the basis of the surface pressure-area per molecule (π-A) isotherms. It was found that the drug was able to become efficiently inserted into preformed DSPC monolayers, indicating a preferential interaction between AD-1 and DSPC. For the examined lateral pressure at 20mN/m, the largest negative values of ΔGex were found for the AD-1/DSPC monolayer, which should be the most stable. Based on the calculated values of ΔGex, we found that the AD-1/DSPC systems exhibited the best mixed characteristics when the molar fraction of the AD-1 was 0.8; at that relative concentration, the AD-1 molecules can mix better and interact with the phospholipid molecules. In addition, the drug-DSPC binary supramolecular structure was also deposited on the mica plates as shown by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Finally, molecular docking calculations explained satisfactorily that, based on the conformations interactions (conformation recognition), even at an AD-1/DSPC molar ratio as high as 8:2, the interfacial stabilization of the AD-1/DSPC system was fairly strong due to hydrophobic interactions. A higher loading capacity of DSPC might be possible, as it is associated with a more flexible geometrical environment, which allows these supramolecular structures to accept larger increases in drug loading upon steric binding. PMID:27469574

  13. The two-phase flow IPTT method for measurement of nonwetting-wetting liquid interfacial areas at higher nonwetting saturations in natural porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hua; El Ouni, Asma; Lin, Dan; Wang, Bingguo; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial areas between nonwetting-wetting (NW-W) liquids in natural porous media were measured using a modified version of the interfacial partitioning tracer test (IPTT) method that employed simultaneous two-phase flow conditions, which allowed measurement at NW saturations higher than trapped residual saturation. Measurements were conducted over a range of saturations for a well-sorted quartz sand under three wetting scenarios of primary drainage (PD), secondary imbibition (SI), and secondary drainage (SD). Limited sets of experiments were also conducted for a model glass-bead medium and for a soil. The measured interfacial areas were compared to interfacial areas measured using the standard IPTT method for liquid-liquid systems, which employs residual NW saturations. In addition, the theoretical maximum interfacial areas estimated from the measured data are compared to specific solid surface areas measured with the N2/BET method and estimated based on geometrical calculations for smooth spheres. Interfacial areas increase linearly with decreasing W-phase (water) saturation over the range of saturations employed. The maximum interfacial areas determined for the glass beads, which have no surface roughness, are 32 ± 4 and 36 ± 5 cm-1 for PD and SI cycles, respectively. The values are similar to the geometric specific solid surface area (31 ± 2 cm-1) and the N2/BET solid surface area (28 ± 2 cm-1). The maximum interfacial areas are 274 ± 38, 235 ± 27, and 581 ± 160 cm-1 for the sand for PD, SI, and SD cycles, respectively, and ˜7625 cm-1 for the soil for PD and SI. The maximum interfacial areas for the sand and soil are significantly larger than the estimated smooth-sphere specific solid surface areas (107 ± 8 cm-1 and 152 ± 8 cm-1, respectively), but much smaller than the N2/BET solid surface area (1387 ± 92 cm-1 and 55224 cm-1, respectively). The NW-W interfacial areas measured with the two-phase flow method compare well to values measured using the

  14. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S

    2014-07-01

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface. The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is significantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical strength.

  15. Long-ranged solvation forces in a fluid with short-ranged interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertsin, Alexander J.; Grunze, Michael

    2003-05-01

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo technique is used to calculate the solvation force and interfacial tension in a simple Lennard-Jones fluid confined between two solid walls. Emphasis is placed on large wall-to-wall separations, where the oscillations of density and solvation force due to layering effects have decayed. Despite the short range of the fluid-fluid and fluid-wall interaction potentials used, the solvation force shows an unsuspectedly long-ranged behavior, remaining quite perceptible up to a separation of 100 molecular diameters. It is also found that the sign of the solvation force at large separations is not uniquely determined by the sign of the interfacial tension: The walls that are "philic" with respect to the constrained fluid may well exhibit both repulsive and attractive solvation forces.

  16. Structure formation via the self-gravity interfacial instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueckstaedt, R. M.; Hunter, J. H.; Peterson, A. H.

    2003-12-01

    Interfacial instabilities (such as Rayleigh-Taylor or Kelvin-Helmholtz) are believed to play significant roles in shaping molecular clouds and giving rise to star forming regions. Recent studies (Hunter, Whitaker,and Lovelace ApJ 482, 1997; Hueckstaedt and Hunter MNRAS 327, 2001) have shown that self-gravity causes crenulations along a density interface to grow as the system seeks a lower energy state. The self-gravity interfacial instability (SGI) persists for wavelengths less that the Jean's length and has a timescale on the order of the freefall time. We discuss the SGI and its application toward molecular cloud morphology.

  17. Interfacial Effects in Polymer Membranes for Clean Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soles, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Polymeric membranes are critical components in several emerging clean energy technologies. Examples include proton exchange membranes for hydrogen fuel cells, anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells, flow batteries, and even block copolymer membranes for solid electrolytes/separators in lithium ion and other battery technologies. In all of these examples the function of the membrane is to physically separate two reactive electrodes or reactants, but allow the transport or exchange of specific ions through the membrane between the active electrodes. The flow of the charged ionic species between the electrodes can be used to balance the flow of electrons through an external electrical circuit that connects the electrodes, thereby storing or delivering charge electrochemically. In this presentation I will review the use of polymeric membranes in electrochemical energy storage technologies and discuss the critical issues related to the membranes that hinder these technologies. In particular I will also focus on the role the polymer membrane interface on device performance. At some point the polymer membrane must be interfaced with an active electrode or catalyst and the nature of this interface can significantly impact performance. Simulations of device performance based on bulk membrane transport properties often fail to predict the actual performance and empirical interfacial impedance terms usually added to capture the device performance. In this presentation I will explore the origins of this interfacial impedance in the different types of fuel cell membranes (proton and alkaline) by creating model thin film membranes where all of the membrane can be considered interfacial. We then use these thin films as a surrogate for the interfacial regions of a bulk membrane and then quantify the structure, dynamics, and transport properties of water and ions in the confined interfacial films. Using neutron reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and

  18. Estimating interfacial thermal conductivity in metamaterials through heat flux mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Canbazoglu, Fatih M.; Vemuri, Krishna P.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2015-04-06

    The variability of the thickness as well as the thermal conductivity of interfaces in composites may significantly influence thermal transport characteristics and the notion of a metamaterial as an effective medium. The consequent modulations of the heat flux passage are analytically and experimentally examined through a non-contact methodology using radiative imaging, on a model anisotropic thermal metamaterial. It was indicated that a lower Al layer/silver interfacial epoxy ratio of ∼25 compared to that of a Al layer/alumina interfacial epoxy (of ∼39) contributes to a smaller deviation of the heat flux bending angle.

  19. A facile microfluidic strategy for measuring interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongbo; Yao, Yuan; Chen, Qiang; Li, Gang; Yao, Shuhuai

    2013-12-01

    We report a facile method for measuring interfacial tension (IFT, γ) of immiscible fluids using a microfluidic device. The IFT is determined by monitoring the pressure drop across a microchannel, where a pair of modified Laplace sensors (formed by tapered channels) are connected, and the curvatures of the interfaces in the tapered channels. The method was tested with the model oil/water systems, and the results agreed well with a commercial tensiometry. We expect this method to be easily implemented in common microfluidic laboratories and supply a low-cost and fast way for interfacial tension measurement.

  20. The ensemble switch method for computing interfacial tensions

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter

    2015-04-14

    We present a systematic thermodynamic integration approach to compute interfacial tensions for solid-liquid interfaces, which is based on the ensemble switch method. Applying Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling techniques, we obtain results for hard spheres, which are in agreement with previous computations. The case of solid-liquid interfaces in a variant of the effective Asakura-Oosawa model and of liquid-vapor interfaces in the Lennard-Jones model are discussed as well. We demonstrate that a thorough finite-size analysis of the simulation data is required to obtain precise results for the interfacial tension.

  1. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  2. Radiative Forcing by Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U.; Doelling, D. R.; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmospheres The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 W/m(exp 2)a daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

  3. Quasicontinuum Models of Interfacial Structure and Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, V.B.; Miller, R.; Phillips, R.; Tadmor, E.B.; Ortiz, M.

    1998-01-01

    Microscopic models of the interaction between grain boundaries (GBs) and both dislocations and cracks are of importance in understanding the role of microstructure in altering the mechanical properties of a material. A recently developed mixed atomistic and continuum method is reformulated to allow for the examination of the interactions between GBs, dislocations, and cracks. These calculations elucidate plausible microscopic mechanisms for these defect interactions and allow for the quantitative evaluation of critical parameters such as the force needed to induce GB migration. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Periodic Arrays of Interfacial Cylindrical reverse Micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson,M.; Cain, N.; Ocko, B.; Gin, D.; Hammond, S.; Schwartz, D.

    2005-01-01

    We report an approach for the fabrication of periodic molecular nanostructures on surfaces. The approach involves biomimetic self-organization of synthetic wedge-shaped amphiphilic molecules into multilayer arrays of cylindrical reverse micelles. The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity. These nanostructured films self-assemble in solution but remain stable upon removal and exposure to ambient conditions, making them potentially suitable for a variety of dry pattern transfer methods. We illustrate the generality of this approach by using two distinct molecular systems that vary in size by a factor of 2.

  5. Imaging interfacial micro- and nano-bubbles by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhao, Binyu; Xue, Lian; Guo, Zhi; Dong, Yaming; Fang, Haiping; Tai, Renzhong; Hu, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Synchrotron-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM) with nanometer resolution was used to investigate the existence and behavior of interfacial gas nanobubbles confined between two silicon nitride windows. The observed nanobubbles of SF6 and Ne with diameters smaller than 2.5 µm were quite stable. However, larger bubbles became unstable and grew during the soft X-ray imaging, indicating that stable nanobubbles may have a length scale, which is consistent with a previous report using atomic force microscopy [Zhang et al. (2010), Soft Matter, 6, 4515-4519]. Here, it is shown that STXM is a promising technique for studying the aggregation of gases near the solid/water interfaces at the nanometer scale.

  6. Liquid-vapor equilibria and interfacial properties of n-alkanes and perfluoroalkanes by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Amat, Miguel A; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2010-03-21

    A molecular dynamics study is presented to assess the performance of a united-atom model in the prediction of liquid-vapor interfacial properties for short-chain perfluoroalkanes and their alkane counterparts. In particular, the ability of this model to discriminate between the surface-energy values of these two types of compounds was investigated over a wide temperature range corresponding to the liquid-vapor region. Comparisons with available experimental data and surface-tension predictions given by other force-field parameterizations, including those based on the more computationally demanding all-atom method, were performed to gauge the viability of this model. It was found that the model used in this study captures qualitatively the expected behavior of surface energy between alkanes and perfluoroalkanes and yields values that are in excellent agreement with experimental data, especially in the high-temperature limit as the critical temperature is approached. PMID:20331313

  7. Liquid-vapor equilibria and interfacial properties of n-alkanes and perfluoroalkanes by molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat, Miguel A.; Rutledge, Gregory C.

    2010-03-01

    A molecular dynamics study is presented to assess the performance of a united-atom model in the prediction of liquid-vapor interfacial properties for short-chain perfluoroalkanes and their alkane counterparts. In particular, the ability of this model to discriminate between the surface-energy values of these two types of compounds was investigated over a wide temperature range corresponding to the liquid-vapor region. Comparisons with available experimental data and surface-tension predictions given by other force-field parameterizations, including those based on the more computationally demanding all-atom method, were performed to gauge the viability of this model. It was found that the model used in this study captures qualitatively the expected behavior of surface energy between alkanes and perfluoroalkanes and yields values that are in excellent agreement with experimental data, especially in the high-temperature limit as the critical temperature is approached.

  8. Ar + induced interfacial mixing and phase formation in the Al/Cr system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. K.; Kim, S. O.; Song, J. H.; Kim, K. W.; Woo, J. J.; Whang, C. N.; Smith, R. J.

    1991-07-01

    Evaporated Al/Cr bilayer thin films were irradiated by 80 keV Ar + at doses in the range from 1 × 10 15 to 2 × 10 16 Ar +/cm 2 at room temperature in order to investigate the Ar + induced interfacial mixing behavior and the phase formation and transition by Ar + bombardment. Ion bombardment induces intermixing across the Al/Cr interface and mixing variance increases with increasing ion dose. Cascade and thermal spike models are found to be not adequate for the ion beam mixing mechanism at room temperature in this system. The Al 13Cr 2 phase is formed as an initial phase by ion beam mixing and then transforms into the Al 11Cr 2 or Al 4Cr phases at subsequent ion bombardment. This result is discussed in terms of the enhanced atomic mobility and the thermodynamical driving force by introducing the concept of an effective heat of formation.

  9. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  10. Multifunctional Paper Strip Based on Self-Assembled Interfacial Plasmonic Nanoparticle Arrays for Sensitive SERS Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Jingjing; Xu, Huiying; Li, Yixin; Ji, Ji; Liu, Baohong

    2015-08-01

    A smart and multifunctional paper-based SERS sensing card is generated through patterning self-assembled interfacial arrays of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the tip of an arrow-shaped paper strip. It is found that the closely packed monolayer of AuNPs is evenly distributed on the paper surface, resulting in a multitude of SERS hot spots over the detection zone. The paper card, with its inherent ability to separate and preconcentrate analytes by the capillary force and polarity difference between sample components, was exploited successfully as an integrated platform, allowing for sub-attomolar (50 × 10(-18) M) detection from microliter-volume (10 μL) samples. Furthermore, the simple preparation (lithography-free process), fast detection (<5 min), and low cost (<3 cents) demonstrate that the paper card is a practical and portable sensing interface for wide application in environmental and food analysis. PMID:26186409

  11. Liquid-vapor equilibria and interfacial properties of n-alkanes and perfluoroalkanes by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Amat, Miguel A; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2010-03-21

    A molecular dynamics study is presented to assess the performance of a united-atom model in the prediction of liquid-vapor interfacial properties for short-chain perfluoroalkanes and their alkane counterparts. In particular, the ability of this model to discriminate between the surface-energy values of these two types of compounds was investigated over a wide temperature range corresponding to the liquid-vapor region. Comparisons with available experimental data and surface-tension predictions given by other force-field parameterizations, including those based on the more computationally demanding all-atom method, were performed to gauge the viability of this model. It was found that the model used in this study captures qualitatively the expected behavior of surface energy between alkanes and perfluoroalkanes and yields values that are in excellent agreement with experimental data, especially in the high-temperature limit as the critical temperature is approached.

  12. Surface and Interfacial Properties of Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Mixtures Released to the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, Scott; Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charlie; Oostrom, Martinus; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2009-05-01

    Surface and interfacial tensions that arise at the interface between different phases are key parameters affecting Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) movement and redistribution in the vadose zone after spill events. In this study, the impact of major additive components on surface and interfacial tensions for organic mixtures and wastewater was investigated. Organic mixture and wastewater compositions are based upon carbon tetrachloride (CT) mixtures released at the Hanford site, where CT was discharged simultaneously with dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP), tributyl phosphate (TBP), dibutyl phosphate (DBP), and a machining lard oil (LO). A considerable amount of wastewater consisting primarily of nitrates and metal salts was also discharged. The tension values measured in this study revealed that the addition of these additive components caused a significant lowering of the interfacial tension with water or wastewater and the surface tension of the wastewater phase in equilibrium with the organic mixtures, compared to pure CT, but had minimal effect on the surface tension of the NAPL itself. These results lead to large differences in spreading coefficients for several mixtures, where the additives caused both a higher (more spreading) initial spreading coefficient and a lower (less spreading) equilibrium spreading coefficient. This indicates that if these mixtures migrate into uncontaminated areas, they will tend to spread quickly, but form a higher residual NAPL saturation after equilibrium, as compared to pure CT. Over time, CT likely volatilizes more rapidly than other components in the originally disposed mixtures and the lard oil and phosphates would become more concentrated in the remaining NAPL, resulting in a lower interfacial tension for the mixture. Spreading coefficients are expected to increase and perhaps change the equilibrated organic mixtures from nonspreading to spreading in water-wetting porous media. These results show that the behavior of organic

  13. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    DOE PAGES

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured propertiesmore » is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.« less

  14. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured properties is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.

  15. Investigation of optical and interfacial properties of Ag/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} metal dielectric multilayer structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, P. Jena, S.; Tokas, R. B.; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.; Rao, K. D.; Misal, J. S.; Prathap, C.

    2015-06-24

    One-dimensional periodic metal-dielectric multilayer thin film structures consisting of Ag and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} alternating layers are deposited on glass substrate using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The spectral property of the multilayers has been investigated using spectrophotometry technique. The optical parameters such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, band gap etc., along with film thickness as well as the interfacial layer properties which influence these properties have been probed with spectroscopic ellipsometry technique. Atomic force microscopy has been employed to characterize morphological properties of this metal-dielectric multilayer.

  16. A perspective on the interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George

    2012-11-01

    century by Gibbs and then promoted by Tolman) with a microscopic DFT treatment allows for a direct and unambiguous description of the interfacial properties of drops of arbitrary size; DFT provides all of the bulk and surface characteristics of the system that are required to uniquely define its thermodynamic properties. In this vein, we propose a non-local mean-field DFT for Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluids to examine drops of varying size. A comparison of the predictions of our DFT with recent simulation data based on a second-order fluctuation analysis (Sampayo et al 2010 J. Chem. Phys. 132 141101) reveals the consistency of the two treatments. This observation highlights the significance of fluctuation effects in small drops, which give rise to additional entropic (thermal non-mechanical) contributions, in contrast to what one observes in the case of planar interfaces which are governed by the laws of mechanical equilibrium. A small negative Tolman length (which is found to be about a tenth of the molecular diameter) and a non-monotonic behaviour of the surface tension with the drop radius are predicted for the LJ fluid. Finally, the limits of the validity of the Tolman approach, the effect of the range of the intermolecular potential, and the behaviour of bubbles are briefly discussed.

  17. Interfacial liquid water on Mars and its potential role in formation of hill and dune gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, Konrad J.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.

    2010-11-01

    Gullies are among the most intriguing structures identified on the surface of Mars. Most common are gullies located on the slopes of craters which are probably formed by liquid water transported by shallow aquifers (Heldmann, J.L., Carlsson, E., Johansson, H., Mellon, M.T., Toon, O.B. [2007]. Icarus 188, 324-344). Two particular types of gullies are found on slopes of isolated hills and dunes. The hill-slope gullies are located mostly at 50°S, which is at the high end of latitudes of bulk of the gullies found so far. The dune gullies are found in several locations up to 65°S (Reiss, D., Jaumann, R., Kereszturi, A., Sik, A., Neukum, G. [2007]. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXXVIII. Abstract 1993), but the best known are those in Russel crater at 54°S. The hill and dune gullies are longer than others making the aquifers explanation for their formation unlikely (Balme, M., Mangold, N., Baratoux, D., Costard, F., Gosselin, M., Masson, P., Pnet, P., Neukum, G. [2006]. J. Geophys. Res. 111. doi:10.1029/2005JE002607). Recently it has been noted that thin liquid films of interfacial water can play a role in rheological processes on the surface of Mars (Moehlmann, D. [2008]. Icarus 195, 131-139. Kereszturi, A., Moehlmann, D., Berczi, Sz., Ganti, T., Kuti, A., Sik, A., Horvath, A. [2009]. Icarus 201, 492-503.). Here we try to answer the question whether interfacial liquid water may occur on Mars in quantities large enough to play a role in formation of gullies. To verify this hypothesis we have calculated thermal models for hills and dunes of various steepness, orientation and physical properties. We find that within a range of average expected values of parameters it is not possible to have more than a few monolayers of liquid water at depths greater than a centimeter. To create subsurface interfacial water film significantly thicker and hence to produce conditions for the slope instability, parameters have to be chosen to have their extreme realistic values or an additional source

  18. Interface states of Ag/(110)GaAs Schottky diodes without and with interfacial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Platen, W.; Schmutzler, H.; Kohl, D.; Brauchle, K.; Wolter, K.

    1988-07-01

    GaAs(110) faces with different preparations: ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) cleaved, polished and etched, polished and sputtered: are prepared as Schottky diodes by the deposition of Ag. Diodes based on UHV-cleaved faces do show homogeneously distributed EL2 and EL5 states in deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). On polished and etched samples an additional interface state (IS) distribution with a density of 9 x 10/sup 11/ eV/sup -1/ cm/sup -2/ at the DLTS maximum appears. These states can be caused by defects at the oxidic interfacial layer. Polishing and sputtering also evokes the IS distribution. The absence of a DLTS signal from metal-induced gap states (MIGS) which pin the Fermi level at 0.49 eV above the valence-band maximum is related to the absence of an interfacial layer in the UHV prepared Schottky diodes. The sputter process increases the electron density in a thin layer below the interface by an As excess. The corresponding smaller extent of the barrier causes an additional electron emission via tunneling processes from the IS distribution. Furthermore, a near-interface state, EL6 (V/sub Ga/-V/sub As/), shows up. Its concentration at the interface attains N/sub EL6/ = 2.5 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ comparable to the shallow donor concentration.

  19. Interface states of Ag/(110)GaAs Schottky diodes without and with interfacial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platen, W.; Schmutzler, H.-J.; Kohl, D.; Brauchle, K.-A.; Wolter, K.

    1988-07-01

    GaAs(110) faces with different preparations—ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) cleaved, polished and etched, polished and sputtered—are prepared as Schottky diodes by the deposition of Ag. Diodes based on UHV-cleaved faces do show homogeneously distributed EL2 and EL5 states in deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). On polished and etched samples an additional interface state (IS) distribution with a density of 9×1011 eV-1 cm-2 at the DLTS maximum appears. These states can be caused by defects at the oxidic interfacial layer. Polishing and sputtering also evokes the IS distribution. The absence of a DLTS signal from metal-induced gap states (MIGS) which pin the Fermi level at 0.49 eV above the valence-band maximum is related to the absence of an interfacial layer in the UHV prepared Schottky diodes. The sputter process increases the electron density in a thin layer below the interface by an As excess. The corresponding smaller extent of the barrier causes an additional electron emission via tunneling processes from the IS distribution. Furthermore, a near-interface state, EL6 (VGa-VAs), shows up. Its concentration at the interface attains NEL6 =2.5×1016 cm-3 comparable to the shallow donor concentration.

  20. Recent progress in interfacial tissue engineering approaches for osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Hacking, S Adam; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-08-01

    This review provides a brief synopsis of the anatomy and physiology of the osteochondral interface, scaffold-based and non-scaffold based approaches for engineering both tissues independently as well as recent developments in the manufacture of gradient constructs. Novel manufacturing techniques and nanotechnology will be discussed with potential application in osteochondral interfacial tissue engineering. PMID:22677924

  1. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  2. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Modules for Probing Gold Nanoparticle Interfacial Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karunanayake, Akila G.; Gunatilake, Sameera R.; Ameer, Fathima S.; Gadogbe, Manuel; Smith, Laura; Mlsna, Deb; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Three gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) undergraduate experiment modules that are focused on nanoparticles interfacial phenomena have been developed. Modules 1 and 2 explore the synthesis and characterization of AuNPs of different sizes but with the same total gold mass. These experiments enable students to determine how particle size affects the AuNP…

  3. Interfacial tension measurements using MRI drop shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Vogt, S J; Honari, A; Hollingsworth, K G; Sederman, A J; Mitchell, J; Johns, M L

    2014-02-18

    Accurate interfacial tension data for fluid systems such as hydrocarbons and water is essential to many applications such as reservoir oil and gas recovery predictions. Conventional interfacial tension measurement techniques typically use optical images to analyze droplet shapes but require that the continuous-phase fluid be optically transparent and that the fluids are not refractive index matched. Magnetic resonance images obtain contrast between fluids using other mechanisms such as magnetic relaxation weighting, so systems that are impossible to measure with optical methods may be analyzed. In this article, we present high-field (9.4 T) MRI images of various droplets analyzed with axisymmetric drop shape analysis. The resultant interfacial tension data show good agreement with literature data. The method is subsequently demonstrated using both opaque continuous phases and refractive-index-matched fluids. We conclude with a brief consideration of the potential to extrapolate the methodology to lower magnetic fields (0.3 T), featuring more accessible hardware; although droplet imaging is possible, resolution and stability do not currently permit accurate interfacial tension measurements. PMID:24471906

  4. Measurement of interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.; Neilson, George F.; Baertlein, Carl; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion is given of a containerless microgravity experiment aimed at measuring the interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs using a compound drop rotation method. The reasons for the failure to execute such experiments in microgravity are described. Also, the results of post-flight analyses used to confirm our arguments are presented.

  5. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  6. Meter-long multiblock copolymer microfibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Han; Remy, Roddel A.; Deng, Fei; Mackay, Michael E.; Fox, Joseph M.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2015-01-01

    High molecular weight multiblock copolymers are synthesized as robust polymer fibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization employing the rapid cycloaddition of s-tetrazines with strained trans-cyclooctenes. When cell-adhesive peptide was incorporated in the tetrazine monomer, the resulting protein-mimetic polymer fibers provide guidance cues for cell attachment and elongation. PMID:25824805

  7. The Hydrophobic Effect in Solute Partitioning and Interfacial Tension

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the partitioning of hydrophobic solutes between water and nonpolar solvents provide estimates for the energy cost of creating hydrophobic-water contacts. This energy is a factor of three lower than the work of adhesion derived from interfacial tension measurements. This discrepancy noted by Tanford in 1979 is widely viewed as a serious challenge to our understanding of hydrophobic interactions. However, the interfacial energy of a water-alkane interface depends on chain length. A simple analysis of published data shows that the loss of rotational freedom of an alkane chain at an interface accounts quantitatively for the length-dependent contribution to interfacial tension, leaving a length-independent contribution very close to the free energy of transfer per unit of solvent accessible surface area. This analysis thus clarifies the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and interfacial tension measurements of hydrophobic interaction energy. Alkanes do not loose rotational freedom when transferred between two different liquid phases but they do at an interface. This reconciles the difference between microscopic and macroscopic measurements. Like the partitioning free energy, the work of adhesion also has a large entropy and small enthalpy at 20 oC. PMID:26813712

  8. Meter-long multiblock copolymer microfibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Han; Remy, Roddel A; Deng, Fei; Mackay, Michael E; Fox, Joseph M; Jia, Xinqiao

    2015-05-01

    High-molecular-weight multiblock copolymers are synthesized as robust polymer fibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization employing the rapid cycloaddition of s-tetrazines with strained trans-cyclooctenes. When cell-adhesive peptide is incorporated in the tetrazine monomer, the resulting protein-mimetic polymer fibers provide guidance cues for cell attachment and elongation.

  9. Interplay between Interfacial Structures and Device Performance in Organic Solar Cells: A Case Study with the Low Work Function Metal, Calcium.

    PubMed

    Ju, Huanxin; Knesting, Kristina M; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Xiao; Wang, Chia-Hsin; Yang, Yaw-Wen; Ginger, David S; Zhu, Junfa

    2016-01-27

    A better understanding of how interfacial structure affects charge carrier recombination would benefit the development of highly efficient organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In this paper, transient photovoltage (TPV) and charge extraction (CE) measurements are used in combination with synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES) to gain insight into the correlation between interfacial properties and device performance. OPV devices based on PCDTBT/PC71BM with a Ca interlayer were studied as a reference system to investigate the interfacial effects on device performance. Devices with a Ca interlayer exhibit a lower recombination than devices with only an Al cathode at a given charge carrier density (n). In addition, the interfacial band structures indicate that the strong dipole moment produced by the Ca interlayer can facilitate the extraction of electrons and drive holes away from the cathode/polymer interface, resulting in beneficial reduction in interfacial recombination losses. These results help explain the higher efficiencies of devices made with Ca interlayers compared to that without the Ca interlayer. PMID:26716763

  10. Studies on the disbonding initiation of interfacial cracks.

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, Brian J.; Pearson, Raymond A.

    2005-08-01

    With the continuing trend of decreasing feature sizes in flip-chip assemblies, the reliability tolerance to interfacial flaws is also decreasing. Small-scale disbonds will become more of a concern, pointing to the need for a better understanding of the initiation stage of interfacial delamination. With most accepted adhesion metric methodologies tailored to predict failure under the prior existence of a disbond, the study of the initiation phenomenon is open to development and standardization of new testing procedures. Traditional fracture mechanics approaches are not suitable, as the mathematics assume failure to originate at a disbond or crack tip. Disbond initiation is believed to first occur at free edges and corners, which act as high stress concentration sites and exhibit singular stresses similar to a crack tip, though less severe in intensity. As such, a 'fracture mechanics-like' approach may be employed which defines a material parameter--a critical stress intensity factor (K{sub c})--that can be used to predict when initiation of a disbond at an interface will occur. The factors affecting the adhesion of underfill/polyimide interfaces relevant to flip-chip assemblies were investigated in this study. The study consisted of two distinct parts: a comparison of the initiation and propagation phenomena and a comparison of the relationship between sub-critical and critical initiation of interfacial failure. The initiation of underfill interfacial failure was studied by characterizing failure at a free-edge with a critical stress intensity factor. In comparison with the interfacial fracture toughness testing, it was shown that a good correlation exists between the initiation and propagation of interfacial failures. Such a correlation justifies the continuing use of fracture mechanics to predict the reliability of flip-chip packages. The second aspect of the research involved fatigue testing of tensile butt joint specimens to determine lifetimes at sub

  11. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  12. Glycosaminoglycan degradation reduces mineralized tissue-titanium interfacial strength.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiromi; Shim, Jaewoo; Butz, Frank; Aita, Hideki; Gupta, Vijay; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2006-06-01

    Although the localization of the proteoglycan/glycosaminoglycan (GAG) complex at the bone-titanium implant interface has been implied, the role of proteoglycans on the establishment of bone-titanium integration is unknown. The hypothesis to be tested was that proteoglycans play an important role in establishing bone-titanium interfacial adhesion. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of proteoglycan knockdown by GAG enzymatic degradation on the interfacial strength between mineralized tissue and titanium having different surface topographies. Rat bone marrow-derived osteoblastic cells were cultured on either a machined titanium disk or an acid-etched titanium disk. At day 21 of culture, one of the three following GAG degradation enzymes was added into the culture; chondroitinase AC, chondroitinase B, or keratanase. After 3 days of incubation (at day 24 of culture), the laser spallation technique was applied to the samples in order to assess the tissue-titanium interfacial strength. In this technique, a laser-generated stress wave is used to separate the tissue-titanium interface, and the interfacial strength is determined interferometrically by recording the transient free surface velocity of the tissue. Mineralized tissue cultured on the acid-etched titanium showed 20-30% higher tissue interfacial strength than that cultured on the machined titanium (p < 0.0001). For both the machined and acid-etched surface cultures, administration of the enzyme reduced the interfacial strength by 25-30% compared with the untreated control cultures (p < 0.0001). There were no differences in the effect among the three different enzymes tested. A nanoindentation study revealed that the enzyme treatment did not affect the elastic modulus of the mineralized tissue. Scanning electron microscopic and energy dispersive spectroscopic analyses revealed less post-spallation tissue remnant on the titanium substrates when treated with the enzymes. The tissue remnant was

  13. "a" interfacial parameter in Nicolais-Narkis model for yield strength of polymer particulate nanocomposites as a function of material and interphase properties.

    PubMed

    Zare, Yasser

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, "a" interfacial parameter in Nicolais-Narkis model is expressed by thickness "ri" and strength "σi" of interphase between polymer and nanoparticles as well as material properties. "a" parameter is connected to "B1" interfacial parameter in modified Pukanszky model and the effects of "ri" and "σi" on "a" are explained. The negligible difference between "a" values calculated by fitting the experimental results to Nicolais-Narkis model and also, by "B1" results confirms the accurateness of the suggested relation between "a" and "B1" parameters. Additionally, an inverse relation is found between "a" and "B1" parameters for nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the slight levels of "ri" and "σi" data give a large value of "a" which indicates the poor interfacial adhesion.

  14. Interfacial toughness of bilayer dental ceramics based on a short-bar, chevron-notch test

    PubMed Central

    Anunmana, Chuchai; Anusavice, Kenneth J.; Mecholsky, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to test the null hypothesis that the interfacial toughness of each of two types of bonded core-veneer bilayer ceramics is not significantly different from the apparent fracture toughness of the control monolithic glass veneer. Methods T-shaped short bars of a lithia-disilicate glass-ceramic core (LC) and yttria-stabilized polycrystalline zirconia core ceramic (ZC) were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendations. V-shaped notches were prepared by using 25-μm-thick palladium foil, leaving the chevron notch area exposed, and the bars were veneered with a thermally compatible glass veneer (LC/GV and ZC/GV). Additionally, we also bonded the glass veneer to itself as a control group (GV/GV). Specimens were kept in distilled water for 30 days before testing in tension. Eight glass veneer bars were prepared for the analysis of fracture toughness test using the indentation-strength technique. Results The mean interfacial toughness of the LC/GV group was 0.69 [0.11] MPa·m1/2, and did not significantly differ from that of the GV/GV control group, 0.74 (0.17) MPa·m1/2 (p > 0.05). However, the difference between the mean interfacial toughness of the ZC/GV group, 0.13 (0.07) MPa·m1/2, and the LC/GV and the GV/GV groups was statistically significant (p<0.05). Significance For bilayer all-ceramic restorations with high-strength core materials, the veneering ceramics are the weakest link in the design of the structure. Since all-ceramic restorations often fail from chipping of veneer layers or crack initiation at the interface, the protective effects of thermal mismatch stresses oral prosthesis design should be investigated. PMID:19818486

  15. Exploring interfacial ferromagnetism in manganite-based superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Di; Flint, Charles; Suzuki, Yuri

    Heterointerface of complex oxides provides a rich playground to explore the emergent phenomena that are not found in bulk. In particular, emergent interfacial ferromagnetism has been successfully demonstrated in heterostructures composed of materials which are paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic in bulk. In our previous work, leakage of itinerant electrons from a paramagnetic metal to an antiferromagnetic insulator has been shown to give rise to interfacial ferromagnetism in CaMnO3 based superlattices. However interfacial ferromagnetism in insulating superlattices suggests a more complicated scenario. Therefore a thorough investigation of coupling between charge, lattice and spin degrees of freedom is necessary. In this talk, we focus on the NdNiO3 /CaMnO3 system. By choosing a paramagnetic layer that undergoes a metal-insulator transition, we can explore the role of electron itinerancy in interfacial ferromagnetism in the same sample to eliminate the inconsistencies that may originate from the deposition of multiple samples. We demonstrate that NdNiO3 exhibits a metal-insulator transition as a function of temperature, which can be tuned as a function of film thickness. We have also grown NdNiO3 /CaMnO3 heterostructures with excellent crystallinity. Preliminary transport measurements indicate that the presence of an adjacent CaMnO3 layer also affects the transport in NdNiO3 so that charge transfer from the itinerant layer into the adjacent antiferromagnetic insulating CaMnO3 is likely not the only contribution to interfacial ferromagnetism.

  16. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  17. Water-in-model oil emulsions studied by small-angle neutron scattering: interfacial film thickness and composition.

    PubMed

    Verruto, Vincent J; Kilpatrick, Peter K

    2008-11-18

    The ever-increasing worldwide demand for energy has led to the upgrading of heavy crude oil and asphaltene-rich feedstocks becoming viable refining options for the petroleum industry. Traditional problems associated with these feedstocks, particularly stable water-in-petroleum emulsions, are drawing increasing attention. Despite considerable research on the interfacial assembly of asphaltenes, resins, and naphthenic acids, much about the resulting interfacial films is not well understood. Here, we describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate interfacial film properties from model emulsion systems. Modeling the SANS data with both a polydisperse core/shell form factor as well as a thin sheet approximation, we have deduced the film thickness and the asphaltenic composition within the stabilizing interfacial films of water-in-model oil emulsions prepared in toluene, decalin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. Film thicknesses were found to be 100-110 A with little deviation among the three solvents. By contrast, asphaltene composition in the film varied significantly, with decalin leading to the most asphaltene-rich films (30% by volume of the film), while emulsions made in toluene and methylnaphthalene resulted in lower asphaltenic contents (12-15%). Through centrifugation and dilatational rheology, we found that trends of decreasing water resolution (i.e., increasing emulsion stability) and increasing long-time dilatational elasticity corresponded with increasing asphaltene composition in the film. In addition to the asphaltenic composition of the films, here we also deduce the film solvent and water content. Our analyses indicate that 1:1 (O/W) emulsions prepared with 3% (w/w) asphaltenes in toluene and 1 wt % NaCl aqueous solutions at pH 7 and pH 10 resulted in 80-90 A thick films, interfacial areas around 2600-3100 cm (2)/mL, and films that were roughly 25% (v/v) asphaltenic, 60-70% toluene, and 8-12% water. The increased asphaltene and water film

  18. Performance of different force fields in force probe simulations.

    PubMed

    Schlesier, Thomas; Diezemann, Gregor

    2013-02-14

    We present detailed force probe molecular dynamic simulations of mechanically interlocked dimeric calix[4]arene-catenanes, comparing the results obtained using three different commonly used force fields (GROMOS G53a5, OPLS-AA, and AMBER GAFF). The model system is well characterized as a two-state system consisting of a closed compact and an elongated structure. Both states are stabilized by a different hydrogen-bond network, and complete separation of the dimer is prevented by the mechanical lock of the entangled aliphatic loops. The system shows fully reversible rebinding meaning that after bond rupture the system rejoins when the external force is relaxed. We present a detailed study of quantities determined in simulations using a force ramp, like the rupture force and rejoin force distributions. Additionally, we analyze the dynamics of the hydrogen-bond network. We find that the results obtained from using the different force fields qualitatively agree in the sense that always the fully reversible behavior is found. The details, like the mean rupture forces, however, do depend on the particular force field. Some of the differences observed can be traced back to differences in the strength of the hydrogen-bond networks.

  19. A Pore Network Model Evaluation of the Types of Fluid/Fluid Interfacial Area Measured by Static and Dynamic Water-Phase Tracer Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibbey, T. C.; Chen, L.

    2010-12-01

    Tracer methods have gained acceptance for measuring fluid/fluid interfacial areas in porous media, and have been applied in both laboratory and field settings. Tracer methods make use of chemicals (typically surfactants or other surface-active chemicals) which adsorb to fluid/fluid interfaces, leading to changes (retardation of transport, depletion of solution concentration, or mobilization of fluid) which can be used to calculate the amount of interfacial area. Advantages of tracer methods include that they are inexpensive to use, don’t require specialized equipment, and can potentially be applied in field settings. The primary disadvantages include uncertainty about the types of interfacial area measured, and questions about whether the tracers themselves produce interfacial area changes. Interfacial areas in porous media containing multiple fluids are often categorized as capillary area (area corresponding to fluids held by capillary forces) and film area (area corresponding to molecular films of the wetting phase on porous medium surfaces). Total area is a measure of area that includes both capillary and film area. The focus of this work was on examining the types of interfacial area measured by both static and dynamic water-phase advective transport tracer methods. Static advective transport methods were introduced in the late 1990s (e.g., Kim et al., Water Resour. Res., 1997, 33, 2705-2711), and involve measuring the retardation of a tracer passed through a porous medium maintained at a preset degree of saturation (interfaces are presumed to be static). Dynamic advective transport methods were introduced in 2006 (Chen and Kibbey, Langmuir, 2006, 22, 6874-6880), and involve measuring depletion of tracer during drainage from a specially-constructed low volume soil cell. As new interfacial area is formed during drainage, tracer adsorbs to the interface, depleting the bulk solution; mass balance calculations are used to determine interfacial area as a function

  20. New insights into the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in thin film solar cells: Formation and properties of the MoSe2 interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkert, T.; Theys, B.; Patriarche, G.; Jubault, M.; Donsanti, F.; Guillemoles, J.-F.; Lincot, D.

    2016-10-01

    Being at the origin of an ohmic contact, the MoSe2 interfacial layer at the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and related compounds) based solar cells has allowed for very high light-to-electricity conversion efficiencies up to 22.3%. This article gives new insights into the formation and the structural properties of this interfacial layer. Different selenization-steps of a Mo covered glass substrate prior to the CIGS deposition by co-evaporation led to MoSe2 interfacial layers with varying thickness and orientation, as observed by x-ray diffraction and atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. A novel model based on the anisotropy of the Se diffusion coefficient in MoSe2 is proposed to explain the results. While the series resistance of finished CIGS solar cells is found to correlate with the MoSe2 orientation, the adhesion forces between the CIGS absorber layer and the Mo substrate stay constant. Their counter-intuitive non-correlation with the configuration of the MoSe2 interfacial layer is discussed and related to work from the literature.