Science.gov

Sample records for additional iop reduction

  1. Ocular Dorzolamide Nanoliposomes for Prolonged IOP Reduction: in-vitroand in-vivo Evaluation in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kouchak, Maryam; Bahmandar, Reza; Bavarsad, Neda; Farrahi, Fereydoun

    2016-01-01

    Dorzolamide ophthalmic drop is one of the most common glaucoma medications but it has a short residence time in the eye. The aim of this study is to develop ocular dorzolamide HCl nanoliposomes (DRZ – nanoliposomes) and to evaluate their potential use for the treatment of ocular hypertension. Nanoliposomes were prepared using Reverse-phase evaporation vesicle (REV) and thin layer hydration (TLH) method with 7:3 and 7:4 molar ratios of phosphatidylcholine:cholesterol. The physicochemical properties of the formulations were investigated. Formulations with 7:4 lipid ratios were evaluated in terms of drug release, physical stability and ex-vivo permeation through the excised albino rabbit cornea. The rabbits in groups of 6 were treated with selected DRZ – nanoliposomes or dorzolamide solution or marketed dorzolamid preparation (Biosopt®) and intraocular pressure (IOP) was monitored. Formulations with 7:4 molar ratio entrapped greater amount of drug compared to those with 7:3 lipid components ratio. DRZ – nanoliposomes with 7:4 lipid ratio showed more transcorneal permeation than Dorzolamide solution (p<0.05); and the formulation prepared by TLH method exhibited higher permeability than that prepared by REV method (p<0.05). The selected DRZ – nanoliposomes showed greater IOP lowering activity and a more prolonged effect compared to dorzolamide solution and Biosopt®. DRZ – nanoliposomes prepared by TLH method with 7:4 ratios showed promising results as a candidate for the treatment of ocular hypertension. PMID:27610160

  2. Ocular Dorzolamide Nanoliposomes for Prolonged IOP Reduction: in-vitroand in-vivo Evaluation in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kouchak, Maryam; Bahmandar, Reza; Bavarsad, Neda; Farrahi, Fereydoun

    2016-01-01

    Dorzolamide ophthalmic drop is one of the most common glaucoma medications but it has a short residence time in the eye. The aim of this study is to develop ocular dorzolamide HCl nanoliposomes (DRZ - nanoliposomes) and to evaluate their potential use for the treatment of ocular hypertension. Nanoliposomes were prepared using Reverse-phase evaporation vesicle (REV) and thin layer hydration (TLH) method with 7:3 and 7:4 molar ratios of phosphatidylcholine:cholesterol. The physicochemical properties of the formulations were investigated. Formulations with 7:4 lipid ratios were evaluated in terms of drug release, physical stability and ex-vivo permeation through the excised albino rabbit cornea. The rabbits in groups of 6 were treated with selected DRZ - nanoliposomes or dorzolamide solution or marketed dorzolamid preparation (Biosopt®) and intraocular pressure (IOP) was monitored. Formulations with 7:4 molar ratio entrapped greater amount of drug compared to those with 7:3 lipid components ratio. DRZ - nanoliposomes with 7:4 lipid ratio showed more transcorneal permeation than Dorzolamide solution (p<0.05); and the formulation prepared by TLH method exhibited higher permeability than that prepared by REV method (p<0.05). The selected DRZ - nanoliposomes showed greater IOP lowering activity and a more prolonged effect compared to dorzolamide solution and Biosopt®. DRZ - nanoliposomes prepared by TLH method with 7:4 ratios showed promising results as a candidate for the treatment of ocular hypertension. PMID:27610160

  3. Coarsened Exact Matching of Phaco-Trabectome to Trabectome in Phakic Patients: Lack of Additional Pressure Reduction from Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Hardik A.; Bussel, Igor I.; Schuman, Joel S.; Brown, Eric N.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) after trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomy surgery in phakic patients (T) and trabectome with same session phacoemulsification (PT) using Coarsened Exact Matching. Although phacoemulsification is associated with IOP reduction when performed on its own, it is not known how much it contributes in PT. Methods Subjects were divided into phakic T and PT. Exclusion criteria were follow-up for <12 months and additional glaucoma surgery. Demographics were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared test for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Multiple imputation was utilized to avoid eliminating data with missing values. Groups were then matched using Coarsened Exact Matching based on age, race, type of glaucoma, baseline IOP, and number of preoperative glaucoma medications. Univariate linear regression was used to examine IOP reduction after surgery; those variables that were statistically significant were included in the final multivariate regression model. Results A total of 753 cases were included (T: 255, PT: 498). When all variables except for age were kept constant, there was an additional IOP reduction of 0.05±0.01 mmHg conferred for every yearly increment in age. Every 1 mmHg increase in baseline IOP correlated to an additional IOP reduction of 0.80±0.02 mmHg. Phacoemulsification was not found to be a statistically significant contributor to IOP when comparing T and PT (p≥0.05). T had a 21% IOP reduction to 15.9±3.5 mmHg (p<0.01) while PT had an 18% reduction to 15.5±3.6 mmHg (p<0.01). Number of medications decreased (p<0.01) in both groups from 2.4±1.2 to 1.9±1.3 and from 2.3±1.1 to 1.7±1.3, respectively. Conclusion Phacoemulsification does not make a significant contribution to postoperative IOP or number of medications when combined with trabectome surgery in phakic patients. PMID:26895293

  4. Sufficient dimension reduction with additional information.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hung; Liu, Chih-Yen; Horng-Shing Lu, Henry

    2016-07-01

    Sufficient dimension reduction is widely applied to help model building between the response [Formula: see text] and covariate [Formula: see text] In some situations, we also collect additional covariate [Formula: see text] that has better performance in predicting [Formula: see text], but has a higher obtaining cost, than [Formula: see text] While constructing a predictive model for [Formula: see text] based on [Formula: see text] is straightforward, this strategy is not applicable since [Formula: see text] is not available for future observations in which the constructed model is to be applied. As a result, the aim of the study is to build a predictive model for [Formula: see text] based on [Formula: see text] only, where the available data is [Formula: see text] A naive method is to conduct analysis using [Formula: see text] directly, but ignoring [Formula: see text] can cause the problem of inefficiency. On the other hand, it is not trivial to utilize the information of [Formula: see text] to infer [Formula: see text], either. In this article, we propose a two-stage dimension reduction method for [Formula: see text] that is able to utilize the information of [Formula: see text] In the breast cancer data, the risk score constructed from the two-stage method can well separate patients with different survival experiences. In the Pima data, the two-stage method requires fewer components to infer the diabetes status, while achieving higher classification accuracy than the conventional method. PMID:26704765

  5. Detecting IOP Fluctuations in Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nuyen, Brenda; Mansouri, Kaweh

    2016-01-01

    Lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the guiding principle of glaucoma management. Although IOP is the only treatable risk factor, its 24-hour behavior is poorly understood. Current glaucoma management usually relies on single IOP measurements during clinic hours, even though IOP is a dynamic parameter with rhythms dependent on individual patients. It has further been shown that most glaucoma patients have their highest IOP measurements outside clinic hours. The fact that these IOP peaks go largely undetected may explain why certain patients progress in their disease despite treatment. Nevertheless, single IOP measurements have determined all major clinical guidelines regarding glaucoma treatment. Other potentially informative parameters, such as fluctuations in IOP and peak IOP, have been neglected, and effects of IOP-lowering interventions on such measures are largely unknown. Continuous 24-hour IOP monitoring has been an interest for more than 50 years, but only recent technological advances have provided clinicians with a device for such an endeavor. This review discusses current uses and shortcomings of current measurement techniques, and provides an overview on current and future methods for 24-hour IOP assessment. It may be possible to incorporate continuous IOP monitoring into clinical practice, potentially to reduce glaucoma-related vision loss. PMID:27014387

  6. Detecting IOP Fluctuations in Glaucoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Nuyen, Brenda; Mansouri, Kaweh

    2016-01-01

    Lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the guiding principle of glaucoma management. Although IOP is the only treatable risk factor, its 24-hour behavior is poorly understood. Current glaucoma management usually relies on single IOP measurements during clinic hours, even though IOP is a dynamic parameter with rhythms dependent on individual patients. It has further been shown that most glaucoma patients have their highest IOP measurements outside clinic hours. The fact that these IOP peaks go largely undetected may explain why certain patients progress in their disease despite treatment. Nevertheless, single IOP measurements have determined all major clinical guidelines regarding glaucoma treatment. Other potentially informative parameters, such as fluctuations in IOP and peak IOP, have been neglected, and effects of IOP-lowering interventions on such measures are largely unknown. Continuous 24-hour IOP monitoring has been an interest for more than 50 years, but only recent technological advances have provided clinicians with a device for such an endeavor. This review discusses current uses and shortcomings of current measurement techniques, and provides an overview on current and future methods for 24-hour IOP assessment. It may be possible to incorporate continuous IOP monitoring into clinical practice, potentially to reduce glaucoma-related vision loss. PMID:27014387

  7. Glaucoma Surgery Calculator: Limited Additive Effect of Phacoemulsification on Intraocular Pressure in Ab Interno Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schuman, Joel S.; Brown, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction and to develop a predictive surgery calculator based on the results between trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomy in pseudophakic patients versus phacoemulsification combined with trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomy in phakic patients. Methods This observational surgical cohort study analyzed pseudophakic patients who received trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomy (AIT) or phacoemulsification combined with AIT (phaco-AIT). Follow up for less than 12 months or neovascular glaucoma led to exclusion. Missing data was imputed by generating 5 similar but non-identical datasets. Groups were matched using Coarsened Exact Matching based on age, gender, type of glaucoma, race, preoperative number of glaucoma medications and baseline intraocular pressure (IOP). Linear regression was used to examine the outcome measures consisting of IOP and medications. Results Of 949 cases, 587 were included consisting of 235 AIT and 352 phaco-AIT. Baseline IOP between groups was statistically significant (p≤0.01) in linear regression models and was minimized after Coarsened Exact Matching. An increment of 1 mmHg in baseline IOP was associated with a 0.73±0.03 mmHg IOP reduction. Phaco-AIT had an IOP reduction that was only 0.73±0.32 mmHg greater than that of AIT. The resulting calculator to determine IOP reduction consisted of the formula -13.54+0.73 × (phacoemulsification yes:1, no:0) + 0.73 × (baseline IOP) + 0.59 × (secondary open angle glaucoma yes:1, no:0) + 0.03 × (age) + 0.09 × (medications). Conclusions This predictive calculator for minimally invasive glaucoma surgery can assist clinical decision making. Only a small additional IOP reduction was observed when phacoemulsification was added to AIT. Patients with a higher baseline IOP had a greater IOP reduction. PMID:27077914

  8. Reduction of Additive Colored Noise Using Coupled Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F.; Ditto, William L.

    We study the effect of additive colored noise on the evolution of maps and demonstrate that the deviations caused by such noise can be reduced using coupled dynamics. We consider both Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as well as 1/fα noise in our numerical simulations. We observe that though the variance of deviations caused by noise depends on the correlations in the noise, under optimal coupling strength, it decreases by a factor equal to the number of coupled elements in the array as compared to the variance of deviations in a single isolated map. This reduction in noise levels occurs in chaotic as well as periodic regime of the maps. Lastly, we examine the effect of colored noise in chaos computing and find that coupling the chaos computing elements enhances the robustness of chaos computing.

  9. Use of additive dentistry decreases risk by minimizing reduction.

    PubMed

    Palmer, K Michael

    2012-05-01

    This case required enhancement of esthetics and reduction of long-term risk of pathologic tooth wear and decay, as well as minimizing erosion caused by innate and environmental influences. The author weighed patient expectations, diet, treatment of teeth, and age to create a treatment plan that would conserve tooth structure while accomplishing the goals of the case. The patient's dentition was restored utilizing intact enamel, adhesive dentistry, and etchable ceramic materials that require less than 1 mm of occlusal reduction without a significant loss of strength. In this case, opening the vertical dimension of occlusion--which was done to increase the height of both the maxillary and mandibular arches, in keeping with the patient's esthetic desires--eliminated the need to remove excessive amounts of healthy tooth structure and facilitated treatment of the occlusal dysfunction. PMID:22616217

  10. 20 CFR 606.25 - Waiver of and substitution for additional tax credit reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... credit reduction. 606.25 Section 606.25 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... SOCIAL SECURITY ACT Relief From Tax Credit Reduction § 606.25 Waiver of and substitution for additional tax credit reduction. A provision of subsection (c)(2) of section 3302 of FUTA provides that, for...

  11. The effects of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction in a SNCR process.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiangtao; Yu, Wei; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Yufei; Zhu, Xiuming

    2015-03-01

    An experimental study of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction during the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process were carried out in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The effects of reaction temperature (Tr), water vapor, Na/K additives (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3) and flyash characteristics on NO reduction were analyzed. The results indicated that NO removal efficiency shows a pattern of increasing first and decreasing later with the increase of the temperature at Tr=850-1150°C. Water vapor can improve the performance of NO reduction, and the NO reduction of 70.5% was obtained while the flue gas containing 4% water vapor at 950°C. Na/K additives have a significant promoting effect on NO reduction and widen the SNCR temperature window, the promoting effect of the test additives is ordered as Na2CO3>KCl>NaCl. NO removal efficiency with 125ppm Na2CO3 and 4% water vapor can reach up to 84.9% at the optimal reaction temperature. The additive concentration has no significant effects on NO reduction while its concentration is above 50ppm. Addition of circulating fluidized combustion (CFB) flyash deteriorates NO reduction significantly. However, CFB flyash and Na/K additives will get a coupling effect on NO reduction during the SNCR process, and the best NO reduction can reach 72.3% while feeding Na2CO3-impregnated CFB flyash at 125ppm Na2CO3 and Tr=950°C. PMID:25532766

  12. DBA/2J Mice Are Susceptible to Diabetic Nephropathy and Diabetic Exacerbation of IOP Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana; Howell, Gareth R.; John, Cai W.; Kief, Joseph L.; Libby, Richard T.; John, Simon W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Some pathological manifestations of diabetes in the eye include retinopathy, cataracts and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in non-proliferative stages of diabetic retinopathy and small increases in IOP in diabetic patients has raised the possibility that diabetes affects the development and progression of ocular hypertension and glaucoma. The Ins2Akita mutation is known to cause diabetes and retinopathy on a C57BL/6J (B6) background by as early as 3 months of age. Here, the impact of the Akita mutation on glaucoma was assessed using DBA/2J (D2) mice, a widely used mouse model of ocular hypertension induced glaucoma. In D2.Ins2Akita/+ mice, the contribution of diabetes to vascular permeability, IOP elevation, RGC loss, and glaucoma development was assessed. D2.Ins2Akita/+ mice developed a severe diabetic nephropathy and early mortality between 6–8 months of age. This agrees with previous reports showing that the D2 background is more susceptible to diabetes than the B6 background. In addition, D2.Ins2Akita/+ mice had vascular leakage, astrocyte reactivity and a significant increase in IOP. However no RGC loss and no anterograde axonal transport dysfunction were found at 8.5 months of age. Therefore, our data show that despite severe diabetes and an increased IOP compared to controls, RGCs do not lose axon transport or degenerate. This may be due to a DBA/2J-specific genetic modifier(s) that could provide novel and important avenues for developing new therapies for diabetic retinopathy and possibly glaucoma. PMID:25207540

  13. Objective analysis of the ARM IOP data: method and sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cedarwall, R; Lin, J L; Xie, S C; Yio, J J; Zhang, M H

    1999-04-01

    Motivated by the need of to obtain accurate objective analysis of field experimental data to force physical parameterizations in numerical models, this paper -first reviews the existing objective analysis methods and interpolation schemes that are used to derive atmospheric wind divergence, vertical velocity, and advective tendencies. Advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. It is shown that considerable uncertainties in the analyzed products can result from the use of different analysis schemes and even more from different implementations of a particular scheme. The paper then describes a hybrid approach to combine the strengths of the regular grid method and the line-integral method, together with a variational constraining procedure for the analysis of field experimental data. In addition to the use of upper air data, measurements at the surface and at the top-of-the-atmosphere are used to constrain the upper air analysis to conserve column-integrated mass, water, energy, and momentum. Analyses are shown for measurements taken in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Programs (ARM) July 1995 Intensive Observational Period (IOP). Sensitivity experiments are carried out to test the robustness of the analyzed data and to reveal the uncertainties in the analysis. It is shown that the variational constraining process significantly reduces the sensitivity of the final data products.

  14. Turbulent Flow Enhancement by Polyelectrolyte Additives: Mechanistic Implications for Drag Reduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagger, David Leonard

    1992-01-01

    The drag reduction phenomenon was experimentally studied in two pipes, of diameters 1.46 and 1.02 cm, using seven polyelectrolytic HPAM additives, with molecular weights from 1 to 20 times 10^6 g/mole and degree of backbone hydrolysis from 8 to 60%, at concentrations from 1 to 1000 wppm, in saline solutions containing from 0.3 to 0.00001 N NaCl. Both laminar and turbulent flow behavior were greatly influenced by salinity-induced changes in the initial conformation of the HPAM additives. Initially collapsed, random-coiling conformations exhibited Newtonian laminar flow and Type-A turbulent drag reduction, while initially extended conformations exhibited shear-thinning in laminar flow and Type-B turbulent drag reduction. The gross-flow physics of Type-B drag reduction were delineated. A characteristic "ladder" structure prevailed, with polymeric regime segments that were roughly parallel to, but shifted upward from, the Prandtl-Karman line. In the polymeric regime, both Type-A fan and Type -B ladder structures were essentially independent of pipe diameter, and were scaled by the wall shear stress. The wall shear stress also scaled degradation during drag reduction. New onset and slope increment correlations were presented for Type-A drag reduction by HPAM additives. In Type-B drag reduction, flow enhancement was found proportional to additive concentration, and the intrinsic slip, Sigma = S^'/(c/M _{rm w}), varied roughly as the third power of backbone chain links N_ {rm bb}. New intrinsic slip and retro-onset correlations were presented for Type-B drag reduction by HPAM additives. Analysis of Type-B literature revealed a wide range of additive efficacies, with specific slips S^'/c from 0.0001 to 4. For the most effective additives, HPAM and asbestos fibers, the additive-pervaded volume fraction per unit flow enhancement, X_{rm v} /S^' ~ 3000, implied that these additives align during drag reduction. The slip ratio R_{rm sc}, which is the relative flow enhancement

  15. Four-point function in the IOP matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ben; Polchinski, Joseph; Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Suh, S. Josephine

    2016-05-01

    The IOP model is a quantum mechanical system of a large- N matrix oscillator and a fundamental oscillator, coupled through a quartic interaction. It was introduced previously as a toy model of the gauge dual of an AdS black hole, and captures a key property that at infinite N the two-point function decays to zero on long time scales. Motivated by recent work on quantum chaos, we sum all planar Feynman diagrams contributing to the four-point function. We find that the IOP model does not satisfy the more refined criteria of exponential growth of the out-of-time-order four-point function.

  16. Reduction of ammonia emission by shallow slurry injection: injection efficiency and additional energy demand.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Martin N; Sommer, Sven G; Madsen, Niels P

    2003-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emission from livestock production causes undesirable environmental effects and a loss of plant-available nitrogen. Much atmospheric NH3 is lost from livestock manure applied in the field. The NH3 emission may be reduced by slurry injection, but slurry injection in general, and especially on grassland, increases the energy demand and places heavy demands on the slurry injection techniques used. The reduction in NH3 emission, injection efficiency, and energy demand of six different shallow slurry-injection techniques was examined. The NH3 emission from cattle slurry applied to grassland was reduced by all the injectors tested in the study, but there were major differences in the NH3 reduction potential of the different types of injectors. Compared with the trailing hose spreading technique, the NH3 loss was reduced by 75% when cattle slurry was injected using the most efficient slurry injection technique, and by 20% when incorporated by the least efficient injection technique. The reduction in NH3 emission was correlated with injection depth and the volume of the slot created. The additional energy demand for reducing ammonia emissions by slurry injection was approximately 13 000 kJ ha(-1) for a 20% reduction and 34 000 kJ ha(-1) for a 75% reduction. The additional energy demand corresponds to additional emissions of, respectively, 5.6 and 14.5 kg CO2 per ha injected. PMID:12809311

  17. 20 CFR 606.25 - Waiver of and substitution for additional tax credit reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Waiver of and substitution for additional tax credit reduction. 606.25 Section 606.25 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... compensation system as determined for the purposes of §§ 606.20(a)(2) and 606.21(b)....

  18. 20 CFR 410.535 - Reductions; effect of an additional claim for benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reductions; effect of an additional claim for benefits. 410.535 Section 410.535 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits §...

  19. 20 CFR 410.535 - Reductions; effect of an additional claim for benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reductions; effect of an additional claim for benefits. 410.535 Section 410.535 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits §...

  20. 33 CFR 151.2050 - Additional requirements-nonindigenous species reduction practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Additional requirements-nonindigenous species reduction practices. 151.2050 Section 151.2050 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION VESSELS CARRYING OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, GARBAGE, MUNICIPAL OR COMMERCIAL...

  1. Free energy calculation of water addition coupled to reduction of aqueous RuO4-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Blumberger, Jochen; Ohno, Takahisa; Sprik, Michiel

    2007-05-01

    Free energy calculations were carried out for water addition coupled reduction of aqueous ruthenate, RuO4-+H2O +e-→[RuO3(OH)2]2-, using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The full reaction is divided into the reduction of the tetrahedral monoanion, RuO4-+e-→RuO42-, followed by water addition, RuO42-+H2O →[RuO3(OH)2]2-. The free energy of reduction is computed from the fluctuations of the vertical energy gap using the MnO4-+e -→MnO42- reaction as reference. The free energy for water addition is estimated using constrained molecular dynamics methods. While the description of this complex reaction, in principle, involves multiple reaction coordinates, we found that reversible transformation of the reactant into the product can be achieved by control of a single reaction coordinate consisting of a suitable linear combination of atomic distances. The free energy difference of the full reaction is computed to be -0.62eV relative to the normal hydrogen electrode. This is in good agreement with the experimental value of -0.59eV, lending further support to the hypothesis that, contrary to the ruthenate monoanion, the dianion is not tetrahedral but forms a trigonal-bipyramidal dihydroxo complex in aqueous solution. We construct an approximate two-dimensional free energy surface using the coupling parameter for reduction and the mechanical constraint for water addition as variables. Analyzing this surface we find that in the most favorable reaction pathway the reduction reaction precedes water addition. The latter takes place via the protonated complex [RuO3(OH)]- and subsequent transport of the created hydroxide ion to the fifth coordination site of Ru.

  2. Oxidation and Reduction of Sulfite by Chloroplasts and Formation of Sulfite Addition Compounds 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Andreas P. M.; Pfanz, Hardy; Heber, Ulrich

    1992-01-01

    After exposing intact chloroplasts isolated from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv Yates) and capable of photoreducing CO2 at high rates to different concentrations of radioactive sulfite in the light or in the dark, 35SO2 and H235S were removed from the acidified suspensions in a stream of nitrogen. Remaining activity could be fractionated into sulfate, organic sulfides, and sulfite addition compounds. When chloroplast suspensions contained catalase, superoxide dismutase and O-acetylserine, the oxidation of sulfite to sulfate was slower in the light than the reductive formation of sulfides that exhibited a maximum rate of about 2 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour, equivalent to about 1% of maximum carbon assimilation. Botht the oxidative and the reductive detoxification of sulfite were very slow in the dark. Oxidation was somewhat, but not much, accelerated in the light in the absence of O-acetylserine, which caused a dramatic decrease in the formation of organic sulfides and an equally dramatic increase in the concentration of sulfite addition compounds whose formation was light-dependent. The sulfite addition compounds were not identified. Addition compounds did not accumulate in the dark. In the light, the electron transport inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, diuron, decreased not only the reduction, but also the oxidation of sulfite and the formation of addition compounds. PMID:16668703

  3. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  4. Metal-Catalyzed β-Functionalization of Michael Acceptors through Reductive Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Streuff, Jan; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2015-11-23

    Transition-metal-catalyzed radical reactions are becoming increasingly important in modern organic chemistry. They offer fascinating and unconventional ways for connecting molecular fragments that are often complementary to traditional methods. In particular, reductive radical additions to α,β-unsaturated compounds have recently gained substantial attention as a result of their broad applicability in organic synthesis. This Minireview critically discusses the recent landmark achievements in this field in context with earlier reports that laid the foundation for today's developments. PMID:26471460

  5. Synthetic protocol toward fused pyrazolone derivatives via a Michael addition and reductive ring closing strategy.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Nikita; Thomas, Joice; John, Jubi; Kusurkar, Radhika; De Borggraeve, Wim M; Dehaen, Wim

    2014-06-01

    A new class of pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridine-3,7-dione and pyrazolo[3,4-d]azepine-3,7-dione scaffolds was synthesized via a Michael addition and reductive cyclization strategy. These fused heterocycles were accessed from simple starting materials such as nitroolefins and 3-ethoxycarbonyl(methylene)pyrazoline-5-one. The pyrazolo-fused heterocycles were obtained in good overall yields. PMID:24797239

  6. Oil-Soluble Polymer Brush Grafted Nanoparticles as Effective Lubricant Additives for Friction and Wear Reduction.

    PubMed

    Wright, Roger A E; Wang, Kewei; Qu, Jun; Zhao, Bin

    2016-07-18

    The development of high performance lubricants has been driven by increasingly growing industrial demands and environmental concerns. Herein, we demonstrate oil-soluble polymer brush-grafted inorganic nanoparticles (hairy NPs) as highly effective lubricant additives for friction and wear reduction. A series of oil-miscible poly(lauryl methacrylate) brush-grafted silica and titania NPs were synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. These hairy NPs showed exceptional stability in poly(alphaolefin) (PAO) base oil; no change in transparency was observed after being kept at -20, 22, and 100 °C for ≥55 days. High-contact stress ball-on-flat reciprocating sliding tribological tests at 100 °C showed that addition of 1 wt % of hairy NPs into PAO led to significant reductions in coefficient of friction (up to ≈40 %) and wear volume (up to ≈90 %). The excellent lubricating properties of hairy NPs were further elucidated by the characterization of the tribofilm formed on the flat. These hairy NPs represent a new type of lubricating oil additives with high efficiency in friction and wear reduction. PMID:27265613

  7. Oil-Soluble Polymer Brush Grafted Nanoparticles as Effective Lubricant Additives for Friction and Wear Reduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wright, Roger A. E.; Wang, Kewei; Qu, Jun; Zhao, Bin

    2016-06-06

    Developments of high performance lubricants are driven by increasingly growing industrial demands and environmental concerns. We demonstrate oil-soluble polymer brush-grafted inorganic nanoparticles (hairy NPs) as highly effective lubricant additives for friction and wear reduction. A series of oil-miscible poly(lauryl methacrylate) brush-grafted silica and titania NPs were synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Moreover, these hairy NPs showed exceptional stability in poly(alphaolefin) (PAO) base oil; no change in transparency was observed after being kept at -20, 22, and 100°C for ≥55 days. High-contact stress ball-on-flat reciprocating sliding tribological tests at 100°C showed that addition of 1 wt% of hairy NPsmore » into PAO led to significant reductions in coefficient of friction (up to ≈40%) and wear volume (up to ≈90%). The excellent lubricating properties of hairy NPs were further elucidated by the characterization of the tribofilm formed on the flat. These hairy NPs represent a new type of lubricating oil additives with high efficiency in friction and wear reduction.« less

  8. Numerical Simulation of High Drag Reduction in a Turbulent Channel Flow with Polymer Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubief, Yves

    2003-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of long chain polymer molecules to wall-bounded flows can lead to dramatic drag reduction. Although this phenomenon has been known for about fifty years, the action of the polymers and its effect on turbulent structures are still unclear. Detailed experiments have characterized two distinct regimes (Warholic et al. 1999), which are referred to as low drag reduction (LDR) and high drag reduction (HDR). The first regime exhibits similar statistical trends as Newtonian flow: the log-law region of the mean velocity profile remains parallel to that of the Newtonian ow but its lower bound moves away from the wall and the upward shift of the log-region is a function of drag reduction, DR. Although streamwise fluctuations are increased and transverse ones are reduced, the shape of the rms velocity profiles is not qualitatively modified. At higher drag reductions, of the order of 40-50%, the ow enters the HDR regime for which the slope of the log-law is dramatically augmented and the Reynolds shear stress is small (Warholic et al. 1999; Ptasinski et al. 2001). The drag reduction is eventually bounded by a maximum drag reduction (MDR) (Virk & Mickley 1970) which is a function of the Reynolds number. While several experiments report mean velocity profiles very close to the empirical profile of Virk & Mickley (1970) for MDR conditions, the observations regarding the structure of turbulence can differ significantly. For instance, Warholic et al. (1999) measured a near-zero Reynolds shear stress, whereas a recent experiment (Ptasinski et al. 2001) shows evidence of non-negligible Reynolds stress in their MDR flow. To the knowledge of the authors, only the LDR regime has been documented in numerical simulations (Sureshkumar et al. 1997; Dimitropoulos et al. 1998; Min et al. 2001; Dubief & Lele 2001; Sibilla & Baron 2002). This paper discusses the simulation of polymer drag reduced channel ow at HDR using the FENE-P (Finite Elastic non

  9. Prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to livestock trade.

    PubMed

    Hop, G E; Mourits, M C M; Slager, R; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Saatkamp, H W

    2013-05-01

    Compared with the domestic trade in livestock, intra-communal trade across the European Union (EU) is subject to costly, additional veterinary measures. Short-distance transportation just across a border requires more measures than long-distance domestic transportation, while the need for such additional cross-border measures can be questioned. This study examined the prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to trade within the cross-border region of the Netherlands (NL) and Germany (GER); that is, North Rhine Westphalia and Lower Saxony. The study constructed a deterministic spread-sheet cost model to calculate the costs of both routine veterinary measures (standard measures that apply to both domestic and cross-border transport) and additional cross-border measures (extra measures that only apply to cross-border transport) as applied in 2010. This model determined costs by stakeholder, region and livestock sector, and studied the prospects for cost reduction by calculating the costs after the relaxation of additional cross-border measures. The selection criteria for relaxing these measures were (1) a low expected added value on preventing contagious livestock diseases, (2) no expected additional veterinary risks in case of relaxation of measures and (3) reasonable cost-saving possibilities. The total cost of routine veterinary measures and additional cross-border measures for the cross-border region was €22.1 million, 58% (€12.7 million) of which came from additional cross-border measures. Two-thirds of this €12.7 million resulted from the trade in slaughter animals. The main cost items were veterinary checks on animals (twice in the case of slaughter animals), export certification and control of export documentation. Four additional cross-border measures met the selection criteria for relaxation. The relaxation of these measures could save €8.2 million (€5.0 million for NL and €3.2 million for GER) annually

  10. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  11. Effect of additives on the reduction of PM2.5 emissions during pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshihiko Ninomiya; Qunying Wang; Shuyin Xu; Katsuharu Mizuno; Isao Awaya

    2009-07-15

    Two bituminous coals used in coal-fired power plants were mixed with either Ca- or Mg-based chemical additives. Coals and the mixtures were burnt in a laboratory-scale drop tube furnace, respectively. The impact of the additives on the transformations of coal minerals, as well as on the emissions of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 {mu}m (PM2.5), was investigated. The generated ash particles were collected using a cyclone combined with a low-pressure impactor. The physical and chemical properties of these ash particles were analyzed. The results indicate that the addition of chemical additives can affect the mineral transformation process, and thus, control the emissions of PM2.5 and PM1 during combustion. In particular, additives have a considerable impact on the particle size distribution and chemical composition of PM, wherein it improves the degree of coalescence of submicron and fine mineral particles, which reduces PM2.5 emissions. The effects of additive on the reduction of PM2.5 emissions depend on the type of coals being used. 17 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Numerical simulation of cloud and precipitation structure during GALE IOP-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Perkey, D. J.; Seablom, M. S.

    1988-01-01

    A regional scale model, LAMPS (Limited Area Mesoscale Prediction System), is used to investigate cloud and precipitation structure that accompanied a short wave system during a portion of GALE IOP-2. A comparison of satellite imagery and model fields indicates that much of the large mesoscale organization of condensation has been captured by the simulation. In addition to reproducing a realistic phasing of two baroclinic zones associated with a split cold front, a reasonable simulation of the gross mesoscale cloud distribution has been achieved.

  13. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  14. Efficacy of combined cataract extraction and endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation for the reduction of intraocular pressure and medication burden

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sammie J.; Mulvahill, Matthew; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Pantcheva, Mina B.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Seibold, Leonard K.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To report on the efficacy of combined endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) and phacoemulsification cataract extraction (PCE) with intraocular lens placement for reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) and medication burden in glaucoma. METHODS A retrospective case review of 91 eyes (73 patients) with glaucoma and cataract that underwent combined PCE/ECP surgery was performed. Baseline demographic and ocular characteristics were recorded, as well as intraocular pressure, number of glaucoma medications, and visual acuity postoperatively with 12-month follow-up. Treatment failure was defined as less than 20% reduction in IOP from baseline on two consecutive visits (at 1, 3, 6, or 12mo postoperatively), IOP ≥21 mm Hg or ≤5 mm Hg on two consecutive visits, or additional glaucoma surgery performed within 12mo after PCE/ECP. RESULTS Overall, mean medicated IOP was reduced from 16.65 mm Hg at baseline to 13.38 mm Hg at 12mo (P<0.0001). Mean number of glaucoma medications was reduced from 1.88 medications at baseline to 1.48 medications at 12mo (P=0.0003). At 3mo postoperatively, the success rate was 73.6% (95%CI: 63.3, 81.5), 57.1% at 6mo (95% CI: 46.3, 66.6), and 49.7% at 12mo (95%CI: 38.9, 59.6). Patient demographic characteristics were not associated with treatment success. The only ocular characteristic associated with treatment success was a higher baseline IOP. CONCLUSION Combined PCE/ECP surgery is an effective surgical option for the reduction of IOP and medication burden in glaucoma patients. Patients with higher baseline IOP levels are most likely to benefit from this procedure. PMID:27275423

  15. Ultrasmooth submicrometer carbon spheres as lubricant additives for friction and wear reduction.

    PubMed

    Alazemi, Abdullah A; Etacheri, Vinodkumar; Dysart, Arthur D; Stacke, Lars-Erik; Pol, Vilas G; Sadeghi, Farshid

    2015-03-11

    Ultrasmooth submicrometer carbon spheres are demonstrated as an efficient additive for improving the tribological performance of lubricating oils. Carbon spheres with ultrasmooth surfaces are fabricated by ultrasound assisted polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde followed by controlled heat treatment. The tribological behavior of the new lubricant mixture is investigated in the boundary and mixed lubrication regimes using a pin-on-disk apparatus and cylinder-on-disk tribometer, respectively. The new lubricant composition containing 3 wt % carbon spheres suspended in a reference SAE 5W30 engine oil exhibited a substantial reduction in friction and wear (10-25%) compared to the neat oil, without change in the viscosity. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigation of the carbon spheres after the tribological experiments illustrated their excellent mechanical and chemical stability. The significantly better tribological performance of the hybrid lubricant is attributed to the perfectly spherical shape and ultrasmooth surface of carbon sphere additive filling the gap between surfaces and acting as a nanoscale ball bearing. PMID:25690952

  16. Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Conjugate Addition to Enones Via Allylnickel Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Ruja; Dorn, Stephanie C. M.; Weix, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    An alternative method to copper-catalyzed conjugate addition followed by enolate silylation for the synthesis of β-di-substituted silyl enol ether products (R1(R2)HCCH=C(OSiR43)R3) is presented. This method uses haloarenes instead of nucleophilic aryl reagents. Nickel ligated to either neocuproine or bipyridine couples an α,β-unsaturated ketone or aldehyde (R2HC=CHC(O)R3) with an organic halide (R1-X) in the presence of a trialkylchlorosilane reagent (Cl-SiR43). Reactions are assembled on the bench-top and tolerate a variety of functional groups (aldehyde, ketone, nitrile, sulfone, pentafluorosulfur, and N-aryltrifluoroacetamide), electron-rich iodoarenes, and electron-poor haloarenes. Mechanistic studies have confirmed the first example of a catalytic reductive conjugate addition of organic halides that proceeds via an allylnickel intermediate. Selectivity is attributed to: 1) rapid, selective reaction of LNi0 with chlorotriethylsilane and enone in the presence of other organic electrophiles, and 2) minimization of enone dimerization by ligand steric effects. PMID:23270480

  17. Exhaust emissions reduction from diesel engine using combined Annona-Eucalyptus oil blends and antioxidant additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, R.; Silambarasan, R.; Pranesh, G.

    2016-07-01

    The limited resources, rising petroleum prices and depletion of fossil fuel have now become a matter of great concern. Hence, there is an urgent need for researchers to find some alternate fuels which are capable of substituting partly or wholly the higher demanded conventional diesel fuel. Lot of research work has been conducted on diesel engine using biodiesel and its blends with diesel as an alternate fuel. Very few works have been done with combination of biodiesel-Eucalypts oil without neat diesel and this leads to lots of scope in this area. The aim of the present study is to analyze the performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder, direct injection, compression ignition engine using eucalyptus oil-biodiesel as fuel. The presence of eucalyptus oil in the blend reduces the viscosity and improves the volatility of the blends. The methyl ester of Annona oil is blended with eucalypts oil in 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 %. The performance and emission characteristics are evaluated by operating the engine at different loads. The performance characteristics such as brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and exhaust gas temperature are evaluated. The emission constituents measured are Carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and Smoke. It is found that A50-Eu50 (50 Annona + 50 % Eucalyptus oil) blend showed better performance and reduction in exhaust emissions. But, it showed a very marginal increase in NOx emission when compared to that of diesel. Therefore, in order to reduce the NOx emission, antioxidant additive (A-tocopherol acetate) is mixed with Annona-Eucalyptus oil blends in various proportions by which NOx emission is reduced. Hence, A50-Eu50 blend can be used as an alternate fuel for diesel engine without any modifications.

  18. An ensemble study of HyMeX IOP6 and IOP7a: sensitivity to physical and initial and boundary condition uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hally, A.; Richard, E.; Ducrocq, V.

    2013-12-01

    The first Special Observation Period of the HyMeX campaign took place in the Mediterranean between September and November 2012 with the aim of better understanding the mechanisms which lead to heavy precipitation events (HPEs) in the region during the autumn months. Two such events, referred to as Intensive Observation Period 6 (IOP6) and Intensive Observation Period 7a (IOP7a), occurred respectively on 24 and 26 September over south-eastern France. IOP6 was characterised by moderate to weak low-level flow which led to heavy and concentrated convective rainfall over the plains near the coast, while IOP7a had strong low-level flow and consisted of a convective line over the mountainous regions further north and a band of stratiform rainfall further east. Firstly, an ensemble was constructed for each IOP using analyses from the AROME, AROME-WMED, ARPEGE and ECMWF operational models as initial (IC) and boundary (BC) conditions for the research model Meso-NH at a resolution of 2.5 km. A high level of model skill was seen for IOP7a, with a lower level of agreement with the observations for IOP6. Using the most accurate member of this ensemble as a CTRL simulation, three further ensembles were constructed in order to study uncertainties related to cloud physic and surface turbulence parameterisations. Perturbations were introduced by perturbing the time tendencies of the warm and cold microphysical and turbulence processes. An ensemble where all three sources of uncertainty were perturbed gave the greatest degree of dispersion in the surface rainfall for both IOPs. Comparing the level of dispersion to that of the ICBC ensemble demonstrated that when model skill is low (high) and low-level flow is weak to moderate (strong), the level of dispersion of the ICBC and physical perturbation ensembles is (is not) comparable. The level of sensitivity to these perturbations is thus concluded to be case dependent.

  19. Eye-Specific IOP-Induced Displacements and Deformations of Human Lamina Cribrosa

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Ian A.; Grimm, Jonathan L.; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Reid, Korey; Minckler, Don S.; Brown, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To measure high-resolution eye-specific displacements and deformations induced within the human LC microstructure by an acute increase in IOP. Methods. Six eyes from donors aged 23 to 82 were scanned using second harmonic-generated (SHG) imaging at various levels of IOP from 10 to 50 mm Hg. An image registration technique was developed, tested, and used to find the deformation mapping between maximum intensity projection images acquired at low and elevated IOP. The mappings were analyzed to determine the magnitude and distribution of the IOP-induced displacements and deformations and contralateral similarity. Results. Images of the LC were obtained and the registration technique was successful. IOP increases produced substantial, and potentially biologically significant, levels of in-plane LC stretch and compression (reaching 10%–25% medians and 20%–30% 75th percentiles). Deformations were sometimes highly focal and concentrated in regions as small as a few pores. Regions of largest displacement, stretch, compression, and shear did not colocalize. Displacements and strains were not normally distributed. Contralateral eyes did not always have more similar responses to IOP than unrelated eyes. Under elevated IOP, some LC regions were under bi-axial stretch, others under bi-axial compression. Conclusions. We obtained eye-specific measurements of the complex effects of IOP on the LC with unprecedented resolution in uncut and unfixed human eyes. Our technique was robust to electronic and speckle noise. Elevated IOP produced substantial in-plane LC stretch and compression. Further research will explore the effects of IOP on the LC in a three-dimensional framework. PMID:24334450

  20. Evaluation of fuel additives for reduction of material imcompatibilities in methanol-gasoline blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, C. F.; Barbee, J. G.; Knutson, W. K.; Cuellar, J. P., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Screening tests determined the efficacy of six commercially available additives as modifiers of methanol's corrosivity toward metals and its weakening of tensile properties of nonmetals in automotive fuel systems. From the screening phase, three additives which seemed to protect some of the metals were tested in higher concentrations and binary combinations in search of optimal application conditions. Results indicate that two of the additives have protective properties and combining them increases the protection of the metals corroded by methanol-gasoline blends. Half of the metals in the tests were not corroded. Testing at recommended concentrations and then at higher concentrations and in combinations shows that the additives would have no protective or harmful effects on the nonmetals. Two additives emerged as candidates for application to the protection of metals in automotive methanol-gasoline fuel systems. The additives tested were assigned letter codes to protect their proprietary nature.

  1. Effect of Protein Additives on Acetylene Reduction (Nitrogen Fixation) by Rhizobium in the Presence and Absence of Soybean Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stephen J.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of protein additives on acetylene reduction (N2 fixation) by Rhizobium associated with soybean cells (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) in vitro was studied. Acetylene reduction was promoted on the basal medium supplemented with 1.4 mg of N/ml supplied as aqueous extracts of hexane-extracted soybean, red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), or peas (Pisum sativum L.). Commercial samples of α-casein, or bovine serum albumin also promoted acetylene reduction at a concentration of 1.4 mg of N/ml of basal medium, but egg albumin supplying an equal amount of nitrogen to the basal medium completely suppressed acetylene reduction. Autoclaving the aqueous extract of hexane-extracted soybean meal had no effect on its ability to promote acetylene reduction. The presence of 40 mm succinate decreased acetylene reduction with leguminous proteins supplying 1.4 mg of N/ml but promoted acetylene reduction by Rhizobium 32H1-soybean cell associations on media containing α-casein, bovine serum albumin, or egg albumin suppling 1.4 mg of N/ml. Similar results were obtained with both cowpea Rhizobium 32H1 and Rhizobium japonicum 61A96. Pure cultures of Rhizobium 32H1 developed acetylene-reducing activity in the presence of soybean extract on basal agar medium and in vermiculite supplied with N-free mineral salts plus crude soybean meal. The results suggest that in certain situations, free living Rhizobium may reduce N2 under field conditions. PMID:16659592

  2. Sustained intraocular pressure reduction throughout the day with travoprost ophthalmic solution 0.004%

    PubMed Central

    Dubiner, Harvey B; Noecker, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to characterize intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction throughout the day with travoprost ophthalmic solution 0.004% dosed once daily in the evening. Methods The results of seven published, randomized clinical trials including at least one arm in which travoprost 0.004% was dosed once daily in the evening were integrated. Means (and standard deviations) of mean baseline and on-treatment IOP, as well as mean IOP reduction and mean percent IOP reduction at 0800, 1000, and 1600 hours at weeks 2 and 12 were calculated. Results From a mean baseline IOP ranging from 25.0 to 27.2 mmHg, mean IOP on treatment ranged from 17.4 to 18.8 mmHg across all visits and time points. Mean IOP reductions from baseline ranged from 7.6 to 8.4 mmHg across visits and time points, representing a mean IOP reduction of 30%. Results of the safety analysis were consistent with the results from the individual studies for travoprost ophthalmic solution 0.004%, with ocular hyperemia being the most common side effect. Conclusion Travoprost 0.004% dosed once daily in the evening provides sustained IOP reduction throughout the 24-hour dosing interval in subjects with ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma. No reduction of IOP-lowering efficacy was observed at the 1600-hour time point which approached the end of the dosing interval. PMID:22536047

  3. 42 CFR 408.21 - Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans. 408.21 Section 408.21 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums...

  4. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    PubMed Central

    Jaynes, William F.; Zartman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (Kd = 13,800) and carnitine (Kd = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity. PMID:22069725

  5. Effects of Topical Bimatoprost 0.01% and Timolol 0.5% on Circadian IOP, Blood Pressure and Perfusion Pressure in Patients with Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension: A Randomized, Double Masked, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tanga, Lucia; Berardo, Francesca; Ferrazza, Manuela; Michelessi, Manuele; Roberti, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the 24-hour (24h) effects on intraocular pressure (IOP) and cardiovascular parameters of timolol 0.5% and bimatoprost 0.01% in open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertensive subjects. Methods In this prospective, randomized, double masked, crossover, clinical trial, after washout from previous medications enrolled subjects underwent 24h IOP, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measurements and were randomized to either topical bimatoprost 0.01% at night plus placebo in the morning or to timolol 0.5% bid. After 8 weeks of treatment a second 24h assessment of IOP, BP and HR was performed and then subjects switched to the opposite treatment for additional 8 weeks when a third 24h assessment was performed. The primary endpoint was the comparison of the mean 24h IOP after each treatment. Secondary endpoints included the comparisons of IOP at each timepoint of the 24h curve and the comparison of BP, HR, ocular perfusion pressure and tolerability. Results Mean untreated 24h IOP was 20.3 mmHg (95%CI 19.0 to 21.6). Mean 24h IOP was significantly lower after 8 weeks of treatment with bimatoprost 0.01% than after 8 weeks of treatment with timolol 0.5% bid (15.7 vs 16.8 mmHg, p = 0.0003). Mean IOP during the day hours was significantly reduced from baseline by both drugs while mean IOP during the night hours was reduced by -2.3 mmHg (p = 0.0002) by bimatoprost 0.01% plus placebo and by -1.1 mmHg by timolol 0.5% bid (p = 0.06). Timolol 0.5% significantly reduced the mean 24h systolic BP from baseline, the diastolic BP during the day hours, the HR during the night hours, and the mean 24h systolic ocular perfusion pressure. Conclusion Both Bimatoprost 0.01% and Timolol 0.5% are effective in reducing the mean 24h IOP from an untreated baseline but Bimatoprost 0.01% is more effective than timolol 0.5% throughout the 24h. Timolol 0.5% effect on IOP is reduced during the night hours and is associated with reduced BP, HR and ocular perfusion pressure. Trial

  6. Drag Reduction Obtained by the Addition of a Boattail to a Box Shaped Vehicle. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Coast down tests were performed on a box shaped ground vehicle used to simulate the aerodynamic drag of high volume transports such as delivery vans, motor homes and trucks. The results of these tests define the reduction in aerodynamic drag that can be obtained by the addition of either a boattail or a truncated boattail to an otherwise blunt based vehicle. Test velocities ranged up to 96.6 km/h (60 mph) with Reynolds numbers to 1.3 x 10 the 7th power. The full boattail provided an average 32 percent reduction in drag at highway speeds whereas the truncated boattail provided an average 31 percent reduction in drag as compared to the configuration having the blunt base. These results are compared with one tenth scale wind tunnel model data.

  7. Lens Position Parameters as Predictors of Intraocular Pressure Reduction After Cataract Surgery in Nonglaucomatous Patients With Open Angles

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Kakigi, Caitlin L.; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between lens position parameters and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Methods The main outcome of the prospective study was percentage of IOP change, which was calculated using the preoperative IOP and the IOP 4 months after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Lens position (LP), defined as anterior chamber depth (ACD) + 1/2 lens thickness (LT), was assessed preoperatively using parameters from optical biometry. Preoperative IOP, central corneal thickness, ACD, LT, axial length (AXL), and the ratio of preoperative IOP to ACD (PD ratio) were also evaluated as potential predictors of percentage of IOP change. The predictive values of the parameters we found to be associated with the primary outcome were compared. Results Four months after cataract surgery, the average IOP reduction was 2.03 ± 2.42 mm Hg, a 12.74% reduction from the preoperative mean of 14.5 ± 3.05 mm Hg. Lens position was correlated with IOP reduction percentage after adjusting for confounders (P = 0.002). Higher preoperative IOP, shallower ACD, shorter AXL, and thicker LT were significantly associated with percentage of IOP decrease. Although not statistically significant, LP was a better predictor of percentage of IOP change compared to PD ratio, preoperative IOP, and ACD. Conclusions The percentage of IOP reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles is greater in more anteriorly positioned lenses. Lens position, which is convenient to compute by basic ocular biometric data, is an accessible predictor with considerable predictive value for postoperative IOP change. PMID:26650901

  8. Effects of lipids on thermophilic anaerobic digestion and reduction of lipid inhibition upon addition of bentonite.

    PubMed

    Angelidaki, I; Petersen, S P; Ahring, B K

    1990-07-01

    The effect of bentonite-bound oil on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure was investigated. In digestor experiments, addition of oil was found to be inhibitory during start-up and the inhibitory effect was less pronounced when the oil was added in the form of bentonite-bound oil compared to when the oil was added alone. After adaptation of the digestors, very rapid degradation of oil was observed and more than 80% of the oil was degraded within a few hours after daily feeding. In batch experiments, glyceride trioleate was found to be inhibitory to thermophilic anaerobic digestion when the concentrations were higher than 2.0 g/l. However, addition of bentonite (a clay mineral) at concentrations of 0.15% and 0.45% was found to partly overcome this inhibition. Addition of calcium chloride in concentration of 3 mM (0.033% w/v) showed a similar positive effect on the utilization of oil, but the effect was lower than with bentonite. PMID:1366749

  9. Formation and reduction of carcinogenic furan in various model systems containing food additives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Sil; Her, Jae-Young; Lee, Kwang-Geun

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to analyse and reduce furan in various model systems. Furan model systems consisting of monosaccharides (0.5M glucose and ribose), amino acids (0.5M alanine and serine) and/or 1.0M ascorbic acid were heated at 121°C for 25 min. The effects of food additives (each 0.1M) such as metal ions (iron sulphate, magnesium sulphate, zinc sulphate and calcium sulphate), antioxidants (BHT and BHA), and sodium sulphite on the formation of furan were measured. The level of furan formed in the model systems was 6.8-527.3 ng/ml. The level of furan in the model systems of glucose/serine and glucose/alanine increased 7-674% when food additives were added. In contrast, the level of furan decreased by 18-51% in the Maillard reaction model systems that included ribose and alanine/serine with food additives except zinc sulphate. PMID:26190608

  10. Reduction of VOCs during pressing of OSB with the use of chemical additives

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.S.; McGinnis, G.D.; Kleinheinz, G.T.; Niemi, B.A.; Flicker, T.M.

    1999-07-01

    As air pollution regulations continue to become increasingly stringent, it is critical for the wood composite industry to develop more efficient and economical methods for handling air pollutant emissions. Technologies currently being used for end of pipeline control are often expensive to install and operate; therefore, more cost-effective methods of reduction are necessary. This project was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using various chemical compounds during pressing or drying of wood particles to minimize/reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from wood composite plants. This study was designed specifically to develop chemical treatment systems, which would reduce VOCs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the oriented strandboard (OSB) manufacturing process. A series of acids, bases, oxidizing agents and nucleophiles were evaluated in this study. The initial model waste stream consisted of furfural and a series of mono-terpenes. The first year results indicated that several of the chemicals did destroy the VOCs; in some cases destruction was observed as high as 75%. The first year of this study was conducted in the laboratory, while the second and third years will combine laboratory studies and OSB plant studies.

  11. Photoinitiated oxidative addition of CF3I to gold(I) and facile aryl-CF3 reductive elimination.

    PubMed

    Winston, Matthew S; Wolf, William J; Toste, F Dean

    2014-05-28

    Herein we report the mechanism of oxidative addition of CF3I to Au(I), and remarkably fast Caryl-CF3 bond reductive elimination from Au(III) cations. CF3I undergoes a fast, formal oxidative addition to R3PAuR' (R = Cy, R' = 3,5-F2-C6H4, 4-F-C6H4, C6H5, 4-Me-C6H4, 4-MeO-C6H4, Me; R = Ph, R' = 4-F-C6H4, 4-Me-C6H4). When R' = aryl, complexes of the type R3PAu(aryl)(CF3)I can be isolated and characterized. Mechanistic studies suggest that near-ultraviolet light (λmax = 313 nm) photoinitiates a radical chain reaction by exciting CF3I. Complexes supported by PPh3 undergo reversible phosphine dissociation at 110 °C to generate a three-coordinate intermediate that undergoes slow reductive elimination. These processes are quantitative and heavily favor Caryl-I reductive elimination over Caryl-CF3 reductive elimination. Silver-mediated halide abstraction from all complexes of the type R3PAu(aryl)(CF3)I results in quantitative formation of Ar-CF3 in less than 1 min at temperatures as low as -10 °C. PMID:24836526

  12. Sodium thermal reduction of tantalum powders from melts with tantalum pentaoxide additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, V. N.; Miroshnichenko, M. N.; Orlov, V. M.; Prokhorova, T. Yu.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of the oxygen concentration in a melt on the characteristics of sodium-reduced tantalum powders, which were produced from potassium heptafluotantalate-based melts with tantalum pentaoxide additions, is studied. An increase in the oxygen content in the initial melt from 0.35 to 2.0 wt % leads to an increase in the specific surface of the formed powder from 1.2 to 3.5 m2/g. The specific charge of anodes made from these powders is 37800-70700 CV/g.

  13. Effect of reduction of strategic Columbium addition in 718 Alloy on the structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, K. R.; Wallace, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A series of alloys was developed having a base composition similar to Inconel 718, with reduced Cb levels of 3.00 and 1.10 wt% Cb. Substitutions of 3.0% W, 3.0W + 0.9V or Mo increased from 3.0% to 5.8% were made for the Cb in these alloys. Two additional alloys, one containing 3.49% Cb and 1.10% Ti and another containing 3.89% Cb and 1.29% Ti were also studied. Tensile properties at rooom and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and an analysis of extracted phases were carried out for each of the alloys. Additions of solid solution elements to a reduced Cb alloy had no significant effect on the properties of the alloys under either process condition. The solution and age alloys with substitutions of 1.27% i at 3.89% Cb had tensile properties similar top hose of the original alloy and stress-rupture properties superior to the original alloy. The improved stress-rupture properties were the result of significant precipitation of Ni3Ti-gamma prime in the alloy, which is more stable than gamma' at the elevated temperatures. At lower temperatures, the new alloy benefits from gamma' strengthening. With more precise control and proper processing, the reduced Cb direct-age alloy could substitute for Alloy 718 in high strength applications.

  14. Anomalous yield reduction in direct-drive DT implosions due to 3He addition

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W; Langenbrunner, James R; Mack, Joseph M; Cooley, James H; Wilson, Douglas C; Evans, Scott C; Sedillo, Tom J; Kyrala, George A; Caldwell, Stephen E; Young, Carlton A; Nobile, Arthur; Wermer, Joseph R; Paglieri, Stephen N; Mcevoy, Aaron M; Kim, Yong Ho; Batha, Steven H; Horsfield, Colin J; Drew, Dave; Garbett, Warren; Rubery, Michael; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Roberts, Samuel; Frenje, Johan A

    2008-01-01

    Glass capsules were imploded in direct drive on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et aI., Opt. Commun. 133, 495, 1997] to look for anomalous degradation in deuterium/tritium (DT) yield (i.e., beyond what is predicted) and changes in reaction history with {sup 3}He addition. Such anomalies have previously been reported for D/{sup 3}He plasmas, but had not yet been investigated for DT/{sup 3}He. Anomalies such as these provide fertile ground for furthering our physics understanding of ICF implosions and capsule performance. A relatively short laser pulse (600 ps) was used to provide some degree of temporal separation between shock and compression yield components for analysis. Anomalous degradation in the compression component of yield was observed, consistent with the 'factor of two' degradation previously reported by MIT at a 50% {sup 3}He atom fraction in D{sub 2} using plastic capsules [Rygg et aI., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. However, clean calculations (i.e., no fuel-shell mixing) predict the shock component of yield quite well, contrary to the result reported by MIT, but consistent with LANL results in D{sub 2}/{sup 3}He [Wilson, et aI., lml Phys: Conf Series 112, 022015 (2008)]. X-ray imaging suggests less-than-predicted compression ofcapsules containing {sup 3}He. Leading candidate explanations are poorly understood Equation-of-State (EOS) for gas mixtures, and unanticipated particle pressure variation with increasing {sup 3}He addition.

  15. Reduction of CO2 diffuse emissions from the traditional ceramic industry by the addition of Si-Al raw material.

    PubMed

    González, I; Barba-Brioso, C; Campos, P; Romero, A; Galán, E

    2016-09-15

    The fabrication of ceramics can produce the emission of several gases, denominated exhaust gases, and also vapours resulting from firing processes, which usually contain metals and toxic substances affecting the environment and the health of workers. Especially harmful are the diffuse emissions of CO2, fluorine, chlorine and sulphur from the ceramics industry, which, in highly industrialized areas, can suppose an important emission focus of dangerous effects. Concerning CO2, factories that use carbonate-rich raw materials (>30% carbonates) can emit high concentrations of CO2 to the atmosphere. Thus, carbonate reduction or substitution with other raw materials would reduce the emissions. In this contribution, we propose the addition of Al-shales to the carbonated ceramic materials (marls) for CO2 emission reduction, also improving the quality of the products. The employed shales are inexpensive materials of large reserves in SW-Spain. The ceramic bodies prepared with the addition of selected Al-shale to marls in variable proportions resulted in a 40%-65% CO2 emission reduction. In addition, this research underlines at the same time that the use of a low-price raw material can also contribute to obtaining products with higher added value. PMID:27233044

  16. Impact of an additional chronic BDNF reduction on learning performance in an Alzheimer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Psotta, Laura; Rockahr, Carolin; Gruss, Michael; Kirches, Elmar; Braun, Katharina; Lessmann, Volkmar; Bock, Jörg; Endres, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a crucial role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. A number of studies demonstrated that AD patients exhibit reduced BDNF levels in the brain and the blood serum, and in addition, several animal-based studies indicated a potential protective effect of BDNF against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. In order to further investigate the role of BDNF in the etiology of AD, we created a novel mouse model by crossing a well-established AD mouse model (APP/PS1) with a mouse exhibiting a chronic BDNF deficiency (BDNF+/−). This new triple transgenic mouse model enabled us to further analyze the role of BDNF in AD in vivo. We reasoned that in case BDNF has a protective effect against AD pathology, an AD-like phenotype in our new mouse model should occur earlier and/or in more severity than in the APP/PS1-mice. Indeed, the behavioral analysis revealed that the APP/PS1-BDNF+/−-mice show an earlier onset of learning impairments in a two-way active avoidance task in comparison to APP/PS1- and BDNF+/−-mice. However in the Morris water maze (MWM) test, we could not observe an overall aggrevated impairment in spatial learning and also short-term memory in an object recognition task remained intact in all tested mouse lines. In addition to the behavioral experiments, we analyzed the amyloid plaque pathology in the APP/PS1 and APP/PS1-BDNF+/−-mice and observed a comparable plaque density in the two genotypes. Moreover, our results revealed a higher plaque density in prefrontal cortical compared to hippocampal brain regions. Our data reveal that higher cognitive tasks requiring the recruitment of cortical networks appear to be more severely affected in our new mouse model than learning tasks requiring mainly sub-cortical networks. Furthermore, our observations of an accelerated impairment in active avoidance learning in APP/PS1-BDNF+/−-mice further supports the hypothesis that BDNF deficiency

  17. Turbulent Drag Reduction with Surfactant Additives — Basic Research and Application to an Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Li, F. C.; Yu, B.; Wei, J. J.

    It is well known that a small amount of chemicals such as water-soluble polymers or surfactants dramatically suppresses turbulence when they are added to liquid flow at large Reynolds number. In the last two decades, the application of surfactants to heat transportation systems such as district heating and cooling systems has attracted much interest among researchers. It has been revealed that 70% of the pumping power used to drive hot water in primary pipelines or district heating systems was saved by adding only a few hundred ppm of surfactant into the circulating water. The technological achievement requires a new design strategy for pipeline networks and heat exchangers to handle the drag reducing liquid flow. In the case of a Newtonian fluid such as water or air, the knowledge for designing fluid systems has been accumulated and the accuracy of numerical prediction is sufficient. On the other hand, the design system for surfactant solutions is not mature because drag-reducing flow phenomena are much more complicated than for Newtonian flow, for example, the friction factor for a surfactant solution depends not only on Reynolds number but also pipe diameter. In order to provide a design strategy for heat transportation systems using surfactant additives, we are now carrying out both experimental and numerical studies for surfactant solutions. In this lecture, experimental and numerical studies on the turbulence structure in drag reducing flow will be introduced. The result of an application study relating to the air conditioning system will be also shown.

  18. Dose combinations of exendin-4 and salmon calcitonin produce additive and synergistic reductions in food intake in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Kemm, Matthew H.; Ofeldt, Erica M.; Moran, Timothy H.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and amylin mediate the feedback control of eating by seemingly separate, but overlapping mechanisms. This study examined the effects of combined doses of the GLP-1 agonist, exendin-4 (Ex-4), and the amylin analog, salmon calcitonin (sCT), on food intake and meal patterns in adult male rhesus monkeys. Monkeys received intramuscular injections of Ex-4 (0, 0.1, 0.32, or 0.56 μg/kg), sCT (0, 0.1, or 0.32 μg/kg), or combinations thereof before a 6-h daily access to food. Dose combinations produced reductions in food intake that were significantly greater than those produced by the individual doses. Surface plots of the hourly intake indicated a synergistic interaction at lower doses of Ex-4 and sCT during the first 4 h of feeding and additive effects at hours 5 and 6. Meal pattern analysis revealed the combinational doses reduced average meal size and meal frequency by additive interactions, whereas infra-additive effects were apparent at lower doses for first meal size. Combinational doses were further characterized by administration of repeated daily injections of 0.56 μg/kg Ex-4 + 0.32 μg/kg sCT for 5 days. This resulted in sustained reductions in daily food intake (>70% from saline baseline) for 5 days with residual reductions (∼48% from saline baseline) persisting on day 1 following the injections. In contrast, when pair-fed an identical amount of daily food, there was a compensatory food intake increase on day 1 following the pair-feeding (∼132% of saline baseline). Such data suggest Ex-4 and sCT interact in an overall additive fashion to reduce food intake and further the understanding of how GLP-1 and amylin agonist combinations influence feeding behavior. PMID:20554932

  19. Improving Coastal Ocean Color Validation Capabilities through Application of Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Understanding how the different components of seawater alter the path of incident sunlight through scattering and absorption is essential to using remotely sensed ocean color observations effectively. This is particularly apropos in coastal waters where the different optically significant components (phytoplankton, detrital material, inorganic minerals, etc.) vary widely in concentration, often independently from one another. Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) form the link between these biogeochemical constituents and the Apparent Optical Properties (AOPs). understanding this interrelationship is at the heart of successfully carrying out inversions of satellite-measured radiance to biogeochemical properties. While sufficient covariation of seawater constituents in case I waters typically allows empirical algorithms connecting AOPs and biogeochemical parameters to behave well, these empirical algorithms normally do not hold for case I1 regimes (Carder et al. 2003). Validation in the context of ocean color remote sensing refers to in-situ measurements used to verify or characterize algorithm products or any assumption used as input to an algorithm. In this project, validation capabilities are considered those measurement capabilities, techniques, methods, models, etc. that allow effective validation. Enhancing current validation capabilities by incorporating state-of-the-art IOP measurements and optical models is the purpose of this work. Involved in this pursuit is improving core IOP measurement capabilities (spectral, angular, spatio-temporal resolutions), improving our understanding of the behavior of analytical AOP-IOP approximations in complex coastal waters, and improving the spatial and temporal resolution of biogeochemical data for validation by applying biogeochemical-IOP inversion models so that these parameters can be computed from real-time IOP sensors with high sampling rates. Research cruises supported by this project provides for collection and

  20. Restoration of species-rich grasslands on ex-arable land: seed addition outweighs soil fertility reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kardol, Paul

    2008-01-01

    A common practice in biodiversity conservation is restoration of former species-rich grassland on ex-arable land. Major constraints for grassland restoration are high soil fertility and limited dispersal ability of plant species to target sites. Usually, studies focus on soil fertility or on methods to introduce plant seeds. However, the question is whether soil fertility reduction is always necessary for getting plant species established on target sites. In a three-year field experiment with ex-arable soil with intensive farming history, we tested single and combined effects of soil fertility reduction and sowing mid-successional plant species on plant community development and soil biological properties. A controlled microcosm study was performed to test short-term effects of soil fertility reduction measures on biomass production of mid-successional species. Soil fertility was manipulated by adding carbon (wood or straw) to incorporate plant-available nutrients into organic matter, or by removing nutrients through top soil removal (TSR). The sown species established successfully and their establishment was independent of carbon amendments. TSR reduced plant biomass, and effectively suppressed arable weeds, however, created a desert-like environment, inhibiting the effectiveness of sowing mid-successional plant species. Adding straw or wood resulted in short-term reduction of plant biomass, suggesting a temporal decrease in plant-available nutrients by microbial immobilisation. Straw and wood addition had little effects on soil biological properties, whereas TSR profoundly reduced numbers of bacteria, fungal biomass and nematode abundance. In conclusion, in ex-arable soils, on a short term sowing is more effective for grassland restoration than strategies aiming at soil fertility reduction.

  1. Intraocular pressure (IOP) in relation to four levels of daily geomagnetic and extreme yearly solar activity.

    PubMed

    Stoupel, E; Goldenfeld, M; Shimshoni, M; Siegel, R

    1993-02-01

    The link between geomagnetic field activity (GMA), solar activity and intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy individuals was investigated. The IOP of 485 patients (970 eyes) was recorded over three nonconsecutive years (1979, 1986, 1989) which were characterized by maximal solar activity (1979, 1989) or minimal solar activity (1986). The measurements were also correlated with four categories of GMA activity: quiet (level I0), unsettled (II0), active (III0), and stormy (IV0). Participants were also differentiated by age and sex. We found that IOP was lowest on days of level IV0 (stromy) GMA. The drop in IOP concomitant with a decrease in GMA level was more significant during periods of low solar activity and in persons over 65 years of age. There was a trend towards higher IOP values on days of levels II0 and IV0 GMA in years of high solar activity. Differences between the sexes and among individuals younger than 65 years were not significant. Our results show an interesting aspect of environmental influence on the healthy population. PMID:8468099

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Field Campaigns or Intensive Operational Periods (IOP)

    DOE Data Explorer

    ARM Climate Research Facility users regularly conduct field campaigns to augment routine data acquisitions and to test and validate new instruments. Any field campaign which is proposed, planned, and implemented at one or more research sites is referred to as an intensive operational period (IOP). IOPs are held using the fixed and mobile sites; Southern Great Plains, North Slope of Alaska, Tropical Western Pacific, ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), and Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP). [Taken from http://www.arm.gov/science/fc.stm] Users may search with the specialized interface or browse campaigns/IOPs in table format. Browsing allows users to see the start date of the IOP, the status (Past, In Progress, etc.), the duration, the Principal Investigator, and the research site, along with the title of the campaign/IOP. Clicking on the title leads to a descriptive summary of the campaign, names of co-investigators, contact information, links to related websites, and a link to available data in the ARM Archive. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The URL to go directly to the ARM Archive, bypassing the information pages, is http://www.archive.arm.gov/. The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  3. Formation of Si nanowires by the electrochemical reduction of SiO2 with Ni or NiO additives.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sheng; Wang, Han; Yang, Juanyu; Yu, Bing; Lu, Shigang

    2016-08-15

    Various morphologies of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were successfully prepared by the electrochemical reduction of silica mixed with different additives (Au, Ag, Fe, Co, Ni, and NiO, respectively). Straight SiNWs were extensively obtained by the electro-reduction of porous Ni/SiO2 blocks in molten CaCl2 at 900 °C. The SiNWs had a wide diameter distribution of 80 to 350 nm, and the Ni-Si droplets were found on the tips of the nanowires. The growth mechanism of SiNWs was investigated, which could reveal that the nano-sized Ni-Si droplets formed at the Ni/SiO2/CaCl2 three-phase interlines. Based on the mechanism proposed, NiO particles with sub-micrometer size were selected as the additive, and straight SiNWs with diameters of 60 to 150 nm were also prepared via the electrochemical process. PMID:27203479

  4. [I have tested for you. The contour tonometer. IOP analysis using "Dynamic Contour Tonometry"].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2006-05-01

    The Pascal tonometer, or the Dynamic Contour Tonometer (DCT) (Swiss Microtechnology, Zurich) is a device that differs from the Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) in its IOP sensor at the center of the cone that measures pressure by a means less dependent on corneal structure. The efficacy of this device in measuring IOP after LASIK surgery has been demonstrated. It can be used to obtain more precise IOP measurements in glaucoma patients or ocular hypertension in cases where the measurement is debatable because of a very thin or very thick cornea. We studied the relations between the measurements with the two devices on thin, normal, and thick corneas. The Pascal tonometer generally showed a good correlation with the Goldmann applanation tonometer, but the limits of agreement are wide. For thin corneas, this device seems more reliable than the GAT, but for thick corneas, no difference was found between the two methods. PMID:17072219

  5. A novel D2-dopaminergic and alpha2-adrenoceptor receptor agonist induces substantial and prolonged IOP decrease in normotensive rabbits.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Jouko; Rautio, Jarkko; Razzetti, Roberta; Järvinen, Tomi

    2003-06-01

    The effects of a novel and selective D2-dopaminergic/alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist, CHF1035, and its metabolite CHF1024 on intraocular pressure (IOP) were determined in rabbits. Because CHF1035 is a mixture of two enantiomers, CHF1800 (+) and CHF1810 (-), pure enantiomers were also studied to determine possible differences in IOP-decreasing ability depending on the stereochemistry of the molecule. CHF1035, CHF1800 (+), CHF1810 (-), CHF1024, brimonidine and 0.9% NaCl were administered topically to rabbits and IOP was then measured at fixed time intervals. The dose-response profile (0.01-1.0% w/v) was determined for CHF1035. CHF1035 and its metabolite CHF1024 significantly lowered IOP in the treated eyes. CHF1035 showed a maximum IOP decrease (7.6 +/- 1.5 mmHg) 5 h post-dosing, whereas the metabolite CHF1024 showed a maximum decrease in IOP (7.0 +/- 0.8 mmHg) 3 h post-dosing. The maximum IOP decrease produced by CHF1035 in the treated eye was comparable with that produced by brimonidine (7.8 +/- 0.9 mmHg), but CHF1035 had a significantly longer duration of action. Unlike brimonidine, CHF1035 and CHF1024 did not decrease IOP in the untreated eye. CHF1810 (-) lowered the IOP more than CHF1800 (+). No irritation, evaluated as eyelid closure, was observed after topical administration of any of the compounds. Only in the case of CHF1035 1% solution, two rabbits out of six closed the eye for 30-45 s. In conclusion, CHF1035 and its metabolite CHF1024 significantly decreased the IOP in rabbits, and are potential novel IOP lowering agents. Especially, CHF1035 produced a substantial decrease in IOP for a prolonged period of time, and thus may prove useful in glaucoma therapy. PMID:12841939

  6. Environmental effect of antioxidant additives on exhaust emission reduction in compression ignition engine fuelled with Annona methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Senthil, R; Silambarasan, R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to analyse the effect of antioxidant l-ascorbic acid on engine performance and emissions of a diesel engine fuelled with methyl ester of Annona oil (MEAO). The antioxidant is mixed in various concentrations (100-400 mg) with MEAO. Result shows that the antioxidant additive mixture (MEAO+LA200) is effective in control of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and hydrocarbon (HC) emission of MEAO-fuelled engine without doing any engine modification. In this study by using MEAO, the NOx emission is reduced by about 23.38% at full load while compared with neat diesel fuel. Likewise there is a reduction in carbon monoxide, smoke, and HC by about 48%, 28.57% and 29.71% at full load condition compared with neat diesel fuel. PMID:25704338

  7. Photochemically induced intramolecular six-electron reductive elimination and oxidative addition of nitric oxide by the nitridoosmate(VIII) anion.

    PubMed

    Thornley, Wyatt A; Bitterwolf, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    UV photolysis of the nitridoosmate(VIII) anion, OsO3 N(-) , in low-temperature frozen matrices results in nitrogen-oxygen bond formation to give the Os(II) nitrosyl complex OsO2 (NO)(-) . Photolysis of the Os(II) nitrosyl product with visible wavelengths results in reversion to the parent Os(VIII) complex. Formally a six-electron reductive elimination and oxidative addition, respectively, this represents the first reported example of such an intramolecular transformation. DFT modelling of this reaction proceeds through a step-wise mechanism taking place through a side-on nitroxyl Os(VI) intermediate, OsO2 (η(2) -NO)(-) . PMID:25537499

  8. Quality control and validation of the new IOP and GOP ocean products from CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calafat, Francisco M.; Cipollini, Paolo; Snaith, Helen; Bouffard, Jérôme; Féménias, Pierre; Parrinello, Tommaso

    2015-04-01

    CryoSat-2 is a huge asset to the oceanographic community, and the exploitation of its data over the ocean represents a welcome additional return for ESA's investment in a mission whose primary objective is to monitor the cryosphere. The CryoSat Project has approved, in the frame of the CryoSat routine phase, the generation of additional ocean products which are available since April 2014. These are the Interim Ocean Products (IOP), normally available within 2-3 day from acquisition, and the Geophysical Ocean Products (GOP), with consolidated orbits and available 30 days after acquisition. To enable their full exploitation by the scientific and operational oceanographic communities, these new ocean products need to be thoroughly quality-controlled and validated. Here we present the results of the scientific quality control performed at the UK National Oceanography Centre (NOC) within the framework of the CryOcean-QCV project. The assessment and quality control of the data is conducted both daily and monthly on a global scale for the L2 IOP and GOP products and includes coverage/completeness, data flow and latency analysis, along-track and crossover analysis, and estimation of error levels and measurement precision. Diagnostics are computed for the sea surface height (SSH), significant wave height (SWH), radar backscatter coefficient (sigma0), wind speed and mispointing parameters. In addition we present an absolute validation of the altimetric SSH for the GOP product against sea level observations from high-quality tide gauges equipped with Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. Finally, the validation is extended by comparing the SSH from CryoSat-2 with that from other altimetric missions (Envisat, Jason-1 and Jason-2).

  9. A Multisensor Investigation of Convection During HyMeX SOP1 IOP13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberto, N.; Adirosi, E.; Baldini, L.; Casella, D.; Dietrich, S.; Panegrossi, G.; Petracca, M.; Sano, P.; Gatlin, P.

    2014-01-01

    A multisensor analysis of the convective precipitation event occurred over Rome during the IOP13 (October 15th, 2012) of the HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean eXperiment) Special Observation Period (SOP) 1 is presented. Thanks to the cooperation among Italian meteorological services and scientific community and a specific agreement with NASA-GSFC, different types of devices for meteorological measurements were made available during the HyMeX SOP.1. For investigating this event, used are the 3-D lightning data provided by the LINET, the CNR ISAC dual-pol C-band radar (Polar 55C), located in Rome, the Drop Size Distributions (DSD) collected by the 2D Video Disdrometer (2DVD) and the collocated Micro Rain Radar (MRR) installed at the Radio Meteorology Lab. of "Sapienza" University of Rome, located 14 km from the Polar 55C radar. The relation between microphysical structure and electrical activity during the convective phase of the event was investigated using LINET lightning data and Polar 55C (working both in PPI and RHI scanning mode) observations. Location of regions of high horizontal reflectivity (Zh) values ( > 50 dBz), indicating convective precipitation, were found to be associated to a high number of LINET strokes. In addition, an hydrometeor classification scheme applied to the Polar 55C scans was used to detect graupel and to identify a relation between number of LINET strokes and integrated IWC of graupel along the event. Properties of DSDs measured by the 2DVD and vertical DSD profiles estimated by MRR and their relation with the lighting activity registered by LINET were investigated with specific focus on the transition from convective to stratiform regimes. A good agreement was found between convection detected by these instruments and the number of strokes detected by LINET.

  10. Low-temperature synthesis of AlN powder with multicomponent additive systems by carbothermal reduction-nitridation method

    SciTech Connect

    Molisani, Andre Luiz; Yoshimura, Humberto Naoyuki

    2010-06-15

    AlN powders were synthesized at low temperatures (1300 and 1400 {sup o}C) by the carbothermal reduction-nitridation (CRN) method using multicomponent additive systems. The synthesis treatments were conducted in a graphite furnace with flowing nitrogen gas between 1200 and 1500 {sup o}C using powder mixtures with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C molar ratio of 1:3 and 0.5-3 wt% of CaF{sub 2}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and/or SrCO{sub 3} as additives. In relation to the conventional CRN process, the use of multicomponent additive systems reduced the synthesis temperature in 200 {sup o}C (CaF{sub 2}-SrCO{sub 3}), 100 {sup o}C (CaF{sub 2}-Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaF{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) or <100 {sup o}C (CaF{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaF{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-SrCO{sub 3}). X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the additives reacted with the alumina powder forming aluminate phases, which vaporized with the increase of synthesis temperature. The enhanced AlN conversion rate was discussed in terms of the vaporization of aluminates in the reducing atmosphere.

  11. Observations of a cold front with strong vertical undulations during the ARM RCS-IOP

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D.N.; Melfi, S.H.

    1996-04-01

    Passage of a cold front was observed on the night of April 14-15, 1994, during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Intensive Observatios Period (IOP) at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. The observations are described.

  12. NOVA/IOPS - MDM/SIO - SL/BIU data transfer test software guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The NOVA/IOPS (Input-Output Processor Simulator) is used to control all interface testing of the MDM (Multiplexer Demultiplexer) Breadboard S10 10M (serial input-output-input module) and the Matra Space Lab Inerface Unit (SL/BIU). The software handles bookkeeping such as word error rates, types of errors, display of error buffers, data display and test identification.

  13. Sunphotometric Measurement of Columnar H2O and Aerosol Optical Depth During the 3rd Water Vapor IOP in Fall 2000 at the SGP ARM Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B; Eilers, J. A.; McIntosh, D. M.; Longo, K.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Braun, J.; Rocken, C.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We conducted ground-based measurements with the Ames Airborne Tracking 6-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-6) during the 3rd Water Vapor IOP (WVIOP3), September 18 - October 8, 2000 at the SGP ARM site. For this deployment our primary result was columnar water vapor (CWV) obtained from continuous solar transmittance measurements in the 0.94-micron band. In addition, we simultaneously measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 380, 450, 525, 864 and 1020 nm. During the IOP, preliminary results of CWV and AOD were displayed in real-time. The result files were made available to other investigators by noon of the next day. During WVIOP3 those data were shown on the daily intercomparison plots on the IOP web-site. Our preliminary results for CWV fell within the spread of values obtained from other techniques. After conclusion of WVIOP3, AATS-6 was shipped directly to Mauna Loa, Hawaii for post-mission calibration. The updated calibration, a cloud screening technique for AOD, along with other mostly cosmetic changes were applied to the WVIOP3 data set and released as version 0.1. The resulting changes in CWV are small, the changes in AOD and Angstrom parameter are more noticeable. Data version 0.1 was successfully submitted to the ARM External Data Center. In the poster we will show data examples for both CWV and AOD. We will also compare our CWV results with those obtained from a GPS (Global Positioning System) slant path method.

  14. Chemo- and Enantioselective Addition and β-Hydrogen Transfer Reduction of Carbonyl Compounds with Diethylzinc Reagent in One Pot Catalyzed by a Single Chiral Organometallic Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huayin; Zong, Hua; Bian, Guangling; Song, Ling

    2015-12-18

    Using a single chiral phosphoramide-Zn(II) complex as the catalyst, the asymmetric β-H transfer reduction of aromatic α-trifluoromethyl ketones and enantioselective addition of aromatic aldehydes with Et2Zn in one pot were successfully realized, affording the corresponding additive products of secondary alcohols in high yields (up to 99%) with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 98% ee) and the reduction products of α-trifluoromethyl alcohols in good to excellent yields with up to 77% ee. PMID:26579727

  15. Alkyl-chain-grafted hexagonal boron nitride nanoplatelets as oil-dispersible additives for friction and wear reduction.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sangita; Sharma, Om P; Gusain, Rashi; Mungse, Harshal P; Kukrety, Aruna; Kumar, Niranjan; Sugimura, Hiroyuki; Khatri, Om P

    2015-02-18

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), an isoelectric analogous to graphene multilayer, can easily shear at the contact interfaces and exhibits excellent mechanical strength, higher thermal stability, and resistance toward oxidation, which makes it a promising material for potential lubricant applications. However, the poor dispersibility of h-BN in lube base oil has been a major obstacle. Herein, h-BN powder was exfoliated into h-BN nanoplatelets (h-BNNPs), and then long alkyl chains were chemically grafted, targeting the basal plane defect and edge sites of h-BNNPs. The chemical and structural features of octadecyltriethoxysilane-functionalized h-BNNPs (h-BNNPs-ODTES) were studied by FTIR, XPS, XRD, HRTEM, and TGA analyses. The h-BNNPs-ODTES exhibit long-term dispersion stability in synthetic polyol ester lube base oil because of van der Waals interaction between the octadecyl chains of h-BNNPs-ODTES and alkyl functionalities of polyol ester. Micro- and macrotribology results showed that h-BNNPs-ODTES, as an additive to synthetic polyol ester, significantly reduced both the friction and wear of steel disks. Elemental mapping of the worn area explicitly demonstrates the transfer of h-BNNPs-ODTES on the contact interfaces. Furthermore, insight into the lubrication mechanism for reduction in both friction and wear is deduced based on the experimental results. PMID:25625695

  16. Bacterial Community Dynamics during Swine In vitro Fermentation Using Starch as a Substrate with Different Feed Additives for Odor Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md. J.; Jeong, C. D.; Mamuad, L. L.; Sung, H. G.; Kim, D. W.; Cho, S. B.; Lee, K.; Jeon, C. O.; Lee, Sang S.

    2012-01-01

    The experiment was conducted by in vitro fermentation and bacterial community analysis to investigate the reduction of odorous compounds in response to the use of feed additives (FA) during carbohydrate overload in growing pigs. Soluble starch at 1% (control) and various FA at 0.1% Ginseng meal (FA1); Persimmon leaf (FA2); Gingko nut (FA3) and Oregano lippia (FA4) were added to fecal slurry and incubated anaerobically for 12 and 24 h. In vitro parameters and microbial diversity of the dominant bacteria following fermentation were analyzed using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), band cloning and sequencing of the V3 region. Results showed that total gas production increased with the advancement of incubation (p<0.05). pH values of FAs and control groups were decreased except the FA4 group which increased somewhat from 12 to 24 h (p<0.05). Ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) and H2S gas concentrations were comparatively lower in both stages in FA4 treatment than in the other groups (p<0.05). Hence, NH3-N concentrations in liquid phases were increased (p<0.05) from 12 to 24 h, but the trend was lowest in FA4 than in the other groups at both stages. The total VFA production was comparatively lower and butyrate levels were moderate in FA4 group than in the the other groups during both stages (p<0.05). Indirect odor-reducing compounds such as NO2, NO3 and SO4 concentrations were higher in the FA4 and FA3 than in the other groups at 24 h (p<0.05). After fermentation, ten dominant bands appeared, six of which appeared in all samples and four in only the FA4 treated group. The total number of DGGE bands and diversity was higher in the FA4-group compared to other groups. Additionally, similarity indices were lowest (71%) in the FA4, which represented a different bacterial community compared with the other groups. These findings indicate that NH3-N, H2S and VFA production was minimal, and pH was also better in the FA4 group than in the other groups. Furthermore, the

  17. Sustained reduction in methane production from long-term addition of 3-nitrooxypropanol to a beef cattle diet.

    PubMed

    Romero-Perez, A; Okine, E K; McGinn, S M; Guan, L L; Oba, M; Duval, S M; Kindermann, M; Beauchemin, K A

    2015-04-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether long-term addition of 3-nitrooxypropanol (NOP) to a beef cattle diet results in a sustained reduction in enteric CH4 emissions in beef cattle. Eight ruminally cannulated heifers (637 ± 16.2 kg BW) were used in a completely randomized design with 2 treatments: Control (0 g/d of NOP) and NOP (2 g/d of NOP). Treatments were mixed by hand into the total mixed ration (60% forage, DM basis) at feeding time. Feed offered was restricted to 65% of ad libitum DMI (slightly over maintenance energy intake) and provided once per day. The duration of the experiment was 146 d, including an initial 18-d covariate period without NOP use; a 112-d treatment period with NOP addition to the diet, divided into four 28-d time intervals (d 1 to 28, 29 to 56, 57 to 84, and 85 to 112); and a final 16-d recovery period without NOP use. During the covariate period and at the end of each interval and the end of the recovery period, CH4 was measured for 3 d using whole animal metabolic chambers. The concentration of VFA was measured in rumen fluid samples collected 0, 3, and 6 h after feeding, and the microbial population was evaluated using rumen samples collected 3 h after feeding on d 12 of the covariate period, d 22 of each interval within the treatment period, and d 8 of the recovery period. Average DMI for the experiment was 7.04 ± 0.27 kg. Methane emissions were reduced by 59.2% when NOP was used (9.16 vs. 22.46 g/kg DMI; P < 0.01). Total VFA concentrations were not affected (P = 0.12); however, molar proportion of acetate was reduced and that for propionate increased when NOP was added (P < 0.01), which reduced the acetate to propionate ratio (3.0 vs. 4.0; P < 0.01). The total copy number of the 16S rRNA gene of total bacteria was not affected (P = 0.50) by NOP, but the copy number of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens was reduced (P < 0.01) and the copy number of the 18S rRNA gene of protozoa was increased (P = 0.03). The residual effect of NOP for

  18. Toward Millions of File System IOPS on Low-Cost, Commodity Hardware

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Da; Burns, Randal; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a storage system that removes I/O bottlenecks to achieve more than one million IOPS based on a user-space file abstraction for arrays of commodity SSDs. The file abstraction refactors I/O scheduling and placement for extreme parallelism and non-uniform memory and I/O. The system includes a set-associative, parallel page cache in the user space. We redesign page caching to eliminate CPU overhead and lock-contention in non-uniform memory architecture machines. We evaluate our design on a 32 core NUMA machine with four, eight-core processors. Experiments show that our design delivers 1.23 million 512-byte read IOPS. The page cache realizes the scalable IOPS of Linux asynchronous I/O (AIO) and increases user-perceived I/O performance linearly with cache hit rates. The parallel, set-associative cache matches the cache hit rates of the global Linux page cache under real workloads. PMID:24402052

  19. Corneal elastic anisotropy and hysteresis as a function of IOP assessed by optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Han, Zhaolong; Wu, Chen; Raghunathan, Raksha; Liu, Chih-Hao; Nair, Achuth; Noorani, Shezaan; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanical anisotropic properties of the cornea can be an important indicator for determining the onset and severity of different diseases and can be used to assess the efficacy of various therapeutic interventions, such as cross-linking and LASIK surgery. In this work, we introduce a noncontact method of assessing corneal mechanical anisotropy as a function of intraocular pressure (IOP) using optical coherence elastography (OCE). A focused air-pulse induced low amplitude (<10 μm) elastic waves in fresh porcine corneas in the whole eye-globe configuration in situ. A phase-stabilized swept source optical coherence elastography (PhS-SSOCE) system imaged the elastic wave propagation at stepped radial angles, and the OCE measurements were repeated as the IOP was cycled. The elastic wave velocity was then quantified to determine the mechanical anisotropy and hysteresis of the cornea. The results show that the elastic anisotropy at the corneal of the apex of the cornea becomes more pronounced at higher IOPs, and that there are distinct radial angles of higher and lower stiffness. Due to the noncontact nature and small amplitude of the elastic wave, this method may be useful for characterizing the elastic anisotropy of ocular and other tissues in vivo completely noninvasively.

  20. Observational analysis of the URBAN2000 field program IOP-10, 25-26 October 2000

    SciTech Connect

    DeCroix, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    In October 2000, the US Department of Energy, along with NOAA and several other government labs and universities, conducted the Vortical Transport and Mixing Experiment (VTMX) and URBAN2000 field programs in Salt Lake City, Utah (Alwine et al., 2082). The VTMX program focused on the basin-scale flow regime, where the URBAN2000 component focused on transport and dispersion in the downtown Salt Lake City area. In this paper, WCI will focus on a specific Intensive Operations Period, IOP-10, which occurred on October 25-26, 2000. IOP-10 was chosen because the winds in the downtown area were fairly weak and variable early in the experiment, and became more windy in the later part of the IOF? The local conditions were influenced by a shortwave ridge, and were cloudy, with a weak and very shallow surface inversion, and light mean southerly flow over the area. In order to prepare initial and boundary conditions for our LES modeling studies of the downtown area, we will present an analysis of some the observations taken during IOP-10.

  1. 42 CFR 408.21 - Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums § 408.21 Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an... direct billed beneficiaries of their reduced premium amounts in the regular monthly billing process....

  2. 42 CFR 408.21 - Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums § 408.21 Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an... direct billed beneficiaries of their reduced premium amounts in the regular monthly billing process....

  3. 42 CFR 408.21 - Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums § 408.21 Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an... direct billed beneficiaries of their reduced premium amounts in the regular monthly billing process....

  4. 42 CFR 408.21 - Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums § 408.21 Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an... direct billed beneficiaries of their reduced premium amounts in the regular monthly billing process....

  5. Effect of additives on Hg2+ reduction and precipitation inhibited by sodium dithiocarbamate in simulated flue gas desulfurization solutions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongjie; Hou, Jiaai; Xu, Jiang; Tang, Tingmei; Xu, Xinhua

    2011-11-30

    Mercury (II) (Hg(2+)) ion can be reduced by aqueous S(IV) (sulfite and/or bisulfite) species, which leads to elemental mercury (Hg(0)) emissions in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Numerous reports have demonstrated the high trapping efficiency of sodium dithiocarbamate over heavy metals. In this paper, a novel sodium dithiocarbamate, DTCR, was utilized as a precipitator to control Hg(2+) reduction and Hg(0) emission against S(IV) in FGD solutions. Results indicated that Hg(2+) reduction efficiency decreased dramatically while precipitation rate peaked at around 91.0% in consistence with the increment of DTCR dosage. Initial pH and temperature had great inhibitory effects on Hg(2+) reduction: the Hg(2+) removal rate gradually increased and reached a plateau along with the increment of temperature and initial pH value. Chloride played a key role in Hg(2+) reduction and precipitation reactions. When Cl(-) concentration increased from 0 to 150 mM, Hg(2+) removal rate dropped from 93.84% to 86.05%, and the Hg(2+) reduction rate remained at a low level (<7.8%). SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-) and other common metal ions would affect the efficiency of Hg(2+) reduction and precipitation reactions in the simulated desulfurization solutions: Hg(2+) removal rate could always be above 90%, while Hg(2+) reduction rate was maintained at below 10%. The predominance of DTCR over aqueous S(IV), indicated by the results above, has wide industrial applications in FGD systems. PMID:21955657

  6. Monitoring Subsurface Microbial Biomass, Community Composition and Physiological Status during Biological Uranium Reduction with Acetate Addition using Lipid Analysis, DNA Arrays and q-PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, A. D.; Long, P. E.; N'Guessan, L.; Williams, K. H.; Chandler, D.

    2011-12-01

    Our objectives for this effort were to investigate microbial community dynamics during each of the distinct terminal electron accepting phases that occur during long-term acetate addition for the immobilization of Uranium. Groundwater was collected from four wells (one up gradient and three down gradient) at three different depths and at four different times (pre-acetate injection, peak iron reduction, iron/sulfate reduction transition and during heavy sulfate reduction). Phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) results from ground water showed that microbial biomass was highest during Iron reduction and then lower during the transition from Iron reduction to Sulfate reduction and lowest during Sulfate reduction. Microbial community composition parameters as measured by PLFA showed distinct differences with terminal electron accepting status. Monounsaturated PLFA that have been shown to correspond with Gram-negative bacteria and Geobacteracea increased markedly with Iron reduction and then decreased with the onset of sulfate reduction. Bacterial physiological stress levels as measured by PLFA fluctuated with terminal electron acceptor status. Low bacterial stress levels coincided with pre-donor addition and Iron reduction but were much higher during Iron to Sulfate transition and during Sulfate reduction. Microarray results showed the expected progression of microbial signatures from Iron to Sulfate -reducers with changes in acetate amendment and in situ field conditions. The microarray response for Geobacter was highly correlated with qPCR for the same target gene (R2 = 0.84). Probes targeting Desulfobacter and Desulfitobacterium were the most reactive during the Iron to Sulfate transition and into Sulfate reduction, with a consistent Desulfotomaculum signature throughout the field experiment and a general decrease in Geobacter signal to noise ratios during the onset of Sulfate reducing conditions. Nitrate reducers represented by Dechloromonas and Dechlorosoma

  7. Inducible scAAV2.GRE.MMP1 lowers IOP long-term in a large animal model for steroid-induced glaucoma gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Borrás, Teresa; Buie, LaKisha K.; Spiga, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of glaucoma relies on administration of daily drops or eye surgery. A gene therapy approach to treat steroid-induced glaucoma would bring a resolution to millions of people worldwide that depend on glucocorticoid therapy for a myriad of inflammatory disorders. Previously, we had characterized a short-term Adh.GRE.MMP1 gene vector for the production of steroid-induced MMP1 in the trabecular meshwork and tested reduction of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in a sheep model. Here we conducted a trial transferring the same transgene cassette to a clinically safe vector (scAAV2), and extended the therapeutic outcome to longer periods of times. No evidence of ocular and/or systemic toxicity was observed. Viral genome distributions showed potential re-inducible vector DNAs in the trabecular meshwork (0.4 vg/cell) and negligible copies in six major internal organs (0.00002-0.005 vg/cell). Histological sections confirmed successful transduction of scAAV2.GFP to the trabecular meshwork. Optimization of the sheep steroid–induced hypertensive model revealed that topical ophthalmic drug difluprednate 0.05% (durezol) induced the highest IOP elevation in the shortest time. This is the first efficacy/toxicity study of a feasible gene therapy treatment of steroid-induced hypertension using clinically accepted scAAV vectors in a large animal model. PMID:26855269

  8. Inducible scAAV2.GRE.MMP1 lowers IOP long-term in a large animal model for steroid-induced glaucoma gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Borrás, T; Buie, L K; Spiga, M G

    2016-05-01

    Current treatment of glaucoma relies on administration of daily drops or eye surgery. A gene therapy approach to treat steroid-induced glaucoma would bring a resolution to millions of people worldwide who depend on glucocorticoid therapy for a myriad of inflammatory disorders. Previously, we had characterized a short-term Adh.GRE.MMP1 gene vector for the production of steroid-induced MMP1 in the trabecular meshwork and tested reduction of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in a sheep model. Here we conducted a trial transferring the same transgene cassette to a clinically safe vector (scAAV2), and extended the therapeutic outcome to longer periods of times. No evidence of ocular and/or systemic toxicity was observed. Viral genome distributions showed potential reinducible vector DNAs in the trabecular meshwork (0.4 v.g. per cell) and negligible copies in six major internal organs (0.00002-0.005 v.g. per cell). Histological sections confirmed successful transduction of scAAV2.GFP to the trabecular meshwork. Optimization of the sheep steroid-induced hypertensive model revealed that topical ophthalmic drug difluprednate 0.05% (durezol) induced the highest IOP elevation in the shortest time. This is the first efficacy/toxicity study of a feasible gene therapy treatment of steroid-induced hypertension using clinically accepted self-complementary adeno-associated vectors (scAAV) vectors in a large animal model. PMID:26855269

  9. Tyrosine triple mutated AAV2-BDNF gene therapy in a rat model of transient IOP elevation

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Maika; Kameya, Shuhei; Fujimoto, Chiaki; Nakamoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Hisatomo; Igarashi, Toru; Miyake, Noriko; Iijima, Osamu; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the neuroprotective effects of exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which provides protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in rodents, in a model of transient intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation using a mutant (triple Y-F) self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 2 vector encoding BDNF (tm-scAAV2-BDNF). Methods The tm-scAAV2-BDNF or control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP; tm-scAAV2-GFP) was intravitreally administered to rats, which were then divided into four groups: control, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury only, I/R injury with tm-scAAV2-GFP, and tm-scAAV2-BDNF. I/R injury was then induced by transiently increasing IOP, after which the rats were euthanized to measure the inner retinal thickness and cell counts in the RGC layer. Results Intravitreous injection of tm-scAAV2-BDNF resulted in high levels of BDNF expression in the neural retina. Histological analysis showed that the inner retinal thickness and cell numbers in the RGC layer were preserved after transient IOP elevation in eyes treated with tm-scAAV2-BDNF but not in the other I/R groups. Significantly reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining after I/R injury in the rats that received tm-scAAV2-BDNF indicated reduced retinal stress, and electroretinogram (ERG) analysis confirmed preservation of retinal function in the tm-scAAV2-BDNF group. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of neuroprotective gene therapy using tm-scAAV2-BDNF to protect the inner retina from transiently high intraocular pressure. An in vivo gene therapeutic approach to the clinical management of retinal diseases in conditions such as glaucoma, retinal artery occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, and diabetic retinopathy thus appears feasible. PMID:27440998

  10. A Carolina coastal low-level jet during GALE IOP 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James D.; Warner, Thomas T.

    1991-01-01

    A persistent, diurnally varying low-level jet (LLJ) was observed along the Carolina coastal plain during the early part of GALE IOP 2 between 0000 UTC January 24 and 0600 UTC January 25. A 1D PBL model (Zhang and Anthes, 1982) is utilized to examine the various dynamic forcing mechanisms controlling the formation and evolution of the LLJ. The experiments suggest that a specific geostrophic wind velocity profile in the lower troposphere was necessary to produce a number of the observed Carolina LLJ characteristics.

  11. Repeated Intravitreous Ranibizumab Injections for Diabetic Macular Edema and the Risk of Sustained IOP Elevation or Ocular Hypotensive Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, Susan B.; Almukhtar, Talat; Bhorade, Anjali; Bressler, Neil M.; Glassman, Adam R.; Huang, Suber S.; Jampol, Lee M.; Kim, Judy E.; Melia, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Importance For the management of retinal disease, use of intravitreous injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor has increased. Recent reports have suggested that this therapy may cause persistent intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation and potentially increase the risk of glaucoma in patients with retinal disease. Objective To assess the risk of sustained IOP elevation or the need for IOP-lowering treatments in eyes with diabetic macular edema following repeated intravitreous injections of ranibizumab. Main Outcome Measure(s) The cumulative probability of sustained IOP elevation, defined as an IOP of at least 22 mmHg and an increase of at least 6 mmHg from baseline at 2 consecutive visits, or initiation or augmentation of ocular hypotensive therapy, through 3 years of follow up. Design, Setting, and Participants An exploratory analysis was conducted within a Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network randomized clinical trial. Of 486 participants (582 eyes) with center-involved diabetic macular edema and no pre-existing open-angle glaucoma, 260 eyes were randomly assigned to receive sham injection plus focal/grid laser; 322 to ranibizumab plus deferred or prompt focal/grid laser. Results The mean baseline IOP in both treatment groups was 16±3 mmHg (range 5–24 mm Hg). The cumulative probability of sustained IOP elevation or initiation or augmentation of ocular hypotensive therapy by 3 years, after repeated ranibizumab injections, was 9.5% in the ranibizumab plus prompt or deferred laser group versus 3.4% in the sham plus laser group (difference = 6.1%, 99% CI: −0.2% to 12.3%; hazard ratio = 2.9, 99% CI: 1.0 to 7.9, P = 0.01). The distribution of IOP and the change in IOP from baseline at each visit through 3 years was similar in each group. Conclusions In eyes with center-involved diabetic macular edema and no prior open angle glaucoma, repeated intravitreous injections of ranibizumab may increase the risk of sustained IOP elevation or the need

  12. Airborne Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Extinction and Scattering During the Aerosol IOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Ricci, K.; Provencal, R.; Schmid, B.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Arnott, P.

    2003-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300 Mm-1 with an estimated precision of 0.1 Min-1 for 1550 nm light and 0.2 Mm-1 for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects.= We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those friom a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  13. Sulfate reduction in sulfuric material after re-flooding: Effectiveness of organic carbon addition and pH increase depends on soil properties.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chaolei; Fitzpatrick, Rob; Mosley, Luke M; Marschner, Petra

    2015-11-15

    Sulfuric material is formed upon oxidation of sulfidic material; it is extremely acidic, and therefore, an environmental hazard. One option for increasing pH of sulfuric material may be stimulation of bacterial sulfate reduction. We investigated the effects of organic carbon addition and pH increase on sulfate reduction after re-flooding in ten sulfuric materials with four treatments: control, pH increase to 5.5 (+pH), organic carbon addition with 2% w/w finely ground wheat straw (+C), and organic carbon addition and pH increase (+C+pH). After 36 weeks, in five of the ten soils, only treatment +C+pH significantly increased the concentration of reduced inorganic sulfur (RIS) compared to the control and increased the soil pore water pH compared to treatment+pH. In four other soils, pH increase or/and organic carbon addition had no significant effect on RIS concentration compared to the control. The RIS concentration in treatment +C+pH as percentage of the control was negatively correlated with soil clay content and initial nitrate concentration. The results suggest that organic carbon addition and pH increase can stimulate sulfate reduction after re-flooding, but the effectiveness of this treatment depends on soil properties. PMID:26024614

  14. Effect of alkali and alkaline-earth chloride addition on electrolytic reduction of UO 2 in LiCl salt bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Yoshiharu

    2011-05-01

    The electrolytic reduction process of actinide oxides in a LiCl salt bath at 923 K has been developed for nuclear fuel reprocessing. Since some salt-soluble fission products, such as Cs, Sr and Ba, accumulate in the LiCl salt bath, their effect on UO 2 reduction was investigated. In the experiments, UO 2 specimens were reduced by potential- or current-controlled electrolysis in various LiCl salt baths containing up to 30 mol% of KCl, CsCl, SrCl 2 or BaCl 2. The rate of UO 2 reduction in a LiCl salt bath was considerably decreased by the addition of alkali metal chlorides (KCl and CsCl) and slightly decreased by BaCl 2 addition. SrCl 2 addition had no appreciable effect. It was suggested that the diffusion of O 2- ions from the inside of UO 2 specimens to the bulk salt determined the reduction rate during the electrolysis and that the effect of salt composition was related to the solubility of O 2- ions in the salt bath.

  15. Additive reductions in zebrafish PRPS1 activity result in a spectrum of deficiencies modeling several human PRPS1-associated diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Wuhong; Xu, Lisha; Varshney, Gaurav K.; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Jones, MaryPat; Huang, Sunny C.; Idol, Jennifer; Pretorius, Pamela R.; Beirl, Alisha; Schimmenti, Lisa A.; Kindt, Katie S.; Sood, Raman; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 (PRPS1) is a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis, and mutations in PRPS1 are found in several human diseases including nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5, and Arts Syndrome. We utilized zebrafish as a model to confirm that mutations in PRPS1 result in phenotypic deficiencies in zebrafish similar to those in the associated human diseases. We found two paralogs in zebrafish, prps1a and prps1b and characterized each paralogous mutant individually as well as the double mutant fish. Zebrafish prps1a mutants and prps1a;prps1b double mutants showed similar morphological phenotypes with increasingly severe phenotypes as the number of mutant alleles increased. Phenotypes included smaller eyes and reduced hair cell numbers, consistent with the optic atrophy and hearing impairment observed in human patients. The double mutant also showed abnormal development of primary motor neurons, hair cell innervation, and reduced leukocytes, consistent with the neuropathy and recurrent infection of the human patients possessing the most severe reductions of PRPS1 activity. Further analyses indicated the phenotypes were associated with a prolonged cell cycle likely resulting from reduced nucleotide synthesis and energy production in the mutant embryos. We further demonstrated the phenotypes were caused by delays in the tissues most highly expressing the prps1 genes. PMID:27425195

  16. Reduction of indicator and pathogenic microorganisms in pig manure through fly ash and lime addition during alkaline stabilization.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jonathan W C; Selvam, Ammaiyappan

    2009-09-30

    A pilot scale study was conducted to evaluate the effect of lime and alkaline coal fly ash (CFA) on the reduction of pathogens in pig manure during alkaline stabilization and suppression of re-growth during post-stabilization incubation. Pig manure was mixed with CFA at 25%, 33% and 50%, and a control without fly ash was maintained. To these manure-ash mixtures, lime was added at the rate of 2% or 4% and incubated for 8 days. During the incubation, the population of Salmonella, fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, fecal Streptococcus and total bacteria were enumerated. After the alkaline stabilization process, the mixtures were incubated under green house condition to evaluate the re-growth of pathogens. During the 8-day alkaline stabilization, Salmonella, fecal coliforms, E. coli and fecal Streptococcus were completely devitalized in manure-ash-lime mixtures, whereas in the control, incubation reduced the pathogen and total bacterial population by 2-3 logs. Fecal streptococcus was destructed within 4 days of alkaline stabilization, whereas other pathogens needed 8 days for their destruction. During the incubation in green house, an increase in the population of the pathogens and total bacteria was observed. Results indicate that alkaline stabilization of pig manure with lime at 4% and CFA at 50% is effective in devitalizing the pathogens and reducing the post-stabilization re-growth. PMID:19442442

  17. Additive reductions in zebrafish PRPS1 activity result in a spectrum of deficiencies modeling several human PRPS1-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Pei, Wuhong; Xu, Lisha; Varshney, Gaurav K; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Jones, MaryPat; Huang, Sunny C; Idol, Jennifer; Pretorius, Pamela R; Beirl, Alisha; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Kindt, Katie S; Sood, Raman; Burgess, Shawn M

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 (PRPS1) is a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis, and mutations in PRPS1 are found in several human diseases including nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5, and Arts Syndrome. We utilized zebrafish as a model to confirm that mutations in PRPS1 result in phenotypic deficiencies in zebrafish similar to those in the associated human diseases. We found two paralogs in zebrafish, prps1a and prps1b and characterized each paralogous mutant individually as well as the double mutant fish. Zebrafish prps1a mutants and prps1a;prps1b double mutants showed similar morphological phenotypes with increasingly severe phenotypes as the number of mutant alleles increased. Phenotypes included smaller eyes and reduced hair cell numbers, consistent with the optic atrophy and hearing impairment observed in human patients. The double mutant also showed abnormal development of primary motor neurons, hair cell innervation, and reduced leukocytes, consistent with the neuropathy and recurrent infection of the human patients possessing the most severe reductions of PRPS1 activity. Further analyses indicated the phenotypes were associated with a prolonged cell cycle likely resulting from reduced nucleotide synthesis and energy production in the mutant embryos. We further demonstrated the phenotypes were caused by delays in the tissues most highly expressing the prps1 genes. PMID:27425195

  18. Effective reduction of lactose maldigestion in preschool children by direct addition of beta-galactosidases to milk at mealtime.

    PubMed

    Barillas, C; Solomons, N W

    1987-05-01

    We examined the efficiency of two beta-galactosidase preparations--one derived from the yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis (Lactaid), the other derived from the fungus, Aspergillus oryzae (Takamine)--to assist the in vivo digestion of lactose consumed by healthy Guatemalan preschool children. Milk prehydrolyzed by in vitro incubation with enzymes was used as the standard of reference, and the degree of incomplete digestion of lactose from 240 mL of milk was determined using the hydrogen breath test. In in vivo dose-response studies, both 3,250 neutral lactose units of Lactaid and 6,635 food and chemical codex lactose units of Takamine completely eliminated excess H2 excretion in a small sample of lactose-maldigesting subjects. When evaluated in a controlled, clinical trial setting, the same dose of Lactaid added directly to the milk at consumption produced an 82% relative reduction in H2 excretion, whereas Takamine was equally as effective as the prehydrolyzed milk. Thus, intraluminal conditions and gastrointestinal transit in the preschool child support the effective assisted digestion of milk lactose in an efficient manner and with the same enzyme to milk ratios as observed previously in adults. PMID:3106927

  19. No catalyst addition and highly efficient dissociation of H2O for the reduction of CO2 to formic acid with Mn.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Lingyun; Zeng, Xu; Yun, Jun; Wei, Feng; Jin, Fangming

    2014-05-20

    The "greenhouse effect" caused by the increasing atmospheric CO2 level is becoming extremely serious, and thus, the reduction of CO2 emissions has become an extensive, urgent, and long-term task. The dissociation of water for CO2 reduction with solar energy is regarded as one of the most promising methods for the sustainable development of the environment and energy. However, a high solar-to-fuel efficiency keeps a great challenge. In this work, the first observation of a highly effective, highly selective, and robust system of dissociating water for the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) into formic acid with metallic manganese (Mn) is reported. A considerably high formic acid yield of more than 75% on a carbon basis from NaHCO3 was achieved with 98% selectivity in the presence of simple commercially available Mn powder without the addition of any catalyst, and the proposed process is exothermic. Thus, this study may provide a promising method for the highly efficient dissociation of water for CO2 reduction by combining solar-driven thermochemistry with the reduction of MnO into Mn. PMID:24787746

  20. Effect of Phytogenic Feed Additives in Soybean Meal on In vitro Swine Fermentation for Odor Reduction and Bacterial Community Comparison.

    PubMed

    Alam, M J; Mamuad, L L; Kim, S H; Jeong, C D; Sung, H G; Cho, S B; Jeon, C O; Lee, K; Lee, Sang S

    2013-02-01

    The effect of different phytogenic feed additives on reducing odorous compounds in swine was investigated using in vitro fermentation and analyzed their microbial communities. Soybean meal (1%) added with 0.1% different phytogenic feed additives (FA) were in vitro fermented using swine fecal slurries and anaerobically incubated for 12 and 24 h. The phytogenic FAs used were red ginseng barn powder (Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, FA1), persimmon leaf powder (Diospyros virginiana L., FA2), ginkgo leaf powder (Ginkgo biloba L., FA3), and oregano lippia seed oil extract (Lippia graveolens Kunth, OL, FA4). Total gas production, pH, ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), nitrite-nitrogen (NO2 (-)-N), nitrate-nitrogen (NO3 (-)-N), sulfate (SO4 (--)), volatile fatty acids (VFA) and other metabolites concentration were determined. Microbial communities were also analyzed using 16S rRNA DGGE. Results showed that the pH values on all treatments increased as incubation time became longer except for FA4 where it decreased. Moreover, FA4 incubated for 12 and 24 h was not detected in NH3-N and H2S. Addition of FAs decreased (p<0.05) propionate production but increased (p<0.05) the total VFA production. Ten 16S rRNA DGGE bands were identified which ranged from 96 to 100% identity which were mostly isolated from the intestine. Similarity index showed three clearly different clusters: I (FA2 and FA3), II (Con and FA1), and III (FA4). Dominant bands which were identified closest to Eubacterium limosum (ATCC 8486T), Uncultured bacterium clone PF6641 and Streptococcus lutetiensis (CIP 106849T) were present only in the FA4 treatment group and were not found in other groups. FA4 had a different bacterial diversity compared to control and other treatments and thus explains having lowest odorous compounds. Addition of FA4 to an enriched protein feed source for growing swine may effectively reduce odorous compounds which are typically associated with swine production. PMID:25049786

  1. Effect of Phytogenic Feed Additives in Soybean Meal on In vitro Swine Fermentation for Odor Reduction and Bacterial Community Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Alam, M. J.; Mamuad, L. L.; Kim, S. H.; Jeong, C. D.; Sung, H. G.; Cho, S. B.; Jeon, C. O.; Lee, K.; Lee, Sang S.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of different phytogenic feed additives on reducing odorous compounds in swine was investigated using in vitro fermentation and analyzed their microbial communities. Soybean meal (1%) added with 0.1% different phytogenic feed additives (FA) were in vitro fermented using swine fecal slurries and anaerobically incubated for 12 and 24 h. The phytogenic FAs used were red ginseng barn powder (Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, FA1), persimmon leaf powder (Diospyros virginiana L., FA2), ginkgo leaf powder (Ginkgo biloba L., FA3), and oregano lippia seed oil extract (Lippia graveolens Kunth, OL, FA4). Total gas production, pH, ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), nitrite-nitrogen (NO2−-N), nitrate-nitrogen (NO3−-N), sulfate (SO4−−), volatile fatty acids (VFA) and other metabolites concentration were determined. Microbial communities were also analyzed using 16S rRNA DGGE. Results showed that the pH values on all treatments increased as incubation time became longer except for FA4 where it decreased. Moreover, FA4 incubated for 12 and 24 h was not detected in NH3-N and H2S. Addition of FAs decreased (p<0.05) propionate production but increased (p<0.05) the total VFA production. Ten 16S rRNA DGGE bands were identified which ranged from 96 to 100% identity which were mostly isolated from the intestine. Similarity index showed three clearly different clusters: I (FA2 and FA3), II (Con and FA1), and III (FA4). Dominant bands which were identified closest to Eubacterium limosum (ATCC 8486T), Uncultured bacterium clone PF6641 and Streptococcus lutetiensis (CIP 106849T) were present only in the FA4 treatment group and were not found in other groups. FA4 had a different bacterial diversity compared to control and other treatments and thus explains having lowest odorous compounds. Addition of FA4 to an enriched protein feed source for growing swine may effectively reduce odorous compounds which are typically associated with swine production. PMID:25049786

  2. Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Poston, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

  3. Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Poston, J.A.

    1997-12-02

    Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

  4. Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Gao, Zhengyang; Zhu, Jiashun; Wang, Quanhai; Huang, Yaji; Chiu, Chengchung; Parker, Bruce; Chu, Paul; Pant, Wei-Ping

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0)concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH3 addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH3 reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. PMID:18350905

  5. Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jiashun Zhu; Quanhai Wang; Yaji Huang; Chengchung Chiu; Bruce Parker; Paul Chu; Wei-ping Pan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0) concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH{sub 3} addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH{sub 3} reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Direct carbon-carbon bond formation via reductive soft enolization: a syn-selective Mannich addition of α-iodo thioesters.

    PubMed

    Truong, Ngoc; Sauer, Scott J; Seraphin-Hatcher, Cyndie; Coltart, Don M

    2016-08-16

    The β-amino carboxylic acid moiety is a key feature of numerous important biologically active compounds. We describe a syn-selective direct Mannich addition reaction that uses α-iodo thioesters and sulfonyl imines and produces β-amino thioesters. Enolate formation is achieved by reductive soft enolization. The products of the reaction provide straightforward access to biologically important β-lactams through a variety of known reactions. PMID:27492274

  7. Effects of Fe(III) and organic matter additions on methanogenic activity and Fe(III) reduction in boreal lake and wetland sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvinen, Anu; Lehtinen, Lotta; Kankaala, Paula

    2013-04-01

    We studied potential methane production and Fe(III) reduction activity in lake sediments and wetland peat sampled from 14 sites in southern and eastern Finland. The concentration of total iron in the sediments and peat varied between 0.5 and 1200 ppm and their organic matter content (loss of ignition) varied between 1-98% of dry weight. Also the effects of added amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and organic matter (ammoniumacetate and/or sodiumacetate) on methanogenic and Fe(III) reduction activities were studied in anaerobic laboratory incubations (in vitro) lasting 5-20 days at 15 °C in darkness. Potential methane production and the effects of iron and acetate additions were highly variable between lake and peatland sites. The highest methanogenic potential was generally measured in productive littoral sites, especially in those dominated by Phragmites australis vegetation stands. In these sediments the total iron concentrations were high and acetate additions clearly increased methane production whereas Fe(III) additions decreased it. Our results demonstrate that microbial Fe(III) reduction plays an important role in the anaerobic organic matter decomposition in many boreal lakes.

  8. An RFID-based on-lens sensor system for long-term IOP monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shun-Hsi; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Liao, Yu-Te; Yang, Tzu-Sen; Kuei, Cheng-Kai; Wu, Tsung-Wei; Huang, Yu-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an RFID-based on-lens sensor system is proposed for noninvasive long-term intraocular pressure monitoring. The proposed sensor IC, fabricated in a 0.18um CMOS process, consists of capacitive sensor readout circuitry, RFID communication circuits, and digital processing units. The sensor IC is integrated with electroplating capacitive sensors and a receiving antenna on the contact lens. The sensor IC can be wirelessly powered, communicate with RFID compatible equipment, and perform IOP measurement using on-lens capacitive sensor continuously from a 2cm distance while the incident power from an RFID reader is 20 dBm. The proposed system is compatible to Gen2 RFID protocol, extending the flexibility and reducing the self-developed firmware efforts. PMID:26738033

  9. Comparison of millimeter-wave cloud radar measurements for the Fall 1997 Cloud IOP

    SciTech Connect

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Li, L.; Galloway, J.; McIntosh, R.E.; Miller, M.A.; Clothiaux, E.E.; Haimov, S.; Mace, G.; Sassen, K.

    1998-05-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Fall 1997 IOP was to intercompare Ka-band (350Hz) and W-band (95GHz) cloud radar observations and verify system calibrations. During September 1997, several cloud radars were deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SOP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, including the full time operation 35 GHz CART Millimeter-wave Cloud Radar (MMCR), the University of Massachusetts (UMass) single antenna 33GHz/95 GHz Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS), the 95 GHz Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR) flown on the University of Wyoming King Air, the University of Utah 95 GHz radar and the dual-antenna Pennsylvania State University 94 GHz radar. In this paper the authors discuss several issues relevant to comparison of ground-based radars, including the detection and filtering of insect returns. Preliminary comparisons of ground-based Ka-band radar reflectivity data and comparisons with airborne radar reflectivity measurements are also presented.

  10. Reduction of dioxin-like toxicity in effluents by additional wastewater treatment and related effects in fish.

    PubMed

    Maier, Diana; Benisek, Martin; Blaha, Ludek; Dondero, Francesco; Giesy, John P; Köhler, Heinz-R; Richter, Doreen; Scheurer, Marco; Triebskorn, Rita

    2016-10-01

    Efficiency of advanced wastewater treatment technologies to reduce micropollutants which mediate dioxin-like toxicity was investigated. Technologies compared included ozonation, powdered activated carbon and granular activated carbon. In addition to chemical analyses in samples of effluents, surface waters, sediments, and fish, (1) dioxin-like potentials were measured in paired samples of effluents, surface waters, and sediments by use of an in vitro biotest (reporter gene assay) and (2) dioxin-like effects were investigated in exposed fish by use of in vivo activity of the mixed-function, monooxygenase enzyme, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) in liver. All advanced technologies studied, based on degradation or adsorption, significantly reduced dioxin-like potentials in samples and resulted in lesser EROD activity in livers of fish. Results of in vitro and in vivo biological responses were not clearly related to quantification of targeted analytes by use of instrumental analyses. PMID:27262214

  11. Reduction of sludge generation by the addition of support material in a cyclic activated sludge system for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Moacir Messias de; Lermontov, André; Araujo, Philippe Lopes da Silva; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2013-09-01

    An innovative biomass carrier (Biobob®) was tested for municipal wastewater treatment in an activated sludge system to evaluate the pollutant removal performance and the sludge generation for different carrier volumes. The experiment was carried out in a pilot-scale cyclic activated sludge system (CASS®) built with three cylindrical tanks in a series: an anoxic selector (2.1 m(3)), an aerobic selector (2.5 m(3)) and the main aerobic reactor (25.1 m(3)). The results showed that by adding the Biobob® carrier decreased the MLVSS concentration, which consequently reduced the waste sludge production of the system. Having 7% and 18% (v/v) support material in the aerobic reactor, the observed biomass yield decreased 18% and 36%, respectively, relative to the reactor operated with suspended biomass. The addition of media did not affect the system's performance for COD and TSS removal. However, TKN and TN removal were improved by 24% and 14%, respectively, using 18% (v/v) carrier. PMID:23831747

  12. Reference Alloy Waste Form Fabrication and Initiation of Reducing Atmosphere and Reductive Additives Study on Alloy Waste Form Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Frank; T.P. O'Holleran; P.A. Hahn

    2011-09-01

    This report describes the fabrication of two reference alloy waste forms, RAW-1(Re) and RAW-(Tc) using an optimized loading and heating method. The composition of the alloy materials was based on a generalized formulation to process various proposed feed streams resulting from the processing of used fuel. Waste elements are introduced into molten steel during alloy fabrication and, upon solidification, become incorporated into durable iron-based intermetallic phases of the alloy waste form. The first alloy ingot contained surrogate (non-radioactive), transition-metal fission products with rhenium acting as a surrogate for technetium. The second alloy ingot contained the same components as the first ingot, but included radioactive Tc-99 instead of rhenium. Understanding technetium behavior in the waste form is of particular importance due the longevity of Tc-99 and its mobility in the biosphere in the oxide form. RAW-1(Re) and RAW-1(Tc) are currently being used as test specimens in the comprehensive testing program investigating the corrosion and radionuclide release mechanisms of the representative alloy waste form. Also described in this report is the experimental plan to study the effects of reducing atmospheres and reducing additives to the alloy material during fabrication in an attempt to maximize the oxide content of waste streams that can be accommodated in the alloy waste form. Activities described in the experimental plan will be performed in FY12. The first aspect of the experimental plan is to study oxide formation on the alloy by introducing O2 impurities in the melt cover gas or from added oxide impurities in the feed materials. Reducing atmospheres will then be introduced to the melt cover gas in an attempt to minimize oxide formation during alloy fabrication. The second phase of the experimental plan is to investigate melting parameters associated with alloy fabrication to allow the separation of slag and alloy components of the melt.

  13. Sludge reduction by direct addition of chlorine dioxide into a sequencing batch reactor under operational mode of repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Liu, Weiyi; Li, Yuanmei; Xiao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of direct addition of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) into a repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on its sludge reduction and process performance was investigated. The experimental results showed that the sludge reduction efficiency was 32.9% and the observed growth yield (Yobs) of SBR was 0.11 kg VSS (volatile suspended solids) /kg COD (chemical oxygen demand) for 80 days' operation at the optimum ClO2 dosage of 2.0 mg/g TSS (total suspended solids). It was speculated that cell lysis and cryptic growth, uncoupled metabolism and endogenous metabolism were jointly responsible for the sludge reduction in this study. COD, NH3-N, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) in the effluent increased on average 29.47, 4.44, 1.97 and 0.05 mg/L, respectively. However, the effluent quality still satisfied the first-class B discharge standards for municipal wastewater treatment plants in China. In that case, the sludge maintained fine viability with the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) being 14.47 mg O2/(g VSS·h) and demonstrated good settleability with the sludge volume index (SVI) being 116 mL/g. The extra cost of sludge reduction at the optimum ClO2 dosage was estimated to be 2.24 CNY (or 0.36 dollar)/kg dry sludge. PMID:26524444

  14. Evaluation of a QAA-based algorithm using MODIS land bands data for retrieval of IOPs in the Eastern China Seas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuguo; Zhang, Tinglu

    2015-06-01

    A quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA)-based algorithm which is applied to moderate imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land band data (469, 555, and 645 nm) is proposed and named QAA-RGR (Red-Green-bands-Ratio). The performance has been evaluated using in situ measurements data and MODIS data from the Eastern China Seas (ECS). The QAA-RGR algorithm uses the ratio of the remote sensing reflectance at 645nm (Rrs645) to the Rrs555 to estimate the absorption coefficient at 555nm. In addition, the spectral slope of the backscattering coefficient (bb) is estimated using a statistical relationship based on bb555. The other steps of the retrieval algorithm are the same as those of the extensively used QAA version 5 (QAAv5). First, the QAA-RGR algorithm was applied to an in situ measurement data set for the ECS to retrieve inherent optical properties (IOPs), and the results were compared with the QAAv5. The results demonstrate that, the two algorithms exhibit similar performance for in situ measurements. Second, the algorithm was applied to the land bands data and ocean bands data of MODIS over the ECS to obtain the distribution of IOPs at 500m and 1000m resolutions. The results of the retrieval algorithm were evaluated against the corresponding in situ measurements and compared to those from QAAv5. The results demonstrate that, the QAA-RGR algorithm is characterized by a better performance than QAAv5 for MODIS data. For QAAv5, the averaged mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) values of retrieval results of absorption coefficients and backscattering coefficients compared with in situ match-up measurements are 25.2% and 22.2%, respectively. For QAA-RGR, the averaged MAPE values are 15.9% and 18.3%, respectively. The QAAv5 retrieval results are often significantly underestimated especially for turbid coastal waters because of the easy saturation at 667nm band in addition to a large uncertainty in the estimation of Rrs of the

  15. Catalysis via homolytic substitutions with C-O and Ti-O bonds: oxidative additions and reductive eliminations in single electron steps.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Fleckhaus, André; Lafont, Manuel Alejandre; Okkel, Andreas; Kotsis, Konstantinos; Anoop, Anakuthil; Neese, Frank

    2009-11-25

    In a combined theoretical and experimental study, an efficient catalytic reaction featuring epoxide opening and tetrahydrofuran formation through homolytic substitution reactions at C-O and Ti-O bonds was devised. The performance of these two key steps of the catalytic cycle was studied and could be adjusted by modifying the electronic properties of the catalysts through introduction of electron-donating or -withdrawing substituents to the titanocene catalysts. By regarding both steps as single electron versions of oxidative addition and reductive elimination, a mechanism-based platform for the design of catalysts and reagents for electron transfer reactions evolved that opens broad perspectives for further investigations. PMID:19919150

  16. The homogeneous reduction of CO₂ by [Ni(cyclam)]⁺: increased catalytic rates with the addition of a CO scavenger.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, Jesse D; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2015-03-18

    The homogeneous electrochemical reduction of CO2 by the molecular catalyst [Ni(cyclam)](2+) is studied by electrochemistry and infrared spectroelectrochemistry. The electrochemical kinetics are probed by varying CO2 substrate and proton concentrations. Products of CO2 reduction are observed in infrared spectra obtained from spectroelectrochemical experiments. The two major species observed are a Ni(I) carbonyl, [Ni(cyclam)(CO)](+), and a Ni(II) coordinated bicarbonate, [Ni(cyclam)(CO2OH)](+). The rate-limiting step during electrocatalysis is determined to be CO loss from the deactivated species, [Ni(cyclam)(CO)](+), to produce the active catalyst, [Ni(cyclam)](+). Another macrocyclic complex, [Ni(TMC)](+), is deployed as a CO scavenger in order to inhibit the deactivation of [Ni(cyclam)](+) by CO. Addition of the CO scavenger is shown to dramatically increase the catalytic current observed for CO2 reduction. Evidence for the [Ni(TMC)](+) acting as a CO scavenger includes the observation of [Ni(TMC)(CO)](+) by IR. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations probing the optimized geometry of the [Ni(cyclam)(CO)](+) species are also presented. PMID:25714353

  17. Radiation dosimetry for iop.org/images/0031-9155/41/10/006/img1.gif"/> therapy of neuroblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, Maggie A.; Fielding, Sue L.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes the methodology which can be used to determine whole-body, red marrow, blood, bladder, liver, and tumour doses delivered during iop.org/images/0031-9155/41/10/006/img6.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> therapy of neuroblastoma. The methodology is based on the Physics Protocol used in a multi-centre study undertaken by the United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group (UKCCSG). In this study, the estimates of the doses delivered, using 2.4 - 12.1 GBq iop.org/images/0031-9155/41/10/006/img6.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>, were in the following ranges: whole body, iop.org/images/0031-9155/41/10/006/img8.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>; red marrow, iop.org/images/0031-9155/41/10/006/img9.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>; blood, iop.org/images/0031-9155/41/10/006/img10.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>; bladder, iop.org/images/0031-9155/41/10/006/img11.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>; liver, iop.org/images/0031-9155/41/10/006/img12.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>; and tumour, iop.org/images/0031-9155/41/10/006/img13.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/>.

  18. Effect of cobalt addition on the liquid-phase sintering of W-Cu prepared by the fluidized bed reduction method

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, S.K.; Lee, S.W.; Ihn, T.H. . Dept. of Metallurgy)

    1994-08-01

    A new process, fluidized bed reduction (FBR) method, was applied for fabrication of uniform W-Cu sintered material. Liquid-phase sintering was carried out to obtain fully densified W-Cu composite, and the effect of cobalt addition on the sintering behavior was investigated. It was found that fully densified material could not be obtained even after sintering at 1,200 C for 4 hours in the case of 75W-25Cu, while more than 96 pct density could be obtained as soon as the sintering temperature reached 1,200 C when 0.5 wt pct cobalt was added prior to the sintering. It has been found that the wetting angle of the liquid copper is reduced significantly by the addition of cobalt, and the formation reaction of Co[sub 7]W[sub 6] intermetallic compound at the surface of the tungsten powder is mainly responsible for the enhancement of the densification process.

  19. Effect of cobalt addition on the liquid-phase sintering of W-Cu prepared by the fluidized bed reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Seung-Ki; Lee, Seok-Woon; Ihn, Tae-Hyoung

    1994-08-01

    A new process, fluidized bed reduction (FBR) method, was applied for fabrication of uniform W-Cu sintered material. Liquid-phase sintering was carried out to obtain fully densified W-Cu composite, and the effect of cobalt addition on the sintering behavior was investigated. It was found that fully densified material could not be obtained even after sintering at 1200 °C for 4 hours in the case of 75W-25Cu, while more than 96 pct density could be obtained as soon as the sintering temperature reached 1200 °C when 0.5 wt pct cobalt was added prior to the sintering. It has been found that the wetting angle of the liquid copper is reduced significantly by the addition of cobalt, and the formation reaction of Co7W6 intermetallic compound at the surface of the tungsten powder is mainly responsible for the enhancement of the densification process.

  20. COMPARISON OF MILLIMETER-WAVE CLOUD RADAR MEASUREMENTS FOR THE FALL 1997 CLOUD IOP

    SciTech Connect

    SEKELSKY,S.M.; LI,L.; GALLOWAY,J.; MCINTOSH,R.E.; MILLER,M.A.; CLOTHIAUX,E.E.; HAIMOV,S.; MACE,G.; SASSEN,K.

    1998-03-23

    One of the primary objectives of the Fall 1997 IOP was to intercompare Ka-band (35GHz) and W-band (95GHz) cloud radar observations and verify system calibrations. During September 1997, several cloud radars were deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, including the full time operation 35 GHz CART Millimeter-wave Cloud Radar (MMCR), (Moran, 1997), the University of Massachusetts (UMass) single antenna 33GHz/95 GHz Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS), (Sekelsky, 1996), the 95 GHz Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR) flown on the University of Wyoming King Air (Galloway, 1996), the University of Utah 95 GHz radar and the dual-antenna Pennsylvania State University 94 GHz radar (Clothiaux, 1995). In this paper the authors discuss several issues relevant to comparison of ground-based radars, including the detection and filtering of insect returns. Preliminary comparisons of ground-based Ka-band radar reflectivity data and comparisons with airborne radar reflectivity measurements are also presented.

  1. Microphysical relationships of clouds observed during March 2000 Cloud IOP at SGP Site and important implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.; Liu, Y.

    2010-03-15

    Cloud droplet size distributions ---- hence the key microphysical quantities of climate importance (e.g., the total droplet concentration, liquid water content, relative dispersion, mean-volume radius, radar reflectivity, and effective radius) are determined by different physical mechanisms such as pre-cloud aerosols, cloud updraft and turbulent entrainment-mixing processes. Therefore, the relationships among these microphysical properties are expected to behave differently in response to aerosols, cloud updrafts and turbulent entrainment-mixing processes. Identifying and quantifying the influences on these microphysical relationships of the various mechanisms is critical for accurately representing cloud microphysics in climate models and for reducing the uncertainty in estimates of aerosol indirect effects. This study first examines the characteristics of the relationships between relative dispersion, droplet concentration, liquid water content, mean-volume radius, effective radius and radar reflectivity calculated from in-situ measurements of cloud droplet size distributions collected during the March 2000 Cloud IOP at the SGP site. The relationships are further analyzed to dissect the effects from different mechanisms/factors (aerosols, updraft, and different turbulent entrainment-mixing processes). Potential applications to improve radar retrievals of cloud properties will be explored as well.

  2. Effect of α-Si3N4 Addition on Sintering of α-Sialon Powder via Carbonthermal Reduction Nitridation of Boron-rich Slag-based Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junbin; Jiang, Tao; Xue, Xiangxin

    2011-10-01

    With boron-rich slag, silica fume, bauxite chalmette, carbon black and α-Si3N4 as starting materials, α-Sialon powders were prepared by carbothermal reduction-nitridation(CRN). Different contents of α-Si3N4 addition were added to investigate the α-Sialon formation as a function of α-Si3N4 addition from boron rich slag based mixture fired at 1480 °C for 8 h under N2 flowing of 0.4 L/min. Phase assembly, microstructure of reaction products were determined by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope. The results showed that the main phases of the samples were a-Sialon, h-BN, AlN and small quantity of SiC. With the increasing amount of the α-Si3N4 addition, the h-BN content remained in a constant and AlN content was running down steadily, while the α-Sialon content increased gradually. The aspect ratio and the amount of elongated α-Sialon grains could be tailored by using different amounts of the α-Si3N4 addition.

  3. Significant Promotion Effect of Mo Additive on a Novel Ce-Zr Mixed Oxide Catalyst for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO(x) with NH3.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shipeng; Liu, Fudong; Shi, Xiaoyan; Liu, Kuo; Lian, Zhihua; Xie, Lijuan; He, Hong

    2015-05-13

    A novel Mo-promoted Ce-Zr mixed oxide catalyst prepared by a homogeneous precipitation method was used for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) with NH3. The optimal catalyst showed high NH3-SCR activity, SO2/H2O durability, and thermal stability under test conditions. The addition of Mo inhibited growth of the CeO2 particle size, improved the redox ability, and increased the amount of surface acidity, especially the Lewis acidity, all of which were favorable for the excellent NH3-SCR performance. It is believed that the catalyst is promising for the removal of NO(x) from diesel engine exhaust. PMID:25894854

  4. The impact of the sea surface temperature resolution on mesoscale coastal processes during GALE IOP 2

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, J.D.; Warner, T.T. )

    1993-02-01

    The Pennsylvania State University-NCAR Mesoscale Model is used to examine the sensitivity of the structure and evolution of mesoscale coastal phenomena to the sea surface temperature (SST) distribution in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream during intensive observation period 2 (IOP 2) of the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE). Experiments are performed with three different SST analyses: (1) a high-resolution 14-km analysis, (2) a medium-resolution 275-km analysis, and (3) a coarse-resolution 381-km analysis. The results indicate that numerical simulations of mesoscale phenomena embedded in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream are very sensitive to the SST distribution. The total average heat fluxes differ by less than 15% among the three experiments; however, the mesoscale distributions of the oceanic surface heat fluxes differ substantially. Significant dissimilarities occur among the three experiments in terms of the intensity and movement of the north-wall MABL front, MABL structure, coastal front, cyclone, and precipitation. The maximum values of diagnosed quantites (e.g., vorticity, divergence, thermal gradients, and frontogenesis) in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream vary by as much as a factor of 8 among the three simulations. Also, the lower-tropospheric geostrophic forcing along the coast is relatively weak in the two simulations that used lower-resolution SST analyses. This weak geostrophic forcing in the lower-resolution SST experiments results in the development of a low-level jet that is weaker than observed and simulated in the experiment with the high-resolution analysis. The use of high-resolution SST analyses in research and operational mesoscale models may be essential in some cases for the accurate prediction of coastal cyclones and their associated mesoscale structures. 43 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Scale Model Acoustic Test Validation of IOP-SS Water Prediction using Loci-STREAM-VoF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). SMAT consists of a 5% scale representation of the ignition overpressure sound-suppression system (IOP-SS) that is being tested to quantify the water flow and induced air entrainment in and around the mobile launcher exhaust hole. This data will be compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the newly developed Loci-STREAM Volume of Fluid (VoF) methods. Compressible and incompressible VoF methods have been formulated, and are currently being used to simulate the water flow of SMAT IOP-SS. The test data will be used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess and validate the VoF methods.

  6. Large-eddy simulation of urban dispersion during the Urban 2000 Field Program IOP-10, 25-26 October 2000

    SciTech Connect

    DeCroix, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    In October 2000, the US Department of Energy, along with NOAA and several other government labs and universities, conducted the Vertical Transport and Mixing Experiment (VTMX) and URBAN2000 field programs in Salt Lake City, Utah (Alwine et al., 2002). The VTMX program focused on the basin-scale flow regime, where the URBAN2000 component focused on transport and dispersion in the downtown Salt Lake City area. In this paper, we will focus on a specific Intensive Operations Period, IOP-10, which occurred on October 25-26, 2000. IOP-16 was chosen because the winds in the downtown area were fairly weak and variable early in the experiment, and became more windy in the later part of the IOP. The local conditions were influenced by a shortwave ridge, and were cloudy, with a weak and very shallow surface inversion, and light mean southerly flow over the area. An inert tracer gas, SF6, was released downtown Salt Lake City for a duration of one hour at three separate times on 26 October 2000, 01:00-02:00, 03:00-04:00, and 05:00-06:00 MDT. This paper will focus on the first release time, from 01:00-02:00 MDT.

  7. Effects of combined treatments of electron-beam irradiation and addition of leek (Allium tuberosum) extract on reduction of pathogens in pork jerky.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mingu; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jayasena, Dinesh D; Bae, Young Sik; Yong, Hae In; Lee, Mooha; Jo, Cheorun

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the combined effect of electron-beam irradiation and addition of leek (Allium tuberosum R.) extract on pork jerky inoculated with selected foodborne pathogens. Prepared pork jerky samples (control and samples with 1.0% leek extract) were inoculated with pathogens and subsequently irradiated at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy doses. In comparison with the control, samples with 1.0% leek extract showed significant reduction in the numbers of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium. No viable counts were detected for Salmonella Typhimurium in both control and leek-extract samples, and for E. coli and L. monocytogenes in the leek-extract sample exposed to 3 kGy irradiation dose. The D(10) values for E. coli, L. monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium observed in the irradiated samples with leek extract were 0.39, 0.34, and 0.32 kGy, while the D(10) values in those without leek extract were 0.65, 0.65, and 0.39 kGy, respectively. Therefore, our results clearly showed that irradiation combined with leek extract was effective in reducing pathogens, suggesting that a low dose of irradiation combined with the addition of a natural antimicrobial agent can enhance the microbial safety and shelf-life of pork jerky. PMID:23199493

  8. Combining an amyloid-beta (Aβ) cleaving enzyme inhibitor with a γ-secretase modulator results in an additive reduction of Aβ production.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, Kia; Eketjäll, Susanna; Georgievska, Biljana; Tunblad, Karin; Eliason, Kristina; Olsson, Fredrik; Radesäter, Ann-Cathrin; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Arvidsson, Per I; von Berg, Stefan; Fälting, Johanna; Cowburn, Richard F; Dabrowski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in amyloid plaques. Aβ peptides are produced by sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein by the β amyloid cleaving enzyme (BACE) and the γ-secretase (γ-sec) complex. Pharmacological treatments that decrease brain levels of in particular the toxic Aβ42 peptide are thought to be promising approaches for AD disease modification. Potent and selective BACE1 inhibitors as well as γ-sec modulators (GSMs) have been designed. Pharmacological intervention of secretase function is not without risks of either on- or off-target adverse effects. One way of improving the therapeutic window could be to combine treatment on multiple targets, using smaller individual doses and thereby minimizing adverse effect liability. We show that combined treatment of primary cortical neurons with a BACE1 inhibitor and a GSM gives an additive effect on Aβ42 level change compared with the individual treatments. We extend this finding to C57BL/6 mice, where the combined treatment results in reduction of brain Aβ42 levels reflecting the sum of the individual treatment efficacies. These results show that pharmacological targeting of two amyloid precursor protein processing steps is feasible without negatively interfering with the mechanism of action on individual targets. We conclude that targeting Aβ production by combining a BACE inhibitor and a GSM could be a viable approach for therapeutic intervention in AD modification. PMID:25303711

  9. IOP from reflectance measurements to obtain the Kd coefficient: application to the Gabon and Congo coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeltz, M.; Froidefond, J.-M.; Jourdain, F.; Martiny, N.

    2009-08-01

    During the "Optic-Congo" oceanographic survey which took place in 2005 on board the "Beautemp-Beaupré" SHOM vessel, different optical measurements of the surface water were acquired using a TRIOS radiance sensor fixed onboard a mini-catamaran. Hydrological measurements (CTD, fluorescence, attenuation, scattering) and water samples were simultaneously collected in order to measure SPM, Chlorophyll-a and CDOM concentrations. Four types of surface water colours (blue, green-yellow, dark and brown) were identified. The main characteristics of these waters were the very low Chlorophyll-a concentrations for this period of the year (March), and the very high CDOM concentrations along the Congo coast, and particularly in the turbid plume of the Congo River. The attenuation and scattering measurements highlighted the predominance of organic matter at the water surface. These observations were documented using a beam electron microscope and by microanalysis. This data set was used to classify the water bodies along the Gabon and Congo coasts. We propose here to use the remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) measurements to invert the IOP (absorption (a) and backscattering (bb)) using the WASI numerical bio-optical model. The model is iterative: the Rrs WASI simulations are computed given initial values of ocean constituents' concentrations and iteratively adjusted to the Rrs in-situ measurements. The IOP computations are satisfying when the correlations between simulated and measured Rrs are optimized. Then, the attenuation coefficients (Kd) are computed from the IOP coefficients. These results are compared with measurements of Ku carried out during the survey.

  10. Revolution or flight from reality? The IoP Education Group Conference 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1999-09-01

    constructivism in action. Brilliant, I thought. In a parallel session Ian Lawrence demonstrated the use of ICT (via CD-ROM) in the IOP's new Advancing Physics A-level course. It gives an extremely flexible and user-friendly set of resources for teaching physics that all A-level students and teachers should find useful and indeed stimulating. It has working simulations, details of lab activities, extension readings, questions and an A-to-Z Wordlist that is a revision tool on its own. At an anticipated price of #10 it is a sure-fire buy. Roger Frost is a well-known author and expert on making use of ICT. He is also a very funny `presenter', with a firm grasp of reality and a keen eye for the incidental absurdities often associated with the higher technology. He took us through a wide range of ideas and programs that were seriously enriching, finishing with a demonstration of a yet to be released piece of datalogging software and associated sensors (from Pasco Scientific) that seem likely to revolutionize this aspect of ICT. In the final session Ian Lawrence and Philip Britton reprised their opening talk with the aim of getting some `action points' that the Education Group could use in forming opinions and/or lobbying authority. For interactive ICT you need a set of laptops (otherwise no bench-space) and an electronic projector or white-board. Start saving now. This conference is not the end of discussion: you can join in the online conference by e-mailing PTNC_request@iop.org, saying `subscribe PTNC your.e-mail address' Useful follow-ups Jerry Wellington: report on evaluation of ICT use available at www.chemistryschool.com Useful astronomy programs downloadable (unzip needed) from www.gettysburg.edu/academics/~physics/clea/CLEAhome.html

  11. Investigation into the effects of vermiculite on NOx reduction and additives on sooting and exhaust infrared signature from a gas-turbine combustor. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, K.R.

    1990-09-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of using catalytic reduction of NOX emissions from a typical jet engine combustor in the test cell environment. A modified T-63 combustor in combination with an instrumented 21 foot augmentation tube containing a vermiculite catalyst was used. Several methods for containing the vermiculite were attempted. Both vermiculite and vermiculite which had been coated with thiourea were used. Up to 19% reduction in NOX concentrations was obtained using the vermiculite coated with thiourea, however the pressure loss across the catalyst bed was measured to be 36 in. H2O. The techniques used proved ineffective and unacceptable for gas turbine engine test cell applications. Tests were conducted using both Wynn's 15/590 and Catane TM (ferrocene) fuel supplements in order to determine their effectiveness for soot reduction and whether or not the exhaust plume could be changed.

  12. Dose addition models based on biologically-relevant reductions in fetal testosterone accurately predict postnatal reproductive tract alterations by a phthalate mixture in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Challenges in cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic phthalate mixtures include a lack of data on all the individual phthalates and difficulty determining the biological relevance of reduction in fetal testosterone (T) on postnatal development. The objectives of the curren...

  13. Impact of KITcube data on the prediction of maritime convective severe weather. Test for HYMEX IOP13 event.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrio Carrio, Diego Saul; Homar Santaner, Víctor; Corsmeier, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    The Special Observation Period 1 (SOP1) was a great milestone reached by the HyMeX scientific community. Observations sampling on 20 cases of severe weather were taken under an unprecedented international collaboration. The nderlying objective of this campaign was to improve the knowledge of the mechanisms leading to heavy precipitation and flash flooding in the Mediterranean. One of the most active platforms during the campaign was the KITcube-observatory of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, a mobile platform that includes ground-based remote sensors (radar and lidar) and instruments for in-situ measurements. During SOP1, the KITcube operated on the island of Corsica, providing direct observational data on severe weather occurring in the north-eastern region of the Western Mediterranean. IOP 13 occurred between 15-16 October 2012 and it was characterized by heavy rains over northern and central Italy. Storms formed over the French coastlands and over the sea, progressing eastwards across the Gulf of Genoa. The most affected areas were north-eastern Italy (160mm/24h), LiguriaTuscany (120mm/24h) and central Italy (600mm/24h). The prediction of these maritime convection driven cases is highly demanding for both operational offices and high resolution numerical models. Ensemble data assimilation methods provide the tools to combine observational and modeling information to formalize the problem of optimal use and transference of information in the initialization and integration of a forecasting system. We test the benefits offered by an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) system for the prediction of the IOP13 event. We assess the impacts of various in-situ special observations taken by the KITcube team during this event on the forecasts of socially sensible parameters such as probability of severe and accumulated precipitation. We discuss these impacts not only on the forecasts products but also in terms of the relevant physical mechanisms involved in the event.

  14. Statistical analysis and comparative study of energy balance components estimated using micrometeorological techniques during HUBEX/IOP 1998/99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhilin; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Renhua

    2003-06-01

    In order to study energy and water cycles in the Huaihe River Basin, micrometeorological measurements were carried out in Shouxian County, Anhui Province, during HUBEX/IOP (May to August 1998 and June to July 1999). The employed techniques included Bowen Ratio-Energy Balance (BREB) and Eddy Covariance (EC) methods. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the energy balance components in the district are analyzed. Furthermore, the results are compared with those from other regions of China. The main results are as follows: (1) There was a consistency between the available energy (R n-G) and the sum of sensible (H) and latent (E) heat fluxes measured by the EC method (H+E)ec, but E br was slightly larger (about 10%) than E ec; (2) Most of the net radiation (R n) was used to evaporate water from the surface. During HUBEX/IOP in 1998 and 1999, the mean daily amounts of R n were 13.89 MJ m-2d-1 and 11.83 MJ m-2d-1, and the mean Bowen Ratios (β) were 0.14 (over ruderal) and 0.06 (over paddy) respectively; (3) The diurnal variation characteristic of β was larger and unsteady at sunrise and sunset, and smaller and steady during the rest of the daytime. Local advection appeared in the afternoon over paddy areas in 1999; (4) In comparison with the results from other regions of China, the mean β was the lowest (0.06) over paddy areas in the Huaihe River Basin and the highest (0.57) during June August 1998 in Inner Mongolia grassland. The Bowen Ratio β is mainly related to the soil humidity.

  15. Comparison study of intraocular pressure reduction efficacy and safety between latanoprost and tafluprost in Japanese with normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Tada, Kaori; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Sotozono, Chie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction efficacy and safety between the ophthalmic solutions 0.005% latanoprost (Lat) and 0.0015% tafluprost (Taf) in Japanese patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Methods In this randomized nonmasked study, we prospectively enrolled 30 Japanese NTG patients who had used Lat monotherapy for more than 4 weeks, and randomly divided them into the following two groups: 1) Lat-to-Taf group (LT group) and 2) Taf-to-Lat group (TL group). At the beginning of the study, both groups were switched from initial Lat to Lat or Taf for 12 weeks, and then switched over to the other drug (crossover) for 12 additional weeks. At 0, 4, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, we evaluated each patient’s IOP, conjunctival injection, and corneal epitheliopathy score, and at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, we evaluated their eyelash changes and pigmentation of the eyelids and irises. Results The mean IOP of the LT group (15 eyes) was 10.5, 10.6, and 11.1 mmHg, at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively, whereas that of the TL group (15 eyes) was 11.7, 11.1, and 10.5 mmHg at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups and in the intragroup comparisons. Moreover, no significant differences were found between Lat and Taf in regard to the conjunctival injection score and corneal epitheliopathy score. Eyelash changes and eyelid and iris pigmentation were similar in both groups. Conclusion The findings of this study show that Lat and Taf have equivalent efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with NTG. PMID:27601879

  16. STIMULATION OF REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRA- CHLOROETHENE (PCE) IN ANAEROBIC AQUIFER MICROCOSMS BY ADDITION OF SHORT-CHAIN ORGANIC ACIDS OR ALCOHOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of the addition of common fermentation products on the dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene was studied in methanogenic slurries made with aquifer solids. Lactate, propionate, crotonate, butyrate, and ethanol stimulated dehalogenation activity, while acetate, methanol, ...

  17. Reduction of hydrogen cyanide concentrations and acute inhalation toxicity from flexible polyurethane foam combustion products by the addition of copper compounds. Part 3. The effect of copper additives on the flammability characteristics of flexible polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.C.; Braun, E.; Shields, J.R.; Lowe, D.

    1990-10-01

    The report addresses the issue of whether the addition of a copper compound to a flexible polyurethane foam would affect the flammability characteristics of the foam. The following properties were examined: (1) ignitability in three systems (the NBS Toxicity Test Method, the Cone Calorimeter, and Lateral Ignition and Flame Spread Test (LIFT)), (2) heat release rate under small-scale (Cone Calorimeter) and medium-scale (furniture calorimeter), (3) smoke obscuration (Cone Calorimeter), and (4) rate of flame spread (LIFT). In all cases, no differences in flammability characteristics between the treated and untreated foam were observed.

  18. Comparison of surgical time and IOP spikes with two ophthalmic viscosurgical devices following Visian STAAR (ICL, V4c model) insertion in the immediate postoperative period

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sri; Brar, Sheetal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effect of two ocular viscosurgical devices (OVDs) on intraocular pressure (IOP) and surgical time in immediate postoperative period after bilateral implantable collamer lens (using the V4c model) implantation. Methods A total of 20 eligible patients were randomized to receive 2% hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) in one eye and 1% hyaluronic acid in fellow eye. Time taken for complete removal of OVD and total surgical time were recorded. At the end of surgery, IOP was adjusted between 15 and 20 mmHg in both the eyes. Results Mean time for complete OVD evacuation and total surgical time were significantly higher in the HPMC group (P=0.00). Four eyes in the HPMC group had IOP spike, requiring treatment. IOP values with noncontact tonometry at 1, 2, 4, 24, and 48 hours were not statistically significant (P>0.05) for both the groups. Conclusion The study concluded that 1% hyaluronic acid significantly reduces total surgical time, and incidence of acute spikes may be lower compared to 2% HPMC when used for implantable collamer lens (V4c model). PMID:26869754

  19. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    SciTech Connect

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D.

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  20. Reduction of irradiation off-odor and lipid oxidation in ground beef by α-tocopherol addition and the use of a charcoal pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, S. H.; Jang, A.; Kim, J. K.; Song, H. P.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, M.; Jo, C.

    2009-02-01

    A combination of a charcoal pack during irradiation and α-tocopherol addition into ground beef was applied to eliminate an irradiation characteristic off-odor and to retard the lipid oxidation caused by the irradiation process. Ground beef was mixed with 200 ppm α-tocopherol and gamma irradiated with 0, 5, and 10 kGy with or without a charcoal pack present during the irradiation treatment. The pH of the control group was lower than that of α-tocopherol and charcoal pack treatment initially but increased rapidly and showed higher pH at day 7. Addition of α-tocopherol with or without charcoal pack addition showed lower 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values in irradiated ground beef at days 3 and 7 compared to those without addition. The color of ground beef was not significantly affected by the treatment. However, odor preference result showed that 10 kGy-irradiated ground beef with a combination of charcoal pack and α-tocopherol addition had higher scores than the control group regardless of irradiation. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis identified various volatile compounds that were created by irradiation of ground beef. These compounds were reduced or eliminated when a charcoal pack was used during the irradiation process. The results of the present study imply that combination of packaging with a charcoal pack during the irradiation process and addition of α-tocopherol into ground beef is a good method to effectively eliminate an irradiation off-odor and retard the lipid oxidation development in ground beef caused by irradiation.

  1. Promotion of oxygen reduction reaction durability of carbon-supported PtAu catalysts by surface segregation and TiO₂ addition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Wei; Chen, Hong-Shuo; Lai, Chien-Ming; Lin, Jiunn-Nan; Tsai, Li-Duan; Wang, Kuan-Wen

    2014-02-12

    Highly effective carbon supported-Pt75Au25 catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are prepared though titanium dioxide modification and post heat treatment. After accelerated durability test (ADT) of 1700 cycles, the ORR activity of PtAu/C catalysts modified by TiO2 and air heat treatment is 3 times higher than that of the commercial Pt/C. The enhancement of ORR activity is attributed to surface and structural alteration by air-induced Pt surface segregation and lower unfilled d states. On the contrary, for TiO2 modified and H2 treated PtAu/C catalysts, the deterioration of the ORR activity may be due to the loss of electrochemical surface area after ADT and the increase of d-band vacancy. PMID:24447040

  2. Reduction of nectarine decay caused by Rhizopus stolonifer, Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium digitatum with Aloe vera gel alone or with the addition of thymol.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Diana; Díaz-Mula, Huertas M; Guillén, Fabián; Zapata, Pedro J; Castillo, Salvador; Serrano, María; Valero, Daniel; Martínez-Romero, Domingo

    2011-12-01

    Two nectarine cultivars ('Flavela' and 'Flanoba') were treated with Aloe vera gel alone, or with the addition of thymol, and then inoculated with Rhizopus stolonifer, Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium digitatum. Both treatments were effective in reducing the decay incidence caused by the 3 fungi species, although the addition of thymol did not generally improve the efficacy of Aloe vera gel on reducing the infection damage. The coatings were clearly effective in reducing the postharvest ripening process of both nectarine cultivars manifested by a delay in ethylene production and respiration rate, weight loss and softening. Interestingly, these coatings showed effectiveness on reducing decay development in inoculated fruits and thus Aloe vera could be considered as natural antifungal compound and might serve as alternative of synthetic fungicides. PMID:21974979

  3. Feasibility study of sustained-release travoprost punctum plug for intraocular pressure reduction in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Shamira A; Ting, Daniel SW; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Chew, Paul T; Aquino, Maria Cecilia D; Sng, Chelvin CA; Ho, Sue-Wei; Aung, Tin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy and safety of a punctum plug-based sustained drug release system for a prostaglandin analog, travoprost (OTX-TP), for intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction in an Asian population. Methods This is an initial feasibility, prospective, single-arm study involving 26 eyes and a bioresorbable punctum plug containing OTX-TP. An OTX-TP was placed in the vertical portion of the superior or inferior canaliculus of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. The main outcome measure was the IOP-lowering efficacy of OTX-TP at 3 (8 am) and 10, 20, and 30 days (8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm), compared to baseline. Results A total of 26 OTX-TP were inserted for 17 subjects. The mean (standard deviation) age was 57.2 (13.8) years. At 10 days, all plugs were still present, and the IOP reduction from baseline was 6.2 (23%), 5.4 (21%), and 7.5 mmHg (28%) at 8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm, respectively. At 10 days, the mean IOP (standard error of mean) was 21.2 (1.2), 20.4 (0.8), and 19.7 (1.0) at 8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm, respectively, showing no discernible IOP trend during the course of the day. At 30 days, plug retention had declined to 42%, and the overall IOP reduction had decreased to 16%. Conclusion The sustained-release OTX-TP is able to reduce IOP by 24% (day 10) and 15.6% (day 30), respectively. It is a potentially well-tolerable ocular hypotensive for glaucoma patients with a history of poor compliance. PMID:27175058

  4. Time Resolved 3-D Mapping of Atmospheric Aerosols and Clouds During the Recent ARM Water Vapor IOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary; Miller, David; Wilkerson, Thomas; Andrus, Ionio; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The HARLIE lidar was deployed at the ARM SGP site in north central Oklahoma and recorded over 100 hours of data on 16 days between 17 September and 6 October 2000 during the recent Water Vapor Intensive Operating Period (IOP). Placed in a ground-based trailer for upward looking scanning measurements of clouds and aerosols, HARLIE provided a unique record of time-resolved atmospheric backscatter at 1 micron wavelength. The conical scanning lidar images atmospheric backscatter along the surface of an inverted 90 degree (full angle) cone up to an altitude of 20 km. 360 degree scans having spatial resolutions of 20 meters in the vertical and 1 degree in azimuth were obtained every 36 seconds. Various boundary layer and cloud parameters are derived from the lidar data, as well as atmospheric wind vectors where there is Sufficiently resolved structure that can be traced moving through the surface described by the scanning laser beam. Comparison of HARLIE measured winds with radiosonde measured winds validates the accuracy of this new technique for remotely measuring atmospheric winds without Doppler information.

  5. Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Observation Period (RCS-IOP) millimeter-wave radar calibration and data intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Firda, J.M.; McIntosh, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    During April 1994, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) and the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) fielded two millimeter-wave atmospheric radars in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Operation Period (RCS-IOP) experiment. The UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) operates simultaneously at 33.12 GHz and 94.92 GHz through a single antenna. The Penn State radar operates at 93.95 GHz and has separate transmitting and receiving antennas. The two systems were separated by approximately 75 meters and simultaneously observed a variety of cloud types at verticle incidence over the course of the experiment. This abstract presents some initial results from our calibration efforts. An absolute calibration of the UMass radar was made from radar measurements of a trihedral corner reflector, which has a known radar cross-section. A relative calibration of between the Penn State and UMass radars is made from the statistical comparison of zenith pointing measurements of low altitude liquid clouds. Attenuation is removed with the aid of radiosonde data, and the difference in the calibration between the UMass and Penn State radars is determined by comparing the ratio of 94-GHz and 95-GHz reflectivity values to a model that accounts for parallax effects of the two antennas used in the Penn State system.

  6. Aerosol Single-Scattering Albedo and Asymmetry Parameter from MFRSR Observations during the ARM Aerosol IOP 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Barnard, James C.

    2007-06-15

    Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) provide routine measurements of the aerosol optical depth ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) at six wavelengths (0.415, 0.5, 0.615, 0.673, 0.870 and 0.94  << OLE Object: Picture (Metafile) >> ). The single-scattering albedo ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) is typically estimated from the MFRSR measurements by assuming the asymmetry parameter ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ). In most instances, however, it is not easy to set an appropriate value of << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> due to its strong temporal and spatial variability. Here, we introduce and validate an updated version of our retrieval technique that allows one to estimate simultaneously << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> and << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> for different types of aerosol. We use the aerosol and radiative properties obtained during the Atmospheric Science Program (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) to validate our retrieval in two ways. First, the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are compared with those obtained from independent surface, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and aircraft measurements. The MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are in reasonable agreement with these independent measurements. Second, we perform radiative closure experiments using the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties. The calculated broadband values of the direct and diffuse fluxes are comparable (~ 5 << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) to those obtained from measurements.

  7. Viscosity and yield stress reduction in non-colloidal concentrated suspensions by surface modification with polymers and surfactants and/or nanoparticle addition.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Maricel; Robben, Amanda; Grady, Brian P; Robb, Ian

    2006-03-15

    A custom-designed apparatus termed the yield stress adaptor (YSA) has been used to evaluate the effect of polymer-surfactant coatings, and the addition of nanoparticles of different size, shape and surface chemistry, on the rheological properties of large hydrophilic particulates, sand, with the aim of reducing interparticle friction forces. Experimental results show that the flow properties of sand slurries at high volume fractions of sand (>50%) can be significantly enhanced by adding nanoparticles, and by surface modification with polymer/surfactant mixtures. A lesser effect is observed for polymer-only and surfactant-only coated samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of organic species at the surface. The effect of polymer/surfactant concentration, adsorption time, polymer molecular weight, as well as surfactant charge and chemical structure were also addressed. PMID:16289129

  8. Influence of operation conditions and additives on the development of producer gas and tar reduction in air gasification of construction woody wastes using a two-stage gasifier.

    PubMed

    Mun, Tae-Young; Kim, Jin-O; Kim, Jin-Won; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2011-07-01

    Air gasification was conducted with fractions of construction woody wastes in a two-stage gasifier, consisting of a fluidized bed zone and a tar cracking zone. The aim of this work is to investigate the influence of reaction conditions and additives on the composition of producer gas and tar content in producer gas. A producer gas obtained with activated carbon of 540 g at an ER of 0.26 was mainly composed of H(2) (25 vol.%), CO (22 vol.%) and CH(4) (5 vol.%). Regarding tar removal efficiency, activated carbon was better than olivine. The tar removal rate with virgin activated carbon reached up to 80%. The reuse of spent activated carbon caused an efficiency loss in tar removal to some extent. Overall, it seems that the strong need for intensive downstream tar removal measurements can be removed with the use of a two-stage gasifier and the application of activated carbon. PMID:21565495

  9. Protein and Calorie Restriction Contribute Additively to Protection from Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Partly via Leptin Reduction in Male Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Lauren T; Treviño-Villarreal, J Humberto; Mejia, Pedro; Grondin, Yohann; Harputlugil, Eylul; Hine, Christopher; Vargas, Dorathy; Zheng, Hanqiao; Ozaki, C Keith; Kristal, Bruce S; Simpson, Stephen J; Mitchell, James R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Short-term dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition preconditions against surgical stress in rodents; however, the nutritional basis and underlying nutrient/energy-sensing pathways remain poorly understood. Objectives: We investigated the relative contribution of protein restriction (PR) vs. calorie restriction (CR) to protection from renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and changes in organ-autonomous nutrient/energy-sensing pathways and hormones underlying beneficial effects. Methods: Mice were preconditioned on experimental diets lacking total calories (0–50% CR) or protein/essential amino acids (EAAs) vs. complete diets consumed ad libitum (AL) for 1 wk before IRI. Renal outcome was assessed by serum markers and histology and integrated over a 2-dimensional protein/energy landscape by geometric framework analysis. Changes in renal nutrient/energy-sensing signal transduction and systemic hormones leptin and adiponectin were also measured. The genetic requirement for amino acid sensing via general control non-derepressible 2 (GCN2) was tested with knockout vs. control mice. The involvement of the hormone leptin was tested by injection of recombinant protein vs. vehicle during the preconditioning period. Results: CR-mediated protection was dose dependent up to 50% with maximal 2-fold effect sizes. PR benefits were abrogated by EAA re-addition and additive with CR, with maximal benefits at any given amount of CR occurring with a protein-free diet. GCN2 was not required for functional benefits of PR. Activation and repression of nutrient/energy-sensing kinases, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), respectively, on PR reflected a state of negative energy balance, paralleled by 13% weight loss and an 87% decrease in leptin, independent of calorie intake. Recombinant leptin administration partially abrogated benefits of dietary preconditioning against renal IRI. Conclusions: In male mice, PR

  10. Pt-Sn/C catalysts prepared by sodium borohydride reduction for alcohol oxidation in fuel cells: Effect of the precursor addition order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Suárez, F. E.; Bueno-López, A.; Eguiluz, K. I. B.; Salazar-Banda, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    A series of Pt-Sn/C catalysts used as anodes during ethanol oxidation are synthesized by a deposition process using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. The order in which the precursors are added affects the electrocatalytic activity and physical-chemical characteristics of the bimetallic catalysts, where the Pt-Sn catalyst prepared by co-precipitation of both metals functions best below a potential of 0.5 V and the catalyst prepared by sequential deposition of Sn and Pt (drying after Sn addition) is most active above a potential of 0.5 V. The electrochemical behavior of catalysts during ethanol oxidation in an acidic medium are characterized and monitored in a half-cell test at room temperature by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and anode potentiostatic polarization. Catalyst structure and chemical composition are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This behavior presented for best Pt-Sn catalyst can be attributed to the so-called bifunctional mechanism and to the electronic interaction between Pt and Sn.

  11. Testing the Effects of the Addition of Videos to a Website Promoting Environmental Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Practices: Are Videos Worth It?

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Evan K.; Silk, Kami J.

    2013-01-01

    Searching for ways to reach wider audiences in more comprehensible ways, health promotion agencies might add videos to their current web offerings. While potentially costly and time consuming to create, the effect of these videos on websites has not received much attention. This study translated research about the potential breast cancer risk for young girls associated with the household chemical PFOA into two websites mothers with young daughters were randomly assigned to view (website with videos vs. website without videos). Results revealed participants in the video condition found the advocated risk protective behaviors easier to perform and stated they were more likely to perform them than those in the non-video condition. Approximately 15 days after exposure, those in the video condition performed on average one more protective behavior than those in the non-video condition. Results also suggest that agencies’ efforts should focus on creating one quality video to place on a homepage, as video views declined the deeper people navigated into the site. Behaviors advocated should also be ones that can have lasting impacts with one-time actions, as effects wore away over time. Additional strategies are discussed for health promoters seeking to create videos to add to their current websites. PMID:25143661

  12. Electrochemical Reduction of Ag2VP2O8 Composite Electrodes Visualized via In situ Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD). Unexpected Conductive Additive Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kirshenbaum, Kevin C.; Bock, David C.; Zhong, Zhong; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther

    2015-07-29

    In our study, we characterize the deposition of silver metal nanoparticles formed during discharge of Li/Ag2VP2O8 cells with composite cathodes containing conductive carbon additive. Using in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) of an intact battery, the location and distribution of silver metal nanoparticles generated upon reduction-displacement deposition within an Ag2VP2O8 cathode containing a pre-existing percolation network can be observed for the first time. Our study yielded unexpected results where higher rate initial discharge generated a more effective conductive matrix. This stands in contrast to cells with cathodes with no conductive additive where a low rate initial discharge proved more effective. Our results provide evidence that using conductive additives in conjunction with an in situ reduction-displacement deposition of silver metal provides a path toward the ultimate goal of complete electrical contact and full utilization of all electroactive particles.

  13. Drag Reduction by Polymeric and Nonpolymeric Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Christopher; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1997-11-01

    To investigate the ``self-healing'' property of drag reducing surfactant micelles we have conducted a comparative study between high polymers and surfactants in six turbulent pipe flows (Reynolds numbers between 2000 and 90,000) with varying intensities o f secondary flow. Friction factor values are measured in a straight pipe of 185 diameters; three pipes, each turning through four 90 degree elbows, of lengths 1085 diameters, 875 diameters, and 600 diameters; and a twice-turned coiled pipe, radius of curv ature of 24 diameters and length of 290 diameters. All the flows are gravity driven to prevent degradation effects caused by pump impellers. The large stresses set up by the secondary flows degrade the fragile polymers, thus reducing their effectivness as a drag reducer. The ``self-healing'' of the micelles enables the surfactant to maintain its effectivness. We will present the ``self-healing'' characteristics of the surfactant micelles using the polymer data as the datum.

  14. Modelling CLPX IOP3 Radiometric Data by Means of the Dense Media Theory: Preliminary Results for the LSOS Test Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Marco; Kim, Edward J.; Cline, Don; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard; Brodzik, Mary Jo; Hardy, Janet

    2003-01-01

    The capabilities of the Dense Media Radiative Transfer model using the Quasi Crystalline Approximation with Coherent Potential (QCA-CP) to reproduce measured radiometric data were tested using the University of Tokyo Ground Based Microwave Radiometer (GBMR-7) during the third Intensive Observation Period (IOP3) of the NASA Cold-land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX). The data were collected at the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8-ha study site consisting of two open meadows separated by trees. Intensive measurements were also made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. A DMRT model is needed to describe radiative transfer in a medium such as snow because the assumption of independent scattering used in classical radiative transfer theory (CRT) is not valid. Validation of the DMRT approach requires a relationship between measured snow grain size and the DMRT approximation of snow grain radius as spherical particles with a mean radius of the log-normal particle-size distribution. This relationship is very important for a better understanding of snow modelling and for practical applications. DMRT simulations were compared with observations of microwave brightnesses at 18.7, 36.5 and 89-GHz (V and H polarizations) collected on February-1 9-25, 2003. Observation angles ranged from 30\\deg to 70\\deg. Model inputs included measured snow parameters except mean grain size. The average snow temperature, fractional volume and depth were held constant, together with the ice and soil permittivities. The minimum and maximum measured mean grain sizes were used to test the capabilities of the DMRT to reproduce the brightnesses as upper and lower limits. The sensitivity to the largest and smallest measured grain size in the three classes of minimum, medium and maximum observed grain sizes was also investigated. DMRT particle sizes yielding a best-fit to the experimental data for each date were computed. Results show that the measured

  15. A data assimilation experiment of RASTA airborne cloud radar data during HyMeX IOP16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saussereau, Gaël; Caumont, Olivier; Delanoë, Julien

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of HyMeX first special observing period (SOP1), which took place from 5 September to 5 November 2012, was to document the heavy precipitation events and flash floods that regularly affect the north-western Mediterranean coastal areas. In the two-month campaign, around twenty rainfall events were documented in France, Italy, and Spain. Among the instrumental platforms that were deployed during SOP1, the Falcon 20 of the Safire unit (http://www.safire.fr/) made numerous flights in storm systems so as to document their thermodynamic, microphysical, and dynamical properties. In particular, the RASTA cloud radar (http://rali.projet.latmos.ipsl.fr/) was aboard this aircraft. This radar measures vertical profiles of reflectivity and Doppler velocity above and below the aircraft. This unique instrument thus allows us to document the microphysical properties and the speed of wind and hydrometeors in the clouds, quasi-continuously in time and at a 60-m vertical resolution. For this field campaign, a special version of the numerical weather prediction (NWP) Arome system was developed to cover the whole north-western Mediterranean basin. This version, called Arome-WMed, ran in real time during the SOP in order to, notably, schedule the airborne operations, especially in storm systems. Like the operational version, Arome-WMed delivers forecasts at a horizontal resolution of 2.5 km with a one-moment microphysical scheme that predicts the evolution of six water species: water vapour, cloud liquid water, rainwater, pristine ice, snow, and graupel. Its three-dimensional variational (3DVar) data assimilation (DA) system ingests every three hours (at 00 UTC, 03 UTC, etc.) numerous observations (radiosoundings, ground automatic weather stations, radar, satellite, GPS, etc.). In order to provide improved initial conditions to Arome-WMed, especially for heavy precipitation events, RASTA data were assimilated in Arome-WMed 3DVar DA system for IOP16 (26 October 2012), to

  16. A concentration dependent auto-relay-recognition by the same analyte: a dual fluorescence switch-on by hydrogen sulfide via Michael addition followed by reduction and staining for bio-activity.

    PubMed

    Das, Avijit Kumar; Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Dutta, Gorachand; Maity, Sibaprasad; Mandal, Tarun kanti; Khanra, Kalyani; Bhattacharyya, Nandan

    2016-01-14

    H2S is shown, for the first time, to play an extraordinary dual role due to its nucleophilicity and reducing property with our single chemosensor, PND [4-(piperidin-1-yl) naphthalene-1,2-dione]. The initial nucleophilic attack via Michael addition (a lower concentration of H2S, blue fluorescence) is followed by the reduction of the 1,2-diketo functionality (a higher concentration of H2S, green fluorescence). This chemosensor, which also shows biological response, is remarkably effective in sensing the same analyte (H2S) at its different concentrations in a relay pathway via a fluorescence "off-on-on" mechanism, and this is also supported by DFT calculation and Cyclic voltammograms. PMID:26510406

  17. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  18. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  19. Influence of the addition of transition metals (Cr, Zr, Mo) on the properties of MnOx-FeOx catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx by Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changcheng; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Xiaolei; Xu, Haitao; Sun, Keqin; Shen, Kai

    2013-02-15

    The co-precipitation and citric acid methods were employed to prepare MnO(x)-FeO(x) catalysts for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by ammonia. It was found that the Mn-Fe (CP) sample obtained from the co-precipitation method, which exhibited low crystalline of manganese oxides on the surface, high specific surface area and abundant acid sites at the surface, had better catalytic activity. The effects of doping different transition metals (Mo, Zr, Cr) in the Mn-Fe (CP) catalysts were further investigated. The study suggested that the addition of Cr can obviously reduce the take-off temperature of Mn-Fe catalyst to 90°C, while the impregnation of Zr and Mo raised that remarkably. The texture and micro-structure analysis revealed that for the Cr-doped Mn-Fe catalysts, the active components had better dispersion with less agglomeration and sintering and the largest BET surface specific area. In situ FTIR study indicated that the addition of Cr can increase significantly the surface acidity, especially, the Lewis acid sites, and promote the formation of the intermediate -NH(3)(+). H(2)-TPR results confirmed the better low-temperature redox properties of Mn-Fe-Cr. PMID:23142012

  20. Towards alpha- or beta-D-C-glycosyl compounds by tin-catalyzed addition of glycosyl radicals to acrylonitrile and vinylphosphonate, and flexible reduction of tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl bromide with cyanoborohydride.

    PubMed

    Praly, Jean-Pierre; Ardakani, Azin Salek; Bruyère, Isabelle; Marie-Luce, Chrystelle; Bing Qin, Bing

    2002-10-01

    Photo-induced radical addition of acetylated alpha-D-glucopyranosyl bromide (1). to acrylonitrile or diethyl vinylphosphonate, in the presence of catalytic amounts of tri-n-butyltin chloride and sodium (or tetra-n-butylammonium) cyanoborohydride in excess, allowed efficient preparations of alpha-configurated nonononitrile and 2-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-ethylphosphonate (79, 70% yields, respectively). These conditions led to 2-(alpha-D-manno-, and galactopyranosyl)-ethylphosphonates in 68 and 76% yields. Similarly, radical addition of acetylated 1-bromo-beta-D-glucopyranosyl chloride (2). to acrylonitrile or diethyl vinylphosphonate afforded mainly intermediate chlorides which, upon radical reduction with excess tri-n-butyltin hydride, afforded the corresponding beta anomers (40 and 38%, respectively) by sequential C-C and C-H bond formation. Stereocontrol relies on the alpha-stereoselective quenching of D-glycopyranos-1-yl radicals. We found also that UV light irradiation of 1 with excess NaBH(3)CN in tert-butanol afforded either 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-2-deoxy-alpha-D-arabino-hexopyranose (65% after crystallization) or, when 10% mol thiophenol was added, 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol (79%). These are simple, tin-free, and easily controlled conditions, which compare well with known preparations of these reduced sugars. PMID:12423963

  1. Chronic nitrogen addition causes a reduction in soil carbon dioxide efflux during the high stem-growth period in a tropical montane forest but no response from a tropical lowland forest on a decadal time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, B.; Corre, M. D.; Veldkamp, E.; Sueta, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is rapidly increasing in tropical regions. We studied the response of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux to long-term experimental N addition (125 kg N ha-1 yr-1) in mature lowland and montane forests in Panama. In the lowland forest, on soils with high nutrient-supplying and buffering capacity, fine litterfall and stem-growth were neither N- nor phosphorus-limited. In the montane forest, on soils with low nutrient supplying capacity and an organic layer, fine litterfall and stem-growth were N-limited. Our objectives were to 1) explore the influence of soil temperature and moisture on the dynamics of soil CO2 efflux and 2) determine the responses of soil CO2 efflux from an N-rich and N-limited forest to elevated N input. Annual soil CO2-C efflux was larger in the lowland (15.44 ± 1.02 Mg C ha-1) than in the montane forest (9.37 ± 0.28 Mg C ha-1). In the lowland forest, soil moisture explained the largest fraction of the variance in soil CO2 efflux while soil temperature was the main explanatory variable in the montane forest. Soil CO2 efflux in the lowland forest did not differ between the control and 9-11 yr N-addition plots, suggesting that chronic N input to nutrient-rich tropical lowland forests on well-buffered soils may not change their C balance on a decadal time scale. In the montane forest, first year N addition did not affect soil CO2 efflux but annual CO2 efflux was reduced by 14% and 8% in the 2nd and 3rd year N-addition plots, respectively, compared to the control. This reduction was caused by a decrease in soil CO2 efflux during the high stem-growth period of the year, suggesting a shift in carbon partitioning from below- to aboveground in the N-addition plots in which stem diameter growth was promoted.

  2. Chronic nitrogen addition causes a reduction in soil carbon dioxide efflux during the high stem-growth period in a tropical montane forest but no response from a tropical lowland forest in decadal scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, B.; Corre, M. D.; Veldkamp, E.; Sueta, J. P.

    2009-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is rapidly increasing in tropical regions. We studied the response of soil carbon dioxide CO2 efflux to long-term experimental N-addition (125 kg N ha-1 yr-1) in mature lowland and montane forests in Panamá. In the lowland forest, on soils with high nutrient-supplying and buffering capacity, fine litterfall and stem-growth were neither N- nor phosphorus-limited. In the montane forest, on soils with low nutrient supplying capacity and an organic layer, fine litterfall and stem-growth were N-limited. Our objectives were to 1) explore the influence of soil temperature and moisture on the dynamics of soil CO2 efflux and 2) determine the responses of soil CO2 efflux from an N-rich and N-limited forest to elevated N input. Annual soil CO2-C efflux was larger from the lowland (15.20±1.25 Mg C ha-1) than the montane forest (9.36±0.29 Mg C ha-1). In the lowland forest, soil moisture explained the largest fraction of the variance in soil CO2 efflux while soil temperature was the main explanatory variable in the montane forest. Soil CO2 efflux in the lowland forest did not differ between the control and 9-11 yr N-addition plots, suggesting that chronic N input to nutrient-rich tropical lowland forests on well-buffered soils may not change their C balance in decadal scale. In the montane forest, first year N addition did not affect soil CO2 efflux but annual CO2 efflux was reduced by 14% and 8% in the 2- and 3 yr N-addition plots, respectively, compared to the control. This reduction was caused by a decrease in soil CO2 efflux during the high stem-growth period of the year, suggesting a shift in carbon partitioning from below- to aboveground in the N-addition plots where stem diameter growth was promoted.

  3. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  4. Brinzolamide nanocrystal formulations for ophthalmic delivery: reduction of elevated intraocular pressure in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tuomela, Annika; Liu, Peng; Puranen, Jooseppi; Rönkkö, Seppo; Laaksonen, Timo; Kalesnykas, Giedrius; Oksala, Olli; Ilkka, Jukka; Laru, Johanna; Järvinen, Kristiina; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2014-06-01

    Nanocrystal-based drug delivery systems provide important tools for ocular formulation development, especially when considering poorly soluble drugs. The objective of the study was to formulate ophthalmic, intraocular pressure (IOP) reducing, nanocrystal suspensions from a poorly soluble drug, brinzolamide (BRA), using a rapid wet milling technique, and to investigate their IOP reducing effect in vivo. Different stabilizers for the nanocrystals were screened (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), poloxamer F127 and F68, polysorbate 80) and HPMC was found to be the only successful stabilizer. In order to investigate both the effect of an added absorption enhancer (polysorbate 80) and the impact of the free drug in the nanocrystal suspension, formulations in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 and pH 4.5 were prepared. Particle size, polydispersity (PI), solid state (DSC), morphology (SEM) as well as dissolution behavior and the uniformity of the formulations were characterized. There was rapid dissolution of BRA (in PBS pH 7.4) from all the nanocrystal formulations; after 1 min 100% of the drug was fully dissolved. The effect was significantly pronounced at pH 4.5, where the dissolved fraction of drug was the highest. The cytotoxicity of nanocrystal formulations to human corneal epithelial cell (HCE-T) viability was tested. The effects of the nanocrystal formulations and the commercial product on the cell viability were comparable. The intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering effect was investigated in vivo using a modern rat ocular hypertensive model and elevated IOP reduction was seen in vivo with all the formulations. Notably, the reduction achieved in experimentally elevated IOP was comparable to that obtained with a marketed product. In conclusion, various BRA nanocrystal formulations, which all showed advantageous dissolution and absorption behavior, were successfully formulated. PMID:24680962

  5. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  6. Impact of a Glaucoma Severity Index on Results of Trabectome Surgery: Larger Pressure Reduction in More Severe Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Ralitsa T.; Roy, Pritha; Parikh, Hardik A.; Dang, Yalong; Schuman, Joel S.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To stratify outcomes of trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomy (AIT) by glaucoma severity using a simple and clinically useful glaucoma index. Based on prior data of trabectome after failed trabeculectomy, we hypothesized that more severe glaucoma might have a relatively more reduced facility compared to mild glaucoma and respond with a larger IOP reduction to trabecular meshwork ablation. Methods Patients with primary open angle glaucoma who had undergone AIT without any other same session surgery and without any second eye surgery during the following 12 months were analyzed. Eyes of patients that had less than 12 months follow up or were diagnosed with neovascular glaucoma were excluded. A glaucoma index (GI) was created to capture glaucoma severity based on visual field, number of preoperative medications, and preoperative IOP. Visual field (VF) was separated into 3 categories: mild, moderate, and advanced (assigned 1, 2, and 3 points, respectively). Preoperative number of medications (meds) was divided into 4 categories: ≤1, 2, 3 or ≥4, and assigned with a value of 1 to 4. Baseline IOP (IOP) was divided into 3 categories: <20 mmHg, 20–29 mmHg, and greater than 30 mmHg and assigned with 1 to 3 points. GI was defined as IOP × meds × VF and separated into 4 groups: <6 (Group 1), 6–12 (Group 2), >12–18 (Group 3) and >18 (Group 4). Linear regression was used to determine if there was an association between GI group and IOP reduction after one year or age, gender, race, diagnosis, cup to disc (C/D) ratio, and Shaffer grade. Results Out of 1340 patients, 843 were included in the analysis. The GI group distribution was GI1 = 164, GI2 = 202, GI3 = 260, and GI4 = 216. Mean IOP reduction after one year was 4.0±5.4, 6.4±5.8, 9.0±7.6, 12.0±8.0 mmHg for GI groups 1 to 4, respectively. Linear regression showed that IOP reduction was associated with GI group after adjusting for age, gender, race, diagnosis, cup to disc ratio, and Shaffer grade

  7. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  8. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  9. GENERIC VERIFICATION PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINATION OF EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS OBTAINED BY USE OF ALTERNATIVE OR REFORMULATED LIQUID FUELS, FUEL ADDITIVES, FUEL EMULSIONS AND LUBRICANTS FOR HIGHWAY AND NONROAD USE DISEL ENGINES AND LIGHT DUTY GASOLINE ENGINES AND VEHICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report sets standards by which the emissions reduction provided by fuel and lubricant technologies can be tested and be tested in a comparable way. It is a generic protocol under the Environmental Technology Verification program.

  10. Lead Exposure Reduction Act of 1992. Report together with Additional and Dissenting Views To Accompany 5730 (Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office.) Part 1 [and] Part 2. House of Representatives, 102d Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This two-part report deals with the Lead Exposure Reduction Act of 1992 (H.R. 5730), an amendment to the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The amendment is intended to lead to the reduction of levels of lead in the environment and to lower the degree of childhood exposure to lead. The bill provides for a…

  11. DENSE PHASE REBURN COMBUSTION SYSTEM (DPRCS) DEMONSTRATION ON A 154 MWE TANGENTIAL FURNACE: ADDITIONAL AREA OF INTEREST-TO DEVELOP AND DEMONSTRATE AN IN-FURNACE MULTI-POLLUTANT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE NOx, SO2 & Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Allen C. Wiley; Steven Castagnero; Geoff Green; Kevin Davis; David White

    2004-03-01

    Semi-dense phase pneumatic delivery and injection of calcium and sodium sorbents, and microfine powdered coal, at various sidewall elevations of an online operating coal-fired power plant, was investigated for the express purpose of developing an in-furnace, economic multi-pollutant reduction methodology for NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} & Hg. The 154 MWe tangentially-fired furnace that was selected for a full-scale demonstration, was recently retrofitted for NO{sub x} reduction with a high velocity rotating-opposed over-fire air system. The ROFA system, a Mobotec USA technology, has a proven track record of breaking up laminar flow along furnace walls, thereby enhancing the mix of all constituents of combustion. The knowledge gained from injecting sorbents and micronized coal into well mixed combustion gases with significant improvement in particulate retention time, should serve well the goals of an in-furnace multi-pollutant reduction technology; that of reducing back-end cleanup costs on a wide variety of pollutants, on a cost per ton basis, by first accomplishing significant in-furnace reductions of all pollutants.

  12. Intelligent Data Reduction (IDARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, D. Michael; Ford, Donnie R.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the Intelligent Data Reduction (IDARE) expert system and an IDARE user's manual are given. IDARE is a data reduction system with the addition of a user profile infrastructure. The system was tested on a nickel-cadmium battery testbed. Information is given on installing, loading, maintaining the IDARE system.

  13. Drag reduction in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  14. Drag reduction in nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  15. Comparison of CCN activity measured in pristine and polluted sites during the Intensive Operation Periods (IOP) of the GoAmazon 2014 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, H. M.; Krüger, M. L.; Thalman, R. M.; Wang, J.; Pauliquevis, T.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Almeida, G. P.; Poeschl, U.; Andreae, M. O.; Martin, S. T.; Artaxo, P.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Cirino, G. G.; Andrade, M. D. F.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of aerosol particles on cloud microphysical properties, cloud cover, precipitation, and regional climate are significant. The Amazon region is particularly susceptible to changes in number-diameter distributions of the atmospheric particle population because of the low background concentrations and high water vapor levels, indicating a regime of cloud properties that is highly sensitive to aerosol microphysics. A particle-limited regime means that for modest to vigorous updrafts the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is dominated by CCN number instead of updraft velocity. This natural regime, different from most other continental areas worldwide, is expected to be disrupted by the interaction of Manaus urban plume with the natural aerosol population. Studying the effects of this interaction on the cloud and aerosol life cycle is the main objective of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) campaign taking place around Manaus-Brazil from January 2014 to December 2015. In this paper we compare the particle hygroscopicity calculated from measurements of size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei performed at three ground sites during the first and second intensive operational periods. Site T3 is about 70km downwind from Manaus experiencing urban polluted and background conditions; site T2 is just across the Negro river from Manaus and operated only for the second IOP; and T0, at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO), is a pristine site about 200km upwind from Manaus. Our results indicate a lower hygroscopicity under polluted conditions, with mean value around 0.14 to 0.16, than under clean conditions, with a mean value around 0.2 to 0.3. At the clean site, it was possible to identify peaks of large sea salt particles with organic coating, while small particles seems to be pure organic. The activation fraction and hygroscopicity will be compared and discussed as a function of particle size.

  16. The additive effect of dorzolamide hydrochloride (Trusopt) and a morning dose of bimatoprost (Lumigan) on intraocular pressure and retrobulbar blood flow in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej; Siemiątkowska, Anna; Fuksińska, Beata; Robaszkiewicz, Jacek; Zegadło, Arkadiusz; Ehrlich, Rita; Siesky, Brent; Harris, Alon

    2010-01-01

    Aims To assess the additive effect of dorzolamide hydrochloride 2% on the diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP) curve and retrobulbar haemodynamics in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) treated with morning-dosed bimatoprost 0.03%. Methods Twenty-five patients with POAG were evaluated in a prospective, single-masked study. After a 1 week run-in period with bimatoprost all patients were treated with bimatoprost dosed once in the morning for 1 month, after which dorzolamide was added twice daily for 2 months. Goldmann applanation IOP, arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate were measured every 2 h for 24 h and diurnal ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) was calculated. Colour Doppler imaging (CDI) of the ophthalmic artery (OA) and the central retinal artery (CRA) was recorded five times daily. All measurements were taken after the two phases of treatment and were compared. Results The mean baseline IOP was 14.8±3.5 mm Hg. Mean IOP following bimatoprost monotherapy (12.8±2.9 mm Hg) and after 2 months of dorzolamide adjunctive therapy (12.2±2.6 mm Hg) were not statistically significantly different (p=0.544). Only at the 4:00 h time point was IOP significantly reduced using the bimatoprost/dorzolamide combined treatment (p=0.013). The 24 h IOP fluctuations were lower when dorzolamide was added (6.0±2.3 mm Hg vs 4.6±1.5 mm Hg, p=0.0016). Repeated analysis of variance detected a significant decrease of vascular resistance in the OA (p=0.0167) with adjunctive dorzolamide treatment. Conclusions The addition of dorzolamide to morning-dosed bimatoprost had an additive hypotensive effect only on the night-time IOP curve at 4:00 h and resulted in a lower IOP fluctuation. Dorzolamide added to bimatoprost may reduce vascular resistance in the OA. PMID:20558428

  17. Association of biometric factors with anterior chamber angle widening and intraocular pressure reduction after uneventful phacoemulsification for cataract

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guofu; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Lee, Roland; Chen, Yi-Chun; He, Mingguang; Lin, Shan C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate anterior chamber biometric factors associated with the degree of angle widening and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after phacoemulsification. SETTING University of California, San Francisco, California, USA. DESIGN Case series. METHODS Anterior chamber parameters obtained by anterior segment coherence tomography were compared preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Measurements included the angle opening distance 500 μm anterior to the scleral spur (AOD500), trabecular–iris space area 500 μm from the scleral spur (TISA500), iris curvature (I-Curv), anterior chamber angle (ACA), trabecular–iris space area, anterior chamber volume, anterior chamber width, and lens vault (LV). RESULTS The study enrolled 73 eyes. The mean patient age was 77.45 years ± 7.84 (SD); 65.75% of patients were women. From preoperatively to 3 months postoperatively, the mean AOD500 increased significantly (0.254 ± 0.105 to 0.433 ± 0.108 mm) and the mean IOP decreased significantly (14.97 ± 3.35 to 12.62 ± 3.37 mm Hg) (P < .001). The reduction in IOP was correlated with the increase in AOD500 (r = 0.240, P = .041) and preoperative LV (r = 0.235, P = .045). After adjusting for related factors, AOD500 widening was positively correlated with LV (β = 0.458, P = .044) and I-Curv (β = 0.235, P = .043) and negatively correlated with preoperative TISA500 (β = −0.269, P = .025) and ACA (β = −0.919, P = .027). CONCLUSIONS Surgically induced AOD widening was significantly correlated with anterior chamber biometric factors. Preoperative LV appears to be a significant factor in angle widening and IOP reduction after phacoemulsification. PMID:22055073

  18. Light-driven biocatalytic reduction of α,β-unsaturated compounds by ene reductases employing transition metal complexes as photosensitizers† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental sections, tables, figures and discussion. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cy01642h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Peers, Martyn K.; Toogood, Helen S.; Heyes, Derren J.; Mansell, David; Coe, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and cost effective nicotinamide cofactor regeneration is essential for industrial-scale bio-hydrogenations employing flavin-containing biocatalysts such as the Old Yellow Enzymes. A direct flavin regeneration system using visible light to initiate a photoredox cycle and drive biocatalysis is described, and shown to be effective in driving biocatalytic activated alkene reduction. Using Ru(ii) or Ir(iii) complexes as photosensitizers, coupled with an electron transfer mediator (methyl viologen) and sacrificial electron donor (triethanolamine) drives catalytic turnover of two Old Yellow Enzymes with multiple oxidative substrates. Therefore, there is great potential in the development of light-driven biocatalytic systems, providing an alternative to the reliance on enzyme-based cofactor regeneration systems. PMID:27019691

  19. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  20. Radon reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.A. )

    1990-11-01

    During a radon gas screening program, elevated levels of radon gas were detected in homes on Mackinac Island, Mich. Six homes on foundations with crawl spaces were selected for a research project aimed at reducing radon gas concentrations, which ranged from 12.9 to 82.3 pCi/l. Using isolation and ventilation techniques, and variations thereof, radon concentrations were reduced to less than 1 pCi/l. This paper reports that these reductions were achieved using 3.5 mil cross laminated or 10 mil high density polyethylene plastic as a barrier without sealing to the foundation or support piers, solid and/or perforated plastic pipe and mechanical fans. Wind turbines were found to be ineffective at reducing concentrations to acceptable levels. Homeowners themselves installed all materials.

  1. Dexmedetomidine as an additive to local anesthetics compared with intravenous dexmedetomidine in peribulbar block for cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, AM; Mahmoud, AAA; Abdelhaq, MM; Yasin, HM; Bayoumi, ASM

    2016-01-01

    Background: No studies compared parenteral dexmedetomidine with its use as an adjuvant to ophthalmic block. We compared between adding dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine in peribulbar block and intravenous (IV) dexmedetomidine during peribulbar block for cataract surgery. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study on 90 patients for cataract surgery under peribulbar anesthesia. Study included three groups; all patients received 10 ml of peribulbar anesthesia and IV infusion of drugs as follows: Group I: Received a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (4.5 ml) + lidocaine 2% (4.5 ml) + normal saline (1 ml) + 150 IU hyaluronidase + IV infusion of normal saline, Group II: Received mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (4.5 ml) + lidocaine 2% (4.5 ml) + dexmedetomidine 50 μg (1 ml) +150 IU hyaluronidase + IV infusion of normal saline and Group III: Received mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (4.5 ml) + lidocaine 2% (4.5 ml) + normal saline (1 ml) +150 IU hyaluronidase + IV dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg over 10 min; followed by 0.4 μg/kg/h IV infusion. We recorded onset, duration of block, Ramsay Sedation Score, intra-ocular pressure (IOP), hemodynamics, and adverse effects. Results: There was a significant decrease in the onset of action and increase in the duration of block in Group II as compared with the Group I and Group III. Mean Ramsay Sedation Score was higher in Group III. The IOP showed a significant decrease in Group II and Group III 10 min after injection (P < 0.01). Heart rate showed a significant decrease in Group III in comparison with the two other groups (P < 0.05). Only two patients in Group III developed bradycardia. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine as an additive shortens onset time, prolong block durations and significantly decreases the IOP with minimal side effects. IV dexmedetomidine, in addition, produces intra-operative sedation with hemodynamic stability. PMID:26952175

  2. News Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-01-01

    Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

  3. Cincinnati Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-03-04

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) to demonstrate Big Area Additive Manufacturing which increases the speed of the additive manufacturing (AM) process by over 1000X, increases the size of parts by over 10X and shows a cost reduction of over 100X. ORNL worked with CI to transition the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology from a proof-of-principle (TRL 2-3) demonstration to a prototype product stage (TRL 7-8).

  4. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  6. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  7. Ocular-specific ER stress reduction rescues glaucoma in murine glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Zode, Gulab S.; Sharma, Arti B.; Lin, Xiaolei; Searby, Charles C.; Bugge, Kevin; Kim, Gun Hee; Clark, Abbot F.; Sheffield, Val C.

    2014-01-01

    Administration of glucocorticoids induces ocular hypertension in some patients. If untreated, these patients can develop a secondary glaucoma that resembles primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The underlying pathology of glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma is not fully understood, due in part to lack of an appropriate animal model. Here, we developed a murine model of glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma that exhibits glaucoma features that are observed in patients. Treatment of WT mice with topical ocular 0.1% dexamethasone led to elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP), functional and structural loss of retinal ganglion cells, and axonal degeneration, resembling glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma in human patients. Furthermore, dexamethasone-induced ocular hypertension was associated with chronic ER stress of the trabecular meshwork (TM). Similar to patients, withdrawal of dexamethasone treatment reduced elevated IOP and ER stress in this animal model. Dexamethasone induced the transcriptional factor CHOP, a marker for chronic ER stress, in the anterior segment tissues, and Chop deletion reduced ER stress in these tissues and prevented dexamethasone-induced ocular hypertension. Furthermore, reduction of ER stress in the TM with sodium 4-phenylbutyrate prevented dexamethasone-induced ocular hypertension in WT mice. Our data indicate that ER stress contributes to glucocorticoid-induced ocular hypertension and suggest that reducing ER stress has potential as a therapeutic strategy for treating glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma. PMID:24691439

  8. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  9. Combined experimental and Monte Carlo verification of iop.org/images/0031-9155/43/12/008/img1.gif"/> brachytherapy plans for vaginal applicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloboda, Ron S.; Wang, Ruqing

    1998-12-01

    Dose rates in a phantom around a shielded and an unshielded vaginal applicator containing Selectron low-dose-rate iop.org/images/0031-9155/43/12/008/img2.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> sources were determined by experiment and Monte Carlo simulation. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a white polystyrene phantom using an experimental protocol geared for precision. Calculations for the same set-up were done using a version of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code system modified for brachytherapy applications into which a new combinatorial geometry package developed by Bielajew was recently incorporated. Measured dose rates agree with Monte Carlo estimates to within 5% (1 SD) for the unshielded applicator, while highlighting some experimental uncertainties for the shielded applicator. Monte Carlo calculations were also done to determine a value for the effective transmission of the shield required for clinical treatment planning, and to estimate the dose rate in water at points in axial and sagittal planes transecting the shielded applicator. Comparison with dose rates generated by the planning system indicates that agreement is better than 5% (1 SD) at most positions. The precision thermoluminescent dosimetry protocol and modified Monte Carlo code are effective complementary tools for brachytherapy applicator dosimetry.

  10. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) intensive observation period (IOP)-4 and simulations of land use pattern effect on the LLJ

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Raman, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is an important element of the low-level atmospheric circulation. It transports water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn affects the development of weather over the Great Plains of the central United States. The LLJ is generally recognized as a complex response of the atmospheric boundary layer to the diurnal cycle of thermal forcing. Early studies have attributed the Great Plains LLJ to the diurnal oscillations of frictional effect, buoyancy over sloping terrain, and the blocking effects of the Rocky Mountains. Recent investigations show that the speed of the LLJ is also affected by the soil type and soil moisture. Some studies also suggest that synoptic patterns may play an important role in the development of the LLJ. Land surface heterogeneties significantly affect mesoscale circulations by generating strong contrasts in surface thermal fluxes. Thus one would expect that the land use pattern should have effects on the LLJ`s development and structure. In this study, we try to determine the relative roles of the synoptic forcing, planetary boundary layers (PBL) processes, and the land use pattern in the formation of the LLJ using the observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Intensive Operation Period (IOP)-4 and numerical sensitivity tests.

  11. Decrease in Corneal Damage due to Benzalkonium Chloride by the Addition of Mannitol into Timolol Maleate Eye Drops.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Tanino, Tadatoshi; Ito, Yoshimasa; Okamoto, Norio; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of mannitol on corneal damage caused by benzalkonium chloride (BAC), which is used as a preservative in commercially available timolol maleate eye drops, using rat debrided corneal epithelium and a human cornea epithelial cell line (HCE-T). Corneal wounds were monitored using a fundus camera TRC-50X equipped with a digital camera; eye drops were instilled into rat eyes five times a day after corneal epithelial abrasion. The viability of HCE-T cells was calculated by TetraColor One; and Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) were used to measure antimicrobial activity. The reducing effects on transcorneal penetration and intraocular pressure (IOP) of the eye drops were determined using rabbits. The corneal wound healing rate and rate constant (kH), as well as cell viability, were higher following treatment with 0.005% BAC solution containing 0.5% mannitol than in the case BAC solution alone; the antimicrobial activity was approximately the same for BAC solutions with and without mannitol. In addition, the kH for rat eyes instilled with commercially available timolol maleate eye drops containing 0.5% mannitol was significantly higher than that for eyes instilled with timolol maleate eye drops without mannitol, and the addition of mannitol did not affect the corneal penetration or IOP reducing effect of the timolol maleate eye drops. A preservative system comprising BAC and mannitol may provide effective therapy for glaucoma patients requiring long-term treatment with anti-glaucoma agents. PMID:26136174

  12. Decrease in corneal damage due to benzalkonium chloride by the addition of sericin into timolol maleate eye drops.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Okamoto, Norio; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of sericin on corneal damage due to benzalkonium chloride (BAC) used as a preservative in commercially available timolol maleate eye drops using rat debrided corneal epithelium and a human cornea epithelial cell line (HCE-T). Corneal wounds were monitored using a fundus camera TRC-50X equipped with a digital camera; eye drops were instilled into the rat eyes five times a day after corneal epithelial abrasion. The viability of HCE-T cells was calculated by TetraColor One; and Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) were used to measure antimicrobial activity. The reducing effects on transcorneal penetration and intraocular pressure (IOP) of the eye drops were determined using rabbits. The corneal wound healing rate and rate constants (kH) as well as cell viability were higher following treatment with 0.005% BAC solution containing 0.1% sericin than in the case of treatment with BAC solution alone; the antimicrobial activity was approximately the same for BAC solutions with and without sericin. In addition, the kH for rat eyes instilled with commercially available timolol maleate eye drops containing 0.1% sericin was significantly higher than that of eyes instilled with timolol maleate eye drops without sericin, and the addition of sericin did not affect the corneal penetration or IOP reducing effect of commercially available timolol maleate eye drops. A preservative system comprising BAC and sericin may provide effective therapy for glaucoma patients requiring long-term anti-glaucoma agents. PMID:23470443

  13. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  14. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  15. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  16. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  17. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  18. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  19. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  20. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  1. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  2. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  3. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  4. Project identification for methane reduction options

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  5. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  6. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  7. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  8. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  9. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  10. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  11. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  12. Clinical Options for the Reduction of Elevated Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Crawley, Laura; Zamir, Sohaib M.; Cordeiro, Maria F.; Guo, Li

    2012-01-01

    Elevated IOP in clinical practice is usually seen in glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Glaucoma affects 60 million people worldwide and 8.4 million are bilaterally blind from this chronic disease.1 Options for reducing IOP rely on pharmacological agents, laser treatments and surgery which may be penetrating or non-penetrating. The last twenty years has seen significant changes in all of these strategies. This review aims to cover these clinical options and introduce some of the new technologies currently in development for the clinical lowering of IOP. PMID:23650457

  13. Characteristics of asphalt mixes with FT additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefunková, S.

    2012-03-01

    This article is focused on low-temperature asphalt mixture technologies using FT additive and RAP. The modern production and use of asphalt mixture technologies with reduced temperatures has many advantages. These advantages mainly help to save energy and the environment. Lower temperatures enable a reduction in energy consumption, a more acceptable working environment for workers, a reduction in negative environmental effects, such as greenhouse gas emissions, and an improvement in the workability of mixtures and a prolongation of their duration. This technology is currently becoming popular in many countries.

  14. Addition agents effects on hydrocarbon fuels burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Sakhovskii, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Literature review on addition agents effects on hydrocarbon fuels burning has been conducted. The impact results in flame pattern and burning velocity change, energy efficiency increase, environmentally harmful NOx and CO emission reduction and damping of self-oscillations in flow. An assumption about water molecules dissociation phenomenon existing in a number of practical applications and being neglected in most explanations for physical- chemical processes taking place in case of injection of water/steam into combustion zone has been noted. The hypothesis about necessity of water dissociation account has been proposed. It can be useful for low temperature combustion process control and NOx emission reduction.

  15. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  16. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  17. Reductive dissolution of goethite by phenolic reductants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaKind, Judy S.; Stone, Alan T.

    1989-05-01

    The reductive dissolution of goethite (α-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe 2O 3) by phenolic reductants has been examined in order to improve the understanding of iron transformations in soils, sediments and aquifers. Rates of goethite reductive dissolution by hydroquinone increased as the pH was increased from pH 1.8 to 4.65, arid the following reaction stoichiometry was obeyed: 2 α- FeOOH + QH2 = 2 Fe2+ + Q + 4 OH-. As the pH was increased from pH 4.5 to 6.0, the reductive dissolution rate decreased to below the detection limit. At pH 3.4, the reductive dissolution of hematite was two orders of magnitude slower than goethite. The relationship between structure and reactivity was examined for a series of mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxybenzene reductants. Rates of reductive dissolution decreased in the following order: catechol ˜- hydroquinone > 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid > resorcinol-phenol-4-hydroxybenzoic acid.

  18. Polarographic reduction behaviour of clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Malik, W U; Gupta, G C

    1968-01-01

    Suspensions of the clay minerals bentonite, kaolinite illite and chlorite have been examined polarographically and reduction waves found. The differences in their behaviour, with and without the addition of surface active reagents, are reported. PMID:18960257

  19. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  20. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  1. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  2. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  3. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  4. Midwestern Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    The Midwestern Greenhouse Gas Reduction Acccord, or Midwestern Greenhouse gas Accord (MGA), is a regional agreement by governors of the states in the US Midwest and one Canadian province to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to combat climate change. Signatories to the accord include the US states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Kansas, Ohio and South Dakota, and the Canadian Province of Manitoba. The accord, signed on November 15, 2007, established the Midwestern Greenhouse Gas Reduction Program, which aims to: establish greenhouse gas reduction targets and timeframes consistent with MGA member states' targets; develop a market-based and multi-sector cap-and-trade mechanism to help achieve those reduction targets; establish a system to enable tracking, management, and crediting for entities that reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and develop and implement additional steps as needed to achieve the reduction targets, such as a low-carbon fuel standards and regional incentives and funding mechanisms. The GHG registry will be managed by the Climate Registry, which manages the registry for other US state schemes. One of the first actions was to convene an Energy Security under Climate Stewardship Platform to guide future development of the Midwest's energy economy.

  5. Chromate reduction by rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, R.B.; Cooke, R.T. Jr.

    1986-05-29

    Chromate was reduced during the oxidation of 1-methylnicotinamide chlorine by partially purified rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase. In addition to l-methylnicotinamide, several other electron donor substrates for aldehyde oxidase were able to support the enzymatic chromate reduction. The reduction required the presence of both enzyme and the electron donor substrate. The rate of the chromate reduction was retarded by inhibitors or aldehyde oxidase but was not affected by substrates or inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. These results are consistent with the involvement of aldehyde oxidase in the reduction of chromate by rabbit liver cytosolic enzyme preparations.

  6. Zero-strain reductive intercalation in a molecular framework† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis, experimental methods, and sample characterisation; X-ray powder diffraction refinement details. See DOI: 10.1039/c4ce02364a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Joshua A.; Cairns, Andrew B.; Lim, Jared J. K.; Cassidy, Simon J.; Clarke, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Reductive intercalation of potassium within the molecular framework Ag3[Fe(CN)6] gives rise to a volume strain that is an order of magnitude smaller than is typical for common ion-storage materials. We suggest that framework flexibility might be exploited as a general strategy for reducing cycling strain in battery and ion-storage materials. PMID:25892969

  7. Ultrasound-Assisted Distal Radius Fracture Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Socransky, Steve; Skinner, Andrew; Bromley, Mark; Smith, Andrew; Anawati, Alexandre; Middaugh, Jeff; Ross, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Closed reduction of distal radius fractures (CRDRF) is a commonly performed emergency department (ED) procedure. The use of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) to diagnose fractures and guide reduction has previously been described. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the addition of PoCUS to CRDRF changed the perception of successful initial reduction. This was measured by the rate of further reduction attempts based on PoCUS following the initial clinical determination of achievement of best possible reduction. Methods  We performed a multicenter prospective cohort study, using a convenience sample of adult ED patients presenting with a distal radius fracture to five Canadian EDs. All study physicians underwent standardized PoCUS training for fractures. Standard clinically-guided best possible fracture reduction was initially performed. PoCUS was then used to assess the reduction adequacy. Repeat reduction was performed if deemed indicated. A post-reduction radiograph was then performed. Clinician impression of reduction adequacy was scored on a 5 point Likert scale following the initial clinically-guided reduction and following each PoCUS scan and the post-reduction radiograph. Results  There were 131 patients with 132 distal radius fractures. Twelve cases were excluded prior to analysis. There was no significant difference in the assessment of the initial reduction status by PoCUS as compared to the clinical exam (mean score: 3.8 vs. 3.9; p = 0.370; OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.46 to 1.72; p = 0.87). Significantly fewer cases fell into the uncertain category with PoCUS than with clinical assessment (2 vs 12; p = 0.008). Repeat reduction was performed in 49 patients (41.2%). Repeat reduction led to a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the PoCUS determined adequacy of reduction (mean score: 4.3 vs 3.1; p < 0.001). In this group, the odds ratio for adequate vs. uncertain or inadequate reduction assessment using PoCUS was 12.5 (95% CI 3

  8. Ultrasound-Assisted Distal Radius Fracture Reduction.

    PubMed

    Socransky, Steve; Skinner, Andrew; Bromley, Mark; Smith, Andrew; Anawati, Alexandre; Middaugh, Jeff; Ross, Peter; Atkinson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Closed reduction of distal radius fractures (CRDRF) is a commonly performed emergency department (ED) procedure. The use of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) to diagnose fractures and guide reduction has previously been described. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the addition of PoCUS to CRDRF changed the perception of successful initial reduction. This was measured by the rate of further reduction attempts based on PoCUS following the initial clinical determination of achievement of best possible reduction. Methods  We performed a multicenter prospective cohort study, using a convenience sample of adult ED patients presenting with a distal radius fracture to five Canadian EDs. All study physicians underwent standardized PoCUS training for fractures. Standard clinically-guided best possible fracture reduction was initially performed. PoCUS was then used to assess the reduction adequacy. Repeat reduction was performed if deemed indicated. A post-reduction radiograph was then performed. Clinician impression of reduction adequacy was scored on a 5 point Likert scale following the initial clinically-guided reduction and following each PoCUS scan and the post-reduction radiograph. Results  There were 131 patients with 132 distal radius fractures. Twelve cases were excluded prior to analysis. There was no significant difference in the assessment of the initial reduction status by PoCUS as compared to the clinical exam (mean score: 3.8 vs. 3.9; p = 0.370; OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.46 to 1.72; p = 0.87). Significantly fewer cases fell into the uncertain category with PoCUS than with clinical assessment (2 vs 12; p = 0.008). Repeat reduction was performed in 49 patients (41.2%). Repeat reduction led to a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the PoCUS determined adequacy of reduction (mean score: 4.3 vs 3.1; p < 0.001). In this group, the odds ratio for adequate vs. uncertain or inadequate reduction assessment using PoCUS was 12.5 (95% CI 3

  9. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  10. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  11. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  12. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth's history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth's crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  13. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    PubMed Central

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  14. Polymethylmethacrylate bone cements and additives: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Manit; Chan, Edward KS; Gupta, Sunil; Diwan, Ashish D

    2013-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement technology has progressed from industrial Plexiglass administration in the 1950s to the recent advent of nanoparticle additives. Additives have been trialed to address problems with modern bone cements such as the loosening of prosthesis, high post-operative infection rates, and inflammatory reduction in interface integrity. This review aims to assess current additives used in PMMA bone cements and offer an insight regarding future directions for this biomaterial. Low index (< 15%) vitamin E and low index (< 5 g) antibiotic impregnated additives significantly address infection and inflammatory problems, with only modest reductions in mechanical strength. Chitosan (15% w/w PMMA) and silver (1% w/w PMMA) nanoparticles have strong antibacterial activity with no significant reduction in mechanical strength. Future work on PMMA bone cements should focus on trialing combinations of these additives as this may enhance favourable properties. PMID:23610754

  15. Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS). Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes.

  16. Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    at the AAPL to measure Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR) background noise levels. Six condenser microphones were placed in strategic locations around the dome and the inlet tunnel to measure different noise sources. From the control room the jet was monitored with the help of video cameras and other sensors. The data points were recorded, reduced, and plotted, and will be used to plan future modifications to the NATR. The primary goal to create data reduction test programs and provide verification was completed. As a result of the internship, I learned C/C++, UNIX/LINUX, Excel, and acoustic data processing methods. I also recorded data at the AAPL, then processed and plotted it. These data would be useful to compare against existing data. In addition, I adjusted software to work on the Mac OSX platform. And I used the available training resources.

  17. Does Source Reduction Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaway, David

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that quantification is essential to establish the cost-effectiveness of source reduction (SR). Presents case studies of monitoring methods for seven different kinds of SR efforts: (1) packaging changes, (2) SR businesses, (3) waste exchanges, (4) individual nonresidential efforts, (5) variable garbage rates, (6) yard waste reduction, and…

  18. Bimatoprost/timolol fixed combination (BTFC) in patients with primary open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Rotsos, Tryfon G.; Kliafa, Vasso G.; Asher, Kevin J.; Papaconstantinou, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of the fixed combination of bimatoprost 0.03% and timolol 0.5% (BTFC) in patients in Greece with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT) whose previous therapy provided insufficient lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP). METHODS A multicenter, prospective, open-label, non-interventional, observational study of the use of BTFC in clinical practice was conducted at 41 sites in Greece. The primary endpoint was the reduction in IOP from baseline at study end, approximately 12wk after initiation of BTFC therapy. RESULTS A total of 785 eligible patients were enrolled in the study and 97.6% completed the study. The mean±SD IOP reduction from baseline at 12wk after initiation of BTFC was 6.3±2.8 mm Hg (n=764; P<0.001). In patients (n=680) who replaced their previous IOP-lowering monotherapy (a single drug, or a fixed combination of 2 drugs in a single ophthalmic drop) with once-daily BTFC, the mean±SD IOP reduction from baseline at 12wk was 6.2±2.8 mm Hg (P<0.001). IOP was reduced from baseline in 99.2% of patients, and 58.0% of patients reached or exceeded their target IOP. Substantial mean IOP reductions were observed regardless of the previous therapy. BTFC was well tolerated, with 96.0% of patients who completed the study rating the tolerability of BTFC as “good” or “very good.” Adverse events were reported in 8.3% of patients; only 0.6% of patients discontinued the study due to adverse events. CONCLUSION In clinical practice in Greece, BTFC is well tolerated and effectively lower the IOP in patients with POAG or OHT who requires additional IOP lowering on their previous therapy. PMID:26949613

  19. Reduction of hydrogen cyanide concentrations and acute inhalation toxicity from flexible polyurethane foam combustion products by the addition of copper compounds. Part 4. Effects of combustion conditions and scaling on the generation of hydrogen cyanide and toxicity from flexible polyurethane foam with and without copper compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.C.; Braun, E.; Paabo, M.; Harris, R.H.; Navarro, M.

    1992-12-01

    Two full-scale protocols (A B) were tested to determine the efficacy of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) in reducing the concentrations of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from flexible polyurethane foams (FPU) when thermally decomposed under realistic room conditions. In each Protocol A test, a FPU cushion (untreated or treated with 0.1% Cu2O) was cut in half, and the two halves were stacked on a load cell in a closed room. The ignition source was a hot wire placed between the two halves. Rats were exposed to the decomposition products to examine the toxicological effects of the foams with and without Cu2O. Protocol B differed from Protocol A in that chairs were simulated by four FPU cushions attached to a steel frame; the treated FPU contained 1.0% Cu2O; the cushions were covered with a cotton fabric; the chairs were ignited with cigarettes; and the burn room was open and connected to a corridor. In both protocols, the thermal decomposition progressed through nonflaming, smoldering and flaming phases and the concentrations of HCN and other gases were monitored. Foams used in the full-scale room burns were also examined under small-scale conditions (under flaming or a two-phase nonflaming/ramped heating mode) in the cup furnace smoke toxicity method. Both atmospheric and reduced O2 conditions were studied. The small-scale tests showed an 87% reduction in the concentration of HCN and a 40 to 73% reduction in the toxicity of the thermal decomposition products when the Cu2O-treated foams were tested. In the full-scale tests, the concentration of HCN was reduced 70% when the FPU contained 1.0% Cu2O, but not when the foams contained 0.1% Cu2O.

  20. Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection

    DOEpatents

    Brusasco, Raymond M.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

  1. 1995 Fast Track: cost reduction and improvement.

    PubMed

    Panzer, R J; Tuttle, D N; Kolker, R M

    1997-01-01

    To respond to a cost reduction crisis, Strong Memorial Hospital implemented an aggressively managed program of accelerated improvement teams. "Fast-track" teams combined the application of many management tools (total quality management, breakthrough thinking, reengineering, etc.) into one problem-solving process. Teams and managers were charged to work on specific cost reduction strategies. Teams were given additional instruction on interpersonal skills such as communication, teamwork, and leadership. Paradoxically, quality improvement in our hospital was advanced more through this effort at cost reduction than had previously been done in the name of quality itself. PMID:10176411

  2. Recursions of Symmetry Orbits and Reduction without Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykh, Andrei A.; Sheftel, Mikhail B.

    2011-04-01

    We consider a four-dimensional PDE possessing partner symmetries mainly on the example of complex Monge-Ampère equation (CMA). We use simultaneously two pairs of symmetries related by a recursion relation, which are mutually complex conjugate for CMA. For both pairs of partner symmetries, using Lie equations, we introduce explicitly group parameters as additional variables, replacing symmetry characteristics and their complex conjugates by derivatives of the unknown with respect to group parameters. We study the resulting system of six equations in the eight-dimensional space, that includes CMA, four equations of the recursion between partner symmetries and one integrability condition of this system. We use point symmetries of this extended system for performing its symmetry reduction with respect to group parameters that facilitates solving the extended system. This procedure does not imply a reduction in the number of physical variables and hence we end up with orbits of non-invariant solutions of CMA, generated by one partner symmetry, not used in the reduction. These solutions are determined by six linear equations with constant coefficients in the five-dimensional space which are obtained by a three-dimensional Legendre transformation of the reduced extended system. We present algebraic and exponential examples of such solutions that govern Legendre-transformed Ricci-flat Kähler metrics with no Killing vectors. A similar procedure is briefly outlined for Husain equation.

  3. Footprint reduction's 'multiple paybacks'.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    Some of the measures that EFM personnel can take to further reduce their estates' carbon footprint at a time when pressure to cut energy consumption must be balanced both against the requirement to create the best possible patient environment, and new medical technology that may require substantial energy to operate, were the focus of a recent IHEEM carbon reduction seminar in London. The one-day event, "Planning to achieve Carbon Reduction Commitment targets for healthcare premises", also included a look at the key steps affected healthcare organisations, and especially their estates teams, need to be taking already to ensure compliance with the new Carbon Reduction Commitment scheme. PMID:20597381

  4. Reduction of bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Cindy

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on reduction of bone strength are presented. WEHI 231 B growth rates, experimental chambers used to apply the electric field to the cell cultures, and a mouse suspended by rotating cuff in electromagnetic field are shown.

  5. AMD NOX REDUCTION IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the first phase of a potentially multi-phase project aimed at identifying scientific methodologies that will lead to the development of innnovative analytical tools supporting the analysis of control strategy effectiveness, namely. accountabilty. Significant reductions i...

  6. Model Reduction in Groundwater Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, W. W. G.

    2014-12-01

    Model reduction has been shown to be a very effective method for reducing the computational burden of large-scale simulations. Model reduction techniques preserve much of the physical knowledge of the system and primarily seek to remove components from the model that do not provide significant information of interest. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is a model reduction technique by which a system of ordinary equations is projected onto a much smaller subspace in such a way that the span of the subspace is equal to the span of the original full model space. Basically, the POD technique selects a small number of orthonormal basis functions (principal components) that span the spatial variability of the solutions. In this way the state variable (head) is approximated by a linear combination of these basis functions and, using a Galerkin projection, the dimension of the problem is significantly reduced. It has been shown that for a highly discritized model, the reduced model can be two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the original model and runs 1,000 faster. More importantly, the reduced model captures the dominating characteristics of the full model and produces sufficiently accurate solutions. One of the major tasks in the development of the reduced model is the selection of snapshots which are used to determine the dominant eigenvectors. This paper discusses ways to optimize the snapshot selection. Additionally, the paper also discusses applications of the reduced model to parameter estimation, Monte Carlo simulation and experimental design in groundwater modeling.

  7. The Airframe Noise Reduction Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA goal of reducing external aircraft noise by 10 dB in the near-term presents the acoustics community with an enormous challenge. This report identifies technologies with the greatest potential to reduce airframe noise. Acoustic and aerodynamic effects will be discussed, along with the likelihood of industry accepting and implementing the different technologies. We investigate the lower bound, defined as noise generated by an aircraft modified with a virtual retrofit capable of eliminating all noise associated with the high lift system and landing gear. However, the airframe noise of an aircraft in this 'clean' configuration would only be about 8 dB quieter on approach than current civil transports. To achieve the NASA goal of 10 dB noise reduction will require that additional noise sources be addressed. Research shows that energy in the turbulent boundary layer of a wing is scattered as it crosses trailing edge. Noise generated by scattering is the dominant noise mechanism on an aircraft flying in the clean configuration. Eliminating scattering would require changes to much of the aircraft, and practical reduction devices have yet to receive serious attention. Evidence suggests that to meet NASA goals in civil aviation noise reduction, we need to employ emerging technologies and improve landing procedures; modified landing patterns and zoning restrictions could help alleviate aircraft noise in communities close to airports.

  8. Photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1993-10-20

    The photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate solutions to tetravalent uranium was investigated as a means of producing uranium dioxide feed for the saltless direct oxide reduction (SDOR) process. At high uranium concentrations, reoxidation of U{sup +4} occurs rapidly. The kinetics of the nitric oxidation of tetravalent uranium depend on the concentrations of hydrogen ion, nitrate ion, nitrous acid, and tetravalent uranium in the same manner as was reported elsewhere for the nitrate oxidation of PU{sup +3}. Reaction rate data were successfully correlated with a mechanism in which nitrogen dioxide is the reactive intermediate. Addition of a nitrous acid scavenger suppresses the reoxidation reaction. An immersion reactor employing a mercury vapor lamp gave reduction times fast enough for routine production usage. Precipitation techniques for conversion of aqueous U(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} to hydrous UO{sub 2} were evaluated. Prolonged dewatering times tended to make the process time consuming. Use of 3- to 4-M aqueous NaOH gave the best dewatering times observed. Reoxidation of the UO{sub 2} by water of hydration was encountered, which required the drying process to be carried out under a reducing atmosphere.

  9. Additionality of global benefits and financial additionality in the context of the AIJ negotiations

    SciTech Connect

    Puhl, I.

    1996-12-31

    The Conference of the Party at their first meeting (COP1) took a decision regarding criteria for joint implementation as indicated in Art. 4.2 (a) of the FCCC which established a pilot phase for activities implemented jointly (AIJ) under the pilot phase. Besides some more technical issues this decision specified that such measures should bring about real, measurable and long-term environmental benefits related to the mitigation of climate change that would not have occurred in the absence of such activities. It also established that the financing of AIJ shall be additional to the financial obligations of developed country parties. These two requirements are called the additionality criteria for AIJ. The first refers to the realness of GHG emission abatement (which means reduction compared to a baseline) whereas the second describes that funds earmarked for AIJ have no other objective (i.e. profit making, export promotion) but to reduce GHG emissions to avoid the free-riding of investors and subsequently developed country parties. The reporting framework as well as the reporting requirements under national programs do not specify further the two types of additionality and even though research focuses on issues like baseline determination there has been no attempt so far to identify approaches which contribute towards defining strict and practicable methods and guidelines to frame additionality criteria. The first FCCC assessment of pilot project reporting revealed that in the reporting of activities, emissions additionality often remained unclear, especially in cases where AIJ was only a portion of an existing or already planned project, and that there is a point about how to account for financial additionality. It subsequently proposed to develop a uniform approach to baseline determination and the assessment of emission (reduction) additionality and financial additionality.

  10. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  11. Deciphering the roles of multiple additives in organocatalyzed Michael additions.

    PubMed

    Günler, Z Inci; Companyó, Xavier; Alfonso, Ignacio; Burés, Jordi; Jimeno, Ciril; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2016-05-21

    The synergistic effects of multiple additives (water and acetic acid) on the asymmetric Michael addition of acetone to nitrostyrene catalyzed by primary amine-thioureas (PAT) were precisely determined. Acetic acid facilitates hydrolysis of the imine intermediates, thus leading to catalytic behavior, and minimizes the formation of the double addition side product. In contrast, water slows down the reaction but minimizes catalyst deactivation, eventually leading to higher final yields. PMID:27128165

  12. News Girls in Physics: Getting girls engaged with physics Schools Lecture: How to explore the universe: the IOP schools lecture series 2009 Elastomobile Competition: Rubber-band vehicles go for gold Congress: Congress celebrates centenary Outreach Programme: Tales of the Stars inspires young children from around the world Physics Olympiad: BPhO selects top students for International Physics Olympiad Mobile Science: Mobile teaching lab visits rural Turkey China: Inspiration and competition in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    Girls in Physics: Getting girls engaged with physics Schools Lecture: How to explore the universe: the IOP schools lecture series 2009 Elastomobile Competition: Rubber-band vehicles go for gold Congress: Congress celebrates centenary Outreach Programme: Tales of the Stars inspires young children from around the world Physics Olympiad: BPhO selects top students for International Physics Olympiad Mobile Science: Mobile teaching lab visits rural Turkey China: Inspiration and competition in China

  13. News Conference: ASE '09 invigorates participants 34th Stirling Physics Meeting: IOP in Scotland meets to debate curriculum and celebrate success From the News to the Classroom: A positive outlook for science as Obama takes up US presidency Workshop: Nanoschool educates Finnish teachers CERN: Act fast: High School Teacher Programme calls for applicants London Physics Teachers' Network: Teachers' Network Day has an international flavour CERN: LHC timetabled to restart in the summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    Conference: ASE '09 invigorates participants 34th Stirling Physics Meeting: IOP in Scotland meets to debate curriculum and celebrate success From the News to the Classroom: A positive outlook for science as Obama takes up US presidency Workshop: Nanoschool educates Finnish teachers CERN: Act fast: High School Teacher Programme calls for applicants London Physics Teachers' Network: Teachers' Network Day has an international flavour CERN: LHC timetabled to restart in the summer

  14. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  15. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  16. Reductive mobilization of oxide-bound metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed a large number of experiments which examine the release of MnO{sub 2}-bound Co, Ni, and Cu. Our work has focused upon the following areas: (1) competitive adsorption among the three toxic metals and Mn(II); (2) toxic metal release upon addition of low MW organic reductants and complexants; and (3) toxic metal release upon addition of natural organic matter-rich surface waters and IHSS organic matter reference material.

  17. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-16

    This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

  18. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  19. Stress and stress reduction.

    PubMed

    Straub, Heather; Qadir, Sameen; Miller, Greg; Borders, Ann

    2014-09-01

    Chronic stress contributes to preterm birth (PTB), through direct physiological mechanisms or behavioral pathways. This review identified interventions to prevent PTB through decreased maternal stress. Studies were grouped according to intervention: group prenatal care (11 studies), care coordination (8 studies), health insurance expansion (4 studies), expanded prenatal education/support in the clinic (8 studies), home visitation (9 studies), telephone contact (2 studies), or stress-reduction strategies (5 studies). Group prenatal care had the most evidence for PTB prevention. Comparative studies of PTB prevention through different models of prenatal care and maternal support, education, empowerment, stress-reduction, and coping strategies are needed. PMID:24979355

  20. Time, Chance, and Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Gerhard; Hüttemann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    List of contributors; 1. Introduction Gerhard Ernst and Andreas Hütteman; Part I. The Arrows of Time: 2. Does a low-entropy constraint prevent us from influencing the past? Mathias Frisch; 3. The part hypothesis meets gravity Craig Callender; 4. Quantum gravity and the arrow of time Claus Kiefer; Part II. Probability and Chance: 5. The natural-range conception of probability Jacob Rosenthal; 6. Probability in Boltzmannian statistical mechanics Roman Frigg; 7. Humean mechanics versus a metaphysics of powers Michael Esfeld; Part III. Reduction: 8. The crystallisation of Clausius's phenomenological thermodynamics C. Ulises Moulines; 9. Reduction and renormalization Robert W. Batterman; 10. Irreversibility in stochastic dynamics Jos Uffink; Index.

  1. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  2. 75 FR 27313 - Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED PROCUREMENT LIST Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  3. Reviews Book: Enjoyable Physics Equipment: SEP Colorimeter Box Book: Pursuing Power and Light Equipment: SEP Bottle Rocket Launcher Equipment: Sciencescope GLE Datalogger Equipment: EDU Logger Book: Physics of Sailing Book: The Lightness of Being Software: Logotron Insight iLog Studio iPhone Apps Lecture: 2010 IOP Schools and Colleges Lecture Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Enjoyable Physics Mechanics book makes learning more fun SEP Colorimeter Box A useful and inexpensive colorimeter for the classroom Pursuing Power and Light Account of the development of science in the 19th centuary SEP Bottle Rocket Launcher An excellent resource for teaching about projectiles GLE Datalogger GPS software is combined with a datalogger EDU Logger Remote datalogger has greater sensing abilities Logotron Insight iLog Studio Software enables datlogging, data analysis and modelling iPhone Apps Mobile phone games aid study of gravity WORTH A LOOK Physics of Sailing Book journeys through the importance of physics in sailing The Lightness of Being Study of what the world is made from LECTURE The 2010 IOP Schools and Colleges Lecture presents the physics of fusion WEB WATCH Planet Scicast pushes boundaries of pupil creativity

  4. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…

  5. Hadamard speckle contrast reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisnadi, Jahja I.

    2004-01-01

    The condition for a diffuser to produce the maximum speckle contrast reduction with the minimum number of distinct phase patterns is derived. A binary realization of this optimum diffuser is obtained by mapping the rows or columns of a Hadamard matrix to the phase patterns. The method is experimentally verified in the Grating Light Valve laser projection display.

  6. Industrial Waste Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-24

    US industry generates over 12 billion tons of wastes each year. These wastes consist of undesirable by-products of industrial production that are discarded into our environment. Energy is an integral part of these wastes; it is found in the embodied energy of industrial feedstocks not optimally used, in the energy content of the wastes themselves, and in the energy needed to transport, treat, and dispose of wastes. Estimates of the potential energy savings from reducing industrial wastes range from three to four quadrillion Btu per year -- enough to meet the annual energy needs of 30 million American homes. This document presents a plan for the Industrial Waste Reduction Program, which has been designed to help achieve national goals for energy efficiency and waste minimization. The objective of the program is to improve the energy efficiency of industrial processes through cost-effective waste reduction. The initial program focus is on waste reduction opportunities in the production and use of chemicals, due to the significant amount of energy used in these activities and the large amounts of hazardous and toxic wastes they generate. The chemical industry will be the initial subject of a series of waste reduction opportunity assessments conducted as part of the program. Assessments of other industries and waste problems will follow.

  7. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, R. Craig

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" reviews several concerns that must be addressed by school business administrators in districts facing declining enrollments and the need for reductions in force. The chapter first looks at the business administrator's significant role in planning for retrenchment. The chapter then…

  8. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert

    Chapter 2 in a book on school law discusses the reasons for reduction in force (RIF) and presents a set of model regulations for school districts as the best means of minimizing legal problems resulting from RIF. The reasons for RIF include declining student enrollments; reduced turnover among teachers; changes in programs; and more constrained…

  9. Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketroser, Heidi

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the fifth annual Dr. Curtis C. Melnick Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference sponsored by the Greater Chicago (Illinois) Regional Office of the Anti-Defamation League of the B'nai B'rith. The day-long conference addressed issues of prejudice and allowed students and staff from various high schools to explore their concerns with…

  10. Imino Transfer Hydrogenation Reductions.

    PubMed

    Wills, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This review contains a summary of recent developments in the transfer hydrogenation of C=N bonds, with a particularly focus on reports from within the last 10 years and asymmetric transformations. However, earlier work in the area is also discussed in order to provide context for the more recent results described. I focus strongly on the Ru/TsDPEN class of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reactions originally reported by Noyori et al., together with examples of their applications, particularly to medically valuable target molecules. The recent developments in the area of highly active imine-reduction catalysts, notably those based on iridium, are also described in some detail. I discuss diastereoselective reduction methods as a route to the synthesis of chiral amines using transfer hydrogenation. The recent development of a methodology for positioning reduction complexes within chiral proteins, permitting the generation of asymmetric reduction products through a directed modification of the protein environment in a controlled manner, is also discussed. PMID:27573139

  11. Nagel on reduction.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2015-10-01

    This paper attempts a critical reappraisal of Nagel's (1961, 1970) model of reduction taking into account both traditional criticisms and recent defenses. This model treats reduction as a type of explanation in which a reduced theory is explained by a reducing theory after their relevant representational items have been suitably connected. In accordance with the deductive-nomological model, the explanation is supposed to consist of a logical deduction. Nagel was a pluralist about both the logical form of the connections between the reduced and reducing theories (which could be conditionals or biconditionals) and their epistemological status (as analytic connections, conventions, or synthetic claims). This paper defends Nagel's pluralism on both counts and, in the process, argues that the multiple realizability objection to reductionism is misplaced. It also argues that the Nagel model correctly characterizes reduction as a type of explanation. However, it notes that logical deduction must be replaced by a broader class of inferential techniques that allow for different types of approximation. Whereas Nagel (1970), in contrast to his earlier position (1961), recognized the relevance of approximation, he did not realize its full import for the model. Throughout the paper two case studies are used to illustrate the arguments: the putative reduction of classical thermodynamics to the kinetic theory of matter and that of classical genetics to molecular biology. PMID:26386529

  12. Financing Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Class size reduction has been shown to, among other things, improve academic achievement for all students and particularly for low-income and minority students. With the No Child Left Behind Act's heavy emphasis on scientifically based research, adequate yearly progress, and disaggregated results, one wonders why all children aren't enrolled in…

  13. Teaching Reductive Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Gal-Ezer, Judith

    2005-01-01

    When dealing with a complex problem, solving it by reduction to simpler problems, or problems for which the solution is already known, is a common method in mathematics and other scientific disciplines, as in computer science and, specifically, in the field of computability. However, when teaching computational models (as part of computability)…

  14. On the way to extended noise reductions in propeller aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiers, R. F. C.

    1984-08-01

    Origins of cabin noise in propeller driven aircraft (PDE) and the importance of further reductions are described. Trends in propeller technology and fuselage construction are aimed at the development of extremely fuel-efficient PDE. However, the related increase of cabin noise levels urges the extension of noise reduction in PDE. Fokker noise reduction methodology for meeting the challenge of maintaining and improving noise levels in future PDE is discussed. Additional noise reduction is hard to obtain. Sophisticated techniques were used to acquire the necessary data and take effective noise reduction measures.

  15. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  16. Additives for high temperature liquid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, C.; Yavrouian, A.H.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this task is to perform research for the Department of Energy (DOE) on the synthesis and characterization of additives for liquid lubricants which will lead to significant improvements in the major tribology task area of friction and wear reductions at high temperature. To this end JPL is surveying candidate precursor compounds which are soluble in liquid lubricants, synthesizing the most promising of these materials, characterizing them, and submitting these additives to NIST for evaluation. Calculations have been made to estimate the Hildebrand solubility parameters for candidate precursor compounds. The initial listing is confined to dinitrites which can form chelates with metals or their compounds. The goal is to find soluble additives that can react in situ with the bearing surface to form adherent lubricating film. Although none of the compounds listed match the solubility parameters of liquid lubricants, the lowest solubility parameters were calculated for dialkyl substituted compounds. In this case, there is probably sufficient solubility to provide adequate amounts of reactants on the metal surfaces. The conclusions are based on previous results where only 1/2 to 1% solubility was sufficient to give excellent lubrication.

  17. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  18. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  19. Supersonic jet shock noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Shock-cell noise is identified to be a potentially significant problem for advanced supersonic aircraft at takeoff. Therefore NASA conducted fundamental studies of the phenomena involved and model-scale experiments aimed at developing means of noise reduction. The results of a series of studies conducted to determine means by which supersonic jet shock noise can be reduced to acceptable levels for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft are reviewed. Theoretical studies were conducted on the shock associated noise of supersonic jets from convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzles. Laboratory studies were conducted on the influence of narrowband shock screech on broadband noise and on means of screech reduction. The usefulness of C-D nozzle passages was investigated at model scale for single-stream and dual-stream nozzles. The effect of off-design pressure ratio was determined under static and simulated flight conditions for jet temperatures up to 960 K. Annular and coannular flow passages with center plugs and multi-element suppressor nozzles were evaluated, and the effect of plug tip geometry was established. In addition to the far-field acoustic data, mean and turbulent velocity distributions were measured with a laser velocimeter, and shadowgraph images of the flow field were obtained.

  20. Comparison of noise reduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, S. D.; Whitaker, R. W.

    1991-06-01

    When using infrasound as a tool for verification, the most important measurement to determine yield has been the peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of the signal. Therefore, there is a need to operate at the most favorable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) possible. Winds near the ground can degrade the SNR, thereby making accurate signal amplitude measurement difficult. Wind noise reduction techniques were developed to help alleviate this problem; however, a noise reducing system should reduce the noise, and should not introduce distortion of coherent signals. An experiment is described to study system response for a variety of noise reducing configurations to a signal generated by an underground test (UGT) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In addition to the signal, background noise reduction is examined through measurements of variance. Sensors using two particular geometries of noise reducing equipment, the spider and the cross appear to deliver the best SNR. Because the spider configuration is easier to deploy, it is now the most commonly used.

  1. Microstructural Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Brice, D. A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H. L.

    2016-07-01

    In additively manufactured (AM) metallic materials, the fundamental interrelationships that exist between composition, processing, and microstructure govern these materials’ properties and potential improvements or reductions in performance. For example, by using AM, it is possible to achieve highly desirable microstructural features (e.g., highly refined precipitates) that could not otherwise be achieved by using conventional approaches. Simultaneously, opportunities exist to manage macro-level microstructural characteristics such as residual stress, porosity, and texture, the last of which might be desirable. To predictably realize optimal microstructures, it is necessary to establish a framework that integrates processing variables, alloy composition, and the resulting microstructure. Although such a framework is largely lacking for AM metallic materials, the basic scientific components of the framework exist in literature. This review considers these key components and presents them in a manner that highlights key interdependencies that would form an integrated framework to engineer microstructures using AM.

  2. Optimality, reduction and collective motion

    PubMed Central

    Justh, Eric W.; Krishnaprasad, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The planar self-steering particle model of agents in a collective gives rise to dynamics on the N-fold direct product of SE(2), the rigid motion group in the plane. Assuming a connected, undirected graph of interaction between agents, we pose a family of symmetric optimal control problems with a coupling parameter capturing the strength of interactions. The Hamiltonian system associated with the necessary conditions for optimality is reducible to a Lie–Poisson dynamical system possessing interesting structure. In particular, the strong coupling limit reveals additional (hidden) symmetry, beyond the manifest one used in reduction: this enables explicit integration of the dynamics, and demonstrates the presence of a ‘master clock’ that governs all agents to steer identically. For finite coupling strength, we show that special solutions exist with steering controls proportional across the collective. These results suggest that optimality principles may provide a framework for understanding imitative behaviours observed in certain animal aggregations. PMID:27547087

  3. Energy Savings from Industrial Water Reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; de Fontaine, Andre

    2015-08-03

    Although it is widely recognized that reducing freshwater consumption is of critical importance, generating interest in industrial water reduction programs can be hindered for a variety of reasons. These include the low cost of water, greater focus on water use in other sectors such as the agriculture and residential sectors, high levels of unbilled and/or unregulated self-supplied water use in industry, and lack of water metering and tracking capabilities at industrial facilities. However, there are many additional components to the resource savings associated with reducing site water use beyond the water savings alone, such as reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, treatment chemicals, and impact on the local watershed. Understanding and quantifying these additional resource savings can expand the community of businesses, NGOs, government agencies, and researchers with a vested interest in water reduction. This paper will develop a methodology for evaluating the embedded energy consumption associated with water use at an industrial facility. The methodology developed will use available data and references to evaluate the energy consumption associated with water supply and wastewater treatment outside of a facility’s fence line for various water sources. It will also include a framework for evaluating the energy consumption associated with water use within a facility’s fence line. The methodology will develop a more complete picture of the total resource savings associated with water reduction efforts and allow industrial water reduction programs to assess the energy and CO2 savings associated with their efforts.

  4. Additives for high temperature liquid lubricants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yavrouian, A.H.; Repar, J.; Moran, C.M.; Lawton, E.A.; Anderson, M.S.

    1994-01-15

    The purpose of this task was to perform research for the Department of Energy (DOE) on the synthesis and characterization of additives for liquid lubricants which could lead to significant improvements in the major tribological task area of friction and wear reduction at high temperature. To this end JPL surveyed candidate precursor compounds which are soluble in liquid lubricants, synthesized the most promising of these materials, characterized them and submitted these additives to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for evaluation.

  5. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Roscoe A.

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and not MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)

  6. Bacterial reduction of chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieman, E.A.; Yonge, D.R.; Johnstone, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    A mixed culture was enriched from surface soil obtained from an eastern United States site highly contaminated with chromate. Growth of the culture was inhibited by a chromium concentration of 12 mg/L. Another mixed culture was enriched from subsurface soil obtained from the Hanford reservation, at the fringe of a chromate plume. The enrichment medium was minimal salts solution augmented with acetate as the carbon source, nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor, and various levels of chromate. This mixed culture exhibited chromate tolerance, but not chromate reduction capability, when growing anaerobically on this medium. However, this culture did exhibit chromate reduction capability when growing anaerobically on TSB. Growth of this culture was not inhibited by a chromium concentration of 12 mg/L. Mixed cultures exhibited decreasing diversity with increasing levels of chromate in the enrichment medium. An in situ bioremediation strategy is suggested for chromate contaminated soil and groundwater. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and notmore » MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)« less

  8. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  9. Algorithmic dimensionality reduction for molecular structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, W. Michael; Martin, Shawn; Pollock, Sara N.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction approaches have been used to exploit the redundancy in a Cartesian coordinate representation of molecular motion by producing low-dimensional representations of molecular motion. This has been used to help visualize complex energy landscapes, to extend the time scales of simulation, and to improve the efficiency of optimization. Until recently, linear approaches for dimensionality reduction have been employed. Here, we investigate the efficacy of several automated algorithms for nonlinear dimensionality reduction for representation of trans, trans-1,2,4-trifluorocyclo-octane conformation—a molecule whose structure can be described on a 2-manifold in a Cartesian coordinate phase space. We describe an efficient approach for a deterministic enumeration of ring conformations. We demonstrate a drastic improvement in dimensionality reduction with the use of nonlinear methods. We discuss the use of dimensionality reduction algorithms for estimating intrinsic dimensionality and the relationship to the Whitney embedding theorem. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the choice of high-dimensional encoding on the reduction. We show for the case studied that, in terms of reconstruction error root mean square deviation, Cartesian coordinate representations and encodings based on interatom distances provide better performance than encodings based on a dihedral angle representation. PMID:18715062

  10. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  11. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Goodnow, Warren H.; Payne, John R.

    1982-01-01

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB.sub.2, for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints.

  12. Television noise reduction device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, B. L.; Stamps, J. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A noise reduction system that divides the color video signal into its luminance and chrominance components is reported. The luminance component of a given frame is summed with the luminance component of at least one preceding frame which was stored on a disc recorder. The summation is carried out so as to achieve a signal amplitude equivalent to that of the original signal. The averaged luminance signal is then recombined with the chrominance signal to achieve a noise-reduced television signal.

  13. [Aware and cooperative reduction].

    PubMed

    Tambone, V; Ghilardi, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to address the question of reduction in the scientific method, to evaluate its legitimacy as well as its pro and contra from an epistemological point of view. In the first paragraph we classify some kinds of reductionism, analysing their presuppositions and epistemological status and showing some examples of scientific reduction. The presentation includes a classificatory table that shows some of the different forms of biological reductionism. In the second paragraph we study the epistemology of science starting from its modern beginning: the Vienna Circle, focusing on the meaning of methodological reductionism. What did it mean for science to define itself mainly as method, which effects did this new concept of science have on methodology and what kind of problems did this movement bring about. In the third paragraph we examine the reactions triggered by methodological reductionism, we analyze the theoretical consistency of these answers, trying to offer a balanced view. We show how complexity can be seen as a paradigm of the anti-reductionism effort, and we study its epistemological basis. In the fourth paragraph we outline our operative proposal: the reduction that is both aware and cooperative. We point out the main reasons why science cannot avoid being reductive in some way, and therefore how we need to deal with this feature in order to prevent it to degenerate into reductionism. We show some examples of this new proposal taken from the practical realm and from literature, where it is possible to discern the spirit of this alternative methodology. PMID:22964706

  14. Drag reduction strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. Christopher

    1994-01-01

    previously a description was given of an active control scheme using wall transpiration that leads to a 15% reduction in surface skin friction beneath a turbulent boundary layer, according to direct numerical simulation. In this research brief further details of that scheme and its variants are given together with some suggestions as to how sensor/actuator arrays could be configured to reduce surface drag. The research which is summarized here was performed during the first half of 1994. This research is motivated by the need to understand better how the dynamics of near-wall turbulent flow can be modified so that skin friction is reduced. The reduction of turbulent skin friction is highly desirable in many engineering applications. Experiments and direct numerical simulations have led to an increased understanding of the cycle of turbulence production and transport in the boundary layer and raised awareness of the possibility of disrupting the process with a subsequent reduction in turbulent skin friction. The implementation of active feedback control in a computational setting is a viable approach for the investigation of the modifications to the flow physics that can be achieved. Bewley et al. and Hill describe how ideas from optimal control theory are employed to give 'sub-optimal' drag reduction schemes. The objectives of the work reported here is to investigate in greater detail the assumptions implicit within such schemes and their limitations. It is also our objective to describe how an array of sensors and actuators could be arranged and interconnected to form a 'smart' surface which has low skin friction.

  15. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

    1982-09-14

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

  16. Reduction of astrographic catalogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.; Prugna, F. D.; Cova, J.

    1984-01-01

    An automatic program for the reduction of overlapping Carte du Ciel plates is described. The projection and transformation equations are given and the RAA subprogram flow is outlined. The program was applied to two different sets of data, namely to nine overlapping plates of the Cape Zone of the CdC, and to fifteen plates taken with the CIDA-refractor of the open cluster Tr10.

  17. Echocardiographic speckle reduction comparison.

    PubMed

    Finn, Seán; Glavin, Martin; Jones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a detailed description and comparison of speckle reduction of medical ultrasound, and in particular echocardiography, is presented. Fifteen speckle reduction filters are described in a detailed fashion to facilitate implementation for research and evaluation. The filtering techniques considered include anisotropic diffusion, wavelet denoising, and local statistics. Common nomenclature and notation are adopted, to expedite comparison between approaches. Comparison of the filters is based on their application to simulated images, clinical videos, and a computational requirement analysis. The ultrasound simulation method provides a realistic model of the image acquisition process, and permits the use of a noise-free reference image for comparison. Application of objective quality metrics quantifies the preservation of image edges, overall image distortion, and improvement in image contrast. The computational analysis quantifies the number of operations required for each speckle reduction method. A speed-accuracy analysis of discretization methods for anisotropic diffusion is included. It is concluded that the optimal method is the OSRAD diffusion filter. This method is capable of strong speckle suppression, increasing the average SNRA of the simulated images by a factor of two. This method also shows favorable edge preservation and contrast improvement, and may be efficiently implemented. PMID:21244977

  18. Enantioselective Reduction of Ketones and Imines Catalyzed by (CN-Box)Re(V)-Oxo Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nolin, Kristine A.; Ahn, Richard W.; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    The development and application of chiral, non-racemic Re(V)-oxo complexes to the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones is described. In addition to the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones, we report the application of these complexes to (1) a tandem Meyer-Schuster rearrangement/reduction to access enantioenriched allylic alcohols and (2) the enantioselective reduction of imines. PMID:20623567

  19. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  20. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting. PMID:26118220

  1. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Sugar Addition Test

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-06-20

    In order to meet certain production goals, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has focused on implementing a more temporally efficient method of waste vitrification. Changes in frit composition and alterations in the feed preparation process were investigated to determine if melt rate could be improved. The addition of sugar as an alternative reductant to formic acid was investigated for Macrobatch 3 (MB3).

  2. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  3. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  4. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  5. Promoting Additive Acculturation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    A study focusing on 113 ninth graders of Mexican descent indicates that most students and their parents adhere to a strategy of additive acculturation (incorporating skills of the new culture and language), but that the school curriculum and general school climate devalue Mexican culture. (SLD)

  6. Individualized Additional Instruction for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Ken

    2010-01-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the…

  7. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  8. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  9. Tinkertoy Color-Addition Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joe L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple home-built device, using an overhead projector, for use in demonstrations of the addition of various combinations of red, green, and blue light. Useful in connection with discussions of color, color vision, or color television. (JRH)

  10. Silage Additives and Management Issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants are the most common silage additives in the United States. These products contain lactic acid bacteria to supplement the lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop and help insure a consistent fermentation in the silo. There are three types of inoculants: homofermentative lactic acid bact...

  11. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  12. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  13. Nox Emission Reduction in Commercial Jets Through Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balepin, Vladimir; Ossello, Chris; Snyder, Chris

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses a method of the nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission reduction through the injection of water in commercial turbofan engines during the takeoff and climbout cycles. In addition to emission reduction, this method can significantly reduce turbine temperature during the most demanding operational modes (takeoff and climbout) and increase engine reliability and life.

  14. Reduction of turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A. (Inventor); Brookfield, John M. (Inventor); Sell, Julian (Inventor); Hayden, Belva J. (Inventor); Ingard, K. Uno (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    In the invention, propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise characteristic of interaction of a turbomachine blade wake, produced by a turbomachine blade as the blade rotates, with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade, are reduced. This is accomplished by injection of fluid into the blade wake through a port in the rotor blade. The mass flow rate of the fluid injected into the blade wake is selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake. With this fluid injection, reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved. In a further noise reduction technique, boundary layer fluid is suctioned into the turbomachine blade through a suction port on the side of the blade that is characterized as the relatively low-pressure blade side. As with the fluid injection technique, the mass flow rate of the fluid suctioned into the blade is here selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake; reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved with this suction technique. Blowing and suction techniques are also provided in the invention for reducing noise associated with the wake produced by fluid flow around a stationary blade upstream of a rotating turbomachine.

  15. Dimensional reduction transition

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.

    1984-11-01

    In this conference on phase transitions in the early Universe the author discusses the transition from more than four space-time dimensions to four effective space-time dimensions; the dimensional reduction transition. The basic assumption is that the true dimensionality of space-time is more than four, and that at present the extra dimensions are compact and too small to be observable. The origin of the observed gauge symmetries from symmetries of a compact space has been proposed as a possible approach for the unification of particle physics and gravity. The common assumption in all models with extra dimensions is that the unseen dimensions are compactified to a very small size, usually taken to be of the order of the Planck length. To probe the structure of the extra dimensions would require energies of the Planck mass E = m/sub pl/ = 1.2 x 10/sup 19/GeV, and the early Universe may be the only source of such energies. The author will assume for initial conditions that all spatial dimensions are small, and that initially the Universe had N = 3 + D spatial dimensions. When the temperature fell below T = R/sub D//sup -1/, where R/sub D/ is the physical size of the compact extra dimensions, the space-time dimensionality of the Universe underwent a reduction to effectively a 4 space-time dimensional Universe, and dynamical effects of the extra dimensions became unimportant. In this paper I will discuss three possible consequences of this cosmological dimensional reduction; entropy production (inflation), magnetic monopole production, and stable, massive particle production. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Electrolytic oxide reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Barnes, Laurel A; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L; Berger, John F

    2015-04-28

    An electrolytic oxide reduction system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a plurality of anode assemblies, a plurality of cathode assemblies, and a lift system configured to engage the anode and cathode assemblies. The cathode assemblies may be alternately arranged with the anode assemblies such that each cathode assembly is flanked by two anode assemblies. The lift system may be configured to selectively engage the anode and cathode assemblies so as to allow the simultaneous lifting of any combination of the anode and cathode assemblies (whether adjacent or non-adjacent).

  17. REDSPEC: NIRSPEC data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Prato, L.; McLean, I.

    2015-07-01

    REDSPEC is an IDL based reduction package designed with NIRSPEC in mind though can be used to reduce data from other spectrographs as well. REDSPEC accomplishes spatial rectification by summing an A+B pair of a calibration star to produce an image with two spectra; the image is remapped on the basis of polynomial fits to the spectral traces and calculation of gaussian centroids to define their separation, producing straight spectral traces with respect to the detector rows. The raw images are remapped onto a coordinate system with uniform intervals in spatial extent along the slit and in wavelength along the dispersion axis.

  18. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Payne, John R.

    1983-09-20

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces.

  19. Alumina reduction cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tabereaux, A.T.; Gunnip, F.L.

    1987-06-16

    An alumina reduction cell is described having a cathode and an anode. The anode is formed of a carbonaceous paste and baked during operation of cell and the anode having rows of anode pins on opposing faces. The pins are positioned by passing the pins through openings in anode channels vertically stacked along the opposing faces of the anode. The lowermost row of anode pins carries current through the anode; the improvement positions the anode pins passing through along a line of constant current distribution in the anode.

  20. Aircraft engine pollution reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of engine operation on the types and levels of the major aircraft engine pollutants is described and the major factors governing the formation of these pollutants during the burning of hydrocarbon fuel are discussed. Methods which are being explored to reduce these pollutants are discussed and their application to several experimental research programs are pointed out. Results showing significant reductions in the levels of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen obtained from experimental combustion research programs are presented and discussed to point out potential application to aircraft engines.

  1. 33 CFR 151.2050 - Additional requirements-nonindigenous species reduction practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION VESSELS CARRYING OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES... ballast water essential for vessel operations while in the waters of the United States. (e) Rinse...

  2. 33 CFR 151.2050 - Additional requirements-nonindigenous species reduction practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION VESSELS CARRYING OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES... ballast water essential for vessel operations while in the waters of the United States. (e) Rinse...

  3. STIMULATION OF THE REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE IN ANAEROBIC AQUIFER MICROCOSMS BY THE ADDITION OF TOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the biologically mediated interactions of toluene and PCE under anaerobic conditions were investigated by using microcosms constructed with aquifer solids from an area that was exposed to both alkylbenzenes and chlorinated ethenes at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Statio...

  4. Dry additives-reduction catalysts for flue waste gases originating from the combustion of solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Hard coal is the basic energy generating raw material in Poland. In 1990, 60% of electricity and thermal energy was totally obtained from it. It means that 100 million tons of coal were burned. The second position is held by lignite - generating 38% of electricity and heat (67.3 million tons). It is to be underlined that coal combustion is particularly noxious to the environment. The coal composition appreciably influences the volume of pollution emitted in the air. The contents of incombustible mineral parts - ashes - oscillates from 2 to 30%; only 0.02 comes from plants that had once originated coal and cannot be separated in any way. All the rest, viz. the so-called external mineral substance enters the fuel while being won. The most indesirable hard coal ingredient is sulfur whose level depends on coal sorts and its origin. The worse the fuel quality, the more sulfur it contains. In the utilization process of this fuel, its combustible part is burnt: therefore, sulfur dioxide is produced. At the present coal consumption, the SO{sub 2} emission reaches the level of 3.2 million per year. The intensifies the pressure on working out new coal utilization technologies, improving old and developing of pollution limiting methods. Research is also directed towards such an adaptation of technologies in order that individual users may also make use thereof (household furnaces) as their share in the pollution emission is considerable.

  5. NOx reduction in diesel fuel flames by additions of water and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.

    1997-12-31

    Natural gas has the highest heating value per unit mass (50.1 MJ/kg, LHV) of any of the hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., butane, liquid diesel fuel, gasoline, etc.). Since it has the lowest carbon content per unit mass, combustion of natural gas produces much less carbon dioxide, soot particles, and oxide of nitrogen than combustion of liquid diesel fuel. In view of anticipated strengthening of regulations on pollutant emissions from diesel engines, alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) have been experimentally introduced to replace the traditional diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks, transit buses, off-road vehicles, locomotives, and stationary engines. To help in applying natural gas in Diesel engines and increasing combustion efficiency, the emphasis of the present paper is placed on the detailed flame chemistry of methane-air combustion. The present work is the continued effort in finding better methods to reduce NO{sub x}. The goal is to identify a reliable chemical reaction mechanism for natural gas in both premixed and diffusion flames and to establish a systematic reduced mechanism which may be useful for large-scale numerical modeling of combustion behavior in natural gas engines.

  6. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  7. Metal-air cell with performance enhancing additive

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Cody A; Buttry, Daniel

    2015-11-10

    Systems and methods drawn to an electrochemical cell comprising a low temperature ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions and a performance enhancing additive added to the low temperature ionic liquid. The additive dissolves in the ionic liquid to form cations, which are coordinated with one or more negative ions forming ion complexes. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. The ion complexes improve oxygen reduction thermodynamics and/or kinetics relative to the ionic liquid without the additive.

  8. Amine-intercalated α-zirconium phosphates as lubricant additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Huaping; Dai, Wei; Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham; Liang, Hong

    2015-02-01

    In this study, three types of amines intercalated α-zirconium phosphate nanosheets with different interspaces were synthesized and examined as lubricant additives to a mineral oil. Results from tribological experiments illustrated that these additives improved lubricating performance. Results of rheological experiments showed that the viscosity of the mineral oil was effectively reduced with the addition of α-zirconium phosphate nanosheets. The two-dimensional structure, with larger interspaces, resulting from amine intercalation, exhibited improved effectiveness in reducing viscosity. This study demonstrates that the nanosheet structure of α-zirconium phosphates is effective in friction reduction. The manufacture of lubricants with tailored viscosity is possible by using different intercalators.

  9. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  10. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  11. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  12. UCAC3: ASTROMETRIC REDUCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, Charlie T.; Zacharias, Norbert; Wycoff, Gary L.

    2010-06-15

    Presented here are the details of the astrometric reductions from the x, y data to mean right ascension (R.A.), declination (decl.) coordinates of the third U.S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC3). For these new reductions we used over 216,000 CCD exposures. The Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) data are used extensively to probe for coordinate and coma-like systematic errors in UCAC data mainly caused by the poor charge transfer efficiency of the 4K CCD. Errors up to about 200 mas have been corrected using complex look-up tables handling multiple dependences derived from the residuals. Similarly, field distortions and sub-pixel phase errors have also been evaluated using the residuals with respect to 2MASS. The overall magnitude equation is derived from UCAC calibration field observations alone, independent of external catalogs. Systematic errors of positions at the UCAC observing epoch as presented in UCAC3 are better corrected than in the previous catalogs for most stars. The Tycho-2 catalog is used to obtain final positions on the International Celestial Reference Frame. Residuals of the Tycho-2 reference stars show a small magnitude equation (depending on declination zone) that might be inherent in the Tycho-2 catalog.

  13. Microbial reduction of iodate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Councell, T.B.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were unable to reduce iodate in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7). Both D. desulfuricans and S. putrefaciens were able to reduce iodate at pH 7 in 10 mM HEPES buffer. Both soluble ferrous iron and sulfide, as well as iron monosulfide (FeS) were shown to abiologically reduce iodate to iodide. These results indicate that ferric iron and/or sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of mediating both direct, enzymatic, as well as abiotic reduction of iodate in natural anaerobic environments. These microbially mediated reactions may be important factors in the fate and transport of 129I in natural systems.

  14. Intraocular pressure dynamics with prostaglandin analogs: a clinical application of the water-drinking test

    PubMed Central

    Özyol, Pelin; Özyol, Erhan; Baldemir, Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the clinical applicability of the water-drinking test in treatment-naive primary open-angle glaucoma patients. Methods Twenty newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in this prospective study. The water-drinking test was performed at baseline and 6 weeks and 3 months after prostaglandin analog treatment. Peak and fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements obtained with the water-drinking test during follow-up were analyzed. Analysis of variance for repeated measures and paired and unpaired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results The mean baseline IOP values in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma were 25.1±4.6 mmHg before prostaglandin analog treatment, 19.8±3.7 mmHg at week 6, and 17.9±2.2 mmHg at month 3 after treatment. The difference in mean baseline IOP of the water-drinking tests was statistically significant (P<0.001). At 6 weeks of prostaglandin analog treatment, two patients had high peak and fluctuation of IOP measurements despite a reduction in baseline IOP. After modifying treatment, patients had lower peak and fluctuation of IOP values at month 3 of the study. Conclusion Peak and fluctuation of IOP in response to the water-drinking test were lower with prostaglandin analogs compared with before medication. The water-drinking test can represent an additional benefit in the management of glaucoma patients, especially by detecting higher peak and fluctuation of IOP values despite a reduced mean IOP. Therefore, it could be helpful as a supplementary method in monitoring IOP in the clinical practice. PMID:27555742

  15. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  16. Effects of breast reduction on pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Kececi, Yavuz; Dagistan, Seyhan

    2014-01-01

    Macromastia causes several health problems, and reduction surgery alleviates them successfully. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether reduction mammaplasty improves possible impairments on pulmonary functions related to macromastia. Thirty-one patients participated in the study. Pulmonary function tests were performed before and 3 months after surgery with a spirometry. Preoperative and postoperative pulmonary function values were compared using a paired t test. Two patients were found to have mild restriction in preoperative spirometric analysis, and they went to normal range in postoperative analysis. All other patients were assessed as having normal values in both preoperative and postoperative analyses. Preoperative and postoperative forced vital capacity values were 2.72±0.06 and 2.79±0.05 L, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test, P=0.014). The other parameter in which breast reduction had statistically significant improvement was forced vital capacity performed/predicted ratio (paired t test, P=0.041). Additionally, the weight of resected breast tissue correlated significantly with the change of forced vital capacity (Pearson correlation coefficient=0.379, P=0.036). Breast reduction surgery improves the pulmonary function parameters that are mainly influenced by restrictive states. This result led us to consider that macromastia causes a relative restriction in chest wall compliance, and reduction of breast weight may enhance chest wall compliance and improve pulmonary function. PMID:25058756

  17. Development and evaluation of thermal model reduction algorithms for spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiml, Michael; Suderland, Martin; Reiss, Philipp; Czupalla, Markus

    2015-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the topic of the reduction of thermal models of spacecraft. The work presented here has been conducted in cooperation with the company OHB AG, formerly Kayser-Threde GmbH, and the Institute of Astronautics at Technische Universität München with the goal to shorten and automatize the time-consuming and manual process of thermal model reduction. The reduction of thermal models can be divided into the simplification of the geometry model for calculation of external heat flows and radiative couplings and into the reduction of the underlying mathematical model. For simplification a method has been developed which approximates the reduced geometry model with the help of an optimization algorithm. Different linear and nonlinear model reduction techniques have been evaluated for their applicability in reduction of the mathematical model. Thereby the compatibility with the thermal analysis tool ESATAN-TMS is of major concern, which restricts the useful application of these methods. Additional model reduction methods have been developed, which account to these constraints. The Matrix Reduction method allows the approximation of the differential equation to reference values exactly expect for numerical errors. The summation method enables a useful, applicable reduction of thermal models that can be used in industry. In this work a framework for model reduction of thermal models has been created, which can be used together with a newly developed graphical user interface for the reduction of thermal models in industry.

  18. Decision-Making, Science and Gasoline Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. W.; Small, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    Methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a gasoline additive to serve two major purposes. The first use was as an octane-enhancer to replace organic lead, beginning in 1979. The second use, which began about 1992, was as a oxygenated additive to meet requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Generally, the amount of MTBE used for octane enhancement was lower than that required to meet CAAA requirements. An unintended consequence of MTBE use has been widespread groundwater contamination. The decision to use certain amounts of MTBE or other chemcials as gasoline additives is the outcome of economic, regulatory, policy, political, and scientific considerations. Decision makers ask questions such as "How do ground water impacts change with changing MTBE content? How many wells would be impacted? and What are the associated costs?" These are best answered through scientific inquiry, but many different approaches could be developed. Decision criteria include time, money, comprehensiveness, and complexity of the approach. Because results must be communicated to a non-technical audience, there is a trade off between the complexity of the approach and the ability to convince economists, lawyers and policy makers that results make sense. The question on MTBE content posed above was investigated using transport models, a release scenario and gasoline composition. Because of the inability of transport models to predict future concentrations, an approach was chosen to base comparative assessment on a calibrated model. By taking this approach, "generic" modeling with arbitrarily selected parameters was avoided and the validity of the simulation results rests upon relatively small extrapolations from the original calibrated models. A set of simulations was performed that assumed 3% (octane enhancement) and 11% (CAAA) MTBE in gasoline. The results were that ground water concentrations would be reduced in proportion to the reduction of MTBE in the fuel

  19. Reductant injection and mixing system

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Matt; Henry, Cary A.; Ruth, Michael J.

    2016-02-16

    A gaseous reductant injection and mixing system is described herein. The system includes an injector for injecting a gaseous reductant into an exhaust gas stream, and a mixer attached to a surface of the injector. The injector includes a plurality of apertures through which the gaseous reductant is injected into an exhaust gas stream. The mixer includes a plurality of fluid deflecting elements.

  20. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoji; Li, Zhaofei; Hirai, Kei; Tassel, Cédric; Loyer, François; Ichikawa, Noriya; Abe, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Takano, Mikio; Hernandez, Olivier J.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H2 and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures.

  1. Additional evidence of Mercurian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trask, N.J.; Strom, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence concerned with (1) the character and distribution of terrain surrounding fresh basins, (2) albedo, color and temporal differences between a basin rim and smooth plains on its floor, and (3) the stratigraphic relations and local distribution of smooth plains in the hilly and lineated terrain are cited as additional evidence for an internal origin of much of the Mercurian smooth plains. Altough the question of Mercurian volcanism should be kept open, this evidence together with that presented in an earlier paper suggests that volcanism occurred on Mercury early in its history. ?? 1976.

  2. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  3. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  4. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  5. (Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms)

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this report are to: (1) characterize selected aerobic bacterial strains for their abilities to depolymerize lignite coal polymers, and isolate and identify the extracellular enzymes responsible for depolymerization of the coal; (2) characterize selected strictly anaerobic bacteria, that were previously shown to reductively transform coal substructure model compounds, for the ability to similarly transform polymeric coal; and (3) isolate more strains of anaerobic bacteria by enrichment using additional coal substructure model compounds and coal as substrates.

  6. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Payne, J.R.

    1983-09-20

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

  7. Aircraft engine pollution reduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of engine operation on the types and levels of the major aircraft engine pollutants is described and the major factors governing the formation of these pollutants during the burning of hydrocarbon fuel are discussed. Methods which are being explored to reduce these pollutants are discussed and their application to several experimental research programs are pointed out. Results showing significant reductions in the levels of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen obtained from experimental combustion research programs are presented and discussed to point out potential application to aircraft engines. An experimental program designed to develop and demonstrate these and other advanced, low pollution combustor design methods is described. Results that have been obtained to date indicate considerable promise for reducing advanced engine exhaust pollutants to levels significantly below current engines.

  8. Secondary superheater slagging reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Larose, J.A. ); Benson, R.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Utility boilers can be modified to reduce excessive slagging on the secondary superheater lower leading edges. Reduction of the high slagging accumulation rates will increase the pendant heat absorption and reduce the required superheater cleaning and slag removal. The cause of te slagging and appropriate boiler modifications are determined with numerical modeling. Results from two utility boiler analyses showed that regions of high gas and particle temperatures and flow rates exist near the superheater lower surfaces and are the probable cause of the rapid slagging. Design modifications which redistribute the flow and reduce the temperature entering the superheater reduce the impaction of molten ash on the pendant surface; this lowers the slag accumulation rate which allows the boiler to operate longer without cleaning and at a higher capacity. This paper shows the potential improvements in the secondary superheater inlet conditions by modifying the boiler.

  9. Reductive electrolytic dechlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.W. Jr.; Suidan, M.T.; Venosa, A.D.; Acheson, C.M.

    1995-11-01

    A biofilm-electrode reactor (BER) was used to dechlorinate pentachlorophenol (PCP), a recalcitrant halogenated organic used in wood and leather preservation. Electrical current was shown to play a necessary role in dechlorination, although it is unknown whether this was due to the resultant generation of hydrogen or the low reducing potential surface formed on the cathode of the anode-cathode cell. The PCP concentration in the feed was 5,000 {micro} g/L, and the PCP in the effluent was about 50 {micro}g/L, at a ethanol feed of 5 mg/L, which is a 99% reduction in PCP concentration. The feed ethanol was varied from zero to 100 mg/L, with the greatest PCP removal occurring at the highest ethanol feed rate. The total dechlorination decreased significantly when the ethanol was removed from the feed, indicating that the ethanol stabilized dechlorination.

  10. Effects of Distributed Energy Resources on Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR)

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ruchi; Tuffner, Francis K.; Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2011-10-10

    Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) is one of the cheapest technologies which can be intelligently leveraged to provide considerable energy savings. The addition of renewables in the form of distributed resources can affect the entire power system, but more importantly, affects the traditional substation control schemes at the distribution level. This paper looks at the effect on energy consumption, peak load reduction, and voltage profile changes due to the addition of distributed generation in a distribution feeder using combinations of volt var control. An IEEE 13-node system is used to simulate the various cases. Energy savings and peak load reduction for different simulation scenarios are compared.

  11. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  12. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  13. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  14. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  15. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  16. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  17. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder. PMID:3826294

  18. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  19. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  20. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  1. SIPSEY WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mineral surveys the Sipsey Wilderness and additions are deemed to have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Although limestone, shale, and sandstone resources that occur in the area are physically suitable for a variety of uses, similar materials are available outside the area closer to transportation routes and potential markets. A small amount of coal has been identified in the area, occurring as nonpersistent beds less than 28 in. thick. Oil and (or) natural gas resources may be present if suitable structural traps exist in the subsurface. Therefore, the area has a probable oil and gas potential. Small amounts of asphaltic sandstone and limestone, commonly referred to as tar sands, may also occur in the subsurface. 5 refs.

  2. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  3. Replacement, reduction and refinement.

    PubMed

    Flecknell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    In 1959, William Russell and Rex Burch published "The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique". They proposed that if animals were to be used in experiments, every effort should be made to Replace them with non-sentient alternatives, to Reduce to a minimum the number of animals used, and to Refine experiments which used animals so that they caused the minimum pain and distress. These guiding principles, the "3 Rs" of animal research, were initially given little attention. Gradually, however, they have become established as essential considerations when animals are used in research. They have influenced new legislation aimed at controlling the use of experimental animals, and in the United Kingdom they have become formally incorporated into the Animal (Scientific) Procedures Act. The three principles, of Replacement, Reduction and Refinement, have also proven to be an area of common ground for research workers who use animals, and those who oppose their use. Scientists, who accept the need to use animals in some experiments, would also agree that it would be preferable not to use animals. If animals were to be used, as few as possible should be used and they should experience a minimum of pain or distress. Many of those who oppose animal experimentation, would also agree that until animal experimentation is stopped, Russell and Burch's 3Rs provide a means to improve animal welfare. It has also been recognised that adoption of the 3Rs can improve the quality of science. Appropriately designed experiments that minimise variation, provide standardised optimum conditions of animals care and minimise unnecessary stress or pain, often yield better more reliable data. Despite the progress made as a result of attention to these principles, several major problems have been identified. When replacing animals with alternative methods, it has often proven difficult to formally validate the alternative. This has proven a particular problem in regulatory toxicology

  4. The maximum drag reduction asymptote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, George H.; Hof, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    Addition of long chain polymers is one of the most efficient ways to reduce the drag of turbulent flows. Already very low concentration of polymers can lead to a substantial drag and upon further increase of the concentration the drag reduces until it reaches an empirically found limit, the so called maximum drag reduction (MDR) asymptote, which is independent of the type of polymer used. We here carry out a detailed experimental study of the approach to this asymptote for pipe flow. Particular attention is paid to the recently observed state of elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT) which has been reported to occur in polymer solutions at sufficiently high shear. Our results show that upon the approach to MDR Newtonian turbulence becomes marginalized (hibernation) and eventually completely disappears and is replaced by EIT. In particular, spectra of high Reynolds number MDR flows are compared to flows at high shear rates in small diameter tubes where EIT is found at Re < 100. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA grant agreement n° [291734].

  5. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  6. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction bymore » clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H 2 ) production.« less

  7. Fermentation and hydrogen metabolism affect uranium reduction by clostridia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction by clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H2) production. PMID:25937978

  8. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction by clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H2) production. PMID:25937978

  9. Size reduction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, V.

    1999-12-15

    The Size Reduction Machine (SRM) is a mobile platform capable of shearing various shapes and types of metal components at a variety of elevations. This shearing activity can be performed without direct physical movement and placement of the shear head by the operator. The base unit is manually moved and roughly aligned to each cut location. The base contains the electronics: hydraulic pumps, servos, and actuators needed to move the shear-positioning arm. The movable arm allows the shear head to have six axes of movement and to cut to within 4 inches of a wall surface. The unit has a slick electrostatic capture coating to assist in external decontamination. Internal contamination of the unit is controlled by a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter on the cooling inlet fan. The unit is compact enough to access areas through a 36-inch standard door opening. This paper is an Innovative Technology Summary Report designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They also are designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users.

  10. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Malcolm M.; McKenna, Robert J.; Deschamps, Claude C.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) is the safe, effective, and durable palliation of dyspnea in appropriately selected patients with moderate to severe emphysema. Appropriate patient selection and preoperative preparation are prerequisites for successful LVRS. An effective LVRS program requires participation by and communication between experts from pulmonary medicine, thoracic surgery, thoracic anesthesiology, critical care medicine, rehabilitation medicine, respiratory therapy, chest radiology, and nursing. The critical analysis of perioperative outcomes has influenced details of the conduct of the procedure and has established a bilateral, stapled approach as the standard of care for LVRS. The National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) remains the world's largest multi-center, randomized trial comparing LVRS to maximal medical therapy. NETT purposely enrolled a broad spectrum of anatomic patterns of emphysema. This, along with the prospective, audited collection of extensive demographic, physiologic, radiographic, surgical and quality-of-life data, has positioned NETT as the most robust repository of evidence to guide the refinement of patient selection criteria for LVRS, to assist surgeons in providing optimal intraoperative and postoperative care, and to establish benchmarks for survival, complication rates, return to independent living, and durability of response. This article reviews the evolution of current LVRS practice with a particular emphasis on technical aspects of the operation, including the predictors and consequences of its most common complications. PMID:18453353

  11. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting. PMID:25500631

  12. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  13. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  14. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  15. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  16. Aviation fuel additives. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and development of aviation fuel additives and their effectiveness. Articles include studies on antioxidant, antimist, antistatic, lubricity, corrosion inhibition, and icing inhibition additives. Other applications are covered in investigations of additives for vulnerability reduction, thermal stability, and storage stability of aviation fuels. (Contains a minimum of 168 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Metal-Ion Additives Reduce Thermal Expansion Of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.; Emerson, Burt R., Jr.; Willis, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimides widely used as high-performance polymers because of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE's) greater than those of metals, ceramics, and glasses. Decreasing CTE's of polyimides increase usefulness for aerospace and electronics applications in which dimensional stability required. Additives containing metal ions reduce coefficients of thermal expansion of polyimides. Reductions range from 11 to over 100 percent.

  18. The role of sulphate reduction on the reductive S decolorization of the azo dye reactive orange 14.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, F J; Enriquez, J E; Mendoza-Hernandez, M R; Razo-Flores, E; Field, J A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a broad range of sulphate concentrations (0-10g SO4(-2) L(-1)) on the reduction of an azo dye (reactive orange 14 (RO14)) by an anaerobic sludge. An increase in the sulphate concentration generally stimulated the reduction of RO14 by sludge incubations supplemented with glucose, acetate or propionate as electron donor. Sulphate and azo dye reductions took place simultaneously in all incubations. However, there was a decrease on the rate of decolorization when sulphate was supplied at 10g SO4(-2) L(-1). Abiotic incubations at different sulphide concentrations (0-2.5 g sulphide L(-1)) promoted very poor reduction of RO14. However, addition of riboflavin (20 microM), as a redox mediator, accelerated the reduction of RO14 up to 44-fold compared to a control lacking the catalyst. Our results indicate that sulphate-reduction may significantly contribute to the reduction of azo dyes both by biological mechanisms and by abiotic reductions implicating sulphide as an electron donor. The contribution of abiotic decolorization by sulphide, however, was only significant when a proper redox mediator was included. Our results also revealed that sulphate-reduction can out-compete with azo reduction at high sulphate concentrations leading to a poor decolorising performance when no sufficient reducing capacity is available. PMID:16939099

  19. Model reduction for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, Wodek; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    Several conditions for a near-optimal reduction of general dynamic systems are presented focusing on the reduction in balanced and modal coordinates. It is shown that model and balanced reductions give very different results for the flexible structure with closely-spaced natural frequencies. In general, balanced reduction is found to give better results. A robust model reduction technique was developed to study the sensitivity of modeling error to variations in the damping of a structure. New concepts of grammians defined over a finite time and/or a frequency interval are proposed including computational procedures for evaluating them. Application of the model reduction technique to these grammians is considered to lead to a near-optimal reduced model which closely reproduces the full system output in the time and/or frequency interval.

  20. UHB engine fan broadband noise reduction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliebe, Philip R.; Ho, Patrick Y.; Mani, Ramani

    1995-06-01

    A study has been completed to quantify the contribution of fan broadband noise to advanced high bypass turbofan engine system noise levels. The result suggests that reducing fan broadband noise can produce 3 to 4 EPNdB in engine system noise reduction, once the fan tones are eliminated. Further, in conjunction with the elimination of fan tones and an increase in bypass ratio, a potential reduction of 7 to 10 EPNdB in system noise can be achieved. In addition, an initial assessment of engine broadband noise source mechanisms has been made, concluding that the dominant source of fan broadband noise is the interaction of incident inlet boundary layer turbulence with the fan rotor. This source has two contributors, i.e., unsteady life dipole response and steady loading quadrupole response. The quadrupole contribution was found to be the most important component, suggesting that broadband noise reduction can be achieved by the reduction of steady loading field-turbulence field quadrupole interaction. Finally, for a controlled experimental quantification and verification, the study recommends that further broadband noise tests be done on a simulated engine rig, such as the GE Aircraft Engine Universal Propulsion Simulator, rather than testing on an engine statically in an outdoor arena The rig should be capable of generating forward and aft propagating fan noise, and it needs to be tested in a large freejet or a wind tunnel.

  1. Robotic system for glovebox size reduction

    SciTech Connect

    KWOK,KWAN S.; MCDONALD,MICHAEL J.

    2000-03-02

    The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing technologies for glovebox size reduction in the DOE nuclear complex. A study was performed for Kaiser-Hill (KH) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) on the available technologies for size reducing the glovebox lines that require size reduction in place. Currently, the baseline approach to these glovebox lines is manual operations using conventional mechanical cutting methods. The study has been completed and resulted in a concept of the robotic system for in-situ size reduction. The concept makes use of commercially available robots that are used in the automotive industry. The commercially available industrial robots provide high reliability and availability that are required for environmental remediation in the DOE complex. Additionally, the costs of commercial robots are about one-fourth that of the custom made robots for environmental remediation. The reason for the lower costs and the higher reliability is that there are thousands of commercial robots made annually, whereas there are only a few custom robots made for environmental remediation every year. This paper will describe the engineering analysis approach used in the design of the robotic system for glovebox size reduction.

  2. UHB Engine Fan Broadband Noise Reduction Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, Philip R.; Ho, Patrick Y.; Mani, Ramani

    1995-01-01

    A study has been completed to quantify the contribution of fan broadband noise to advanced high bypass turbofan engine system noise levels. The result suggests that reducing fan broadband noise can produce 3 to 4 EPNdB in engine system noise reduction, once the fan tones are eliminated. Further, in conjunction with the elimination of fan tones and an increase in bypass ratio, a potential reduction of 7 to 10 EPNdB in system noise can be achieved. In addition, an initial assessment of engine broadband noise source mechanisms has been made, concluding that the dominant source of fan broadband noise is the interaction of incident inlet boundary layer turbulence with the fan rotor. This source has two contributors, i.e., unsteady life dipole response and steady loading quadrupole response. The quadrupole contribution was found to be the most important component, suggesting that broadband noise reduction can be achieved by the reduction of steady loading field-turbulence field quadrupole interaction. Finally, for a controlled experimental quantification and verification, the study recommends that further broadband noise tests be done on a simulated engine rig, such as the GE Aircraft Engine Universal Propulsion Simulator, rather than testing on an engine statically in an outdoor arena The rig should be capable of generating forward and aft propagating fan noise, and it needs to be tested in a large freejet or a wind tunnel.

  3. Emerging Community Noise Reduction Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current NASA research portfolio in the area of aircraft noise reduction is presented. The emphasis of the research described herein is on meeting the aggressive near- and mid-term national goals for reducing aircraft noise emissions, which NASA internal studies have shown to be feasible using noise reduction technologies currently being developed in-house or in partnership with NASA s industry and academic partners. While NASA has an active research effort in airframe noise reduction, this overview focuses on propulsion noise reduction only.

  4. Fraction reduction in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Haizhu; Liu, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction. PMID:24772037

  5. The mechanism of bacterial indigo reduction.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, S K; John, P

    2005-07-01

    The reduction of water-insoluble indigo by the recently isolated moderate thermophile, Clostridium isatidis, has been studied with the aim of developing a sustainable technology for industrial indigo reduction. The ability to reduce indigo was not shared with C. aurantibutyricum, C. celatum and C. papyrosolvens, but C. papyrosolvens could reduce indigo carmine (5,5'-indigosulfonic acid), a soluble indigo derivative. The supernatant from cultures of C. isatidis, but not from cultures of the other bacteria tested, decreased indigo particle size to one-tenth diameter. Addition of madder powder, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid, and humic acid all stimulated indigo reduction by C. isatidis. Redox potentials of cultures of C. isatidis were about 100 mV more negative than those of C. aurantibutyricum, C. celatum and C. papyrosolvens, and reached -600 mV versus the SCE in the presence of indigo, but potentials were not consistently affected by the addition of the quinone compounds, which probably act by modifying the surface of the bacteria or indigo particles. It is concluded that C. isatidis can reduce indigo because (1) it produces an extracellular factor that decreases indigo particle size, and (2) it generates a sufficiently reducing potential. PMID:15635460

  6. A noniterative improvement of Guyan reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, N.

    1993-01-01

    In determining the natural modes and frequencies of a linear elastic structure, Guyan reduction is often used to reduce the size of the mass and stiffness matrices and the solution of the reduced system is obtained first. The reduced system modes are then expanded to the size of the original system by using a static transformation linking the retained degrees of freedom to the omitted degrees of freedom. In the present paper, the transformation matrix of Guyan reduction is modified to include additional terms from a series accounting for the inertial effects. However, the inertial terms are dependent on the unknown frequencies. A practical approximation is employed to compute the inertial terms without any iteration. This new transformation is implemented in NASTRAN using a DMAP sequence alter. Numerical examples using a cantilever beam illustrate the necessary condition for allowing a large number of additional terms in the proposed series correction of Guyan reduction. A practical example of a large model of the Plasma Motor Generator module to be flown on a Delta launch vehicle is also presented.

  7. MIXTURES OF THYROID DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: TESTING ADDITIVITY OF HEPATIC INDUCERS AND THYROID PEROXIDASE INHIBITORS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to chemical mixtures via diet, occupation, and the environment. Previous data demonstrated that low doses of polycyclic halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) acting through similar mechanisms result in an additive reduction of thyroxine (T4). If xenobioti...

  8. Optimal design of compact spur gear reductions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Lattime, S. B.; Kimmel, J. A.; Coe, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    The optimal design of compact spur gear reductions includes the selection of bearing and shaft proportions in addition to gear mesh parameters. Designs for single mesh spur gear reductions are based on optimization of system life, system volume, and system weight including gears, support shafts, and the four bearings. The overall optimization allows component properties to interact, yielding the best composite design. A modified feasible directions search algorithm directs the optimization through a continuous design space. Interpolated polynomials expand the discrete bearing properties and proportions into continuous variables for optimization. After finding the continuous optimum, the designer can analyze near optimal designs for comparison and selection. Design examples show the influence of the bearings on the optimal configurations.

  9. Infrared Imaging Data Reduction Software and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbey, C. N.; McMahon, R. G.; Lewis, J. R.; Irwin, M. J.

    Developed to satisfy certain design requirements not met in existing packages (e.g., full weight map handling) and to optimize the software for large data sets (non-interactive tasks that are CPU and disk efficient), the InfraRed Data Reduction software package is a small ANSI C library of fast image processing routines for automated pipeline reduction of infrared (dithered) observations. The software includes stand-alone C programs for tasks such as running sky frame subtraction with object masking, image registration and co-addition with weight maps, dither offset measurement using cross-correlation, and object mask dilation. Although currently used for near-IR mosaic images, the modular software is concise and readily adaptable for reuse in other work. IRDR, available via anonymous ftp at ftp.ast.cam.ac.uk in pub/sabbey

  10. Nitrogenase Reduction of Carbon-Containing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Seefeldt, Lance C.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Duval, Simon; Dean, Dennis R.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an enzyme found in many bacteria and archaea that catalyzes biological dinitrogen fixation, the reduction of N2 to NH3, accounting for the major input of fixed nitrogen into the biogeochemical N cycle. In addition to reducing N2 and protons, nitrogenase can reduce a number of small, non-physiological substrates. Among these alternative substrates are included a wide array of carbon containing compounds. These compounds have provided unique insights into aspects of the nitrogenase mechanism. Recently, it was shown that carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) can also be reduced by nitrogenase to yield hydrocarbons, opening new insights into the mechanism of small molecule activation and reduction by this complex enzyme as well as providing clues for the design of novel molecular catalysts. PMID:23597875

  11. Selective reduction in multiple gestation.

    PubMed

    Osborn, M R

    1989-07-01

    As new advances in the treatment and management of infertility become available, it is hoped that selective reduction procedures will no longer be necessary. In the interim, however, it is imperative that nurses be knowledgeable about the options available to parents experiencing multifetal pregnancy, including the choice of selective reduction procedures. PMID:2732940

  12. Reduction-Fired Seedpod Bowls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyke, Rod

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on a reduction-firing process with an aim of producing high-quality blackware similar to the black-on-black pottery of Maria Martinez and other American Indian potters. Includes a lesson on creating reduction-fired seedpod bowls, lists of instructional resources and materials, and the objectives and evaluation. (CMK)

  13. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  14. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  15. The Ethics of Interproximal Reduction.

    PubMed

    Noar, Joseph H; Kneafsey, Louise C

    2015-12-01

    Interproximal reduction (IPR) has become particularly popular with the use of removable aligners. Clinical and ethical factors concerning the use of interproximal reduction to facilitate orthodontic alignment are discussed. CPD/Clinical Relevance: An understanding of the aetiological factors of a malocclusion is essential to enable full discussion of the risks and benefits, or the alternatives to IPR. PMID:26855997

  16. Modifications in vertical scar breast reduction.

    PubMed

    Beer, G M; Morgenthaler, W; Spicher, I; Meyer, V E

    2001-06-01

    The use of vertical-scar breast reduction techniques is only slowly increasing, even though they have been advocated by Lassus and Lejour and are requested by patients. Possible reasons why surgeons are reluctant to use these techniques are that they are said to be more difficult to learn, they require considerable experience and intuition, and their applicability is confined to small breasts. Several surgeons have developed modifications, combining vertical-scar breast reduction techniques with details of the familiar inverted-T-scar technique. We present a procedure involving two further modifications of the vertical-scar breast reduction technique: first, a standardised, geometrical preoperative drawing from our superior-pedicle T technique, with the aim of establishing a reproducible method of reduction requiring no particular intuitive touch, and, second, the addition of a periareolar skin resection, to give the breast the desired round shape. Between September 1998 and December 1999 we used this technique in a prospective series of 52 patients. The median resection weight was 450 g. The maximal postoperative follow-up was 15 months. There were no acute postoperative complications necessitating reoperation. The late complication rate was within the expected range for such procedures (seven patients, 13.5%) and included vertical-scar widening, areolar distortion, residual wrinkles due to incomplete shrinkage of the undermined skin in the inferior pole and asymmetry of the breast. This procedure enables us to offer patients with moderate to marked hypertrophy a reproducible versatile vertical breast reduction technique. The technique is easy to teach and easy to learn, especially for those who are familiar with the superior pedicle inverted-T-scar technique. PMID:11355991

  17. Popular weight reduction diets.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Stella Lucia

    2006-01-01

    The percentage of people who are overweight and obese has increased tremendously over the last 30 years. It has become a worldwide epidemic. This is evident by the number of children are being diagnosed with a body mass index >85th percentile, and the number of children begin diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a disease previously reserved for adults. The weight loss industry has also gained from this epidemic; it is a billion dollar industry. People pay large sums of money on diet pills, remedies, and books, with the hope of losing weight permanently. Despite these efforts, the number of individuals who are overweight or obese continues to increase. Obesity is a complex, multifactorial disorder. It would be impossible to address all aspects of diet, exercise, and weight loss in this review. Therefore, this article will review popular weight loss diets, with particular attention given to comparing low fat diets with low carbohydrate diets. In addition, the role that the environment plays on both diet and exercise and how they impact obesity will be addressed. Finally, the National Weight Control Registry will be discussed. PMID:16407735

  18. Pulmonary emboli risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Epley, D

    2000-06-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a major cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. Significant morbidity is a characteristic of this phenomenon and its common antecedent, deep venous thrombosis. Research has shown that pulmonary embolism is rarely a consequence of superficial venous thrombosis. Because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are often nonspecific and not readily apparent, prevention is the goal of patient care. Nurses play a critical role in the prevention process. The recognition of persons at risk, the assessment of these patients for early signs and symptoms, and the institution of prophylactic measures to minimize the effect of any existing factors or to deter their development are essential components of nursing care. The administration of anticoagulation therapy, with the concomitant monitoring of its effectiveness, and the education of persons regarding precautions associated with the indicated medications and relevant lifestyle modifications are also fundamental aspects of care. This article provides a review of risk factors associated with pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis, particularly prolonged immobility and surgery involving the abdomen or lower extremities, as well as a review of the respective etiologies, most notably those encompassing Vichow's triad. In addition, current modalities to diagnose, treat, and prevent these allied disorders are discussed, as well as the associated nursing management. PMID:11249288

  19. Microbial Mn(IV) reduction requires an initial one-electron reductive solubilization step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hui; Szeinbaum, Nadia H.; DiChristina, Thomas J.; Taillefert, Martial

    2012-12-01

    Mn(IV) and Mn(II) are the most stable and prevalent forms of manganese in natural environments. The occurrence of Mn(III) in minerals and the detection of soluble Mn(III) in natural waters, however, suggest that Mn(III) is an intermediate in both the oxidation of Mn(II) and the reduction of Mn(IV). Mn(III) has recently been proposed as an intermediate during the oxidation of Mn(II) by Mn-oxidizing bacteria but has never been considered as an intermediate during the bio-reduction of Mn(IV). Here we show for the first time that microbial Mn(IV) reduction proceeds step-wise via two successive one-electron transfer reactions with production of soluble Mn(III) as transient intermediate. Incubations with mutant strains demonstrate that the reduction of both solid Mn(IV) and soluble Mn(III) occurs at the outer membrane of the cell. In addition, pseudo-first order rate constants obtained from these incubations indicate that Mn(IV) respiration involves only one of the two potential terminal reductases (c-type cytochrome MtrC and OmcA) involved in Fe(III) respiration. More importantly, only the second electron transfer step is coupled to production of dissolved inorganic carbon, suggesting that the first electron transfer reaction is a reductive solubilization step that increases Mn bioavailability. These findings oppose the long-standing paradigm that microbial Mn(IV) reduction proceeds via a single two-electron transfer reaction coupled to organic carbon oxidation, and suggest that diagenetic models should be revised to correctly account for the impact of manganese reduction in the global carbon cycle.

  20. In-Situ Microphysics from the RACORO IOP

    DOE Data Explorer

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2013-11-08

    These files were generated by Greg McFarquhar and Robert Jackson at the University of Illinois. Please contact mcfarq@atmos.uiuc.edu or rjackso2@atmos.uiuc.edu for more information or for assistance in interpreting the content of these files. We highly recommend that anyone wishing to use these files do so in a collaborative endeavor and we welcome queries and opportunities for collaboration. There are caveats associated with the use of the data which are difficult to thoroughly document and not all products for all time periods have been thoroughly examined. This is a value added data set of the best estimate of cloud microphysical parameters derived using data collected by the cloud microphysical probes installed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter during RACORO. These files contain best estimates of liquid size distributions N(D) in terms of droplet diameter D, liquid water content LWC, extinction of liquid drops beta, effective radius of cloud drops (re), total number concentration of droplets NT, and radar reflectivity factor Z at 1 second resolution.

  1. In-Situ Microphysics from the MPACE IOP

    DOE Data Explorer

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2008-01-15

    Best estimates of the size distributions of supercooled water droplets and ice crystals for mixed-phase clouds measured during M-PACE for spiral ascents/descents over Barrow and Oliktok Point, and for ramped ascents/descents between Barrow and Oliktok Point. Our best estimates of the bulk microphysical properties such as ice water content (IWC), liquid water content (LWC), effective radius of ice crystals defined following Fu (1996) (rei), effective radius of supercooled water droplets (rew), total ice crystal number concentration (Ni), total water droplet number concentration (Nw) and total condensed water content (CWC), are also provided. The quantities were derived from the FSSP, 1DC, 2DC, HVPS and the CVI. Note HVPS data are only available after 10 Oct 2004 and some procedures have been developed to account for the missing data.

  2. [Treatment of acrylate wastewater by electrocatalytic reduction process].

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Na; Song, Yu-Dong; Zhou, Yue-Xi; Zhu, Shu-Quan; Zheng, Sheng-Zhi; Ll, Si-Min

    2011-10-01

    High-concentration acrylate wastewater was treated by an electrocatalytic reduction process. The effects of the cation exchange membrane (CEM) and cathode materials on acrylate reduction were investigated. It indicated that the acrylate could be reduced to propionate acid efficiently by the electrocatalytic reduction process. The addition of CEM to separator with the cathode and anode could significantly improve current efficiency. The cathode materials had significant effect on the reduction of acrylate. The current efficiency by Pd/Nickel foam, was greater than 90%, while those by nickel foam, the carbon fibers and the stainless steel decreased successively. Toxicity of the wastewater decreased considerably and methane production rate in the biochemical methane potential (BMP) test increased greatly after the electrocatalytic reduction process. PMID:22279908

  3. Reduction of aircraft gas turbine engine pollutant emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    To accomplish simultaneous reduction of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen, required major modifications to the combustor. The modification most commonly used was a staged combustion technique. While these designs are more complicated than production combustors, no insurmountable operational difficulties were encountered in either high pressure rig or engine tests which could not be resolved with additional normal development. The emission reduction results indicate that reductions in unburned hydrocarbons were sufficient to satisfy both near and far-termed EPA requirements. Although substantial reductions were observed, the success in achieving the CO and NOx standards was mixed and depended heavily on the engine/engine cycle on which it was employed. Technology for near term CO reduction was satisfactory or marginally satisfactory. Considerable doubt exists if this technology will satisfy all far-term requirements.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technology Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Frank F.; Anderson, Molly S.; Abney, Morgan B.

    2011-01-01

    For long-term human missions, a closed-loop atmosphere revitalization system (ARS) is essential to minimize consumables. A carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology is used to reclaim oxygen (O2) from metabolic CO2 and is vital to reduce the delivery mass of metabolic O2. A key step in closing the loop for ARS will include a proper CO2 reduction subsystem that is reliable and with low equivalent system mass (ESM). Sabatier and Bosch CO2 reduction are two traditional CO2 reduction subsystems (CRS). Although a Sabatier CRS has been delivered to International Space Station (ISS) and is an important step toward closing the ISS ARS loop, it recovers only 50% of the available O2 in CO2. A Bosch CRS is able to reclaim all O2 in CO2. However, due to continuous carbon deposition on the catalyst surface, the penalties of replacing spent catalysts and reactors and crew time in a Bosch CRS are significant. Recently, technologies have been developed for recovering hydrogen (H2) from Sabatier-product methane (CH4). These include methane pyrolysis using a microwave plasma, catalytic thermal pyrolysis of CH4 and thermal pyrolysis of CH4. Further, development in Sabatier reactor designs based on microchannel and microlith technology could open up opportunities in reducing system mass and enhancing system control. Improvements in Bosch CRS conversion have also been reported. In addition, co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 is a new technology that integrates oxygen generation and CO2 reduction functions in a single system. A co-electrolysis unit followed by either a Sabatier or a carbon formation reactor based on Bosch chemistry could improve the overall competitiveness of an integrated O2 generation and CO2 reduction subsystem. This study evaluates all these CO2 reduction technologies, conducts water mass balances for required external supply of water for 1-, 5- and 10-yr missions, evaluates mass, volume, power, cooling and resupply requirements of various technologies. A system

  5. Combination of brinzolamide and brimonidine for glaucoma and ocular hypertension: critical appraisal and patient focus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quang H

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness and is characterized by optic nerve damage that results in visual field loss. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) has been associated with glaucoma progression; thus, IOP-lowering medications are the standard of care for glaucoma. Guidelines suggest monotherapy with IOP-lowering agents such as β-blockers (eg, timolol), prostaglandin analogs, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, brinzolamide), and α2-receptor agonists (eg, brimonidine). However, monotherapy may provide insufficient IOP reduction in some patients, thereby necessitating the use of multiple IOP-lowering medications. Multidrug regimens may be complex, may increase the risk of preservative-related ocular symptoms, and may potentially reduce overall drug exposure as a consequence of drug washout during closely timed sequential administrations; these difficulties may reduce overall drug efficacy and decrease patient persistence and adherence with multidrug treatment regimens. Fixed-combination medications that provide two IOP-lowering therapies within a single solution are available and may overcome some of these challenges. However, all currently available fixed combinations combine timolol with another IOP-lowering agent, indicating that additional fixed-combination alternatives would be beneficial. To meet this demand, a novel fixed combination of brinzolamide 1% and brimonidine 0.2% (BBFC) has recently been developed. In two randomized, double-masked, multinational clinical trials, BBFC had greater IOP-lowering efficacy than brinzolamide or brimonidine monotherapy after 3 months of treatment in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. In both studies, the overall safety profile of BBFC was consistent with that of brinzolamide and brimonidine. Comparative studies with BBFC versus other IOP-lowering monotherapy and fixed-combination medications are not available, but the IOP reductions observed with BBFC are similar to or greater than

  6. Combination of brinzolamide and brimonidine for glaucoma and ocular hypertension: critical appraisal and patient focus.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quang H

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness and is characterized by optic nerve damage that results in visual field loss. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) has been associated with glaucoma progression; thus, IOP-lowering medications are the standard of care for glaucoma. Guidelines suggest monotherapy with IOP-lowering agents such as β-blockers (eg, timolol), prostaglandin analogs, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, brinzolamide), and α2-receptor agonists (eg, brimonidine). However, monotherapy may provide insufficient IOP reduction in some patients, thereby necessitating the use of multiple IOP-lowering medications. Multidrug regimens may be complex, may increase the risk of preservative-related ocular symptoms, and may potentially reduce overall drug exposure as a consequence of drug washout during closely timed sequential administrations; these difficulties may reduce overall drug efficacy and decrease patient persistence and adherence with multidrug treatment regimens. Fixed-combination medications that provide two IOP-lowering therapies within a single solution are available and may overcome some of these challenges. However, all currently available fixed combinations combine timolol with another IOP-lowering agent, indicating that additional fixed-combination alternatives would be beneficial. To meet this demand, a novel fixed combination of brinzolamide 1% and brimonidine 0.2% (BBFC) has recently been developed. In two randomized, double-masked, multinational clinical trials, BBFC had greater IOP-lowering efficacy than brinzolamide or brimonidine monotherapy after 3 months of treatment in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. In both studies, the overall safety profile of BBFC was consistent with that of brinzolamide and brimonidine. Comparative studies with BBFC versus other IOP-lowering monotherapy and fixed-combination medications are not available, but the IOP reductions observed with BBFC are similar to or greater than

  7. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Travis Shane; Mincher, Bruce Jay; Schmitt, Nicholas C

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  8. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  9. Chromate reduction and retention processes within arid subsurface environments.

    PubMed

    Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Borch, Thomas; Mayes, Melanie A; Jardine, Phillip M; Fendorf, Scott

    2005-10-15

    Chromate is a widespread contaminantthat has deleterious impacts on human health, the mobility and toxicity of which are diminished by reduction to Cr(III). While biological and chemical reduction reactions of Cr(VI) are well resolved, reduction within natural sediments, particularly of arid environments, remains poorly described. Here, we examine chromate reduction within arid sediments from the Hanford, WA site, where Fe(III) (hydr)oxide and carbonate coatings limit mineral reactivity. Chromium(VI) reduction by Hanford sediments is negligible unless pretreated with acid; acidic pretreatment of packed mineral beds having a Cr(VI) feed solution results in Cr(III) associating with the minerals antigorite and lizardite in addition to magnetite and Fe(II)-bearing clay minerals. Highly alkaline conditions (pH > 14), representative of conditions near high-level nuclearwaste tanks, result in Fe(II) dissolution and concurrent Cr(VI) reduction. Additionally, Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are found associated with portlandite, suggesting a secondary mechanism for chromium retention at high pH. Thus, mineral reactivity is limited within this arid environment and appreciable reduction of Cr(VI) is restricted to highly alkaline conditions resulting near leaking radioactive waste disposal tanks. PMID:16295844

  10. Chromate Reduction and Retention Processes within Arid Subsurface Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ginder-Vogel,M.; Borch, T.; Mayes, M.; Jardine, P.; Fendorf, S.

    2005-01-01

    Chromate is a widespread contaminant that has deleterious impacts on human health, the mobility and toxicity of which are diminished by reduction to Cr(III). While biological and chemical reduction reactions of Cr(VI) are well resolved, reduction within natural sediments, particularly of arid environments, remains poorly described. Here, we examine chromate reduction within arid sediments from the Hanford, WA site, where Fe(III) (hydr)oxide and carbonate coatings limit mineral reactivity. Chromium(VI) reduction by Hanford sediments is negligible unless pretreated with acid; acidic pretreatment of packed mineral beds having a Cr(VI) feed solution results in Cr(III) associating with the minerals antigorite and lizardite in addition to magnetite and Fe(II)-bearing clay minerals. Highly alkaline conditions (pH > 14), representative of conditions near high-level nuclear waste tanks, result in Fe(II) dissolution and concurrent Cr(VI) reduction. Additionally, Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are found associated with portlandite, suggesting a secondary mechanism for chromium retention at high pH. Thus, mineral reactivity is limited within this arid environment and appreciable reduction of Cr(VI) is restricted to highly alkaline conditions resulting near leaking radioactive waste disposal tanks.

  11. DRAG REDUCTION WITH SUPERHYDROPHOBIC RIBLETS

    SciTech Connect

    Barbier, Charlotte N; D'Urso, Brian R; Jenner, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    Samples combining riblets and superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated at University of Pittsburgh and their drag reduction properties are studied at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a commercial cone-and-plate rheometer. In parallel to the experiments, numerical simulations are performed in order to estimate the slip length at high rotational speed. For each sample, a drag reduction of at least 5% is observed in both laminar and turbulent regime. At low rotational speed, drag reduction up to 30% is observed with a 1 mm deep grooved sample. As the rotational speed increases, a secondary flow develops causing a slight decrease in drag reductions. However, drag reduction above 15% is still observed for the large grooved samples. In the turbulent regime, the 100 microns grooved sample becomes more efficient than the other samples in drag reduction and manages to sustain a drag reduction above 15%. Using the simulations, the slip length of the 100 micron grooved sample is estimated to be slightly above 100 micron in the turbulent regime.

  12. Technologies for Aircraft Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2006-01-01

    Technologies for aircraft noise reduction have been developed by NASA over the past 15 years through the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program and the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project. This presentation summarizes highlights from these programs and anticipated noise reduction benefits for communities surrounding airports. Historical progress in noise reduction and technologies available for future aircraft/engine development are identified. Technologies address aircraft/engine components including fans, exhaust nozzles, landing gear, and flap systems. New "chevron" nozzles have been developed and implemented on several aircraft in production today that provide significant jet noise reduction. New engines using Ultra-High Bypass (UHB) ratios are projected to provide about 10 EPNdB (Effective Perceived Noise Level in decibels) engine noise reduction relative to the average fleet that was flying in 1997. Audio files are embedded in the presentation that estimate the sound levels for a 35,000 pound thrust engine for takeoff and approach power conditions. The predictions are based on actual model scale data that was obtained by NASA. Finally, conceptual pictures are shown that look toward future aircraft/propulsion systems that might be used to obtain further noise reduction.

  13. Fluorescence quenching of flavins by reductive agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Bansal, A. K.; Song, S.-H.; Dick, B.

    2007-07-01

    The fluorescence behaviour of the flavins riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and lumiflavin in aqueous solution at pH 8 in the presence of the reducing agents β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME), dithiothreitol (DTT), and sodium nitrite (NaNO 2) is studied under aerobic conditions. The fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes are determined as a function of the reducing agent concentration. For all three reducing agents diffusion controlled dynamic fluorescence quenching is observed which is thought to be due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. For DTT additionally static fluorescence quenching occurs.

  14. Effect of polymer additives on hydrodynamics and oxygen transfer in a bubble column bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Y

    1993-01-01

    The influence of polymer additives (polyethylene oxide and polyacrylamide) on the hydrodynamics and oxygen transfer in a bubble column bioreactor was examined. The addition of small amounts of these polymers has been known to cause significant drag reduction in turbulent flow circumstances. The gas hold-up was slightly decreased and the liquid-phase mixing was somewhat enhanced due to the addition of the polymers. The addition of polymer additives brought about a reduction of the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient by about 40%. In dilute polymer solutions, large bubbles formed by bubble coalescence moved with high rise velocities in the presence of many small bubbles and the bubble size distributions were less uniform compared with those in water. The complicated changes in bubble hydrodynamic characteristics were examined to give possible explanations for oxygen transfer reduction. PMID:7763940

  15. Hexavalent chromium reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough causes transitory inhibition of sulfate reduction and cellgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Klonowska, A.; Clark, M.E.; Thieman, S.B.; Giles, B.J.; Wall,J.D.; Fields, M.W.

    2008-01-07

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a well-studiedsulfate reducer that can reduce heavy metals and radionuclides [e.g.,Cr(VI) and U(VI)]. Cultures grown in a defined medium had a lag period ofapproximately 30 h when exposed to 0.05 mM Cr(VI). Substrate analysesrevealed that although Cr(VI) was reduced within the first 5 h, growthwas not observed for an additional 20 h. The growth lag could beexplained by a decline in cell viability; however, during this time smallamounts of lactate were still utilized without sulfate reduction oracetate formation. Approximately 40 h after Cr exposure (0.05 mM),sulfate reduction occurred concurrently with the accumulation of acetate.Similar amounts of hydrogen were produced by Cr-exposed cells compared tocontrol cells, and lactate was not converted to glycogen duringnon-growth conditions. D. vulgaris cells treated with a reducing agentand then exposed to Cr(VI) still experienced a growth lag, but theaddition of ascorbate at the time of Cr(VI) addition prevented the lagperiod. In addition, cells grown on pyruvate displayed more tolerance toCr(VI) compared to lactate-grown cells. These results indicated that D.vulgaris utilized lactate during Cr(VI) exposure without the reduction ofsulfate or production of acetate, and that ascorbate and pyruvate couldprotect D. vulgaris cells from Cr(VI)/Cr(III) toxicity.

  16. Fan Noise Reduction: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2001-01-01

    Fan noise reduction technologies developed as part of the engine noise reduction element of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program are reviewed. Developments in low-noise fan stage design, swept and leaned outlet guide vanes, active noise control, fan flow management, and scarfed inlet are discussed. In each case, a description of the method is presented and, where available, representative results and general conclusions are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of the accomplishments of the AST-sponsored fan noise reduction research and a few thoughts on future work.

  17. Geometric Quantization and Foliation Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skerritt, Paul

    A standard question in the study of geometric quantization is whether symplectic reduction interacts nicely with the quantized theory, and in particular whether "quantization commutes with reduction." Guillemin and Sternberg first proposed this question, and answered it in the affirmative for the case of a free action of a compact Lie group on a compact Kahler manifold. Subsequent work has focused mainly on extending their proof to non-free actions and non-Kahler manifolds. For realistic physical examples, however, it is desirable to have a proof which also applies to non-compact symplectic manifolds. In this thesis we give a proof of the quantization-reduction problem for general symplectic manifolds. This is accomplished by working in a particular wavefunction representation, associated with a polarization that is in some sense compatible with reduction. While the polarized sections described by Guillemin and Sternberg are nonzero on a dense subset of the Kahler manifold, the ones considered here are distributional, having support only on regions of the phase space associated with certain quantized, or "admissible", values of momentum. We first propose a reduction procedure for the prequantum geometric structures that "covers" symplectic reduction, and demonstrate how both symplectic and prequantum reduction can be viewed as examples of foliation reduction. Consistency of prequantum reduction imposes the above-mentioned admissibility conditions on the quantized momenta, which can be seen as analogues of the Bohr-Wilson-Sommerfeld conditions for completely integrable systems. We then describe our reduction-compatible polarization, and demonstrate a one-to-one correspondence between polarized sections on the unreduced and reduced spaces. Finally, we describe a factorization of the reduced prequantum bundle, suggested by the structure of the underlying reduced symplectic manifold. This in turn induces a factorization of the space of polarized sections that agrees

  18. Subsolidus reduction of lunar spinels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of evidence that some lunar basalts must have exceeded the lower limit of crystallization oxygen fugacity (fO2) by several orders of magnitude. The evidence is based primarily on the decomposition of Cr-Al-ulvospinel, and is further supported in one case by the decomposition of olivine. The data suggest that some rocks have undergone intense nonequilibrium subsolidus reduction. The reduction phenomenon is widespread, and is considered to have developed either during initial deuteric cooling or as a result of a postcrystallization reduction event.

  19. Ligand coordination modulates reductive elimination from aluminium(iii).

    PubMed

    Urwin, Stephanie J; Rogers, David M; Nichol, Gary S; Cowley, Michael J

    2016-09-21

    Oxidative addition of inert bonds at low-valent main-group centres is becoming a major class of reactivity for these species. The reverse reaction, reductive elimination, is possible in some cases but far rarer. Here, we present a mechanistic study of reductive elimination from Al(iii) centres and unravel ligand effects in this process. Experimentally determined activation and thermodynamic parameters for the reductive elimination of Cp*H from Cp*2AlH are reported, and this reaction is found to be inhibited by the addition of Lewis bases. We find that C-H oxidative addition at Al(i) centres proceeds by initial protonation at the low-valent centre. PMID:27530604

  20. Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives

    SciTech Connect

    Stoakley, D.M.; St.Clair, A.K. )

    1992-07-01

    Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The CTE's of conventional polyimides range from 30 to 60 ppm/C. Approaches that have been reported to lower their CTE's include linearizing the polymer molecular structure and orienting the polyimide film. This current study involves the incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides and has resulted in significantly lowered CTE's. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12% to over 100% depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Iron Alumininides Intermetallic Alloy with Molybdenum Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhailawati, H.; Fauzi, M. N. A.

    2010-03-11

    In this work, FeAl-based alloys with and without molybdenum addition were fabricated by sintering of mechanically alloyed powders in order to investigate the effect of molybdenum on iron aluminide mechanical properties. Bulk samples were prepared by mechanical alloying for 4 hours, pressing at 360 MPa and sintering at 1000 deg. C for 2 hours. The specimens were tested in compression at room temperature using Instron machine. The phase identification and microstructure of the consolidated material was examined by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope correspondingly. Results show that 2.5 wt%Mo addition significantly increased the ultimate stress and ultimate strain in compressive mode due to solid solution hardening. However, the addition of Mo more than 2.5 wt% was accompanied by a reduction in both properties caused by the presence of Mo-rich precipitate particles.

  2. Accelerating procelain formation by incorporating a complex additive

    SciTech Connect

    Maslennikova, G.N.; Dubovitskii, S.A.; Moroz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    The authors studied the influence of a complex additive consisting of oxides of calcium, zinc, and magnesium on the formaton of porcelain. In order to achieve a more uniform distribution of the complex additive in the porcelain body it was incorporated in the form of water soluble salts-nitrates, which ensured comparability of results and excluded the effect of the different types of anions. The study of the main parameters of sintering (porosity, shrinkage, and mechanical strength) for the test bodies showed that they sinter at lower temperatures and attain zero porosity, maximum shrinkage, and mechanical strength. The most typical bodies indentified in this way were investigated by methods of complex differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. Thus, the introduction of complex additives consisting of calcium, zinc, and magnesium oxides contributes to the earlier formation of porcelain. With the reduction of firing temperatures by 100/sup 0/C the authors observe an improvement in the basic properties of porcelain.

  3. Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides, resulting in significantly lowered CTE's, has been studied. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12 percent to over 100 percent depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

  4. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  5. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  6. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  7. Comparative studies on single-layer reduced graphene oxide films obtained by electrochemical reduction and hydrazine vapor reduction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The comparison between two kinds of single-layer reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets, obtained by reduction of graphene oxide (GO) with the electrochemical method and hydrazine vapor reduction, referred to as E-rGO and C-rGO, respectively, is systematically studied. Although there is no morphology difference between the E-rGO and C-rGO films adsorbed on solid substrates observed by AFM, the reduction process to obtain the E-rGO and C-rGO films is quite different. In the hydrazine vapor reduction, the nitrogen element is incorporated into the obtained C-rGO film, while no additional element is introduced to the E-rGO film during the electrochemical reduction. Moreover, Raman spectra show that the electrochemical method is more effective than the hydrazine vapor reduction method to reduce the GO films. In addition, E-rGO shows better electrocatalysis towards dopamine than does C-rGO. This study is helpful for researchers to understand these two different reduction methods and choose a suitable one to reduce GO based on their experimental requirements. PMID:22373422

  8. Switching current density reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2014-01-28

    We investigate the switching current density reduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions using micromagnetic simulations. We find that the switching current density can be reduced with elongated lateral shapes of the magnetic tunnel junctions, and additional reduction can be achieved by using a noncollinear polarizer layer. The reduction is closely related to the details of spin configurations during switching processes with the additional in-plane anisotropy.

  9. Reductive Degradation: Versatile, Low Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water and Sewage Works, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article discusses the use of reductive degradation as an economical and effective treatment of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Comparisons with activated carbon treatment show lower capital equipment and treatment costs. (CS)

  10. Dimension Reduction With Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Kasun, Liyanaarachchi Lekamalage Chamara; Yang, Yan; Huang, Guang-Bin; Zhang, Zhengyou

    2016-08-01

    Data may often contain noise or irrelevant information, which negatively affect the generalization capability of machine learning algorithms. The objective of dimension reduction algorithms, such as principal component analysis (PCA), non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), random projection (RP), and auto-encoder (AE), is to reduce the noise or irrelevant information of the data. The features of PCA (eigenvectors) and linear AE are not able to represent data as parts (e.g. nose in a face image). On the other hand, NMF and non-linear AE are maimed by slow learning speed and RP only represents a subspace of original data. This paper introduces a dimension reduction framework which to some extend represents data as parts, has fast learning speed, and learns the between-class scatter subspace. To this end, this paper investigates a linear and non-linear dimension reduction framework referred to as extreme learning machine AE (ELM-AE) and sparse ELM-AE (SELM-AE). In contrast to tied weight AE, the hidden neurons in ELM-AE and SELM-AE need not be tuned, and their parameters (e.g, input weights in additive neurons) are initialized using orthogonal and sparse random weights, respectively. Experimental results on USPS handwritten digit recognition data set, CIFAR-10 object recognition, and NORB object recognition data set show the efficacy of linear and non-linear ELM-AE and SELM-AE in terms of discriminative capability, sparsity, training time, and normalized mean square error. PMID:27214902

  11. Chlorophenol degradation coupled to sulfate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Young, L.Y. )

    1990-11-01

    We studied chlorophenol degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions with an estuarine sediment inoculum. These cultures degraded 0.1 mM 2-, 3-, and 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol within 120 to 220 days, but after refeeding with chlorophenols degradation took place in 40 days or less. Further refeeding greatly enhanced the rate of degradation. Sulfate consumption by the cultures corresponded to the stoichiometric values expected for complete oxidation of the chlorophenol to CO{sub 2}. Formation of sulfide from sulfate was confirmed with a radiotracer technique. No methane was formed, verifying that sulfate reduction was the electron sink. Addition of molybdate, a specific inhibitor of sulfate reduction, inhibited chlorophenol degradation completely. These results indicate that the chlorophenols were mineralized under sulfidogenic conditions and that substrate oxidation was coupled to sulfate reduction. In acclimated cultures the three monochlorophenol isomers and 2,4-dichlorophenol were degraded at rates of 8 to 37 {mu}mol liter{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1}. The relative rates of degradation were 4-chlorophenol > 3-chlorophenol > 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol. Sulfidogenic cultures initiated with biomass from an anaerobic bioreactor used in treatment of pulp-bleaching effluents dechlorinated 2,4-dichlorophenol to 4-chlorophenol, which persisted, whereas 2,6-dichlorophenol was sequentially dechlorinated first to 2-chlorophenol and then to phenol.

  12. Data reduction from twinned RNA crystals.

    PubMed

    Lietzke, S E; Carperos, V E; Kundrot, C E

    1996-07-01

    Methods were developed to process diffraction data from epitaxically twinned crystals. Four programs for data reduction and two display programs were developed to augment the data-reduction program XDS [Kabsch (1988). J. Appl. Cryst. 21, 916-924]. The programs can be generalized for use with other data-reduction software that provides the user with a list of the reflections used to determine lattice constants and crystal orientation. LATTICE_VIEW generates a PDB file containing 'water molecules' at the reciprocal-space coordinates of the strong spots found in the initial data frames. The PDB file is visualized to identify spots that belong to the same lattice, obtain unit-cell dimensions for a lattice, and assess data quality. VECTOR_MATCH is used to find additional spots belonging to a lattice. ACCOUNT4 determines which spots have been processed by XDS. COMFORT discards reflections that are too close to a reflection in another lattice. The display programs provide useful visual information on the quality of the crystal orientations used. Data with an R(merge) of 7.1% at 2.4 A resolution were obtained from epitaxically twinned crystals of an RNA dodecamer. The data were of sufficient quality to solve the structure with a combination of molecular replacement and single isomorphous replacement methods. PMID:15299632

  13. Integrated diesel engine NOx reduction technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, J.; Zhu, J.; Savonen, C.L.; Kharas, K.C.C.; Bailey, O.H.; Miller, M.; Vuichard, J.

    1997-12-31

    The effectiveness of catalyst performance is a function of the inlet exhaust gas temperature, gas flow rate, concentration of NO{sub x} and oxygen, and reductant quantity and species. Given this interrelationship, it becomes immediately clear that an integrated development approach is necessary. Such an approach is taken in this project. As such, the system development path is directed by an engine-catalyst engineering team. Of the tools at the engine engineer`s disposal the real-time aspects of computer assisted subsystem modeling is valuable. It will continue to be the case as ever more subtle improvements are needed to meet competitive performance, durability, and emission challenges. A review of recent prototype engines has shown that considerable improvements to base diesel engine technology are being made. For example, HSDI NO{sub x} has been reduced by a factor of two within the past ten years. However, additional substantial NO{sub x}/PM reduction is still required for the future. A viable lean NO{sub x} catalyst would be an attractive solution to this end. The results of recent high and low temperature catalyst developments were presented. High temperature base metal catalysts have been formulated to produce very good conversion efficiency and good thermal stability, albeit at temperatures near the upper range of diesel engine operation. Low temperature noble metal catalysts have been developed to provide performance of promising 4-way control but need increased NO{sub x} reduction efficiency.

  14. Additional properties and uses of essential oils.

    PubMed

    Seymour, R

    2003-01-01

    Much evidence has been published supporting the use of mouthwashes in a number of crucial areas of oral health. These areas include antibacterial activity, home irrigation, maintenance of implant health, postsurgery uses, reduction of bacteria in dental aerosols and bacteraemia reduction. Although other commonly used mouthwashes (e.g. chlorhexidine) have been reviewed in other articles in this Supplement, this article concentrates solely on data supporting essential-oil mouthwash use in these oral health areas. PMID:12787199

  15. 2dfdr: Data reduction software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AAO software Team

    2015-05-01

    2dfdr is an automatic data reduction pipeline dedicated to reducing multi-fibre spectroscopy data, with current implementations for AAOmega (fed by the 2dF, KOALA-IFU, SAMI Multi-IFU or older SPIRAL front-ends), HERMES, 2dF (spectrograph), 6dF, and FMOS. A graphical user interface is provided to control data reduction and allow inspection of the reduced spectra.

  16. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C.; Silver, S. )

    1990-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a K{sub m} of 40 {mu}M CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  17. Photo-chemical reduction of iodate (IO3-) in sea-water leading to the emission of iodine (I2) in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.

    2013-12-01

    Iodine exists in open seawaters mainly in the inorganic forms iodate (IO3-) and iodide (I-). While the concentration of IO3- predominates in deep water, I- concentrations increase toward the surface. The primary precursor for iodine oxide particle (IOP) formation in the coastal marine boundary layer (MBL) is iodine (I2) originating from exposed macroalgae. In contrast, recent field measurements of IO above the open ocean suggest that biogenic organic-iodine emissions cannot account for the observed levels. Thus, the alternative mechanisms include the reduction of IO3- to I- in seawater which in turn is converted to, and emitted as I2 to the atmosphere which may contribute to observed levels of I2 in the MBL. In this study a series of laboratory investigations of the photo-chemical reduction of iodate (IO3-) to both aqueous iodide (I-) and a bound, soluble iodinated organic form have been conducted to investigate three potentially important processes likely to participate in the recycling of I2 from seawater in the presence of sunlight: (i) the role of dissolved organic materials (i.e. humic acid), (ii) the effect of salinity (Cl- concentration) and (iii) deposition and uptake of O3. The experiments involved the initial photolysis of IO3- solutions with either humic acid or Cl- added. The formation of I- in solution (due to IO3- reduction) was detected using time-resolved UV-Vis spectroscopy. Oxidation of iodide ions to I2 formation in the solutions and release to the gas-phase was confirmed indirectly by the detection of iodine oxide particles (IOPs) generated by the photo-oxidation of the gas-phase I2 released from solution using a coupled differential mobility analyser (DMA) and Faraday cup electrometer (FCE) system. The results indicate a constant fraction of ~ 20% of reduced iodate is in the form free iodide (I-) and by difference, ~ 80% of reduced iodate is most likely in an iodinated humic acid. Iodine (I2) is emitted by the uptake of ozone on iodide (I

  18. Motions of alloying additions in the CAS steelmaking operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, D.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    1993-08-01

    Water model studies in a pilot scale ladle ( D = 1.12 m and L = 0.93 m) were carried out to investigate the subsurface motion of both buoyant and sinking additions during the CAS (com-position adjustment by sealed argon bubbling systems) alloy addition procedure in steelmaking. This technique involves placing a refractory baffle around a rising gas/liquid plume within a stirred ladle of steel. Alloy additions are then made by projecting them into the slag-free region of steel within the baffled region. It was found that such particles while moving through the upwelling two-phase plume region can experience a significant reduction in drag forces, causing buoyant particles to penetrate more deeply than anticipated for a homogeneous fluid. Therefore, considering reduced drag on particles penetrating the upwelling gas liquid plume region, predictions were made for the trajectories of spherical-shaped particles using Newton’s law of motion. Predictions were in very reasonable agreement with those measured. Incorporating the velocity fields in industrial size vessels already reported by the present authors, trajectories of spherical-shaped additions (diameter ˜ 80 mm) in a 150-ton ladle during CAS operations were then predicted. The industrial implications of such trajectories, together with the alloy’s dissolution and dispersion behavior, were also analyzed. Finally, advantages of the CAS alloy addition procedure over conventional methods, in terms of the recovery rates of buoyant additions, are discussed.

  19. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  20. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  1. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  2. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  3. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  4. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-09

    This is the first of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. This paper examines the circumstances and consequences of the elimination of � The INF-range Pershing II ballistic missile and Gryphon Ground-Launched Cruise Missile (GLCM), deployed by NATO under a dual-track strategy to counter Soviet intermediate-range missiles while pursuing negotiations to limit or eliminate all of these missiles. � The Short-Range Attack Missile (SRAM), which was actually a family of missiles including SRAM A, SRAM B (never deployed), and SRAM II and SRAM T, these last two cancelled during an over-budget/behind-schedule development phase as part of the Presidential Nuclear Initiatives of 1991 and 1992. � The nuclear-armed version of the Tomahawk Land-Attack Cruise Missile (TLAM/N), first limited to shore-based storage by the PNIs, and finally eliminated in deliberations surrounding the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review Report. � The Missile-X (MX), or Peacekeeper, a heavy MIRVed ICBM, deployed in fixed silos, rather than in an originally proposed mobile mode. Peacekeeper was likely intended as a bargaining chip to facilitate elimination of Russian heavy missiles. The plan failed when START II did not enter into force, and the missiles were eliminated at the end of their intended service life. � The Small ICBM (SICBM), or Midgetman, a road-mobile, single

  5. Big Soda Lake (Nevada). 2. Pelagic sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    The epilimnion of hypersaline, alkaline, meromictic Big Soda Lake contains an average 58 mmol sulfate liter−1 and 0.4 µmol dissolved iron liter−1. The monimolimnion, which is permanently anoxic, has a sulfide concentration ranging seasonally from 4 to 7 mmol liter−1. Depth profiles of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, assayed with a 35S tracer technique and in situ incubations, demonstrated that sulfate reduction occurs within the water column of this extreme environment. The average rate of reduction in the monimolimnion was 3 µmol sulfate liter−1 d−1in May compared to 0.9 in October. These values are comparable to rates of sulfate reduction reported for anoxic waters of more moderate environments. Sulfate reduction also occurred in the anoxic zone of the mixolimnion, though at significantly lower rates (0.025–0.090 µmol liter−1 d−1 at 25 m). Additions of FeS (1.0 mmol liter−1) doubled the endogenous rate of sulfate reduction in the monimolimnion, while MnS and kaolinite had no effect. These results suggest that sulfate reduction in Big Soda Lake is iron limited and controlled by seasonal variables other than temperature. Estimates of the organic carbon mineralized by sulfate reduction exceed measured fluxes of particulate organic carbon sinking from the mixolimnion. Thus, additional sources of electron donors (other than those derived from the sinking of pelagic autotrophs) may also fuel monimolimnetic sulfate reduction in the lake.

  6. Elastic constants of Ultrasonic Additive Manufactured Al 3003-H18.

    PubMed

    Foster, D R; Dapino, M J; Babu, S S

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM), also known as Ultrasonic Consolidation (UC), is a layered manufacturing process in which thin metal foils are ultrasonically bonded to a previously bonded foil substrate to create a net part. Optimization of process variables (amplitude, normal load and velocity) is done to minimize voids along the bonded interfaces. This work pertains to the evaluation of bonds in UAM builds through ultrasonic testing of a build's elastic constants. Results from ultrasonic testing on UAM parts indicate orthotropic material symmetry and a reduction of up to 48% in elastic constant values compared to a control sample. The reduction in elastic constant values is attributed to interfacial voids. In addition, the elastic constants in the plane of the Al foils have nearly the same value, while the constants normal to the foil direction have much different values. In contrast, measurements from builds made with Very High Power Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (VHP UAM) show a drastic improvement in elastic properties, approaching values similar to that of bulk aluminum. PMID:22939821

  7. Waste reduction at a propellant manufacturing site

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, L.A.

    1994-12-31

    It is the US Army policy to reduce the volume and toxicity of hazardous waste generated by its operations and activities. The Army established a goal to reduce 1985 waste generation levels by 50% by the year 1992, with additional reductions proposed through 1999 per Army guidance. To assist in accomplishing this goal, the Production Base Modernization Activity under a program sponsored by the US Army Materiel Command contracted Science Applications International Corporation to conduct a waste minimization audit at Radford Army Ammunition Plant. This study addressed hazardous wastes as well as non-hazardous oily wastes. The investigation was conducted in three phases to document how hazardous and oily wastes are produced and to recommend waste reduction alternatives. Radford Army Ammunition Plant (RAAP) produces in-process materials such as nitric and sulfuric acids, and propellant components including nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin. In addition, to propellants, the explosives trinitrotoluene and diethylene glycol dinitrate can be produced. The manufacture of military propellants generates the majority of waste at the facility. This paper will present the results of the RAAP Hazmin study, focusing on the major waste generating processes involved with propellant manufacture, Hazmin options suggested to minimize waste generation, and lessons learned.

  8. Reactive Additives for Phenylethynyl-Containing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Rommel, Monica L.

    2005-01-01

    Phenylethynyl-containing reactive additive (PERA) compounds and mixtures have been found to be useful for improving the processability of oligomers, polymers, co-oligomers, and copolymers that contain phenylethynyl groups. The additives can be incorporated in different forms: A solution of an amide acid or an imide of a PERA can be added to a solution of phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer; or An imide powder of a PERA can be mixed with a dry powder of a phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer. The effect of a given PERA on the processability and other properties of the resin system depends on whether the PERA is used in the amide acid or an imide form. With proper formulation, the PERA reduces the melt viscosity of the resin and thereby reduces the processing pressures needed to form the adhesive bonds, consolidate filled or unfilled moldings, or fabricate fiber-reinforced composite laminates. During thermal cure, a PERA reacts with itself as well as with the phenylethynyl-containing host resin and thereby becomes chemically incorporated into the resin system. The effects of the PERA on mechanical properties, relative to those of the host resin, depend on the amount of PERA used. Typically, the incorporation of the PERA results in (1) increases in the glass-transition temperature (Tg), modulus of elasticity, and parameters that characterize behavior under compression, and (2) greater retention of the aforementioned mechanical properties at elevated temperatures without (3) significant reduction of toughness or damage tolerance. Of the formulations tested thus far, the ones found to yield the best overall results were those for which the host resin was the amide acid form of a phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) co-oligomer having a molecular weight of 5,000 g/mole [hence, designated PETI-5] and a PERA denoted as PERA-1. PETI-5 was made from 3,3',4'4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, 3

  9. Rapid reduction of titanium dioxide nano-particles by reduction with a calcium reductant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Masumi; Matsuura, Shiki; Natsui, Shungo; Tsuji, Etsuji; Habazaki, Hiroki; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-09-01

    Micro-, submicron-, and nano-scale titanium dioxide particles were reduced by reduction with a metallic calcium reductant in calcium chloride molten salt at 1173 K, and the reduction mechanism of the oxides by the calcium reductant was explored. These oxide particles, metallic calcium as a reducing agent, and calcium chloride as a molten salt were placed in a titanium crucible and heated under an argon atmosphere. Titanium dioxide was reduced to metallic titanium through a calcium titanate and lower titanium oxide, and the materials were sintered together to form a micro-porous titanium structure in molten salt at high temperature. The reduction rate of titanium dioxide was observed to increase with decreasing particle size; accordingly, the residual oxygen content in the reduced titanium decreases. The obtained micro-porous titanium appeared dark gray in color because of its low surface reflection. Micro-porous metallic titanium with a low oxygen content (0.42 wt%) and a large surface area (1.794 m2 g-1) can be successfully obtained by reduction under optimal conditions.

  10. Prospective, randomized study of one, two, or three trabecular bypass stents in open-angle glaucoma subjects on topical hypotensive medication

    PubMed Central

    Katz, L Jay; Erb, Carl; Carceller, Guillamet Amadeu; Fea, Antonio M; Voskanyan, Lilit; Wells, Jeffrey M; Giamporcaro, Jane Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of one, two, or three trabecular microbypass stents in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (OAG) not controlled on ocular hypotensive medication. A total of 119 subjects were followed for 18 months postoperatively. Materials and methods Subjects with medicated intraocular pressure (IOP) 18–30 mmHg and postmedication-washout baseline IOP 22–38 mmHg were randomized to implantation of one, two, or three stents. Ocular hypotensive medication was to be used if postoperative IOP exceeded 18 mmHg. Results A total of 38 subjects were implanted with one stent, 41 subjects with two stents, and 40 subjects with three stents. Both month 12 IOP reduction ≥20% without ocular hypotensive medication vs baseline unmedicated IOP and month 12 unmedicated IOP ≤18 mmHg were achieved by 89.2%, 90.2%, and 92.1% of one-, two-, and three-stent eyes, respectively. Furthermore, 64.9%, 85.4%, and 92.1% of the three respective groups achieved unmedicated IOP ≤15 mmHg. Over the 18-month follow-up period, medication was required in seven one-stent subjects, four two-stent subjects, and three three-stent subjects. At 18 months, mean unmedicated IOP was 15.9±0.9 mmHg in one-stent subjects, 14.1±1.0 mmHg in two-stent subjects, and 12.2±1.1 mmHg in three-stent subjects. Month 18 IOP reduction was significantly greater (P<0.001) with implantation of each additional stent, with mean differences in reduction of 1.84 mmHg (95% confidence interval 0.96–2.73) for three-stent vs two-stent groups and 1.73 mmHg (95% confidence interval 0.83–2.64) for two-stent vs one-stent groups. Adverse events through 18 months were limited to cataract progression with best-corrected visual acuity loss and subsequent cataract surgery. Conclusion In this series, implantation of each additional stent resulted in significantly greater IOP reduction with reduced medication use. Titratability of stents as a sole procedure was shown to be effective and safe, with

  11. Crystallographic Control in Ilmenite Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, M. L.; Grey, I. E.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2007-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the products from hydrogen reduction of polygranular synthetic ilmenite discs at temperatures in the range 823 to 1173 K and pressures in the range 1 to 13 atm. Reduction commences at grain boundaries and cracks and advances progressively to grain interiors. Within individual grains, the morphology of the reduction products was found to be crystallographically controlled. Near parallel bands of metallic iron (Fe m ) form within each grain, aligned with the basal plane of ilmenite (il) (0001) il . The separation between bands is of the order of 1 μm and is relatively constant with change of pressure and temperature. In the interband region, conversion of ilmenite to rutile occurs preferentially parallel to \\{ 11ifmmodeexpandafterbarelseexpandafter\\=fi{2}0\\} _{{il}} ilmenite planes, generating platelets of rutile that grow normal to the Fe m bands. The intergrain duplex morphology of the reduction products closely resembles cellular precipitation in alloys. At reduction temperatures above ˜1000 K, the interband region comprises dense, nonporous oriented intergrowths of rutile platelets and residual ilmenite, whereas below ˜900 K, the interband region contains a fine, filamentary network of pores. In the intermediate temperature regime, a change from dense to porous interband region occurs with increasing pressure. The observations have been interpreted in terms of the relative rates of interfacial chemical reaction and solid-state diffusion, with the latter having a controlling influence at lower temperatures or higher pressures.

  12. Toxicity reduction in industrial effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, P.W.; Eckenfelder, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    The toxicity of manufacturing wastewaters to fish and other aquatic organisms is now being used by state and federal regulators to monitor and restrict industrial wastewater discharges. As a result, there is a great need for guidance on the subject of aquatic toxicity reduction in the field of industrial water pollution control. This book is a comprehensive reference source on the testing protocols, comparative data, and treatment techniques for effective toxicity reduction. Included in this book are detailed chapters covering various methods for toxicity reduction, such as the removal of metals, aerobic biological treatment, stripping of volatile organics, and management of sludges from toxic wastewater treatment. The book features: a complete overview of the subject, including background material for newcomers to the field; a basic summary and comparison of alternate treatment procedures; the latest methods for the identification of toxic components that readers can use for testing in their own laboratories; a description of applicable technologies for toxicity reduction; actual data from the use of processes that allow readers to compare technologies; solids management requirements including handling and disposal; useful economic comparisons of technologies; and illustrative case studies that demonstrate the application of the latest toxicity reduction technology and data to specific situations. Eleven chapters are processed separately in the appropriate data bases.

  13. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, J.; Viola, M. B.

    2013-10-31

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  14. Current trends in breast reduction.

    PubMed

    Roje, Zdravko; Roje, Zeljka; Milosević, Milan; Varvodić, Josip; Mance, Marko

    2012-06-01

    Results of our study describe the long term effects of reduction mammaplasty. Many women with excessively small or large breasts have an altered personal self-image and often suffer from low self-esteem and other psychological stresses. This procedure is designed to reduce and reshape large breasts, and since the size, shape, and symmetry of a woman's breasts can have a profound effect on her mental and physical well-being it is important to observe the patient's long-term outcome. Currently, breast reduction surgery is safe, effective and beneficial to the patient. In Croatia, reduction mammoplasty is often excluded from the general health care plan. The distinction between "reconstructive" versus "cosmetic" breast surgery is very well defined by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Board of Directors. Unfortunately, the Croatian Health Society has yet to standardize such a distinction. There is an imperative need for evidence-based selection criteria. We retrospectively analyzed data of 59 female patients suffering from symptomatic macromastia who underwent reduction mammaplasty over a 16 year period (1995 until 2011). Our aim was to compare and contrast the various techniques available for reduction mammaplasty and to determine, based on patient outcome and satisfaction, which technique is most suited for each patient. The results of our study generally reinforce the observation that reduction mammaplasty significantly provides improvements in health status, long-term quality of life, postsurgical breast appearance and significantly decrease physical symptoms of pain. A number of 59 consecutive cases were initially treated with the four different breast reduction techniques: inverted-T scat or Wisa pattern breast reduction, vertical reduction mammaplasty, simplified vertical reduction mammaplasty, inferior pedicle and free nipple graft techniques. The average clinical follow-up period was 6-months, and included 48 patients. The statistical analysis of the

  15. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  16. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  17. Evaluation of Boundary-Enhancement Additives for Perfluoropolyethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R. , Jr.; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Lin, Tzuhn-Yuan; Kawa, Hajimu

    1996-01-01

    Six additives were synthesized and evaluated as boundary lubrication enhancers for perfluoropolyethers. These additives included a phosphonate, a thiophosphonate, a beta-diketone, a benzothiazole, an amide and a sulfite. These additives were evaluated in a vacuum four-ball apparatus, at a one weight percent concentration in a perfluoropolyether based on hexafluoropropene oxide. Tests were performed in vacuum (less than 5.0 x 10(exp 6) Torr), at room temperature (approx. 23 C), at an initial Hertzian stress of 3.5 GPa (200N load), and a sliding velocity of 28.8 mm/sec (100 rpm). Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies were used to analyze the 440 C specimens after testing. Wear rates for each formulation were determined from the slope of wear volume as a function of sliding distance. All additives yielded reductions in mean wear rates of at least 55 percent, with the exception of the benzothiazole which had no effect. Two of the additives, an amide and a sulfite, reduced the mean wear rate by at least 80 percent. IR and Raman analysis indicated the severity of wear can be correlated to the amount of surface fluorinated polymeric acid species (R(sub f)COOH) and amorphous carbon, in and around the wear scar.

  18. Electret properties of biaxially stretched polypropylene films containing various additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, J.; Behrendt, N.; Altstädt, V.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Sessler, G. M.

    2006-02-01

    Isotactic polypropylene (i-PP) films containing additives such as the commercial α -nucleation agent NA11 and the anorganic filler particles CaCO3 and Al2O3 were biaxially stretched. As a result, the films assume a cellular morphology with oblong cavities extending in the direction of the film elongation. In the present study, stretched films of 50 µm thickness with additive concentrations of 0.05-10 mass per cent were charged with a corona method to potentials of 400 or 500 V. The stability of the charges was tested isothermally at temperatures of 90 and 120 °C and by means of thermally stimulated discharge (TSD) experiments. The isothermal measurements show, for the above additives with concentrations higher than about 0.3%, a reduction of the charge decay with increasing additive concentrations. Compared with reference films of pure PP, the potential decay of the films containing additive concentrations of 10% is significantly reduced. Correspondingly, the TSD measurements indicate a shift of the main discharge peak to higher temperatures up to the melting temperature. Generally, the voiding and thus the stability also increases with the stretching ratio. These improvements of the charge stability are attributed to the barrier effect of the cavities. The results are of interest with respect to the various applications of PP electrets, such as ferroelectret devices and air filters.

  19. Reduction method for thermal analysis of complex aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    A reduction method which combines classical Rayleigh-Ritz modal superposition techniques with contemporary finite-element methods is applied to transient nonlinear thermal analysis of aerospace structures. The essence of the method is the use of a few thermal modes from eigenvalue analyses as basis vectors to represent the temperature response in the structure. The method is used to obtain approximate temperature histories for a portion of the Shuttle orbiter wing subject to reentry heating and for a large space antenna reflector subject to heating associated with a low Earth orbit. The reduction method has excellent potential for significant size reduction for radiation-dominated problems such as the antenna reflector. However, for conduction-dominated problems such as the Shuttle wing, especially those with complex spatial and temporal variations in the applied heating, additional work appears necessary to find alternate sources of basis vectors which will permit significant problem size reductions.

  20. Manganese inhibition of microbial iron reduction in anaerobic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Potential mechanisms for the lack of Fe(II) accumulation in Mn(IV)-containing anaerobic sediments were investigated. The addition of Mn(IV) to sediments in which Fe(II) reduction was the terminal electron-accepting process removed all the pore-water Fe(II), completely inhibited net Fe(III) reduction, and stimulated Mn(IV) reduction. Results demonstrate that preferential reduction of Mn(IV) by FE(III)-reducing bacteria cannot completely explain the lack of Fe(II) accumulation in anaerobic, Mn(IV)-containing sediments, and indicate that Mn(IV) oxidation of Fe(II) is the mechanism that ultimately prevents Fe(II) accumulation. -Authors

  1. Closed reduction of a fractured bone

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture reduction - closed ... Closed reduction is a procedure to set (reduce) a broken bone without surgery. This allows the bone ... soon as possible after the bone breaks. A closed reduction can be done by an orthopedic surgeon ( ...

  2. Waste reduction plan for The Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.M.

    1990-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a multipurpose Research and Development (R D) facility. These R D activities generate numerous small waste streams. Waste minimization is defined as any action that minimizes the volume or toxicity of waste by avoiding its generation or recycling. This is accomplished by material substitution, changes to processes, or recycling wastes for reuse. Waste reduction is defined as waste minimization plus treatment which results in volume or toxicity reduction. The ORNL Waste Reduction Program will include both waste minimization and waste reduction efforts. Federal regulations, DOE policies and guidelines, increased costs and liabilities associated with the management of wastes, limited disposal options and facility capacities, and public consciousness have been motivating factors for implementing comprehensive waste reduction programs. DOE Order 5820.2A, Section 3.c.2.4 requires DOE facilities to establish an auditable waste reduction program for all LLW generators. In addition, it further states that any new facilities, or changes to existing facilities, incorporate waste minimization into design considerations. A more recent DOE Order, 3400.1, Section 4.b, requires the preparation of a waste reduction program plan which must be reviewed annually and updated every three years. Implementation of a waste minimization program for hazardous and radioactive mixed wastes is sited in DOE Order 5400.3, Section 7.d.5. This document has been prepared to address these requirements. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoji; Li, Zhaofei; Hirai, Kei; Tassel, Cédric; Loyer, François; Ichikawa, Noriya; Abe, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; and others

    2013-11-15

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: Topochemical reductions with hydrides: Solid state or gas phase reaction? Display Omitted - Highlights: • SrFeO{sub 2} and LaNiO{sub 2} were prepared by topochemical reduction of oxides. • Separating the reducing agent (CaH{sub 2}, Mg metal) from the oxide still results in reduction. • Such topochemical reactions can occur in the gas phase.

  4. Technologies for Turbofan Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    An overview presentation of NASA's engine noise research since 1992 is given for subsonic commercial aircraft applications. Highlights are included from the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program and the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project with emphasis on engine source noise reduction. Noise reduction goals for 10 EPNdB by 207 and 20 EPNdB by 2022 are reviewed. Fan and jet noise technologies are highlighted from the AST program including higher bypass ratio propulsion, scarf inlets, forward-swept fans, swept/leaned stators, chevron nozzles, noise prediction methods, and active noise control for fans. Source diagnostic tests for fans and jets that have been completed over the past few years are presented showing how new flow measurement methods such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) have played a key role in understanding turbulence, the noise generation process, and how to improve noise prediction methods. Tests focused on source decomposition have helped identify which engine components need further noise reduction. The role of Computational AeroAcoustics (CAA) for fan noise prediction is presented. Advanced noise reduction methods such as Hershel-Quincke tubes and trailing edge blowing for fan noise that are currently being pursued n the QAT program are also presented. Highlights are shown form engine validation and flight demonstrations that were done in the late 1990's with Pratt & Whitney on their PW4098 engine and Honeywell on their TFE-731-60 engine. Finally, future propulsion configurations currently being studied that show promise towards meeting NASA's long term goal of 20 dB noise reduction are shown including a Dual Fan Engine concept on a Blended Wing Body aircraft.

  5. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  6. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in water samples acidified for preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Grove, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in water samples, preserved by standard techniques, was investigated. The standard preservation technique for water samples that are to be analyzed for Cr(VI) consists of filtration through a 0.45-??m membrane, acidification to a pH < 2, and storage in plastic bottles. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of H+ concentration, NO2, temperature, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO2, DOC, H+, and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4??C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0.45-??m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred needs to be considered.The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO//2, DOC, H** plus , and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4 degree C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0. 45- mu m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr

  7. 2008 world direct reduction statistics

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-01

    This supplement discusses total direct reduced iron (DRI) production for 2007 and 2008 by process. Total 2008 production by MIDREX(reg sign) direct reduction process plants was over 39.8 million tons. The total of all coal-based processes was 17.6 million tons. Statistics for world DRI production are also given by region for 2007 and 2008 and by year (1970-2009). Capacity utilization for 2008 by process is given. World DRI production by region and by process is given for 1998-2008 and world DRI shipments are given from the 1970s to 2008. A list of world direct reduction plants is included.

  8. Modelling the behaviour of additives in gun barrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, N.; Ludwig, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model which predicts the flow and heat transfer in a gun barrel is described. The model is transient, two-dimensional and equations are solved for velocities and enthalpies of a gas phase, which arises from the combustion of propellant and cartridge case, for particle additives which are released from the case; volume fractions of the gas and particles. Closure of the equations is obtained using a two-equation turbulence model. Preliminary calculations are described in which the proportions of particle additives in the cartridge case was altered. The model gives a good prediction of the ballistic performance and the gas to wall heat transfer. However, the expected magnitude of reduction in heat transfer when particles are present is not predicted. The predictions of gas flow invalidate some of the assumptions made regarding case and propellant behavior during combustion and further work is required to investigate these effects and other possible interactions, both chemical and physical, between gas and particles.

  9. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional information. 25.111 Section 25.111... Applications and Licenses General Application Filing Requirements § 25.111 Additional information. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any time additional information concerning any application, or...

  10. 20 CFR 901.72 - Additional rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Additional rules. 901.72 Section 901.72... Additional rules. The Joint Board may, in notice or other guidance of general applicability, provide additional rules regarding the enrollment of actuaries. Effective Date Note: At 76 FR 17776, Mar. 31,...

  11. 17 CFR 48.10 - Additional contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional contracts. 48.10... FOREIGN BOARDS OF TRADE § 48.10 Additional contracts. (a) Generally. A registered foreign board of trade that wishes to make an additional futures, option or swap contract available for trading by...

  12. 17 CFR 48.10 - Additional contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional contracts. 48.10...) REGISTRATION OF FOREIGN BOARDS OF TRADE § 48.10 Additional contracts. (a) Generally. A registered foreign board of trade that wishes to make an additional futures, option or swap contract available for trading...

  13. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  14. 20 CFR 802.215 - Additional briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Additional briefs. 802.215 Section 802.215 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview Procedures Initial Processing § 802.215 Additional briefs. Additional briefs may be filed or ordered in...

  15. 77 FR 49783 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/15/2012 (77 FR 35942-35944) and 6/22/2012 (77 FR 37659-37660), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  16. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  17. 20 CFR 802.215 - Additional briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional briefs. 802.215 Section 802.215 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview Procedures Initial Processing § 802.215 Additional briefs. Additional briefs may be filed or ordered in...

  18. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to determine... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section...

  19. 78 FR 9386 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/30/2012 (77 FR 71400-71401), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  20. 78 FR 45183 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 5/31/2013 (78 FR 32631-32632); 6/7/2013 (78 FR 34350-34351); and 6/14/2013 (78 FR... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  1. 34 CFR 75.231 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional information. 75.231 Section 75.231 Education... Make A Grant § 75.231 Additional information. After selecting an application for funding, the Secretary may require the applicant to submit additional information. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3 and 3474)...

  2. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The... activity to submit additional information....

  3. 10 CFR 725.13 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional information. 725.13 Section 725.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Applications § 725.13 Additional information. The... and before the termination of the permit, require additional information in order to enable the...

  4. 10 CFR 725.13 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional information. 725.13 Section 725.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Applications § 725.13 Additional information. The... and before the termination of the permit, require additional information in order to enable the...

  5. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  6. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  7. 12 CFR 1249.19 - Additional provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional provisions. 1249.19 Section 1249.19 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY ENTERPRISES BOOK-ENTRY PROCEDURES § 1249.19 Additional provisions. (a) Additional requirements. In any case or any class of cases arising under this part, an Enterprise may require such...

  8. 75 FR 33269 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 4/9/2010 (75 FR 18164-18165), the Committee for Purchase From People Who... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  9. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  10. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  11. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  12. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  13. 76 FR 18189 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 1/28/2011 (76 FR 5142-5143), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  14. 75 FR 4784 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/16/2009 (74 FR 58949-58950), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  15. 75 FR 54114 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 7/2/2010 (75 FR 38467-38468) and 7/9/2010 (75 FR 39497-39499), the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  16. 77 FR 53180 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/15/2012 (77 FR 35942-35944) and 6/29/2012 (77 FR 38775-38776), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase from People who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  17. 76 FR 19751 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 1/28/2011 (76 FR 5142-5143), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  18. 17 CFR 48.10 - Additional contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Additional contracts. 48.10... FOREIGN BOARDS OF TRADE § 48.10 Additional contracts. (a) Generally. A registered foreign board of trade that wishes to make an additional futures, option or swap contract available for trading by...

  19. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition to those established in...

  20. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...