Science.gov

Sample records for additional length scales

  1. Multi-Length-Scale Morphologies Driven by Mixed Additives in Porphyrin-Based Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ke; Miao, Jingsheng; Xiao, Liangang; Deng, Wanyuan; Kan, Yuanyuan; Liang, Tianxiang; Wang, Cheng; Huang, Fei; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Wu, Hongbin; Peng, Xiaobin

    2016-06-01

    A new category of deep-absorbing small molecules is developed. Optimized devices driven by mixed additives show a remarkable short-circuit current of ≈20 mA cm(-2) and a highest power conversion efficiency of 9.06%. A multi-length-scale morphology is formed, which is fully characterized by resonant soft X-ray scattering, high-angle annular dark film image transmission electron microscopy, etc. PMID:27062394

  2. Hydrophobic interactions in model enclosures from small to large length scales: non-additivity in explicit and implicit solvent models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingle; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    The binding affinities between a united-atom methane and various model hydrophobic enclosures were studied through high accuracy free energy perturbation methods (FEP). We investigated the non-additivity of the hydrophobic interaction in these systems, measured by the deviation of its binding affinity from that predicted by the pairwise additivity approximation. While only small non-additivity effects were previously reported in the interactions in methane trimers, we found large cooperative effects (as large as −1.14 kcal mol−1 or approximately a 25% increase in the binding affinity) and anti-cooperative effects (as large as 0.45 kcal mol−1) for these model enclosed systems. Decomposition of the total potential of mean force (PMF) into increasing orders of multi-body interactions indicates that the contributions of the higher order multi-body interactions can be either positive or negative in different systems, and increasing the order of multi-body interactions considered did not necessarily improve the accuracy. A general correlation between the sign of the non-additivity effect and the curvature of the solute molecular surface was observed. We found that implicit solvent models based on the molecular surface area (MSA) performed much better, not only in predicting binding affinities, but also in predicting the non-additivity effects, compared with models based on the solvent accessible surface area (SASA), suggesting that MSA is a better descriptor of the curvature of the solutes. We also show how the non-additivity contribution changes as the hydrophobicity of the plate is decreased from the dewetting regime to the wetting regime. PMID:21043426

  3. Softness Correlations Across Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, Robert; Shavit, Amit; Rieser, Jennifer; Schoenholz, Samuel; Cubuk, Ekin; Durian, Douglas; Liu, Andrea; Riggleman, Robert

    In disordered systems, it is believed that mechanical failure begins with localized particle rearrangements. Recently, a machine learning method has been introduced to identify how likely a particle is to rearrange given its local structural environment, quantified by softness. We calculate the softness of particles in simulations of atomic Lennard-Jones mixtures, molecular Lennard-Jones oligomers, colloidal systems and granular systems. In each case, we find that the length scale characterizing spatial correlations of softness is approximately a particle diameter. These results provide a rationale for why localized rearrangements--whose size is presumably set by the scale of softness correlations--might occur in disordered systems across many length scales. Supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46199.

  4. Addition of low concentrations of an ionic liquid to a base oil reduces friction over multiple length scales: a combined nano- and macrotribology investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Somers, Anthony E; Howlett, Patrick C; Rutland, Mark W; Forsyth, Maria; Atkin, Rob

    2016-03-01

    The efficacy of ionic liquids (ILs) as lubricant additives to a model base oil has been probed at the nanoscale and macroscale as a function of IL concentration using the same materials. Silica surfaces lubricated with mixtures of the IL trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinate and hexadecane are probed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (nanoscale) and ball-on-disc tribometer (macroscale). At both length scales the pure IL is a much more effective lubricant than hexadecane. At the nanoscale, 2.0 mol% IL (and above) in hexadecane lubricates the silica as well as the pure IL due to the formation of a robust IL boundary layer that separates the sliding surfaces. At the macroscale the lubrication is highly load dependent; at low loads all the mixtures lubricate as effectively as the pure IL, whereas at higher loads rather high concentrations are required to provide IL like lubrication. Wear is also pronounced at high loads, for all cases except the pure IL, and a tribofilm is formed. Together, the nano- and macroscales results reveal that the IL is an effective lubricant additive - it reduces friction - in both the boundary regime at the nanoscale and mixed regime at the macroscale. PMID:26865399

  5. The NIST Length Scale Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Beers, John S.; Penzes, William B.

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) interferometer for measuring graduated length scales has been in use since 1965. It was developed in response to the redefinition of the meter in 1960 from the prototype platinum-iridium bar to the wavelength of light. The history of the interferometer is recalled, and its design and operation described. A continuous program of modernization by making physical modifications, measurement procedure changes and computational revisions is described, and the effects of these changes are evaluated. Results of a long-term measurement assurance program, the primary control on the measurement process, are presented, and improvements in measurement uncertainty are documented.

  6. LENGTH SCALE OF TURBULENCE ABOVE ROUGH SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of analyses of data for two urban sites and a rural site suggest that the mixing length can be represented by the integral length scale of the turbulence derived from vertical velocity spectra. The result is apparently universal and permits the shear production of turbule...

  7. Coupled length scales in eroding landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Kelvin K.; Rothman, Daniel H.

    2001-05-01

    We report results from an empirical study of the anisotropic structure of eroding landscapes. By constructing a novel correlation function, we show quantitatively that small-scale channel-like features of landscapes are coupled to the large-scale structure of drainage basins. We show additionally that this two-scale interaction is scale-dependent. The latter observation suggests that a commonly applied effective equation for erosive transport may itself depend on scale.

  8. The length-scaling properties of topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissel, Jeffrey K.; Pratson, Lincoln F.; Malinverno, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    The scaling properties of synthetic topographic surfaces and digital elevation models (DEMs) of topography are examined by analyzing their 'structure functions,' i.e., the qth order powers of the absolute elevation differences: delta h(sub q) (l) = E((absolute value of h(x + l) - h(x))(exp q)). We find that the relation delta h(sub 1 l) approximately equal cl(exp H) describes well the scaling behavior of natural topographic surfaces, as represented by DEMs gridded at 3 arc sec. Average values of the scaling exponent H between approximately 0.5 and 0.7 characterize DEMs from Ethiopia, Saudi Arabia, and Somalia over 3 orders of magnitude range in length scale l (approximately 0.1-150 km). Differences in appparent topographic roughness among the three areas most likely reflect differences in the amplitude factor c. Separate determination of scaling properties in the x and y coordinate directions allows us to assess whether scaling exponents are azimuthally dependent (anisotropic) or whether they are isotropic while the surface itself is anisotropic over a restricted range of length scale. We explore ways to determine whether topographic surfaces are characterized by simple or multiscaling properties.

  9. Relevant length scale of barchan dunes.

    PubMed

    Hersen, Pascal; Douady, Stéphane; Andreotti, Bruno

    2002-12-23

    A new experiment can create small scale barchan dunes under water: some sand is put on a tray moving periodically and asymmetrically in a water tank, and barchans rapidly form. We measure basic morphological and dynamical properties of these dunes and compare them to field data. These favorable results demonstrate experimentally the relevance of the so-called "saturation length" for the control of the dunes physics. PMID:12484824

  10. Quantum criticality with two length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hui; Guo, Wenan; Sandvik, Anders W.

    2016-04-01

    The theory of deconfined quantum critical (DQC) points describes phase transitions at absolute temperature T = 0 outside the standard paradigm, predicting continuous transformations between certain ordered states where conventional theory would require discontinuities. Numerous computer simulations have offered no proof of such transitions, instead finding deviations from expected scaling relations that neither were predicted by the DQC theory nor conform to standard scenarios. Here we show that this enigma can be resolved by introducing a critical scaling form with two divergent length scales. Simulations of a quantum magnet with antiferromagnetic and dimerized ground states confirm the form, proving a continuous transition with deconfined excitations and also explaining anomalous scaling at T > 0. Our findings revise prevailing paradigms for quantum criticality, with potential implications for many strongly correlated materials.

  11. Quantum criticality with two length scales.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hui; Guo, Wenan; Sandvik, Anders W

    2016-04-01

    The theory of deconfined quantum critical (DQC) points describes phase transitions at absolute temperature T = 0 outside the standard paradigm, predicting continuous transformations between certain ordered states where conventional theory would require discontinuities. Numerous computer simulations have offered no proof of such transitions, instead finding deviations from expected scaling relations that neither were predicted by the DQC theory nor conform to standard scenarios. Here we show that this enigma can be resolved by introducing a critical scaling form with two divergent length scales. Simulations of a quantum magnet with antiferromagnetic and dimerized ground states confirm the form, proving a continuous transition with deconfined excitations and also explaining anomalous scaling at T > 0. Our findings revise prevailing paradigms for quantum criticality, with potential implications for many strongly correlated materials. PMID:26989196

  12. Determining multiple length scales in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yi-Qiao; Ryu, Seungoh; Sen, Pabitra N.

    2000-07-01

    Carbonate reservoirs in the Middle East are believed to contain about half of the world's oil. The processes of sedimentation and diagenesis produce in carbonate rocks microporous grains and a wide range of pore sizes, resulting in a complex spatial distribution of pores and pore connectivity. This heterogeneity makes it difficult to determine by conventional techniques the characteristic pore-length scales, which control fluid transport properties. Here we present a bulk-measurement technique that is non-destructive and capable of extracting multiple length scales from carbonate rocks. The technique uses nuclear magnetic resonance to exploit the spatially varying magnetic field inside the pore space itself-a `fingerprint' of the pore structure. We found three primary length scales (1-100µm) in the Middle-East carbonate rocks and determined that the pores are well connected and spatially mixed. Such information is critical for reliably estimating the amount of capillary-bound water in the rock, which is important for efficient oil production. This method might also be used to complement other techniques for the study of shaly sand reservoirs and compartmentalization in cells and tissues.

  13. Determining multiple length scales in rocks

    PubMed

    Song; Ryu; Sen

    2000-07-13

    Carbonate reservoirs in the Middle East are believed to contain about half of the world's oil. The processes of sedimentation and diagenesis produce in carbonate rocks microporous grains and a wide range of pore sizes, resulting in a complex spatial distribution of pores and pore connectivity. This heterogeneity makes it difficult to determine by conventional techniques the characteristic pore-length scales, which control fluid transport properties. Here we present a bulk-measurement technique that is nondestructive and capable of extracting multiple length scales from carbonate rocks. The technique uses nuclear magnetic resonance to exploit the spatially varying magnetic field inside the pore space itself--a 'fingerprint' of the pore structure. We found three primary length scales (1-100 microm) in the Middle-East carbonate rocks and determined that the pores are well connected and spatially mixed. Such information is critical for reliably estimating the amount of capillary-bound water in the rock, which is important for efficient oil production. This method might also be used to complement other techniques for the study of shaly sand reservoirs and compartmentalization in cells and tissues. PMID:10910355

  14. Introducing artificial length scales to tailor magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, J.; Strache, T.; Liedke, M. O.; Markó, D.; Wintz, S.; Lenz, K.; Keller, A.; Facsko, S.; Mönch, I.; McCord, J.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetism is a collective phenomenon. Hence, a local variation on the nanoscale of material properties, which act on the magnetic properties, affects the overall magnetism in an intriguing way. Of particular importance are the length scales on which a material property changes. These might be related to the exchange length, the domain wall width, a typical roughness correlation length, or a length scale introduced by patterning of the material. Here we report on the influence of two artificially created length scales: (i) ion erosion templates that serve as a source of a predefined surface morphology (ripple structure) and hence allow for the investigation of roughness phenomena. It is demonstrated that the ripple wave length can be easily tuned over a wide range (25-175 nm) by varying the primary ion erosion energy. The effect of this ripple morphology on the induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in soft magnetic Permalloy films is studied. Only below a ripple wavelength threshold (≈60 nm) is a significant induced magnetic anisotropy found. Above this threshold the corrugated Permalloy film acts as a flat film. This cross-over is discussed in the frame of dipolar interactions giving rise to the induced anisotropies. (ii) Ion implantation through a lithographically defined mask, which is used for a magnetic property patterning on various length scales. The resulting magnetic properties are neither present in non-implanted nor in homogeneously implanted films. Here new insight is gained by the comparison of different stripe patterning widths ranging from 1 to 10 μm. In addition, the appearance of more complicated magnetic domain structures, i.e. spin-flop domain configurations and head-on domain walls, during hard axis magnetization reversal is demonstrated. In both cases the magnetic properties, the magnetization reversal process as well as the magnetic domain configurations depend sensitively on the artificially introduced length scale.

  15. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  16. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  17. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-06-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients.

  18. Optimal Length Scale for a Turbulent Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadek, Mira; Alexakis, Alexandros; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that there is an optimal forcing length scale for low Prandtl number dynamo flows that can significantly reduce the required energy injection rate. The investigation is based on simulations of the induction equation in a periodic box of size 2 π L . The flows considered are the laminar and turbulent A B C flows forced at different forcing wave numbers kf, where the turbulent case is simulated using a subgrid turbulence model. At the smallest allowed forcing wave number kf=kmin=1 /L the laminar critical magnetic Reynolds number R mclam is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the turbulent critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmc turb due to the hindering effect of turbulent fluctuations. We show that this hindering effect is almost suppressed when the forcing wave number kf is increased above an optimum wave number kfL ≃4 for which Rmc turb is minimum. At this optimal wave number, Rmc turb is smaller by more than a factor of 10 than the case forced in kf=1 . This leads to a reduction of the energy injection rate by 3 orders of magnitude when compared to the case where the system is forced at the largest scales and thus provides a new strategy for the design of a fully turbulent experimental dynamo.

  19. Optimal Length Scale for a Turbulent Dynamo.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Mira; Alexakis, Alexandros; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-02-19

    We demonstrate that there is an optimal forcing length scale for low Prandtl number dynamo flows that can significantly reduce the required energy injection rate. The investigation is based on simulations of the induction equation in a periodic box of size 2πL. The flows considered are the laminar and turbulent ABC flows forced at different forcing wave numbers k_{f}, where the turbulent case is simulated using a subgrid turbulence model. At the smallest allowed forcing wave number k_{f}=k_{min}=1/L the laminar critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{lam} is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the turbulent critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{turb} due to the hindering effect of turbulent fluctuations. We show that this hindering effect is almost suppressed when the forcing wave number k_{f} is increased above an optimum wave number k_{f}L≃4 for which Rm_{c}^{turb} is minimum. At this optimal wave number, Rm_{c}^{turb} is smaller by more than a factor of 10 than the case forced in k_{f}=1. This leads to a reduction of the energy injection rate by 3 orders of magnitude when compared to the case where the system is forced at the largest scales and thus provides a new strategy for the design of a fully turbulent experimental dynamo. PMID:26943538

  20. Going up in time and length scales in modeling polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    Polymer properties depend on a wide range of coupled length and time scales, with unique macroscopic viscoelastic behavior stemming from interactions at the atomistic level. The need to probe polymers across time and length scales and particularly computational modeling is inherently challenging. Here new paths to probing long time and length scales including introducing interactions into traditional bead-spring models and coarse graining of atomistic simulations will be compared and discussed. Using linear polyethylene as a model system, the degree of coarse graining with two to six methylene groups per coarse-grained bead derived from a fully atomistic melt simulation were probed. We show that the degree of coarse graining affects the measured dynamic. Using these models we were successful in probing highly entangled melts and were able reach the long-time diffusive regime which is computationally inaccessible using atomistic simulations. We simulated the relaxation modulus and shear viscosity of well-entangled polyethylene melts for scaled times of 500 µs. Results for plateau modulus are in good agreement with experiment. The long time and length scale is coupled to the macroscopic viscoelasticity where the degree of coarse graining sets the minimum length scale instrumental in defining polymer properties and dynamics. Results will be compared to those obtained from simple bead-spring models to demonstrate the additional insight that can be gained from atomistically inspired coarse grained models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. How Cells Measure Length on Subcellular Scales.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Wallace F

    2015-12-01

    Cells are not just amorphous bags of enzymes, but precise and complex machines. With any machine, it is important that the parts be of the right size, yet our understanding of the mechanisms that control size of cellular structures remains at a rudimentary level in most cases. One problem with studying size control is that many cellular organelles have complex 3D structures that make their size hard to measure. Here we focus on linear structures within cells, for which the problem of size control reduces to the problem of length control. We compare and contrast potential mechanisms for length control to understand how cells solve simple geometry problems. PMID:26437596

  2. Hierarchy of Bone Microdamage at Multiple Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2007-01-01

    Microdamage formation is a critical determinant of bone fracture and the nature and type of damage formed in bone depends on the interaction of its extracellular matrix (ECM) with the applied loading. More importantly, because bone is a hierarchical composite with multiple length scales linked to each other, the nature and type of damage in bone could also be hierarchical. In this review article, based on new unpublished data and a reanalysis of literature reports on in vivo and in vitro observations of microdamage, three length scales including mineralized collagen fibrils, lamellar and osteonal levels have been identified as the key contributors to microdamage hierarchy and energy dissipation in bone. Inherent hierarchy in bone’s ECM therefore has specific microstructural features and energy dissipation mechanisms at different length scales that allow the bone to effectively resist the different components of the applied physiological loading. Furthermore, because human bones experience multiaxial cyclic loading and its ECM is subjected to variation with aging and disease, additional emphasis is placed on investigating how the nature of applied loading and the quality of ECM affect the hierarchy of microdamage formation with age. PMID:18516216

  3. Length Scales in Bayesian Automatic Adaptive Quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Gh.; Adam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Two conceptual developments in the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of one-dimensional Riemann integrals [Gh. Adam, S. Adam, Springer LNCS 7125, 1-16 (2012)] are reported. First, it is shown that the numerical quadrature which avoids the overcomputing and minimizes the hidden floating point loss of precision asks for the consideration of three classes of integration domain lengths endowed with specific quadrature sums: microscopic (trapezoidal rule), mesoscopic (Simpson rule), and macroscopic (quadrature sums of high algebraic degrees of precision). Second, sensitive diagnostic tools for the Bayesian inference on macroscopic ranges, coming from the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature, are derived.

  4. Drift wave transport scalings introduced by varying correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, J.; Holod, I.

    2005-01-01

    Scalings of the correlation length of drift wave turbulence with magnetic current q, shear, elongation, and temperature ratio have been introduced into a drift wave transport model. The correlation length is calculated from linear scaling of the fastest growing mode. Such a procedure is supported by previous turbulence simulations with absorbing boundaries for short and long wavelengths. The resulting q and s scalings are now in better agreement with experimental scalings. In particular, the simulation results for transport barrier shots improve.

  5. Localization length scales of triplet excitons in singlet fission materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, Sam L.; Thorley, Karl J.; Anthony, John E.; Bouchiat, Hélène; Greenham, Neil C.; Chepelianskii, Alexei D.

    2015-09-01

    We measure the dielectric confinement length scales of triplet excitons in organic semiconductors by jointly measuring their microwave-domain electric and magnetic susceptibilities. We apply this technique to characterize triplet excitons in two singlet fission materials with distinct solid-state packing and correlate the extracted localization length scales with the role of the excitonic environment. By using the magnetic susceptibility simultaneously determined through our experiments, we compare the independently extracted dielectric and spin-spin localization length scales, highlighting the role of local anisotropy on the properties of excitonic triplet states.

  6. Length scale effects on percolation of geometrically complex nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, T. J.; Stevens, D. R.; Roberts, W. A.; Gorga, R. E.; Clarke, L. I.

    2008-10-01

    With growing interest in materials that include nanostructures the focus on nanocomposites (a polymer-based matrix that is enhanced by a nanometer sized particle) has grown. Electrospun nanocomposites contain a complex geometry including fiber sizes of 200 nm arranged in a random mat with a porosity of >= 70%. Composites utilize connected paths of particles throughout the sample to enhance the mechanical and electrical properties of the matrix. Previous literature has shown, in the case of continuous films, that this percolation phenomenon is affected by the sample size. This work aims to investigate these length scale effects within a complex morphology, such as a nanofiber mat. For a clear understanding of the change in percolation vs. length scale we fabricated interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) with a finger spacing of 10 to 100 μm, electrospun mats onto the IDEs, and performed electrical conductance measurements. In addition, computation simulations of the experimental systems were undertaken. I will discuss our results and the role sample size/shape plays on 1) the percolation threshold and 2) the conductivity vs. doping fraction curve.

  7. Hydrodynamic length-scale selection in microswimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Dunkel, Jörn; Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Bär, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A universal characteristic of mesoscale turbulence in active suspensions is the emergence of a typical vortex length scale, distinctly different from the scale invariance of turbulent high-Reynolds number flows. Collective length-scale selection has been observed in bacterial fluids, endothelial tissue, and active colloids, yet the physical origins of this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we systematically derive an effective fourth-order field theory from a generic microscopic model that allows us to predict the typical vortex size in microswimmer suspensions. Building on a self-consistent closure condition, the derivation shows that the vortex length scale is determined by the competition between local alignment forces, rotational diffusion, and intermediate-range hydrodynamic interactions. Vortex structures found in simulations of the theory agree with recent measurements in Bacillus subtilis suspensions. Moreover, our approach yields an effective viscosity enhancement (reduction), as reported experimentally for puller (pusher) microorganisms.

  8. DHS Internship Summary-Crystal Assembly at Different Length Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, L

    2009-08-06

    I was part of a project in which in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor growth and dissolution of atomic and colloidal crystals. At both length scales, the chemical environment of the system greatly altered crystal growth and dissolution. Calcium phosphate was used as a model system for atomic crystals. A dissolution-reprecipitation reaction was observed in this first system, involving the conversion of brushite (DCPD) to octacalcium phosphate (OCP). In the second system, polymeric colloidal crystals were dissolved in an ionic solvent, revealing the underlying structure of the crystal. The dissolved crystal was then regrown through an evaporative step method. Recently, we have also found that colloids can be reversibly deposited in situ onto an ITO (indium tin oxide) substrate via an electrochemistry setup. The overall goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the mechanisms that control crystallization and order, so that these might be controlled during material synthesis. Controlled assembly of materials over a range of length scales from molecules to nanoparticles to colloids is critical for designing new materials. In particular, developing materials for sensor applications with tailorable properties and long range order is important. In this work, we examine two of these length scales: small molecule crystallization of calcium phosphate (whose crystal phases include DCPD, OCP, and HAP) and colloidal crystallization of Poly(methyl methacrylate) beads. Atomic Force Microscopy is ideal for this line of work because it allows for the possibility of observing non-conducting samples in fluid during growth with high resolution ({approx} 10 nm). In fact, during atomic crystal growth one can observe changes in atomic steps, and with colloidal crystals, one can monitor the individual building blocks of the crystal. Colloids and atoms crystallize under the influence of different forces acting at different length scales as seen in Table 1

  9. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatridge, Michael Jonathan

    Information stored in magnetic fields plays an important role in everyday life. This information exists over a remarkably wide range of sizes, so that magnetometry at a variety of length scales can extract useful information. Examples at centimeter to millimeter length scales include measurement of spatial and temporal character of fields generated in the human brain and heart, and active manipulation of spins in the human body for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At micron length scales, magnetometry can be used to measure magnetic objects such as flux qubits; at nanometer length scales it can be used to study individual magnetic domains, and even individual spins. The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) based magnetometer for two such applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nanoscale magnetometry, are the focus of this thesis. Conventional MRI has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body. This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of protons with the addition application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients to encode spatial information. Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems. Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. The prepolarized, SQUID detected ultra-low field MRI (ULF MRI) developed by the Clarke group allows imaging in very weak fields (typically 132 muT, corresponding to a resonant frequency of 5.6 kHz). At these low field strengths, there is enhanced contrast in the longitudinal relaxation time of various tissue types, enabling imaging of objects which are not visible to conventional MRI, for instance prostate cancer. We are currently investigating the contrast between normal and cancerous

  10. Length scales and self-organization in dense suspension flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düring, Gustavo; Lerner, Edan; Wyart, Matthieu

    2014-02-01

    Dense non-Brownian suspension flows of hard particles display mystifying properties: As the jamming threshold is approached, the viscosity diverges, as well as a length scale that can be identified from velocity correlations. To unravel the microscopic mechanism governing dissipation and its connection to the observed correlation length, we develop an analogy between suspension flows and the rigidity transition occurring when floppy networks are pulled, a transition believed to be associated with the stress stiffening of certain gels. After deriving the critical properties near the rigidity transition, we show numerically that suspension flows lie close to it. We find that this proximity causes a decoupling between viscosity and the correlation length of velocities ξ, which scales as the length lc characterizing the response to a local perturbation, previously predicted to follow lc˜1/√zc-z ˜p0.18, where p is the dimensionless particle pressure, z is the coordination of the contact network made by the particles, and zc is twice the spatial dimension. We confirm these predictions numerically and predict the existence of a larger length scale lr˜√p with mild effects on velocity correlation and of a vanishing strain scale δγ ˜1/p that characterizes decorrelation in flow.

  11. Procedure for Determining Turbulence Length Scales Using Hotwire Anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Gabry, Lamyaa A.; Thurman, Douglas R.; Poinsatte, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Hotwire anemometers are used to measure instantaneous velocity from which the mean velocity and the velocity fluctuation can be determined. Using a hotwire system, it is possible to deduce not only the velocity components and their fluctuation but to also analyze the energy spectra and from that the turbulence length scales. In this experiment, hotwire anemometry is used to measure the flow field turbulence for an array of film cooling holes. The objective of this paper is to document the procedure that is used to reduce the instantaneous velocity measurements to determine the turbulence length scales using data from the film-cooling experiments to illustrate the procedure.

  12. Process length scales and longitudinal damping in karst conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, M. D.; Luhmann, A. J.; Wicks, C. M.; Saar, M. O.

    2012-03-01

    Simple mathematical models often allow an intuitive grasp of the function of physical systems. We develop a mathematical framework to investigate reactive or dissipative transport processes within karst conduits. Specifically, we note that for processes that occur within a characteristic timescale, advection along the conduit produces a characteristic process length scale. We calculate characteristic length scales for the propagation of thermal and electrical conductivity signals along karst conduits. These process lengths provide a quantitative connection between karst conduit geometry and the signals observed at a karst spring. We show that water input from the porous/fractured matrix is also characterized by a length scale and derive an approximation that accounts for the influence of matrix flow on the transmission of signals through the aquifer. The single conduit model is then extended to account for conduits with changing geometries and conduit flow networks, demonstrating how these concepts can be applied in more realistic conduit geometries. We introduce a recharge density function, ϕR, which determines the capability of an aquifer to damp a given signal, and cast previous explanations of spring variability within this framework. Process lengths are a general feature of karst conduits and surface streams, and we conclude with a discussion of other potential applications of this conceptual and mathematical framework.

  13. Estimation of Length-Scales in Soils by MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daidzic, N. E.; Altobelli, S.; Alexander, J. I. D.

    2004-01-01

    Soil can be best described as an unconsolidated granular media that forms porous structure. The present macroscopic theory of water transport in porous media rests upon the continuum hypothesis that the physical properties of porous media can be associated with continuous, twice-differentiable field variables whose spatial domain is a set of centroids of Representative Elementary Volume (REV) elements. MRI is an ideal technique to estimate various length-scales in porous media. A 0.267 T permanent magnet at NASA GRC was used for this study. A 2D or 3D spatially-resolved porosity distribution were obtained from the NMR signal strength from each voxel and the spin-lattice relaxation time. A classical spin-warp imaging with Multiple Spin Echos (MSE) was used to evaluate proton density in each voxel. Initial resolution of 256 x 256 was subsequently reduced by averaging neighboring voxels and the porosity convergence was observed. A number of engineered "space candidate" soils such as Isolite(trademark), Zeoponics(trademark), Turface(trademark), and Profile(trademark) were used. Glass beads in the size range between 50 microns to 2 mm were used as well. Initial results with saturated porous samples have shown a good estimate of the average porosity consistent with the gravimetric porosity measurement results. For Profile(trademark) samples with particle sizes ranging between 0.25 to 1 mm and characteristic interparticle pore size of 100 microns the characteristic Darcy scale was estimated to be about delta(sub REV) = 10 mm. Glass beads porosity show clear convergence toward a definite REV which stays constant throughout homogeneous sample. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  14. Past and Future Blurring at Fundamental Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, M. J.; Farina, C.; Cougo-Pinto, M. V.

    2010-11-19

    We obtain the {kappa}-deformed versions of the retarded and advanced Green functions and show that their causality properties are blurred in a time interval of the order of a length parameter q=1/(2{kappa}). The functions also indicate a smearing of the light cone. These results favor the interpretation of q as a fundamental length scale below which the concept of a point in space-time should be substituted by the concept of a fuzzy region of radius q, as proposed long ago by Heisenberg.

  15. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M

    2003-11-11

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3{omega}) with a total intensity of 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO{sub 2} producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n{sub e} = 6 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and temperatures of T{sub e} = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last {approx}1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length ({approx}2 mm). increasing to 12% for {approx}7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths.

  16. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales. PMID:25758945

  17. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-03-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales.

  18. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales. PMID:25758945

  19. Cross correlation and length scales in turbulent flows near surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.; Moin, P.; Lee, M.; Moser, R. D.; Spalart, P.; Mansour, N. N.; Kaimal, J. C.; Gaynor, E.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of length scales are used in turbulent flows; 'functional length scales' such as mixing length, dissipation length L(sub epsilon), etc., and 'flow-field length scales' derived from cross correlations of velocity, pressure, etc. in the flow. Some connection between these scales are derived here. We first consider the cross correlation R(sub vv)(y,y(sub 1)) of the normal components u at two heights y, y(sub 1) above a rigid surface, normalized by the velocity y(sub 1) (greater than y). For shear-free boundary layers it is found theoretically, and in field and numerical experiments that R(sub vv) approximately equals y/y(sub 1). For shear layers it is also found that R(sub vv) approximately equals f(y/y(sub 1)) less than or equal to y,y(sub 1). This function f differs slightly between low Reynolds number numerical simulations and field experiments. The lateral structure defined by R(sub vv)(y,r(sub 3); y(sub 1),0) is also self similar and shows that the eddies centered at about y(sub 1) appear to have constant lateral width a(sub 3) above and below y(sub 1), where a(sub 3, sup +) approximately equals 7+1/(1.4dU(sup +)/dy(sup +)), when normalized on u(sub *) and v, where U is the mean velocity. Results for L(sub epsilon, sup -1) from direct numerical simulation are found to compare well with the formula L(sub epsilon, sup -1) = A(sub B)/y + A(sub S)dU/dy/v, for unidirectional and reversing turbulent boundary layers and channel flow, except near where dU/dy approximately equals 0. The conclusion is that the large-scale eddy structure and length scales in these flows are determined by a combination of shear and blocking, and that the vertical component of turbulence has a self-similar structure in both kinds of boundary layer.

  20. Atomistic Simulation of Polymer Crystallization at Realistic Length Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Fried, L E

    2005-01-28

    Understanding the dynamics of polymer crystallization during the induction period prior to crystal growth is a key goal in polymer physics. Here we present the first study of primary crystallization of polymer melts via molecular dynamics simulations at physically realistic (about 46 nm) length scales. Our results show that the crystallization mechanism involves a spinodal decomposition microphase separation caused by an increase in the average length of rigid trans segments along the polymer backbone during the induction period. Further, the characteristic length of the growing dense domains during the induction period is longer than predicted by classical nucleation theory. These results indicate a new 'coexistence period' in the crystallization, where nucleation and growth mechanisms coexist with a phase separation mechanism. Our results provide an atomistic verification of the fringed micelle model.

  1. The length and time scales of water's glass transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Using a general model for the equilibrium dynamics of supercooled liquids, I compute from molecular properties the emergent length and time scales that govern the nonequilibrium relaxation behavior of amorphous ice prepared by rapid cooling. Upon cooling, the liquid water falls out of equilibrium whereby the temperature dependence of its relaxation time is predicted to change from super-Arrhenius to Arrhenius. A consequence of this crossover is that the location of the apparent glass transition temperature depends logarithmically on cooling rate. Accompanying vitrification is the emergence of a dynamical length-scale, the size of which depends on the cooling rate and varies between angstroms and tens of nanometers. While this protocol dependence clarifies a number of previous experimental observations for amorphous ice, the arguments are general and can be extended to other glass forming liquids.

  2. Topology, length scales, and energetics of surfactant micelles.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Subas; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2015-07-14

    We study the morphology, energetics, and kinetics of a self-associating model cationic surfactant in water using large-scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations over time scales that allow for probing micelle recombination dynamics. We develop an algorithm to track micelle contours and quantify various microstructural features such as contour length distribution, persistence length, and mesh size. We predict reliably the end-cap energy and recombination time of micelles, directly from molecular simulations for the first time. We further consider the variation of solution viscosity as a function of salt concentration and show that branched and multiconnected structures govern the experimentally observed anomalous dependence of zero-shear viscosity on salt concentration. Overall, simulation predictions are in good agreement with experiments. PMID:26178125

  3. Emergence of Chirality from Isotropic Interactions of Three Length Scales.

    PubMed

    Mkhonta, S K; Elder, K R; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2016-05-20

    Chirality is known to play a pivotal role in determining material properties and functionalities. However, it remains a great challenge to understand and control the emergence of chirality and the related enantioselective process particularly when the building components of the system are achiral. Here we explore the generic mechanisms driving the formation of two-dimensional chiral structures in systems characterized by isotropic interactions and three competing length scales. We demonstrate that starting from isotropic and rotationally invariant interactions, a variety of chiral ordered patterns and superlattices with anisotropic but achiral units can self-assemble. The mechanisms for selecting specific states are related to the length-scale coupling and the selection of resonant density wave vectors. Sample phase diagrams and chiral elastic properties are identified. These findings provide a viable route for predicting chiral phases and selecting the desired handedness. PMID:27258877

  4. Emergence of Chirality from Isotropic Interactions of Three Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhonta, S. K.; Elder, K. R.; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Chirality is known to play a pivotal role in determining material properties and functionalities. However, it remains a great challenge to understand and control the emergence of chirality and the related enantioselective process particularly when the building components of the system are achiral. Here we explore the generic mechanisms driving the formation of two-dimensional chiral structures in systems characterized by isotropic interactions and three competing length scales. We demonstrate that starting from isotropic and rotationally invariant interactions, a variety of chiral ordered patterns and superlattices with anisotropic but achiral units can self-assemble. The mechanisms for selecting specific states are related to the length-scale coupling and the selection of resonant density wave vectors. Sample phase diagrams and chiral elastic properties are identified. These findings provide a viable route for predicting chiral phases and selecting the desired handedness.

  5. Instability of Stratified Shear Flow: Intermittency and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert; Odier, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The stability of stratified shear flows which occur in oceanic overflows, wind-driven thermoclines, and atmospheric inversion layers is governed by the Richardson Number Ri , a non-dimensional balance between stabilizing stratification and destabilizing shear. For a shear flow with velocity difference U, density difference Δρ and characteristic length H, one has Ri = g (Δρ / ρ) H /U2 . A more precise definition is the gradient Richardson Number Rig =N2 /S2 where the buoyancy frequency N =√{ (g / ρ) ∂ρ / ∂z } , the mean strain S = ∂U / ∂z with z parallel to gravity and with ensemble or time averages defining the gradients. We explore the stability and mixing properties of a wall-bounded shear flow for 0 . 1 < Rig < 1 using simultaneous measurements of density and velocity fields. The flow, confined from the top by a horizontal boundary, is a lighter alcohol-water mixture injected from a nozzle into quiescent heavier salt-water fluid. The injected flow is turbulent with Taylor Reynolds number about 75. We compare a set of length scales that characterize the mixing properties of our turbulent stratified shear flow including Thorpe Length LT, Ozmidov Length LO, and Ellison Length LE.

  6. Uncinate Process Length in Birds Scales with Resting Metabolic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Tickle, Peter; Nudds, Robert; Codd, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental function of the respiratory system is the supply of oxygen to meet metabolic demand. Morphological constraints on the supply of oxygen, such as the structure of the lung, have previously been studied in birds. Recent research has shown that uncinate processes (UP) are important respiratory structures in birds, facilitating inspiratory and expiratory movements of the ribs and sternum. Uncinate process length (UPL) is important for determining the mechanical advantage for these respiratory movements. Here we report on the relationship between UPL, body size, metabolic demand and locomotor specialisation in birds. UPL was found to scale isometrically with body mass. Process length is greatest in specialist diving birds, shortest in walking birds and intermediate length in all others relative to body size. Examination of the interaction between the length of the UP and metabolic demand indicated that, relative to body size, species with high metabolic rates have corresponding elongated UP. We propose that elongated UP confer an advantage on the supply of oxygen, perhaps by improving the mechanical advantage and reducing the energetic cost of movements of the ribs and sternum. PMID:19479074

  7. Taylor length-scale size particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Francesco

    The present study investigates the two-way coupling effects of finite-size solid spherical particles on decaying isotropic turbulence using an immersed boundary method. The conventional point particle assumption is valid only in the case of particles with a diameter, dp, much smaller than the Kolmogorov length scale, eta. In a simulation with particles of diameter dp > eta the flow around each particle needs to be resolved. In this study, we use a method similar to that of Uhlmann(2005) [55] that adapts the Immersed Boundary(IB) Method developed by Peskin [38] to simulate the flow around suspended spherical solid particles. The main idea of the method is to distribute a number of Lagrangian points uniformly over the surface of the particle. A force is applied at each Lagrangian point to represent the momentum exchange between the particle and the surrounding fluid. An analytic three-point delta function is used to distribute the force to the Eulerian grid points saddling the spherical surface to satisfy the no-slip condition at each Lagrangian point. Decaying turbulence is simulated in a periodic box with a uniform mesh of up to (512)3 grid points and an initial microscale Reynolds number of up to Relambda0 = 110. We compare the single phase flow (SPF) with particle-laden flows with particles of different diameters. The density of the particle varies from 2.56 to 10 times that of the fluid. The effects of the particles on the temporal development of turbulence kinetic energy E(t), its dissipation rate epsilon( t), its two-way coupling rate of change Ψp( t) and frequency spectra E(o) are discussed. In this study, in contrast to particles with dp < eta [15], particles with dp > eta always increase the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy, epsilon( t). In addition, Ψp(t) is always positive, whereas it can be positive or negative for particles with dp < eta. The balance between these two effects caused E(t) to be smaller than that of the single-phase flow

  8. Length-Scale Dependent Viscosity in Semidilute Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poling-Skutvik, Ryan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Conrad, Jacinta

    2015-03-01

    Using optical microscopy and particle tracking algorithms, we measured the mean-squared displacements (MSDs) of fluorescent polystyrene particles with diameters ranging from 300 nm to 2 μm suspended in semidilute solutions of high molecular weight partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide. The solutions had polymer concentrations ranging from 0.67 to 67c*, where c* is the overlap concentration, and estimated correlation lengths of ~ 100 to 900 nm. At short times, the particles exhibited subdiffusive behavior characterized by MSD ~tα with α < 1 . On long time scales, the particles transitioned to Fickian diffusion (α = 1) and their diffusivity was calculated from the slope of the MSD. Whereas the large particles agreed with predictions using the Stokes-Einstein equation and bulk zero-shear viscosity, the smaller particles diffused much faster than predicted. The relative diffusivities do not collapse onto a single curve, but rather form a continuum that varies with particle size. This indicates that the particles experience a size-dependent effective viscosity mediated by the ratio of particle diameter to characteristic length scales in the polymer solution.

  9. Length scale selects directionality of droplets on vibrating pillar ratchet

    SciTech Connect

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay V.

    2014-09-22

    Directional control of droplet motion at room temperature is of interest for applications such as microfluidic devices, self-cleaning coatings, and directional adhesives. Here, arrays of tilted pillars ranging in height from the nanoscale to the microscale are used as structural ratchets to directionally transport water at room temperature. Water droplets deposited on vibrating chips with a nanostructured ratchet move preferentially in the direction of the feature tilt while the opposite directionality is observed in the case of microstructured ratchets. This remarkable switch in directionality is consistent with changes in the contact angle hysteresis. To glean further insights into the length scale dependent asymmetric contact angle hysteresis, the contact lines formed by a nonvolatile room temperature ionic liquid placed onto the tilted pillar arrays were visualized and analyzed in situ in a scanning electron microscope. As a result, the ability to tune droplet directionality by merely changing the length scale of surface features all etched at the same tilt angle would be a versatile tool for manipulating multiphase flows and for selecting droplet directionality in other lap-on-chip applications.

  10. A Two-length Scale Turbulence Model for Single-phase Multi-fluid Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzkopf, J. D.; Livescu, D.; Baltzer, J. R.; Gore, R. A.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2015-09-08

    A two-length scale, second moment turbulence model (Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes, RANS) is proposed to capture a wide variety of single-phase flows, spanning from incompressible flows with single fluids and mixtures of different density fluids (variable density flows) to flows over shock waves. The two-length scale model was developed to address an inconsistency present in the single-length scale models, e.g. the inability to match both variable density homogeneous Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and Rayleigh-Taylor induced turbulence, as well as the inability to match both homogeneous shear and free shear flows. The two-length scale model focuses on separating the decay and transport length scales, as the two physical processes are generally different in inhomogeneous turbulence. This allows reasonable comparisons with statistics and spreading rates over such a wide range of turbulent flows using a common set of model coefficients. The specific canonical flows considered for calibrating the model include homogeneous shear, single-phase incompressible shear driven turbulence, variable density homogeneous Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence, Rayleigh-Taylor induced turbulence, and shocked isotropic turbulence. The second moment model shows to compare reasonably well with direct numerical simulations (DNS), experiments, and theory in most cases. The model was then applied to variable density shear layer and shock tube data and shows to be in reasonable agreement with DNS and experiments. Additionally, the importance of using DNS to calibrate and assess RANS type turbulence models is highlighted.

  11. The length scale for sub-grid-scale parameterization with anisotropic resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilly, Douglas K.

    1989-01-01

    Use of the Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity formulation and related schemes for subgrid-scale parameterization of large eddy simulation models requires specification of a single length scale, earlier related by Lilly to the scale of filtering and/or numerical resolution. An anisotropic integration of the Kolmogoroff enstrophy spectrum allows generalization of that relationship to anisotropic resolution. It is found that the Deardorff assumption is reasonably accurate for small anisotropies and can be simply improved for larger values.

  12. Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Minori; van Limbeek, Michiel A J; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-02-12

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting or drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high-speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time and length scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate. PMID:26918994

  13. Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-02-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting or drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high-speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time and length scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  14. Hybrid Supramolecular and Colloidal Hydrogels that Bridge Multiple Length Scales**

    PubMed Central

    Janeček, Emma-Rose; McKee, Jason R; Tan, Cindy S Y; Nykänen, Antti; Kettunen, Marjo; Laine, Janne; Ikkala, Olli; Scherman, Oren A

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid nanocomposites were constructed based on colloidal nanofibrillar hydrogels with interpenetrating supramolecular hydrogels, displaying enhanced rheological yield strain and a synergistic improvement in storage modulus. The supramolecular hydrogel consists of naphthyl-functionalized hydroxyethyl cellulose and a cationic polystyrene derivative decorated with methylviologen moieties, physically cross-linked with cucurbit[8]uril macrocyclic hosts. Fast exchange kinetics within the supramolecular system are enabled by reversible cross-linking through the binding of the naphthyl and viologen guests. The colloidal hydrogel consists of nanofibrillated cellulose that combines a mechanically strong nanofiber skeleton with a lateral fibrillar diameter of a few nanometers. The two networks interact through hydroxyethyl cellulose adsorption to the nanofibrillated cellulose surfaces. This work shows methods to bridge the length scales of molecular and colloidal hybrid hydrogels, resulting in synergy between reinforcement and dynamics. PMID:25772264

  15. Katanin contributes to interspecies spindle length scaling in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Loughlin, Rose; Wilbur, Jeremy D.; McNally, Francis J.; Nédélec, François J.; Heald, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Bipolar spindles must separate chromosomes by the appropriate distance during cell division, but mechanisms determining spindle length are poorly understood. Based on a 2D model of meiotic spindle assembly, we predicted that higher localized microtubule (MT) depolymerization rates could generate the shorter spindles observed in egg extracts of X. tropicalis compared to X. laevis. We found that katanin-dependent MT severing was increased in X. tropicalis, which lacks an inhibitory phosphorylation site in the p60 catalytic subunit that is present in X. laevis p60. Katanin inhibition lengthened spindles in both species, and kinetochore fibers extended through X. tropicalis spindle poles disrupting them. In both X. tropicalis extracts and the spindle simulation, a threshold number of stable kinetochore fibers could overwhelm MT depolymerization, leading to similar phenotypes. Thus, mechanisms have evolved in different species to scale spindle size and coordinate regulation of multiple MT populations in order to generate a robust steady state structure. PMID:22153081

  16. Additional Results of Ice-Accretion Scaling at SLD Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Thomas H. (Technical Monitor); Anderson, David N.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2005-01-01

    To determine scale velocity an additional similarity parameter is needed to supplement the Ruff scaling method. A Weber number based on water droplet MVD has been included in several studies because the effect of droplet splashing on ice accretion was believed to be important, particularly for SLD conditions. In the present study, ice shapes recorded at Appendix-C conditions and recent results at SLD conditions are reviewed to show that droplet diameter cannot be important to main ice shape, and for low airspeeds splashing does not appear to affect SLD ice shapes. Evidence is presented to show that while a supplementary similarity parameter probably has the form of a Weber number, it must be based on a length proportional to model size rather than MVD. Scaling comparisons were made between SLD reference conditions and Appendix-C scale conditions using this Weber number. Scale-to-reference model size ratios were 1:1.7 and 1:3.4. The reference tests used a 91-cm-chord NACA 0012 model with a velocity of approximately 50 m/s and an MVD of 160 m. Freezing fractions of 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 were included in the study.

  17. Length scale selects directionality of droplets on vibrating pillar ratchet

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay V.

    2014-09-22

    Directional control of droplet motion at room temperature is of interest for applications such as microfluidic devices, self-cleaning coatings, and directional adhesives. Here, arrays of tilted pillars ranging in height from the nanoscale to the microscale are used as structural ratchets to directionally transport water at room temperature. Water droplets deposited on vibrating chips with a nanostructured ratchet move preferentially in the direction of the feature tilt while the opposite directionality is observed in the case of microstructured ratchets. This remarkable switch in directionality is consistent with changes in the contact angle hysteresis. To glean further insights into the lengthmore » scale dependent asymmetric contact angle hysteresis, the contact lines formed by a nonvolatile room temperature ionic liquid placed onto the tilted pillar arrays were visualized and analyzed in situ in a scanning electron microscope. As a result, the ability to tune droplet directionality by merely changing the length scale of surface features all etched at the same tilt angle would be a versatile tool for manipulating multiphase flows and for selecting droplet directionality in other lap-on-chip applications.« less

  18. Length scales for fragile glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, Raymond D.

    1995-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation results are used to demonstrate the existence of a growing length in supercooled, fragile glass-forming liquids. This length is the longest wavelength, propagating shear wave the fluid can support. Explicit results are reported for an equimolar soft-sphere mixture. A possible connection between this length and the size of locally rigid clusters is discussed.

  19. Time-dependent couplings and crossover length scales in nonequilibrium surface roughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradas, Marc; López, Juan M.; Hernández-Machado, A.

    2007-07-01

    We show that time-dependent couplings may lead to nontrivial scaling properties of the surface fluctuations of the asymptotic regime in nonequilibrium kinetic roughening models. Three typical situations are studied. In the case of a crossover between two different rough regimes, the time-dependent coupling may result in anomalous scaling for scales above the crossover length. In a different setting, for a crossover from a rough to either a flat or damping regime, the time-dependent crossover length may conspire to produce a rough surface, although the most relevant term tends to flatten the surface. In addition, our analysis sheds light into an existing debate in the problem of spontaneous imbibition, where time-dependent couplings naturally arise in theoretical models and experiments.

  20. Fault zone rheology and length scales of frictional failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.

    2011-12-01

    variation in power-law exponent indicates that whether deformation occurs predominantly by continuous or discontinuous deformation may be predicted from the shape of the frequency-size distribution of competent lenses, and supports the hypothesis that bulk rheology is determined by the volume fraction of competent material. The distribution of competent material likely affects the seismic style of actively deforming fault zones. The length scales of shear discontinuities are likely to be a factor determining the possible length scales of seismic ruptures, and thus the likely range of earthquake magnitudes which may occur within a tabular fault zone segment. The power-law exponent of the distribution may be analogous to the b-value in the earthquake frequency-magnitude relationship, where a low power-law exponent, reflecting a high proportion of large phacoids or phacoid clusters, relates to a low b, reflecting a higher proportion of large earthquakes. Variation in the distribution of materials of varying rheology, both along and across strike, may therefore be a possible explanation for 3-D variability in seismic style.

  1. Scale Length of Mantle Heterogeneities: Helium Diffusion Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S.; Kurz, M.; Wang, Z.

    2007-12-01

    will be >20 Ra. In essence, slabs may lose their He signature by diffusion, but it will remain recorded in the surrounding mantle; i.e. veins may run but they can't hide! For both enriched and depleted upper mantle slabs, sampled along a spreading ridge, the 3/4He variability on 10-20 km scale lengths would be easily observed; even massive along-axis melt mixing (50-100 km) would not hide these signatures. We have evaluated 3 extant ridge-crest data sets in this context (MAR 0-47S; EPR 19-23S; SWIR 16- 24E), with a view to defining scale-lengths of He isotope variability. The average 3/4He variability for these 3 areas is 0.47, 0.19 and 0.21 Ra (±1 sigma); a well-sampled sub-area on the MAR (25.7-26.5S) is 0.13 Ra. There is a monotonic variation along the SWIR, from 6.6 to 7.3 Ra; variability about a best fit line is 0.09 Ra (maximum deviation is only 0.20 Ra). At the smallest scale, a single 20 km EPR flow field shows similar variability (0.29 Ra) to the above examples. Since these ridges range from slow to very fast-spreading, the variability in size of along- axis magma chambers will lead inevitably to various scales of melt averaging. We conclude that these ridge areas are not sampling mantle that contains enriched veins or recycled oceanic crust slabs of any significant size. This is especially clear for the 500 km domain on the SWIR, where very small He variability is observed, superimposed on a large scale He gradient. In particular, the view of the upper mantle as a ubiquitous mixture of veins and depleted matrix, with MORB always representing an averaging of this mixture, appears untenable.

  2. A Two-length Scale Turbulence Model for Single-phase Multi-fluid Mixing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwarzkopf, J. D.; Livescu, D.; Baltzer, J. R.; Gore, R. A.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2015-09-08

    A two-length scale, second moment turbulence model (Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes, RANS) is proposed to capture a wide variety of single-phase flows, spanning from incompressible flows with single fluids and mixtures of different density fluids (variable density flows) to flows over shock waves. The two-length scale model was developed to address an inconsistency present in the single-length scale models, e.g. the inability to match both variable density homogeneous Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and Rayleigh-Taylor induced turbulence, as well as the inability to match both homogeneous shear and free shear flows. The two-length scale model focuses on separating the decay and transport length scales,more » as the two physical processes are generally different in inhomogeneous turbulence. This allows reasonable comparisons with statistics and spreading rates over such a wide range of turbulent flows using a common set of model coefficients. The specific canonical flows considered for calibrating the model include homogeneous shear, single-phase incompressible shear driven turbulence, variable density homogeneous Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence, Rayleigh-Taylor induced turbulence, and shocked isotropic turbulence. The second moment model shows to compare reasonably well with direct numerical simulations (DNS), experiments, and theory in most cases. The model was then applied to variable density shear layer and shock tube data and shows to be in reasonable agreement with DNS and experiments. Additionally, the importance of using DNS to calibrate and assess RANS type turbulence models is highlighted.« less

  3. Physical aspects of a length scale for the Gulf Stream front

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, T.W.

    1983-07-20

    A discussion is presented of the physical interpretation of the length scale, lambda, introduced in a recent paper by Kao and Cheney (1982) to scale the sea surface height anomaly across the Gulf Stream front. Additional results of sea-surface height anomaly profiles computed from the hydrographic data from Fuglister's GULF STREAM 60 are also included. In all cases the width of the anomaly is spanned rather precisely by 2lambda. The relationship between lambda and the internal Rossby radius of deformation lambda, is discussed.

  4. Scale length of mantle heterogeneities: Constraints from helium diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.; Kurz, M. D.; Wang, Z.

    2008-05-01

    A model of coupled He production/diffusion is used to constrain the question of whether Earth's peridotitic mantle contains ubiquitous mesoscale veins or slabs of other lithologies. The high diffusion rates of helium preclude survival of He isotope heterogeneities on scales smaller than a few tens of meters, especially if they represent long term in-growth of 4He in the mantle. For 1.5 Gyr residence times, and a diffusion coefficient of 10 - 10 m 2/s, 0.5 km slabs or 2 km cylinders will lose > 90% of in-grown 4He. However, substantial 3He/ 4He variations may persist in slabs or be induced in adjacent mantle, depending on initial He, U and Th contents. We have modeled three cases of 3He/ 4He equilibration between mantle domains: an ocean crust (OC) slab in depleted upper mantle (DMM) or in enriched mantle (BSE), and a BSE slab in DMM. For a 1 km OC slab in DMM (8 Ra today), the slab today will have 3He/ 4He of only 3 Ra, and will have influenced the surrounding mantle with 4He for > 7 km on either side. The average 3He/ 4He of this mixed zone will be < 7 Ra, even when sampled by melts over a total width of 20-50 km. For the case of a 1 km BSE slab in DMM (8 Ra today), the slab will be 37 Ra today, and will have infected a mantle domain > 16 km wide. Even with a 60 km melt sampling width, the average 3He/ 4He will be > 15 Ra. Slabs may lose their He signature by diffusion, but their presence will be recorded in the surrounding mantle. We have evaluated 3 along-axis N-MORB ridge-crest data sets in this context (MAR 25.7-26.5°S; EPR 19-23°S; SWIR 16-24° E), with a view to defining scale-lengths of He isotope variability. The average 3He/ 4He variability for these 3 areas is very small, and independent of spreading rate: 0.13, 0.19 and 0.21 Ra (± 1 σ). Since these ridges range from ultra-slow to very fast-spreading, the variability in size of along-axis magma chambers will lead inevitably to various scales of melt averaging. We conclude that these ridge areas are

  5. Proton conduction in exchange membranes across multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Jorn, Ryan; Savage, John; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-11-20

    Concerns over global climate change associated with fossil-fuel consumption continue to drive the development of electrochemical alternatives for energy technology. Proton exchange fuel cells are a particularly promising technology for stationary power generation, mobile electronics, and hybrid engines in automobiles. For these devices to work efficiently, direct electrical contacts between the anode and cathode must be avoided; hence, the separator material must be electronically insulating but highly proton conductive. As a result, researchers have examined a variety of polymer electrolyte materials for use as membranes in these systems. In the optimization of the membrane, researchers are seeking high proton conductivity, low electronic conduction, and mechanical stability with the inclusion of water in the polymer matrix. A considerable number of potential polymer backbone and side chain combinations have been synthesized to meet these requirements, and computational studies can assist in the challenge of designing the next generation of technologically relevant membranes. Such studies can also be integrated in a feedback loop with experiment to improve fuel cell performance. However, to accurately simulate the currently favored class of membranes, perfluorosulfonic acid containing moieties, several difficulties must be addressed including a proper treatment of the proton-hopping mechanism through the membrane and the formation of nanophase-separated water networks. We discuss our recent efforts to address these difficulties using methods that push the limits of computer simulation and expand on previous theoretical developments. We describe recent advances in the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method that can probe proton diffusion at the nanometer-length scale and accurately model the so-called Grotthuss shuttling mechanism for proton diffusion in water. Using both classical molecular dynamics and coarse-grained descriptions that replace atomistic

  6. Inlet Turbulence and Length Scale Measurements in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, Douglas; Flegel, Ashlie; Giel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Constant temperature hotwire anemometry data were acquired to determine the inlet turbulence conditions of a transonic turbine blade linear cascade. Flow conditions and angles were investigated that corresponded to the take-off and cruise conditions of the Variable Speed Power Turbine (VSPT) project and to an Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) scaled rotor blade tip section. Mean and turbulent flowfield measurements including intensity, length scale, turbulence decay, and power spectra were determined for high and low turbulence intensity flows at various Reynolds numbers and spanwise locations. The experimental data will be useful for establishing the inlet boundary conditions needed to validate turbulence models in CFD codes.

  7. Recognition and assembly at multiple length-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmsted, Brian Keith

    contours to study how symmetry and packing originates at the micron length-scale. Although much is known about assembly at the molecular level for symmetry and packing, the assembly of anisotropic particles at longer length scales, which involve different interactive forces, has not been studied. This work concludes by performing preliminary work in elucidating the general behavior towards symmetry and packing in two-dimensions of micron-sized particles by using gravitational gradients and dielectrophoresis.

  8. Cooperative Length Scale and Fragility of Polystyrene under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuan; Guo, Yunlong; Priestley, Rodney

    2012-02-01

    While thin films are an attractive model system to investigate the impact of confinement on glassy behavior, extending studies beyond thin films to geometries of higher dimensionalities is vital from both scientific and technological viewpoints. In this talk, we present the impact of confinement on the characteristic length at the glass transition as well as the fragility for confined polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles under isochoric conditions. We measure the glass transition temperature (Tg), fictive temperature (Tf) and isochoric heat capacity of silica-capped PS nanoparticles as a function of diameter via differential scanning calorimetry. From the measurement of Tf, we obtain the isochoric fragility, and via the fluctuation formula, the characteristic length at the glass transition. We illustrate that confinement under isochoric conditions for PS nanoparticles leads to a significant increase in the isochoric fragility while the characteristic length is reduced with size. At the minimum the results demonstrate a relationship between fragility and the characteristics length of isochorically-confined polymer that is not intuitive from the Adam-Gibbs theory.

  9. Direct observation of electron propagation and dielectric screening on the atomic length scale.

    PubMed

    Neppl, S; Ernstorfer, R; Cavalieri, A L; Lemell, C; Wachter, G; Magerl, E; Bothschafter, E M; Jobst, M; Hofstetter, M; Kleineberg, U; Barth, J V; Menzel, D; Burgdörfer, J; Feulner, P; Krausz, F; Kienberger, R

    2015-01-15

    The propagation and transport of electrons in crystals is a fundamental process pertaining to the functioning of most electronic devices. Microscopic theories describe this phenomenon as being based on the motion of Bloch wave packets. These wave packets are superpositions of individual Bloch states with the group velocity determined by the dispersion of the electronic band structure near the central wavevector in momentum space. This concept has been verified experimentally in artificial superlattices by the observation of Bloch oscillations--periodic oscillations of electrons in real and momentum space. Here we present a direct observation of electron wave packet motion in a real-space and real-time experiment, on length and time scales shorter than the Bloch oscillation amplitude and period. We show that attosecond metrology (1 as = 10(-18) seconds) now enables quantitative insight into weakly disturbed electron wave packet propagation on the atomic length scale without being hampered by scattering effects, which inevitably occur over macroscopic propagation length scales. We use sub-femtosecond (less than 10(-15) seconds) extreme-ultraviolet light pulses to launch photoelectron wave packets inside a tungsten crystal that is covered by magnesium films of varied, well-defined thicknesses of a few ångströms. Probing the moment of arrival of the wave packets at the surface with attosecond precision reveals free-electron-like, ballistic propagation behaviour inside the magnesium adlayer--constituting the semi-classical limit of Bloch wave packet motion. Real-time access to electron transport through atomic layers and interfaces promises unprecedented insight into phenomena that may enable the scaling of electronic and photonic circuits to atomic dimensions. In addition, this experiment allows us to determine the penetration depth of electrical fields at optical frequencies at solid interfaces on the atomic scale. PMID:25592539

  10. Length scales in glass-forming liquids and related systems: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    The central problem in the study of glass-forming liquids and other glassy systems is the understanding of the complex structural relaxation and rapid growth of relaxation times seen on approaching the glass transition. A central conceptual question is whether one can identify one or more growing length scale(s) associated with this behavior. Given the diversity of molecular glass-formers and a vast body of experimental, computational and theoretical work addressing glassy behavior, a number of ideas and observations pertaining to growing length scales have been presented over the past few decades, but there is as yet no consensus view on this question. In this review, we will summarize the salient results and the state of our understanding of length scales associated with dynamical slow down. After a review of slow dynamics and the glass transition, pertinent theories of the glass transition will be summarized and a survey of ideas relating to length scales in glassy systems will be presented. A number of studies have focused on the emergence of preferred packing arrangements and discussed their role in glassy dynamics. More recently, a central object of attention has been the study of spatially correlated, heterogeneous dynamics and the associated length scale, studied in computer simulations and theoretical analysis such as inhomogeneous mode coupling theory. A number of static length scales have been proposed and studied recently, such as the mosaic length scale discussed in the random first-order transition theory and the related point-to-set correlation length. We will discuss these, elaborating on key results, along with a critical appraisal of the state of the art. Finally we will discuss length scales in driven soft matter, granular fluids and amorphous solids, and give a brief description of length scales in aging systems. Possible relations of these length scales with those in glass-forming liquids will be discussed.

  11. Length scales in glass-forming liquids and related systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    The central problem in the study of glass-forming liquids and other glassy systems is the understanding of the complex structural relaxation and rapid growth of relaxation times seen on approaching the glass transition. A central conceptual question is whether one can identify one or more growing length scale(s) associated with this behavior. Given the diversity of molecular glass-formers and a vast body of experimental, computational and theoretical work addressing glassy behavior, a number of ideas and observations pertaining to growing length scales have been presented over the past few decades, but there is as yet no consensus view on this question. In this review, we will summarize the salient results and the state of our understanding of length scales associated with dynamical slow down. After a review of slow dynamics and the glass transition, pertinent theories of the glass transition will be summarized and a survey of ideas relating to length scales in glassy systems will be presented. A number of studies have focused on the emergence of preferred packing arrangements and discussed their role in glassy dynamics. More recently, a central object of attention has been the study of spatially correlated, heterogeneous dynamics and the associated length scale, studied in computer simulations and theoretical analysis such as inhomogeneous mode coupling theory. A number of static length scales have been proposed and studied recently, such as the mosaic length scale discussed in the random first-order transition theory and the related point-to-set correlation length. We will discuss these, elaborating on key results, along with a critical appraisal of the state of the art. Finally we will discuss length scales in driven soft matter, granular fluids and amorphous solids, and give a brief description of length scales in aging systems. Possible relations of these length scales with those in glass-forming liquids will be discussed. PMID:26684508

  12. Length Scale Correlations of Cellular Microstructures in Directionally Solidified Binary System

    SciTech Connect

    Yunxue Shen

    2002-06-27

    In a cellular array, a range of primary spacing is found to be stable under given growth conditions. Since a strong coupling of solute field exists between the neighboring cells, primary spacing variation should also influence other microstructure features such as cell shape and cell length. The existence of multiple solutions is examined in this study both theoretically as well as experimentally. A theoretical model is developed that identifies and relates four important microstructural lengths, which are found to be primary spacing, tip radius, cell width and cell length. This general microstructural relationship is shown to be valid for different cells in an array as well as for other cellular patterns obtained under different growth conditions. The unique feature of the model is that the microstructure correlation does not depend on composition or growth conditions since these variables scale microstructural lengths to satisfy the relationship obtained in this study. Detailed directional solidification experimental studies have been carried out in the succinonitrile-salol system to characterize and measure these four length scales. Besides the validation of the model, experimental results showed additional scaling laws to be present. In the regime where only a cellular structure is formed, the shape of the cell, the cell tip radius and the length of the cell are all found to scale individually with the local primary spacing. The presence of multiple solutions of primary spacing is also shown to influence the cell-dendrite transition that is controlled not only by the processing variables (growth velocity, thermal gradient and composition) but also by the local cell spacing. The cell-dendrite transition was found not to be sharp, but occurred over a range of processing conditions. Two critical conditions have been identified such that only cells are present below lower critics condition, and only dendrites are formed above the upper critics condition. Between

  13. Length Scale Correlations of Cellular Microstructures in Directionally Solidified Binary System

    SciTech Connect

    Yunxue Shen

    2002-08-01

    In a cellular array, a range of primary spacing is found to be stable under given growth conditions. Since a strong coupling of solute field exists between the neighboring cells, primary spacing variation should also influence other microstructure features such as cell shape and cell length. The existence of multiple solutions is examined in this study both theoretically as well as experimentally. A theoretical model is developed that identifies and relates four important microstructural lengths, which are found to be primary spacing, tip radius, cell width and cell length. This general microstructural relationship is shown to be valid for different cells in an array as well as for other cellular patterns obtained under different growth conditions. The unique feature of the model is that the microstructure correlation does not depend on composition or growth conditions since these variables scale microstructural lengths to satisfy the relationship obtained in this study. Detailed directional solidification experimental studies have been carried out in the succinonitrile-salol system to characterize and measure these four length scales. Besides the validation of the model, experimental results showed additional scaling laws to be present. In the regime where only a cellular structure is formed, the shape of the cell, the cell tip radius and the length of the cell are all found to scale individually with the local primary spacing. The presence of multiple solutions of primary spacing is also shown to influence the cell-dendrite transition that is controlled not only by the processing variables (growth velocity, thermal gradient and composition) but also by the local cell spacing. The cell-dendrite transition was found not to be sharp, but occurred over a range of processing conditions. Two critical conditions have been identified such that only cells are present below lower critics condition, and only dendrites are formed above the upper critics condition. Between

  14. Experimental evidence for two thermodynamic length scales in neutralized polyacrylate gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Grillo, Isabelle; Basser, Peter J.; Geissler, Erik

    2002-11-01

    The small angle neutron scattering (SANS) behavior of fully neutralized sodium polyacrylate gels is investigated in the presence of calcium ions. Analysis of the SANS response reveals the existence of three characteristic length scales, two of which are of thermodynamic origin, while the third length is associated with the frozen-in structural inhomogeneities. This latter contribution exhibits power law behavior with a slope of about -3.6, reflecting the presence of interfaces. The osmotically active component of the scattering signal is defined by two characteristic length scales, a correlation length ξ and a persistence length L.

  15. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  16. Shear viscosity of strongly coupled Yukawa systems on finite length scales.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, K Y; Murillo, M S

    2001-02-12

    The Yukawa shear viscosity has been calculated using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. Near the viscosity minimum, we find exponential decay consistent with the Navier-Stokes equation, with significant deviations on finite length scales for larger viscosity values. The viscosity is determined to be nonlocal on a scale length consistent with the correlation length, revealing the length scales necessary for obtaining transport coefficients in the hydrodynamic limit by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods. Our results are quasiuniversal with respect to excess entropy for excess entropies well below unity. PMID:11178047

  17. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    PubMed Central

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  18. Non-universal aperture-length scaling of opening mode fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer, Franziska; Schöpfer, Martin P. J.; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Opening-mode fractures, such as joints, veins and dykes, typically exhibit a power-law aperture-length scaling with a power-law exponent of about 0.5. The fracture aperture is hence proportional to the square root of fracture length, a relation which is in fact predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) for an isolated Mode I fracture subjected to remote tension. The existence of such a 'universal scaling law' is however a highly debated topic. High quality outcrop data illustrate that fracture aperture-length scaling may be 'non-universal' and indicate that below a certain length-scale scaling is super-linear (power-law exponent > 1). We use a numerical model comprised of a square lattice of breakable elastic beams to investigate the aperture-length scaling that emerges in thin plates subjected to remote tension. Strength heterogeneity is introduced in the regular lattice by randomly assigning beam strengths from a Weibull probability distribution. The model fracture system evolution is characterised by two stages which are separated by the strain at which peak-stress occurs. During the pre-peak stress stage fracture aperture-length scaling is universal with a power-law exponent of about 0.5 as expected from LEFM. Shortly after the material has attained its maximum load bearing capacity, aperture-length scaling becomes non-universal, so that the average aperture-length relation plotted on a log-log graph exhibits a distinct kink. Fractures with a length less than this critical length scale exhibit super-linear aperture-length scaling, whereas fractures with a greater length exhibit sub-linear scaling. The models illustrate that the emergence of non-universal aperture-length scaling is a result of fracture clustering, which occurs after peak-stress in the form of a localised fracture zone. Given that fracture clustering is a common phenomenon in natural fracture systems, we argue that a universal scaling law may be the exception rather than the rule.

  19. Investigation of the effect of inlet turbulence length scale on fan discrete tone noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodder, B. K.

    1973-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation at the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel of fan rotor alone discrete tone noise is presented. The investigation examines rotor interaction with fan inlet turbulence. The importance of turbulence length scale is shown by comparing the fan radiated acoustic spectrum with and without modified turbulence length scales. A small-scale low pressure ratio fan was used for the experiment.

  20. Laser profilometry and length-scale analysis of stone tools: second series experiment results.

    PubMed

    James Stemp, W; Childs, Ben E; Vionnet, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Based on the need to develop a method to reliably and objectively document and discriminate the use-wear on archaeological stone tools, Stemp et al. (2009) tested whether the surface roughness measured on experimentally worn stone tools used on different contact materials could be discriminated. Results of these initial experiments indicated that discrimination was possible and also determined the scales over which this discrimination occurred. In this article, we report the results of additional experiments using the same method on a second set of tools to test its reliability and reproducibility. In these experiments, four flint flakes were intensively used for 20 min on either conch shell or dry deer antler. The surface roughness or texture of the stone tools was measured by generating 2D profiles using a UBM laser profilometer. Relative lengths (RLs) calculated from the profiles were used directly as characterization parameters and subsequently compared statistically at each scale using the F-test to establish a level of confidence for the differentiation at each scale represented in the measured profiles. The mean square ratios of measurement data were used to determine whether the variation in roughness was statistically significant and to what level of confidence. The scales at which there was a high level of confidence were the ones at which the tools were differentiable. The results of these experiments confirm our previous findings that RLs, over certain scale ranges, can discriminate the stone tool surface wear profiles produced by the different contact materials. PMID:20853403

  1. Radiation Damage on Multiple Length Scales in Uranium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mahima

    Radiation damage in UO2 has been well studied but there exists little correlation between point defect accumulation, lattice structure changes and microstructure. This is partly because irradiated nuclear fuel is highly radioactive and its defect chemistry is extremely complicated resulting from fission of the material and consequent fission products being embedded in the fuel matrix [Olander1976]. To adequately study the evolution of defects from point defects through to microstructure features, the resulting defects have to be intentionally simplified for characterization. Ion accelerators have the unique capability of creating simple microstructure features using specific ions, without the added complication of fission and neutron activation from nuclear reactors. As an example, H+ ions have been used to create (only) a distribution of dislocations that were studied using various techniques. The ability to tune the energy or type of the ion to achieve desirable implantation depth and ideally simple microstructure renders it a lucrative instrument for this type of analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been utilized to study extended structure changes and microstructure evolution. Ion beam irradiations create displacements and displacement networks, voids, surface fracturing, gas bubbles and several other microstructure changes to model nuclear reactor damage [Noris1972]. Using an ion accelerator, it has been possible to isolate these radiation induced defects and study their subsequent evolution with increasing dose. Insofar, since all of the phenomena caused by radiation damage originate from point defects, the elucidation of radiation effects on the atomic scale is crucial. This is rendered complicated due to aperiodic irradiation defects. This lack of periodicity renders standard approaches, such as TEM and XRD ineffective, as these methods probe average structure over tens of Angstroms. Therefore, techniques

  2. A large scale membrane-binding protein conformational change that initiates at small length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandpre, Trevor; Andorf, Matthew; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Lamb, Robert; Poor, Taylor; Landahl, Eric

    2013-03-01

    The fusion (F) protein of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a membrane-bound, homotrimeric glycoprotein located on the surface of PIV5 viral envelopes. Upon being triggered by the receptor-binding protein (HN), F undergoes a greater than 100Å ATP-independent refolding event. This refolding event results in the insertion of a hydrophobic fusion peptide into the membrane of the target cell, followed by the desolvation and subsequent fusion event as the two membranes are brought together. Isothermal calorimetry and hydrophobic dye incorporation experiments indicate that the soluble construct of the F protein undergoes a conformational rearrangement event at around 55 deg C. We present the results of an initial Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering (TR-SAXS) study of this large scale, entropically driven conformational change using a temperature jump. Although we the measured radius of gyration of this protein changes on a 110 second timescale, we find that the x-ray scattering intensity at higher angles (corresponding to smaller length scales in the protein) changes nearly an order of magnitude faster. We believe this may be a signature of entropically-driven conformational change. To whom correspondence should be addressed

  3. Topographic Roughness of Hawaiian Volcanic Terrains: Analysis of Multiple Datasets Indicates Length Scales are Critical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. R.; Anderson, F. S.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Haldemann, A.; Brooks, B.; Foster, J.

    2007-12-01

    The roughness of a natural surface is often defined by the topography of the surface at scales of a few tens of meters or less. To ensure the safety of rovers and scientific instruments on Mars, these scales are of critical importance during landing site selection and rover traverse operations. Published work on terrestrial and Martian topography datasets has demonstrated that statistical values such as the Hurst exponent can be used in conjunction with related statistical measures such as RMS slope or deviation to quantify the relationship between scale-dependent roughness values and the morphology of a surface. In our detailed studies of the statistical behavior of meter-scale surface roughness on Earth, we determine that the length scales used to calculate the surface roughness affect the resulting roughness statistics and must be taken into account when analyzing planetary surface roughness. Extensive airborne Light Detection and Ranging (a-LiDAR) coverage of the summit of Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii (1 m DEM) provides an opportunity for simulating higher resolution Martian topography data such as will be obtained from photoclinometry and stereo imaging using the HiRISE camera on MRO. In addition to the a-LiDAR data, we use high-resolution topography (2 cm DEM) generated from a tripod-mounted scanning LiDAR system (t-LiDAR). Previous authors have described techniques for calculating roughness statistics in one dimension using topographic profiles. We adapt the 1D method for use with 2D topographic datasets to generate maps of the Hurst exponent of Martian analog flows in Hawaii. Results from the surface roughness analysis suggest that the calculated RMS deviation or slope and Hurst exponent exhibit systematic variations as the length of a profile segment (in 1D studies) or size of the cell (in 2D studies) changes. These new results, combined with previously described data, indicate that the length scales used to calculate roughness statistics

  4. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Lancaster, K. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (1020W cm-2 ) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μ m ).

  5. Multi-plane Particle Shadow Velocimetry to Quantify Integral Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jeff; Truong, Christine; Hinkle, Steven; Sinding, Kyle; Camp, Tiffany; Fontaine, Arnie; Krane, Michael; Devilbiss, David

    2015-11-01

    Multi-plane PIV has been used for several years to assist in quantifying the integral length scales in turbulent flow. Particle shadow velocimetry (PSV) enables illumination of a volume and is an efficient means of obtaining multi-plane illumination. The combination of two colors in the LED backlight and a dichroic mirror makes possible the imaging of two planes in space without the complexity of aligning two different light sources. The velocity fields obtained in these two vector fields are then correlated to obtain length scales using the definitions in the literature. The length scales and multi-plane measurements are compared with previous studies which used proven measurement methods.

  6. Bridging Length Scales to Study Self-Assembly and Self-Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Bryan; Needleman, Daniel

    A variety of proteins can assemble into large polymers as an integral part of their biological function. Studying the biochemistry and biophysics of polymer formation often involves time-resolvable measurements of the amount of polymer. Non-invasive measurements of polymer can be divided into two categories: short (spectroscopy) and large (microscopy) length scale measurements. Microscopy-based estimates of polymer amount are often dependent on spatial non-uniformity of polymer, whereas spectroscopy-based estimates of polymer amount are often based on models that are difficult to test. Here we show how both large and small length scale measurements can be combined to validate the assumptions behind both measurements while incorporating both measurements to make more accurate estimates of polymer amount. We utilize this approach with two-photon microscopy and FRET to measure the amount of tubulin (monomer) in microtubules (polymer) in order to study microtubule nucleation in cell extracts. In addition, this approach may be useful to study a wide variety of polymers, including actin filaments, viruses, lipid membranes, and other protein aggregates.

  7. Additional Saturday rehabilitation improves functional independence and quality of life and reduces length of stay: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many inpatients receive little or no rehabilitation on weekends. Our aim was to determine what effect providing additional Saturday rehabilitation during inpatient rehabilitation had on functional independence, quality of life and length of stay compared to 5 days per week of rehabilitation. Methods This was a multicenter, single-blind (assessors) randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation and 12-month follow-up conducted in two publically funded metropolitan inpatient rehabilitation facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Patients were eligible if they were adults (aged ≥18 years) admitted for rehabilitation for any orthopedic, neurological or other disabling conditions excluding those admitted for slow stream rehabilitation/geriatric evaluation and management. Participants were randomly allocated to usual care Monday to Friday rehabilitation (control) or to Monday to Saturday rehabilitation (intervention). The additional Saturday rehabilitation comprised physiotherapy and occupational therapy. The primary outcomes were functional independence (functional independence measure (FIM); measured on an 18 to 126 point scale), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D utility index; measured on a 0 to 1 scale, and EQ-5D visual analog scale; measured on a 0 to 100 scale), and patient length of stay. Outcome measures were assessed on admission, discharge (primary endpoint), and at 6 and 12 months post discharge. Results We randomly assigned 996 adults (mean (SD) age 74 (13) years) to Monday to Saturday rehabilitation (n = 496) or usual care Monday to Friday rehabilitation (n = 500). Relative to admission scores, intervention group participants had higher functional independence (mean difference (MD) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5 to 4.1, P = 0.01) and health-related quality of life (MD 0.04, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.07, P = 0.009) on discharge and may have had a shorter length of stay by 2 days (95% CI 0 to 4, P = 0.1) when compared to

  8. Kinetically engendered subspinodal length scales in spontaneous dewetting of thin liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotni, Tirumala Rao; Sarkar, Jayati; Khanna, Rajesh

    2014-08-01

    Numerical simulations reveal emergence of subspinodal length scales in spontaneous dewetting of nonslipping unstable thin liquid films on homogeneous substrates if the liquid viscosity decreases with decrease in film thickness.

  9. Desert bird associations with broad-scale boundary length: Applications in avian conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutzwiller, K.J.; Barrow, W.C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    1. Current understanding regarding the effects of boundaries on bird communities has originated largely from studies of forest-non-forest boundaries in mesic systems. To assess whether broad-scale boundary length can affect bird community structure in deserts, and to identify patterns and predictors of species' associations useful in avian conservation, we studied relations between birds and boundary-length variables in Chihuahuan Desert landscapes. Operationally, a boundary was the border between two adjoining land covers, and broad-scale boundary length was the total length of such borders in a large area. 2. Within 2-km radius areas, we measured six boundary-length variables. We analysed bird-boundary relations for 26 species, tested for assemblage-level patterns in species' associations with boundary-length variables, and assessed whether body size, dispersal ability and cowbird-host status were correlates of these associations. 3. The abundances or occurrences of a significant majority of species were associated with boundary-length variables, and similar numbers of species were related positively and negatively to boundary-length variables. 4. Disproportionately small numbers of species were correlated with total boundary length, land-cover boundary length and shrubland-grassland boundary length (variables responsible for large proportions of boundary length). Disproportionately large numbers of species were correlated with roadside boundary length and riparian vegetation-grassland boundary length (variables responsible for small proportions of boundary length). Roadside boundary length was associated (positively and negatively) with the most species. 5. Species' associations with boundary-length variables were not correlated with body size, dispersal ability or cowbird-host status. 6. Synthesis and applications. For the species we studied, conservationists can use the regressions we report as working models to anticipate influences of boundary-length changes

  10. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk <λrk > c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk <νrk > c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  11. Size effects and internal length scales in the elasticity of random fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, Catalin; Berkache, Kamel; Shahsavari, Ali; Ganghoffer, Jean-Francois

    Random fiber networks are the structural element of many biological and man-made materials, including connective tissue, various consumer products and packaging materials. In all cases of practical interest the scale at which the material is used and the scale of the fiber diameter or the mean segment length of the network are separated by several orders of magnitude. This precludes solving boundary value problems defined on the scale of the application while resolving every fiber in the system, and mandates the development of continuum equivalent models. To this end, we study the intrinsic geometric and mechanical length scales of the network and the size effect associated with them. We consider both Cauchy and micropolar continuum models and calibrate them based on the discrete network behavior. We develop a method to predict the characteristic length scales of the problem and the minimum size of a representative element of the network based on network structural parameters and on fiber properties.

  12. Virtual Testing of Large Composite Structures: A Multiple Length/Time-Scale Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigliotti, Luigi; Pinho, Silvestre T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper illustrates a multiple length/time-scale framework for the virtual testing of large composite structures. Such framework hinges upon a Mesh Superposition Technique (MST) for the coupling between areas of the structure modelled at different length-scales and upon an efficient solid-to-shell numerical homogenization which exploits the internal symmetries of Unit Cells (UCs). Using this framework, it is possible to minimize the areas of the structure modelled at the lowest- (and computationally demanding) scales and the computational cost required to calculate the homogenised to be used in the higher-scales subdomains of multiscale FE models, as well as to simulate the mechanical response of different parts of the structure using different solvers, depending on where they are expected to provide the most computationally efficient solution. The relevance and key-aspects of the multiple length/time-scale framework are demonstrated through the analysis of a real-sized aeronautical composite component.

  13. Eringen's small length scale coefficient for buckling of nonlocal Timoshenko beam based on microstructured beam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Challamel, N.; Wang, C. M.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the determination of Eringen's small length scale coefficient e0 for buckling of nonlocal Timoshenko beam from a microstructured beam model. The microstructured beam model is composed of discrete rigid elements (of equal length), which are connected by rotational and shear springs that model the bending and shearing behaviors in a beam. The exact solution of e0 is given for nonlocal Timoshenko beam with small length scale term appearing in the normal stress-strain relation only. It is shown that e0 approaches 1/√12 ≈0.289 which coincides with the one calibrated for nonlocal Euler beams.

  14. Characteristic length scales of the secondary relaxations in glass-forming glycerol.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Mamontov, E; Jalarvo, N; Stingaciu, L; Ohl, M

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the secondary relaxations and their link to the main structural relaxation in glass-forming liquids using glycerol as a model system. We analyze the incoherent neutron scattering signal dependence on the scattering momentum transfer, Q , in order to obtain the characteristic length scale for different secondary relaxations. Such a capability of neutron scattering makes it somewhat unique and highly complementary to the traditional techniques of glass physics, such as light scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy, which provide information on the time scale, but not the length scales, of relaxation processes. The choice of suitable neutron scattering techniques depends on the time scale of the relaxation of interest. We use neutron backscattering to identify the characteristic length scale of 0.7 Å for the faster secondary relaxation described in the framework of the mode-coupling theory (MCT). Neutron spin-echo is employed to probe the slower secondary relaxation of the excess wing type at a low temperature ( ∼ 1.13T g . The characteristic length scale for this excess wing dynamics is approximately 4.7 Å. Besides the Q -dependence, the direct coupling of neutron scattering signal to density fluctuation makes this technique indispensable for measuring the length scale of the microscopic relaxation dynamics. PMID:27021657

  15. Does Scale Length Matter? A Comparison of Nine- versus Five-Point Rating Scales for the Mini-CEX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Educators must often decide how many points to use in a rating scale. No studies have compared interrater reliability for different-length scales, and few have evaluated accuracy. This study sought to evaluate the interrater reliability and accuracy of mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) scores, comparing the traditional mini-CEX…

  16. What can we learn about a dynamical length scale in glasses from measurements of surface mobility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, J. A.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the ability of recent measurements on the size of a liquid-like mobile surface region in glasses to provide direct information on the length scale of enhanced surface mobility. While these quantities are strongly related there are important distinctions that limit the ability of measurements to quantify the actual length over which the surface properties change from surface to bulk-like. In particular, we show that for temperatures near the bulk glass transition, measurements of a liquid-like mobile layer may have very limited predictive power when it comes to determining the temperature dependent length scale of enhanced surface mobility near the glass transition temperature. This places important limitations on the ability of measurements of such enhanced surface dynamics to contribute to discussion on the length scale for dynamical correlation in glassy materials.

  17. Improvement of modal scaling factors using mass additive technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Allemang, Randall J.; Wei, Max L.; Brown, David L.

    1987-01-01

    A general investigation into the improvement of modal scaling factors of an experimental modal model using additive technique is discussed. Data base required by the proposed method consists of an experimental modal model (a set of complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors) of the original structure and a corresponding set of complex eigenvalues of the mass-added structure. Three analytical methods,i.e., first order and second order perturbation methods, and local eigenvalue modification technique, are proposed to predict the improved modal scaling factors. Difficulties encountered in scaling closely spaced modes are discussed. Methods to compute the necessary rotational modal vectors at the mass additive points are also proposed to increase the accuracy of the analytical prediction.

  18. Experimental observation of a fundamental length scale of waves in random media.

    PubMed

    Barkhofen, S; Metzger, J J; Fleischmann, R; Kuhl, U; Stöckmann, H-J

    2013-11-01

    Waves propagating through a weakly scattering random medium show a pronounced branching of the flow accompanied by the formation of freak waves, i.e., extremely intense waves. Theory predicts that this strong fluctuation regime is accompanied by its own fundamental length scale of transport in random media, parametrically different from the mean free path or the localization length. We show numerically how the scintillation index can be used to assess the scaling behavior of the branching length. We report the experimental observation of this scaling using microwave transport experiments in quasi-two-dimensional resonators with randomly distributed weak scatterers. Remarkably, the scaling range extends much further than expected from random caustics statistics. PMID:24237521

  19. Universality of galactic surface densities within one dark halo scale-length.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Gianfranco; Famaey, Benoit; Zhao, HongSheng; Salucci, Paolo

    2009-10-01

    It was recently discovered that the mean dark matter surface density within one dark halo scale-length (the radius within which the volume density profile of dark matter remains approximately flat) is constant across a wide range of galaxies. This scaling relation holds for galaxies spanning a luminosity range of 14 magnitudes and the whole Hubble sequence. Here we report that the luminous matter surface density is also constant within one scale-length of the dark halo. This means that the gravitational acceleration generated by the luminous component in galaxies is always the same at this radius. Although the total luminous-to-dark matter ratio is not constant, within one halo scale-length it is constant. Our finding can be interpreted as a close correlation between the enclosed surface densities of luminous and dark matter in galaxies. PMID:19794488

  20. A crystal plasticity analysis of length-scale dependent internal stresses with image effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we present a stress functions approach to include image effects in continuum crystal plasticity arising from the long-range elastic interactions (LRI) between the GND density and free surfaces. The resulting length-scale dependent internal stresses augment those produced by the GND density variation. The formulation is applied to the case of a long, thin specimen subjected to uniform curvature. The analysis shows that under nominally uniform GND density distribution, internal stresses arise from two sources: (1) GND-GND LRI arising from the finite spatial extent of the uniform GND density field and (2) the LRI between the GND density and free surfaces appearing as image fields. A comparison with experimental results suggests that the length-scale for internal stresses, described as a correlation length-scale, should increase with decreasing specimen thickness. This observation is rationalized by associating the internal length-scale with the average slip-plane spacing, which may increase with decreasing specimen size due to paucity of dislocation sources. Finally, we also discuss the length-scale dependent image stress in terms of the Peach-Koehler force density proposed by Gurtin (2002).

  1. Dramatically growing shear rigidity length scale in the supercooled glass former NiZr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingartner, Nicholas B.; Soklaski, Ryan; Kelton, K. F.; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-06-01

    Finding a suitably growing length scale that increases in tandem with the immense viscous slowdown of supercooled liquids is an open problem associated with the glass transition. Here, we define and demonstrate the existence of one such length scale which may be experimentally verifiable. This is the length scale over which external shear perturbations appreciably penetrate into a liquid as the glass transition is approached. We provide simulation based evidence of its existence, and its growth by at least an order of magnitude, by using molecular dynamics simulations of NiZr2, a good fragile glass former. On the probed timescale, upon approaching the glass transition temperature Tg from above, this length scale ξ is also shown to be consistent with Ising-like scaling, ξ ∝(T/-Tg Tg)-ν , with ν ≈0.7 . Furthermore, we demonstrate the possible scaling of ξ about the temperature at which super-Arrhenius growth of viscosity, and a marked growth of the penetration depth, sets in. Our simulation results suggest that upon supercooling, marked initial increase of the shear penetration depth in fluids may occur in tandem with the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation.

  2. Microstructural characterization of transformable Fe-Mn alloys at different length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, X.; Wang, X.; Zurob, H.S.

    2009-11-15

    The as-annealed and deformed Microstructure of transformable Fe-Mn alloys were, comprehensively, characterized over a wide range of length scales. Differential interference contrast optical metallography, combined with a tinting etching method, was employed to examine the grain morphology. A new specimen preparation method, involving electro-polishing and electro-etching, was developed for scanning electron microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction analysis. This method leads to a very good imaging contrast and thus bridges the length scale gap between optical metallography and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, it enables simultaneous scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analysis which allows correlations among morphology, crystal orientation and phase analysis in the length scale of microns. Transmission electron microscopy investigations were also made to evaluate the thermal and mechanical transformation products as well as defect structures.

  3. Critical length scales and strain localization govern the mechanical performance of multi-layer graphene assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenjie; Ruiz, Luis; Pugno, Nicola M.; Keten, Sinan

    2016-03-01

    Multi-layer graphene assemblies (MLGs) or fibers with a staggered architecture exhibit high toughness and failure strain that surpass those of the constituent single sheets. However, how the architectural parameters such as the sheet overlap length affect these mechanical properties remains unknown due in part to the limitations of mechanical continuum models. By exploring the mechanics of MLG assemblies under tensile deformation using our established coarse-grained molecular modeling framework, we have identified three different critical interlayer overlap lengths controlling the strength, plastic stress, and toughness of MLGs, respectively. The shortest critical length scale Lsc governs the strength of the assembly as predicted by the shear-lag model. The intermediate critical length Lpc is associated with a dynamic frictional process that governs the strain localization propensity of the assembly, and hence the failure strain. The largest critical length scale LTc corresponds to the overlap length necessary to achieve 90% of the maximum theoretical toughness of the material. Our analyses provide the general guidelines for tuning the constitutive properties and toughness of multilayer 2D nanomaterials using elasticity, interlayer adhesion energy and geometry as molecular design parameters.Multi-layer graphene assemblies (MLGs) or fibers with a staggered architecture exhibit high toughness and failure strain that surpass those of the constituent single sheets. However, how the architectural parameters such as the sheet overlap length affect these mechanical properties remains unknown due in part to the limitations of mechanical continuum models. By exploring the mechanics of MLG assemblies under tensile deformation using our established coarse-grained molecular modeling framework, we have identified three different critical interlayer overlap lengths controlling the strength, plastic stress, and toughness of MLGs, respectively. The shortest critical length scale

  4. Surface-immobilized hydrogel patterns on length scales from micrometer to nanometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeira, Assaf

    The present work concentrates on the study of pattern generation and transfer processes of monolayer covered surfaces, deriving from the basic working concept of Constructive Lithography. As an advancement of constructive lithography, we developed a direct, one-step printing (contact electrochemical printing, CEP) and replication (contact electrochemical replication, CER) of hydrophilic organic monolayer patterns surrounded by a hydrophobic monolayer background. In addition, we present a process of transfer of metal between two contacting solid surfaces to predefined monolayer template pattern sites (contact electrochemical transfer, CET). This thesis shows that CEP, CER, and CET may be implemented under a variety of different experimental conditions, regardless of whether the initial "master" pattern was created by a parallel (fast) or serial (slow) patterning process. CEP and CER also posses the unique attractive property that each replica may equally function as master stamp in the fabrication of additional replicas. Moreover, due to a mechanism of selfcorrection patterned surfaces produced these process are often free of defects that the initial "master" stamp may had. We finally show that the electrochemical patterning of OTS monolayers on silicon can be further extended to flexible polymeric substrate materials as well as to a variety of chemical manipulations, allowing the fabrication of tridimensional (3D) composite structures made on the basis of readily available OTS compound. The results obtained suggest that such contact electrochemical processes could be used to rapidly generate multiple copies of surface patterns spanning variable length scales, this basic approach being applicable to rigid as well as flexible substrate materials.

  5. Tests of the gravitational inverse-square law below the dark-energy length scale.

    PubMed

    Kapner, D J; Cook, T S; Adelberger, E G; Gundlach, J H; Heckel, B R; Hoyle, C D; Swanson, H E

    2007-01-12

    We conducted three torsion-balance experiments to test the gravitational inverse-square law at separations between 9.53 mm and 55 microm, probing distances less than the dark-energy length scale lambda(d)=[4 -root](variant Planck's over 2pic/rho(d) approximately 85 microm. We find with 95% confidence that the inverse-square law holds (|alpha|length scale lambda=56 microm and that an extra dimension must have a size R

  6. A grid-independent length scale for large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piomelli, U.; Geurts, B. J.

    2009-11-01

    In most large-eddy simulations a length-scale related to the grid size is used in the subgrid-scale models. Rapid variations of the mesh may cause errors and unphysical results. We propose a new length scale for small-scale turbulence models that is decoupled from the grid, and is determined dynamically from the velocity field itself. It is based on an approximation to a local integral scale used in turbulence models. The resulting eddy-viscosity model has many features of dynamic models (it vanishes near a wall or in laminar flows, and senses the local small scales of the flow) but does not require the use of spatial filtering operations, which are costly and may be difficult to perform on unstructured grids. The model coefficient is determined by a Successive Inverse Polynomial Interpolation procedure (Geurts & Meyers, 2006), in which the coefficient is optimized computationally to minimize a specified cost function. Since this procedure can be performed on coarse grids, it adds little to the computational cost of the method. A set of 4-6 coarse simulations with the new model is required to approximate the optimum with fair accuracy, and the total cost of a simulation is comparable to that of a single simulation with a dynamic model. The new length scale also has the desirable feature that refining the mesh does not result in a DNS, but in a grid-converged LES. Applications to plane channel and mixing layers will be presented.

  7. The Venus ionopause current sheet - Thickness length scale and controlling factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Scarf, F. L.; Brace, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the fluxgate magnetometer, plasma wave experiment and Langmuir probe aboard Pioneer Venus are used to investigate the characteristic thickness length scale of the ionopause current sheet, as well as how this length scale is controlled. Thickness is found to be a bistatic quality, large scales being associated with high field strengths and current sheet altitudes below 300 km, while smaller scales are found with lower field strengths and ionopause altitudes above 300 km. Ion collisions and plasma wave activity contribute to the formation of the broader, low-altitude ionopause current sheets. Although evidence suggests that the wave activity influences the thin ionopause current sheets, a simple model points to the control of the thin ionopause current sheets by ionospheric ion and electron temperatures

  8. Critical length scales and strain localization govern the mechanical performance of multi-layer graphene assemblies.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenjie; Ruiz, Luis; Pugno, Nicola M; Keten, Sinan

    2016-03-17

    Multi-layer graphene assemblies (MLGs) or fibers with a staggered architecture exhibit high toughness and failure strain that surpass those of the constituent single sheets. However, how the architectural parameters such as the sheet overlap length affect these mechanical properties remains unknown due in part to the limitations of mechanical continuum models. By exploring the mechanics of MLG assemblies under tensile deformation using our established coarse-grained molecular modeling framework, we have identified three different critical interlayer overlap lengths controlling the strength, plastic stress, and toughness of MLGs, respectively. The shortest critical length scale L governs the strength of the assembly as predicted by the shear-lag model. The intermediate critical length L is associated with a dynamic frictional process that governs the strain localization propensity of the assembly, and hence the failure strain. The largest critical length scale L corresponds to the overlap length necessary to achieve 90% of the maximum theoretical toughness of the material. Our analyses provide the general guidelines for tuning the constitutive properties and toughness of multilayer 2D nanomaterials using elasticity, interlayer adhesion energy and geometry as molecular design parameters. PMID:26935048

  9. Eating disorder diagnostic scale: additional evidence of reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Stice, Eric; Fisher, Melissa; Martinez, Erin

    2004-03-01

    The authors conducted 4 studies investigating the reliability and validity of the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (HDDS; E. Stice, C. F. Telch, & S. L. Rizvi, 2000), a brief self-report measure for diagnosing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Study 1 found that the HDDS showed criterion validity with interview-based diagnoses, convergent validity with risk factors for eating pathology, and internal consistency. Studies 2 and 3 found that the EDDS was sufficiently sensitive to detect the effects of eating disorder prevention programs. Regarding predictive validity, Studies 3 and 4 found that the EDDS predicted response to a prevention program and future onset of eating pathology and depression. Results provide additional evidence of the reliability and validity of this scale and suggest it may be useful in clinical and research applications. PMID:15023093

  10. Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wendt, K. A.; Forssén, C.; Papenbrock, T.; Sääf, D.

    2015-06-03

    In this paper, we precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the A-body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of A nucleons in the NCSM space to that of A nucleons in a 3(A-1)-dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for 6Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound statesmore » of 4He, 6He, 6Li, and 7Li. Finally, we also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for 10B and 16O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.« less

  11. Nano-scaled graphene platelets with a high length-to-width aspect ratio

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-09-07

    This invention provides a nano-scaled graphene platelet (NGP) having a thickness no greater than 100 nm and a length-to-width ratio no less than 3 (preferably greater than 10). The NGP with a high length-to-width ratio can be prepared by using a method comprising (a) intercalating a carbon fiber or graphite fiber with an intercalate to form an intercalated fiber; (b) exfoliating the intercalated fiber to obtain an exfoliated fiber comprising graphene sheets or flakes; and (c) separating the graphene sheets or flakes to obtain nano-scaled graphene platelets. The invention also provides a nanocomposite material comprising an NGP with a high length-to-width ratio. Such a nanocomposite can become electrically conductive with a small weight fraction of NGPs. Conductive composites are particularly useful for shielding of sensitive electronic equipment against electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI), and for electrostatic charge dissipation.

  12. Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, K. A.; Forssén, C.; Papenbrock, T.; Sääf, D.

    2015-06-01

    We precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the A -body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of A nucleons in the NCSM space to that of A nucleons in a 3 (A -1 ) -dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for 6Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound states of 4He,6He,6Li , and 7Li . We also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for 10B and 16O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.

  13. A modification in the technique of computing average lengths from the scales of fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John

    1953-01-01

    In virtually all the studies that employ scales, otollths, or bony structures to obtain the growth history of fishes, it has been the custom to compute lengths for each individual fish and from these data obtain the average growth rates for any particular group. This method involves a considerable amount of mathematical manipulation, time, and effort. Theoretically it should be possible to obtain the same information simply by averaging the scale measurements for each year of life and the length of the fish employed and computing the average lengths from these data. This method would eliminate all calculations for individual fish. Although Van Oosten (1929: 338) pointed out many years ago the validity of this method of computation, his statements apparently have been overlooked by subsequent investigators.

  14. Studying fractal geometry on submicron length scales by small-angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.; Lin, J.

    1988-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that internal surfaces of porous geological materials, such as rocks and lignite coals, can be described by fractals down to atomic length scales. In this paper, the basic properties of self-similar and self-affine fractals are reviewed and how fractal dimensions can be measured by small-angle scattering experiments are discussed.

  15. Near-wall reconstruction of higher order moments and length scales using the POD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glauser, Mark N.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the near-wall behavior of the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) eigenfunctions derived from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of channel flow is performed. Consistent with previous studies, a low order multi-mode reconstruction of the kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stress suffices. A similar reconstruction of the isotropic dissipation rate is shown to be insufficient, however. An analysis is performed of the multi-mode composition of the dissipation rate in the near-wall region, and it is shown that a significant number of higher-order modes are required to achieve the correct asymptotic consistency in the near-wall region. In an attempt to avoid this problem, a length scale definition is proposed in terms of an integration of the correlation tensor which factors in the presence of the wall. The wall is accounted for by only integrating out to 2y(+) and not over the entire domain. Viscous and inviscid estimates for the dissipation were used in the near-wall and core regions respectively, in conjunction with this length scale representation to obtain an estimate of the dissipation throughout the domain. The resulting dissipation exhibits the proper behavior near the wall and in the inertial layer. A 1 POD mode estimate of the length scale is computed and found to agree quite well with the length scale obtained when the entire correlation tensor is used.

  16. Determining the optimal smoothing length scale for actuator line models of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Luis; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a widely used tool for simulating wind turbines when performing Large-Eddy Simulations. The ALM uses a smearing kernel ηɛ = 1 /ɛ3π 3 / 2 exp (-r2 /ɛ2) , where r is the distance to an actuator point, and ɛ is the smoothing length scale which establishes the kernel width, to project the lift and drag forces onto the grid. In this work, we develop formulations to establish the optimum value of the smoothing length scale ɛ, based on physical arguments, instead of purely numerical constraints. This parameter has a very important role in the ALM, to provide a length scale, which may, for example, be related to the chord of the airfoil being studied. In the proposed approach, we compare features (such as vertical pressure gradient) of a potential flow solution for flow over a lifting surface with features of the solution of the Euler equations with a body force term. The potential flow solution over a lifting surface is used as a general representation of an airfoil. The method presented aims to minimize the difference between these features of the flow fields as a function of the smearing length scale (ɛ), in order to obtain the optimum value. This work is supported by NSF (IGERT and IIA-1243482) and computations use XSEDE resources.

  17. Length scaling of carbon nanotube electric and photo diodes down to sub-50 nm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haitao; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2014-09-10

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for future optoelectronics and logic circuits.1-3 Sub-10 nm channel length CNT transistors have been demonstrated with superb performance.4 Yet, the scaling of CNT p-n diodes or photodiodes, basic elements for most optoelectronic devices, is held back on a scale of micrometers.5-8 Here, we demonstrate that CNT diodes fabricated via a dopant-free technique show good rectifying characteristics and photovoltaic response even when the channel length is scaled to sub-50 nm. By making a trade-off between performance and size, a diode with both channel length and contact width around 100 nm, fabricated on a CNT with a small diameter (d ∼ 1.2 nm), shows a photovoltage of 0.24 V and a fill factor of up to 60%. Study on the dependence of turn-on voltage on scaled channel length reveals transferred charges induced potential barrier at the contact in long channel diodes and the effect of self-adjusting charge distribution. This effect could be utilized for realizing stable and high performance sub-100 nm pitch CNT diodes. As elementary building blocks, such tiny electric and photodiodes could be used in nanoscale rectifiers, photodetectors, light sources, and high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. PMID:25115287

  18. Feasibility analysis of large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, Samantha J.

    The investigation of microgravity fluid dynamics emerged out of necessity with the advent of space exploration. In particular, capillary research took a leap forward in the 1960s with regards to liquid settling and interfacial dynamics. Due to inherent temperature variations in large spacecraft liquid systems, such as fuel tanks, forces develop on gas-liquid interfaces which induce thermocapillary flows. To date, thermocapillary flows have been studied in small, idealized research geometries usually under terrestrial conditions. The 1 to 3m lengths in current and future large tanks and hardware are designed based on hardware rather than research, which leaves spaceflight systems designers without the technological tools to effectively create safe and efficient designs. This thesis focused on the design and feasibility of a large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment, which utilizes temperature variations to drive a flow. The design of a helical channel geometry ranging from 1 to 2.5m in length permits a large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment to fit in a seemingly small International Space Station (ISS) facility such as the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). An initial investigation determined the proposed experiment produced measurable data while adhering to the FIR facility limitations. The computational portion of this thesis focused on the investigation of functional geometries of fuel tanks and depots using Surface Evolver. This work outlines the design of a large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment for the ISS FIR. The results from this work improve the understanding thermocapillary flows and thus improve technological tools for predicting heat and mass transfer in large length-scale thermocapillary flows. Without the tools to understand the thermocapillary flows in these systems, engineers are forced to design larger, heavier vehicles to assure safety and mission success.

  19. Scale and time dependence of serial correlations in word-length time series of written texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    This work considered the quantitative analysis of large written texts. To this end, the text was converted into a time series by taking the sequence of word lengths. The detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was used for characterizing long-range serial correlations of the time series. To this end, the DFA was implemented within a rolling window framework for estimating the variations of correlations, quantified in terms of the scaling exponent, strength along the text. Also, a filtering derivative was used to compute the dependence of the scaling exponent relative to the scale. The analysis was applied to three famous English-written literary narrations; namely, Alice in Wonderland (by Lewis Carrol), Dracula (by Bram Stoker) and Sense and Sensibility (by Jane Austen). The results showed that high correlations appear for scales of about 50-200 words, suggesting that at these scales the text contains the stronger coherence. The scaling exponent was not constant along the text, showing important variations with apparent cyclical behavior. An interesting coincidence between the scaling exponent variations and changes in narrative units (e.g., chapters) was found. This suggests that the scaling exponent obtained from the DFA is able to detect changes in narration structure as expressed by the usage of words of different lengths.

  20. Integrated measurements of acoustical and optical thin layers II: Horizontal length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, Mark A.; Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Robbins, Ian C.; Schroth-Miller, Maddie; Waluk, Chad M.; Zelenke, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The degree of layered organization of planktonic organisms in coastal systems impacts trophic interactions, the vertical availability of nutrients, and many biological rate processes. While there is reasonable characterization of the vertical structure of these phenomena, the extent and horizontal length scale of variation has rarely been addressed. Here we extend the examination of the vertical scale in the first paper of the series to the horizontal scale with combined shipboard acoustic measurements and bio-optic measurements taken on an autonomous underwater vehicle. Measurements were made in Monterey Bay, CA from 2002 to 2008 for the bio-optical parameters and during 2006 for acoustic scattering measurements. The combined data set was used to evaluate the horizontal decorrelation length scales of the bio-optical and acoustic scattering layers themselves. Because biological layers are often decoupled from the physical structure of the water column, assessment of the variance within identified layers was appropriate. This differs from other studies in that physical parameters were not used as a basis for the layer definition. There was a significant diel pattern to the decorrelation length scale for acoustic layers with the more abundant nighttime layers showing less horizontal variability despite their smaller horizontal extent. A significant decrease in the decorrelation length scale was found in bio-optical parameters over six years of study, coinciding with a documented shift in the plankton community. Results highlight the importance of considering plankton behavior and time of day with respect to scale when studying layers, and the challenges of sampling these phenomena.

  1. Length Scales of Local Glass Transition Temperature Gradients Near Soft and Hard Polymer-Polymer Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglay, Roman; Roth, Connie

    Polymer-polymer interfaces are ubiquitous in polymer blends and block copolymers, while opening up another avenue for the study of interfacial perturbations to the local glass transition temperature Tg(z). We have previously reported the full local Tg(z) profile across a glassy-rubbery polymer interface between polystyrene (PS) and poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PnBMA), an 80 K difference in bulk Tg [Baglay & Roth, J Chem Phys 2015, 143, 111101]. By using local fluorescence measurements, we revealed how the Tg(z) profile extends hundreds of nanometers away from the interface showing an asymmetric behavior penetrating deeper into the glassy PS side relative to the composition profile. Here, we extend these measurements to investigate how the local Tg profile in PS varies when in contact with a variety of immiscible polymers whose Tgs vary between +90 K and -80 K relative to the bulk Tg of PS, so-called hard vs. soft confinement. The data reveal that the onset of local Tg deviation from bulk in PS occurs at two distinct length scales, which depend on whether PS is the low Tg component (hard confinement) or the high Tg component (soft confinement). In addition, we explore the influence of finite system size on the range of dynamics by the introduction of periodic boundary conditions, as is commonly encountered in computer simulations or block copolymer systems.

  2. Bounds on fifth forces at the sub-Å length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salumbides, E. J.; Ubachs, W.; Korobov, V. I.

    2014-06-01

    Constraints on a possible fifth-force interaction between hadrons are derived based on an analysis of results from laser precision frequency measurements of antiprotonic helium atoms, both pHe+ and pHe+ species, and from experiments on resonant formation rates of ddμ+-ions in muon-catalyzed fusion processes. A comparison is made between accurate experimental data and first-principles theoretical descriptions of the exotic systems within a quantum electrodynamical framework. The agreement between theory and experiment sets general limits on a possible additional hadron-hadron interaction, written in the form of a Yukawa potential V5(r)=α5exp(-r/λ)/r, with λ representing the characteristic length scale associated with the mass of a hypothetical force-carrying particle via λ=ℏ/(m5c). The laser spectroscopic data of antiprotonic helium set a constraint of α5/αEM<10-8 for λ<1 Å, while the binding energy of the muonic molecular deuterium ion delivers a constraint of α5/αEM∼10-5 for λ<0.05 Å, where αEM represents the strength of the electromagnetic interaction or the fine structure constant.

  3. Intermediate length scale organisation in tin borophosphate glasses: new insights from high field correlation NMR.

    PubMed

    Tricot, G; Saitoh, A; Takebe, H

    2015-11-28

    The structure of tin borophosphate glasses, considered for the development of low temperature sealing glasses or anode materials for Li-batteries, has been analysed at the intermediate length scale by a combination of high field standard and advanced 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The nature and extent of B/P mixing were analysed using the (11)B((31)P) dipolar heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence NMR sequence and the data interpretation allowed (i) detecting the presence and analysing the nature of the B-O-P linkages, (ii) re-interpreting the 1D (31)P spectra and (iii) extracting the proportion of P connected to borate species. Interaction between the different borate species was analysed using the (11)B double quantum-simple quantum experiment to (i) investigate the presence and nature of the B-O-B linkage, (ii) assign the different borate species observed all along the composition line and (iii) monitor the borate network formation. In addition, (119)Sn static NMR was used to investigate the evolution of the chemical environment of the tin polyhedra. Altogether, the set of data allowed determining the structural units constituting the glass network and quantifying the extent of B/P mixing. The structural data were then used to explain the non-linear and unusual evolution of the glass transition temperature. PMID:26186677

  4. Energy-Filtering Transmission Electron Microscopy on the Nanometer Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Grogger, Werner; Varela del Arco, Maria; Ristau, Roger; Schaffer, Bernhard; Hofer, Ferdinand; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2004-01-01

    Energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), developed about ten years ago, is now a routine analysis tool in the characterization of materials. Based on the physical principles of electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS), but with the addition of in-column or post-column energy-filters, it forms images of microstructures using a narrow energy band of inelastically scattered electrons. Post-column energy-filters, developed commercially by Gatan (Gatan Imaging Filter, GIF) in the early 1990s, could be attached to nearly any TEM. Almost at the same time, the introduction of the EM-912 microscope with an integrated {Omega}-filter by Zeiss, made it possible to use in-column filters as well. These two developments made EFTEM possible on an almost routine basis. The operation of these filters is rather straightforward and it is now possible to acquire element specific images within a few minutes. However, the optimal setup for data acquisition, the judicious choice of experimental parameters to solve specific materials science problems and the interpretation of the results can be rather difficult. For best results, a fundamental knowledge of the underlying physics of EELS and a systematic development of the technical details is necessary. In this work, we discuss the current status of EFTEM in terms of spatial resolution and illustrate it with a few technologically relevant applications at the nanometer length scale.

  5. Vertical length scale selection for pancake vortices in strongly stratified viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Billant, Paul

    2004-04-01

    The evolution of pancake dipoles of different aspect ratio is studied in a stratified tank experiment. Two cases are reported here for values of the dipole initial aspect ratio alpha_0 = L_v/L_h (where L_v and L_h are vertical and horizontal length scales, respectively) of alpha_0 = 0.4 (case I) and alpha_0 = 1.2 (case II). In the first case, the usual decay scenario is observed where the dipole diffuses slowly with a growing thickness and a decaying circulation. In case II, we observed a regime where the thickness of the dipole decreases and the circulation in the horizontal mid-plane of the vortices remains constant. We show that this regime where the vertical length scale decreases can be explained by the shedding of two boundary layers at the top and bottom of the dipole that literally peel off vorticity layers. Horizontal advection and vertical diffusion cooperate in this regime and the decrease towards the viscous vertical length scale delta = L_hRe(-1/2) occurs on a time scale alpha_0 Re(1/2) T_A, T_A being the advection time L_h/U. From a scaling analysis of the equations for a stratified viscous fluid in the Boussinesq approximation, two dominant balances depending on the parameter R = ReF_h(2) are discussed, where F_h = U/NL_h is the horizontal Froude number and Re = UL_h/nu is the Reynolds number, U, N and nu being, respectively, the translation speed of the dipole, the Brunt Väisälä frequency and the kinematic viscosity. When R≫ 1 the vertical length scale is determined by buoyancy effects to be of order L_b = U/N. The experiments presented in this paper pertain to the case of small R, where viscous effects govern the selection of the vertical length scale. We show that if initially L_v ≤ delta, the flow diffuses on the vertical (case I), while if L_v ≫ delta (case II), vertically sheared horizontal advection decreases the vertical length scale down to delta. This viscous regime may explain results from experiments and numerical simulations on

  6. Advancing multiscale structural mapping of the brain through fluorescence imaging and analysis across length scales.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, L J; Guo, S M; Murugadoss, K; Bathe, M

    2016-02-01

    Brain function emerges from hierarchical neuronal structure that spans orders of magnitude in length scale, from the nanometre-scale organization of synaptic proteins to the macroscopic wiring of neuronal circuits. Because the synaptic electrochemical signal transmission that drives brain function ultimately relies on the organization of neuronal circuits, understanding brain function requires an understanding of the principles that determine hierarchical neuronal structure in living or intact organisms. Recent advances in fluorescence imaging now enable quantitative characterization of neuronal structure across length scales, ranging from single-molecule localization using super-resolution imaging to whole-brain imaging using light-sheet microscopy on cleared samples. These tools, together with correlative electron microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging at the nanoscopic and macroscopic scales, respectively, now facilitate our ability to probe brain structure across its full range of length scales with cellular and molecular specificity. As these imaging datasets become increasingly accessible to researchers, novel statistical and computational frameworks will play an increasing role in efforts to relate hierarchical brain structure to its function. In this perspective, we discuss several prominent experimental advances that are ushering in a new era of quantitative fluorescence-based imaging in neuroscience along with novel computational and statistical strategies that are helping to distil our understanding of complex brain structure. PMID:26855758

  7. Probing sub-alveolar length scales with hyperpolarized-gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Wilson; Carl, Michael; Mooney, Karen; Mugler, John; Cates, Gordon

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion MRI of the lung is a promising technique for detecting alterations of normal lung microstructure in diseases such as emphysema. The length scale being probed using this technique is related to the time scale over which the helium-3 or xenon-129 diffusion is observed. We have developed new MR pulse sequence methods for making diffusivity measurements at sub-millisecond diffusion times, allowing one to probe smaller length scales than previously possible in-vivo, and opening the possibility of making quantitative measurements of the ratio of surface area to volume (S/V) in the lung airspaces. The quantitative accuracy of simulated and experimental measurements in microstructure phantoms will be discussed, and preliminary in-vivo results will be presented.

  8. Composition dependence of charge and magnetic length scales in mixed valence manganite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2016-07-01

    Mixed-valence manganese oxides present striking properties like the colossal magnetoresistance, metal-insulator transition (MIT) that may result from coexistence of ferromagnetic, metallic and insulating phases. Percolation of such phase coexistence in the vicinity of MIT leads to first-order transition in these manganites. However the length scales over which the electronic and magnetic phases are separated across MIT which appears compelling for bulk systems has been elusive in (La1‑yPry)1‑xCaxMnO3 films. Here we show the in-plane length scale over which charge and magnetism are correlated in (La0.4Pr0.6)1‑xCaxMnO3 films with x = 0.33 and 0.375, across the MIT temperature. We combine electrical transport (resistance) measurements, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), and specular/off-specular x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) measurements as a function of temperature to elucidate relationships between electronic, magnetic and morphological structure of the thin films. Using off-specular XRMS we obtained the charge-charge and charge-magnetic correlation length of these LPCMO films across the MIT. We observed different charge-magnetic correlation length for two films which increases below the MIT. The different correlation length shown by two films may be responsible for different macroscopic (transport and magnetic) properties.

  9. Composition dependence of charge and magnetic length scales in mixed valence manganite thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J W; Fitzsimmons, M R; Jeen, H; Biswas, A

    2016-01-01

    Mixed-valence manganese oxides present striking properties like the colossal magnetoresistance, metal-insulator transition (MIT) that may result from coexistence of ferromagnetic, metallic and insulating phases. Percolation of such phase coexistence in the vicinity of MIT leads to first-order transition in these manganites. However the length scales over which the electronic and magnetic phases are separated across MIT which appears compelling for bulk systems has been elusive in (La1-yPry)1-xCaxMnO3 films. Here we show the in-plane length scale over which charge and magnetism are correlated in (La0.4Pr0.6)1-xCaxMnO3 films with x = 0.33 and 0.375, across the MIT temperature. We combine electrical transport (resistance) measurements, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), and specular/off-specular x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) measurements as a function of temperature to elucidate relationships between electronic, magnetic and morphological structure of the thin films. Using off-specular XRMS we obtained the charge-charge and charge-magnetic correlation length of these LPCMO films across the MIT. We observed different charge-magnetic correlation length for two films which increases below the MIT. The different correlation length shown by two films may be responsible for different macroscopic (transport and magnetic) properties. PMID:27461993

  10. Composition dependence of charge and magnetic length scales in mixed valence manganite thin films

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed-valence manganese oxides present striking properties like the colossal magnetoresistance, metal-insulator transition (MIT) that may result from coexistence of ferromagnetic, metallic and insulating phases. Percolation of such phase coexistence in the vicinity of MIT leads to first-order transition in these manganites. However the length scales over which the electronic and magnetic phases are separated across MIT which appears compelling for bulk systems has been elusive in (La1−yPry)1−xCaxMnO3 films. Here we show the in-plane length scale over which charge and magnetism are correlated in (La0.4Pr0.6)1−xCaxMnO3 films with x = 0.33 and 0.375, across the MIT temperature. We combine electrical transport (resistance) measurements, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), and specular/off-specular x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) measurements as a function of temperature to elucidate relationships between electronic, magnetic and morphological structure of the thin films. Using off-specular XRMS we obtained the charge-charge and charge-magnetic correlation length of these LPCMO films across the MIT. We observed different charge-magnetic correlation length for two films which increases below the MIT. The different correlation length shown by two films may be responsible for different macroscopic (transport and magnetic) properties. PMID:27461993

  11. Natural length scales define the range of applicability of the Richards equation for capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Lehmann, Peter; Assouline, Shmuel

    2015-09-01

    The rapid expansion of remotely sensed spatial information and enhanced computational capabilities fuel raising scientific and public expectations for reliable hydrologic predictions across time and spatial scales. Process-based hydrologic models often rely on the Richards equation (RE) formalism to represent unsaturated flow processes at multiple scales which raises the much debated question: does the underlying physics in the RE formulation apply at large scales of practical interest? The study analyses recent findings from different unsaturated flow processes (soil evaporation, internal redistribution, and capillary flow from point sources) revealing inherent characteristic length scales that delineate the spatial range of applicability of the RE. These length scales reflect the role of intrinsic porous medium properties that shape liquid phase continuity and interplay of forces that drive and resist unsaturated flow. The study revisits some of the key assumptions in the RE and their ramifications for numerical discretization. An intrinsic length scale for hydraulic continuity deduced from pore size distribution has been shown to control soil evaporation dynamics (i.e., stage 1 to stage 2 transition), to provide upper bounds for regional evaporative losses, and governs the dynamics of internal redistribution toward field capacity. For large-scale hydrologic applications, we show that the spatial extent of lateral flow interactions under most natural capillary gradients rarely exceed a few meters. The study provides a framework for guiding numerical and mathematical models for capillary flows across different scales considering the conditions for coexistence of stationarity, hydraulic continuity, and capillary gradients—essential ingredients for physically consistent application of the RE.

  12. Self-Organization on Multiple Length Scales in ``Hairy-Rod''--Coil Block Copolymer Supramolecular Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Hammond, Matthew; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2008-03-01

    A peptide-synthetic hybrid block copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(L-glutamic acid), is demonstrated to form supramolecular complexes with primary alkylamines of varying alkyl chain length (8 to 18 methylene units) in organic solvents via acid-base proton transfer and subsequent ionic bonding. The peptidic block being in the α-helical conformation, these materials behave as coil-``hairy rod'' block copolymers, and show hierarchically self-organized nanostructures in the solid state; X-ray scattering measurements show mesomorphic behavior at the length scales of both the overall block copolymer and the polypeptide-alkylammonium complex.

  13. Scaling analysis of random walks with persistence lengths: Application to self-avoiding walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granzotti, C. R. F.; Martinez, A. S.; da Silva, M. A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We develop an approach for performing scaling analysis of N -step random walks (RWs). The mean square end-to-end distance, , is written in terms of inner persistence lengths (IPLs), which we define by the ensemble averages of dot products between the walker's position and displacement vectors, at the j th step. For RW models statistically invariant under orthogonal transformations, we analytically introduce a relation between and the persistence length, λN, which is defined as the mean end-to-end vector projection in the first step direction. For self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on 2D and 3D lattices we introduce a series expansion for λN, and by Monte Carlo simulations we find that λ∞ is equal to a constant; the scaling corrections for λN can be second- and higher-order corrections to scaling for . Building SAWs with typically 100 steps, we estimate the exponents ν0 and Δ1 from the IPL behavior as function of j . The obtained results are in excellent agreement with those in the literature. This shows that only an ensemble of paths with the same length is sufficient for determining the scaling behavior of , being that the whole information needed is contained in the inner part of the paths.

  14. Measurements of the Influence of Integral Length Scale on Stagnation Region Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. James; Ching, Chang Y.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose was twofold: first, to determine if a length scale existed that would cause the greatest augmentation in stagnation region heat transfer for a given turbulence intensity and second, to develop a prediction tool for stagnation heat transfer in the presence of free stream turbulence. Toward this end, a model with a circular leading edge was fabricated with heat transfer gages in the stagnation region. The model was qualified in a low turbulence wind tunnel by comparing measurements with Frossling's solution for stagnation region heat transfer in a laminar free stream. Five turbulence generating grids were fabricated; four were square mesh, biplane grids made from square bars. Each had identical mesh to bar width ratio but different bar widths. The fifth grid was an array of fine parallel wires that were perpendicular to the axis of the cylindrical leading edge. Turbulence intensity and integral length scale were measured as a function of distance from the grids. Stagnation region heat transfer was measured at various distances downstream of each grid. Data were taken at cylinder Reynolds numbers ranging from 42,000 to 193,000. Turbulence intensities were in the range 1.1 to 15.9 percent while the ratio of integral length scale to cylinder diameter ranged from 0.05 to 0.30. Stagnation region heat transfer augmentation increased with decreasing length scale. An optimum scale was not found. A correlation was developed that fit heat transfer data for the square bar grids to within +4 percent. The data from the array of wires were not predicted by the correlation; augmentation was higher for this case indicating that the degree of isotropy in the turbulent flow field has a large effect on stagnation heat transfer. The data of other researchers are also compared with the correlation.

  15. Physics on the Smallest Scales: An Introduction to Minimal Length Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprenger, Martin; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Many modern theories which try to unify gravity with the Standard Model of particle physics, such as e.g. string theory, propose two key modifications to the commonly known physical theories: the existence of additional space dimensions; the existence of a minimal length distance or maximal resolution. While extra dimensions have received a wide…

  16. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  17. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I foundmore » that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.« less

  18. Mitotic chromosome length scales in response to both cell and nuclear size

    PubMed Central

    Ladouceur, Anne-Marie; Dorn, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular development requires that cells reduce in size as a result of consecutive cell divisions without increase in embryo volume. To maintain cellular integrity, organelle size adapts to cell size throughout development. During mitosis, the longest chromosome arm must be shorter than half of the mitotic spindle for proper chromosome segregation. Using high-resolution time-lapse microscopy of living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we have quantified the relation between cell size and chromosome length. In control embryos, chromosome length scaled to cell size. Artificial reduction of cell size resulted in a shortening of chromosome length, following a trend predicted by measurements from control embryos. Disturbing the RAN (Ras-related nuclear protein)-GTP gradient decoupled nuclear size from cell size and resulted in chromosome scaling to nuclear size rather than cell size; smaller nuclei contained shorter chromosomes independent of cell size. In sum, quantitative analysis relating cell, nuclear, and chromosome size predicts two levels of chromosome length regulation: one through cell size and a second in response to nuclear size. PMID:26033258

  19. Stability of two-dimensional soft quasicrystals in systems with two length scales.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Tong, Jiajun; Zhang, Pingwen; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-10-01

    The relative stability of two-dimensional soft quasicrystals in systems with two length scales is examined using a recently developed projection method, which provides a unified numerical framework to compute the free energy of periodic crystal and quasicrystals. Accurate free energies of numerous ordered phases, including dodecagonal, decagonal, and octagonal quasicrystals, are obtained for a simple model, i.e., the Lifshitz-Petrich free-energy functional, of soft quasicrystals with two length scales. The availability of the free energy allows us to construct phase diagrams of the system, demonstrating that, for the Lifshitz-Petrich model, the dodecagonal and decagonal quasicrystals can become stable phases, whereas the octagonal quasicrystal stays as a metastable phase. PMID:26565220

  20. Structure, dynamics and multiple length-scales in network-forming materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Relationships between the structural and dynamical properties of network-forming materials are investigated. A generic model is utilised for systems of stoichiometry MX2 which are linked in the sense that they can all be usefully considered as constructed from linked MX4 tetrahedra. A single model parameter (the anion polarizability) is varied systematically to control the mean MXM bond angles (and hence the network topologies). The networks evolve from those dominated by corner-sharing units to those dominated by edge-sharing structural motifs. These changes are accompanied by changes in the characteristic length-scales, with the emergence of ordering on intermediate length-scales. Key dynamical properties (the liquid relaxation just above the melting point and the liquid fragility) are studied and their relationship to the underlying static structure analysed.

  1. Phase field modelling of stressed grain growth: Analytical study and the effect of microstructural length scale

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshidian, M.; Rabczuk, T.

    2014-03-15

    We establish the correlation between the diffuse interface and sharp interface descriptions for stressed grain boundary migration by presenting analytical solutions for stressed migration of a circular grain boundary in a bicrystalline phase field domain. The validity and accuracy of the phase field model is investigated by comparing the phase field simulation results against analytical solutions. The phase field model can reproduce precise boundary kinetics and stress evolution provided that a thermodynamically consistent theory and proper expressions for model parameters in terms of physical material properties are employed. Quantitative phase field simulations are then employed to investigate the effect of microstructural length scale on microstructure and texture evolution by stressed grain growth in an elastically deformed polycrystalline aggregate. The simulation results reveal a transitional behaviour from normal to abnormal grain growth by increasing the microstructural length scale.

  2. The role of reactant unmixedness, strain rate, and length scale on premixed combustor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsen, S.; LaRue, J.; Vilayanur, S.; Guillaume, D.

    1995-12-31

    Lean premixed combustion provides a means to reduce pollutant formation and increase combustion efficiency. However, fuel-air mixing is rarely uniform in space and time. This nonuniformity in concentration will lead to relative increases in pollutant formation and decreases in combustion efficiency. The nonuniformity of the concentration at the exit of the premixer has been defined by Lyons (1981) as the ``unmixedness.`` Although turbulence properties such as length scales and strain rate are known to effect unmixedness, the exact relationship is unknown. Evaluating this relationship and the effect of unmixedness in premixed combustion on pollutant formation and combustion efficiency are an important part of the overall goal of US Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program and are among the goals of the program described herein. The information obtained from ATS is intended to help to develop and commercialize gas turbines. The contributions to the program which the University of California (Irvine) Combustion Lab (UCICL) will provide are: (1) establish the relationship of inlet unmixedness, length scales, and mean strain rate to performance, (2) determine the optimal levels of inlet unmixedness, length scales, and mean strain rates to maximize combustor performance, and (3) identify efficient premixing methods for achieving the necessary inlet conditions. The program during this reporting period is focused on developing a means to measure and qualify different degrees of temporal and spatial unmixedness. Laser diagnostic methods for planer unmixedness measurements are being developed and preliminary results are presented herein. These results will be used to (1), aid in the design of experimental premixers, and (2), determine the unmixedness which will be correlated with the emissions of the combustor. This measure of unmixedness coupled with length scale, strain rate and intensity information is required to attain the UCI goals.

  3. Factorial Moments Analyses Show a Characteristic Length Scale in DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, A. K.; Narayana Rao, A. V. S. S.

    2000-02-01

    A unique feature of most of the DNA sequences, found through the factorial moments analysis, is the existence of a characteristic length scale around which the density distribution is nearly Poissonian. Above this point, the DNA sequences, irrespective of their intron contents, show long range correlations with a significant deviation from the Gaussian statistics, while, below this point, the DNA statistics are essentially Gaussian. The famous DNA walk representation is also shown to be a special case of the present analysis.

  4. Energy Dependence and Scaling Property of Localization Length near a Gapped Flat Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li; Tureci, Hakan

    Using a tight-binding model for a one-dimensional Lieb lattice, we show that the localization length near a gapped flat band behaves differently from the typical Urbach tail in a band gap: instead of reducing monotonically as the energy E moves away from the flat band energy Ef, the presence of the flat band causes a nonmonotonic energy dependence of the localization length. This energy dependence follows a scaling property when the energy is within the spread (W) of uniformly distributed diagonal disorder, i.e. the localization length is only a function of (E-Ef)/W. Several other lattices are compared to distinguish the effect of the flat band on the localization length, where we eliminate, shift, or duplicate the flat band, without changing the dispersion relations of other bands. Using the top right element of the Green's matrix, we derive an analytical relation between the density of states and the localization length, which shines light on these properties of the latter, including a summation rule for its inverse. This work is partially supported by NSF under Grant No. DMR-1506987.

  5. Characterization of Deformation and Failure Modes of Ordinary and Auxetic Foams at Different Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Fu-Pen

    Sandwich panels with foam core have gained substantial importance in marine structures for the past several decades. However, designers of ships still lack the confidence in composites when compared to traditional structural materials such as aluminum or steel. As a result, composite structures tend to be overdesigned to provide added safety. While there have been numerous studies, most investigators treat the foam cores as made of homogeneous and isotropic materials. But at the length scale of the order of millimeter or smaller, foam is neither homogeneous nor isotropic. In this paper, we present some results of the characteristics of deformation and failure mechanism of polymer foam composites at different length scales. Central to this investigation is a multiscale digital speckle photography technique whereby we can measure detailed full deformation with spatial resolution ranging from centimeters to micrometers. We first investigate the size effect on the mechanical properties of polyurethane foams with and without nanoparticles, crack tip deformation field at different length scales, and the crack propagation characteristics in a foam. Then we present results for a newly created auxetic PVC foam composite. Auxetic materials have a negative Poisson's ratio rendering them to be more resistant to shear failure, indentation, and impact damages. We describe the manufacturing process of this material and demonstrate its advantageous properties as compared to the original foam.

  6. LPI Thresholds in Longer Scale Length Plasmas Driven by the Nike Laser*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J.; Oh, J.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.; Manka, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive driver for inertial confinement fusion due to its short wavelength (248nm), large bandwidth (1-3 THz), and beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. Experiments with the Nike KrF laser have demonstrated intensity thresholds for laser plasma instabilities (LPI) higher than reported for other high power lasers operating at longer wavelengths (>=351 nm). The previous Nike experiments used short pulses (350 ps FWHM) and small spots (<260 μm FWHM) that created short density scale length plasmas (Ln˜50-70 μm) from planar CH targets and demonstrated the onset of two-plasmon decay (2φp) at laser intensities ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2. This talk will present an overview of the current campaign that uses longer pulses (0.5-4.0 ns) to achieve greater density scale lengths (Ln˜100-200 μm). X-rays, emission near ^1/2φo and ^3/2φo harmonics, and reflected laser light have been monitored for onset of 2φp. The longer density scale lengths will allow better comparison to results from other laser facilities. *Work supported by DoE/NNSA and ONR.

  7. Spacetime with zero point length is two-dimensional at the Planck scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.; Chakraborty, Sumanta; Kothawala, Dawood

    2016-05-01

    It is generally believed that any quantum theory of gravity should have a generic feature—a quantum of length. We provide a physical ansatz to obtain an effective non-local metric tensor starting from the standard metric tensor such that the spacetime acquires a zero-point-length ℓ _0 of the order of the Planck length LP. This prescription leads to several remarkable consequences. In particular, the Euclidean volume V_D(ℓ ,ℓ _0) in a D-dimensional spacetime of a region of size ℓ scales as V_D(ℓ , ℓ _0) ∝ ℓ _0^{D-2} ℓ ^2 when ℓ ˜ ℓ _0, while it reduces to the standard result V_D(ℓ ,ℓ _0) ∝ ℓ ^D at large scales (ℓ ≫ ℓ _0). The appropriately defined effective dimension, D_eff , decreases continuously from D_eff=D (at ℓ ≫ ℓ _0) to D_eff=2 (at ℓ ˜ ℓ _0). This suggests that the physical spacetime becomes essentially 2-dimensional near Planck scale.

  8. Measurement of Two-Plasmon-Decay Dependence on Plasma Density Scale Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberberger, D.

    2013-10-01

    An accurate understanding of the plasma scale-length (Lq) conditions near quarter-critical density is important in quantifying the hot electrons generated by the two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability in long-scale-length plasmas. A novel target platform was developed to vary the density scale length and an innovative diagnostic was implemented to measure the density profiles above 1021 cm-3 where TPD is expected to have the largest growth. A series of experiments was performed using the four UV (351-nm) beams on OMEGA EP that varied the Lq by changing the radius of curvature of the target while maintaining a constant Iq/Tq. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons (fhot) was observed to increase rapidly from 0.005% to 1% by increasing the plasma scale length from 130 μm to 300 μm, corresponding to target diameters of 0.4 mm to 8 mm. A new diagnostic was developed based on refractometry using angular spectral filters to overcome the large phase accumulation in standard interferometric techniques. The angular filter refractometer measures the refraction angles of a 10-ps, 263-nm probe laser after propagating through the plasma. An angular spectral filter is used in the Fourier plane of the probe beam, where the refractive angles of the rays are mapped to space. The edges of the filter are present in the image plane and represent contours of constant refraction angle. These contours are used to infer the phase of the probe beam, which are used to calculate the plasma density profile. In long-scale-length plasmas, the diagnostic currently measures plasma densities from ~1019 cm-3 to ~2 × 1021 cm-3. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. In collaboration with D. H. Edgell, S. X. Hu, S. Ivancic, R. Boni, C. Dorrer, and D. H. Froula (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, U. of Rochester).

  9. Convergence of macroscopic tongue anatomy in ruminants and scaling relationships with body mass or tongue length.

    PubMed

    Meier, Andrea R; Schmuck, Ute; Meloro, Carlo; Clauss, Marcus; Hofmann, Reinhold R

    2016-03-01

    Various morphological measures demonstrate convergent evolution in ruminants with their natural diet, in particular with respect to the browser/grazer dichotomy. Here, we report quantitative macroanatomical measures of the tongue (length and width of specific parts) of 65 ruminant species and relate them to either body mass (BM) or total tongue length, and to the percentage of grass in the natural diet (%grass). Models without and with accounting for the phylogenetic structures of the dataset were used, and models were ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion. Scaling relationships followed geometric principles, that is, length measures scaled with BM to the power of 0.33. Models that used tongue length rather than BM as a body size proxy were consistently ranked better, indicating that using size proxies that are less susceptible to a wider variety of factors (such as BM that fluctuates with body condition) should be attempted whenever possible. The proportion of the freely mobile tongue tip of the total tongue (and hence also the corpus length) was negatively correlated to %grass, in accordance with concepts that the feeding mechanism of browsers requires more mobile tongues. It should be noted that some nonbrowsers, such as cattle, use a peculiar mechanism for grazing that also requires long, mobile tongues, but they appear to be exceptions. A larger corpus width with increasing %grass corresponds to differences in snout shape with broader snouts in grazers. The Torus linguae is longer with increasing %grass, a finding that still warrants functional interpretation. This study shows that tongue measures covary with diet in ruminants. In contrast, the shape of the tongue (straight or "hourglass-shaped" as measured by the ratio of the widest and smallest corpus width) is unrelated to diet and is influenced strongly by phylogeny. PMID:26647882

  10. Physics on the smallest scales: an introduction to minimal length phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, Martin; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-07-01

    Many modern theories which try to unify gravity with the Standard Model of particle physics, such as e.g. string theory, propose two key modifications to the commonly known physical theories: the existence of additional space dimensions; the existence of a minimal length distance or maximal resolution. While extra dimensions have received a wide coverage in publications over the last ten years (especially due to the prediction of micro black hole production at the Large Hadron Collider), the phenomenology of models with a minimal length is still less investigated. In a summer study project for bachelor students in 2010, we have explored some phenomenological implications of the potential existence of a minimal length. In this paper, we review the idea and formalism of a quantum gravity-induced minimal length in the generalized uncertainty principle framework as well as in the coherent state approach to non-commutative geometry. These approaches are effective models which can make model-independent predictions for experiments and are ideally suited for phenomenological studies. Pedagogical examples are provided to grasp the effects of a quantum gravity-induced minimal length. This paper is intended for graduate students and non-specialists interested in quantum gravity.

  11. Evolution of length scales and statistics of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability from direct numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, V K; Zubel, M; Hickel, S; Adams, N A

    2014-12-01

    In this study we present direct numerical simulation results of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) initiated by Ma=1.05,Ma=1.2, and Ma=1.5 shock waves interacting with a perturbed planar interface between air and SF(6). At the lowest shock Mach number the fluids slowly mix due to viscous diffusion, whereas at the highest shock Mach number the mixing zone becomes turbulent. When a minimum critical Taylor microscale Reynolds number is exceeded, an inertial range spectrum emerges, providing further evidence of transition to turbulence. The scales of turbulent motion, i.e., the Kolmogorov length scale, the Taylor microscale, and the integral length, scale are presented. The separation of these scales is found to increase as the Reynolds number is increased. Turbulence statistics, i.e., the probability density functions of the velocity and its longitudinal and transverse derivatives, show a self-similar decay and thus that turbulence evolving from RMI is not fundamentally different from isotropic turbulence, though nominally being only isotropic and homogeneous in the transverse directions. PMID:25615181

  12. Characteristic length scale of the intermediate structure in zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer flow

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, G. I.; Chorin, A. J.; Prostokishin, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    In a turbulent boundary layer over a smooth flat plate with zero pressure gradient, the intermediate structure between the viscous sublayer and the free stream consists of two layers: one adjacent to the viscous sublayer and one adjacent to the free stream. When the level of turbulence in the free stream is low, the boundary between the two layers is sharp, and both have a self-similar structure described by Reynolds-number-dependent scaling (power) laws. This structure introduces two length scales: one—the wall-region thickness—determined by the sharp boundary between the two intermediate layers and the second determined by the condition that the velocity distribution in the first intermediate layer be the one common to all wall-bounded flows and in particular coincide with the scaling law previously determined for pipe flows. Using recent experimental data, we determine both these length scales and show that they are close. Our results disagree with the classical model of the “wake region.” PMID:10760253

  13. Measurements of the effect of free-stream turbulence length scale on heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, R. W.; Oldfield, M. L. G.

    1992-06-01

    The effects of free-stream turbulence scale on heat transfer through a turbulent flat plate boundary layer have been measured. A variety of turbulence spectra were produced by parallel bar grids. The design of these was guided by previous measurements of combustion chamber turbulence. Heat transfer was measured transiently using thin film gauges. The heat transfer to the plate was found to be a function of turbulence integral length scale as well as intensity, and is of relevance to gas turbine heat transfer where airfoils are subject to high turbulence levels from the combustor. Enhancement factors of up to 40 percent were experienced and the results extend conclusions drawn by other workers to higher turbulence levels and scales.

  14. Scaling of the critical free length for progressive unfolding of self-bonded graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Kenny; Cranford, Steven W.

    2014-05-19

    Like filled pasta, rolled or folded graphene can form a large nanocapsule surrounding a hollow interior. Use as a molecular carrier, however, requires understanding of the opening of such vessels. Here, we investigate a monolayer sheet of graphene as a theoretical trial platform for such a nanocapsule. The graphene is bonded to itself via aligned disulfide (S-S) bonds. Through theoretical analysis and atomistic modeling, we probe the critical nonbonded length (free length, L{sub crit}) that induces fracture-like progressive unfolding as a function of folding radius (R{sub i}). We show a clear linear scaling relationship between the length and radius, which can be used to determine the necessary bond density to predict mechanical opening/closing. However, stochastic dissipated energy limits any exact elastic formulation, and the required energy far exceeds the dissociation energy of the S-S bond. We account for the necessary dissipated kinetic energy through a simple scaling factor (Ω), which agrees well with computational results.

  15. Large-scale evidence of dependency length minimization in 37 languages

    PubMed Central

    Futrell, Richard; Mahowald, Kyle; Gibson, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Explaining the variation between human languages and the constraints on that variation is a core goal of linguistics. In the last 20 y, it has been claimed that many striking universals of cross-linguistic variation follow from a hypothetical principle that dependency length—the distance between syntactically related words in a sentence—is minimized. Various models of human sentence production and comprehension predict that long dependencies are difficult or inefficient to process; minimizing dependency length thus enables effective communication without incurring processing difficulty. However, despite widespread application of this idea in theoretical, empirical, and practical work, there is not yet large-scale evidence that dependency length is actually minimized in real utterances across many languages; previous work has focused either on a small number of languages or on limited kinds of data about each language. Here, using parsed corpora of 37 diverse languages, we show that overall dependency lengths for all languages are shorter than conservative random baselines. The results strongly suggest that dependency length minimization is a universal quantitative property of human languages and support explanations of linguistic variation in terms of general properties of human information processing. PMID:26240370

  16. Second-moment closures and length scales for weakly stratified turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, Helmut; Peters, Hartmut

    2000-03-01

    For the special hydrodynamic situation of unbounded homogeneous shear layers, turbulence closure models of Mellor-Yamada type (MY) and k-ɛ type are put into a single canonical form. For this situation we show that conventional versions of MY and various k-ɛ versions lack a proper steady state, and are unable to simulate the most basic properties of stratified shear flows exemplified in, for example, the Rohr et al. [1988] experiments: exponential growth at sufficiently low gradient Richardson number (Rg), exponential decay at sufficiently large Rg, and a steady state in between. Proper choice of one special model parameter readily solves the problems. In the fairly general case of structural equilibrium (state of exponential evolution) in weakly to moderately stratified turbulence (Rg ≲ 0.25), the ratio between the Thorpe scale (or Ellison scale) and the Ozmidov scale varies like the gradient Richardson number (Rg) to the power 3/4, and the ratio of the Thorpe scale to the buoyancy scale varies like Rg1/2. Length scales predicted by our current model are consistent with laboratory measurements of Rohr et al. [1988], with large-eddy numerical simulations of Schumann and Gerz [1995], and with microstructure measurements from the 1987 Tropic Heat Experiment in the equatorial Pacific by Peters et al. [1995].

  17. Condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces: the role of local energy barriers and structure length scale.

    PubMed

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Thompson, Carl V; Wang, Evelyn N

    2012-10-01

    Water condensation on surfaces is a ubiquitous phase-change process that plays a crucial role in nature and across a range of industrial applications, including energy production, desalination, and environmental control. Nanotechnology has created opportunities to manipulate this process through the precise control of surface structure and chemistry, thus enabling the biomimicry of natural surfaces, such as the leaves of certain plant species, to realize superhydrophobic condensation. However, this "bottom-up" wetting process is inadequately described using typical global thermodynamic analyses and remains poorly understood. In this work, we elucidate, through imaging experiments on surfaces with structure length scales ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm and wetting physics, how local energy barriers are essential to understand non-equilibrium condensed droplet morphologies and demonstrate that overcoming these barriers via nucleation-mediated droplet-droplet interactions leads to the emergence of wetting states not predicted by scale-invariant global thermodynamic analysis. This mechanistic understanding offers insight into the role of surface-structure length scale, provides a quantitative basis for designing surfaces optimized for condensation in engineered systems, and promises insight into ice formation on surfaces that initiates with the condensation of subcooled water. PMID:22931378

  18. Characteristic length scale of input data in distributed models: implications for modeling grain size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artan, Guleid A.; Neale, C. M. U.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model response. The semi-variogram and the characteristic length calculated from the spatial autocorrelation were used to determine the scale of variability of the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data. The data were collected from two hillsides at Upper Sheep Creek, a sub-basin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, in southwest Idaho. The data were analyzed in terms of the semivariance and the integral of the autocorrelation. The minimum characteristic length associated with the variability of the data used in the analysis was 15 m. Simulated and observed radiometric surface temperature fields at different spatial resolutions were compared. The correlation between agreement simulated and observed fields sharply declined after a 10×10 m2 modeling grid size. A modeling grid size of about 10×10 m2 was deemed to be the best compromise to achieve: (a) reduction of computation time and the size of the support data; and (b) a reproduction of the observed radiometric surface temperature.

  19. Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

    2004-03-01

    A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the

  20. Brief communication: Possible explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Allen G.

    2016-04-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. Application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law may allow interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  1. Explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. The application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law allows interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  2. Atmospheric lateral and longitudinal turbulent length scales (measured at 600 to 800 meters above grade level)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    NASA's Airborne Doppler Lidar System has been used to obtain a detailed 'instantaneous' mapping of horizontal spatial wind fields at 600-800 m elevations on the east side of the San Gorgonio Pass in California, in the form of checkerboard-fashion horizontal wind vectors spaced at 300 m intervals along and normal to the flight path. Spatial autocorrelations for the lateral and longitudinal components are ensemble-averaged, and integral turbulent length scales are computed for the wind fields' longitudinal and lateral directions. The flow in the region studied does not appear to be isotropic.

  3. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  4. KL4 Peptide Induces Reversible Collapse Structures on Multiple Length Scales in Model Lung Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Michael Henderson, J.; Walther, Frans J.; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Notter, Robert H.; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of KL4, a 21-residue amphipathic peptide approximating the overall ratio of positively charged to hydrophobic amino acids in surfactant protein B (SP-B), on the structure and collapse of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol monolayers. As reported in prior work on model lung surfactant phospholipid films containing SP-B and SP-B peptides, our experiments show that KL4 improves surfactant film reversibility during repetitive interfacial cycling in association with the formation of reversible collapse structures on multiple length scales. Emphasis is on exploring a general mechanistic connection between peptide-induced nano- and microscale reversible collapse structures (silos and folds). PMID:22208194

  5. Extreme-ultraviolet radiation transport in small scale length laser-produced tin plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequoia, Kevin Lamar Williams

    The majority of the studies on laser-produced plasmas as an efficient extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light source have focused on relatively large plasmas produced at large laser facilities. However, to develop a commercially viable light source for EUV lithography, much smaller lasers and hence much smaller plasmas must be employed. Smaller plasmas behave quite differently than large plasmas in that the temperature and density are less uniform, and lateral expansion is more important. These differences affect the energy transport and, in particular, the radiation transport. This work studies the EUV radiation transport in small scale length tin plasmas, focusing on the effects of target geometry and laser pulse duration. Both planar and spherical tin targets were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 microm. Conversion efficiency of laser light to 13.5 nm radiation (in-band), EUV emission spectrum, two-dimensional in-band emission profile, and the plasma electron density were measured experimentally. These measurements provide insight into where the laser is absorbed, where the in-band emission is produced, and how the radiation is transmitted. The plasma evolution in these experiments were simulated with a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code, while the radiation transport and atomic kinetics where modeled with a collisional radiative code. Additional experiments were conducted using planar targets where the pulse duration was varied from 0.5 ns to 16 ns to understand the effects of laser pulse duration. It was found that the optimum plasma temperature for efficient generation and transmission of in-band emission is 20 eV. This is lower than the previously reported optimum temperature of 30 eV. The use of a 1.064 microm heating laser results in overheating of the plasma in a region that is much too dense to transmit the in-band emission. This overheating is necessary for the plasma to reach the optimum temperature in the region where the density is

  6. Hybrid coarse-graining approach for lipid bilayers at large length and time scales.

    PubMed

    Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2009-04-01

    A hybrid analytic-systematic (HAS) coarse-grained (CG) lipid model is developed and employed in a large-scale simulation of a liposome. The methodology is termed hybrid analytic-systematic because one component of the interaction between CG sites is variationally determined from the multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) methodology, whereas the remaining component utilizes an analytic potential. The systematic component models the in-plane center-of-mass interaction of the lipids as determined from an atomistic-level MD simulation of a bilayer. The analytic component is based on the well-known Gay-Berne ellipsoid-of-revolution liquid-crystal model and is designed to model the highly anisotropic interactions at a highly coarse-grained level. The HAS CG approach is the first step in an "aggressive" CG methodology designed to model multicomponent biological membranes at very large length and time scales. PMID:19281167

  7. Reynolds Number Effects on Boundary Layer Streamwise Velocity Statistics and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, M.; Atzet, I.; Klewicki, J.

    2003-11-01

    Well-resolved streamwise velocity data were recently obtained in a turbulent boundary layer at R_θ ≈ 5 × 10^6. Hot-wire anemometry experiments were performed on the salt playa of Utah's western desert under conditions of near-neutral thermal stability, as verified by the Monin-Obukhov length. A distinction of the present data is the use of 20 simultaneously sampled hot-wires to cover a wall normal distance (inner normalized) spanning 5≤ y^+ ≤ 10^4. Because of inherent temporal variations in the atmosphere, simultaneous data are needed to clarify trends in the statistical profiles. The present atmospheric results are compared with wind tunnel data acquired in the range 2500 ≤ R_θ ≤ 1.5×10^4. In all cases, the inner normalized wire length is less than 10. The inner normalized mean profile at high R_θ exhibit a logarithmic region with an inverse slope less than the typical value of κ=0.41, observed at lower R_θ. Evidence for a secondary peak in the inner normalized rms profile is observed near y^+=550 at R_θ ≈ 5 × 10^6. The variation of intermediate length and time scales (Taylor microscales) as a function of Reynolds number and distance from the wall is also presented.

  8. Relations between overturning length scales at the Spanish planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Pilar; Cano, José L.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the behavior of the maximum Thorpe displacement (dT)max and the Thorpe scale LTat the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), extending previous research with new data and improving our studies related to the novel use of the Thorpe method applied to ABL. The maximum Thorpe displacements vary between -900 m and 950 m for the different field campaigns. The maximum Thorpe displacement is always greater under convective conditions than under stable ones, independently of its sign. The Thorpe scale LT ranges between 0.2 m and 680 m for the different data sets which cover different stratified mixing conditions (turbulence shear-driven and convective regions). The Thorpe scale does not exceed several tens of meters under stable and neutral stratification conditions related to instantaneous density gradients. In contrast, under convective conditions, Thorpe scales are relatively large, they exceed hundreds of meters which may be related to convective bursts. We analyze the relation between (dT)max and the Thorpe scale LT and we deduce that they verify a power law. We also deduce that there is a difference in exponents of the power laws for convective conditions and shear-driven conditions. These different power laws could identify overturns created under different mechanisms. References Cuxart, J., Yagüe, C., Morales, G., Terradellas, E., Orbe, J., Calvo, J., Fernández, A., Soler, M., Infante, C., Buenestado, P., Espinalt, Joergensen, H., Rees, J., Vilà, J., Redondo, J., Cantalapiedra, I. and Conangla, L.: Stable atmospheric boundary-layer experiment in Spain (Sables 98). A report, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 96, 337-370, 2000. Dillon, T. M.: Vertical Overturns: A Comparison of Thorpe and Ozmidov Length Scales, J. Geophys. Res., 87(C12), 9601-9613, 1982. Itsweire, E. C.: Measurements of vertical overturns in stably stratified turbulent flow, Phys. Fluids, 27(4), 764-766, 1984. Kitade, Y., Matsuyama, M. and Yoshida, J.: Distribution of overturn induced by internal

  9. Additional Results of Glaze Icing Scaling in SLD Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2016-01-01

    New guidance of acceptable means of compliance with the super-cooled large drops (SLD) conditions has been issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in its Advisory Circular AC 25-28 in November 2014. The Part 25, Appendix O is developed to define a representative icing environment for super-cooled large drops. Super-cooled large drops, which include freezing drizzle and freezing rain conditions, are not included in Appendix C. This paper reports results from recent glaze icing scaling tests conducted in NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) to evaluate how well the scaling methods recommended for Appendix C conditions might apply to SLD conditions. The models were straight NACA 0012 wing sections. The reference model had a chord of 72 in. and the scale model had a chord of 21 in. Reference tests were run with airspeeds of 100 and 130.3 kn and with MVD's of 85 and 170 micron. Two scaling methods were considered. One was based on the modified Ruff method with scale velocity found by matching the Weber number WeL. The other was proposed and developed by Feo specifically for strong glaze icing conditions, in which the scale liquid water content and velocity were found by matching reference and scale values of the nondimensional water-film thickness expression and the film Weber number Wef. All tests were conducted at 0 deg AOA. Results will be presented for stagnation freezing fractions of 0.2 and 0.3. For nondimensional reference and scale ice shape comparison, a new post-scanning ice shape digitization procedure was developed for extracting 2-D ice shape profiles at any selected span-wise location from the high fidelity 3-D scanned ice shapes obtained in the IRT.

  10. Identifying and characterising the different structural length scales in liquids and glasses: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Philip S; Zeidler, Anita

    2013-10-01

    The structure of several network-forming liquids and glasses is considered, where a focus is placed on the detailed information that is made available by using the method of neutron diffraction with isotope substitution (NDIS). In the case of binary network glass-forming materials with the MX2 stoichiometry (e.g. GeO2, GeSe2, ZnCl2), two different length scales at distances greater than the nearest-neighbour distance manifest themselves by peaks in the measured diffraction patterns. The network properties are influenced by a competition between the ordering on these "intermediate" and "extended" length scales, which can be manipulated by changing the chemical identity of the atomic constituents or by varying state parameters such as the temperature and pressure. The extended-range ordering, which describes the decay of the pair-correlation functions at large-r, can be represented by making a pole analysis of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, an approach that can also be used to describe the large-r behaviour of the pair-correlation functions for liquid and amorphous metals where packing constraints are important. The first applications are then described of the NDIS method to measure the detailed structure of aerodynamically-levitated laser-heated droplets of "fragile" glass-forming liquid oxides (CaAl2O4 and CaSiO3) at high-temperatures (~2000 K) and the structure of a "strong" network-forming glass (GeO2) under pressures ranging from ambient to ~8 GPa. The high-temperature experiments show structural changes on multiple length scales when the oxides are vitrified. The high-pressure experiment offers insight into the density-driven mechanisms of network collapse in GeO2 glass, and parallels are drawn with the high-pressure behaviour of silica glass. Finally, the hydrogen-bonded network of water is considered, where the first application of the method of oxygen NDIS is used to measure the structures of light versus heavy water and a difference of approximately equal

  11. Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C

    2011-01-18

    Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

  12. New Large Length Scale Capillary Fluidics Investigations Using a Drop Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weislogel, Mark; Wollman, Andrew; Wiles, Brentley

    2013-11-01

    Drop Towers provide brief terrestrial access to microgravity environments. When exploited for capillary fluidics research, the drop tower allows for unique control over an experiment's initial conditions which can enable, enhance, or otherwise improve methods to study capillary flows and phenomena at significantly larger length scales than can be achieved on the ground. In this work a new, highly accessible, 2.1 s tower is introduced for such research. Enabled in part by simple macro-fabrication methods, a variety of new demonstrative experiments are presented for purely capillarity-driven flows leading to droplet ejections, bubble ingestions, sinking flows, particle injections, and multiphase flows. Due to the repeatability of the passive flows, each experiment may be used in turn as a means to study other phenomena and forward-looking research themes are suggested that include large length scale passive phase separations, heat and mass transfer, droplet dynamics, combustion, and more. NASA NNX09AP66A Glenn Research Center, NASA NNX10AK68H Oregon Space Grant Consortium.

  13. Effects of the continuous-spontaneous-localization model in the regime of large localization length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedingham, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    Working in the limit in which the localization length scale is large compared to other relevant length scales, we examine three experimental situations with the continuous-spontaneous-localization (CSL) model, a well-motivated alternative to standard quantum theory. These are the two-slit experiment, scattering from a potential barrier, and release of two noninteracting particles simultaneously from a potential trap. In each case we calculate the diagonal part of the time-evolved density matrix giving a probability density function over final measured states. The case of the two-slit experiment is already well understood and we reproduce some known conditions for observing loss of interference. The other examples have not previously been examined in the context of CSL. For scattering from a potential barrier we find that the probability of reflection is unchanged by CSL; however, the momentum state is spread in a characteristic way. For the case of two particles released simultaneously from a trap we find that it is more likely that the particles diffuse in the same direction than would happen if the particles behaved independently. We assess the possibility of observing these effects.

  14. Testing fault displacement-length scaling relations through analogue modeling in an extensional setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, L.; Basili, R.; Burrato, P.; Kastelic, V.; Toscani, G.; Seno, S.; Valensise, G.

    2013-12-01

    The scaling relation between displacement and length of faults plays a crucial role in understanding the growth history of individual faults and their possible linkage and reactivation in future ruptures. Displacement-length relations are commonly based on empirical data. The measurement of fault geometric properties, however, is generally affected by large scattering due not only to intrinsic difficulties of making observations in natural cases (outcrop availability, seismic profiles), but also to the variety of geological factors that may affect the rupture patterns. These can be the interaction between the present-day tectonic regime and an inherited structural fabric, or that between a master fault at depth and shallow structural features. As an alternative to field observations, analogue modeling provides an opportunity to investigate the faulting processes in a controlled environment. During the last decade, the ability of scaled models to properly reproduce such geological processes has greatly improved thanks to the introduction of new materials (e.g. wet kaolin) suitable for reproducing brittle deformation in the upper crust and hi-tech monitoring systems (e.g. laser scanner, particle image velocimetry) with the ability of capturing structural details and performing accurate measurements. We use a dedicated apparatus with such properties to gain insights on the evolution of extensional faults through a suite of experiments which includes (a) setups in homogeneous material to test our ability in meeting general criteria related with fault displacement-length parameters; and (b) increasing complexities attained by inserting various pre-existing fault patterns to analyze how shallow mechanical discontinuities affect our ability to characterize a major fault at depth. Our results show that pre-existing faults can either halt or favor fault development and growth depending on their location/orientation with respect to the applied stress field and suggest the

  15. Simulation of driven self assembly of complex polymeric systems across multiple length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Juan

    2007-03-01

    The self assembly of macromolecular systems is often driven or facilitated by the application of external fields, including flow, voltage, or confinement. The structures that arise when external fields are applied often depend on the history of the sample, and it is therefore important to develop theoretical and computational methods capable of describing the order formation process across multiple length and time scales. Over the past several years we have developed several new classes of multiscale modeling techniques for study of the structure and properties of polymeric materials under external fields, including confinement or flows. For systems at equilibrium, these systems permit precise calculation of the free energy. For systems beyond equilibrium, these methods include the effects of fluctuating hydrodynamic interactions (for dilute and semidilute systems) and the effects of constraining molecules (for concentrated melts). These models and methods can be used to investigate the equilibrium structure and relaxation of a variety of fluids, including solutions of biological macromolecules. The usefulness and limitations of our proposed approach will be discussed in the context of three applications. The first application is concerned with the elongation and presentation of long DNA molecules in nanofluidic channels. A multiscale model, that includes fluctuating hydrodynamic interactions, has been used to design a gene mapping device and to interpret experimental data pertaining to the structure and dynamics of confined chromosome-length DNA. The second application is concerned with the study of liquid-crystal based biosensors. A multiscale model has been used to design a liquid-crystal based device in which nanoscale particles suspended in a liquid crystal self assemble into highly regular structures, including chains, upon exposure to proteins or virions. The third application focuses on the formation of ordered block copolymer structures on nanopatterned

  16. Correlation Length Scales of Isotopic Variations Along Mid-Ocean Ridges and Upper Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. W.; Spera, F. J.

    2003-12-01

    How isotopic variations in basalts erupted at the Earth's surface are linked to convective mixing in the underlying mantle is a central problem in geodynamics. The objective of this study is to quantify the length scales of upper mantle heterogeneity through spatial statistical analysis of MORB. We define a characteristic length scale, the scale of segregation L, computed from the spatial self-correlations for 3He/4He, 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd and 206,207,208Pb/204Pb in "zero age" lavas from mid-ocean ridges. Our working hypothesis is that small scale convection in the upper mantle controls dispersion of geochemical tracers. Differences in L between ocean basins may then be quantitatively related to unsteadiness in this convection, due to thickening of the lithosphere, plume impingement, or lateral temperature/compositional differences between continental and oceanic lithosphere induced by batholith formation. The correlation coefficient R, and the separation distance r, are calculated for every i,j pair of points. Ri,j is given by the product of the deviations in isotope composition from the population mean, normalized to the population variance, and R(r) is computed as an ensemble average. The total number of point pairs (N) for n sample locations is given by N=n(n-1)/2. For the global MORB data set (n=1265 and 735 for Sr and He, respectively), N exceeds 105 (799480 and 269745, respectively). A value of R(r) close to 1 indicates that an isotope ratio above (or below) the population average is likely to be associated with an above (or below) average value at a distance r away. A value of R(r) close to zero implies a random relationship, and a value close to -1 implies an anti-correlation. R(r) approaches unity at small r by definition, as points close together are from the same "clump" of mantle. The value of r at which R first goes to zero is denoted as r*. On a diagram of R(r) vs. r (the correlogram), the integral of R(r) from r=0 to r=r* is the scale of

  17. A simulation procedure for light-matter interaction at different length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiner, Claude; Nemitz, Wolfgang; Wenzl, Franz P.; Hartmann, Paul; Hohenester, Ulrich; Sommer, Christian

    2012-06-01

    The development of photonic devices with tailor-made optical properties requires the control and the manipulation of light propagation within structures of different length scales, ranging from sub-wavelength to macroscopic dimensions. However, optical simulation at different length scales necessitates the combination of different simulation methods, which have to account properly for various effects such as polarization, interference, or diffraction: At dimensions much larger than the wavelength of light common ray-tracing (RT) techniques are conveniently employed, while in the subwavelength regime more sophisticated approaches, like the so-called finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, are needed. Describing light propagation both in the sub-wavelength regime as well as at macroscopic length scales can only be achieved by bridging between these two approaches. In this contribution we present on the one hand a study aiming at the determination of the intermediate size range for which both simulation methods are applicable and on the other hand an approach for combining classical ray-tracing with FDTD simulation in order to handle optical elements of large sizes. Generally, the interface between RT and FDTD is restricted to very small sample areas. Nevertheless, many real world optical devices use e.g. diffractive optical elements (DOEs) having comparably large areas in the order of 1-2 mm² (or larger). Therefore, one has to develop strategies in order to handle the data transfer between FDTD and RT also for structures of such larger size scales. Our approach in this regard is based on the symmetries of the structures. In this way support programs like e.g. MATLAB can be used to replicate the near-field of a single structure and to merge it to the near-field of a larger area. Comparisons of RT and FDTD simulations in the far-field can be used to validate the physical correctness of this approach. With such procedure it is possible to optimize light

  18. A stochastic immersed boundary method for fluid-structure dynamics at microscopic length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Atzberger, Paul J. . E-mail: atzberg@math.ucsb.edu; Kramer, Peter R.; Peskin, Charles S.

    2007-06-10

    In modeling many biological systems, it is important to take into account flexible structures which interact with a fluid. At the length scale of cells and cell organelles, thermal fluctuations of the aqueous environment become significant. In this work, it is shown how the immersed boundary method of [C.S. Peskin, The immersed boundary method, Acta Num. 11 (2002) 1-39.] for modeling flexible structures immersed in a fluid can be extended to include thermal fluctuations. A stochastic numerical method is proposed which deals with stiffness in the system of equations by handling systematically the statistical contributions of the fastest dynamics of the fluid and immersed structures over long time steps. An important feature of the numerical method is that time steps can be taken in which the degrees of freedom of the fluid are completely underresolved, partially resolved, or fully resolved while retaining a good level of accuracy. Error estimates in each of these regimes are given for the method. A number of theoretical and numerical checks are furthermore performed to assess its physical fidelity. For a conservative force, the method is found to simulate particles with the correct Boltzmann equilibrium statistics. It is shown in three dimensions that the diffusion of immersed particles simulated with the method has the correct scaling in the physical parameters. The method is also shown to reproduce a well-known hydrodynamic effect of a Brownian particle in which the velocity autocorrelation function exhibits an algebraic ({tau} {sup -3/2}) decay for long times [B.J. Alder, T.E. Wainwright, Decay of the Velocity Autocorrelation Function, Phys. Rev. A 1(1) (1970) 18-21]. A few preliminary results are presented for more complex systems which demonstrate some potential application areas of the method. Specifically, we present simulations of osmotic effects of molecular dimers, worm-like chain polymer knots, and a basic model of a molecular motor immersed in fluid

  19. Integral Length Scale Effects on JP-8 Spray Penetration and Ignition at Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurman, Matthew; Tess, Michael; Bravo, Luis; Kweon, Chol-Bum

    2014-11-01

    The effect of the integral length scale on global spray diagnostics was examined for non-reacting and reacting JP-8 sprays. The scales were set by varying the nominal nozzle diameter from 90 μm, 100 μm, and 147 μm, resulting in the ranges of Re (6.7 × 104 - 9.9 × 104) and We (1.3 × 106 - 1.7 × 106) setting the spray in the fully atomization mode. A high temperature (900-1000 K) high pressure (60-100 bar) flow through chamber was used to conduct experiments at relevant compression ignition engine operating conditions. Each fuel injector was characterized with an injection analyzer to determine the rate of injection and injected fuel mass. High speed near simultaneous Mie and schlieren images were acquired to determine the liquid and vapor penetration lengths of the non-reacting spray. Ignition delay experiments were conducted by measuring the start of formation of OH radicals. A numerical investigation was also carried out to provide additional insights into the behavior of each spray with the specified conditions. The quantitative results presented will aid in the overall advancement of fuel injector designs and ultimately lead to optimized engines.

  20. Development of a scanning tunneling potentiometry system for measurement of electronic transport at short length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozler, Michael

    It is clear that complete understanding of macroscopic properties of materials is impossible without a thorough knowledge of behavior at the smallest length scales. While the past 25 years have witnessed major advances in a variety of techniques that probe the nanoscale properties of matter, electrical transport measurements -- the heart of condensed matter research -- have lagged behind, never progressing beyond bulk measurements. This thesis describes a scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) system developed to simultaneously map the transport-related electrochemical potential distribution of a biased sample along with its surface topography, extending electronic transport measurements to the nanoscale. Combining a novel sample biasing technique with a continuous current-nulling feedback scheme pushes the noise performance of the measurement to its fundamental limit - the Johnson noise of the STM tunnel junction. The resulting 130 nV voltage sensitivity allows us to spatially resolve local potentials at scales down to 2 nm, while maintaining atomic scale STM imaging, all at scan sizes of up to 15 microns. A mm-range two-dimensional coarse positioning stage and the ability to operate from liquid helium to room temperature with a fast turn-around time greatly expand the versatility of the instrument. Use of carefully selected model materials, combined with excellent topographic and voltage resolution has allowed us to distinguish measurement artifacts caused by surface roughness from true potentiometric features, a major problem in previous STP measurements. The measurements demonstrate that STP can produce physically meaningful results for homogeneous transport as well as non-uniform conduction dominated by material microstructures. Measurements of several physically interesting materials systems are presented as well, revealing new behaviors at the smallest length sales. The results establish scanning tunneling potentiometry as a useful tool for physics and

  1. Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale: Additional Evidence of Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Fisher, Melissa; Martinez, Erin

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted 4 studies investigating the reliability and validity of the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (HDDS; E. Stice, C. F. Telch, & S. L. Rizvi, 2000), a brief self-report measure for diagnosing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Study 1 found that the HDDS showed criterion validity with interview-based…

  2. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  3. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  4. The role of macroscopic hardening and individual length-scales on crack tip stress elevation from phenomenological strain gradient plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komaragiri, Uday; Agnew, Sean R.; Gangloff, Richard P.; Begley, Matthew R.

    This paper quantifies the effect of strain gradient plasticity (SGP) on crack tip stress elevation for a broad range of applied loading conditions and constitutive model parameters, including both macroscopic hardening parameters and individual material length-scales controlling gradient effects. Finite element simulations incorporating the Fleck-Hutchinson SGP theory are presented for an asymptotically sharp stationary crack. Results identify fundamental scaling relationships describing (i) the physical length-scales over which strain gradients are prominent, and (ii) the degree of stress elevation over conventional Hutchinson-Rice-Rosengren (HRR) fields. Results illustrate that the three length-scale theory predicts much larger SGP effects than the single length-scale theory. Critically, the first length-scale parameter dominates SGP stress elevation: this suggests that SGP effects in fracture can be predicted using the length-scales extracted from nanoindentation, which exhibits similar behavior. Transitional loading/material parameters are identified that establish regimes of SGP relevance: this provides the foundation for the rational application of SGP when developing new micromechanical models of crack tip damage mechanisms and associated subcritical crack propagation behavior in structural alloys.

  5. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. But how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer ‘how far is far enough,’ we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25-2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  6. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    SciTech Connect

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-02

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. However, how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer 'how far is far enough,' we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25–2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  7. Temperature and length scale dependence of solvophobic solvation in a single-site water-like liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdle, John R.; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Rossky, Peter J.

    2013-02-01

    The temperature and length scale dependence of solvation properties of spherical hard solvophobic solutes is investigated in the Jagla liquid, a simple liquid that consists of particles interacting via a spherically symmetric potential combining a hard core repulsion and a longer ranged soft core interaction, yet exhibits water-like anomalies. The results are compared with equivalent calculations for a model of a typical atomic liquid, the Lennard-Jones potential, and with predictions for hydrophobic solvation in water using the cavity equation of state and the extended simple point charge model. We find that the Jagla liquid captures the qualitative thermodynamic behavior of hydrophobic hydration as a function of temperature for both small and large length scale solutes. In particular, for both the Jagla liquid and water, we observe temperature-dependent enthalpy and entropy of solvation for all solute sizes as well as a negative solvation entropy for sufficiently small solutes at low temperature. This feature of water-like solvation is distinct from the strictly positive and temperature independent enthalpy and entropy of cavity solvation observed in the Lennard-Jones fluid. The results suggest that, compared to a simple liquid, it is the presence of a second thermally accessible repulsive energy scale, acting to increasingly favor larger separations for decreasing temperature, that is the essential characteristic of a liquid that favors low-density, open structures, and models hydrophobic hydration, and that it is the presence of this second energy scale that leads to the similarity in the behavior of water and the Jagla liquid. In addition, the Jagla liquid dewets surfaces of large radii of curvature less readily than the Lennard-Jones liquid, reflecting a greater flexibility or elasticity in the Jagla liquid structure than that of a typical liquid, a behavior also similar to that of water's hydrogen bonding network. The implications of the temperature and

  8. The P/Halley: Spatial distribution and scale lengths for C2, CN, NH2, and H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Uwe; Combi, Michael; Disanti, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    From P/Halley long slit spectroscopic exposures on 12 dates, extending from Oct. 1985 to May 1986, spatial profiles were obtained for emissions by C2, CN, NH2, and OI(1D). Haser model scale lengths were fitted to these data. The extended time coverage allowed the checking for consistency between the various dates. The time varying production rate of P/Halley severely affected the profiles after perihelion, which is shown in two profile sequences on adjacent dates. Because of the time varying production rate, it was not possible to obtain reliable Haser model scale lengths after perihelion. The pre-perihelion analysis yielded Haser model scale lengths of sufficient consistency that they can be used for production rate determinations, whenever it is necessary to extrapolate from observed column densities within finite observing apertures. Results of scale lengths reduced to 1 AU are given and discussed.

  9. Turbulent transport and length scale measurement experiments with comfined coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Roback, R.

    1984-01-01

    A three phase experimental study of mixing downstream of swirling and nonswirling confined coaxial jets was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently employed in a variety of computational procedures. The present effort was directed toward the acquisition of length scale and dissipation rate data that provide more accurate inlet boundary conditions for the computational procedures and a data base to evaluate the turbulent transport models in the near jet region where recirculation does not occur, and the acquisition of mass and momentum turbulent transport data for a nonswirling flow condition with a blunt inner jet inlet configuration rather than the tapered inner jet inlet. A measurement technique, generally used to obtain approximate integral length and microscales of turbulence and dissipation rates, was computerized. Results showed the dissipation rate varied by 2 1/2 orders of magnitude across the inlet plane, by 2 orders of magnitude 51 mm from the inlet plane, and by 1 order of magnitude at 102 mm from the inlet plane for a nonswirling flow test conditions.

  10. Transfer-matrix scaling from disorder-averaged correlation lengths for diluted Ising systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz, S. L. A.; Stinchcombe, R. B.

    1994-10-01

    A transfer-matrix-scaling technique is developed for randomly diluted systems, and applied to the site-diluted Ising model on a square lattice in two dimensions. For each allowed disorder configuration between two adjacent columns, the contribution of the respective transfer matrix to the decay of correlations is considered only as far as the ratio of its two largest eigenvalues, allowing an economical calculation of a configuration-averaged correlation length. Standard phenomenological-renormalization procedures are then used to analyze aspects of the phase boundary which are difficult to assess accurately by alternative methods. For magnetic site concentration p close to pc, the extent of exponential behavior of the Tc×p curve is clearly seen for over two decades of variation of p-pc. Close to the pure-system limit, the exactly known reduced slope is reproduced to a very good approximation, though with nonmonotonic convergence. The averaged correlation lengths are inserted into the exponent-amplitude relationship predicted by conformal invariance to hold at criticality. The resulting exponent η remains near the pure value (1/4) for all intermediate concentrations until it crosses over to the percolation value at the threshold.

  11. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Shana O; Mirkin, Chad A; Walt, David R; Ismagilov, Rustem F; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices. PMID:25466541

  12. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices. PMID:25466541

  13. On the characteristic length scales associated with plastic deformation in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Murali, P.; Zhang, Y. W.; Gao, H. J.

    2012-05-14

    Atomistic simulations revealed that the spatial correlations of plastic displacements in three metallic glasses, FeP, MgAl, and CuZr, follow an exponential law with a characteristic length scale l{sub c} that governs Poisson's ratio {nu}, shear band thickness t{sub SB}, and fracture mode in these materials. Among the three glasses, FeP exhibits smallest l{sub c}, thinnest t{sub SB}, lowest {nu}, and brittle fracture; CuZr exhibits largest l{sub c}, thickest t{sub SB}, highest {nu}, and ductile fracture, while properties of MgAl lie in between those of FeP and CuZr. These findings corroborate well with existing experimental observations and suggest l{sub c} as a fundamental measure of the shear transformation zone size in metallic glasses.

  14. On the characteristic length scales associated with plastic deformation in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, P.; Zhang, Y. W.; Gao, H. J.

    2012-05-01

    Atomistic simulations revealed that the spatial correlations of plastic displacements in three metallic glasses, FeP, MgAl, and CuZr, follow an exponential law with a characteristic length scale ℓc that governs Poisson's ratio ν, shear band thickness tSB, and fracture mode in these materials. Among the three glasses, FeP exhibits smallest ℓc, thinnest tSB, lowest ν, and brittle fracture; CuZr exhibits largest ℓc, thickest tSB, highest ν, and ductile fracture, while properties of MgAl lie in between those of FeP and CuZr. These findings corroborate well with existing experimental observations and suggest ℓc as a fundamental measure of the shear transformation zone size in metallic glasses.

  15. A Hybrid Coarse-graining Approach for Lipid Bilayers at Large Length and Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Gary S.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid analytic-systematic (HAS) coarse-grained (CG) lipid model is developed and employed in a large-scale simulation of a liposome. The methodology is termed hybrid analyticsystematic as one component of the interaction between CG sites is variationally determined from the multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) methodology, while the remaining component utilizes an analytic potential. The systematic component models the in-plane center of mass interaction of the lipids as determined from an atomistic-level MD simulation of a bilayer. The analytic component is based on the well known Gay-Berne ellipsoid of revolution liquid crystal model, and is designed to model the highly anisotropic interactions at a highly coarse-grained level. The HAS CG approach is the first step in an “aggressive” CG methodology designed to model multi-component biological membranes at very large length and timescales. PMID:19281167

  16. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices.

  17. Multi-length scale porous polymer films from hypercrosslinked breath figure arrays.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lei; Zhang, Aijuan; Li, Wenqing; Bai, Hua; Li, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Multi-length scale porous polymer (MLSPP) films were fabricated using commercially available polystyrene (PS) via static breath figure (BF) process and sequent hypercrosslinking reaction. One level of ordered pores in microscale were introduced using static BF process, and the other level in nanoscale were produced by the sequent Friedel-Crafts hypercrosslinking reaction. The chemical structure of the PS MLSPP film was investigated by Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, and the morphology of the film was observed with electron microscopes. The MLSPP films showed large specific surface areas and excellent chemical and thermal stabilities, owing to the micropores and the crosslinked chemical structure produced by the Friedel-Crafts reaction. The methodology reported in this paper is a template-free, low cost and general strategy for the preparation of MLSPP films, which has potential applications in the areas of environment and energy. PMID:26397926

  18. Comment on {open_quotes}Magnetic-coherence-length scaling in metallic multilayers{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Aarts, J.

    1997-10-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. B {bold 54}, 515 (1996)], Koperdraad and Lodder compare calculations of the parallel critical field H{sub c2}{sup {parallel}} in superconductor{endash}normal-metal multilayers with experimental data taken from the literature. The poor agreement leads them to introduce a scaling factor {alpha} in the superconducting coherence length. The aim of this Comment is to point out the importance of the boundary conditions of the problem. Free sample surfaces will yield different results than an infinite stack of layers. The effect of free surfaces on the temperature of the dimensional crossover in H{sub c2}{sup {parallel}} is shown to be similar to the effect of {alpha}, making the need for the latter parameter questionable. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Nonlinear laser-matter interaction processes in long-scale-length plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seka, W.; Bahr, R. E.; Short, R. W.; Simon, A.; Craxton, R. S.; Montgomery, D. S.; Rubenchik, A. E.

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports on nonlinear laser-plasma interaction experiments using long-scale-length plasmas produced by the 24-beam OMEGA laser system operating at 351 nm. The experiments were carried out with distributed phase plates (DPP's) in all beams and with and without smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Most of the beams were used to create a large preformed plasma, which had gradient scale lengths of ≤800 μm at electron densities below a quarter of the critical density nc and temperatures in excess of 1 keV. One of the beams, the ``interaction beam,'' was timed independently and tightly focused to intensities ˜1015 W/cm2. All beams had pulse durations of ˜0.6 nsec. The interaction processes studied were mainly Raman scattering and the two-plasmon decay (TPD) instability as evidenced by its characteristic 3/2-harmonic emission. Details of the Raman and 3/2-harmonic spectra are presented. Evidence was found for the TPD instability close to its Landau cutoff density at ˜ 0.2nc. Raman emission was narrow-band and observed only from densities < 0.2nc. For late timings of the interaction beam, the Raman emission appeared to originate from near the peak of the density profile, but for earlier timings it appeared to come from densities a factor of 2 below the calculated peak. Application of SSD affected the 3/2-harmonic emission only slightly, but it strongly reduced the Raman emission. A discussion is given of some models that attempt to explain these observations.

  20. Length-scale dependent mechanical properties of Al-Cu eutectic alloy: Molecular dynamics based model and its experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwary, C. S. Chattopadhyay, K.; Chakraborty, S.; Mahapatra, D. R.

    2014-05-28

    This paper attempts to gain an understanding of the effect of lamellar length scale on the mechanical properties of two-phase metal-intermetallic eutectic structure. We first develop a molecular dynamics model for the in-situ grown eutectic interface followed by a model of deformation of Al-Al{sub 2}Cu lamellar eutectic. Leveraging the insights obtained from the simulation on the behaviour of dislocations at different length scales of the eutectic, we present and explain the experimental results on Al-Al{sub 2}Cu eutectic with various different lamellar spacing. The physics behind the mechanism is further quantified with help of atomic level energy model for different length scale as well as different strain. An atomic level energy partitioning of the lamellae and the interface regions reveals that the energy of the lamellae core are accumulated more due to dislocations irrespective of the length-scale. Whereas the energy of the interface is accumulated more due to dislocations when the length-scale is smaller, but the trend is reversed when the length-scale is large beyond a critical size of about 80 nm.

  1. Turbulence length scales in stably stratified free shear flow analyzed from slant aircraft profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Tjernstroem, M. )

    1993-05-01

    The vertical turbulence structure in the marine atmosphere close to a coastline is investigated using airborne measurements. The measurements are from a field experiment close to the coast in the southeast of Sweden, in the Baltic Sea. The Baltic Sea has two main properties that make it particularly interesting to study: significant annual lag in sea surface temperature compared to inland surface temperatures and the fact that it is surrounded by land in all directions within advection distances of from a few hours up to 10-15 hours in normal meteorological conditions. The present results are mostly from spring or early summer with mainly cool water: with a stable or neutral marine boundary layer but with substantial heating of the land area during daytime. When the daytime inland convective boundary layer is advected out over the cool sea, there is a frictional decoupling in space analogous to the same nocturnal process in time. This sometimes creates a residual layer, a remnant of the inland convective boundary layer, that can be advected for considerable distances over the sea. At the top of this layer, wind shear gives rise to a local increase in turbulent kinetic energy. These layers are used for an analysis of turbulent scales for free shear flow in stable stratification. The analysis is based on different length scales used in numerical model closures for turbulence processes and reveals the asymptotic behavior of different scales in the neutral limit and their functional form, and illustrates the nonlinear relationship between scales for different properties. The profiles from the aircraft are taken from 25 slant soundings performed in connection to low-level boundary-layer flights. The results are calculated from turbulence data extracted through filtering techniques on instantaneous time series (individual profiles). The calculated turbulence parameters from all profiles are grouped and averaged compositely over all profiles. 48 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Influence of Growth Rate on Microstructural Length Scales in Directionally Solidified NiAl-Mo Hypo-Eutectic Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfei; Ma, Xuewei; Ren, Huiping; Chen, Lin; Jin, Zili; Li, Zhenliang; Shen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the Ni-46.1Al-7.8Mo (at.%) alloy was directionally solidified at different growth rates ranging from 15 μm/s to 1000 μm/s under a constant temperature gradient (334 K/cm). The dependence of microstructural length scales on the growth rate was investigated. The results show that, with the growth rate increasing, the primary dendritic arm spacings (PDAS) and secondary dendritic arm spacings (SDAS) decreased. There exists a large distribution range in PDAS under directional solidification conditions at a constant temperature gradient. The average PDAS and SDAS as a function of growth rate can be given as λ1 = 848.8967 V-0.4509 and λ2 = 64.2196 V-0.4140, respectively. In addition, a comparison of our results with the current theoretical models and previous experimental results has also been made.

  3. A phenomenological description of BslA assemblies across multiple length scales

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Ryan J.; Bromley, Keith M.; Stanley-Wall, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically interfacially active proteins have garnered considerable interest recently owing to their potential use in a range of materials applications. Notably, the fungal hydrophobins are known to form robust and well-organized surface layers with high mechanical strength. Recently, it was shown that the bacterial biofilm protein BslA also forms highly elastic surface layers at interfaces. Here we describe several self-assembled structures formed by BslA, both at interfaces and in bulk solution, over a range of length scales spanning from nanometres to millimetres. First, we observe transiently stable and highly elongated air bubbles formed in agitated BslA samples. We study their behaviour in a range of solution conditions and hypothesize that their dissipation is a consequence of the slow adsorption kinetics of BslA to an air–water interface. Second, we describe elongated tubules formed by BslA interfacial films when shear stresses are applied in both a Langmuir trough and a rheometer. These structures bear a striking resemblance, although much larger in scale, to the elongated air bubbles formed during agitation. Taken together, this knowledge will better inform the conditions and applications of how BslA can be used in the stabilization of multi-phase materials. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation’. PMID:27298433

  4. Quantifying Contributions to Transport in Ionic Polymers Across Multiple Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Louis

    Self-organized polymer membranes conduct mobile species (ions, water, alcohols, etc.) according to a hierarchy of structural motifs that span sub-nm to >10 μm in length scale. In order to comprehensively understand such materials, our group combines multiple types of NMR dynamics and transport measurements (spectroscopy, diffusometry, relaxometry, imaging) with structural information from scattering and microscopy as well as with theories of porous media,1 electrolytic transport, and oriented matter.2 In this presentation, I will discuss quantitative separation of the phenomena that govern transport in polymer membranes, from intermolecular interactions (<= 2 nm),3 to locally ordered polymer nanochannels (a few to 10s of nm),2 to larger polymer domain structures (10s of nm and larger).1 Using this multi-scale information, we seek to give informed feedback on the design of polymer membranes for use in, e . g . , efficient batteries, fuel cells, and mechanical actuators. References: [1] J. Hou, J. Li, D. Mountz, M. Hull, and L. A. Madsen. Journal of Membrane Science448, 292-298 (2013). [2] J. Li, J. K. Park, R. B. Moore, and L. A. Madsen. Nature Materials 10, 507-511 (2011). [3] M. D. Lingwood, Z. Zhang, B. E. Kidd, K. B. McCreary, J. Hou, and L. A. Madsen. Chemical Communications 49, 4283 - 4285 (2013).

  5. A phenomenological description of BslA assemblies across multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ryan J; Bromley, Keith M; Stanley-Wall, Nicola; MacPhee, Cait E

    2016-07-28

    Intrinsically interfacially active proteins have garnered considerable interest recently owing to their potential use in a range of materials applications. Notably, the fungal hydrophobins are known to form robust and well-organized surface layers with high mechanical strength. Recently, it was shown that the bacterial biofilm protein BslA also forms highly elastic surface layers at interfaces. Here we describe several self-assembled structures formed by BslA, both at interfaces and in bulk solution, over a range of length scales spanning from nanometres to millimetres. First, we observe transiently stable and highly elongated air bubbles formed in agitated BslA samples. We study their behaviour in a range of solution conditions and hypothesize that their dissipation is a consequence of the slow adsorption kinetics of BslA to an air-water interface. Second, we describe elongated tubules formed by BslA interfacial films when shear stresses are applied in both a Langmuir trough and a rheometer. These structures bear a striking resemblance, although much larger in scale, to the elongated air bubbles formed during agitation. Taken together, this knowledge will better inform the conditions and applications of how BslA can be used in the stabilization of multi-phase materials.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298433

  6. Predicting the roughness length of turbulent flows over landscapes with multi-scale microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Field, Jason P.

    2016-05-01

    The fully rough form of the law of the wall is commonly used to quantify velocity profiles and associated bed shear stresses in fluvial, aeolian, and coastal environments. A key parameter in this law is the roughness length, z0. Here we propose a predictive formula for z0 that uses the amplitude and slope of each wavelength of microtopography within a discrete-Fourier-transform-based approach. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is used to quantify the effective z0 value of sinusoidal microtopography as a function of the amplitude and slope. The effective z0 value of landscapes with multi-scale roughness is then given by the sum of contributions from each Fourier mode of the microtopography. Predictions of the equation are tested against z0 values measured in ˜ 105 wind-velocity profiles from southwestern US playa surfaces. Our equation is capable of predicting z0 values to 50 % accuracy, on average, across a 4 order of magnitude range. We also use our results to provide an alternative formula that, while somewhat less accurate than the one obtained from a full multi-scale analysis, has an advantage of being simpler and easier to apply.

  7. Scrape-off Layer Flows With Pressure Gradient Scale Length ~ {rho}{sub p}

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Goldston

    2013-03-08

    A heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width balances magnetic drifts against parallel loss at c{sub s} /2, resulting in a SOL width ~ {rho}{sub p}. T{sub sep} is calculated from Spitzer–Härm parallel thermal conduction. This results in a prediction for the power scrape-off width in quantitative agreement both in magnitude and scaling with recent experimental data. To achieve the ~ c{sub s} /2 flow assumed in this model and measured experimentally sets requirements on the ratio of upstream to total SOL particle sources, relative to the square-root of the ratio of target to upstream temperature. The Pfisch-Schlüter model for equilibrium flows has been modified to allow near-sonic flows, appropriate for gradient scale lengths of order {rho}{sub p}, resulting in a new quadrupole radial flow pattern. The strong parallel flows and plasma charging implied by this model suggest a mechanism for H-mode transition, consistent with many observations

  8. Zebrafish brain mapping--standardized spaces, length scales, and the power of N and n.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul R; Hendry, Aenea C; Lowe, Andrew S

    2015-06-01

    Mapping anatomical and functional parameters of the zebrafish brain is moving apace. Research communities undertaking such studies are becoming ever larger and more diverse. The unique features, tools, and technologies associated with zebrafish are propelling them as the 21st century model organism for brain mapping. Uniquely positioned as a vertebrate model system, the zebrafish enables imaging of anatomy and function at different length scales from intraneuronal compartments to sparsely distributed whole brain patterns. With a variety of diverse and established statistical modeling and analytic methods available from the wider brain mapping communities, the richness of zebrafish neuroimaging data is being realized. The statistical power of population observations (N) within and across many samples (n) projected onto a standardized space will provide vast databases for data-driven biological approaches. This article reviews key brain mapping initiatives at different levels of scale that highlight the potential of zebrafish brain mapping. By way of introduction to the next wave of brain mappers, an accessible introduction to the key concepts and caveats associated with neuroimaging are outlined and discussed. PMID:25418847

  9. Influence of the course boundary value problem on length scale parmeters for second-gradient continuum theories

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Darby J; Bronkhorst, Curt A; Mc Dowell, David L

    2010-12-20

    All nonlocal continuum descriptions of inelastic material response involve length scale parameters that either directly or implicitly quantify the physical dimensions of a neighborhood of response which influences the behavior at a particular point. The second-gradient continuum theories such as those developed by Germain, Toupin and Mindlin, and Eringen, and giving rise to strain-gradient plasticity, is becoming a common coarse-scale basis for homogenization of material response that respects the non local nature of heterogeneous material response. Ideally, the length scale parameters involved in such homogenization would be intrinsically associated with dominant aspects of the microstructure. However, these parameters, at least in some cases, are inextricably linked to the details of the coarse scale boundary value problem. Accordingly, they cannot be viewed as pure constitutive parameters. An example problem of multiscale homogenization is presented to underscore the dependence of second-gradient length scale parameters on the coarse scale boundary value problem, namely the multiscale response of an idealized porous microstructure. The fine scale (microstructure) comprises elastic perfectly plastic matrix with a periodic array of circular voids. This fine scale description of the problem is identical for two separate classes of coarse scale boundary value problem, viz. an extruded channel subject to compression and eventually developing plastic shear bands and a thin layer of material with larger (coarse scale) elliptical voids subject to shear deformation. Implications of the relationship between length scale parameters and the details of the coarse scale boundary value problem are discussed and ideas to ascertain such length parameters from evolving response fields are presented.

  10. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-02

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. However, how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer 'how far is far enough,' we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25–2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  11. A role for self-gravity at multiple length scales in the process of star formation.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Alyssa A; Rosolowsky, Erik W; Borkin, Michelle A; Foster, Jonathan B; Halle, Michael; Kauffmann, Jens; Pineda, Jaime E

    2009-01-01

    Self-gravity plays a decisive role in the final stages of star formation, where dense cores (size approximately 0.1 parsecs) inside molecular clouds collapse to form star-plus-disk systems. But self-gravity's role at earlier times (and on larger length scales, such as approximately 1 parsec) is unclear; some molecular cloud simulations that do not include self-gravity suggest that 'turbulent fragmentation' alone is sufficient to create a mass distribution of dense cores that resembles, and sets, the stellar initial mass function. Here we report a 'dendrogram' (hierarchical tree-diagram) analysis that reveals that self-gravity plays a significant role over the full range of possible scales traced by (13)CO observations in the L1448 molecular cloud, but not everywhere in the observed region. In particular, more than 90 per cent of the compact 'pre-stellar cores' traced by peaks of dust emission are projected on the sky within one of the dendrogram's self-gravitating 'leaves'. As these peaks mark the locations of already-forming stars, or of those probably about to form, a self-gravitating cocoon seems a critical condition for their existence. Turbulent fragmentation simulations without self-gravity-even of unmagnetized isothermal material-can yield mass and velocity power spectra very similar to what is observed in clouds like L1448. But a dendrogram of such a simulation shows that nearly all the gas in it (much more than in the observations) appears to be self-gravitating. A potentially significant role for gravity in 'non-self-gravitating' simulations suggests inconsistency in simulation assumptions and output, and that it is necessary to include self-gravity in any realistic simulation of the star-formation process on subparsec scales. PMID:19122636

  12. Characterization of aging in organic materials on atomic-, meso- and macro-length scales by {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Alam, T.M.; Gillen, K.T.

    1997-10-01

    A fundamental understanding of aging in an organic material requires that one understand how aging affects the chemical structure of a material, and how these chemical changes are related to the material`s macroscopic properties. This level of understanding is usually achieved by examining the material on a variety of length scales ranging from atomic to meso-scale to macroscopic. The authors are developing and applying several {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments to characterize the aging process of organic materials over a broad range of length scales. Examples of studies which range from atomic to macroscopic will be presented.

  13. Clinical Frailty Scale in an Acute Medicine Unit: a Simple Tool That Predicts Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Juma, Salina; Taabazuing, Mary-Margaret; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty is characterized by increased vulnerability to external stressors. When frail older adults are admitted to hospital, they are at increased risk of adverse events including falls, delirium, and disability. The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) is a practical and efficient tool for assessing frailty; however, its ability to predict outcomes has not been well studied within the acute medical service. Objective To examine the CFS in elderly patients admitted to the acute medical ward and its association with length of stay. Design Prospective cohort study in an acute care university hospital in London, Ontario, Canada, involving 75 patients over age 65, admitted to the general internal medicine clinical teaching units (CTU). Measurements Patient demographics were collected through chart review, and CFS score was assigned to each patient after brief clinician assessment. The CFS ranges from 1 (very fit) to 9 (terminally ill) based on descriptors and pictographs of activity and functional status. The CFS was collapsed into three categories: non-frail (CFS 1–4), mild-to-moderately frail (CFS 5–6), and severely frail (CFS 7–8). Outcomes of length of stay and 90-day readmission were gathered through the LHSC electronic patient record. Results Severe frailty was associated with longer lengths of stay (Mean = 12.6 ± 12.7 days) compared to mild-to-moderate frailty (mean = 11.2 ± 10.8 days), and non-frailty (mean = 4.1 ± 2.1 days, p = .014). This finding was significant after adjusting for age, sex, and number of medications. Participants with higher frailty scores showed higher readmission rates when compared with those with no frailty (31.2% for severely frail, vs. 34.2% for mild-to-moderately frail vs. 19% for non-frail) although there was no significant difference in the adjusted analysis. Conclusion The CFS helped identify patients that are more likely to have prolonged hospital stays on the acute medical ward. The CFS is an easy to use tool which

  14. Fracture length scales in human cortical bone: the necessity of nonlinear fracture models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q D; Cox, Brian N; Nalla, Ravi K; Ritchie, R O

    2006-03-01

    Recently published data for fracture in human humeral cortical bone are analyzed using cohesive-zone models to deal with the nonlinear processes of material failure. Such models represent the nonlinear deformation processes involved in fracture by cohesive tractions exerted by the failing material along a fracture process zone, rather than attributing all damage to a process occurring at a single point, as in conventional linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). The relationship between the tractions and the net displacement discontinuity across the process zone is hypothesized to be a material property for bone. To test this hypothesis, the cohesive law was evaluated by analyzing published load vs. load-point displacement data from one laboratory; the calibrated law was then used to predict similar data taken for a different source of bone using a different specimen geometry in a different laboratory. Further model calculations are presented to illustrate more general characteristics of the nonlinear fracture of bone and to demonstrate in particular that LEFM is not internally consistent for all cases of interest. For example, the fracture toughness of bone deduced via LEFM from test data is not necessarily a material constant, but will take different values for different crack lengths and test configurations. LEFM is valid when the crack is much longer than a certain length scale, representative of the length of the process zone in the cohesive model, which for human cortical bone ranges from 3 to 10mm. Since naturally occurring bones and the specimens used to test them are not much larger than this dimension for most relevant orientations, it is apparent that only nonlinear fracture models can give an internally consistent account of their fracture. The cohesive law is thus a more complete representation of the mechanics of material failure than the single-parameter fracture toughness and may therefore provide a superior measure of bone quality. The analysis of

  15. General semi-structured grid generation for complex three-dimensional geometries with disparate length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, Aly Salim

    A general prismatic mesh generator capable of discretizing flow domains for arbitrary 3-D geometries is presented. The overall project objective was to be able to perform routine viscous flow simulations for engineering design and analysis. The suitability of the hybrid prismatic/tetrahedral grid generation approach for numerical computations of flow phenomena over complex bodies was to be authenticated. The prismatic elements are used in close proximity to the body surface to resolve the viscous stresses whereas tetrahedral elements tessellate the rest of the domain. Such an approach allows the exploitation of the best of both, structured and unstructured grid generation approaches. A special algorithm is developed to allow the prisms to march along general splined boundary surfaces. The method uses a 2-D marching scheme in the parametric domain and performs coordinate transfers to the real space. The inclusion of such a scheme allows the use of periodic boundary conditions to reduce solver memory requirements and broaden the range of applicability of the grid generator. The work also introduces the novel ideas of multi-zone and unstructured prismatic mesh generation to allow different levels of grid resolution within the same geometry and to treat disparate length scales. Both these developments are aimed at optimizing the discretized flow domain with the fewest elements and reducing the time step restrictions of the solver by increasing the volumes of the individual cells. Several quality enhancement and validity checks are presented along with an automatic mesh regeneration mechanism for improved overall quality. The combination of the developed algorithms allows for the discretization of realistic 3-D geometries without much user intervention. Applications of the hybrid prismatic/tetrahedral grid generator are presented from various fields such as the aerospace, turbomachinery and offshore industries. The robustness and efficiency of the prismatic grid

  16. Stably stratified shear turbulence: A new model for the energy dissipation length scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Y.; Canuto, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented to compute the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation length scale l(sub epsilon) in a stably stratified shear flow. The expression for l(sub epsilon) is derived from solving the spectral balance equation for the turbulent kinetic energy. The buoyancy spectrum entering such equation is constructed using a Lagrangian timescale with modifications due to stratification. The final result for l(sub epsilon) is given in algebraic form as a function of the Froude number Fr and the flux Richardson number R(sub f), l(sub epsilon) = l(sub epsilon)(Fr, R(sub f). The model predicts that for R(sub f) less than R(sub fc), l(sub epsilon) decreases with stratification. An attractive feature of the present model is that it encompasses, as special cases, some seemingly different models for l(sub epsilon) that have been proposed in the past by Deardorff, Hunt et al., Weinstock, and Canuto and Minotti. An alternative form for the dissipation rate epsilon is also discussed that may be useful when one uses a prognostic equation for the heat flux. The present model is applicable to subgrid-scale models, which are needed in large eddy simulations (LES), as well as to ensemble average models. The model is applied to predict the variation of l(sub epsilon) with height z in the planetary boundary layer. The resulting l(sub epsilon) versus z profile reproduces very closely the nonmonotonic profile of l(sub epsilon) exhibited by many LES calculations, beginning with the one by Deardorff in 1974.

  17. Hydrodynamic interactions and Brownian forces in colloidal suspensions: Coarse-graining over time and length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padding, J. T.; Louis, A. A.

    2006-09-01

    We describe in detail how to implement a coarse-grained hybrid molecular dynamics and stochastic rotation dynamics simulation technique that captures the combined effects of Brownian and hydrodynamic forces in colloidal suspensions. The importance of carefully tuning the simulation parameters to correctly resolve the multiple time and length scales of this problem is emphasized. We systematically analyze how our coarse-graining scheme resolves dimensionless hydrodynamic numbers such as the Reynolds number Re, which indicates the importance of inertial effects, the Schmidt number Sc, which indicates whether momentum transport is liquidlike or gaslike, the Mach number, which measures compressibility effects, the Knudsen number, which describes the importance of noncontinuum molecular effects, and the Peclet number, which describes the relative effects of convective and diffusive transport. With these dimensionless numbers in the correct regime the many Brownian and hydrodynamic time scales can be telescoped together to maximize computational efficiency while still correctly resolving the physically relevant processes. We also show how to control a number of numerical artifacts, such as finite-size effects and solvent-induced attractive depletion interactions. When all these considerations are properly taken into account, the measured colloidal velocity autocorrelation functions and related self-diffusion and friction coefficients compare quantitatively with theoretical calculations. By contrast, these calculations demonstrate that, notwithstanding its seductive simplicity, the basic Langevin equation does a remarkably poor job of capturing the decay rate of the velocity autocorrelation function in the colloidal regime, strongly underestimating it at short times and strongly overestimating it at long times. Finally, we discuss in detail how to map the parameters of our method onto physical systems and from this extract more general lessons—keeping in mind that there

  18. Multi Length Scale Imaging of Flocculated Estuarine Sediments; Insights into their Complex 3D Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, Jonathan; Bushby, Andy; Droppo, Ian; Carr, Simon; Spencer, Kate

    2015-04-01

    Suspended estuarine sediments form flocs that are compositionally complex, fragile and irregularly shaped. The fate and transport of suspended particulate matter (SPM) is determined by the size, shape, density, porosity and stability of these flocs and prediction of SPM transport requires accurate measurements of these three-dimensional (3D) physical properties. However, the multi-scaled nature of flocs in addition to their fragility makes their characterisation in 3D problematic. Correlative microscopy is a strategy involving the spatial registration of information collected at different scales using several imaging modalities. Previously, conventional optical microscopy (COM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have enabled 2-dimensional (2D) floc characterisation at the gross (> 1 µm) and sub-micron scales respectively. Whilst this has proven insightful there remains a critical spatial and dimensional gap preventing the accurate measurement of geometric properties and an understanding of how structures at different scales are related. Within life sciences volumetric imaging techniques such as 3D micro-computed tomography (3D µCT) and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy [FIB-SEM (or FIB-tomography)] have been combined to characterise materials at the centimetre to micron scale. Combining these techniques with TEM enables an advanced correlative study, allowing material properties across multiple spatial and dimensional scales to be visualised. The aims of this study are; 1) to formulate an advanced correlative imaging strategy combining 3D µCT, FIB-tomography and TEM; 2) to acquire 3D datasets; 3) to produce a model allowing their co-visualisation; 4) to interpret 3D floc structure. To reduce the chance of structural alterations during analysis samples were first 'fixed' in 2.5% glutaraldehyde/2% formaldehyde before being embedding in Durcupan resin. Intermediate steps were implemented to improve contrast and remove pore water, achieved by the

  19. Hybrid Simulation Strategy for Simulating Self-Assembled Morphologies at the Atomistic Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuraman, Vaidyanathan; Ganesan, Venkat

    In the context of Lithium-ion batteries, an enhancement in both ionic conductivity and mechanical properties, were observed for block copolymer electrolytes with increasing MW. On the contrary, when homopolymers were used as electrolytes, the ionic conductivity decreased with increasing MW. However, the origins of such increase in conductivity are unclear and are speculated to be tied to both the morphology and the atomistic details of the copolymer themselves. Motivated by such issues, we present a strategy to create ordered morphologies of block copolymers at the atomistic level using a combination of coarse-graining and inverse coarse-graining techniques. A mapping which is developed using the long-ranged structural mapping in the disordered phases will be utilized to generate self-assembled morphologies. In particular we focus on generating self-assembled morphologies of PS-PEO at the atomistic length scales. Statics and dynamics of such self-assembled morphologies will be presented and the effect of self assembly on the transport properties of ions will also be explored. Funded by NSF.

  20. Review of the synergies between computational modeling and experimental characterization of materials across length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Dingreville, Rémi; Karnesky, Richard A.; Puel, Guillaume; Schmitt, Jean -Hubert

    2015-11-16

    With the increasing interplay between experimental and computational approaches at multiple length scales, new research directions are emerging in materials science and computational mechanics. Such cooperative interactions find many applications in the development, characterization and design of complex material systems. This manuscript provides a broad and comprehensive overview of recent trends in which predictive modeling capabilities are developed in conjunction with experiments and advanced characterization to gain a greater insight into structure–property relationships and study various physical phenomena and mechanisms. The focus of this review is on the intersections of multiscale materials experiments and modeling relevant to the materials mechanics community. After a general discussion on the perspective from various communities, the article focuses on the latest experimental and theoretical opportunities. Emphasis is given to the role of experiments in multiscale models, including insights into how computations can be used as discovery tools for materials engineering, rather than to “simply” support experimental work. This is illustrated by examples from several application areas on structural materials. In conclusion this manuscript ends with a discussion on some problems and open scientific questions that are being explored in order to advance this relatively new field of research.

  1. Measurement of growing dynamical length scales and prediction of the jamming transition in a granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keys, Aaron S.; Abate, Adam R.; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Durian, Douglas J.

    2007-04-01

    Supercooled liquids and dense colloidal suspensions exhibit anomalous behaviour known as `spatially heterogeneous dynamics' (SHD), which becomes increasingly pronounced as the system approaches the glass transition. Recently, the observation of SHD in confined granular packings under slow shear near the onset of jamming has bolstered speculation that the two transitions are related. Here, we report measurements of SHD in a system of air-driven granular beads, as a function of both density and effective temperature. On approach to jamming, the dynamics becomes progressively slower and more spatially heterogeneous. The rapid growth of timescales and dynamical length scales characterizing the heterogeneities can be described both by mode-coupling theory and the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) equation, such as in glass-forming liquids. The value of the control variable at the VTF transition coincides with point J (refs 9, 10), the random close-packed jamming density at which all motion ceases, in analogy to a zero-temperature ideal glass transition. Our findings demonstrate further universality of the jamming concept and provide a significant step forward in the quest for a unified theory of jamming in disparate systems.

  2. Review of the synergies between computational modeling and experimental characterization of materials across length scales

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dingreville, Rémi; Karnesky, Richard A.; Puel, Guillaume; Schmitt, Jean -Hubert

    2015-11-16

    With the increasing interplay between experimental and computational approaches at multiple length scales, new research directions are emerging in materials science and computational mechanics. Such cooperative interactions find many applications in the development, characterization and design of complex material systems. This manuscript provides a broad and comprehensive overview of recent trends in which predictive modeling capabilities are developed in conjunction with experiments and advanced characterization to gain a greater insight into structure–property relationships and study various physical phenomena and mechanisms. The focus of this review is on the intersections of multiscale materials experiments and modeling relevant to the materials mechanicsmore » community. After a general discussion on the perspective from various communities, the article focuses on the latest experimental and theoretical opportunities. Emphasis is given to the role of experiments in multiscale models, including insights into how computations can be used as discovery tools for materials engineering, rather than to “simply” support experimental work. This is illustrated by examples from several application areas on structural materials. In conclusion this manuscript ends with a discussion on some problems and open scientific questions that are being explored in order to advance this relatively new field of research.« less

  3. The role of reactant unmixedness, strain rate, and length scale on premixed combustor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsen, S.; LaRue, J.; Vilayanur, S.

    1995-10-01

    Lean premixed combustion provides a means to reduce pollutant formation and increase combustion efficiency. However, fuel-air mixing is rarely uniform in space and time. This nonuniformity in concentration will lead to relative increases in pollutant formation and decreases in combustion efficiency. The nonuniformity of the concentration at the exit of the premixer has been defined by Lyons (1981) as the {open_quotes}unmixedness.{close_quotes} Although turbulence properties such as length scales and strain rate are known to effect unmixedness, the exact relationship is unknown. Evaluating this relationship and the effect of unmixedness in premixed combustion on pollutant formation and combustion efficiency are an important part of the overall goal of US Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program and are among the goals of the program described herein. The information obtained from ATS is intended to help to develop and commercialize gas turbines which have (1) a wide range of operation/stability, (2) a minimal amount of pollutant formation, and (3) high combustion efficiency. Specifically, with regard to pollutants, the goals are to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions by at least 10%, obtain less than 20 PPM of both CO and UHC, and increase the combustion efficiency by 5%.

  4. Low frequency energy scavenging using sub-wave length scale acousto-elastic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Riaz U.; Banerjee, Sourav

    2014-11-01

    This letter presents the possibility of energy scavenging (ES) utilizing the physics of acousto-elastic metamaterial (AEMM) at low frequencies (<˜3KHz). It is proposed to use the AEMM in a dual mode (Acoustic Filter and Energy Harvester), simultaneously. AEMM's are typically reported for filtering acoustic waves by trapping or guiding the acoustic energy, whereas this letter shows that the dynamic energy trapped inside the soft constituent (matrix) of metamaterials can be significantly harvested by strategically embedding piezoelectric wafers in the matrix. With unit cell AEMM model, we experimentally asserted that at lower acoustic frequencies (< ˜3 KHz), maximum power in the micro Watts (˜35µW) range can be generated, whereas, recently reported phononic crystal based metamaterials harvested only nano Watt (˜30nW) power against 10KΩ resistive load. Efficient energy scavengers at low acoustic frequencies are almost absent due to large required size relevant to the acoustic wavelength. Here we report sub wave length scale energy scavengers utilizing the coupled physics of local, structural and matrix resonances. Upon validation of the argument through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, a multi-frequency energy scavenger (ES) with multi-cell model is designed with varying geometrical properties capable of scavenging energy (power output from ˜10µW - ˜90µW) between 0.2 KHz and 1.5 KHz acoustic frequencies.

  5. Review of the synergies between computational modeling and experimental characterization of materials across length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingreville, Rémi; Karnesky, Richard A.; Puel, Guillaume; Schmitt, Jean-Hubert

    2016-02-01

    With the increasing interplay between experimental and computational approaches at multiple length scales, new research directions are emerging in materials science and computational mechanics. Such cooperative interactions find many applications in the development, characterization and design of complex material systems. This manuscript provides a broad and comprehensive overview of recent trends where predictive modeling capabilities are developed in conjunction with experiments and advanced characterization to gain a greater insight into structure-properties relationships and study various physical phenomena and mechanisms. The focus of this review is on the intersections of multiscale materials experiments and modeling relevant to the materials mechanics community. After a general discussion on the perspective from various communities, the article focuses on the latest experimental and theoretical opportunities. Emphasis is given to the role of experiments in multiscale models, including insights into how computations can be used as discovery tools for materials engineering, rather than to "simply" support experimental work. This is illustrated by examples from several application areas on structural materials. This manuscript ends with a discussion on some problems and open scientific questions that are being explored in order to advance this relatively new field of research.

  6. Indentation-induced localized deformation and elastic strain partitioning in composites at submicron length scale

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, R.I.; Bei, H.; Gao, Y.F.; Ice, G.E.

    2010-10-26

    Three-dimensional spatially resolved strains were mapped in a model NiAl/Mo composite after nanoindentation. The depth-dependent strain distributed in the two phases and partitioned across the composite interfaces is directly measured at submicron length scale using X-ray microdiffraction and compared with a detailed micromechanical stress analysis. It is shown that indentation-induced deformation in the composite material is distinct from deformation expected in a single-phase material. This difference arises in part from residual thermal strains in both phases of the composite in the as-grown state. Interplay between residual thermal strains and external mechanical strain results in a complex distribution of dilatational strain in the Mo fibers and NiAl matrix and is distinct in different locations within the indented area. Reversal of the strain sign (e.g., alternating tensile/compressive/tensile strain distribution) is observed in the NiAl matrix. Bending of the Mo fibers during indentation creates relatively large 1.5{sup o} misorientations between the different fibers and NiAl matrix. Compressive strain along the <0 0 1> direction reached -0.017 in the Mo fibers and -0.007 in the NiAl matrix.

  7. Relevant time- and length scale of touch-down for drops impacting on a heated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Shirota, Minori; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    The vapor generated from a liquid drop impacting a hot solid surface can prevent it to make contact, depending on the solid temperature. The minimum temperature when no contact is made between the drop and the solid is called the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature. The latent heat needed to generated the vapor is drawn from the solid, and in general the Leidenfrost temperature depends on the solid thermal properties. Here we show experiments conducted on a sapphire plate, to minimize the cooling of the solid and ensuring nearly isothermal conditions. By using high speed total internal reflection imaging, we observe the drop base during impact up to about 100nm above the substrate surface. By this technique we are able to study the processes responsible for the transition between fully wetting and fully levitating drop impact conditions as the solid temperature increases. We reveal the relevant length- and time-scales for the dimple formation under the drop and explain their relevance for the late-time dynamics. As the transition regime is traversed from low to high temperature, the liquid-solid contact gradually decreases which reduces the friction with the solid, enhancing the spreading of the drop considerably.

  8. Comparison of friction and wear of articular cartilage on different length scales.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Sandra; Boettcher, Kathrin; Wiegleb, Lorenz; Urban, Joanna; Burgkart, Rainer; Lieleg, Oliver; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-09-18

    The exceptional tribological properties of articular cartilage are still far from being fully understood. Articular cartilage is able to withstand high loads and provide exceptionally low friction. Although the regeneration abilities of the tissue are very limited, it can last for many decades. These biomechanical properties are realized by an interplay of different lubrication and wear protection mechanisms. The deterioration of cartilage due to aging or injury leads to the development of osteoarthritis. A current treatment strategy focuses on supplementing the intra-articular fluid with a saline solution containing hyaluronic acid. In the work presented here, we investigated how changing the lubricating fluid affects friction and wear of articular cartilage, focusing on the boundary and mixed lubrication as well as interstitial fluid pressurization mechanisms. Different length and time scales were probed by atomic force microscopy, tribology and profilometry. We compared aqueous solutions with different NaCl concentrations to a viscosupplement containing hyaluronic acid (HA). In particular, we found that the presence of ions changes the frictional behavior and the wear resistance. In contrast, hyaluronic acid showed no significant impact on the friction coefficient, but considerably reduced wear. This study confirms the previous notion that friction and wear are not necessarily correlated in articular cartilage tribology and that the main role of HA might be to provide wear protection for the articular surface. PMID:26294356

  9. Polarized Enhanced Backscattering Spectroscopy for Characterization of Biological Tissues at Subdiffusion Length-scales

    PubMed Central

    Radosevich, Andrew J.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Yi, Ji; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1980’s, the enhanced backscattering (EBS) phenomenon has been well-studied in a large variety of non-biological materials. Yet, until recently the use of conventional EBS for the characterization of biological tissue has been fairly limited. In this work we detail the unique ability of EBS to provide spectroscopic, polarimetric, and depth-resolved characterization of biological tissue using a simple backscattering instrument. We first explain the experimental and numerical procedures used to accurately measure and model the full azimuthal EBS peak shape in biological tissue. Next we explore the peak shape and height dependencies for different polarization channels and spatial coherence of illumination. We then illustrate the extraordinary sensitivity of EBS to the shape of the scattering phase function using suspensions of latex microspheres. Finally, we apply EBS to biological tissue samples in order to measure optical properties and observe the spatial length-scales at which backscattering is altered in early colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24163574

  10. Extending the length and time scales of Gram–Schmidt Lyapunov vector computations

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Anthony B.; Green, Jason R.

    2013-08-01

    Lyapunov vectors have found growing interest recently due to their ability to characterize systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium. The computation of orthogonal Gram–Schmidt vectors requires multiplication and QR decomposition of large matrices, which grow as N{sup 2} (with the particle count). This expense has limited such calculations to relatively small systems and short time scales. Here, we detail two implementations of an algorithm for computing Gram–Schmidt vectors. The first is a distributed-memory message-passing method using Scalapack. The second uses the newly-released MAGMA library for GPUs. We compare the performance of both codes for Lennard–Jones fluids from N=100 to 1300 between Intel Nahalem/Infiniband DDR and NVIDIA C2050 architectures. To our best knowledge, these are the largest systems for which the Gram–Schmidt Lyapunov vectors have been computed, and the first time their calculation has been GPU-accelerated. We conclude that Lyapunov vector calculations can be significantly extended in length and time by leveraging the power of GPU-accelerated linear algebra.

  11. Revealing Optical Properties of Reduced-Dimensionality Materials at Relevant Length Scales.

    PubMed

    Ogletree, D Frank; Schuck, P James; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander F; Borys, Nicholas J; Aloni, Shaul; Bao, Wei; Barja, Sara; Lee, Jiye; Melli, Mauro; Munechika, Keiko; Whitelam, Stephan; Wickenburg, Sebastian

    2015-10-14

    Reduced-dimensionality materials for photonic and optoelectronic applications including energy conversion, solid-state lighting, sensing, and information technology are undergoing rapid development. The search for novel materials based on reduced-dimensionality is driven by new physics. Understanding and optimizing material properties requires characterization at the relevant length scale, which is often below the diffraction limit. Three important material systems are chosen for review here, all of which are under investigation at the Molecular Foundry, to illustrate the current state of the art in nanoscale optical characterization: 2D semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides; 1D semiconducting nanowires; and energy-transfer in assemblies of 0D semiconducting nanocrystals. For each system, the key optical properties, the principal experimental techniques, and important recent results are discussed. Applications and new developments in near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and cathodoluminescence in the electron microscope are given detailed attention. Work done at the Molecular Foundry is placed in context within the fields under review. A discussion of emerging opportunities and directions for the future closes the review. PMID:26332202

  12. Temperature and pressure tuneable swollen bicontinuous cubic phases approaching nature's length scales.

    PubMed

    Barriga, H M G; Tyler, A I I; McCarthy, N L C; Parsons, E S; Ces, O; Law, R V; Seddon, J M; Brooks, N J

    2015-01-21

    Bicontinuous cubic structures offer enormous potential in applications ranging from protein crystallisation to drug delivery systems and have been observed in cellular membrane structures. One of the current bottlenecks in understanding and exploiting these structures is that cubic scaffolds produced in vitro are considerably smaller in size than those observed in biological systems, differing by almost an order of magnitude in some cases. We have addressed this technological bottleneck and developed a methodology capable of manufacturing highly swollen bicontinuous cubic membranes with length scales approaching those seen in vivo. Crucially, these cubic systems do not require the presence of proteins. We have generated highly swollen Im3m symmetry bicontinuous cubic phases with lattice parameters of up to 480 Å, composed of ternary mixtures of monoolein, cholesterol and negatively charged lipid (DOPS or DOPG) and we have been able to tune their lattice parameters. The swollen cubic phases are highly sensitive to both temperature and pressure; these structural changes are likely to be controlled by a fine balance between lipid headgroup repulsions and lateral pressure in the hydrocarbon chain region. PMID:25430049

  13. Quantum electrodynamics and the electron self-energy in a deformed space with a minimal length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Apollo V.; Abreu, E. M. C.; Neves, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    The main motivation to study models in the presence of a minimal length is to obtain a quantum field theory free of the divergences. In this way, in this paper, we have constructed a new framework for quantum electrodynamics embedded in a minimal length scale background. New operators are introduced and the Green function method was used for the solution of the field equations, i.e. the Maxwell, Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. We have analyzed specifically the scalar field and its one loop propagator. The mass of the scalar field regularized by the minimal length was obtained. The QED Lagrangian containing a minimal length was also constructed and the divergences were analyzed. The electron and photon propagators, and the electron self-energy at one loop as a function of the minimal length was also obtained.

  14. Recent Progress in the Study of Single Molecule Chemistry at the Nanometer Length Scale and Picosecond Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duyne, Richard

    2015-03-01

    During the last few years, there has been an explosion of interest and activity in the field of plasmonics. The goal of plasmonics is to control and manipulate light on the nanometer length scale using the properties of the collective electronic excitations in noble metal films or nanoparticles, known as surface plasmons. An improved understanding of the interactions between adsorbed molecules and plasmonic nanostructures (i.e., molecular plasmonics) is having a significant impact in a number of research areas including electrochemistry, surface science, catalysis for energy conversion and storage, the materials science of nanoparticles, biomedical diagnostics, art conservation science, and nanolithography. In the first part of this lecture, I will provide some background material on the basic physical concepts underlying molecular plasmonics with an emphasis on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy, and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). In the second part of this lecture, I will focus in on three recent advances in TERS which illustrate the power of this nanoscale vibrational spectroscopy. First, new insights into the nature of the relative intensity fluctuations in single molecule tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SMTERS) will be discussed. Second, our current understanding of the adsorbate surface interactions involved in the low temperature (LT), ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) TERS of the Ag tip/Rhodamine 6G (R6G) /Ag(111) system will be described. Finally, an update on our new results in coupling ultrafast lasers with TERS. This last topic illuminates a path forward toward the goal of understanding chemistry at the space-time limit.

  15. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  16. Assessing the role of static length scales behind glassy dynamics in polydisperse hard disks.

    PubMed

    Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-06-01

    The possible role of growing static order in the dynamical slowing down toward the glass transition has recently attracted considerable attention. On the basis of random first-order transition theory, a new method to measure the static correlation length of amorphous order, called "point-to-set" (PTS) length, has been proposed and used to show that the dynamic length grows much faster than the static length. Here, we study the nature of the PTS length, using a polydisperse hard-disk system, which is a model that is known to exhibit a growing hexatic order upon densification. We show that the PTS correlation length is decoupled from the steeper increase of the correlation length of hexatic order and dynamic heterogeneity, while closely mirroring the decay length of two-body density correlations. Our results thus provide a clear example that other forms of order can play an important role in the slowing down of the dynamics, casting a serious doubt on the order-agnostic nature of the PTS length and its relevance to slow dynamics, provided that a polydisperse hard-disk system is a typical glass former. PMID:26038545

  17. In Situ Spatiotemporal Mapping of Flow Fields around Seeded Stem Cells at the Subcellular Length Scale

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min Jae; Dean, David; Knothe Tate, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    A major hurdle to understanding and exploiting interactions between the stem cell and its environment is the lack of a tool for precise delivery of mechanical cues concomitant to observing sub-cellular adaptation of structure. These studies demonstrate the use of microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) for in situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around mesenchymal stem cells, i.e. murine embryonic multipotent cell line C3H10T1/2, at the subcellular length scale, providing a tool for real time observation and analysis of stem cell adaptation to the prevailing mechanical milieu. In the absence of cells, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predicts flow regimes within 12% of μ-PIV measures, achieving the technical specifications of the chamber and the flow rates necessary to deliver target shear stresses at a particular height from the base of the flow chamber. However, our μ-PIV studies show that the presence of cells per se as well as the density at which cells are seeded significantly influences local flow fields. Furthermore, for any given cell or cell seeding density, flow regimes vary significantly along the vertical profile of the cell. Hence, the mechanical milieu of the stem cell exposed to shape changing shear stresses, induced by fluid drag, varies with respect to proximity of surrounding cells as well as with respect to apical height. The current study addresses a previously unmet need to predict and observe both flow regimes as well as mechanoadaptation of cells in flow chambers designed to deliver precisely controlled mechanical signals to live cells. An understanding of interactions and adaptation in response to forces at the interface between the surface of the cell and its immediate local environment may be key for de novo engineering of functional tissues from stem cell templates as well as for unraveling the mechanisms underlying multiscale development, growth and adaptation of organisms. PMID:20862249

  18. Exploring soil organic matter-mineral interactions: mechanistic insights at the nanometer and molecular length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomb, C.; Qafoku, N. P.; Grate, J. W.; Hufschmid, R.; Browning, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    With elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic emissions and disruption to the carbon cycle, the effects of climate change are being accelerated. Approximately 80% of Earth's terrestrial organic carbon is stored in soil, and the residence time of this carbon can range from hours to millenia. Understanding the dynamics of this carbon pool in the carbon cycle is crucial to both predicting climate and sustaining ecosystem services. Soil organic carbon is known to be strongly associated with high surface area clay minerals. The nature of these interactions is not well understood primarily due to the heterogeneity of soil, as much of the current knowledge relies on experiments that take a top-down approach using bulk experimental measurements. Our work seeks to probe physical, chemical, and molecular-level interactions at the organic-mineral interface using a bottom-up approach that establishes a model system where complexity can be built in systematically. By performing in situ techniques such as dynamic force spectroscopy, a technique where organic molecules can be brought into contact with mineral surfaces in a controlled manner using an atomic force microscope, we demonstrate the ability to mechanistically probe the energy landscape of individual organic molecules with mineral surfaces. We demonstrate the ability to measure the binding energies of soil-inspired organic functional groups (including carboxylic acid, amine, methyl, and phosphate) with clay and mineral surfaces as a function of solution chemistry. This effort can provide researchers with both guiding principles about carbon dynamics at the sub-nanometer length scale and insights into early aggregation events, where organic-mineral interactions play a significant role.

  19. Orientational dynamics of water confined on a nanometer length scale in reverse micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Howe-Siang; Piletic, Ivan R.; Fayer, M. D.

    2005-05-01

    The time-resolved orientational anisotropies of the OD hydroxyl stretch of dilute HOD in H2O confined on a nanometer length scale in sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles are studied using ultrafast infrared polarization and spectrally resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, and the results are compared to the same experiments on bulk water. The orientational anisotropy data for three water nanopool sizes (4.0, 2.4, and 1.7nm) can be fitted well with biexponential decays. The biexponential decays are analyzed using a wobbling-in-a-cone model that involves fast orientational diffusion within a cone followed by slower, full orientational relaxation. The data provide the cone angles, the diffusion constants for motion within the cones, and the final diffusion constants as a function of the nanopool size. The two processes can be interpreted as a local angular fluctuation of the OD and a global hydrogen bond network rearrangement process. The trend in the relative amplitudes of the long and short exponential decays suggest an increasing rigidity as the nanopool size decreases. The trend in the long decay constants indicates a longer hydrogen bond network rearrangement time with decreasing reverse micelle size. The anisotropy measurements for the reverse micelles studied extrapolate to ˜0.33 rather than the ideal value of 0.4, suggesting the presence of an initial inertial component in the anisotropy decay that is too fast to resolve. The very fast decay component is consistent with initial inertial orientational motion that is seen in published molecular-dynamics simulations of water in AOT reverse micelles. The angle over which the inertial orientational motion occurs is determined. The results are in semiquantitative agreement with the molecular-dynamics simulations.

  20. Electron Transport Behavior on Gate Length Scaling in Sub-50 nm GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jaeheon

    2011-12-01

    Short channel GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFETs) have been fabricated with gate length to 20 nm, in order to examine the characteristics of sub-50 nm MESFET scaling. Here the rise in the measured transconductance is mainly attributed to electron velocity overshoot. For gate lengths below 40 nm, however, the transconductance drops suddenly. The behavior of velocity overshoot and its degradation is investigated and simulated by using a transport model based on the retarded Langevin equation (RLE). This indicates the existence of a minimum acceleration length needed for the carriers to reach the overshoot velocity. The argument shows that the source resistance must be included as an internal element, or appropriate boundary condition, of relative importance in any model where the gate length is comparable to the inelastic mean free path of the carriers.

  1. Additional field verification of convective scaling for the lateral dispersion parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, S.K.; Davis, P.A.

    1988-07-01

    The results of a series of diffusion trials over the heterogeneous surface of the Canadian Precambrian Shield provide additional support for the convective scaling of the lateral dispersion parameter. The data indicate that under convective conditions, the lateral dispersion parameter can be scaled with the convective velocity scale and the mixing depth. 10 references.

  2. Unidirectional solidification of Zn-rich Zn-Cu peritectic alloys -- 2. Microstructural length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D.; Li, Y.; Ng, S.C.; Jones, H.

    2000-05-11

    Experimental results are presented of solidification microstructure length scale including {eta}-phase cell spacing, primary {epsilon} secondary dendrite arm spacing, size of nonaligned dendrite of primary {epsilon}, and volume fraction of primary {epsilon}, as functions of alloy concentration (containing up to 7.37 wt% Cu) and growth velocity (ranging from 0.02 to 4.82 mm/s) in the unidirectional solidification of Zn-rich Zn-Cu peritectic alloys. Intercellular spacing ({lambda}) of two-phase cellular structure decreases with increasing growth velocity (V) such that {lambda}V{sup 1/2} is constant at a fixed alloy concentration in parametric agreement with the KGT and Hunt-Lu models. The value of {lambda}V{sup 1/2} varies from 216 {+-} 10 to 316 {+-} 55 {micro}m{sup 3/2}/s{sup 1/2} with decrease in alloy concentration from 4.94 to 2.17 wt% Cu. These values are much greater than for normal eutectic systems but comparable with monotectic alloys. Dendritic secondary arm spacing ({lambda}{sub 2}) of primary {epsilon} decreases with increasing V such that {lambda}{sub 2}V{sup 1/3} is constant ranging 14.9 {+-} 0.9 to 75.6 {+-} 8.1 {micro}m{sup 4/3}/s{sup 1/3} with increase in alloy concentration (C{sub 0}) from 2.17 to 7.37 wt% Cu, which is in parametric agreement with predictions of arm-coarsening theory. The volume fraction (f{sub e}) of primary {epsilon} increases with increasing V for Zn-rich Zn-3.37, 4.94 and 7.37 wt% Cu hyperperitectic alloys. Predictions of the Scheil and Sarreal-Abbaschian models show good agreement with the observed f{sub {epsilon}} for Zn-4.94 wt% Cu at moderate V from 0.19 to 2.64 mm/s, but fail at low V of less than 0.16 mm/s and at high V of greater than 3.54 mm/s. The measured average size, {Lambda}V{sup 1/2} is constant for a given alloy, increasing from (0.98 {+-} 0.04) x 10{sup 3} to (7.2 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup 3} {micro}m{sup 3/2}/s{sup 1/2} with increase in alloy concentration from 2.17 to 4.94 wt% Cu.

  3. Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles: Form and Function at Multiple Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Runye Helen

    Hierarchical self-assembly, the organization of molecules into supramolecular structures of increasing size and complexity, is a potent tool for materials synthesis and requires understanding the connections of structure across multiple length scales. Herein, self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) into nanoscopic and macroscopic materials is explored, and their anti-cancer applications are investigated. First, nanoscale assembly is examined in the context of an anti-angiogenic PA bearing the G-helix motif of maspin, a tumor suppressor protein. Assembly of this maspin-mimetic PA (MMPA) stabilizes the native G-helix conformation and improves binding to endothelial cells. Furthermore, PA nanostructures significantly increase cell adhesion to fibronectin as compared to G-helix peptide alone. Combined with its inhibitory effect on cell migration, MMPA nanostructures thus show anti-angiogenic activity on par with maspin protein in vitro and in vivo. Second, assembly of cationic PAs with hyaluronic acid (HA), an anionic polyelectrolyte, into macroscopic membranes is explored using PAs with identical formal charge but systematically varied self-assembly domains. Results suggest that membrane formation is dictated by the initial moments of component aggregation and is highly sensitive to PA molecular structure via nanoscale assembly. Specifically, PAs with beta-sheet forming residues are nanofibrous and have high surface charge density, leading to robust membranes with aligned-fiber microstructure. PAs without beta-sheet forming residues are nanospherical and have low surface charge density, leading to weak membranes with non-fibrous finger-like microstructure. Lastly, the principles of PA-HA membrane assembly are applied towards development of anti-cancer therapeutic biomaterials. Here, cytotoxic PAs bearing the epitope (KLAKLAKbeta)2 are co-assembled with non-bioactive cationic PA in order to achieve varying nanoscale morphology. These nanostructures are then

  4. Performance of four turbulence closure models implemented using a generic length scale method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Sherwood, C.R.; Arango, H.G.; Signell, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence model (one equation for turbulence kinetic energy and a second for a generic turbulence length-scale quantity) proposed by Umlauf and Burchard [J. Marine Research 61 (2003) 235] is implemented in a three-dimensional oceanographic model (Regional Oceanographic Modeling System; ROMS v2.0). These two equations, along with several stability functions, can represent many popular turbulence closures, including the k-kl (Mellor-Yamada Level 2.5), k-??, and k-?? schemes. The implementation adds flexibility to the model by providing an unprecedented range of turbulence closure selections in a single 3D oceanographic model and allows comparison and evaluation of turbulence models in an otherwise identical numerical environment. This also allows evaluation of the effect of turbulence models on other processes such as suspended-sediment distribution or ecological processes. Performance of the turbulence models and sediment-transport schemes is investigated with three test cases for (1) steady barotropic flow in a rectangular channel, (2) wind-induced surface mixed-layer deepening in a stratified fluid, and (3) oscillatory stratified pressure-gradient driven flow (estuarine circulation) in a rectangular channel. Results from k-??, k-??, and gen (a new closure proposed by Umlauf and Burchard [J. Marine Research 61 (2003) 235]) are very similar for these cases, but the k-kl closure results depend on a wall-proximity function that must be chosen to suit the flow. Greater variations appear in simulations of suspended-sediment concentrations than in salinity simulations because the transport of suspended-sediment amplifies minor variations in the methods. The amplification is caused by the added physics of a vertical settling rate, bottom stress dependent resuspension, and diffusive transport of sediment in regions of well mixed salt and temperature. Despite the amplified sensitivity of sediment to turbulence models in the estuary test case, the four

  5. Taylor-plasticity-based analysis of length scale effects in void growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. X.; Demiral, M.; El Sayed, T.

    2014-10-01

    We have studied the void growth problem by employing the Taylor-based strain gradient plasticity theories, from which we have chosen the following three, namely, the mechanism-based strain gradient (MSG) plasticity (Gao et al 1999 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47 1239, Huang et al 2000 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 48 99-128), the Taylor-based nonlocal theory (TNT; 2001 Gao and Huang 2001 Int. J. Solids Struct. 38 2615) and the conventional theory of MSG (CMSG; Huang et al 2004 Int. J. Plast. 20 753). We have addressed the following three issues which occur when plastic deformation at the void surface is unconstrained. (1) Effects of elastic deformation. Elasticity is essential for cavitation instability. It is therefore important to guarantee that the gradient term entering the Taylor model is the effective plastic strain gradient instead of the total strain gradient. We propose a simple elastic-plastic decomposition method. When the void size approaches the minimum allowable initial void size related to the maximum allowable geometrically necessary dislocation density, overestimation of the flow stress due to the negligence of the elastic strain gradient is on the order of \\frac{l\\varepsilon_Y}{R0} near the void surface, where l, ɛY and R0 are, respectively, the intrinsic material length scale, the yield strain and the initial void radius. (2) MSG intrinsic inconsistency, which was initially mentioned in Gao et al (1999 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47 1239) but has not been the topic of follow-up studies. We realize that MSG higher-order stress arises due to the linear-strain-field approximation within the mesoscale cell with a nonzero size, lɛ. Simple analysis shows that within an MSG mesoscale cell near the void surface, the difference between microscale and mesoscale strains is on the order of (\\frac{l\\varepsilon}{R0})2 , indicating that when \\frac{l\\varepsilon}{R0}˜ 1.0 , the higher-order stress effect can make the MSG result considerably different from the TNT or CMSG

  6. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter

    2008-08-01

    The magnetic properties of low dimensional solid state matter is of the utmost interest both scientifically as well as technologically. In addition to the charge of the electron which is the base for current electronics, by taking into account the spin degree of freedom in future spintronics applications open a new avenue. Progress towards a better physical understanding of the mechanism and principles involved as well as potential applications of nanomagnetic devices can only be achieved with advanced analytical tools. Soft X-ray microscopy providing a spatial resolution towards 10nm, a time resolution currently in the sub-ns regime and inherent elemental sensitivity is a very promising technique for that. This article reviews the recent achievements of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy by selected examples of spin torque phenomena, stochastical behavior on the nanoscale and spin dynamics in magnetic nanopatterns. The future potential with regard to addressing fundamental magnetic length and time scales, e.g. imaging fsec spin dynamics at upcoming X-ray sources is pointed out.

  7. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P. Oshkai; M. Geveci; D. Rockwell; M. Pollack

    2002-12-12

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of,these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  8. Lagrangian Formulation of a Magnetostatic Field in the Presence of a Minimal Length Scale Based on the Kempf Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moayedi, S. K.; Setare, M. R.; Khosropour, B.

    2013-11-01

    In the 1990s, Kempf and his collaborators Mangano and Mann introduced a D-dimensional (β, β‧)-two-parameter deformed Heisenberg algebra which leads to an isotropic minimal length (\\triangle Xi)\\min = \\hbar √ {Dβ +β '}, \\forall i\\in \\{1, 2, ..., D\\}. In this work, the Lagrangian formulation of a magnetostatic field in three spatial dimensions (D = 3) described by Kempf algebra is presented in the special case of β‧ = 2β up to the first-order over β. We show that at the classical level there is a similarity between magnetostatics in the presence of a minimal length scale (modified magnetostatics) and the magnetostatic sector of the Abelian Lee-Wick model in three spatial dimensions. The integral form of Ampere's law and the energy density of a magnetostatic field in the modified magnetostatics are obtained. Also, the Biot-Savart law in the modified magnetostatics is found. By studying the effect of minimal length corrections to the gyromagnetic moment of the muon, we conclude that the upper bound on the isotropic minimal length scale in three spatial dimensions is 4.42×10-19 m. The relationship between magnetostatics with a minimal length and the Gaete-Spallucci nonlocal magnetostatics [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45, 065401 (2012)] is investigated.

  9. Asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguides with centimeter-scale propagation length under subwavelength confinement for photonic components.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    An asymmetric hybrid plasmonic metal-wire waveguide is proposed by combining the advantages of symmetric and hybrid plasmonic modes. The idea of asymmetric structure eliminates the adverse effect of a substrate and enhances the optical performance of the waveguide. The guiding properties of the proposed waveguide are intensively investigated using the finite elements method. The results exhibit a quite long propagation length of 2.69 cm with subwavelength confinement. More importantly, an extremely large figure of merit of 139037 is achieved. Furthermore, the proposed waveguides can be used as directional couplers. They can achieve a coupling length of only 1.01 μm at S = 0.1 μm with negligible loss. A strong dependence of coupling length on the operating wavelength makes the proposed waveguide promising for realizing wavelength-selective components at telecommunication wavelengths. PMID:25400529

  10. Asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguides with centimeter-scale propagation length under subwavelength confinement for photonic components

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An asymmetric hybrid plasmonic metal-wire waveguide is proposed by combining the advantages of symmetric and hybrid plasmonic modes. The idea of asymmetric structure eliminates the adverse effect of a substrate and enhances the optical performance of the waveguide. The guiding properties of the proposed waveguide are intensively investigated using the finite elements method. The results exhibit a quite long propagation length of 2.69 cm with subwavelength confinement. More importantly, an extremely large figure of merit of 139037 is achieved. Furthermore, the proposed waveguides can be used as directional couplers. They can achieve a coupling length of only 1.01 μm at S = 0.1 μm with negligible loss. A strong dependence of coupling length on the operating wavelength makes the proposed waveguide promising for realizing wavelength-selective components at telecommunication wavelengths. PMID:25400529

  11. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, R.; Bobke, A.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, we analyze three commonly used methods to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. ["Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers," Fluid Dyn. Res. 41, 021404 (2009)] and the one by Nickels ["Inner scaling for wall-bounded flows subject to large pressure gradients," J. Fluid Mech. 521, 217-239 (2004)], and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. ["A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the `outer' peak," Phys. Fluids 23, 041702 (2011)]. The boundary layers developing over the suction and pressure sides of a NACA4412 wing section, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at chord Reynolds number Rec = 400 000, are used as the test case, besides other numerical and experimental data from favorable, zero, and adverse pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, although the composite-profile techniques require data preparation, including initial estimations of fitting parameters and data truncation. Stronger pressure gradients (with a Rotta-Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Collapse of intermittency factors obtained from a wide range of pressure-gradient and Re conditions on the wing further highlights the robustness of the diagnostic plot method to determine the

  12. Dependence of displacement-length scaling relations for fractures and deformation bands on the volumetric changes across them

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, R.A.; Soliva, R.; Fossen, H.; Okubo, C.H.; Reeves, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Displacement-length data from faults, joints, veins, igneous dikes, shear deformation bands, and compaction bands define two groups. The first group, having a power-law scaling relation with a slope of n = 1 and therefore a linear dependence of maximum displacement and discontinuity length (Dmax = ??L), comprises faults and shear (non-compactional or non-dilational) deformation bands. These shearing-mode structures, having shearing strains that predominate over volumetric strains across them, grow under conditions of constant driving stress, with the magnitude of near-tip stress on the same order as the rock's yield strength in shear. The second group, having a power-law scaling relation with a slope of n = 0.5 and therefore a dependence of maximum displacement on the square root of discontinuity length (Dmax = ??L0.5), comprises joints, veins, igneous dikes, cataclastic deformation bands, and compaction bands. These opening- and closing-mode structures grow under conditions of constant fracture toughness, implying significant amplification of near-tip stress within a zone of small-scale yielding at the discontinuity tip. Volumetric changes accommodated by grain fragmentation, and thus control of propagation by the rock's fracture toughness, are associated with scaling of predominantly dilational and compactional structures with an exponent of n = 0.5. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Space perception and body morphology: extent of near space scales with arm length.

    PubMed

    Longo, Matthew R; Lourenco, Stella F

    2007-02-01

    Numerous studies have found that the near space immediately surrounding the body is represented differently than more distant space. In a previous study, we found a gradual shift in attentional bias (on a line bisection task) between near and far space (Longo and Lourenco in Neuropsychologia 44:977-981, 2006). The present study concerns the possibility that arm length relates systematically to the rate at which this gradual shift between near and far space occurs. Participants bisected lines using a laser pointer at eight distances (within and beyond arm's reach), and the rate of shift was estimated by the slope of the least-squares regression line. A negative correlation was found between the slopes and arm length; participants with longer arms showed a more gradual shift in bias with increasing distance than those with shorter arms. These results suggest that, while near space cannot be considered categorically as that within arm's reach, there is a systematic relation between the extent ("size") of near space and arm length. Arm length may constitute an intrinsic metric for the representation of near space. PMID:17256162

  14. A multi-resolution analysis of lidar-DTMs to identify geomorphic processes from characteristic topographic length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangireddy, H.; Passalacqua, P.; Stark, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    Characteristic length scales are often present in topography, and they reflect the driving geomorphic processes. The wide availability of high resolution lidar Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) allows us to measure such characteristic scales, but new methods of topographic analysis are needed in order to do so. Here, we explore how transitions in probability distributions (pdfs) of topographic variables such as (log(area/slope)), defined as topoindex by Beven and Kirkby[1979], can be measured by Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA) of lidar DTMs [Stark and Stark, 2001; Sangireddy et al.,2012] and used to infer dominant geomorphic processes such as non-linear diffusion and critical shear. We show this correlation between dominant geomorphic processes to characteristic length scales by comparing results from a landscape evolution model to natural landscapes. The landscape evolution model MARSSIM Howard[1994] includes components for modeling rock weathering, mass wasting by non-linear creep, detachment-limited channel erosion, and bedload sediment transport. We use MARSSIM to simulate steady state landscapes for a range of hillslope diffusivity and critical shear stresses. Using the MRA approach, we estimate modal values and inter-quartile ranges of slope, curvature, and topoindex as a function of resolution. We also construct pdfs at each resolution and identify and extract characteristic scale breaks. Following the approach of Tucker et al.,[2001], we measure the average length to channel from ridges, within the GeoNet framework developed by Passalacqua et al.,[2010] and compute pdfs for hillslope lengths at each scale defined in the MRA. We compare the hillslope diffusivity used in MARSSIM against inter-quartile ranges of topoindex and hillslope length scales, and observe power law relationships between the compared variables for simulated landscapes at steady state. We plot similar measures for natural landscapes and are able to qualitatively infer the dominant geomorphic

  15. CHARACTERISTIC LENGTH SCALE OF INPUT DATA IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS: IMPLICATIONS FOR MODELING GRID SIZE. (R824784)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model resp...

  16. Evaluation of a Two-Length Scale Turbulence Model with Experiments on Shock-Driven Turbulent Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, John; Gore, Rob; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    A new second moment turbulence model which uses separate transport and decay length scales is used to model the shock-driven instability. The ability of the model to capture the evolution of turbulence statistics and mixing is discussed. Evaluation is based on comparison to the Georgia Tech shock tube experiments. In the experiments a membraneless light-over-heavy interface is created. There is a long-wavelength perturbation which exists due to inclination of the entire shock tube. By limiting calculations to one dimension, there is not a geometric description of the incline, and the ability of the transport length scale alone to capture the effect of the long-wavelength perturbation is tested.

  17. The scaling of the minimum sum of edge lengths in uniformly random trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Juan Luis; Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The minimum linear arrangement problem on a network consists of finding the minimum sum of edge lengths that can be achieved when the vertices are arranged linearly. Although there are algorithms to solve this problem on trees in polynomial time, they have remained theoretical and have not been implemented in practical contexts to our knowledge. Here we use one of those algorithms to investigate the growth of this sum as a function of the size of the tree in uniformly random trees. We show that this sum is bounded above by its value in a star tree. We also show that the mean edge length grows logarithmically in optimal linear arrangements, in stark contrast to the linear growth that is expected on optimal arrangements of star trees or on random linear arrangements.

  18. Distinct Length Scales in the VO{sub 2} Metal–Insulator Transition Revealed by Bi-chromatic Optical Probing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Novikova, Irina B.; Klopf, John M.; Madaras, Scott E.; Williams, Gwyn P.; Madaras, Eric; Lu, Liwei; Wolf, Stuart A.; Lukaszew, Rosa A.

    2014-01-01

    Upon a heating-induced metal–instulator transition (MIT) in VO{sub 2}, microscopic metallic VO{sub 2} puddles nucleate and coarsen within the insulating matrix. This coexistence of the two phases across the transition spans distinct length scales as their relative domain sizes change. Far-field optical probing is applied to follow the dynamic evolution of the highly correlated metallic domains as the MIT progresses.

  19. Does the orbit-averaged theory require a scale separation between periodic orbit size and perturbation correlation length?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong

    2013-10-15

    Using the canonical perturbation theory, we show that the orbit-averaged theory only requires a time-scale separation between equilibrium and perturbed motions and verifies the widely accepted notion that orbit averaging effects greatly reduce the microturbulent transport of energetic particles in a tokamak. Therefore, a recent claim [Hauff and Jenko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 075004 (2009); Jenko et al., ibid. 107, 239502 (2011)] stating that the orbit-averaged theory requires a scale separation between equilibrium orbit size and perturbation correlation length is erroneous.

  20. Dynamics of Water Confined on a Nanometer Length Scale in Reverse Micelles: Ultrafast Infrared Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Howe-Siang; Piletic, Ivan R.; Riter, Ruth E.; Levinger, Nancy E.; Fayer, M. D.

    2005-02-01

    The dynamics of water, confined on a nanometer length scale (1.7 to 4.0 nm) in sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate reverse micelles, is directly investigated using frequency resolved infrared vibrational echo experiments. The data are compared to bulk water and salt solution data. The experimentally determined frequency-frequency correlation functions show that the confined water dynamics is substantially slower than bulk water dynamics and is size dependent. The fastest dynamics (˜50 fs) is more similar to bulk water, while the slowest time scale dynamics is much slower than water, and, in analogy to bulk water, reflects the making and breaking of hydrogen bonds.

  1. Dynamics of water confined on a nanometer length scale in reverse micelles: ultrafast infrared vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Howe-Siang; Piletic, Ivan R; Riter, Ruth E; Levinger, Nancy E; Fayer, M D

    2005-02-11

    The dynamics of water, confined on a nanometer length scale (1.7 to 4.0 nm) in sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate reverse micelles, is directly investigated using frequency resolved infrared vibrational echo experiments. The data are compared to bulk water and salt solution data. The experimentally determined frequency-frequency correlation functions show that the confined water dynamics is substantially slower than bulk water dynamics and is size dependent. The fastest dynamics (approximately 50 fs) is more similar to bulk water, while the slowest time scale dynamics is much slower than water, and, in analogy to bulk water, reflects the making and breaking of hydrogen bonds. PMID:15783696

  2. Additional Validity Evidence and Across-Group Equivalency of the "HOPE Teacher Rating Scale"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Scott J.; Gentry, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The "HOPE Scale" was developed to identify academic and social components of giftedness and talent in elementary-aged students with particular attention to students from low-income and/or culturally diverse families. Based on previous findings, additional research was conducted on revisions made to the "HOPE Scale". Items were added, and 71…

  3. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length two-plasmon-decay experiments at the Omega Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Myatt, J. F.; Skupsky, S.; Yaakobi, B.

    2013-03-15

    Direct-drive-ignition designs with plastic CH ablators create plasmas of long density scale lengths (L{sub n} {>=} 500 {mu}m) at the quarter-critical density (N{sub qc}) region of the driving laser. The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can exceed its threshold in such long-scale-length plasmas (LSPs). To investigate the scaling of TPD-induced hot electrons to laser intensity and plasma conditions, a series of planar experiments have been conducted at the Omega Laser Facility with 2-ns square pulses at the maximum laser energies available on OMEGA and OMEGA EP. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been performed for these LSP experiments using the two-dimensional hydrocode draco. The simulated hydrodynamic evolution of such long-scale-length plasmas has been validated with the time-resolved full-aperture backscattering and Thomson-scattering measurements. draco simulations for CH ablator indicate that (1) ignition-relevant long-scale-length plasmas of L{sub n} approaching {approx}400 {mu}m have been created; (2) the density scale length at N{sub qc} scales as L{sub n}({mu}m) Asymptotically-Equal-To (R{sub DPP} Multiplication-Sign I{sup 1/4}/2); and (3) the electron temperature T{sub e} at N{sub qc} scales as T{sub e}(keV) Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.95 Multiplication-Sign {radical}(I), with the incident intensity (I) measured in 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} for plasmas created on both OMEGA and OMEGA EP configurations with different-sized (R{sub DPP}) distributed phase plates. These intensity scalings are in good agreement with the self-similar model predictions. The measured conversion fraction of laser energy into hot electrons f{sub hot} is found to have a similar behavior for both configurations: a rapid growth [f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 6} for G{sub c} < 4] followed by a saturation of the form, f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 1.2} for G{sub c} {>=} 4, with the

  4. Resolution of sub-element length scales in Brownian dynamics simulations of biopolymer networks with geometrically exact beam finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kei W.; Meier, Christoph; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2015-12-01

    Networks of crosslinked biopolymer filaments such as the cytoskeleton are the subject of intense research. Oftentimes, mechanics on the scale of single monomers (∼ 5 nm) govern the mechanics of the entire network (∼ 10 μm). Until now, one either resolved the small scales and lost the big (network) picture or focused on mechanics above the single-filament scale and neglected the molecular architecture. Therefore, the study of network mechanics influenced by the entire spectrum of relevant length scales has been infeasible so far. We propose a method that reconciles both small and large length scales without the otherwise inevitable loss in either numerical efficiency or geometrical (molecular) detail. Both explicitly modeled species, filaments and their crosslinkers, are discretized with geometrically exact beam finite elements of Simo-Reissner type. Through specific coupling conditions between the elements of the two species, mechanical joints can be established anywhere along a beam's centerline, enabling arbitrary densities of chemical binding sites. These binding sites can be oriented to model the monomeric architecture of polymers. First, we carefully discuss the method and then demonstrate its capabilities by means of a series of numerical examples.

  5. Influence of structural length-scale variations on azimuth-resolved light scattering patterns of inhomogeneous cell models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifler, Dizem; Guillaud, Martial

    2015-07-01

    Optical scattering provides an intrinsic contrast mechanism for the diagnosis of early precancerous changes in tissues. There have been a multitude of numerical studies targeted at delineating the relationship between cancer-related alterations in morphology and internal structure of cells and the resulting changes in their optical scattering properties. Despite these efforts, we still need to further our understanding of inherent scattering signatures that can be linked to precancer progression. As such, computational studies aimed at relating electromagnetic wave interactions to cellular and subcellular structural alterations are likely to provide a quantitative framework for a better assessment of the diagnostic content of optical signals. In this study, we aim to determine the influence of structural length-scale variations on two-dimensional light scattering properties of cells. We numerically construct cell models with different lower bounds on the size of refractive index heterogeneities and we employ the finite-difference time-domain method to compute their azimuth-resolved light scattering patterns. The results indicate that changes in length-scale variations can significantly alter the two-dimensional scattering patterns of cell models. More specifically, the degree of azimuthal asymmetry characterizing these patterns is observed to be highly dependent on the range of length-scale variations. Overall, the study described here is expected to offer useful insights into whether azimuth-resolved measurements can be explored for diagnostic purposes.

  6. Modeling the collective relaxation time of glass-forming polymers at intermediate length scales: Application to polyisobutylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenero, Juan; Alvarez, Fernando; Khairy, Yasmin; Arbe, Arantxa

    2013-07-01

    In a recent paper [V. N. Novikov, K. S. Schweizer, and A. P. Sokolov, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164508 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4802771 a simple analytical ansatz has been proposed to describe the momentum transfer (Q) dependence of the collective relaxation time of glass-forming systems in a wide Q-range covering the region of the first maximum of the static structure factor S(Q) and the so-called intermediate length scale regime. In this work we have generalized this model in order to deal with glass-forming systems where the atomic diffusive processes are sub-linear in nature. This is for instance the case of glass-forming polymers. The generalized expression considers a sub-linear jump-diffusion model and reduces to the expression previously proposed for normal diffusion. The generalized ansatz has been applied to the experimental results of the Q- and temperature-dependence of polyisobutylene (PIB), which were previously published. To reduce the number of free parameters of the model to only one, we have taken advantage of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of PIB properly validated by neutron scattering results. The model perfectly describes the experimental results capturing both, Q- and temperature-dependences. Moreover, the model also reproduces the experimental Q-dependence of the effective activation energy of the collective relaxation time in the temperature range of observation. This non-trivial result gives additional support to the way the crossover between two different relaxation mechanisms of density fluctuations is formulated in the model.

  7. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    P Oshkai; M Geveci; D Rockwell; M Pollack

    2004-05-24

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe, which give rise to flow tones, are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  8. Age-related changes in the plasticity and toughness of human cortical bone at multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Schaible, Eric; Bale, Hrishikesh; Barth, Holly D; Tang, Simon Y; Reichert, Peter; Busse, Bjoern; Alliston, Tamara; Ager, Joel W; Ritchie, Robert O

    2011-08-30

    The structure of human cortical bone evolves over multiple length scales from its basic constituents of collagen and hydroxyapatite at the nanoscale to osteonal structures at near-millimeter dimensions, which all provide the basis for its mechanical properties. To resist fracture, bone's toughness is derived intrinsically through plasticity (e.g., fibrillar sliding) at structural scales typically below a micrometer and extrinsically (i.e., during crack growth) through mechanisms (e.g., crack deflection/bridging) generated at larger structural scales. Biological factors such as aging lead to a markedly increased fracture risk, which is often associated with an age-related loss in bone mass (bone quantity). However, we find that age-related structural changes can significantly degrade the fracture resistance (bone quality) over multiple length scales. Using in situ small-angle X-ray scattering and wide-angle X-ray diffraction to characterize submicrometer structural changes and synchrotron X-ray computed tomography and in situ fracture-toughness measurements in the scanning electron microscope to characterize effects at micrometer scales, we show how these age-related structural changes at differing size scales degrade both the intrinsic and extrinsic toughness of bone. Specifically, we attribute the loss in toughness to increased nonenzymatic collagen cross-linking, which suppresses plasticity at nanoscale dimensions, and to an increased osteonal density, which limits the potency of crack-bridging mechanisms at micrometer scales. The link between these processes is that the increased stiffness of the cross-linked collagen requires energy to be absorbed by "plastic" deformation at higher structural levels, which occurs by the process of microcracking. PMID:21873221

  9. The narrow pulse approximation and long length scale determination in xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of model porous media.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Sen, P N; Hürlimann, M D; Patz, S; Cory, D G; Walsworth, R L

    2002-06-01

    We report a systematic study of xenon gas diffusion NMR in simple model porous media, random packs of mono-sized glass beads, and focus on three specific areas peculiar to gas-phase diffusion. These topics are: (i) diffusion of spins on the order of the pore dimensions during the application of the diffusion encoding gradient pulses in a PGSE experiment (breakdown of the narrow pulse approximation and imperfect background gradient cancellation), (ii) the ability to derive long length scale structural information, and (iii) effects of finite sample size. We find that the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times in small beads is significantly affected by the gas pressure. In particular, as expected, we find smaller deviations between measured D(t) and theoretical predictions as the gas pressure is increased, resulting from reduced diffusion during the application of the gradient pulse. The deviations are then completely removed when water D(t) is observed in the same samples. The use of gas also allows us to probe D(t) over a wide range of length scales and observe the long time asymptotic limit which is proportional to the inverse tortuosity of the sample, as well as the diffusion distance where this limit takes effect (approximately 1-1.5 bead diameters). The Padé approximation can be used as a reference for expected xenon D(t) data between the short and the long time limits, allowing us to explore deviations from the expected behavior at intermediate times as a result of finite sample size effects. Finally, the application of the Padé interpolation between the long and the short time asymptotic limits yields a fitted length scale (the Padé length), which is found to be approximately 0.13b for all bead packs, where b is the bead diameter. PMID:12165255

  10. The narrow pulse approximation and long length scale determination in xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of model porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Sen, P. N.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report a systematic study of xenon gas diffusion NMR in simple model porous media, random packs of mono-sized glass beads, and focus on three specific areas peculiar to gas-phase diffusion. These topics are: (i) diffusion of spins on the order of the pore dimensions during the application of the diffusion encoding gradient pulses in a PGSE experiment (breakdown of the narrow pulse approximation and imperfect background gradient cancellation), (ii) the ability to derive long length scale structural information, and (iii) effects of finite sample size. We find that the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times in small beads is significantly affected by the gas pressure. In particular, as expected, we find smaller deviations between measured D(t) and theoretical predictions as the gas pressure is increased, resulting from reduced diffusion during the application of the gradient pulse. The deviations are then completely removed when water D(t) is observed in the same samples. The use of gas also allows us to probe D(t) over a wide range of length scales and observe the long time asymptotic limit which is proportional to the inverse tortuosity of the sample, as well as the diffusion distance where this limit takes effect (approximately 1-1.5 bead diameters). The Pade approximation can be used as a reference for expected xenon D(t) data between the short and the long time limits, allowing us to explore deviations from the expected behavior at intermediate times as a result of finite sample size effects. Finally, the application of the Pade interpolation between the long and the short time asymptotic limits yields a fitted length scale (the Pade length), which is found to be approximately 0.13b for all bead packs, where b is the bead diameter. c. 2002 Elsevier Sciences (USA).

  11. Study of the overturning length scales at the Spanish planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Pilar; Cano, José L.

    2016-03-01

    The focus of this paper is to analyse the behaviour of the maximum Thorpe displacement (dT)max and the Thorpe scale LT at the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), extending previous research with new data and improving our studies related to the novel use of the Thorpe method applied to ABL. The maximum Thorpe displacements vary between -900 and 950 m for the different field campaigns. The Thorpe scale LT ranges between 0.2 and 680 m for the different data sets which cover different stratified mixing conditions (turbulence shear-driven and convective regions). We analyse the relationship between (dT)max and the Thorpe scale LT and we deduce that they verify a power law. We also deduce that there is a difference in exponents of the power laws for convective conditions and shear-driven conditions. These different power laws could identify overturns created under different mechanisms.

  12. AC electrified jets in a flow-focusing device: Jet length scaling.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Alzaga-Gimeno, Javier; Tan, Say Hwa; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Ramos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We use a microfluidic flow-focusing device with integrated electrodes for controlling the production of water-in-oil drops. In a previous work, we reported that very long jets can be formed upon application of AC fields. We now study in detail the appearance of the long jets as a function of the electrical parameters, i.e., water conductivity, signal frequency, and voltage amplitude. For intermediate frequencies, we find a threshold voltage above which the jet length rapidly increases. Interestingly, this abrupt transition vanishes for high frequencies of the signal and the jet length grows smoothly with voltage. For frequencies below a threshold value, we previously reported a transition from a well-behaved uniform jet to highly unstable liquid structures in which axisymmetry is lost rather abruptly. These liquid filaments eventually break into droplets of different sizes. In this work, we characterize this transition with a diagram as a function of voltage and liquid conductivity. The electrical response of the long jets was studied via a distributed element circuit model. The model allows us to estimate the electric potential at the tip of the jet revealing that, for any combination of the electrical parameters, the breakup of the jet occurs at a critical value of this potential. We show that this voltage is around 550 V for our device geometry and choice of flow rates. PMID:27375826

  13. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in

  14. Scaling Between Fault Length, Damaged Zone Thickness and Width of Secondary Fault Fans Derived from Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, Jean Paul; Mao, Xiaolin

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between earthquakes, fault network geometry and fault zone structure is a key question motivating the integration of dynamic rupture and long-term crustal deformation modeling. Here, we address the scaling between fault structural properties from the perspective of dynamic and quasi-static processes involved in fault system evolution. Faults are surrounded by materials damaged through quasi-static and dynamic processes, forming damaged zones whose thickness and damage intensity may vary as a function of fault maturity and length. In the vicinity (typically less than a few hundred meters) of their principal slip surface, faults develop an "inner damage zone", usually characterized by micro-fracture observations. At a larger scale, faults develop an "outer damage zone" of secondary macroscopic fault branches at their tips, which organize into fans of splay faults. Inner damage zones can significantly affect earthquake ruptures, enhance near-field ground motions and facilitate fluid transport in the crust. Fault zone trapped waves can generate pulse-like rupture and oscillatory rupture speed, facilitate supershear rupture transition and allow for steady rupture propagation at speeds that are unstable or inadmissible in homogeneous media. The effects of a fault damage zone crucially depend on its thickness. Field observations of inner damage zone thickness as a function of cumulated slip show linear scaling at small slip but saturation at large slip, with maximum damage zone thickness of a few hundred meters. We previously developed fracture mechanics theoretical arguments and dynamic rupture simulations with off-fault inelastic deformation that predict saturation of the thickness of co-seismic damage zone controlled by the depth extent of the seismogenic zone. In essence, the stress intensity factor at the front of a rupture, which controls the distance reached by the large off-fault stresses that cause damage, scales with the shortest characteristic

  15. Characterization of light transport in scattering media at sub-diffusion length scales with Low-coherence Enhanced Backscattering

    PubMed Central

    Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Low-coherence enhanced backscattering (LEBS) is a technique that has recently shown promise for tissue characterization and the detection of early pre-cancer. Although several Monte Carlo models of LEBS have been described, these models have not been accurate enough to predict all of the experimentally observed LEBS features. We present an appropriate Monte Carlo model to simulate LEBS peak properties from polystyrene microsphere suspensions in water. Results show that the choice of the phase function greatly impacts the accuracy of the simulation when the transport mean free path (ls*) is much greater than the spatial coherence length (LSC). When ls* < LSC, a diffusion approximation based model of LEBS is sufficiently accurate. We also use the Monte Carlo model to validate that LEBS can be used to measure the radial scattering probability distribution (radial point spread function), p(r), at small length scales and demonstrate LEBS measurements of p(r) from biological tissue. In particular, we show that pre-cancerous and benign mucosal tissues have different small length scale light transport properties. PMID:21037980

  16. The role of discharge variation in scaling of drainage area and food chain length in rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabo, John L.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Post, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Food chain length (FCL) is a fundamental component of food web structure. Studies in a variety of ecosystems suggest that FCL is determined by energy supply, environmental stability, and/or ecosystem size, but the nature of the relationship between environmental stability and FCL, and the mechanism linking ecosystem size to FCL, remain unclear. Here we show that FCL increases with drainage area and decreases with hydrologic variability and intermittency across 36 North American rivers. Our analysis further suggests that hydrologic variability is the mechanism underlying the correlation between ecosystem size and FCL in rivers. Ecosystem size lengthens river food chains by integrating and attenuating discharge variation through stream networks, thereby enhancing environmental stability in larger river systems.

  17. Sensitivity of the two-dimensional shearless mixing layer to the initial turbulent kinetic energy and integral length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathali, M.; Deshiri, M. Khoshnami

    2016-04-01

    The shearless mixing layer is generated from the interaction of two homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT) fields with different integral scales ℓ1 and ℓ2 and different turbulent kinetic energies E1 and E2. In this study, the sensitivity of temporal evolutions of two-dimensional, incompressible shearless mixing layers to the parametric variations of ℓ1/ℓ2 and E1/E2 is investigated. The sensitivity methodology is based on the nonintrusive approach; using direct numerical simulation and generalized polynomial chaos expansion. The analysis is carried out at Reℓ 1=90 for the high-energy HIT region and different integral length scale ratios 1 /4 ≤ℓ1/ℓ2≤4 and turbulent kinetic energy ratios 1 ≤E1/E2≤30 . It is found that the most influential parameter on the variability of the mixing layer evolution is the turbulent kinetic energy while variations of the integral length scale show a negligible influence on the flow field variability. A significant level of anisotropy and intermittency is observed in both large and small scales. In particular, it is found that large scales have higher levels of intermittency and sensitivity to the variations of ℓ1/ℓ2 and E1/E2 compared to the small scales. Reconstructed response surfaces of the flow field intermittency and the turbulent penetration depth show monotonic dependence on ℓ1/ℓ2 and E1/E2 . The mixing layer growth rate and the mixing efficiency both show sensitive dependence on the initial condition parameters. However, the probability density function of these quantities shows relatively small solution variations in response to the variations of the initial condition parameters.

  18. Effects of Physical Processes and Sampling Resolution on Fault Displacement Versus Length Scaling: The Case of the Cantarell Complex Oilfield, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shunshan; Nieto-Samaniego, Angel F.; Murillo-Muñetón, Gustavo; Alaniz-Álvarez, Susana A.; Grajales-Nishimura, José M.; Velasquillo-Martinez, Luis G.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we first review some factors that may alter the fault D max /L ratio and scaling relationship. The three main physical processes are documented as follows: (1) The D max /L ratio increases in an individual segmented fault, whereas it decreases in a fault array consisting of two or more fault segments. This effect occurs at any scale during fault growth and in any type of rock. (2) Vertical restriction decreases the D max /L ratio along the fault strike due to mechanical layers. (3) The D max /L ratio increases or decreases due to fault reactivation depending on the type of reactivation. Thus, using data from the normal faults of the Cantarell oilfield in the southern Gulf of Mexico, we document that the displacement ( D max ) and length ( L) show a weak correlation of linear or power-law scaling, with exponents that are much less than 1 ( n ≈ 0.5). This scaling relation is due to the combination of the physical processes mentioned above, as well as sampling effects, such as technique resolution. These results indicate that sublinear scaling ( n ≈ 0.5) can occur as a result of more than one physical process during faulting in a studied area. In addition to the physical processes associated with brittle deformation in the studied area, the sampling resolution dramatically affects the exponents of the D max - L scaling.

  19. Halogen-bonded mesogens direct polymer self-assemblies up to millimetre length scale

    PubMed Central

    Houbenov, Nikolay; Milani, Roberto; Poutanen, Mikko; Haataja, Johannes; Dichiarante, Valentina; Sainio, Jani; Ruokolainen, Janne; Resnati, Giuseppe; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Ikkala, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Aligning polymeric nanostructures up to macroscale in facile ways remains a challenge in materials science and technology. Here we show polymeric self-assemblies where nanoscale organization guides the macroscopic alignment up to millimetre scale. The concept is shown by halogen bonding mesogenic 1-iodoperfluoroalkanes to a star-shaped ethyleneglycol-based polymer, having chloride end-groups. The mesogens segregate and stack parallel into aligned domains. This leads to layers at ~10 nm periodicity. Combination of directionality of halogen bonding, mesogen parallel stacking and minimization of interfacial curvature translates into an overall alignment in bulk and films up to millimetre scale. Upon heating, novel supramolecular halogen-bonded polymeric liquid crystallinity is also shown. As many polymers present sites capable of receiving halogen bonding, we suggest generic potential of this strategy for aligning polymer self-assemblies. PMID:24893843

  20. Do additional full-length radiographs of the humerus and forearm improve the decision making in children with supracondylar humerus fractures?

    PubMed

    Bloom, Tamir; Seigerman, Daniel A; Zhao, Caixia; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2016-09-01

    We sought to determine the diagnostic utility of additional full-length radiographs of the forearm and humerus for pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures. A pediatric orthopedic surgeon and a senior orthopedic resident individually reviewed the initial humerus, forearm, and elbow radiographs of 55 children with a supracondylar humerus fracture and recommended definitive treatment (operative vs. nonoperative) on the basis of the modified Gartland classification. Interobserver agreements for classification and the recommended treatment were highest for the elbow radiographs (weighted κ=0.92). All disagreements in the recommended treatment were in fractures classified as Gartland type I versus II fractures. Although two children (4%) had an ipsilateral distal forearm fracture, selective versus routine use of additional full-length radiographs in children with a supracondylar humerus fracture needs to be evaluated further. PMID:27258360

  1. Gait dynamics in Parkinson's disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties.

  2. Using tank 107-AN caustic addition for confirmation of mixing scale relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.C.

    1995-05-01

    A subscale jet mixing program was carried out in two scale tanks to extend the basis of previous subscale tests to include in-tank geometry associated with tank AN-107. The laboratory data will be correlated with the data to be collected in the upcoming tank AN-107 mixing and caustic addition test. The objective is to verify the scaling relationship used in the MWTF mixer design.

  3. Length distributions of identity by descent reveal fine-scale demographic history.

    PubMed

    Palamara, Pier Francesco; Lencz, Todd; Darvasi, Ariel; Pe'er, Itsik

    2012-11-01

    Data-driven studies of identity by descent (IBD) were recently enabled by high-resolution genomic data from large cohorts and scalable algorithms for IBD detection. Yet, haplotype sharing currently represents an underutilized source of information for population-genetics research. We present analytical results on the relationship between haplotype sharing across purportedly unrelated individuals and a population's demographic history. We express the distribution of IBD sharing across pairs of individuals for segments of arbitrary length as a function of the population's demography, and we derive an inference procedure to reconstruct such demographic history. The accuracy of the proposed reconstruction methodology was extensively tested on simulated data. We applied this methodology to two densely typed data sets: 500 Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) individuals and 56 Kenyan Maasai (MKK) individuals (HapMap 3 data set). Reconstructing the demographic history of the AJ cohort, we recovered two subsequent population expansions, separated by a severe founder event, consistent with previous analysis of lower-throughput genetic data and historical accounts of AJ history. In the MKK cohort, high levels of cryptic relatedness were detected. The spectrum of IBD sharing is consistent with a demographic model in which several small-sized demes intermix through high migration rates and result in enrichment of shared long-range haplotypes. This scenario of historically structured demographies might explain the unexpected abundance of runs of homozygosity within several populations. PMID:23103233

  4. Small scale structure of spacetime in presence of a minimal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothawala, Dawood

    2015-04-01

    I present some recent results which yields some specific consequences of having a minimal spacetime length L0 while maintaining Lorentz covariance. In particular: (i) the resultant description of geometry must be in terms of a non-local bi-tensor qab(P,p, L20) instead of the conventional metric tensor gab(p), (ii) qab and gab are related disformally through the Synge world function, (iii) the resultant non-local d'Alembartian yields Green's functions with a natural covariant short distance cut-off, (iv) the Ricci bi-scalar R(P,p, L20) corresponding to qab yields a local scalar S(P, L20) = R(P, P, L20) in the coincidence such that {\\lim L→ 0} S(P;L) \\propto Rab ta t^b where ta are arbitrary normalized vectors representing gauge degrees of freedom at each spacetime event; this limit turns out to be independent of the precise details of the short distance modification, (v) the Gibbons-Hawking-York surface term for qab yields a residual entropy for each spacetimeevent

  5. Locally auxetic behavior of elastomeric polypropylene on the 100 nm length scale.

    PubMed

    Franke, Mechthild; Magerle, Robert

    2011-06-28

    We observe unexpected locally auxetic behavior in elastomeric polypropylene, a semicrystalline polymer with a natural microstructure and a low degree of crystallinity. Our series of scanning force microscopy images show the nanomechanical deformation processes that occur upon stretching a thin film of elastomeric polypropylene. Upon uniaxial stretching, the angle between epitaxially grown lamella branches remains constant and the lamellae elongate, resulting in locally auxetic behavior (negative Poisson's ratio) on the 100-nanometer scale. This mechanism causing auxetic behavior, which was previously proposed on the basis of geometric arguments, appears to be an intrinsic property of certain semicrystalline polymers. PMID:21495686

  6. Measuring Scale Errors in a Laser Tracker's Horizontal Angle Encoder Through Simple Length Measurement and Two-Face System Tests.

    PubMed

    Muralikrishnan, B; Blackburn, C; Sawyer, D; Phillips, S; Bridges, R

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method to estimate the scale errors in the horizontal angle encoder of a laser tracker in this paper. The method does not require expensive instrumentation such as a rotary stage or even a calibrated artifact. An uncalibrated but stable length is realized between two targets mounted on stands that are at tracker height. The tracker measures the distance between these two targets from different azimuthal positions (say, in intervals of 20° over 360°). Each target is measured in both front face and back face. Low order harmonic scale errors can be estimated from this data and may then be used to correct the encoder's error map to improve the tracker's angle measurement accuracy. We have demonstrated this for the second order harmonic in this paper. It is important to compensate for even order harmonics as their influence cannot be removed by averaging front face and back face measurements whereas odd orders can be removed by averaging. We tested six trackers from three different manufacturers. Two of those trackers are newer models introduced at the time of writing of this paper. For older trackers from two manufacturers, the length errors in a 7.75 m horizontal length placed 7 m away from a tracker were of the order of ± 65 μm before correcting the error map. They reduced to less than ± 25 μm after correcting the error map for second order scale errors. Newer trackers from the same manufacturers did not show this error. An older tracker from a third manufacturer also did not show this error. PMID:27134789

  7. Characteristic length scales and time-averaged transport velocities of suspended sediment in the mid-Atlantic Region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pizzuto, James; Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Gellis, Allen; Noe, Greg; Williamson, Elyse; Karwan, Diana L.; O'Neal, Michael; Marquard, Julia; Aalto, Rolf; Newbold, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Watershed Best Management Practices (BMPs) are often designed to reduce loading from particle-borne contaminants, but the temporal lag between BMP implementation and improvement in receiving water quality is difficult to assess because particles are only moved downstream episodically, resting for long periods in storage between transport events. A theory is developed that describes the downstream movement of suspended sediment particles accounting for the time particles spend in storage given sediment budget data (by grain size fraction) and information on particle transit times through storage reservoirs. The theory is used to define a suspended sediment transport length scale that describes how far particles are carried during transport events, and to estimate a downstream particle velocity that includes time spent in storage. At 5 upland watersheds of the mid-Atlantic region, transport length scales for silt-clay range from 4 to 60 km, while those for sand range from 0.4 to 113 km. Mean sediment velocities for silt-clay range from 0.0072 km/yr to 0.12 km/yr, while those for sand range from 0.0008 km/yr to 0.20 km/yr, 4–6 orders of magnitude slower than the velocity of water in the channel. These results suggest lag times of 100–1000 years between BMP implementation and effectiveness in receiving waters such as the Chesapeake Bay (where BMPs are located upstream of the characteristic transport length scale). Many particles likely travel much faster than these average values, so further research is needed to determine the complete distribution of suspended sediment velocities in real watersheds.

  8. Characteristic length scales and time-averaged transport velocities of suspended sediment in the mid-Atlantic Region, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, James; Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Gellis, Allen; Noe, Greg; Williamson, Elyse; Karwan, Diana L.; O'Neal, Michael; Marquard, Julia; Aalto, Rolf; Newbold, Denis

    2014-02-01

    Watershed Best Management Practices (BMPs) are often designed to reduce loading from particle-borne contaminants, but the temporal lag between BMP implementation and improvement in receiving water quality is difficult to assess because particles are only moved downstream episodically, resting for long periods in storage between transport events. A theory is developed that describes the downstream movement of suspended sediment particles accounting for the time particles spend in storage given sediment budget data (by grain size fraction) and information on particle transit times through storage reservoirs. The theory is used to define a suspended sediment transport length scale that describes how far particles are carried during transport events, and to estimate a downstream particle velocity that includes time spent in storage. At 5 upland watersheds of the mid-Atlantic region, transport length scales for silt-clay range from 4 to 60 km, while those for sand range from 0.4 to 113 km. Mean sediment velocities for silt-clay range from 0.0072 km/yr to 0.12 km/yr, while those for sand range from 0.0008 km/yr to 0.20 km/yr, 4-6 orders of magnitude slower than the velocity of water in the channel. These results suggest lag times of 100-1000 years between BMP implementation and effectiveness in receiving waters such as the Chesapeake Bay (where BMPs are located upstream of the characteristic transport length scale). Many particles likely travel much faster than these average values, so further research is needed to determine the complete distribution of suspended sediment velocities in real watersheds.

  9. Backscatter Reduction Using Combined Spatial, Temporal, and Polarization Beam Smoothing in a Long-Scale-length Laser Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Berger, R. L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Williams, E. A.; Young, P. E.

    2001-03-26

    Spatial, temporal, and polarization smoothing schemes are combined for the first time to reduce to a few percent the total stimulated backscatter of a NIF-like probe laser beam (2x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, 351 nm, f/8) in a long-scale-length laser plasma. Combining temporal and polarization smoothing reduces simulated Brillouin scattering and simulated Raman scattering (SRS) up to an order of magnitude although neither smoothing scheme by itself is uniformly effective. The results agree with trends observed in simulations performed with the laser-plasma interaction code F3D simulations [R.L. Berger et al., Phys. Plasma 6, 1043 (1999)].

  10. Scalar wave propagation in random amplifying media: Influence of localization effects on length and time scales and threshold behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Regine; Lubatsch, Andreas

    2011-07-15

    We present a detailed discussion of scalar wave propagation and light intensity transport in three-dimensional random dielectric media with optical gain. The intrinsic length and time scales of such amplifying systems are studied and comprehensively discussed as well as the threshold characteristics of single- and two-particle propagators. Our semianalytical theory is based on a self-consistent Cooperon resummation, representing the repeated self-interference, and incorporates as well optical gain and absorption, modeled in a semianalytical way by a finite imaginary part of the dielectric function. Energy conservation in terms of a generalized Ward identity is taken into account.

  11. Problems in biology with many scales of length: Cell-cell adhesion and cell jamming in collective cellular migration.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Adrian F; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Park, Jin-Ah

    2016-04-10

    As do all things in biology, cell mechanosensation, adhesion and migration begin at the scale of the molecule. Collections of molecules assemble to comprise microscale objects such as adhesions, organelles and cells. And collections of cells in turn assemble to comprise macroscale tissues. From the points of view of mechanism and causality, events at the molecular scale are seen most often as being the most upstream and, therefore, the most fundamental and the most important. In certain collective systems, by contrast, events at many scales of length conspire to make contributions of equal importance, and even interact directly and strongly across disparate scales. Here we highlight recent examples in cellular mechanosensing and collective cellular migration where physics at some scale bigger than the cell but smaller than the tissue - the mesoscale - becomes the missing link that is required to tie together findings that might otherwise seem counterintuitive or even unpredictable. These examples, taken together, establish that the phenotypes and the underlying physics of collective cellular migration are far richer than previously anticipated. PMID:26546401

  12. Scale lengths in quasi-parallel shocks. [interplanetary and earth bow waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; Greenstadt, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    A review was carried out of ISEE and Voyager spacecraft magnetometer data to determine if quasi-parallel bow shocks are really broad, disordered regions. The key parameter was the deceleration scale (thickness, Lp) across which random energy would need to increase and a localized electrostatic field (E) would be present. Lp would define the breadth of the shock and be associated with a plasma deceleration. The ISEE 1 satellite collected data on the electron density, bulk speed, magnetic intensity, and electron temperature in November 1977 during five traverses of the bow shock. Similar data were gathered from an interplanetary shock wave in 1981. The evidence supported the concept of a plasma deceleration across a thin layer (Lp) in both types of shocks. The layers were about 50 times (interplanetary) and 20 times (earth) thinner than surrounding magnetic fluctuation regions. It is asserted that the regions of deceleration, although much thinner, are the actual shocks and not the entire regions of magnetic fluctuations.

  13. Applicability of Macroscopic Wear and Friction Laws on the Atomic Length Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Feldbauer, G.; Bianchi, D.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Betz, G.; Vernes, A.

    2015-07-01

    Using molecular dynamics, we simulate the abrasion process of an atomically rough Fe surface with multiple hard abrasive particles. By quantifying the nanoscopic wear depth in a time-resolved fashion, we show that Barwell's macroscopic wear law can be applied at the atomic scale. We find that in this multiasperity contact system, the Bowden-Tabor term, which describes the friction force as a function of the real nanoscopic contact area, can predict the kinetic friction even when wear is involved. From this the Derjaguin-Amontons-Coulomb friction law can be recovered, since we observe a linear dependence of the contact area on the applied load in accordance with Greenwood-Williamson contact mechanics.

  14. Characterization of Tissue Structure at Varying Length Scales Using Temporal Diffusion Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gore, John C.; Xu, Junzhong; Colvin, Daniel C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Parsons, Edward C.; Does, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The concepts, theoretical behavior and experimental applications of temporal diffusion spectroscopy are reviewed and illustrated. Temporal diffusion spectra are obtained by using oscillating gradient waveforms in diffusion-weighted measurements, and represent the manner in which various spectral components of molecular velocity correlations vary in different geometrical structures that restrict or hinder free movements. Measurements made at different gradient frequencies reveal information on the scale of restrictions or hindrances to free diffusion, and the shape of a spectrum reveals the relative contributions of spatial restrictions at different distance scales. Such spectra differ from other so-called diffusion spectra which depict spatial frequencies and are defined at a fixed diffusion time. Experimentally, oscillating gradients at moderate frequency are more feasible for exploring restrictions at very short distances, which in tissues correspond to structures smaller than cells. We describe the underlying concepts of temporal diffusion spectra and provide analytical expressions for the behavior of the diffusion coefficient as a function of gradient frequency in simple geometries with different dimensions. Diffusion in more complex model media that mimic tissues has been simulated using numerical methods. Experimental measurements of diffusion spectra have been obtained in suspensions of particles and cells, as well as in vivo in intact animals. An observation of particular interest is the increased contrast and heterogeneity observed in tumors using oscillating gradients at moderate frequency compared to conventional pulse gradient methods, and the potential for detecting changes in tumors early in their response to treatment. Computer simulations suggest that diffusion spectral measurements may be sensitive to intracellular structures such as nuclear size, and that changes in tissue diffusion properties may be measured before there are changes in cell

  15. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, M. A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, F.; Sun, X.; Khaleel, M. A.; Horstemeyer, M. F.

    2012-02-01

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained ≈170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 Å of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-Σ grain boundaries (e.g., the Σ3{112} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and Σ designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have ≈80% more grain boundary sites per area and ≈300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 Å versus 10-11 Å for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  16. Probing grain boundary sink strength at the nanoscale: Energetics and length scales of vacancy and interstitial absorption by grain boundaries in α-Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Solanki, K. N.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Horstemeyer, Mark

    2012-02-10

    The energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between point defects (vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and grain boundaries in bcc Fe was explored. Molecular statics simulations were used to generate a grain boundary structure database that contained {approx}170 grain boundaries with varying tilt and twist character. Then, vacancy and self-interstitial atom formation energies were calculated at all potential grain boundary sites within 15 {angstrom} of the boundary. The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms with symmetric tilt grain boundaries in iron and the length scales involved with absorption of these point defects by grain boundaries. Both low- and high-angle grain boundaries were effective sinks for point defects, with a few low-{Sigma} grain boundaries (e.g., the {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} twin boundary) that have properties different from the rest. The formation energies depend on both the local atomic structure and the distance from the boundary center. Additionally, the effect of grain boundary energy, disorientation angle, and {Sigma} designation on the boundary sink strength was explored; the strongest correlation occurred between the grain boundary energy and the mean point defect formation energies. Based on point defect binding energies, interstitials have {approx}80% more grain boundary sites per area and {approx}300% greater site strength than vacancies. Last, the absorption length scale of point defects by grain boundaries is over a full lattice unit larger for interstitials than for vacancies (mean of 6-7 {angstrom} versus 10-11 {angstrom} for vacancies and interstitials, respectively).

  17. Long-length, long-lived flow-shear stabilized Z-pinches: Background and Experimental plans for scaling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Shumlak, U.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; McLean, H. S.; Schmidt, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP experiment produces long-lived sheared-flow-stabilized Z-pinch plasmas up to 126 cm in length for several flow-through times, and up to thousands of Alfvén times. Experimental measurements of the magnetic structure along the full length of the plasma column show an axially uniform Z-pinch plasma during the observed quiescent period. Interferometry, fast-framing images, and Rogowskii coils corroborate the existence of a pinched plasma during this quiescent period of time. Detailed two-dimensional non-linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculations have been performed showing the formation and assembly of long-length, long-lived Z-pinches. Experimentally-observed plasma lifetimes and velocity-shear profiles are shown to be consistent with calculations of viscous-damping timescales based on the measured plasma parameters. A newly-funded ARPA-E ALPHA project, the Fusion Z-pinch Experiment ``FuZE'' is being constructed at the University of Washington, in collaboration with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. FuZE will study scaling and stability of the successful ZaP experiment to higher pinch currents. The FuZE experimental design, goals, and plans, based on ZaP experimental results, will be presented.

  18. Delineating tectonic units beneath the Donbas Fold Belt using scale lengths estimated from DOBRE 2000/2001 deep reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, S. F. A.; Roy-Chowdhury, K.; Stephenson, R. A.; Stovba, S.

    2009-10-01

    A novel statistical analysis, which augments conventional interpretation of deep seismic reflection/refraction data, is applied to the DOBRE 2000/2001 reflection profile. The goal is to improve delineation of the lithosphere in terms of lithotectonic units and to compare these to existing interpretations. After a successful validation of the method using synthetic data, stochastic parameters estimated from windowed average lateral autocorrelations in the DOBRE data are compiled in a two-dimensional profile of von Karman-type causative reflectivity. These estimates in terms of lateral correlation lengths and power law exponents are accompanied by associated uncertainties. Given its low uncertainties, the lateral correlation length ax turns out to be a robust delineator. The profile of ax reveals systematic spatial variations in the lithospheric fabric below the Donbas Fold Belt. As in earlier interpretations based upon conventional processing of reflection/refraction data, both the sedimentary basin and Moho discontinuity stand out clearly, as well as a region indicating massive vertical intrusion in the crust from upper mantle sills and ultramafic underplating of the lower crust. Notable differences with conventional interpretations include the number and extent of supra-Moho rift pillow structures, the lack of imaging a crust-cutting dislocation feature and a laterally disturbed uppermost mantle. Von Karman lateral correlation length provides new independent information at a scale between velocity models from wide-angle reflection/refraction data and line drawings from near vertical reflections and provides new insights and understanding of lithospheric evolution.

  19. Biological length scale topography enhances cell-substratum adhesion of human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Karuri, Nancy W.; Liliensiek, Sara; Teixeira, Ana I.; Abrams, George; Campbell, Sean; Nealey, Paul F.; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The basement membrane possesses a rich 3-dimensional nanoscale topography that provides a physical stimulus, which may modulate cell-substratum adhesion. We have investigated the strength of cell-substratum adhesion on nanoscale topographic features of a similar scale to that of the native basement membrane. SV40 human corneal epithelial cells were challenged by well-defined fluid shear, and cell detachment was monitored. We created silicon substrata with uniform grooves and ridges having pitch dimensions of 400-4000 nm using X-ray lithography. F-actin labeling of cells that had been incubated for 24 hours revealed that the percentage of aligned and elongated cells on the patterned surfaces was the same regardless of pitch dimension. In contrast, at the highest fluid shear, a biphasic trend in cell adhesion was observed with cells being most adherent to the smaller features. The 400 nm pitch had the highest percentage of adherent cells at the end of the adhesion assay. The effect of substratum topography was lost for the largest features evaluated, the 4000 nm pitch. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the cells during and after flow indicated that the aligned and elongated cells on the 400 nm pitch were more tightly adhered compared to aligned cells on the larger patterns. Selected experiments with primary cultured human corneal epithelial cells produced similar results to the SV40 human corneal epithelial cells. These findings have relevance to interpretation of cell-biomaterial interactions in tissue engineering and prosthetic design. PMID:15226393

  20. Molecular density functional theory of water describing hydrophobicity at short and long length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    We present an extension of our recently introduced molecular density functional theory of water [G. Jeanmairet et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 619 (2013)] to the solvation of hydrophobic solutes of various sizes, going from angstroms to nanometers. The theory is based on the quadratic expansion of the excess free energy in terms of two classical density fields: the particle density and the multipolar polarization density. Its implementation requires as input a molecular model of water and three measurable bulk properties, namely, the structure factor and the k-dependent longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities. The fine three-dimensional water structure around small hydrophobic molecules is found to be well reproduced. In contrast, the computed solvation free-energies appear overestimated and do not exhibit the correct qualitative behavior when the hydrophobic solute is grown in size. These shortcomings are corrected, in the spirit of the Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory, by complementing the functional with a truncated hard-sphere functional acting beyond quadratic order in density, and making the resulting functional compatible with the Van-der-Waals theory of liquid-vapor coexistence at long range. Compared to available molecular simulations, the approach yields reasonable solvation structure and free energy of hard or soft spheres of increasing size, with a correct qualitative transition from a volume-driven to a surface-driven regime at the nanometer scale.

  1. Dominant length scale of the ``pure'' turbulent fluctuations in the outer region of wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yong Seok; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nick

    2014-11-01

    A new method of decomposing the total velocity in boundary layers, which removes the influence of instantaneous boundary layer thickness variations to the fluctuating velocity component, is proposed. The recent proposition of the quiescent core of turbulent channel flow by Kwon et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 751, 228 (2014)) permits us to apply the same decomposition to channel flows where the quiescent core is analogous to the free-stream. Using this decomposition, it is observed that the majority of the large-scale streamwise velocity fluctuation within the intermittent region is attributed to the oscillation of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface or the quiescent core. It suggests that the quiescent core and the free-stream play a similar role and the flow nearer to the wall in both flows is more similar than previously thought while the different characteristics of the free-stream and the quiescent core account for the differences in the outer region of two flows. These findings re-affirm the analogy between the quiescent core and the free-stream, which could potentially lead to the unified conceptual model between internal and external flows. This work is financially supported by the Australian Research Council and the Defence Science and Technology Organisation.

  2. Strategies for Directing the Structure and Function of 3D Collagen Biomaterials across Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandan D.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen type I is a widely used natural biomaterial that has found utility in a variety of biological and medical applications. Its well characterized structure and role as an extracellular matrix protein make it a highly relevant material for controlling cell function and mimicking tissue properties. Collagen type I is abundant in a number of tissues, and can be isolated as a purified protein. This review focuses on hydrogel biomaterials made by reconstituting collagen type I from a solubilized form, with an emphasis on in vitro studies in which collagen structure can be controlled. The hierarchical structure of collagen from the nanoscale to the macroscale is described, with an emphasis on how structure is related to function across scales. Methods of reconstituting collagen into hydrogel materials are presented, including molding of macroscopic constructs, creation of microscale modules, and electrospinning of nanoscale fibers. The modification of collagen biomaterials to achieve desired structures and functions is also addressed, with particular emphasis on mechanical control of collagen structure, creation of collagen composite materials, and crosslinking of collagenous matrices. Biomaterials scientists have made remarkable progress in rationally designing collagen-based biomaterials and in applying them to both the study of biology and for therapeutic benefit. This broad review illustrates recent examples of techniques used to control collagen structure, and to thereby direct its biological and mechanical functions. PMID:24012608

  3. Spatial and Temporal Length Scales Characterizing the Evolution of Seismicity Rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, S. Z.; Tiampo, K. F.; Bowman, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous studies have documented systematic changes in seismicity rates preceding large magnitude events. Many works suggest that these changes can be used to conduct time-dependent earthquake forecasting. We use two approaches to examine the spatial and temporal scales characterizing the seismicity rate changes, with the goal of exploring the underlying physical process. The first set of analyses follow the methodology outlined in Tiampo et al. [2002], for determining the eigenfunctions describing spatial and temporal correlation in regional seismicity. We extend the method by incorporating a temporal lag in construction of the covariance matrix. Decomposing the matrix into its eigenmodes then highlights correlated activity separated in time by the specified lag. Here, we present the results obtained for southern California seismicity from 1932 to 2004, using a range of temporal lags. Our second approach considers changes in yearly seismicity rates as a function of distance from the rupture plane of major historical events. To quantify the significance of trends in the seismicity rates, we auto-correlate the data, using a range of spatial and temporal lags. Here, we focus on the results for the 1987 Superstition Hills, 1992 Landers, and 1994 Northridge, California, earthquakes. We also briefly address the results for the 1971 San Fernando, 1983 Coalinga, 1986 Chalfant Valley, 1989 Loma Prieta, 1999 Hector Mine events and the 2002 Denali, AK, earthquake.

  4. Chemical additive to maximize antimicrobial effect of chlorine during pilot scale immersion chilling of broiler carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A prior laboratory scale study demonstrated the potential for T-128, a proprietary blend including propylene glycol and phosphoric acid, to enhance the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine during immersion chilling of broiler parts. The objective of the current study was to test the addition of T-128...

  5. Imaging Acoustic Phonon Dynamics on the Nanometer-Femtosecond Spatiotemporal Length-Scale with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plemmons, Dayne; Flannigan, David

    Coherent collective lattice oscillations known as phonons dictate a broad range of physical observables in condensed matter and act as primary energy carriers across a wide range of material systems. Despite this omnipresence, analysis of phonon dynamics on their ultrashort native spatiotemporal length scale - that is, the combined nanometer (nm), spatial and femtosecond (fs), temporal length-scales - has largely remained experimentally inaccessible. Here, we employ ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) to directly image discrete acoustic phonons in real-space with combined nm-fs resolution. By directly probing electron scattering in the image plane (as opposed to the diffraction plane), we retain phase information critical for following the evolution, propagation, scattering, and decay of phonons in relation to morphological features of the specimen (i.e. interfaces, grain boundaries, voids, ripples, etc.). We extract a variety of morphologically-specific quantitative information from the UEM videos including phonon frequencies, phase velocities, and decays times. We expect these direct manifestations of local elastic properties in the vicinity of material defects and interfaces will aide in the understanding and application of phonon-mediated phenomena in nanostructures. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.

  6. Optimal length scales emerging from shear load transfer in natural materials: application to carbon-based nanocomposite design.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoding; Naraghi, Mohammad; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2012-03-27

    Numerous theoretical and experimental studies on various species of natural composites, such as nacre in abalone shells, collagen fibrils in tendon, and spider silk fibers, have been pursued to provide insight into the synthesis of novel bioinspired high-performance composites. However, a direct link between the mechanical properties of the constituents and the various geometric features and hierarchies remains to be fully established. In this paper, we explore a common denominator leading to the outstanding balance between strength and toughness in natural composite materials. We present an analytical model to link the mechanical properties of constituents, their geometric arrangement, and the chemistries used in their lateral interactions. Key critical overlap length scales between adjacent reinforcement constituents, which directly control strength and toughness of composite materials, emerge from the analysis. When these length scales are computed for three natural materials-nacre, collagen molecules, and spider silk fibers-very good agreement is found as compared with experimental measurements. The model was then used to interpret load transfer capabilities in synthetic carbon-based materials through parametrization of in situ SEM shear experiments on overlapping multiwall carbon nanotubes. PMID:22316210

  7. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, E. Arciprete, F.; Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F.; Magri, R.

    2014-09-15

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  8. Age-related changes in the plasticity and toughness of human cortical bone at multiple length-scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Bale, Hrishikesh; Barth, Holly D.; Tang, Simon Y.; Reichert, Peter; Busse, Bjoern; Alliston, Tamara; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-08-10

    The structure of human cortical bone evolves over multiple length-scales from its basic constituents of collagen and hydroxyapatite at the nanoscale to osteonal structures at nearmillimeter dimensions, which all provide the basis for its mechanical properties. To resist fracture, bone’s toughness is derived intrinsically through plasticity (e.g., fibrillar sliding) at structural-scales typically below a micron and extrinsically (i.e., during crack growth) through mechanisms (e.g., crack deflection/bridging) generated at larger structural-scales. Biological factors such as aging lead to a markedly increased fracture risk, which is often associated with an age-related loss in bone mass (bone quantity). However, we find that age-related structural changes can significantly degrade the fracture resistance (bone quality) over multiple lengthscales. Using in situ small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction to characterize sub-micron structural changes and synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and in situ fracture-toughness measurements in the scanning electron microscope to characterize effects at micron-scales, we show how these age-related structural changes at differing size-scales degrade both the intrinsic and extrinsic toughness of bone. Specifically, we attribute the loss in toughness to increased non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking which suppresses plasticity at nanoscale dimensions and to an increased osteonal density which limits the potency of crack-bridging mechanisms at micron-scales. The link between these processes is that the increased stiffness of the cross-linked collagen requires energy to be absorbed by “plastic” deformation at higher structural levels, which occurs by the process of microcracking.

  9. Effect of Addition of Mill Scale on Sintering of Iron Ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Pinson, David; Chew, Sheng; Monaghan, Brian J.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Webster, Nathan A. S.; Rogers, Harold; Zhang, Guangqing

    2016-06-01

    Iron-rich (65 to 70 pct total Fe) mill scale generated during processing by steel mills can be recycled by using it as a ferrous raw material in the sintering process. The effect of mill scale addition on the phase formation of sintered specimens from an industrial sinter blend containing 0 to 15 wt pct mill scale was examined, and the mineral phases formed during sintering under various conditions (T = 1523 K to 1598 K [1250 °C to 1325 °C] and gas compositions of pO2 = 0.5, 5 and 21 kPa) were quantitatively measured. For samples sintered in air (pO2 = 21 kPa), there was negligible effect of mill scale addition on the phases formed. The oxidation of the mill scale was complete, and phases such as Silico-Ferrite of Calcium and Aluminum (SFCA), SFCA-I, and hematite dominated. Under lower oxygen partial pressures (pO2 = 0.5 or 5 kPa), and throughout the temperature range examined, the mill scale was converted to magnetite, with the extent of reaction controlled by the hematite-magnetite conversion kinetics. When sintered in the gas mixture with pO2 = 5 kPa, an increase in the mill scale content from 0 to 15 wt pct resulted in a decrease of hematite and total SFCA phases and a corresponding increase in the amount of magnetite which formed. The oxidation of wustite in mill scale to magnetite decreased the local partial pressure of O2 and increased sintering temperature, which promoted the decomposition of hematite.

  10. Effects of characteristic length scales on the exciton dynamics in rubrene single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseking, Björn; Schmeiler, Teresa; Müller, Benjamin; Deibel, Carsten; Engels, Bernd; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Pflaum, Jens

    2014-11-01

    We present temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) investigations on well-defined morphologies of the prototypical organic semiconductor rubrene. By their respective degree of spatial constraint these morphologies directly influence the temperature dependent excitonic processes and their dynamics. While in bulk single crystals singlet exciton decay is governed by thermally activated fission at a time constant of 20 ps, this mechanism appears to be absent in rubrene microcrystals. Here the dynamics are characterized by a pronounced increase of the average exciton lifetime as confirmed by the dominating PL decay channel with an effective time constant of 100 ps. The enhanced surface-to-volume ratio indicates that the participating states might originate from microcrystal boundaries which could be reached by the substantial amount of migrating excitons prior to the onset of other decay processes. The suppression of singlet fission in these crystalline microstructures is promoted by the significantly lower activation energy of 25 meV for the 100 ps channel compared to the singlet fission barrier of 44 meV and imposes severe consequences for its utilization in, e.g., thin film photovoltaics. For the crystalline samples, an additional relaxation channel with a time constant of around 500 ps becomes relevant at very low temperatures. As this process is the only one observed for amorphous rubrene thin films it points at the local nature of the underlying decay mechanism.

  11. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we analyze three methods used to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. (Fluid Dyn. Res. 41:021401, 2009) and the one by Nickels (J. Fluid Mech. 521:217–239, 2004), and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. (Phys. Fluids 23:041702, 2011). The boundary layer developing over the suction side of a NACA4412 wing profile, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at Rec = 400,000, is used as the test case. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, but stronger pressure gradients (with β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity, and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Therefore, the technique based on the diagnostic plot is a robust method to determine the boundary layer thickness (equivalent to δ99) and edge velocity in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

  12. Microfibril Orientation Dominates the Microelastic Properties of Human Bone Tissue at the Lamellar Length Scale

    PubMed Central

    Rupin, Fabienne; Raum, Kay; Peyrin, Françoise; Burghammer, Manfred; Saïed, Amena; Laugier, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The elastic properties of bone tissue determine the biomechanical behavior of bone at the organ level. It is now widely accepted that the nanoscale structure of bone plays an important role to determine the elastic properties at the tissue level. Hence, in addition to the mineral density, the structure and organization of the mineral nanoparticles and of the collagen microfibrils appear as potential key factors governing the elasticity. Many studies exist on the role of the organization of collagen microfibril and mineral nanocrystals in strongly remodeled bone. However, there is no direct experimental proof to support the theoretical calculations. Here, we provide such evidence through a novel approach combining several high resolution imaging techniques: scanning acoustic microscopy, quantitative scanning small-Angle X-ray scattering imaging and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography. We find that the periodic modulations of elasticity across osteonal bone are essentially determined by the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and to a lesser extent only by the particle size and density. Based on the strong correlation between the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and the collagen molecules, we conclude that the microfibril orientation is the main determinant of the observed undulations of microelastic properties in regions of constant mineralization in osteonal lamellar bone. This multimodal approach could be applied to a much broader range of fibrous biological materials for the purpose of biomimetic technologies. PMID:23472132

  13. Kinetics of phase transition in protein solutions on microscopic and mesoscopic length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filobelo, Luis F.

    2005-11-01

    Phase transformations in solutions of macromolecules are fundamental for all living things, and of great importance in science and industry. For instance, insulin is biosynthesized in the beta cells of the pancreas and stored in crystalline form, which protects it form cleavage, until it is needed. Certain diseases such as Alzheimer, sickle cell anemia, and eye cataract are produced by the polymerization of protein molecules, which loose their functionality after the phase transition. Additionally, separation operations in manufacturing of pharmaceuticals can be eliminated if the crystals produced have a narrow size distribution. The nucleation and growth of crystals can be adequately controlled only if the mechanisms that govern these processes are well understood. Here we have investigated several facets of the kinetics controlling the behavior of phase transition in protein solutions. We performed experiments to determine the homogenous nucleation rate for lysozyme and insulin crystals and the contribution of heterogeneously nucleated crystals. In the first segment of this work we discuss the existence of a solution-to-crystal spinodal boundary derived from these determinations, and showed that the formation of crystalline nuclei from solution occur in two steps for lysozyme: the formation of quasi-droplets of a disordered intermediate, followed by the nucleation of ordered crystalline embryos within these droplets in which the rate of each step depends on a respective free energy barrier and on the growth rate of its near-critical clusters. We addressed experimentally the relative significance of the free-energy barriers and the kinetic factors for the nucleation of crystals from solution. Using dynamic and static light scattering along with differential refractometry, we also characterized the appearance of dense liquid droplets and the magnitude of the second osmotic virial coefficient B2 for insulin in both aqueous solution and in solution containing 15% (v

  14. Additive Partitioning of Coral Reef Fish Diversity across Hierarchical Spatial Scales throughout the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Ramos, Vanessa; Arias-González, Jesús Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing need to examine regional patterns of diversity in coral-reef systems since their biodiversity is declining globally. In this sense, additive partitioning might be useful since it quantifies the contribution of alpha and beta to total diversity across different scales. We applied this approach using an unbalanced design across four hierarchical scales (80 sites, 22 subregions, six ecoregions, and the Caribbean basin). Reef-fish species were compiled from the Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) database and distributions were confirmed with published data. Permutation tests were used to compare observed values to those expected by chance. The primary objective was to identify patterns of reef-fish diversity across multiple spatial scales under different scenarios, examining factors such as fisheries and demographic connectivity. Total diversity at the Caribbean scale was attributed to β-diversity (nearly 62% of the species), with the highest β-diversity at the site scale. α¯-diversity was higher than expected by chance in all scenarios and at all studied scales. This suggests that fish assemblages are more homogenous than expected, particularly at the ecoregion scale. Within each ecoregion, diversity was mainly attributed to alpha, except for the Southern ecoregion where there was a greater difference in species among sites. β-components were lower than expected in all ecoregions, indicating that fishes within each ecoregion are a subsample of the same species pool. The scenario involving the effects of fisheries showed a shift in dominance for β-diversity from regions to subregions, with no major changes to the diversity patterns. In contrast, demographic connectivity partially explained the diversity pattern. β-components were low within connectivity regions and higher than expected by chance when comparing between them. Our results highlight the importance of ecoregions as a spatial scale to conserve local and regional

  15. Additive partitioning of coral reef fish diversity across hierarchical spatial scales throughout the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Francisco-Ramos, Vanessa; Arias-González, Jesús Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing need to examine regional patterns of diversity in coral-reef systems since their biodiversity is declining globally. In this sense, additive partitioning might be useful since it quantifies the contribution of alpha and beta to total diversity across different scales. We applied this approach using an unbalanced design across four hierarchical scales (80 sites, 22 subregions, six ecoregions, and the Caribbean basin). Reef-fish species were compiled from the Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF) database and distributions were confirmed with published data. Permutation tests were used to compare observed values to those expected by chance. The primary objective was to identify patterns of reef-fish diversity across multiple spatial scales under different scenarios, examining factors such as fisheries and demographic connectivity. Total diversity at the Caribbean scale was attributed to β-diversity (nearly 62% of the species), with the highest β-diversity at the site scale. [Formula: see text]-diversity was higher than expected by chance in all scenarios and at all studied scales. This suggests that fish assemblages are more homogenous than expected, particularly at the ecoregion scale. Within each ecoregion, diversity was mainly attributed to alpha, except for the Southern ecoregion where there was a greater difference in species among sites. β-components were lower than expected in all ecoregions, indicating that fishes within each ecoregion are a subsample of the same species pool. The scenario involving the effects of fisheries showed a shift in dominance for β-diversity from regions to subregions, with no major changes to the diversity patterns. In contrast, demographic connectivity partially explained the diversity pattern. β-components were low within connectivity regions and higher than expected by chance when comparing between them. Our results highlight the importance of ecoregions as a spatial scale to conserve local

  16. X-ray imaging of uniform large scale-length plasmas created from gas-filled targets on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D.H.; MacGowan, B.J.; Bernat, T.P.; Klem, D.E.; Montgomery, D.S.; Moody, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Stone, G.F. ); Hsing, W.W. ); Failor, B.H. )

    1995-01-01

    We report on the production and characterization of large scale-length plasmas created by illuminating gas-filled thin-walled balloonlike targets using the Nova laser. The targets consisted of a 5--6000 A skin surrounding 1 atm of neopentane which when ionized becomes a plasma with 10[sup 21] electrons/cm[sup 3]. Results are presented from x-ray imaging used to evaluate the uniformity of the plasma. The most uniform plasmas were produced by illuminating the target with large converging beams that overlapped to cover most of the surface of the gas bag. An alternate focus geometry using small beam spots resulted in a less uniform plasma with low density holes in it.

  17. Characteristic length scale of the magnon accumulation in Fe3O4/Pt bilayer structures by incoherent thermal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anadón, A.; Ramos, R.; Lucas, I.; Algarabel, P. A.; Morellón, L.; Ibarra, M. R.; Aguirre, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) with the thickness of the magnetic materials is studied by means of incoherent thermal excitation. The SSE voltage signal in Fe3O4/Pt bilayer structure increases with the magnetic material thickness up to 100 nm, approximately, showing signs of saturation for larger thickness. This dependence is well described in terms of a spin current pumped in the platinum film by the magnon accumulation in the magnetic material. The spin current is generated by a gradient of temperature in the system and detected by the Pt top contact by means of inverse spin Hall effect. Calculations in the frame of the linear response theory adjust with a high degree of accuracy the experimental data, giving a thermal length scale of the magnon accumulation (Λ) of 17 ± 3 nm at 300 K and Λ = 40 ± 10 nm at 70 K.

  18. Extraction of Channel Length Independent Series Resistance for Deeply Scaled Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li-Juan; Ji, Xiao-Li; Chen, Yuan-Cong; Xia, Hao-Guang; Zhu, Chen-Xin; Guo, Qiang; Yan, Feng

    2014-09-01

    The recently developed four Rsd extraction methods from a single device, involving the constant-mobility method, the direct Id—Vgs method, the conductance method and the Y-function method, are evaluated on 32 nm n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (nMOSFETs). It is found that Rsd achieved from the constant-mobility method exhibits the channel length independent characteristics. The L-dependent Rsd extracted from the other three methods is proven to be associated with the gate-voltage-induced mobility degradation in the extraction procedures. Based on L-dependent behaviors of Rsd, a new method is proposed for accurate series resistance extraction on deeply scaled MOSFETs.

  19. Quantification of Treatment Effect Modification on Both an Additive and Multiplicative Scale

    PubMed Central

    Girerd, Nicolas; Rabilloud, Muriel; Pibarot, Philippe; Mathieu, Patrick; Roy, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background In both observational and randomized studies, associations with overall survival are by and large assessed on a multiplicative scale using the Cox model. However, clinicians and clinical researchers have an ardent interest in assessing absolute benefit associated with treatments. In older patients, some studies have reported lower relative treatment effect, which might translate into similar or even greater absolute treatment effect given their high baseline hazard for clinical events. Methods The effect of treatment and the effect modification of treatment were respectively assessed using a multiplicative and an additive hazard model in an analysis adjusted for propensity score in the context of coronary surgery. Results The multiplicative model yielded a lower relative hazard reduction with bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting in older patients (Hazard ratio for interaction/year = 1.03, 95%CI: 1.00 to 1.06, p = 0.05) whereas the additive model reported a similar absolute hazard reduction with increasing age (Delta for interaction/year = 0.10, 95%CI: -0.27 to 0.46, p = 0.61). The number needed to treat derived from the propensity score-adjusted multiplicative model was remarkably similar at the end of the follow-up in patients aged < = 60 and in patients >70. Conclusions The present example demonstrates that a lower treatment effect in older patients on a relative scale can conversely translate into a similar treatment effect on an additive scale due to large baseline hazard differences. Importantly, absolute risk reduction, either crude or adjusted, can be calculated from multiplicative survival models. We advocate for a wider use of the absolute scale, especially using additive hazard models, to assess treatment effect and treatment effect modification. PMID:27045168

  20. On mechanics and material length scales of failure in heterogeneous interfaces using a finite strain high performance solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Matthew; Matouš, Karel

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulations capable of resolving the large range of spatial scales, from the failure-zone thickness up to the size of the representative unit cell, in damage mechanics problems of particle reinforced adhesives are presented. We show that resolving this wide range of scales in complex three-dimensional heterogeneous morphologies is essential in order to apprehend fracture characteristics, such as strength, fracture toughness and shape of the softening profile. Moreover, we show that computations that resolve essential physical length scales capture the particle size-effect in fracture toughness, for example. In the vein of image-based computational materials science, we construct statistically optimal unit cells containing hundreds to thousands of particles. We show that these statistically representative unit cells are capable of capturing the first- and second-order probability functions of a given data-source with better accuracy than traditional inclusion packing techniques. In order to accomplish these large computations, we use a parallel multiscale cohesive formulation and extend it to finite strains including damage mechanics. The high-performance parallel computational framework is executed on up to 1024 processing cores. A mesh convergence and a representative unit cell study are performed. Quantifying the complex damage patterns in simulations consisting of tens of millions of computational cells and millions of highly nonlinear equations requires data-mining the parallel simulations, and we propose two damage metrics to quantify the damage patterns. A detailed study of volume fraction and filler size on the macroscopic traction-separation response of heterogeneous adhesives is presented.

  1. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation. Small-Scale Demonstration and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Irreversible Wash Aid Additive process has been under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). This process for radioactive cesium mitigation consists of a solution to wash down contaminated structures, roadways, and vehicles and a sequestering agent to bind the radionuclides from the wash water and render them environmentally immobile. The purpose of this process is to restore functionality to basic services and immediately reduce the consequences of a radiologically-contaminated urban environment. Research and development have resulted in a down-selection of technologies for integration and demonstration at the pilot-scale level as part of the Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) under the Department of Homeland Security and the Denver Urban Area Security Initiative. As part of developing the methods for performing a pilot-scale demonstration at the WARRP conference in Denver in 2012, Argonne conducted small-scale field experiments at Separmatic Systems. The main purpose of these experiments was to refine the wash water collection and separations systems and demonstrate key unit operations to help in planning for the large scale demonstration in Denver. Since the purpose of these tests was to demonstrate the operations of the system, we used no radioactive materials. After a brief set of experiments with the LAKOS unit to familiarize ourselves with its operation, two experiments were completed on two separate dates with the Separmatic systems.

  2. Modified Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics if excitations are localized on an intermediate length scale: Applications to non-Debye specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Ralph V.; Davis, Bryce F.

    2013-10-01

    Disordered systems show deviations from the standard Debye theory of specific heat at low temperatures. These deviations are often attributed to two-level systems of uncertain origin. We find that a source of excess specific heat comes from correlations between quanta of energy if excitations are localized on an intermediate length scale. We use simulations of a simplified Creutz model for a system of Ising-like spins coupled to a thermal bath of Einstein-like oscillators. One feature of this model is that energy is quantized in both the system and its bath, ensuring conservation of energy at every step. Another feature is that the exact entropies of both the system and its bath are known at every step, so that their temperatures can be determined independently. We find that there is a mismatch in canonical temperature between the system and its bath. In addition to the usual finite-size effects in the Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, if excitations in the heat bath are localized on an intermediate length scale, this mismatch is independent of system size up to at least 106 particles. We use a model for correlations between quanta of energy to adjust the statistical distributions and yield a thermodynamically consistent temperature. The model includes a chemical potential for units of energy, as is often used for other types of particles that are quantized and conserved. Experimental evidence for this model comes from its ability to characterize the excess specific heat of imperfect crystals at low temperatures.

  3. Modified Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics if excitations are localized on an intermediate length scale: applications to non-Debye specific heat.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Ralph V; Davis, Bryce F

    2013-10-01

    Disordered systems show deviations from the standard Debye theory of specific heat at low temperatures. These deviations are often attributed to two-level systems of uncertain origin. We find that a source of excess specific heat comes from correlations between quanta of energy if excitations are localized on an intermediate length scale. We use simulations of a simplified Creutz model for a system of Ising-like spins coupled to a thermal bath of Einstein-like oscillators. One feature of this model is that energy is quantized in both the system and its bath, ensuring conservation of energy at every step. Another feature is that the exact entropies of both the system and its bath are known at every step, so that their temperatures can be determined independently. We find that there is a mismatch in canonical temperature between the system and its bath. In addition to the usual finite-size effects in the Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, if excitations in the heat bath are localized on an intermediate length scale, this mismatch is independent of system size up to at least 10(6) particles. We use a model for correlations between quanta of energy to adjust the statistical distributions and yield a thermodynamically consistent temperature. The model includes a chemical potential for units of energy, as is often used for other types of particles that are quantized and conserved. Experimental evidence for this model comes from its ability to characterize the excess specific heat of imperfect crystals at low temperatures. PMID:24229117

  4. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-03-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets.

  5. Seeing with the nano-eye: accessing structure, function, and dynamics of matter on its natural length and time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschke, Markus

    2015-03-01

    To understand and ultimately control the properties of most functional materials, from molecular soft-matter to quantum materials, requires access to the structure, coupling, and dynamics on the elementary time and length scales that define the microscopic interactions in these materials. To gain the desired nanometer spatial resolution with simultaneous spectroscopic specificity we combine scanning probe microscopy with different optical, including coherent, nonlinear, and ultrafast spectroscopies. The underlying near-field interaction mediated by the atomic-force or scanning tunneling microscope tip provides the desired deep-sub wavelength nano-focusing enabling few-nm spatial resolution. I will introduce our generalization of the approach in terms of the near-field impedance matching to a quantum system based on special optical antenna-tip designs. The resulting enhanced and qualitatively new forms of light-matter interaction enable measurements of quantum dynamics in an interacting environment or to image the electromagnetic local density of states of thermal radiation. Other applications include the inter-molecular coupling and dynamics in soft-matter hetero-structures, surface plasmon interferometry as a probe of electronic structure and dynamics in graphene, and quantum phase transitions in correlated electron materials. These examples highlight the general applicability of the new near-field microscopy approach, complementing emergent X-ray and electron imaging tools, aiming towards the ultimate goal of probing matter on its most elementary spatio-temporal level.

  6. The PML gene is linked to a megabase-scale insertion/deletion restriction fragment length polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Goy, A.; Xiao, Y.H.; Passalaris, T.

    1995-03-20

    The PML gene located on chromosome band 15q22 is involved with the RAR{alpha} locus (17q21) in a balanced reciprocal translocation uniquely observed in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Physical mapping studies by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the PML gene is flanked by two CpG islands that are separated by a variable distance in normal individuals. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that this is the consequence of a large insertion/deletion polymorphism linked to the PML locus: (1) overlapping fragments obtained with a variety of rare-cutting restriction enzymes demonstrated the same variability in distance between the flanking CpG islands; (2) mapping with restriction enzymes insensitive to CpG methylation confirmed that the findings were not a consequence of variable methylation of CpG dinucleotides; (3) the polymorphism followed a Mendelian inheritance pattern. This polymorphism is localized 3{prime} to the PML locus. There are five common alleles, described on the basis of BssHII fragments, ranging from 220 to 350 kb with increments of approximately 30 kb between alleles. Both heterozygous (61%) and homozygous (391%) patterns were observed in normal individuals. Mega-base-scale insertion/deletion restriction fragment length polymorphisms are very rare and have been described initially in the context of multigene families. Such structures have been also reported as likely regions of genetic instability. High-resolution restriction mapping of this particular structure linked to the PML locus is underway. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets. PMID:27026290

  8. The seasonal and solar cycle variations of electron density gradient scale length during magnetically disturbed days: implications for Spread F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, S.

    2009-07-01

    The behaviour of electron density gradient scale length, L, around post-sunset hours during the magnetically disturbed days of the summer, winter and equinox seasons of solar maximum (2002) and minimum years (1995) has been studied, using ionosonde data of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.5°E, dip = 0.5°N) in the Indian longitude sector. The results indicate a clear seasonal and solar cycle variation in L. Seasonal variations of the maximum vertical drift of the F layer were also examined on these days. In particular, the seasonal variation of the Equatorial Spread F (ESF) during this period is examined in terms of the relative roles of L and the vertical drift of the F layer in the triggering of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Our results on the clear-cut seasonal and solar cycle variation in L for disturbed days and its control of ESF occurrence are presented and discussed.

  9. Creep deformation behavior of Sn-3.5Ag solder/Cu couple at small length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, M.; Chawla, N

    2004-09-06

    In order to adequately characterize the behavior of solder balls in electronic devices, the mechanical behavior of solder joints needs to be studied at small length scales. The creep behavior of single solder ball Sn-Ag/Cu solder joints was studied in shear, at 25, 60, 95, and 130 deg. C, using a microforce testing system. A change in the creep stress exponent with increasing stress was observed and explained in terms of a threshold stress for bypass of Ag{sub 3}Sn particles by dislocations. The stress exponent was also temperature dependent, exhibiting an increase in exponent of two from lower to higher temperature. The activation energy for creep was found to be temperature dependant, correlating with self-diffusion of pure Sn at high temperatures, and dislocation core diffusion of pure Sn at lower temperatures. Normalizing the creep rate for activation energy and the temperature-dependence of shear modulus allowed for unification of the creep data. Microstructure characterization, including preliminary TEM analysis, and fractographic analysis were conducted in order to fully describe the creep behavior of the material.

  10. A Study of Microstructural Length Scale Effects on the Behaviour of FCC Polycrystals Using Strain Gradient Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, K S; Busso, E P; Arsenlis, A

    2004-05-07

    Grain size is a critically important aspect of polycrystalline materials and experimental observations on Cu and Al polycrystals have shown that a Hall-Petchtype phenomenon does exist at the onset of plastic deformation. In this work, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effect of microstructural and deformation-related length scales on the behavior of such FCC polycrystals. It relies on a recently proposed non-local dislocation-mechanics based crystallographic theory to describe the evolution of dislocation mean spacings within each grain, and on finite element techniques to incorporate explicitly grain interaction effects. Polycrystals are modeled as representative volume elements (RVEs) containing up to 64 randomly oriented grains. Predictions obtained from RVEs of Cu polycrystals with different grain sizes are shown to be consistent with experimental data. Furthermore, mesh sensitivity studies revealed that, when there is a predominance of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) relative to statistically-stored dislocations (SSDs), the polycrystal response becomes increasingly mesh sensitive. This was found to occur specially during the early stages of deformation in polycrystals with small grains.

  11. Interpretation of Single- and Multiple-Beam SBS Observations in OMEGA, Long-Scale-Length Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, R. W.; Craxton, R. S.; Seka, W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2001-10-01

    Recent experiments on OMEGA have studied stimulated Brillouin backscatter in preformed long-scale-length plasmas for both single and multiple interaction beams. Scattered light intensities and spectra were obtained for a variety of irradiation conditions. Ion Landau damping is estimated to be sufficiently strong in these plasmas that the locally driven approximation for the ion-sound wave response can be applied. The linear SBS gain coefficient can then obtained by integrating the coupled wave equations for the incident and scattered light throughout the underdense plasma corona. Using density, velocity, and temperature profiles obtained from the two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode SAGE, we have calculated as a function of wavelength the SBS gain coefficients to be expected in these experiments. Comparison with the observed scattering levels and spectra allows several conclusions to be drawn regarding the SBS process in these plasmas. Most saliently, the scattering appears to be dominated by SBS occurring in hot spots, and plasma velocity profiles have a strong influence on the location and level of scattering. Generally good agreement is found between the observations and the calculations, though some discrepancies remain, particularly in the absorption levels and spectral shifts. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  12. Channel length scaling limits of III-V channel MOSFETs governed by source-drain direct tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Shunsuke; Ohmori, Masaki; Maegawa, Yōsuke; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya; Ogawa, Matsuto

    2014-04-01

    The difference in the impact of source-drain (SD) direct tunneling in In0.53Ga0.47As and InP metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) was investigated by a quantum Wigner Monte Carlo simulation. It was found that the subthreshold current increase due to SD direct tunneling is more marked in In0.53Ga0.47As MOSFETs owing to their lower effective mass. In addition, the critical channel length at which a drastic increase in subthreshold current occurs owing to SD direct tunneling was found to be about 20 nm for both In0.53Ga0.47As and InP MOSFETs. Since this value is significantly larger than that for Si MOSFETs, SD direct tunneling can be a major obstacle in downscaling III-V MOSFETs into Lch < 20 nm. Hence, to go beyond the end of the roadmap, we will need a selection of materials to suppress SD direct tunneling.

  13. Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

  14. Nutrient addition effects on tropical dry forests: a mini-review from microbial to ecosystem scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Jennifer; Becklund, Kristen; Gei, Maria; Iyengar, Siddarth; Meyer, Rebecca; O'Connell, Christine; Schilling, Erik; Smith, Christina; Waring, Bonnie; Werden, Leland

    2015-06-01

    Humans have more than doubled inputs of reactive nitrogen globally and greatly accelerated the biogeochemical cycles of phosphorus and metals. However, the impacts of increased element mobility on tropical ecosystems remain poorly quantified, particularly for the vast tropical dry forest biome. Tropical dry forests are characterized by marked seasonality, relatively little precipitation, and high heterogeneity in plant functional diversity and soil chemistry. For these reasons, increased nutrient deposition may affect tropical dry forests differently than wet tropical or temperate forests. Here we review studies that investigated how nutrient availability affects ecosystem and community processes from the microsite to ecosystem scales in tropical dry forests. The effects of N and P addition on ecosystem carbon cycling and plant and microbial dynamics depend on forest successional stage, soil parent material and rainfall regime. Responses may depend on whether overall productivity is N- versus P-limited, although data to test this hypothesis are limited. These results highlight the many important gaps in our understanding of tropical dry forest responses to global change. Large-scale experiments are required to resolve these uncertainties.

  15. Atomistic simulation of laser-pulse surface modification: Predictions of models with various length and time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Starikov, Sergey V. Pisarev, Vasily V.

    2015-04-07

    In this work, the femtosecond laser pulse modification of surface is studied for aluminium (Al) and gold (Au) by use of two-temperature atomistic simulation. The results are obtained for various atomistic models with different scales: from pseudo-one-dimensional to full-scale three-dimensional simulation. The surface modification after laser irradiation can be caused by ablation and melting. For low energy laser pulses, the nanoscale ripples may be induced on a surface by melting without laser ablation. In this case, nanoscale changes of the surface are due to a splash of molten metal under temperature gradient. Laser ablation occurs at a higher pulse energy when a crater is formed on the surface. There are essential differences between Al ablation and Au ablation. In the first step of shock-wave induced ablation, swelling and void formation occur for both metals. However, the simulation of ablation in gold shows an additional athermal type of ablation that is associated with electron pressure relaxation. This type of ablation takes place at the surface layer, at a depth of several nanometers, and does not induce swelling.

  16. Atomistic simulation of laser-pulse surface modification: Predictions of models with various length and time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikov, Sergey V.; Pisarev, Vasily V.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the femtosecond laser pulse modification of surface is studied for aluminium (Al) and gold (Au) by use of two-temperature atomistic simulation. The results are obtained for various atomistic models with different scales: from pseudo-one-dimensional to full-scale three-dimensional simulation. The surface modification after laser irradiation can be caused by ablation and melting. For low energy laser pulses, the nanoscale ripples may be induced on a surface by melting without laser ablation. In this case, nanoscale changes of the surface are due to a splash of molten metal under temperature gradient. Laser ablation occurs at a higher pulse energy when a crater is formed on the surface. There are essential differences between Al ablation and Au ablation. In the first step of shock-wave induced ablation, swelling and void formation occur for both metals. However, the simulation of ablation in gold shows an additional athermal type of ablation that is associated with electron pressure relaxation. This type of ablation takes place at the surface layer, at a depth of several nanometers, and does not induce swelling.

  17. A study protocol of a randomised controlled trial incorporating a health economic analysis to investigate if additional allied health services for rehabilitation reduce length of stay without compromising patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reducing patient length of stay is a high priority for health service providers. Preliminary information suggests additional Saturday rehabilitation services could reduce the time a patient stays in hospital by three days. This large trial will examine if providing additional physiotherapy and occupational therapy services on a Saturday reduces health care costs, and improves the health of hospital inpatients receiving rehabilitation compared to the usual Monday to Friday service. We will also investigate the cost effectiveness and patient outcomes of such a service. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial will evaluate the effect of providing additional physiotherapy and occupational therapy for rehabilitation. Seven hundred and twelve patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation at two metropolitan sites will be randomly allocated to the intervention group or control group. The control group will receive usual care physiotherapy and occupational therapy from Monday to Friday while the intervention group will receive the same amount of rehabilitation as the control group Monday to Friday plus a full physiotherapy and occupational therapy service on Saturday. The primary outcomes will be patient length of stay, quality of life (EuroQol questionnaire), the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and health utilization and cost data. Secondary outcomes will assess clinical outcomes relevant to the goals of therapy: the 10 metre walk test, the timed up and go test, the Personal Care Participation Assessment and Resource Tool (PC PART), and the modified motor assessment scale. Blinded assessors will assess outcomes at admission and discharge, and follow up data on quality of life, function and health care costs will be collected at 6 and 12 months after discharge. Between group differences will be analysed with analysis of covariance using baseline measures as the covariate. A health economic analysis will be carried out alongside the randomised

  18. Near-tip dual-length scale mechanics of mode-I cracking in laminate brittle matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, R.; Islam, S.; Charalambides, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of an on-going study of the near-tip mechanics of mode-I cracking in brittle matrix composite laminates. A finite element model is developed within the context of two competing characteristic lengths present in the composite: the microstructural length (the thickness of the layers) and a macro-length (crack-length, uncracked ligament size, etc.). For various values of the parameters which describe the ratio of these lengths and the constituent properties, the stresses ahead of a crack perpendicular to the laminates are compared with those predicted by assuming the composite is homogeneous orthotropic. The results can be used to determine the conditions for which homogenization can provide a sufficiently accurate description of the stresses in the vicinity of the crack-tip.

  19. Scaling plant nitrogen use and uptake efficiencies in response to nutrient addition in peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, Colleen M; Bridgham, Scott; Kellogg, Laurie E.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in many terrestrial ecosystems, and therefore plant production per unit N taken up (i.e., N use efficiency, NUE) is a fundamentally important component of ecosystem function. Nitrogen use efficiency comprises two components: N productivity (AN, plant production per peak biomass N content) and the mean residence time of N in plant biomass (MRTN). We utilized a five-year fertilization experiment to examine the manner in which increases in N and phosphorus (P) availability affected plant NUE at multiple biological scales (i.e., from leaf to community level). We fertilized a natural gradient of nutrient-limited peatland ecosystems in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA, with 6 g Nm2yr1, 2 g Pm2yr1, or a combination of N and P. Our objectives were to determine how changes in carbon and N allocation within a plant to leaf and woody tissue and changes in species composition within a community, both above- and belowground, would affect (1) NUE; (2) the adaptive trade-off between the components of NUE; (3) the efficiency with which plants acquired N from the soil (N uptake efficiency); and (4) plant community production per unit soil N availability (N response efficiency, NRE). As expected, N and P addition generally increased aboveground production and N uptake. In particular, P availability strongly affected the way in which plants took up and used N. Nitrogen use efficiency response to nutrient addition was not straightforward. Nitrogen use efficiency differed between leaf and woody tissue, among species, and across the ombrotrophic minerotrophic gradient because plants and communities were adapted to maximize either AN or MRTN, but not both concurrently. Increased N availability strongly decreased plant and community N uptake efficiency, while increased P availability increased N uptake efficiency, particularly in a nitrogen-fixing shrub. Nitrogen uptake efficiency was more important in controlling overall plant

  20. Upscaling analysis of aerodynamic roughness length based on in situ data at different spatial scales and remote sensing in north Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Genhou; Hu, Zeyong; Wang, Jiemin; Xie, Zhipeng; Lin, Yun; Huang, Fangfang

    2016-07-01

    The aerodynamic roughness length (z0m) is a crucial parameter in quantifying momentum, sensible and latent heat fluxes between land surface and atmosphere, and it depends greatly on spatial scales. This paper presents a tentative study on the upscaling analysis of z0m in the north Tibetan Plateau based on in situ data from eddy covariance (EC) and large aperture scintillometer (LAS) and leaf area index (LAI) of MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) with 250 m and 2 km spatial resolutions. The comparison of z0m calculated from EC (z0m_EC) and LAS (z0m _LAS) data indicates that z0m at both scales has apparent seasonal variations and is in good agreement with the LAI result. However, z0m_LAS is higher than z0m_EC, which is attributed to the differences in roughness elements in their footprints. An upscaling relationship for z0m is developed with z0m_EC, z0m _LAS and LAI with 250 m spatial resolution of MODIS. In addition, an altitude correction factor is introduced into the vegetation height estimation equation because the cold environment in the north Tibetan Plateau, which is due to its high altitude, has a strong influence on vegetation height. The z0m retrieval with 250 m spatial resolution in the rain season is validated with z0m_EC at sites Nagqu/Amdo, Nagqu/MS3478 and Nagqu/NewD66, and the agreement is acceptable. The spatial distribution of z0m retrievals at small spatial scale in the north Tibetan Plateau from June to September 2012 shows that the z0m values are less than 0.015 m in most areas, with the exception of the area in the southeast part, where z0m reaches 0.025 m owing to low altitudes. The z0m retrievals at large spatial scale in the north Tibetan Plateau from June to September 2012 range from 0.015 to 0.065 m, and high values appear in the area with low altitudes. The spatial distribution and frequency statistics of z0m retrievals at both spatial scales reveal the influence of altitude and LAI on the z0m in the north Tibetan

  1. Combined single crystal polarized XAFS and XRD at high pressure: probing the interplay between lattice distortions and electronic order at multiple length scales in high T c cuprates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fabbris, G.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Haskel, D.

    2016-07-14

    Some of the most exotic material properties derive from electronic states with short correlation length (~10-500 Å), suggesting that the local structural symmetry may play a relevant role in their behavior. In this study, we discuss the combined use of polarized x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction at high pressure as a powerful method to tune and probe structural and electronic orders at multiple length scales. Besides addressing some of the technical challenges associated with such experiments, we illustrate this approach with results obtained in the cuprate La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, in which the response of electronic order to pressure can onlymore » be understood by probing the structure at the relevant length scales.« less

  2. Combined single crystal polarized XAFS and XRD at high pressure: Probing the interplay between lattice distortions and electronic order at multiple length scales in high Tc cuprates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fabbris, G.; Hucker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Haskel, D.

    2016-06-30

    Some of the most exotic material properties derive from electronic states with short correlation length (~10-500 Å), suggesting that the local structural symmetry may play a relevant role in their behavior. In this study, we discuss the combined use of polarized x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction at high pressure as a powerful method to tune and probe structural and electronic orders at multiple length scales. Besides addressing some of the technical challenges associated with such experiments, we illustrate this approach with results obtained in the cuprate La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, in which the response of electronic order to pressure can onlymore » be understood by probing the structure at the relevant length scales.« less

  3. Bridging the Gap Between Large-scale Data Sets and Analyses: Semi-automated Methods to Facilitate Length Polymorphism Scoring and Data Analyses.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers can be developed more quickly and at a lower cost than microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism markers, which makes them ideal markers for large-scale studies of understudied taxa — such as species at risk. However,...

  4. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  5. On the validity of 2D critical taper theory in 3D wedges: defining a lateral deformation length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno; Thorden Haug, Øystein

    2015-04-01

    For 2D critical taper theory to be applicable to 3D natural cases, cylindric deformation is a requirement. The assumption of cylindricity is violated in case of localized perturbations (subducting seamount, localized sedimentation) or due to a lateral change in decollement strength or depth. In natural accretionary wedges and fold-and-thrust belts, along strike changes may occur in a variety of ways: geometrical (due to a protruding indenter or a change in decollement depth), through a lateral change in basal friction (leading to laterally different tapers), or through a change in surface slope (by strongly localized fan sedimentation on accretionary wedges). Recent numerical modelling results (Ruh et al., 2013) have shown that lateral coupling preferentially occurs for relatively small perturbations, i.e. the horizontal shear stress caused by the perturbation is supported by the system. Lateral linking of the wedge in front of a protruding indenter to the wedge in front of the trailing edge of the back stop leads to curved thrust fronts and importantly it has been noted that even outside the curved zone, where the wedge front is again parallel to the direction of tectonic transport, the lateral effect is still evident: both tapers are different from the analytical prediction. We present results from a 3D analogue modelling parameter study to investigate this behavior more quantitatively, with the objective of empirically finding a lateral length scale of deformation in brittle contractional wedges. For a given wedge strength (angle of internal friction), we infer this to be a function of the size (width) of the perturbation and its magnitude (difference in basal friction). To this end we run different series of models in which we systematically vary the width and/or magnitude of a local perturbation. In the first series, the width of a zone of high basal friction is varied, in the second series we vary the width of an indenter and in the third series

  6. Predicting the Effects of Nano-Scale Cerium Additives in Diesel Fuel on Regional-Scale Air Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel vehicles are a major source of air pollutant emissions. Fuel additives containing nanoparticulate cerium (nCe) are currently being used in some diesel vehicles to improve fuel efficiency. These fuel additives also reduce fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissio...

  7. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing

  8. A compensation-defect model for the joint probability density function of the scalar difference and the length scale of dissipation elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lipo; Peters, Norbert

    2008-06-01

    Dissipation element analysis is a new approach to study turbulent scalar fields. Gradient trajectories starting from each material point in a fluctuating scalar field ϕ'(x⃗,t) in ascending and descending directions will inevitably reach a maximal and a minimal point. The ensemble of material points sharing the same pair ending points is named a dissipation element. Dissipation elements can be parametrized by the length scale l and the scalar difference Δϕ', which are defined as the straight line connecting the two extremal points and the scalar difference at these points, respectively. The decomposition of a turbulent field into dissipation elements is space filling. This allows us to reconstruct certain statistical quantities of fine scale turbulence which cannot be obtained otherwise. The marginal probability density function (PDF) of the length scale distribution had been modeled in the previous work based on a Poisson random cutting-reconnection process and had been compared to data from direct numerical simulation (DNS). The joint PDF of l and Δϕ ' contains the important information that is needed for the modeling of scalar mixing in turbulence, such as the marginal PDF of the length of elements and conditional moments, as well as their scaling exponents. In order to be able to predict these quantities, there is a need to model the joint PDF. A compensation-defect model is put forward in this work and the agreement between the model prediction and DNS results is satisfactory.

  9. Addition of random run FM noise to the KPW time scale algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The KPW (Kalman plus weights) time scale algorithm uses a Kalman filter to provide frequency and drift information to a basic time scale equation. This paper extends the algorithm to three-state clocks nd gives results for a simulated eight-clock ensemble.

  10. Effect of length-scale on localization of shear zones along precursor fractures and layers during deformation of middle to lower crustal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancktelow, Neil; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Hawemann, Friedrich; Wex, Sebastian; Camacho, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Deformation of high grade rocks at middle to lower crustal levels involves both distributed and more highly localized ductile strain, with localized shear zones developing on elongate near-planar rheological precursors. These planar heterogeneities may be compositional layers (e.g. dykes) or pre-existing or newly developed fractures, with or without pseudotachylyte. Usual rheological models for viscous rock deformation are scale independent. The geometry of developing localized shear zones should therefore be scalable and depend only on the pre-existing geometry and imposed boundary conditions, as shown in numerical and analogue models. However, this is not what is observed in natural examples. Shear zones preferentially or exclusively develop on long fractures and dykes, typically on the scales of many (tens of) metres to (tens of) kilometres, whereas smaller-scale healed fractures, basic enclaves and short layers or inclusions are less prone to reactivation and locally may be largely ignored. Preferential localization of strain on these longer structures means that the intervening rock volumes remain low-strain domains, so that the smaller-scale planar heterogeneities are effectively shielded during progressive deformation. Any localized deformation of these intervening low-strain domains requires the formation of new elongate fractures acting as a necessary precursor for subsequent localization. These field observations suggest that ductile shear zone localization is more effective with increasing length of the approximately planar precursor. Localized shear zones do not develop by propagation away from an initial small heterogeneity. Instead, their length is largely predetermined by the length of the controlling precursor structure and in-plane propagation of the tips appears to be very limited. Preferential shear reactivation of longer precursors introduces a length-scale dependence from the very initiation of localized "viscous" or "ductile" shear zones

  11. Influence of long-scale length radial electric field components on zonal flow-like structures in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada, U.; Alonso, A.; van Milligen, B. Ph; Hidalgo, C.; Liu, B.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Silva, C.; the TJ-II team

    2016-08-01

    The influence of long-scale length radial electric fields on zonal flows-like structures has been studied in the TJ-II stellarator. This relation has been investigated in the edge plasma using two electrical rake probes. The results presented here show an empirical correlation between the properties of long-range correlations (LRCs) with zonal flow-like structures and the magnitude of radial (neoclassical, NC) electric fields in TJ-II neutral beam heated plasmas. These experimental findings show that the enhancement of the NC radial electric field \\boldsymbol{E}{\\mathbf{r}} increases the magnitude of LRCs, considered as a proxy of zonal flows, while the radial correlation length of the plasma potential fluctuations was found to decrease by about 40%. A strong relation between the magnitude of electric field structures with long and short radial scales was found. The calculated \\boldsymbol{E}{\\mathbf{r}}× \\boldsymbol{B} shearing rate corresponding to the short scale length structures of the radial electric field may be sufficient to regulate turbulence.

  12. Geometrical constraints in the scaling relationships between genome size, cell size and cell cycle length in herbaceous plants

    PubMed Central

    Šímová, Irena; Herben, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Plant nuclear genome size (GS) varies over three orders of magnitude and is correlated with cell size and growth rate. We explore whether these relationships can be owing to geometrical scaling constraints. These would produce an isometric GS–cell volume relationship, with the GS–cell diameter relationship with the exponent of 1/3. In the GS–cell division relationship, duration of processes limited by membrane transport would scale at the 1/3 exponent, whereas those limited by metabolism would show no relationship. We tested these predictions by estimating scaling exponents from 11 published datasets on differentiated and meristematic cells in diploid herbaceous plants. We found scaling of GS–cell size to almost perfectly match the prediction. The scaling exponent of the relationship between GS and cell cycle duration did not match the prediction. However, this relationship consists of two components: (i) S phase duration, which depends on GS, and has the predicted 1/3 exponent, and (ii) a GS-independent threshold reflecting the duration of the G1 and G2 phases. The matches we found for the relationships between GS and both cell size and S phase duration are signatures of geometrical scaling. We propose that a similar approach can be used to examine GS effects at tissue and whole plant levels. PMID:21881135

  13. Length-Scale-Dependent Phase Transformation of LiFePO4 : An In situ and Operando Study Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and XRD.

    PubMed

    Siddique, N A; Salehi, Amir; Wei, Zi; Liu, Dong; Sajjad, Syed D; Liu, Fuqiang

    2015-08-01

    The charge and discharge of lithium ion batteries are often accompanied by electrochemically driven phase-transformation processes. In this work, two in situ and operando methods, that is, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), have been combined to study the phase-transformation process in LiFePO4 at two distinct length scales, namely, particle-level scale (∼1 μm) and macroscopic scale (∼several cm). In situ Raman studies revealed a discrete mode of phase transformation at the particle level. Besides, the preferred electrochemical transport network, particularly the carbon content, was found to govern the sequence of phase transformation among particles. In contrast, at the macroscopic level, studies conducted at four different discharge rates showed a continuous but delayed phase transformation. These findings uncovered the intricate phase transformation in LiFePO4 and potentially offer valuable insights into optimizing the length-scale-dependent properties of battery materials. PMID:26073651

  14. EnviroAtlas: Incorporation of Community-Scale Data for Additional Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    EnviroAtlas is ORD’s online spatial decision support tool for viewing and analyzing the supply, demand, and drivers of change related to natural and built infrastructure at multiple scales for the nation. Maps and text identify known relationships between the goods and services ...

  15. Criterion Noise in Ratings-Based Recognition: Evidence from the Effects of Response Scale Length on Recognition Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Tullis, Jonathan G.; Lee, Ji Hae

    2013-01-01

    Rating scales are a standard measurement tool in psychological research. However, research has suggested that the cognitive burden involved in maintaining the criteria used to parcel subjective evidence into ratings introduces "decision noise" and affects estimates of performance in the underlying task. There has been debate over whether…

  16. Response of soybean rhizosphere communities to human hygiene water addition as determined by community level physiological profiling (CLPP) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerkhof, L.; Santoro, M.; Garland, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we describe an experiment conducted at Kennedy Space Center in the biomass production chamber (BPC) using soybean plants for purification and processing of human hygiene water. Specifically, we tested whether it was possible to detect changes in the root-associated bacterial assemblage of the plants and ultimately to identify the specific microorganism(s) which differed when plants were exposed to hygiene water and other hydroponic media. Plants were grown in hydroponics media corresponding to four different treatments: control (Hoagland's solution), artificial gray water (Hoagland's+surfactant), filtered gray water collected from human subjects on site, and unfiltered gray water. Differences in rhizosphere microbial populations in all experimental treatments were observed when compared to the control treatment using both community level physiological profiles (BIOLOG) and molecular fingerprinting of 16S rRNA genes by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (TRFLP). Furthermore, screening of a clonal library of 16S rRNA genes by TRFLP yielded nearly full length SSU genes associated with the various treatments. Most 16S rRNA genes were affiliated with the Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Variovorax, Burkholderia, Bordetella and Isosphaera groups. This molecular approach demonstrated the ability to rapidly detect and identify microorganisms unique to experimental treatments and provides a means to fingerprint microbial communities in the biosystems being developed at NASA for optimizing advanced life support operations.

  17. Preliminary simulation of hyporheic hydrology suggests systematic changes in hyporheic flow path length and residence time in response to reach-scale channel restoration in Meacham Creek, OR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerson, B. E.; Poole, G.

    2011-12-01

    Hyporheic hydrologic response to stream restoration has typically focused on hydrodynamics associated with individual features or habitat units rather than whole reaches. Here we present preliminary results from MODFLOW simulations that compare modeled hyporheic hydrology prior to and after major channel reconfiguration associated with a recently completed reach-scale channel restoration on Meacham Creek in northeastern Oregon. Our model was parameterized using LiDAR floodplain surface elevation data and empirically-derived estimates of aquifer properties. Results show that groundwater flow path length and cumulative residence time distributions are apt to be altered by channel reconfiguration. For example, our model shows that the relatively high-gradient and straight baseline channel is dominated by either short or long flow path lengths, with relatively few medium length flow paths. In contrast, the proposed restoration channel is more sinuous and has a lower gradient. Our modeling suggests that the restoration channel will have a broader distribution of flow path lengths and residence times. We used model results to select well locations for intensive monitoring of groundwater surface elevation and temperature. Monitoring will continue through 2012 and is designed to evaluate model predictions as well as to document the effects of the channel restoration on surface water-groundwater interactions and concomitant effects on water temperature.

  18. Long-term storage and transport length scale of fine sediment: Analysis of a mercury release into a river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, J. E.

    2014-08-01

    Excessive suspended sediment concentrations create important water quality problems, but scientists disagree on how to predict its movement through watersheds. Most models assume that fine-grained sediment moves rapidly far downstream, without recognizing the importance of episodic, long-term storage. Here a historic industrial release of mercury is interpreted as a decadal sediment tracer experiment, releasing sediment particles "tagged" with mercury that are deposited on floodplains. As expected, floodplain mercury inventories decrease exponentially downstream, with a characteristic decay length of 10 km (95% confidence interval: 5-25 km) that defines the distance suspended particles typically move downstream before entering storage. Floodplain mercury inventories are not significantly different above and below three colonial age mill dams (present at the time of mercury release but now breached), suggesting that these results reflect ongoing processes. Suspended sediment routing models that neglect long-term storage, and the watershed management plans based on them, may need revision.

  19. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management

  20. How to control the scaling of CaCO3: a "fingerprinting technique" to classify additives.

    PubMed

    Verch, Andreas; Gebauer, Denis; Antonietti, Markus; Cölfen, Helmut

    2011-10-01

    A titration set-up coupling ion selective electrodes with pH adjustment was used to analyze the effects of additives present during precipitation of calcium carbonate. Besides industrially well-established antiscalants (sodium triphosphate, citrate, polyacrylate and poly(aspartic acid)), also functional polymers being active in morphosynthesis (polystyrene sulfonate and poly(styrene-alt-maleic acid)) were analyzed. Interestingly each additive acts in its specific way, suggesting the notation "fingerprinting" for a complex interplay of up to five "solution modes" of influencing CaCO(3) precipitation and crystallisation. The results provide new insights into the modes of additive controlled crystallisation, and in the long run, the insights may facilitate the design of precipitation systems that yield complex and tailor-made crystals. PMID:21860865

  1. PILOT-SCALE STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF BROMINE ADDITION ON THE EMISSIONS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The addition of brominated organic compounds to the feed of a pilot-scale incinerator burning chlorinated waste has been found previously, under some circumstances, to enhance emissions of volatile and semivolatile organic chlorinated products of incomplete combustion (PiCs) incl...

  2. Gait dynamics in Parkinson’s disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    PubMed Central

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties. PMID:19566273

  3. Predicting the effects of nanoscale cerium additives in diesel fuel on regional-scale air quality.

    PubMed

    Erdakos, Garnet B; Bhave, Prakash V; Pouliot, George A; Simon, Heather; Mathur, Rohit

    2014-11-01

    Diesel vehicles are a major source of air pollutant emissions. Fuel additives containing nanoparticulate cerium (nCe) are currently being used in some diesel vehicles to improve fuel efficiency. These fuel additives also reduce fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions and alter the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and hydrocarbon (HC) species, including several hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). To predict their net effect on regional air quality, we review the emissions literature and develop a multipollutant inventory for a hypothetical scenario in which nCe additives are used in all on-road and nonroad diesel vehicles. We apply the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to a domain covering the eastern U.S. for a summer and a winter period. Model calculations suggest modest decreases of average PM2.5 concentrations and relatively larger decreases in particulate elemental carbon. The nCe additives also have an effect on 8 h maximum ozone in summer. Variable effects on HAPs are predicted. The total U.S. emissions of fine-particulate cerium are estimated to increase 25-fold and result in elevated levels of airborne cerium (up to 22 ng/m3), which might adversely impact human health and the environment. PMID:25271762

  4. EVALUATION OF FULL SCALE ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS UTILIZING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON ADDITION WITH WET AIR REGENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to activated sludge systems is a proven method of wastewater treatment. Of eleven POTWs in the U.S. that were designed for PAC use, ten included wet air regeneration (WAR) for the destruction of secondary sludge solids and recovery ...

  5. Identification of a kinetic length scale which dictates alloy phase composition in Ni-Al interfaces on annealing at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Mitali; Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal; Bhattacharya, Debarati; Gupta, Mukul

    2014-12-01

    Ni-aluminides are an important class of intermetallics from technological point of view. Ni-Al phase diagram has been studied in detail experimentally as well as theoretically. It is known that if annealed at low temperature, the first alloy phase is usually NiAl3 according to Bené's rule. It is also understood that heat of formation may get modified by local densities of the constituents forming the alloy. In this regard, it is important to identify a kinetic length scale for defining "local density" in a system. We have deposited ultrathin multilayers of Ni and Al of layer thickness in tens of nanometres with Ni:Al stoichiometric ratio as 3:1 and 1:3, respectively. Considering these stoichiometry, Ni3Al and NiAl3 are the thermodynamically favoured alloy phases in these samples. We used x-ray reflectivity, polarized neutron reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to follow the alloy formation after annealing and identified the alloy phases at interfaces with nanometre resolution. Diffusion length of Ni and Al was obtained using Darken's law. Our results predict that `diffusion length' is the unique length scale that connects kinetics to local density. In another interesting observation, using "virtual Kirkendall markers" at the interfaces, we showed asymmetry in consumption of Al for alloy formation, at Al on Ni (Al/Ni) and Ni on Al (Ni/Al) interfaces by comparing as-deposited and annealed states with respect to the markers.

  6. Density and temperature characterization of long-scale length, near-critical density controlled plasma produced from ultra-low density plastic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Iwawaki, T.; Morita, K.; Antici, P.; Baton, S. D.; Filippi, F.; Habara, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Nicolaï, P.; Nazarov, W.; Rousseaux, C.; Starodubstev, M.; Tanaka, K. A.; Fuchs, J.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to produce long-scale length (i.e. millimeter scale-length), homogeneous plasmas is of interest in studying a wide range of fundamental plasma processes. We present here a validated experimental platform to create and diagnose uniform plasmas with a density close or above the critical density. The target consists of a polyimide tube filled with an ultra low-density plastic foam where it was heated by x-rays, produced by a long pulse laser irradiating a copper foil placed at one end of the tube. The density and temperature of the ionized foam was retrieved by using x-ray radiography and proton radiography was used to verify the uniformity of the plasma. Plasma temperatures of 5-10 eV and densities around 1021 cm-3 are measured. This well-characterized platform of uniform density and temperature plasma is of interest for experiments using large-scale laser platforms conducting High Energy Density Physics investigations.

  7. Planar Two-Plasmon-Decay Experiments at Polar-Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Scale Lengths at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Seka, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Hohenberger, M.; Epstein, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Turnbull, D. P.; Ralph, J. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Moody, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    Results from the first experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to probe two-plasmon -decay (TPD) hot-electron production at scale lengths relevant to polar-direct-drive (PDD) ignition are reported. The irradiation on one side of a planar CH foil generated a plasma at the quarter-critical surface with a predicted density gradient scale length of Ln ~ 600 μm , a measured electron temperature of Te ~ 3 . 5 to 4.0 keV, an overlapped laser intensity of I ~ 6 ×1014 W/cm2, and a predicted TPD threshold parameter of η ~ 4 . The hard x-ray spectrum and the Kα emission from a buried Mo layer were measured to infer the hot-electron temperature and the fraction of total laser energy converted to TPD hot electrons. Optical emission at ω/2 correlated with the time-dependent hard x-ray signal confirms that TPD is responsible for the hot-electron generation. The effect of laser beam angle of incidence on TPD hot-electron generation was assessed, and the data show that the beam angle of incidence did not have a strong effect. These results will be used to benchmark simulations of TPD hot-electron production at conditions relevant to PDD ignition-scale implosions. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Density and temperature characterization of long-scale length, near-critical density controlled plasma produced from ultra-low density plastic foam

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. N.; Iwawaki, T.; Morita, K.; Antici, P.; Baton, S. D.; Filippi, F.; Habara, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Nicolaï , P.; Nazarov, W.; Rousseaux, C.; Starodubstev, M.; Tanaka, K. A.; Fuchs, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to produce long-scale length (i.e. millimeter scale-length), homogeneous plasmas is of interest in studying a wide range of fundamental plasma processes. We present here a validated experimental platform to create and diagnose uniform plasmas with a density close or above the critical density. The target consists of a polyimide tube filled with an ultra low-density plastic foam where it was heated by x-rays, produced by a long pulse laser irradiating a copper foil placed at one end of the tube. The density and temperature of the ionized foam was retrieved by using x-ray radiography and proton radiography was used to verify the uniformity of the plasma. Plasma temperatures of 5–10 eV and densities around 1021 cm−3 are measured. This well-characterized platform of uniform density and temperature plasma is of interest for experiments using large-scale laser platforms conducting High Energy Density Physics investigations. PMID:26923471

  9. Density and temperature characterization of long-scale length, near-critical density controlled plasma produced from ultra-low density plastic foam.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Iwawaki, T; Morita, K; Antici, P; Baton, S D; Filippi, F; Habara, H; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nicolaï, P; Nazarov, W; Rousseaux, C; Starodubstev, M; Tanaka, K A; Fuchs, J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to produce long-scale length (i.e. millimeter scale-length), homogeneous plasmas is of interest in studying a wide range of fundamental plasma processes. We present here a validated experimental platform to create and diagnose uniform plasmas with a density close or above the critical density. The target consists of a polyimide tube filled with an ultra low-density plastic foam where it was heated by x-rays, produced by a long pulse laser irradiating a copper foil placed at one end of the tube. The density and temperature of the ionized foam was retrieved by using x-ray radiography and proton radiography was used to verify the uniformity of the plasma. Plasma temperatures of 5-10 eV and densities around 10(21) cm(-3) are measured. This well-characterized platform of uniform density and temperature plasma is of interest for experiments using large-scale laser platforms conducting High Energy Density Physics investigations. PMID:26923471

  10. Multi-length-scale Material Model for SiC/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs): Inclusion of In-Service Environmental Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Galgalikar, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.

    2016-01-01

    In our recent work, a multi-length-scale room-temperature material model for SiC/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) was derived and parameterized. The model was subsequently linked with a finite-element solver so that it could be used in a general room-temperature, structural/damage analysis of gas-turbine engine CMC components. Due to its multi-length-scale character, the material model enabled inclusion of the effects of fiber/tow (e.g., the volume fraction, size, and properties of the fibers; fiber-coating material/thickness; decohesion properties of the coating/matrix interfaces; etc.) and ply/lamina (e.g., the 0°/90° cross-ply versus plain-weave architectures, the extent of tow crimping in the case of the plain-weave plies, cohesive properties of the inter-ply boundaries, etc.) length-scale microstructural/architectural parameters on the mechanical response of the CMCs. One of the major limitations of the model is that it applies to the CMCs in their as-fabricated conditions (i.e., the effect of prolonged in-service environmental exposure and the associated material aging-degradation is not accounted for). In the present work, the model is upgraded to include such in-service environmental-exposure effects. To demonstrate the utility of the upgraded material model, it is used within a finite-element structural/failure analysis involving impact of a toboggan-shaped turbine shroud segment by a foreign object. The results obtained clearly revealed the effects that different aspects of the in-service environmental exposure have on the material degradation and the extent of damage suffered by the impacted CMC toboggan-shaped shroud segment.

  11. Combining effective media and multi-phase methods of Lattice Boltzmann modelling for the characterisation of liquid-vapour dynamics in multi-length scale heterogeneous structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, P. J.; Turner, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    The combination of the lattice Boltzmann Shan-Chen pseudo-potential method for multiphase fluids (Shan and Chen 1993 Phys. Rev. E 47 1815) and a grey or partial bounce back lattice Boltzmann algorithm for effective media (Walsh et al 2009 Comput. Geosci. 35 1186), is demonstrated for application to liquid-vapour fluid dynamics in porous media with porosity spanning a very wide range of length scales. Liquid / vapour distributions in cellular like structures with cell walls of reduced permeability are seen to follow expectation.

  12. Reduction of laser beam spray at 0.527 (micron)m in an ignition scale length plasma with temporal beam smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, C .; Divol, L; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R K; MacKinnon, A J; Meezan, N B; Moody, J D; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Bahr, R; Seka, W

    2004-02-04

    We have measured the effect of laser smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) on beam spray, transmission and deflection of a 2{omega} (527 nm) high intensity (10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) interaction beam through an underdense large scale length plasma. We observe a 40% reduction of the beam spray when SSD is used, consistent with modeling by a fluid laser-plasma interaction code (pF3d). We measured a decrease in beam transmission with increasing laser intensity, consistent with the onset of parametric instabilities.

  13. Measurement of Acceptor-TΨC Helix Length of tRNA for Terminal A76-Addition by A-Adding Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Martinez, Anna; Tomita, Kozo

    2015-05-01

    The 3'-terminal CCA (C74C75A76-3') of tRNA is required for protein synthesis. In Aquifex aeolicus, the CCA-3' is synthesized by CC-adding and A-adding enzymes, although in most organisms, CCA is synthesized by a single CCA-adding enzyme. The mechanisms by which the A-adding enzyme adds only A76, but not C74C75, onto tRNA remained elusive. The complex structures of the enzyme with various tRNAs revealed the presence of a single tRNA binding site on the enzyme, with the enzyme measuring the acceptor-TΨC helix length of tRNA. The 3'-C75 of tRNA lacking A76 can reach the active site and the size and shape of the nucleotide binding pocket at the insertion stage are suitable for ATP. The 3'-C74 of tRNA lacking C75A76 cannot reach the active site, although CTP or ATP can bind the active pocket. Thus, the A-adding enzyme adds only A76, but not C74C75, onto tRNA. PMID:25914059

  14. Neuraminidase stalk length and additional glycosylation of the hemagglutinin influence the virulence of influenza H5N1 viruses for mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following passage of avian influenza H5 and H7 viruses in poultry, the hemagglutinin (HA) can acquire additional glycosylation sites and the neuraminidase (NA) stalk becomes shorter. We investigated whether these features play a role in the pathogenesis of infection in mammalian hosts. From 1996 t...

  15. Relations between surface conductance and spectral vegetation indices at intermediate (100 m2 to 15 km2) length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Piers J.; Heiser, Mark D.; Hall, Forrest G.

    1992-11-01

    The theoretical analysis of Sellers et al. (1992) indicates that the relative response of the unstressed canopy conductance (g*c) to changes in incident (nonsaturating) PAR flux (F0) should be proportional to some spectral vegetation indices (SVI), specifically the simple ratio (SR) vegetation index, for vegetation covers of similar physiology and physiognomy; or ∇F ≡ (∂g*c/∂F0) ∝ SR. This relationship was tested using the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) flux station data set (g*c) and the FIFE Landsat thematic mapper image data (SVI). The flux station data were used to invert a soil-plant-atmosphere model (the simple biosphere model (SiB) of Sellers et al., 1986) to derive estimates of g*c separate from the soil evaporation contribution and corrected for the "stress" effects of vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture deficit. The Landsat imagery was sampled to produce SR vegetation index values for small areas (90 × 90 m) centered on each flux station. The derived ∇F and SR values were found to be near-linearly related on a site-by-site basis. Differences between sites are thought to be related to the fractional cover of C3 versus C4 vegetation so that ∇S,F ≡ (∂∇F/∂(SR)) ∝ V3, where V3 is the fractional cover of C3 vegetation. The above equations form the basis for a simple biophysically based model of canopy-scale conductance. The model was applied on the flux station scale (100 m)2 and was also used to calculate fluxes for the entire FIFE site (15 × 15 km)2; the latter results were compared with airborne flux measurements. It is demonstrated that because the proposed relationship between ∇F and SR is near-linear, the calculation of evapotranspiration rates for large areas using this model is effectively scale-invariant.

  16. The role of length scales in bridging the gap between rock CPO and seismic signals of crustal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D.; Johnson, S. E.; Vel, S. S.; Song, W. J.; Christensen, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies based on laboratory petrophysics and in particular EBSD-based calculations indicate material rock anisotropy for crustal rocks can possess significant low orders of symmetry. These symmetries based on elastic tensor calculations can range from hexagonal and orthorhombic down to monoclinic and triclinic. On the other hand, interpretation of field seismic data yield crustal anisotropy of fast- or slow-axis transverse isotropy (hexagonal) symmetry at best; identification of orthorhombic symmetry is barely possible. Seismic results are often limited to simple orientations of the symmetry axes, such as vertical (radial anisotropy) or horizontal (azimuthal anisotropy). The physical scales of earth anisotropic fabrics and of seismic waves affect the types of information that may be extracted from seismic signals. A seismic wave has inherent limits to resolving capabilities, usually measured as some percentage of its wavelength, λ. This wave will accumulate anisotropic signal in two ways based on its path through anisotropic media of physical size, L: (1) When the wave is much smaller than the anisotropic material (λ << L), the seismic signal will be produced integrating along its path. (2) When the wave is much larger than the material (λ >> L), the wave will not see details of the material but will respond to just the bulk average of the material. In the first case, the wave will be sensitive to large scale earth changes such as limbs of an antiformal mountain range. The accumulating anisotropic seismic signal can get complicated (e.g., shear wave splits of splits). In the second case, the wave is too large to see any fine detail, and the material can be represented by an equivalent "effective media" that produces the same seismic response. Geometrical structure is a factor that helps bridge the scales of rock CPO to lower resolution seismic signals. Local rock CPO can fill or be mapped into a structure that is large enough for a seismic wave to respond

  17. Microstructure and properties of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O with nanometer-scale alumina additions.

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K. C.

    1998-09-11

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles {approx}30 nm is size were added to Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} in a 1:4 molar ratio. For comparison, 0.3 and {approx}3 pm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were added to separate batches. All materials were partial-melt processed. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reacted during melting to primarily form stable compounds of approximate composition (Sr,Ca){sub 2}AlO{sub 4}. All additions caused slight decreases in the T{sub c} and melting point of the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}. The submicrometer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions induced large expansions in magnetic-hysteresis width at 6 K. Electron microscopy examinations strongly suggested that the hysteresis expansion was related to alloying of the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} matrix rather than to pinning by volume defects.

  18. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjorn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.

  19. Sensitivity alteration of fiber Bragg grating sensors with additive micro-scale bi-material coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xixi; Alemohammad, Hamidreza; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes a combined fabrication method for creating a bi-material micro-scale coating on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) optical sensors using laser-assisted maskless microdeposition (LAMM) and electroless nickel plating. This bi-material coating alters the sensitivity of the sensor where it also acts as a protective layer. LAMM is used to coat bare FBGs with a 1-2 µm thick conductive silver layer followed by the electroless nickel plating process to increase layer thickness to a desired level ranging from 1 to 80 µm. To identify an optimum coating thickness and predict its effect on the sensor's sensitivity to force and temperature, an optomechanical model is developed in this study. According to the model if the thickness of the Ni layer is 30-50 µm, maximum temperature sensitivity is achieved. Our analytical and experimental results suggest that the temperature sensitivity of the coated FBG with 1 µm Ag and 33 µm Ni is almost doubled compared to a bare FBG with sensitivity of 0.011 ± 0.001 nm °C-1. In contrast, the force sensitivity is decreased; however, this sensitivity reduction is less than the values reported in the literature.

  20. Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics: quantum mecahnical molecular dynamics for extended time and length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklasson, Anders; Cawkwell, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) based on density functional theory offers a very accurate quantum mechanical approach to atomistic simulations that is more reliable and general compared to classical MD. Unfortunately, BOMD simulations are often limited by a high computational cost or by problems such as unbalanced phase space trajectories, numerical instabilities and a systematic long-term energy drift. These problems become particularly severe in combination with reduced complexity or linear scaling algorithms that are necessary for the study of large systems. We have recently taken some steps toward a new generation of first principles MD, which combines some of the best features of regular BOMD and Car-Parrinello MD, while avoiding their most serious shortcomings. The new dynamics is given in terms of an extended Lagrangian (XL), where auxiliary extended electronic degrees of freedom are added to the nuclear part. Our framework enables accurate geometric integration of both the nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom that provide a time-reversible and energy conserving dynamics on the ground state BO potential energy surface that is stable also under approximate SCF convergence. XL-BOMD provides a surprisingly simple and general framework for atomistic simulations

  1. Turbulent CO2 Flux Measurements by Lidar: Length Scales, Results and Comparison with In-Situ Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Fabien; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Hilton, Timothy W.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Andrews, Arlyn; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2009-01-01

    The vertical CO2 flux in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is investigated with a Doppler differential absorption lidar (DIAL). The instrument was operated next to the WLEF instrumented tall tower in Park Falls, Wisconsin during three days and nights in June 2007. Profiles of turbulent CO2 mixing ratio and vertical velocity fluctuations are measured by in-situ sensors and Doppler DIAL. Time and space scales of turbulence are precisely defined in the ABL. The eddy-covariance method is applied to calculate turbulent CO2 flux both by lidar and in-situ sensors. We show preliminary mean lidar CO2 flux measurements in the ABL with a time and space resolution of 6 h and 1500 m respectively. The flux instrumental errors decrease linearly with the standard deviation of the CO2 data, as expected. Although turbulent fluctuations of CO2 are negligible with respect to the mean (0.1 %), we show that the eddy-covariance method can provide 2-h, 150-m range resolved CO2 flux estimates as long as the CO2 mixing ratio instrumental error is no greater than 10 ppm and the vertical velocity error is lower than the natural fluctuations over a time resolution of 10 s.

  2. A FIRST CONSTRAINT ON THE THICK DISK SCALE LENGTH: DIFFERENTIAL RADIAL ABUNDANCES IN K GIANTS AT GALACTOCENTRIC RADII 4, 8, AND 12 kpc

    SciTech Connect

    Bensby, T.; Alves-Brito, A.; Oey, M. S.; Yong, D.; Melendez, J.

    2011-07-10

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan telescopes, we present detailed elemental abundances for 20 red giant stars in the outer Galactic disk, located at Galactocentric distances between 9 and 13 kpc. The outer disk sample is complemented with samples of red giants from the inner Galactic disk and the solar neighborhood, analyzed using identical methods. For Galactocentric distances beyond 10 kpc, we only find chemical patterns associated with the local thin disk, even for stars far above the Galactic plane. Our results show that the relative densities of the thick and thin disks are dramatically different from the solar neighborhood, and we therefore suggest that the radial scale length of the thick disk is much shorter than that of the thin disk. We make a first estimate of the thick disk scale length of L{sub thick} = 2.0 kpc, assuming L{sub thin} = 3.8 kpc for the thin disk. We suggest that radial migration may explain the lack of radial age, metallicity, and abundance gradients in the thick disk, possibly also explaining the link between the thick disk and the metal-poor bulge.

  3. Phase Behavior of Blends of Linear and Branched Polyethylenes on Micron-Length Scales via Ultra-Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Agamalian, M M; Alamo, R G; Londono, J D; Mandelkern, L; Wignall, G D

    1999-05-17

    SANS experiments on blends of linear, high density (HD) and long chain branched, low density (LD) polyethylenes indicate that these systems form a one-phase mixture in the melt. However, the maximum spatial resolution of pinhole cameras is approximately equal to 103Å and it has therefore been suggested that data might also be interpreted as arising from a bi-phasic melt with large a particle size (~ 1 µm), because most of the scattering from the different phases would not be resolved. We have addressed this hypothesis by means of USANS experiments, which confirm that HDPEILDPE blends are homogenous in the melt on length scales up to 20 µm. We have also studied blends of HDPE and short-chain branched linear low density polyethylenes (LLDPEs), which phase separate when the branch content is sufficiently high. LLDPEs prepared with Ziegler-Natta catalysts exhibit a wide distribution of compositions, and may therefore be thought of as a "blend" of different species. When the composition distribution is broad enough, a fraction of highly branched chains may phase separate on µm-length scales, and USANS has also been used to quantify this phenomenon.

  4. Investigation of SO2, HCl and NOx, control from waste incinerators using a novel additive in a pilot scale reactor.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Nimmo, W; Patsias, A; Hall, W

    2006-05-01

    A pilot scale experimental investigation of the use of a novel additive, calcium magnesium acetate, for the simultaneous control of SO2, HCl and NOx has been carried out. The pilot scale reactor simulated the furnace and flue gas conditions of a typical large scale waste incinerator and was a vertical 4m high reactor operated at 80 kW. The calcium magnesium acetate was added as a wet spray to the reactor at temperatures above 750 degrees C. The influence of the calcium magnesium acetate dose rate was investigated on the simultaneous removal of SO2, HCl and NOx. Maximum reductions were achieved at a Ca/S ratio (or Ca/Cl ratio) of 2.5 and were, 70% for SO2, 45% for HCl and 18% for NOx for each of the pollutant gases respectively. PMID:16749624

  5. Identification of a kinetic length scale which dictates alloy phase composition in Ni-Al interfaces on annealing at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, Mitali Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal; Bhattacharya, Debarati; Gupta, Mukul

    2014-12-14

    Ni-aluminides are an important class of intermetallics from technological point of view. Ni-Al phase diagram has been studied in detail experimentally as well as theoretically. It is known that if annealed at low temperature, the first alloy phase is usually NiAl{sub 3} according to Bené's rule. It is also understood that heat of formation may get modified by local densities of the constituents forming the alloy. In this regard, it is important to identify a kinetic length scale for defining “local density” in a system. We have deposited ultrathin multilayers of Ni and Al of layer thickness in tens of nanometres with Ni:Al stoichiometric ratio as 3:1 and 1:3, respectively. Considering these stoichiometry, Ni{sub 3}Al and NiAl{sub 3} are the thermodynamically favoured alloy phases in these samples. We used x-ray reflectivity, polarized neutron reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy to follow the alloy formation after annealing and identified the alloy phases at interfaces with nanometre resolution. Diffusion length of Ni and Al was obtained using Darken's law. Our results predict that ‘diffusion length’ is the unique length scale that connects kinetics to local density. In another interesting observation, using “virtual Kirkendall markers” at the interfaces, we showed asymmetry in consumption of Al for alloy formation, at Al on Ni (Al/Ni) and Ni on Al (Ni/Al) interfaces by comparing as-deposited and annealed states with respect to the markers.

  6. Investigating the reversibility of structural modifications of LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO₂ cathode materials during initial charge/discharge, at multiple length scales

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Bak, Seong -Min; Kim, Seung Min; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Chang, Wonyoung

    2015-08-11

    In this work, we investigate the structural modifications occurring at the bulk, subsurface, and surface scales of LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO₂ (NMC; y, z = 0.8, 0.1 and 0.4, 0.3, respectively) cathode materials during the initial charge/discharge. Various analytical tools, such as X-ray diffraction, selected-area electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and high-resolution electron microscopy, are used to examine the structural properties of the NMC cathode materials at the three different scales. Cut-off voltages of 4.3 and 4.8 V are applied during the electrochemical tests as the normal and extreme conditions, respectively. The high-Ni-content NMC cathode materials exhibit unusual behaviors, which is deviate frommore » the general redox reactions during the charge or discharge. The transition metal (TM) ions in the high-Ni-content NMC cathode materials, which are mostly Ni ions, are reduced at 4.8 V, even though TMs are usually oxidized to maintain charge neutrality upon the removal of Li. It was found that any changes in the crystallographic and electronic structures are mostly reversible down to the sub-surface scale, despite the unexpected reduction of Ni ions. However, after the discharge, traces of the phase transitions remain at the edges of the NMC cathode materials at the scale of a few nanometers (i.e., surface scale). This study demonstrates that the structural modifications in NMC cathode materials are induced by charge as well as discharge at multiple length scales. These changes are nearly reversible after the first cycle, except at the edges of the samples, which should be avoided because these highly localized changes can initiate battery degradation.« less

  7. A SHORT SCALE LENGTH FOR THE {alpha}-ENHANCED THICK DISK OF THE MILKY WAY: EVIDENCE FROM LOW-LATITUDE SEGUE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Judy Y.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Schneider, Donald P.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-06-10

    We examine the {alpha}-element abundance ratio, [{alpha}/Fe], of 5620 stars, observed by the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration survey in the region 6 kpc scale length (L{sub thick} {approx} 1.8 kpc) compared to the low-{alpha} population, which is typically associated with the thin disk. We find that the fraction of high-{alpha} stars in the inner disk increases at large |Z| and that high-{alpha} stars lag in rotation compared to low-{alpha} stars. In contrast, the fraction of high-{alpha} stars in the outer disk is low at all |Z|, and high- and low-{alpha} stars have similar rotational velocities up to 1.5 kpc from the plane. We interpret these results to indicate that different processes were responsible for the high-{alpha} populations in the inner and outer disk. The high-{alpha} population in the inner disk has a short scale length and large scale height, consistent with a scenario in which the thick disk forms during an early gas-rich accretion phase. Stars far from the plane in the outer disk may have reached their current locations through heating by minor mergers. The lack of high-{alpha} stars at large R and |Z| also places strict constraints on the strength of radial migration via transient spiral structure.

  8. Neandertal clavicle length

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik; Holliday, Trenton W.; Auerbach, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene archaic humans from western Eurasia (the Neandertals) have been described for a century as exhibiting absolutely and relatively long clavicles. This aspect of their body proportions has been used to distinguish them from modern humans, invoked to account for other aspects of their anatomy and genetics, used in assessments of their phylogenetic polarities, and used as evidence for Late Pleistocene population relationships. However, it has been unclear whether the usual scaling of Neandertal clavicular lengths to their associated humeral lengths reflects long clavicles, short humeri, or both. Neandertal clavicle lengths, along with those of early modern humans and latitudinally diverse recent humans, were compared with both humeral lengths and estimated body masses (based on femoral head diameters). The Neandertal do have long clavicles relative their humeri, even though they fall within the ranges of variation of early and recent humans. However, when scaled to body masses, their humeral lengths are relatively short, and their clavicular lengths are indistinguishable from those of Late Pleistocene and recent modern humans. The few sufficiently complete Early Pleistocene Homo clavicles seem to have relative lengths also well within recent human variation. Therefore, appropriately scaled clavicular length seems to have varied little through the genus Homo, and it should not be used to account for other aspects of Neandertal biology or their phylogenetic status. PMID:24616525

  9. Selective Ni-P electroless plating on photopatterned cationic adsorption films influenced by alkyl chain lengths of polyelectrolyte adsorbates and additive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaru; Nawa, Nozomi; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2004-10-26

    We demonstrated that the photopatterned single-layer adsorption film of poly(1-dodecyl-4-pyridinium bromide) on a silica surface was available for a template of nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) electroless plating through sensitization with a SnCl(2) aqueous solution and activation with a PdCl(2) aqueous solution. Four kinds of poly(1-alkyl-4-vinylpyridinium halide)s bearing methyl, propyl, hexyl, and dodecyl groups were prepared. The cationic polymers were adsorbed by a negatively charged silica surface from their solutions, to form single-layer adsorption films exhibiting desorption-resistance toward deionized water and ethanol. The organic adsorption films could be decomposed completely by exposure to 172 nm deep-UV light. The formation and decomposition of the single-layer films were confirmed by deep-UV absorption spectral measurement and zeta-potential measurement. Ni-P electroless plating was carried out on the photopatterned adsorption films, using three types of SnO(x) colloidal materials without and with cationic or anionic surfactant as catalyst precursors in the sensitization step. In the case of the negatively charged SnO(x) colloids surrounded by anionic surfactant, Ni-deposition took place preferentially on the cationic adsorption films remaining in unexposed regions. The Ni-deposition was accelerated significantly on the cationic adsorption film bearing dodecyl groups. It was obvious by ICP-AES analyses that the hydrophobic long-chain dodecyl groups in the adsorption film could promote the adsorption of the negative SnO(x) colloids on the film surface, followed by much nucleus formation of zerovalent Pd catalysts useful for the electroless plating. The result of our experiment clearly showed that, in addition to electrostatic interaction, van der Waals interaction generating between the hydrophobic long-chain hydrocarbons of the adsorption film and the surfactant improved significantly the adsorption stability of the SnO(x) colloids, resulting in highly

  10. A direct dynamical measurement of the Milky Way's disk surface density profile, disk scale length, and dark matter profile at 4 kpc ≲ R ≲ 9 kpc

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-12-20

    We present and apply rigorous dynamical modeling with which we infer unprecedented constraints on the stellar and dark matter mass distribution within our Milky Way (MW), based on large sets of phase-space data on individual stars. Specifically, we model the dynamics of 16,269 G-type dwarfs from SEGUE, which sample 5 kpc < R{sub GC} < 12 kpc and 0.3 kpc ≲ |Z| ≲ 3 kpc. We independently fit a parameterized MW potential and a three-integral, action-based distribution function (DF) to the phase-space data of 43 separate abundance-selected sub-populations (MAPs), accounting for the complex selection effects affecting the data. We robustly measure the total surface density within 1.1 kpc of the mid-plane to 5% over 4.5 kpc < R{sub GC} < 9 kpc. Using metal-poor MAPs with small radial scale lengths as dynamical tracers probes 4.5 kpc ≲ R{sub GC} ≲ 7 kpc, while MAPs with longer radial scale lengths sample 7 kpc ≲ R{sub GC} ≲ 9 kpc. We measure the mass-weighted Galactic disk scale length to be R{sub d} = 2.15 ± 0.14 kpc, in agreement with the photometrically inferred spatial distribution of stellar mass. We thereby measure dynamically the mass of the Galactic stellar disk to unprecedented accuracy: M {sub *} = 4.6 ± 0.3 + 3.0 (R {sub 0}/ kpc – 8) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} and a total local surface density of Σ{sub R{sub 0}}(Z=1.1 kpc)=68 ± 4 M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −2} of which 38 ± 4 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} is contributed by stars and stellar remnants. By combining our surface density measurements with the terminal velocity curve, we find that the MW's disk is maximal in the sense that V {sub c,} {sub disk}/V {sub c,} {sub total} = 0.83 ± 0.04 at R = 2.2 R{sub d} . We also constrain for the first time the radial profile of the dark halo at such small Galactocentric radii, finding that ρ{sub DM}(r; ≈R {sub 0})∝1/r {sup α} with α < 1.53 at 95% confidence. Our results show that action-based DF modeling of complex stellar data sets is now a feasible

  11. The connection between chromatin motion on the 100 nm length scale and core histone dynamics in live XTC-2 cells and isolated nuclei.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sara K; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2004-01-01

    The diffusive motion of DNA-containing chromatin in live cells and isolated nuclei is investigated using a two-photon standing wave fluorescence photobleaching experiment with 100 nm spatial resolution. The chromatin is labeled using the minor groove binding dye Hoechst 33342. In live cells, the mean diffusion rate is 5 x 10(-4) micro m2/s, with considerable cell-to-cell variation. This diffusion is highly constrained and cannot be observed in a standard, single beam fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiment. To determine the chemical origin of the diffusion, we study motion in isolated nuclei and vary the strength of the histone-DNA interactions by changing the ionic strength and using chemical and photocross-linking experiments. At higher NaCl concentrations, we see increased chromatin diffusion as the histone-DNA interaction is weakened due to ionic screening, whereas photocross-linking the core histones to the DNA results in a complete absence of diffusive motion. These trends are consistent with the 100 nm scale motion being correlated with the interactions of histone proteins with the DNA. If chromatin diffusion is connected to the nucleosomal dynamics on much smaller length scales, this may provide a way to assay biochemical activity in vivo based on larger scale macromolecular dynamics observed via fluorescence microscopy. PMID:14695300

  12. Large scale full-length cDNA sequencing reveals a unique genomic landscape in a lepidopteran model insect, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-09-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes. PMID:23821615

  13. Large Scale Full-Length cDNA Sequencing Reveals a Unique Genomic Landscape in a Lepidopteran Model Insect, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes. PMID:23821615

  14. Large-scale sequencing based on full-length-enriched cDNA libraries in pigs: contribution to annotation of the pig genome draft sequence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Along with the draft sequencing of the pig genome, which has been completed by an international consortium, collection of the nucleotide sequences of genes expressed in various tissues and determination of entire cDNA sequences are necessary for investigations of gene function. The sequences of expressed genes are also useful for genome annotation, which is important for isolating the genes responsible for particular traits. Results We performed a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis in pigs by using 32 full-length-enriched cDNA libraries derived from 28 kinds of tissues and cells, including seven tissues (brain, cerebellum, colon, hypothalamus, inguinal lymph node, ovary, and spleen) derived from pigs that were cloned from a sow subjected to genome sequencing. We obtained more than 330,000 EST reads from the 5′-ends of the cDNA clones. Comparison with human and bovine gene catalogs revealed that the ESTs corresponded to at least 15,000 genes. cDNA clones representing contigs and singlets generated by assembly of the EST reads were subjected to full-length determination of inserts. We have finished sequencing 31,079 cDNA clones corresponding to more than 12,000 genes. Mapping of the sequences of these cDNA clones on the draft sequence of the pig genome has indicated that the clones are derived from about 15,000 independent loci on the pig genome. Conclusions ESTs and cDNA sequences derived from full-length-enriched libraries are valuable for annotation of the draft sequence of the pig genome. This information will also contribute to the exploration of promoter sequences on the genome and to molecular biology-based analyses in pigs. PMID:23150988

  15. Saturation of the two-plasmon decay instability in long-scale-length plasmas relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Yaakobi, B; Hu, S X; Chang, P-Y; Craxton, R S; Edgell, D H; Follett, R; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Seka, W; Short, R W; Solodov, A; Stoeckl, C

    2012-04-20

    Measurements of the hot-electron generation by the two-plasmon-decay instability are made in plasmas relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Density-scale lengths of 400 μm at n(cr)/4 in planar CH targets allowed the two-plasmon-decay instability to be driven to saturation for vacuum intensities above ~3.5×10(14) W cm(-2). In the saturated regime, ~1% of the laser energy is converted to hot electrons. The hot-electron temperature is measured to increase rapidly from 25 to 90 keV as the laser beam intensity is increased from 2 to 7×10(14) W cm(-2). This increase in the hot-electron temperature is compared with predictions from nonlinear Zakharov models. PMID:22680726

  16. Saturation of the Two-Plasmon Decay Instability in Long-Scale-Length Plasmas Relevant to Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D. H.; Yaakobi, B.; Hu, S. X.; Chang, P-Y.; Craxton, R. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Solodov, A.; Stoeckl, C.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of the hot-electron generation by the two-plasmon-decay instability are made in plasmas relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Density-scale lengths of 400 {micro}m at n{sub cr}/4 in planar CH targets allowed the two-plasmon-decay instability to be driven to saturation for vacuum intensities above ~3.5 x 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. In the saturated regime, ~1% of the laser energy is converted to hot electrons. The hot-electron temperature is measured to increase rapidly from 25 to 90 keV as the laser beam intensity is increased from 2 to 7 x 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. This increase in the hot-electron temperature is compared with predictions from nonlinear Zakharov models.

  17. Patterning at the 10 nanometer length scale using a strongly segregating block copolymer thin film and vapor phase infiltration of inorganic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jonathan W.; Li, Zhaodong; Black, Charles T.; Sweat, Daniel P.; Wang, Xudong; Gopalan, Padma

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of self-assembled thin films of the cylinder-forming block copolymer poly(4-tert-butylstyrene-block-2-vinylpyridine) to pattern high density features at the 10 nm length scale. This material's large interaction parameter facilitates pattern formation in single-digit nanometer dimensions. This block copolymer's accessible order-disorder transition temperature allows thermal annealing to drive the assembly of ordered 2-vinylpyridine cylinders that can be selectively complexed with the organometallic precursor trimethylaluminum. This unique chemistry converts organic 2-vinylpyridine cylinders into alumina nanowires with diameters ranging from 8 to 11 nm, depending on the copolymer molecular weight. Graphoepitaxy of this block copolymer aligns and registers sub-12 nm diameter nanowires to larger-scale rectangular, curved, and circular features patterned by optical lithography. The alumina nanowires function as a robust hard mask to withstand the conditions required for patterning the underlying silicon by plasma etching. We conclude with a discussion of some of the challenges that arise with using block copolymers for patterning at sub-10 nm feature sizes.In this work, we demonstrate the use of self-assembled thin films of the cylinder-forming block copolymer poly(4-tert-butylstyrene-block-2-vinylpyridine) to pattern high density features at the 10 nm length scale. This material's large interaction parameter facilitates pattern formation in single-digit nanometer dimensions. This block copolymer's accessible order-disorder transition temperature allows thermal annealing to drive the assembly of ordered 2-vinylpyridine cylinders that can be selectively complexed with the organometallic precursor trimethylaluminum. This unique chemistry converts organic 2-vinylpyridine cylinders into alumina nanowires with diameters ranging from 8 to 11 nm, depending on the copolymer molecular weight. Graphoepitaxy of this block copolymer aligns and

  18. Evidence of Rapidly Warming Rivers in the UK from an Extensive Additive Modelling Study at the National Scale Using R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    River water temperature data exhibit non-linear behaviour over the past 50 or so years. Standard techniques for identifying and quantifying trends have centred around the use of linear regression and Mann-Kendall and Thiel-Sen procedures. Observational data from UK rivers suggest that temperatures are far more variable then assumed under these statistical models. In a national-scale assessment of the response of riverine systems to global climatic change, an additive model framework was employed to model patterns in water temperatures from a large database of temporal observational data. Models were developed using R, which allowed for the deployment of cutting-edge additive modelling techniques to describe trends at 2773 sites across England and Wales, UK. At a subset of sites, additive models were used to model long-term trends, trends within seasons and the long-term variation in the seasonal pattern of water temperatures. Changes in water temperature have important consequences for aquatic ecology, with some species being particularly sensitive even to small shifts in temperature during some or all of their lifecycle. While there are many studies reporting increasing regional and global air temperatures, evidence for changes in river water temperature has thus far been site specific and/or from sites heavily influenced by human activities that could themselves lead to warming. Here I present selected results from a national-scale assessment of changing river water temperatures, covering the whole of England and Wales, comprising data from 2,773 locations. Positive trends in water temperature were observed at 86% of sites. At a subset of sites, seasonal trend models were developed, which showed that 90% of locations demonstrated statistically significant increases in water temperature during Autumn and Winter periods. Multivariate smoothers, that allow for within-year and longer-term trend interactions in time, suggest that periods of warmer waters now extend

  19. Effect of ensiling time and exogenous protease addition to whole-plant corn silage of various hybrids, maturities, and chop lengths on nitrogen fractions and ruminal in vitro starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Ferraretto, L F; Crump, P M; Shaver, R D

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ensiling time and exogenous protease addition on soluble CP (% of CP), ammonia-N (% of N), and ruminal in vitro starch digestibility (ivSD) of whole-plant corn silage (WPCS) from 3 hybrids, 2 maturities, and 2 chop lengths. Samples from 3 nonisogenic hybrids [brown midrib containing the bm3 gene mutation (BM3), dual-purpose (DP), or floury-leafy (LFY)] at 2 harvest maturities [2/3 kernel milk line (early) or 7d later (late)] with 2 theoretical lengths of cut settings (0.64 or 1.95cm) on a forage harvester were collected at harvest, treated with or without exogenous protease, and ensiled in triplicate in vacuum heat-sealed plastic bags for 0, 30, 60, 120, and 240d. Thus, the experiment consisted of 120 treatments (3 hybrids × 2 maturities × 2 chop lengths × 2 protease treatments × 5 time points) and 360 mini-silos (3 replications per treatment). Vitreousness, measured by dissection on unfermented kernels on the day of harvest, averaged 66.8, 65.0, and 59.0% for BM3, DP, and LFY, respectively. A protease × maturity interaction was observed with protease increasing ivSD in late but not early maturity. Ensiling time × hybrid interactions were observed for ammonia-N and soluble CP concentrations with greater values for FLY than other hybrids only after 120d of ensiling. Ensiling time × hybrid or protease × hybrid interactions were not observed for ivSD. Measurements of ivSD were greatest for FLY and lowest for BM3. Length of the ensiling period did not attenuate negative effects of kernel vitreousness or maturity on ivSD in WPCS. Results suggest that the dosage of exogenous protease addition used in the present study may reduce but not overcome the negative effects of maturity on ivSD in WPCS. No interactions between chop length and ensiling time or exogenous protease addition were observed for ivSD. PMID:26433421

  20. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjorn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-03-16

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix andmore » elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. Furthermore, the study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.« less

  1. Patterning at the 10 nanometer length scale using a strongly segregating block copolymer thin film and vapor phase infiltration of inorganic precursors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonathan W; Li, Zhaodong; Black, Charles T; Sweat, Daniel P; Wang, Xudong; Gopalan, Padma

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of self-assembled thin films of the cylinder-forming block copolymer poly(4-tert-butylstyrene-block-2-vinylpyridine) to pattern high density features at the 10 nm length scale. This material's large interaction parameter facilitates pattern formation in single-digit nanometer dimensions. This block copolymer's accessible order-disorder transition temperature allows thermal annealing to drive the assembly of ordered 2-vinylpyridine cylinders that can be selectively complexed with the organometallic precursor trimethylaluminum. This unique chemistry converts organic 2-vinylpyridine cylinders into alumina nanowires with diameters ranging from 8 to 11 nm, depending on the copolymer molecular weight. Graphoepitaxy of this block copolymer aligns and registers sub-12 nm diameter nanowires to larger-scale rectangular, curved, and circular features patterned by optical lithography. The alumina nanowires function as a robust hard mask to withstand the conditions required for patterning the underlying silicon by plasma etching. We conclude with a discussion of some of the challenges that arise with using block copolymers for patterning at sub-10 nm feature sizes. PMID:27216015

  2. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials. PMID:26979660

  3. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-03-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.

  4. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials. PMID:26979660

  5. Photocurable high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) containing hydroxyapatite for additive manufacture of tissue engineering scaffolds with multi-scale porosity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-Juan; Paterson, Thomas; Owen, Robert; Sherborne, Colin; Dugan, James; Li, Jun-Ming; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2016-10-01

    Porous composites containing hydroxyapatite (HA) were templated from high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) and were further structured using direct-write UV stereolithography to produce composite scaffolds with multi-scale porosity. FTIR, TGA and SEM analyses confirmed that HA was retained after photocuring and subsequent treatments and was incorporated within the polymerised HIPE (polyHIPE). The addition of HA particles to the polyHIPE caused changes in the mechanical properties of the material. An increase in both the Young's modulus and maximum stress at yield was observed compared with the pure polyHIPE from 1.544±0.231 to 4.614±0.775 and 0.177±0.009 to 0.267±0.034MPa, respectively. Except at very high concentrations, adding HA did not adversely cause the phase separation of the HIPE or the porous microstructure of the resulting polyHIPE. In combination with a photoinitiator, the HIPE emulsion containing HA was investigated as a photocurable resin for stereolithography-based additive manufacturing. The material was readily processable into "woodpile" structures via direct-write UV stereolithography, producing scaffolds with multi-scale porosity which may be useful for medical applications such as tissue engineering. In conclusion, HA was successfully added into polyHIPEs, producing a similar porous structure to that of the pure polyHIPE whilst improving the mechanical performance. PMID:27287098

  6. Turbulence computations with 3-D small-scale additive turbulent decomposition and data-fitting using chaotic map combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerji, S.

    1997-12-31

    Although the equations governing turbulent fluid flow, the Navier-Stokes (N.S.) equations, have been known for well over a century and there is a clear technological necessity in obtaining solutions to these equations, turbulence remains one of the principal unsolved problems in physics today. It is still not possible to make accurate quantitative predictions about turbulent flows without relying heavily on empirical data. In principle, it is possible to obtain turbulent solutions from a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the N.-S. equations. The author first provides a brief introduction to the dynamics of turbulent flows. The N.-S. equations which govern fluid flow, are described thereafter. Then he gives a brief overview of DNS calculations and where they stand at present. He next introduces the two most popular approaches for doing turbulent computations currently in use, namely, the Reynolds averaging of the N.-S. equations (RANS) and large-eddy simulation (LES). Approximations, often ad hoc ones, are present in these methods because use is made of heuristic models for turbulence quantities (the Reynolds stresses) which are otherwise unknown. They then introduce a new computational method called additive turbulent decomposition (ATD), the small-scale version of which is the topic of this research. The rest of the thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 2 he describes the ATD procedure in greater detail; how dependent variables are split and the decomposition into large- and small-scale sets of equations. In Chapter 3 the spectral projection of the small-scale momentum equations are derived in detail. In Chapter 4 results of the computations with the small-scale ATD equations are presented. In Chapter 5 he describes the data-fitting procedure which can be used to directly specify the parameters of a chaotic-map turbulence model.

  7. Long length scales of element transport during reaction texture development in orthoamphibole-cordierite gneiss: Thor-Odin dome, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goergen, Eric T.; Whitney, Donna L.

    2012-02-01

    First-order factors controlling the textural and chemical evolution of metamorphic rocks are bulk composition and pressure-temperature-time ( P- T- t) path. Although it is common to assume that major element bulk composition does not change during regional metamorphism, rocks with reaction textures such as corona structures record evidence for major changes in effective bulk composition (EBC) and therefore provide significant insight into the scale, pathways, and mechanisms of element transport during metamorphism. Quantifying changes in EBC is essential for petrologic applications such as calculation of phase diagrams (pseudosections). The progressive growth of complex corona structures on garnet and Al2SiO5 porphyroblasts in orthoamphibole-cordierite gneiss Thor-Odin dome (British Columbia, Canada) reduced the EBC volume of the rock during metamorphism and therefore had a dramatic effect on the evolution of the stable mineral assemblage. These rocks contain a chemical and textural record of metamorphic reactions and preserve 3D networks (reaction pathways) connecting corona structures. These coronal networks record long (>cm) length scales of localized element transport during metamorphism. P- T, T- X, and P- X pseudosections are used to investigate the control of effective bulk composition on phase assemblage evolution. Despite textural complexity and evidence for disequilibrium, mineral assemblages and compositions were successfully modeled and peak metamorphic conditions estimated at 750°C and 9 kbar. These results illustrate how textural and chemical changes during metamorphism can be evaluated using an integrated petrographic and pseudosection approach, highlight the importance of effective bulk composition choice for application of phase equilibria methods in metamorphic rocks, and show how corona structures can be used to understand the scale of compositional change and element transport during metamorphism.

  8. Crystal modification of iron oxide scale by potassium addition and its application to lithium-ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Dong-Won; Han, Sang-Wook; Kong, Byung-Seon; Oh, Eun-Suok

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes a valuable method to reuse the iron oxide scale (IOS) often produced in the steel industry as an anode active material in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The IOS samples are prepared via quenching of carbon steel and simple oxidation at a high temperature with or without sequential treatment by potassium hydroxide. Morphological and physical characterizations confirm the formation of a lamellar structure of orthorhombic KFeO2 with a high degree of crystallinity in the potassium-added IOSs. Additionally, the potassium addition decreases the particle size of the crystals and increases the d-spacing between crystal layers. Electrochemical performance tests show that the discharge capacities of the IOS samples monotonically increased with increasing number of charge/discharge cycles regardless of the existence of potassium. In addition, the rate of increase is larger in the potassium-added IOS samples containing the lamellar KFeO2 structure. Consequently, after prolonged cycling (more than 500 cycles), the potassium-added IOS sample retains a discharge capacity of 1020 mAh g-1 with good cycling stability, while the IOS quenched sample only exhibits a capacity of 956 mAh g-1. This result is attributed to the unique structure of the KFeO2 crystals formed in the potassium-added IOS particles.

  9. Hierarchical random additive process and logarithmic scaling of generalized high order, two-point correlations in turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. I. A.; Marusic, I.; Meneveau, C.

    2016-06-01

    Townsend [Townsend, The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1976)] hypothesized that the logarithmic region in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows consists of space-filling, self-similar attached eddies. Invoking this hypothesis, we express streamwise velocity fluctuations in the inertial layer in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows as a hierarchical random additive process (HRAP): uz+=∑i=1Nzai . Here u is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, + indicates normalization in wall units, z is the wall normal distance, and ai's are independently, identically distributed random additives, each of which is associated with an attached eddy in the wall-attached hierarchy. The number of random additives is Nz˜ln(δ /z ) where δ is the boundary layer thickness and ln is natural log. Due to its simplified structure, such a process leads to predictions of the scaling behaviors for various turbulence statistics in the logarithmic layer. Besides reproducing known logarithmic scaling of moments, structure functions, and correlation function [" close="]3/2 uz(x ) uz(x +r ) >, new logarithmic laws in two-point statistics such as uz4(x ) > 1 /2, 1/3, etc. can be derived using the HRAP formalism. Supporting empirical evidence for the logarithmic scaling in such statistics is found from the Melbourne High Reynolds Number Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel measurements. We also show that, at high Reynolds numbers, the above mentioned new logarithmic laws can be derived by assuming the arrival of an attached eddy at a generic point in the flow field to be a Poisson process [Woodcock and Marusic, Phys. Fluids 27, 015104 (2015), 10.1063/1.4905301]. Taken together, the results provide new evidence supporting the essential ingredients of the attached eddy hypothesis to describe streamwise velocity fluctuations of large, momentum transporting eddies in wall-bounded turbulence, while

  10. PS-b-PEO/Silica Films with Regular and Reverse Mesostructures of Large Characteristic Length Scales Prepared by Solvent Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    YU,KUI; BRINKER,C. JEFFREY; HURD,ALAN J.; EISENBERG,ADI

    2000-11-22

    Since the discovery of surfactant-templated silica by Mobil scientists in 1992, mesostructured silica has been synthesized in various forms including thin films, powders, particles, and fibers. In general, mesostructured silica has potential applications, such as in separation, catalysis, sensors, and fluidic microsystems. In respect to these potential applications, mesostructured silica in the form of thin films is perhaps one of the most promising candidates. The preparation of mesostructured silica films through preferential solvent evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) has recently received much attention in the laboratories. However, no amphiphile/silica films with reverse mesophases have ever been made through this EISA procedure. Furthermore, templates employed to date have been either surfactants or poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymers, such as pluronic P-123, both of which are water-soluble and alcohol-soluble. Due to their relatively low molecular weight, the templated silica films with mesoscopic order have been limited to relatively small characteristic length scales. In the present communication, the authors report a novel synthetic method to prepare mesostructured amphiphilic/silica films with regular and reverse mesophases of large characteristic length scales. This method involves evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) of amphiphilic polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) diblock copolymers. In the present study, the PS-b-PEO diblocks are denoted as, for example, PS(215)-b-PEO(100), showing that this particular sample contains 215 S repeat units and 100 EO repeat units. This PS(215)-b-PEO(100) diblock possesses high molecular weight and does not directly mix with water or alcohol. To the authors knowledge, no studies have reported the use of water-insoluble and alcohol-insoluble amphiphilic diblocks as structure-directing agents in the synthesis of mesostructured silica films through

  11. Derivation of effective fission gas diffusivities in UO2 from lower length scale simulations and implementation of fission gas diffusion models in BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar; Pastore, Giovanni; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Perriot, Romain Thibault; Tonks, Michael; Stanek, Christopher Richard

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes the development of new fission gas diffusion models from lower length scale simulations and assessment of these models in terms of annealing experiments and fission gas release simulations using the BISON fuel performance code. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe) in UO2 were derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. The importance of the large XeU3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and stability. These models were implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe diffusivities for various irradiation conditions. The effective diffusivities were used in BISON to calculate fission gas release for a number of test cases. The results are assessed against experimental data and future directions for research are outlined based on the conclusions.

  12. The seasonal and solar cycle variations of electron density gradient scale length, vertical drift and layer height during magnetically quiet days: Implications for Spread F over Trivandrum, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, S.

    2009-12-01

    A study has been carried out on the behaviour of electron density gradient scale length, L, vertical drift and layer height, around post sunset hours, during the magnetically quiet days of summer, winter and equinox seasons of solar maximum (2002) and minimum years (1995), using ionosonde data of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.5°E, dip = 0.5°N) in the Indian longitude sector. The results indicate a clear seasonal and solar cycle variation in all the three parameters. Further, the seasonal variation of equatorial Spread F (ESF) during the above period is examined in terms of the relative roles of L, the vertical drift and layer height (of the F layer) in the triggering of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The results, show for the first time, that L also plays an important role, in controlling the quiet time seasonal and solar cycle variability of ESF; whereas in earlier studies this parameter had been taken to be constant. The detailed results are presented and discussed.

  13. Evolution of clustering length, large-scale bias, and host halo mass at 2 < z < 5 in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS)⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkalec, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Pollo, A.; de la Torre, S.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B. C.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorín, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Capak, P.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cuby, J. G.; Dunlop, J.; Fotopoulou, S.; Koekemoer, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Pforr, J.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Wang, P. W.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of galaxy clustering for galaxies in the redshift range 2.0 scale dependent clustering amplitude r0 changes with redshift making use of mock samples to evaluate and correct the survey selection function. Using a power-law model ξ(r) = (r/r0)- γ we find that the correlation function for the general population is best fit by a model with a clustering length r0 = 3.95+0.48-0.54 h-1 Mpc and slope γ = 1.8+0.02-0.06 at z ~ 2.5, r0 = 4.35 ± 0.60 h-1 Mpc and γ = 1.6+0.12-0.13 at z ~ 3.5. We use these clustering parameters to derive the large-scale linear galaxy bias bLPL, between galaxies and dark matter. We find bLPL = 2.68 ± 0.22 at redshift z ~ 3 (assuming σ8 = 0.8), significantly higher than found at intermediate and low redshifts for the similarly general galaxy populations. We fit a halo occupation distribution (HOD) model to the data and we obtain that the average halo mass at redshift z ~ 3 is Mh = 1011.75 ± 0.23 h-1M⊙. From this fit we confirm that the large-scale linear galaxy bias is relatively high at bLHOD = 2.82 ± 0.27. Comparing these measurements with similar measurements at lower redshifts we infer that the star-forming population of galaxies at z ~ 3 should evolve into the massive and bright (Mr< -21.5)galaxy population, which typically occupy haloes of mass ⟨ Mh ⟩ = 1013.9 h-1M⊙ at redshift z = 0. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Program 185.A-0791.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Large-scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-based Lubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, Ali

    2013-09-26

    This project was funded under the Department of Energy (DOE) Lab Call on Nanomanufacturing for Energy Efficiency and was directed toward the development of novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives for improving the friction and wear performance of machine components in a wide range of industrial and transportation applications. Argonne's research team concentrated on the scientific and technical aspects of the project, using a range of state-of-the art analytical and tribological test facilities. Argonne has extensive past experience and expertise in working with boron-based solid and liquid lubrication additives, and has intellectual property ownership of several. There were two industrial collaborators in this project: Ashland Oil (represented by its Valvoline subsidiary) and Primet Precision Materials, Inc. (a leading nanomaterials company). There was also a sub-contract with the University of Arkansas. The major objectives of the project were to develop novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives and to optimize and verify their performance under boundary-lubricated sliding conditions. The project also tackled problems related to colloidal dispersion, larger-scale manufacturing and blending of nano-additives with base carrier oils. Other important issues dealt with in the project were determination of the optimum size and concentration of the particles and compatibility with various base fluids and/or additives. Boron-based particulate additives considered in this project included boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), boron oxide, and borax. As part of this project, we also explored a hybrid MoS{sub 2} + boric acid formulation approach for more effective lubrication and reported the results. The major motivation behind this work was to reduce energy losses related to friction and wear in a wide spectrum of mechanical systems and thereby reduce our dependence on imported oil. Growing concern over greenhouse gas

  15. Frequent N addition and clonal relatedness among immunoglobulin lambda light chains expressed in rheumatoid arthritis synovia and PBL, and the influence of V lambda gene segment utilization on CDR3 length.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), B-lineage cells in the synovial membrane secrete large amounts of immunoglobulin that contribute to tissue destruction. The CDR3 of an immunoglobulin light chain is formed by rearrangements of VL and JL gene segments. Addition of non-germline-encoded (N) nucleotides at V(D)J joins by the enzyme terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) enhances antibody diversity. TdT was previously thought to be active in B cells only during heavy chain rearrangement, but we and others reported unexpectedly high levels of N addition in kappa light chains. We also found clonally related kappa chains bearing unusually long CDR3 intervals in RA synovium, suggesting oligoclonal expansion of a set of atypical B lymphocytes. In this study, we analyzed lambda light chain expression to determine if N addition occurs throughout immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and to compare CDR3 lengths of lambda and kappa light chains in RA patients and normal individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of V lambda III transcripts was performed on RA synovia and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and normal PBL for which kappa repertoires were previously analyzed. Representative lambda + PCR products were cloned and sequenced. RESULTS: Analysis of 161 cDNA clones revealed that N addition occurs in lambda light chains of RA patients and normal controls. The lambda light chain repertoires in RA were enriched for long CDR3 intervals. In both RA and controls, CDR3 lengths were strongly influenced by which V lambda gene segment was present in the rearrangement. Five sets of clonally related sequences were found in RA synovia and PBL; one set was found in normal PBL. CONCLUSIONS: In humans, unlike mice, N addition enhances antibody diversity at all stages of immunoglobulin assembly, and the structural diversity of lambda CDR3 intervals is greater than that of kappa light chains. Clonally related V lambda

  16. Turbulent coagulation of particles smaller than the length scales of turbulence and equilibrium sorption of phenanthrene to clay: Implications for pollutant transport in the estuarine water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunk, Brett Kenneth

    1997-11-01

    Pollutant and particle transport in estuaries is affected by a multitude of physical, chemical and biological processes. In this research the importance of equilibrium sorption and turbulent coagulation were studied. Sorption in estuaries was modeled using phenanthrene, bacterial extracellular polymer and kaolinite clay as surrogates for a hydrophobic organic pollutant, dissolved organic matter and inorganic suspended sediment, respectively. Experiments over a range of estuarine salinities showed that ionic strength had the largest effect on the extent of sorption, while the effect of extracellular polymer coatings on the mineral surfaces was insignificant. Further calculations using typical estuarine suspended sediment concentrations indicated that equilibrium sorption could not fully account for the solid/solution phase distribution of hydrophobic organic compounds in the estuarine water column. For particles that are small compared to the length scales of turbulence, the rate of coagulation is related to the dynamics of the smallest turbulent eddies since they have the highest shear rate. Experimental and theoretical effort focused on determining the coagulation rate of spherical particles in isotropic turbulence. A pair diffusion approximation valid for rapidly fluctuating flows was used to calculate the rate of coagulation in a randomly varying isotropic linear flow field. Dynamic simulations of particle coagulation in Gaussian turbulence were computed over a range of representative values of particle-particle interactions (i.e, hydrodynamic interactions and van der Waals attraction) and total strain (i.e., the product of the strain rate and its time scale). The computed coagulation rates for isotropic turbulence differed from analytical approximations valid at large and small total strain. As expected, particle interactions were found to be significant. Experimental measurements of coagulation in grid-generated turbulence were obtained by measuring the loss

  17. Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Appendices. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This document contains appendices regarding a reprint on a field scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as a oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition.

  18. Concurrent Validity Data for the Uzgiris and Hunt Scales and the Bayley Mental Scale: Additional Evidence on the Dunst Age Norms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, David; And Others

    1988-01-01

    When administered to 34 infants with handicaps, Bayley Scale mental age scores were an average of 2.1 months higher than Estimated Developmental Ages (EDA's) calculated from the Uzgiris and Hunt Scales. The EDA's were significantly and positively related to Bayley mental age, and sensorimotor play emerged as the best single correlate. (Author/JDD)

  19. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Second topical report, Results of bench-scale screening of additives

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-08-13

    ADA Technologies, Inc. (ADA) has completed the bench-scale testing phase of a program to evaluate additives that will improve the collection of fine particles in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A bench-scale ESP was installed at the Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL) combustion research and development facility in Library, PA in order to conduct the evaluation. During a two-week test, four candidate additives were injected into the flue gas ahead of a 100 acfm ESP to determine the effect on fly ash collectability. Two additives were found to reduce the emissions from the ESP. Additives ``C`` and ``D`` performed better than initially anticipated -- reducing emissions initially by 17%. Emissions were reduced by 27% after the ESP was modified by the installation of baffles to minimize sneakage. In addition to the measured improvements in performance, no detrimental effects (i.e., electrode fouling) were observed in the operation of the ESP during the testing. The measures of success identified for the bench-scale phase of the program have been surpassed. Since the additives will affect only non-rapping reentrainment particle losses, it is expected that an even greater improvement in particle collection will be observed in larger-scale ESPs. Therefore, positive results are anticipated during the pilot-scale phase of the program and during a future full-scale demonstration test. A preliminary economic analysis was performed to evaluate the cost of the additive process and to compare its costs against alternative means for reducing emissions from ESPs. The results show that conditioning with additive C at a rate of 0.05% (wt. additive to wt. fly ash) is much less expensive than adding new ESP capacity, and more cost competitive than existing chemical conditioning processes. Preliminary chemical analysis of conditioned fly ash shows that it passes the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure criteria.

  20. PILOT-SCALE STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF BROMINE ADDITION ON THE EMISSIONS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports on a study to evaluate organic combustion by-product emissions while feeding varying amounts of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) into a pilot-scale incinerator burning surrogate waste materials. (NOTE: Adding brominated organic compounds to a pilot-scale incinerat...

  1. Zero Additional Process, Local Charge Trap, Embedded Flash Memory with Drain-Side Assisted Erase Scheme Using Minimum Channel Length/Width Standard Complemental Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single Transistor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, Kousuke; Shinozuka, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Ken

    2012-04-01

    This paper proposes for the first time the completely complemental metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible embedded flash memory with the small cell size as well as the lowest process cost. The single transistor cell with the minimum channel length and width realizes the ideal smallest cell. The non-volatile memory operation is realized with locally injected electrons at the drain-edge by the hot electron injection. This paper also proposes the novel forward-bias assisted erase. The proposed memory is experimentally demonstrated with the 65 nm standard CMOS process without additional process or mask. The cell size is 10F2 with the 65 nm CMOS logic design rule. The excellent reliability such as 100-times program/erase endurance, 10-year data retention and high immunity to the read/program/erase disturb is also experimentally demonstrated. The proposed cell is the ideal candidate for the code-storage embedded non-volatile memories in system-on-chip and microcontroller unit.

  2. Sequence-structure correlations in silk: Poly-Ala repeat of N. clavipes MaSp1 is naturally optimized at a critical length scale.

    PubMed

    Bratzel, Graham; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-03-01

    Spider silk is a self-assembling biopolymer that outperforms many known materials in terms of its mechanical performance despite being constructed from simple and inferior building blocks. While experimental studies have shown that the molecular structure of silk has a direct influence on the stiffness, toughness, and failure strength of silk, few molecular-level analyses of the nanostructure of silk assemblies in particular under variations of genetic sequences have been reported. Here we report atomistic-level structures of the MaSp1 protein from the Nephila Clavipes spider dragline silk sequence, obtained using an in silico approach based on replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and explicit water molecular dynamics. We apply this method to study the effects of a systematic variation of the poly-alanine repeat lengths, a parameter controlled by the genetic makeup of silk, on the resulting molecular structure of silk at the nanoscale. Confirming earlier experimental and computational work, a structural analysis reveals that poly-alanine regions in silk predominantly form distinct and orderly β-sheet crystal domains while disorderly regions are formed by glycine-rich repeats that consist of 3(10)-helix type structures and β-turns. Our predictions are directly validated against experimental data based on dihedral angle pair calculations presented in Ramachandran plots combined with an analysis of the secondary structure content. The key result of our study is our finding of a strong dependence of the resulting silk nanostructure depending on the poly-alanine length. We observe that the wildtype poly-alanine repeat length of six residues defines a critical minimum length that consistently results in clearly defined β-sheet nanocrystals. For poly-alanine lengths below six, the β-sheet nanocrystals are not well-defined or not visible at all, while for poly-alanine lengths at and above six, the characteristic nanocomposite structure of silk emerges with no

  3. Reducing the item number to obtain same-length self-assessment scales: a systematic approach using result of graphical loglinear Rasch modeling.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tine; Kreiner, Svend

    2011-01-01

    The Revised Danish Learning Styles Inventory (R-D-LSI) (Nielsen 2005), which is an adaptation of Sternberg-Wagner Thinking Styles Inventory (Sternberg, 1997), comprises 14 subscales, each measuring a separate learning style. Of these 14 subscales, 9 are eight items long and 5 are seven items long. For self-assessment, self-scoring and self-interpretational purposes it is deemed prudent that subscales measuring comparable constructs are of the same item length. Consequently, in order to obtain a self-assessment version of the R-D-LSI with an equal number of items in each subscale, a systematic approach to item reduction based on results of graphical loglinear Rasch modeling (GLLRM) was designed. This approach was then used to reduce the number of items in the subscales of the R-D-LSI which had an item-length of more than seven items, thereby obtaining the Danish Self-Assessment Learning Styles Inventory (D-SA-LSI) comprising 14 subscales each with an item length of seven. The systematic approach to item reduction based on results of GLLRM will be presented and exemplified by its application to the R-D-LSI. PMID:22357154

  4. Minimal length uncertainty and accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmany, A.; Mortazavi, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, minimal length uncertainty is used as a constraint to solve the Friedman equation. It is shown that, based on the minimal length uncertainty principle, the Hubble scale is decreasing which corresponds to an accelerating universe.

  5. Teachers' Awareness and Use of Scales to Map the Progress of Children Who Speak English as an Additional Language or Dialect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Courcy, Michele; Adoniou, Misty; Ngoc, Doan Ba

    2014-01-01

    With the development of the English as an Additional Language or Dialect (EAL/D) Teacher Resource, the educational needs and outcomes of refugee and immigrant children have been placed on the national mainstream teaching agenda. This new national resource sits alongside a plethora of other resources, known as scales and standards, which have been…

  6. World's largest coseismic strike-slip offset: The 1855 rupture of the Wairarapa Fault, New Zealand, and implications for displacement/length scaling of continental earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, D. W.; Little, T. A.

    2006-12-01

    We used detailed microtopographic surveys to measure fault offset along the southern trace of the Wairarapa fault, near Wellington, New Zealand, which most recently experienced a Mw > 8.1 earthquake in 1855. Our measurements at 16 localities support the inference that dextral slip in 1855 reached 18.7 m and averaged ˜16 m over the 16 km length that we studied. Five measurements were made where a single active strand comprises the fault zone, yielding "smallest" dextral offsets of 13.0-18.7 m. At Pigeon Bush, sequential beheading of a stream and new 14C dating support the interpretation that its 18.7 ± 1.0 m of offset accumulated in 1855. We also measured three "next-smallest" offsets on single-strand faults of 26.3-32.7 m, evidence that dextral slip during the previous event was ˜14 m. Eight measurements were made where the Wairarapa fault includes two closely spaced strands, yielding smallest dextral offsets of 12.9-16.0 m. At Tauherenikau River, 14C dating of postoffset mud yielded ages indistinguishable from A.D. 1855. Combining all single-strand and two-strand (minimum) estimates yields an average dextral slip of 15.5 ± 1.4 m in the study area. Historical observations and our data indicate that vertical slip reached ˜2.5 m. The large displacement and short (˜145 km) strike length yield an unusually high displacement/length ratio for the rupture. As suggested by previous dislocation modeling, we propose that the rupture extended tens of kilometers downdip (W) to merge with the underlying subduction interface. Alternatively, the rupture may have been strongly segmented at depth, yielding an earthquake with an unusually large static stress drop.

  7. Water reuse: >90% water yield in MBR/RO through concentrate recycling and CO2 addition as scaling control.

    PubMed

    Joss, Adriano; Baenninger, Claudia; Foa, Paolo; Koepke, Stephan; Krauss, Martin; McArdell, Christa S; Rottermann, Karin; Wei, Yuansong; Zapata, Ana; Siegrist, Hansruedi

    2011-11-15

    Over 1.5 years continuous piloting of a municipal wastewater plant upgraded with a double membrane system (ca. 0.6 m(3) d(-1) of product water produced) have demonstrated the feasibility of achieving high water quality with a water yield of 90% by combining a membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a submerged ultrafiltration membrane followed by a reverse osmosis membrane (RO). The novelty of the proposed treatment scheme consists of the appropriate conditioning of MBR effluent prior to the RO and in recycling the RO concentrates back to the biological unit. All the 15 pharmaceuticals measured in the influent municipal sewage were retained below 100 ng L(-1), a proposed quality parameter, and mostly below detection limits of 10 ng L(-1). The mass balance of the micropollutants shows that these are either degraded or discharged with the excess concentrate, while only minor quantities were found in the excess sludge. The micropollutant load in the concentrate can be significantly reduced by ozonation. A low treated water salinity (<10 mM inorganic salts; 280 ± 70 μS cm(-1)) also confirms that the resulting product has a high water quality. Solids precipitation and inorganic scaling are effectively mitigated by lowering the pH in the RO feed water with CO(2) conditioning, while the concentrate from the RO is recycled to the biological unit where CO(2) is stripped by aeration. This causes precipitation to occur in the bioreactor bulk, where it is much less of a process issue. SiO(2) is the sole exception. Equilibrium modeling of precipitation reactions confirms the effectiveness of this scaling-mitigation approach for CaCO(3) precipitation, calcium phosphate and sulfate minerals. PMID:21959090

  8. Large-scale analysis of full-length cDNAs from the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar Micro-Tom, a reference system for the Solanaceae genomics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Solanaceae family includes several economically important vegetable crops. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is regarded as a model plant of the Solanaceae family. Recently, a number of tomato resources have been developed in parallel with the ongoing tomato genome sequencing project. In particular, a miniature cultivar, Micro-Tom, is regarded as a model system in tomato genomics, and a number of genomics resources in the Micro-Tom-background, such as ESTs and mutagenized lines, have been established by an international alliance. Results To accelerate the progress in tomato genomics, we developed a collection of fully-sequenced 13,227 Micro-Tom full-length cDNAs. By checking redundant sequences, coding sequences, and chimeric sequences, a set of 11,502 non-redundant full-length cDNAs (nrFLcDNAs) was generated. Analysis of untranslated regions demonstrated that tomato has longer 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions than most other plants but rice. Classification of functions of proteins predicted from the coding sequences demonstrated that nrFLcDNAs covered a broad range of functions. A comparison of nrFLcDNAs with genes of sixteen plants facilitated the identification of tomato genes that are not found in other plants, most of which did not have known protein domains. Mapping of the nrFLcDNAs onto currently available tomato genome sequences facilitated prediction of exon-intron structure. Introns of tomato genes were longer than those of Arabidopsis and rice. According to a comparison of exon sequences between the nrFLcDNAs and the tomato genome sequences, the frequency of nucleotide mismatch in exons between Micro-Tom and the genome-sequencing cultivar (Heinz 1706) was estimated to be 0.061%. Conclusion The collection of Micro-Tom nrFLcDNAs generated in this study will serve as a valuable genomic tool for plant biologists to bridge the gap between basic and applied studies. The nrFLcDNA sequences will help annotation of the tomato whole-genome sequence

  9. Generation and analysis of a large-scale expressed sequence tags from a full-length enriched cDNA library of Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Liu, Changqing; Lu, Taofeng; Liu, Dan; Bai, Chunyu; Li, Xiangchen; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Siberian tiger, the world's most endangered species. The titers of primary and amplified libraries were 1.28×10(6)pfu/mL and 1.59×10(10)pfu/mL respectively. The proportion of recombinants from unamplified library was 91.3% and the average length of exogenous inserts was 1.06kb. A total of 279 individual ESTs with sizes ranging from 316 to 1258bps were then analyzed. Furthermore, 204 unigenes were successfully annotated and involved in 49 functions of the GO classification, cell (175, 85.5%), cellular process (165, 80.9%), and binding (152, 74.5%) are the dominant terms. 198 unigenes were assigned to 156 KEGG pathways, and the pathways with the most representation are metabolic pathways (18, 9.1%). The proportion pattern of each COG subcategory was similar among Panthera tigris altaica, P. tigris tigris and Homo sapiens, and general function prediction only cluster (44, 15.8%) represents the largest group, followed by translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis (33, 11.8%), replication, recombination and repair (24, 8.6%), and only 7.2% ESTs classified as novel genes. Moreover, the recombinant plasmid pET32a-TAT-COL6A2 was constructed, coded for the Trx-TAT-COL6A2 fusion protein with two 6× His-tags in N and C-terminal. After BCA assay, the concentration of soluble Trx-TAT-COL6A2 recombinant protein was 2.64±0.18mg/mL. This library will provide a useful platform for the functional genome and transcriptome research of for the P. tigris and other felid animals in the future. PMID:24630959

  10. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  11. Characterization of sorbitan surfactant-based vesicles at the molecular scale using NMR: Effect of acyl chain length vs. phospholipid composition.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keita; Iwai, Hideka; Kamei, Toshiyuki; Kato, Ayako; Murata, Yusuke; Nakamura, Hidemi; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    We focused on the characterization of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface of the membrane of vesicles prepared with various sorbitan surfactants using two evaluation methods: Laurdan fluorescence intensity (GP(340) value) and NMR analysis (half linewidth). Laurdan fluorescence intensity analysis, used to evaluate the hydrophobicity of the interior of the vesicular membrane, indicated a similarity between Span vesicles and liposomes in terms of hydrophobicity, while NMR analysis, used to assess the mobility of lipid molecules, indicated a large difference between Span vesicles and liposomes in terms of molecular mobility at the interface. These results suggest that the physicochemical properties of Span vesicles and liposomes are roughly similar at the "meso-scale" but not completely similar at the "molecular scale." PMID:27062214

  12. Genomic-scale comparison of sequence- and structure-based methods of function prediction: Does structure provide additional insight?

    PubMed Central

    Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.; Siew, Naomi; Di Gennaro, Jeannine A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    A function annotation method using the sequence-to-structure-to-function paradigm is applied to the identification of all disulfide oxidoreductases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The method identifies 27 sequences as potential disulfide oxidoreductases. All previously known thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and disulfide isomerases are correctly identified. Three of the 27 predictions are probable false-positives. Three novel predictions, which subsequently have been experimentally validated, are presented. Two additional novel predictions suggest a disulfide oxidoreductase regulatory mechanism for two subunits (OST3 and OST6) of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Based on homology, this prediction can be extended to a potential tumor suppressor gene, N33, in humans, whose biochemical function was not previously known. Attempts to obtain a folded, active N33 construct to test the prediction were unsuccessful. The results show that structure prediction coupled with biochemically relevant structural motifs is a powerful method for the function annotation of genome sequences and can provide more detailed, robust predictions than function prediction methods that rely on sequence comparison alone. PMID:11316881

  13. Chemical characteristics of beddings for swine: effects of bedding depths and of addition of inoculums in a pilot-scale.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, E K; Corezzolla, J L; Corrêa, M N; Bianchi, I; Gil-Turnes, C; Lucia, T

    2012-11-01

    The effect of depths and of addition of inoculums on the chemical content of swine beddings was evaluated. For beddings 0.25m (25D) and 0.50m (50D) deep, three treatments were tested in two repeats with the same beddings: control (no inoculums); T1 (250g of Bacillus cereus var. toyoii at 8.4×10(7)CFU/g); and T2 (250g of a pool of Bacillus sp. at 8.4×10(7)CFU/g) (250g for 25D and 500g for 50D). For 25D, the C:N ratio was lower, but N, K and C contents were greater than for 50D (P<0.05). The inoculums did not benefit any chemical parameter (P>0.05). In the second repeat, beddings presented lower C:N ratio and greater N, P and K contents than in the first repeat (P<0.05). Thus, the compost produced after using 25D twice had greater fertilizer value than that of 50D. PMID:22940299

  14. A two-dimensional analysis of the sensitivity of a pulse first break to wave speed contrast on a scale below the resolution length of ray tomography.

    PubMed

    Willey, Carson L; Simonetti, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Mapping the speed of mechanical waves traveling inside a medium is a topic of great interest across many fields from geoscience to medical diagnostics. Much work has been done to characterize the fidelity with which the geometrical features of the medium can be reconstructed and multiple resolution criteria have been proposed depending on the wave-matter interaction model used to decode the wave speed map from scattering measurements. However, these criteria do not define the accuracy with which the wave speed values can be reconstructed. Using two-dimensional simulations, it is shown that the first-arrival traveltime predicted by ray theory can be an accurate representation of the arrival of a pulse first break even in the presence of diffraction and other phenomena that are not accounted for by ray theory. As a result, ray-based tomographic inversions can yield accurate wave speed estimations also when the size of a sound speed anomaly is smaller than the resolution length of the inversion method provided that traveltimes are estimated from the signal first break. This increased sensitivity however renders the inversion more susceptible to noise since the amplitude of the signal around the first break is typically low especially when three-dimensional anomalies are considered. PMID:27369139

  15. Application of maximum likelihood estimator in nano-scale optical path length measurement using spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Motaghian Nezam, S. M. R.; Joo, C; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) measures minute phase changes in transparent biological specimens using a common path interferometer and a spectrometer based optical coherence tomography system. The Fourier transform of the acquired interference spectrum in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is complex and the phase is affected by contributions from inherent random noise. To reduce this phase noise, knowledge of the probability density function (PDF) of data becomes essential. In the present work, the intensity and phase PDFs of the complex interference signal are theoretically derived and the optical path length (OPL) PDF is experimentally validated. The full knowledge of the PDFs is exploited for optimal estimation (Maximum Likelihood estimation) of the intensity, phase, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SD-OCPM. Maximum likelihood (ML) estimates of the intensity, SNR, and OPL images are presented for two different scan modes using Bovine Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (BPAE) cells. To investigate the phase accuracy of SD-OCPM, we experimentally calculate and compare the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the OPL standard deviation and the square root of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (1/2SNR) over 100 BPAE images for two different scan modes. The correction to the OPL measurement by applying ML estimation to SD-OCPM for BPAE cells is demonstrated. PMID:18957999

  16. Extracting Length and Time Scales of Downstream Suspended Transport from Sediment Budget Data: ~100 to 1000-yr Travel Times from the Appalachians to the Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, J. E.; Schenk, E.; Hupp, C. R.; Gellis, A.; Noe, G. B.; Williamson, E.; Karwan, D. L.; O'Neal, M. A.; Marquard, J.; Aalto, R. E.; Newbold, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Watershed Best Management Practices (BMPs) are often designed to reduce loadings of sediments and particle-borne contaminants, but the temporal lag between BMP implementation and improvement in receiving water quality is difficult to assess because particles spend long periods in storage between transport events. Here we present a theory that describes the downstream movement of suspended sediment particles accounting for the time particles spend in storage based on sediment budget data (by grain-size fraction) and information on particle transit times through storage reservoirs. The theory is used to define a suspended-sediment transport-length scale that describes how far particles are carried during transport events, and to estimate a downstream particle velocity that includes time spent in storage. At five upland watersheds of the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S.A., transport-length scales for silt-clay range from 3.5-76.1 km, while those for sand range from 0.9-139.6 km. Stratigraphic data and radiometric dating for a typical eroding bank section suggest an averaged sediment transit time through floodplain storage of 488 years. Mean sediment velocities for silt-clay range from 0.0072-0.16 km/yr, while those for sand range from 0.0008-0.25 km/yr, 4 to 6 orders of magnitude slower than the velocity of water in the channel. These results suggest lag times of 100-1000 years between BMP implementation and effectiveness in receiving waters such as the Chesapeake Bay (where BMPs are located upstream of the characteristic transport length scale). Many particles likely travel much faster than these average values, so further research is needed to define the range and distribution of transport rates within and across particle sizes.

  17. Spreading lengths of Hermite polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Moreno, P.; Dehesa, J. S.; Manzano, D.; Yáñez, R. J.

    2010-03-01

    The Renyi, Shannon and Fisher spreading lengths of the classical or hypergeometric orthogonal polynomials, which are quantifiers of their distribution all over the orthogonality interval, are defined and investigated. These information-theoretic measures of the associated Rakhmanov probability density, which are direct measures of the polynomial spreading in the sense of having the same units as the variable, share interesting properties: invariance under translations and reflections, linear scaling and vanishing in the limit that the variable tends towards a given definite value. The expressions of the Renyi and Fisher lengths for the Hermite polynomials are computed in terms of the polynomial degree. The combinatorial multivariable Bell polynomials, which are shown to characterize the finite power of an arbitrary polynomial, play a relevant role for the computation of these information-theoretic lengths. Indeed these polynomials allow us to design an error-free computing approach for the entropic moments (weighted Lq-norms) of Hermite polynomials and subsequently for the Renyi and Tsallis entropies, as well as for the Renyi spreading lengths. Sharp bounds for the Shannon length of these polynomials are also given by means of an information-theoretic-based optimization procedure. Moreover, the existence of a linear correlation between the Shannon length (as well as the second-order Renyi length) and the standard deviation is computationally proved. Finally, the application to the most popular quantum-mechanical prototype system, the harmonic oscillator, is discussed and some relevant asymptotical open issues related to the entropic moments, mentioned previously, are posed.

  18. Investigating the reversibility of structural modifications of LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO₂ cathode materials during initial charge/discharge, at multiple length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Bak, Seong -Min; Kim, Seung Min; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Chang, Wonyoung

    2015-08-11

    In this work, we investigate the structural modifications occurring at the bulk, subsurface, and surface scales of LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO₂ (NMC; y, z = 0.8, 0.1 and 0.4, 0.3, respectively) cathode materials during the initial charge/discharge. Various analytical tools, such as X-ray diffraction, selected-area electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and high-resolution electron microscopy, are used to examine the structural properties of the NMC cathode materials at the three different scales. Cut-off voltages of 4.3 and 4.8 V are applied during the electrochemical tests as the normal and extreme conditions, respectively. The high-Ni-content NMC cathode materials exhibit unusual behaviors, which is deviate from the general redox reactions during the charge or discharge. The transition metal (TM) ions in the high-Ni-content NMC cathode materials, which are mostly Ni ions, are reduced at 4.8 V, even though TMs are usually oxidized to maintain charge neutrality upon the removal of Li. It was found that any changes in the crystallographic and electronic structures are mostly reversible down to the sub-surface scale, despite the unexpected reduction of Ni ions. However, after the discharge, traces of the phase transitions remain at the edges of the NMC cathode materials at the scale of a few nanometers (i.e., surface scale). This study demonstrates that the structural modifications in NMC cathode materials are induced by charge as well as discharge at multiple length scales. These changes are nearly reversible after the first cycle, except at the edges of the samples, which should be avoided because these highly localized changes can initiate battery degradation.

  19. Impact of the addition of chicken litter on mercury speciation and emissions from coal combustion in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Songgeng Li; Shuang Deng; Andy Wu; Wei-ping Pan

    2008-07-15

    Co-combustion of chicken litter with coal was performed in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor to investigate the effect of chicken litter addition on the partitioning behavior of mercury. Gaseous total and elemental mercury concentrations in the flue gas were measured online, and ash was analyzed for particle-bound mercury along with other elemental and surface properties. The mercury mass balance was between 85 and 105%. The experimental results show that co-combustion of chicken litter decreases the amount of elemental and total mercury in the gas phase. Mercury content in fly ash increases with an increasing chicken litter share. 22 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. The atomic-scale mechanism for the enhanced glass-forming-ability of a Cu-Zr based bulk metallic glass with minor element additions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.; Liu, J. B.; Dong, Y. D.; Lu, J.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the glass forming-ability (GFA) of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) can be greatly enhanced via minor element additions. However, direct evidence has been lacking to reveal its structural origin despite different theories hitherto proposed. Through the high-resolution transmission-electron-microscopy (HRTEM) analysis, here we show that the content of local crystal-like orders increases significantly in a Cu-Zr-Al BMG after a 2-at% Y addition. Contrasting the previous studies, our current results indicate that the formation of crystal-like order at the atomic scale plays an important role in enhancing the GFA of the Cu-Zr-Al base BMG. PMID:24721927

  1. The relative diffusive transport rate of SrI2 in water changes over the nanometer length scale as measured by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Faraone, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to provide insight into the structures of ionic solutions for over a century, but the probes have covered distances shorter than 8 Å. For the non-hydrolyzing salt SrI2 in aqueous solution, a locally ordered lattice of ions exists that scatters slow neutrons coherently down to at least 0.1 mol L(-1) concentration, where the measured average distance between scatterers is over 18 Å. To investigate the motions of these scatterers, coherent quasielastic neutron scattering (CQENS) data on D2O solutions with SrI2 at 1, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mol L(-1) concentrations was obtained to provide an experimental measure of the diffusive transport rate for the motion between pairs of ions relative to each other. Because CQENS measures the motion of one ion relative to another, the frame of reference is centered on an ion, which is unique among all diffusion measurement methods. We call the measured quantity the pairwise diffusive transport rate Dp. In addition to this ion centered frame of reference, the diffusive transport rate can be measured as a function of the momentum transfer q, where q = (4π/λ)sin θ with a scattering angle of 2θ. Since q is related to the interion distance (d = 2π/q), for the experimental range 0.2 Å(-1)≤q≤ 1.0 Å(-1), Dp is, then, measured over interion distances from 40 Å to ≈6 Å. We find the measured diffusional transport rates increase with increasing distance between scatterers over the entire range covered and interpret this behavior to be caused by dynamic coupling among the ions. Within the model of Fickian diffusion, at the longer interionic distances Dp is greater than the Nernst-Hartley value for an infinitely dilute solution. For these nm-distance diffusional transport rates to conform with the lower, macroscopically measured diffusion coefficients, we propose that local, coordinated counter motion of at least pairs of ions is part of the transport process. PMID:27096293

  2. Symmetry of piezoelectric (1–x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O₃-xPbTiO₃ (x=0.31) single crystal at different length scales in the morphotropic phase boundary region

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Payne, David A.; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2012-11-29

    We use probes of three different length scales to examine symmetry of (1–x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O₃-xPbTiO₃ (PMN-xPT) single crystals in the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) region at composition x = 0.31 (PMN-31% PT). On the macroscopic scale, x-ray diffraction (XRD) shows a mixture of strong and weak diffraction peaks of different widths. The closest match to XRD peak data is made with monoclinic Pm (MC) symmetry. On the local scale of a few nanometers, convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) studies, with a 1.6-nm electron probe, reveal no obvious symmetry. These CBED experimental patterns can be approximately matched with simulations based on monoclinic symmetry,more » which suggests locally distorted monoclinic structure. A monoclinic Cm (MA or MB)-like symmetry could also be obtained from certain regions of the crystal by using a larger electron probe size of several tens of nanometers in diameter. Thus the monoclinic symmetry of single crystal PMN-31%PT is developed only in parts of the crystal by averaging over locally distorted structure on the scale of few tens of nanometers. The macroscopic symmetry observed by XRD is a result of averaging from the local structure in PMN-31%PT single crystal. The lack of local symmetry at a few nanometers scale suggests that the polarization switching results from a change in local displacements, which are not restricted to specific symmetry planes or directions.« less

  3. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  4. Single-length-scaling analysis for antiferromagnetic fractons in dilute Heisenberg system RbMn{sub 0.4}Mg{sub 0.6}F{sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Nakayama, T.; Kajimoto, R.; Adams, M. A.; Materials Science Division; High Energy Accelerator Research Organization; Rutherford Appleton Lab.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic structure factors S(q,w) of an ideal percolating network, the three-dimensional (3d) dilute Heisenberg antiferromagnet RbMn{sub 0.4}Mg{sub 0.6}F{sub 3}, obtained from high resolution ({Delta}E = 17.5 {micro}eV) inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments are analyzed for the first time within the framework of the single-length-scaling postulate (SLSP). The analysis confirms the validity of the SLSP and is also used to extract the values of the key exponents governing the spin dynamics, the dynamic exponent (z{sub AF} = D{sub f}/tilded{sub AF}) being 2.5 {+-} 0.1 and the spectral dimension tilded{sub AF} for antiferromagnetic (AFM) fractons taking a value of unity.

  5. Effect of red mud addition on tetracycline and copper resistance genes and microbial community during the full scale swine manure composting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Junya; Sui, Qianwen; Wan, Hefeng; Tong, Juan; Chen, Meixue; Wei, Yuansong; Wei, Dongbin

    2016-09-01

    Swine manure has been considered as the reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Composting is one of the most suitable technologies for treating livestock manures, and red mud was proved to have a positive effect on nitrogen conservation during composting. This study investigated the abundance of eight tetracycline and three copper resistance genes, the bacterial community during the full scale swine manure composting with or without addition of red mud. The results showed that ARGs in swine manure could be effectively removed through composting (reduced by 2.4log copies/g TS), especially during the thermophilic phase (reduced by 1.5log copies/g TS), which the main contributor might be temperature. Additionally, evolution of bacterial community could also have a great influence on ARGs. Although addition of red mud could enhance nitrogen conservation, it obviously hindered removal of ARGs (reduced by 1.7log copies/g TS) and affected shaping of bacterial community during composting. PMID:27367291

  6. Chromosome length scaling in haploid, asexual reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, P. M. C.

    2007-02-01

    We study the genetic behaviour of a population formed by haploid individuals which reproduce asexually. The genetic information for each individual is stored along a bit-string (or chromosome) with L bits, where 0-bits represent the wild allele and 1-bits correspond to harmful mutations. Each newborn inherits this chromosome from its parent with a few random mutations: on average a fixed number m of bits are flipped. Selection is implemented according to the number N of 1-bits counted along the individual's chromosome: the smaller N the higher the probability an individual has to survive a new time step. Such a population evolves, with births and deaths, and its genetic distribution becomes stabilized after sufficiently many generations have passed. The question we pose concerns the procedure of increasing L. The aim is to get the same distribution of genetic loads N/L among the equilibrated population, in spite of a larger L. Should we keep the same mutation rate m/L for different values of L? The answer is yes, which intuitively seems to be plausible. However, this conclusion is not trivial, according to our simulation results: the question also involves the population size.

  7. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  8. The use of ionic liquids as crystallization additives allowed to overcome nanodrop scaling up problems: A success case for producing diffraction-quality crystals of a nitrate reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Catarina; Trincão, José; João Romão, Maria

    2010-02-01

    The native structure of the heterodimeric periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapAB) from Cupriavidus ( C.) necator was solved at 1.5 Å resolution, using one single crystal obtained at the robot facility at the EMBL, Grenoble. The reaction mechanism for this family of proteins was recently revised, based on new crystallographic evidence, and new structural studies are required to clarify this new mechanistic implication. Several nanodrop crystallization trials yielded microcrystals of the C. necator NapAB. However, scale-up attempts systematically failed and did not yield any suitable crystals. Only with the use of ionic liquids (IL) were we able to grow, in a reproducible manner, larger crystals, which diffracted X-rays to 1.7 Å resolution. By using the IL [C 4mim]Cl as a crystallization additive, we achieved reproducibility in obtaining good quality crystals. Although no IL molecules could be identified in the electron density maps, the crystals grown in the presence and absence of IL have large differences in cell constants. This is the first report of the use of IL for a difficult crystallization problem. The procedure now reported can be applied for crystal optimization such as size increase or improvement of fine needles, as well as for scaling-up crystallization conditions from nanolitre to microlitre drop volumes.

  9. Measuring Thermodynamic Length

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2007-09-07

    Thermodynamic length is a metric distance between equilibrium thermodynamic states. Among other interesting properties, this metric asymptotically bounds the dissipation induced by a finite time transformation of a thermodynamic system. It is also connected to the Jensen-Shannon divergence, Fisher information, and Rao's entropy differential metric. Therefore, thermodynamic length is of central interestin understanding matter out of equilibrium. In this Letter, we will consider how to denethermodynamic length for a small system described by equilibrium statistical mechanics and how to measure thermodynamic length within a computer simulation. Surprisingly, Bennett's classic acceptance ratio method for measuring free energy differences also measures thermodynamic length.

  10. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  11. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  12. Overview of bunch length measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1999-02-19

    An overview of particle and photon beam bunch length measurements is presented in the context of free-electron laser (FEL) challenges. Particle-beam peak current is a critical factor in obtaining adequate FEL gain for both oscillators and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) devices. Since measurement of charge is a standard measurement, the bunch length becomes the key issue for ultrashort bunches. Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques are presented in the context of using electromagnetic radiation over eight orders of magnitude in wavelength. In addition, the measurement of microbunching in a micropulse is addressed.

  13. Microbial community and removal of nitrogen via the addition of a carrier in a pilot-scale duckweed-based wastewater treatment system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yonggui; Fang, Yang; Jin, Yanling; Huang, Jun; Ma, Xinrong; He, Kaize; He, Zhiming; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Hai

    2015-03-01

    Carriers were added to a pilot-scale duckweed-based (Lemna japonica 0223) wastewater treatment system to immobilize and enhance microorganisms. This system and another parallel duckweed system without carriers were operated for 1.5 years. The results indicated the addition of the carrier did not significantly affect the growth and composition of duckweed, the recovery of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and CO2 or the removal of TP. However, it significantly improved the removal efficiency of TN and NH4(+)-N (by 19.97% and 15.02%, respectively). The use of 454 pyrosequencing revealed large differences of the microbial communities between the different components within a system and similarities within the same components between the two systems. The carrier biofilm had the highest bacterial diversity and relative abundance of nitrifying bacteria (3%) and denitrifying bacteria (24% of Rhodocyclaceae), which improved nitrogen removal of the system. An efficient N-removal duckweed system with enhanced microorganisms was established. PMID:25579229

  14. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  15. Length Paradox in Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Roberto de A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thought experiment using a general analysis approach with Lorentz transformations to show that the apparent self-contradictions of special relativity concerning the length-paradox are really non-existant. (GA)

  16. [Sonographic leg length measurement].

    PubMed

    Holst, A; Thomas, W

    1989-03-01

    After brief presentation of the clinical and radiological methods to measure the leg length and the leg length difference the authors outline the new diagnostic method for measuring the leg length and the leg length difference by means of real time sonography. Postmortem tests and clinical examples show that ultrasound is ideal to determine exactly the length of femur and tibia. The joint gaps on the hip, knee and upper ankle joint can be demonstrated by means of a 5 MHz linear scanner. A 1 mm strong metal bar on the skin and under the scanner is placed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the body so that the bar can be seen in the centre. A measuring device gives the distances of the joint gaps in cm so that the difference correspond to the real length of femur and tibia. This standardised measuring is done by a particularly developed bearing and measuring device. The results of the sonographical measurements on 20 corpses and checking after consecutive dissections showed in 75% of cases a 100% sonographic measuring accuracy of the total leg length. The separately considered results for femur (85%) and tibia (90) were even better. The maximum sonographic measuring fault was 1.0 cm for the femur (in one case) and 0.5 cm for the tibia, respectively. All sonographic measurements were performed with the Sonoline SL-1 of the Siemens Company (Erlangen, W-Germany). Thus, sonographical measuring of the leg length offers a reliable, non-invasive method that can be repeated as often as necessary and is simply executed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2652268

  17. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  18. Critical Length Limiting Superlow Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Since the demonstration of superlow friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micromechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nanomanipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nanodevices with superlow friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  19. Document Length Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singhal, Amit; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated document retrieval relevance based on document length in an experimental text collection. Topics include term weighting and document ranking, retrieval strategies such as the vector-space cosine match, and a modified technique called the pivoted cosine normalization. (LRW)

  20. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  1. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  2. Proposed Modifications to the Conceptual Model of Coaching Efficacy and Additional Validity Evidence for the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas; Feltz, Deborah; Chase, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether theoretically relevant sources of coaching efficacy could predict the measures derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams (CES II-HST). Data were collected from head coaches of high school teams in the United States (N = 799). The analytic framework was a multiple-group…

  3. Additional Evidence for the Reliability and Validity of the Student Risk Screening Scale at the High School Level: A Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Oakes, Wendy P.; Ennis, Robin Parks; Cox, Meredith Lucille; Schatschneider, Christopher; Lambert, Warren

    2013-01-01

    This study reports findings from a validation study of the Student Risk Screening Scale for use with 9th- through 12th-grade students (N = 1854) attending a rural fringe school. Results indicated high internal consistency, test-retest stability, and inter-rater reliability. Predictive validity was established across two academic years, with Spring…

  4. Required length of guardrails before hazards.

    PubMed

    Tomasch, E; Sinz, W; Hoschopf, H; Gobald, M; Steffan, H; Nadler, B; Nadler, F; Strnad, B; Schneider, F

    2011-11-01

    One way to protect against impacts during run-off-road accidents with infrastructure is the use of guardrails. However, real-world accidents indicate that vehicles can leave the road and end up behind the guardrail. These vehicles have no possibility of returning to the lane. Vehicles often end up behind the guardrail because the length of the guardrails installed before hazards is too short; this can lead to a collision with a shielded hazard. To identify the basic speed for determining the necessary length of guardrails, we analyzed the speed at which vehicles leave the roadway from the ZEDATU (Zentrale Datenbank Tödlicher Unfälle) real-world accidents database. The required length of guardrail was considered the length that reduces vehicle speed at a maximum theoretically possible deceleration of 0.3g behind the barrier based on real-world road departure speed. To determine the desired length of a guardrail ahead of a hazard, we developed a relationship between guardrail length and the speed at which vehicles depart the roadway. If the initial elements are flared away from the carriageway, the required length will be reduced by up to an additional 30% The ZEDATU database analysis showed that extending the current length of guardrails to the evaluated required length would reduce the number of fatalities among occupants of vehicles striking bridge abutments by approximately eight percent. PMID:21819841

  5. Telomere length in early life predicts lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Heidinger, Britt J.; Blount, Jonathan D.; Boner, Winnie; Griffiths, Kate; Metcalfe, Neil B.; Monaghan, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The attrition of telomeres, the ends of eukaryote chromosomes, is thought to play an important role in cell deterioration with advancing age. The observed variation in telomere length among individuals of the same age is therefore thought to be related to variation in potential longevity. Studies of this relationship are hampered by the time scale over which individuals need to be followed, particularly in long-lived species where lifespan variation is greatest. So far, data are based either on simple comparisons of telomere length among different age classes or on individuals whose telomere length is measured at most twice and whose subsequent survival is monitored for only a short proportion of the typical lifespan. Both approaches are subject to bias. Key studies, in which telomere length is tracked from early in life, and actual lifespan recorded, have been lacking. We measured telomere length in zebra finches (n = 99) from the nestling stage and at various points thereafter, and recorded their natural lifespan (which varied from less than 1 to almost 9 y). We found telomere length at 25 d to be a very strong predictor of realized lifespan (P < 0.001); those individuals living longest had relatively long telomeres at all points at which they were measured. Reproduction increased adult telomere loss, but this effect appeared transient and did not influence survival. Our results provide the strongest evidence available of the relationship between telomere length and lifespan and emphasize the importance of understanding factors that determine early life telomere length. PMID:22232671

  6. A variable mixing-length ratio for convection theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. L.; Wolff, C. L.; Sofia, S.

    1981-01-01

    It is argued that a natural choice for the local mixing length in the mixing-length theory of convection has a value proportional to the local density scale height of the convective bubbles. The resultant variable mixing-length ratio (the ratio between the mixing length and the pressure scale height) of this theory is enhanced in the superadiabatic region and approaches a constant in deeper layers. Numerical tests comparing the new mixing length successfully eliminate most of the density inversion that typically plagues conventional results. The new approach also seems to indicate the existence of granular motion at the top of the convection zone.

  7. Geometry of area without length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming; Inami, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    To define a free string by the Nambu-Goto action, all we need is the notion of area, and mathematically the area can be defined directly in the absence of a metric. Motivated by the possibility that string theory admits backgrounds where the notion of length is not well defined but a definition of area is given, we study space-time geometries based on the generalization of a metric to an area metric. In analogy with Riemannian geometry, we define the analogues of connections, curvatures, and Einstein tensor. We propose a formulation generalizing Einstein's theory that will be useful if at a certain stage or a certain scale the metric is ill defined and the space-time is better characterized by the notion of area. Static spherical solutions are found for the generalized Einstein equation in vacuum, including the Schwarzschild solution as a special case.

  8. Spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexlin, Guido; Eberhard, Veit; Hunkel, Dirk; Zeitnitz, B.

    1995-02-01

    A double spectrometer allows the precise measurement of the spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers. Exciting the fibers with a N 2-laser at different points and measuring the wavelength dependent light intensity on both ends of the fiber simultaneously, enables a measurement of the attenuation length which is practically independent of systematic uncertainties. The experimental setup can additionally be used for the measurement of the relative light output. Six types of scintillating fibers from four manufactures (Bicron, Kuraray, Pol.Hi.Tech, and Plastifo) were tested. For different fibers the wavelength dependent attenuation lengths were measured from 0.3 m up to 20 m with an accuracy as good as 1%.

  9. Correlation length for interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.; Sari, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    It is argued that it is necessary to consider two correlation lengths for interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations. For particles with gyroradii large enough to encounter and be scattered by large-scale tangential discontinuities in the field (particles with energies of above several GeV/nucleon) the appropriate correlation length is simply the mean spatial separation between the discontinuities. Particles with gyroradii much less than this mean separation appear to be unaffected by the discontinuities and respond only to smaller-scale field fluctuations. With this system of two correlation lengths the cosmic ray diffusion tensor may be altered from what was predicted by, for example, Jokipii and Coleman, and the objections raised recently by Klimas and Sandri to the diffusion analysis of Jokipii may apply only at relatively low energies (about 50 MeV/nucleon).

  10. Length of stain dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Payload customers for the Space Shuttle have recently expressed concerns about the possibility of their payloads at an adjacent pad being contaminated by plume effluents from a shuttle at an active pad as they await launch on an inactive pad. As part of a study to satisfy such concerns a ring of inexpensive dosimeters was deployed around the active pad at the inter-pad distance. However, following a launch, dosimeters cannot be read for several hours after the exposure. As a consequence factors such as different substrates, solvent systems, and possible volatilization of HCl from the badges were studied. This observation led to the length of stain (LOS) dosimeters of this invention. Commercial passive LOS dosimeters are sensitive only to the extent of being capable of sensing 2 ppm to 20 ppm if the exposure is 8 hours. To map and quantitate the HCl generated by Shuttle launches, and in the atmosphere within a radius of 1.5 miles from the active pad, a sensitivity of 2 ppm HCl in the atmospheric gases on an exposure of 5 minutes is required. A passive length of stain dosimeter has been developed having a sensitivity rendering it capable of detecting a gas in a concentration as low as 2 ppm on an exposure of five minutes.

  11. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  12. Kilogram-scale production of SnO(2) yolk-shell powders by a spray-drying process using dextrin as carbon source and drying additive.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Ho; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-05-01

    A simple and general method for the large-scale production of yolk-shell powders with various compositions by a spray-drying process is reported. Metal salt/dextrin composite powders with a spherical and dense structure were obtained by spray drying and transformed into yolk-shell powders by simple combustion in air. Dextrin plays a key role in the preparation of precursor powders for fabricating yolk-shell powders by spray drying. Droplets containing metal salts and dextrin show good drying characteristics even in a severe environment of high humidity. Sucrose, glucose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone are widely used as carbon sources in the preparation of metal oxide/carbon composite powders; however, they are not appropriate for large-scale spray-drying processes because of their caramelization properties and adherence to the surface of the spray dryer. SnO2 yolk-shell powders were studied as the first target material in the spray-drying process. Combustion of tin oxalate/dextrin composite powders at 600 °C in air produced single-shelled SnO2 yolk-shell powders with the configuration SnO2 @void@SnO2 . The SnO2 yolk-shell powders prepared by the simple spray-drying process showed superior electrochemical properties, even at high current densities. The discharge capacities of the SnO2 yolk-shell powders at a current density of 2000 mA g(-1) were 645 and 570 mA h g(-1) for the second and 100th cycles, respectively; the corresponding capacity retention measured for the second cycle was 88 %. PMID:24665070

  13. Additional psychometric data for the Spanish Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, and psychometric data for a Spanish version of the Revised Dental Beliefs Survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hispanics comprise the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. Previous work with the Spanish Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) yielded good validity, but lower test-retest reliability. We report the performance of the Spanish MDAS in a new sample, as well as the performance of the Spanish Revised Dental Beliefs Survey (R-DBS). Methods One hundred sixty two Spanish-speaking adults attending Spanish-language church services or an Hispanic cultural festival completed questionnaires containing the Spanish MDAS, Spanish R-DBS, and dental attendance questions, and underwent a brief oral examination. Church attendees completed the questionnaire a second time, for test-retest purposes. Results The Spanish MDAS and R-DBS were completed by 156 and 136 adults, respectively. The test-retest reliability of the Spanish MDAS was 0.83 (95% CI = 0.60-0.92). The internal reliability of the Spanish R-DBS was 0.96 (95% CI = 0.94-0.97), and the test-retest reliability was 0.86 (95% CI = 0.64-0.94). The two measures were significantly correlated (Spearman's rho = 0.38, p < 0.001). Participants who do not currently go to a dentist had significantly higher MDAS scores (t = 3.40, df = 106, p = 0.003) as well as significantly higher R-DBS scores (t = 2.21, df = 131, p = 0.029). Participants whose most recent dental visit was for pain or a problem, rather than for a check-up, scored significantly higher on both the MDAS (t = 3.00, df = 106, p = 0.003) and the R-DBS (t = 2.85, df = 92, p = 0.005). Those with high dental fear (MDAS score 19 or greater) were significantly more likely to have severe caries (Chi square = 6.644, df = 2, p = 0.036). Higher scores on the R-DBS were significantly related to having more missing teeth (Spearman's rho = 0.23, p = 0.009). Conclusion In this sample, the test-retest reliability of the Spanish MDAS was higher. The significant relationships between dental attendance and questionnaire scores, as well as the difference in caries

  14. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  15. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  16. The information theoretic interpretation of the length of a curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Hayden, Patrick; Lashkari, Nima; Swingle, Brian

    2015-06-01

    In the context of holographic duality with AdS3 asymptotics, the Ryu-Takayanagi formula states that the entanglement entropy of a subregion is given by the length of a certain bulk geodesic. The entanglement entropy can be operationalized as the entanglement cost necessary to transmit the state of the subregion from one party to another while preserving all correlations with a reference party. The question then arises as to whether the lengths of other bulk curves can be interpreted as entanglement costs for some other information theoretic tasks. Building on recent results showing that the length of more general bulk curves is computed by the differential entropy, we introduce a new task called constrained state merging, whereby the state of the boundary subregion must be transmitted using operations restricted in location and scale in a way determined by the geometry of the bulk curve. Our main result is that the cost to transmit the state of a subregion under the conditions of constrained state merging is given by the differential entropy and hence the signed length of the corresponding bulk curve. When the cost is negative, constrained state merging distills entanglement rather than consuming it. This demon-stration has two parts: first, we exhibit a protocol whose cost is the length of the curve and second, we prove that this protocol is optimal in that it uses the minimum amount of entanglement. In order to complete the proof, we additionally demonstrate that single-shot smooth conditional entropies for intervals in 1+1-dimensional conformal field theories with large central charge are well approximated by their von Neumann counterparts. We also revisit the relationship between the differential entropy and the maximum entropy among locally consistent entropy density operators, demonstrating large quantitative discrepancy between the two quantities in conformal field theories. We conclude with a brief discussion of extensions and lessons.

  17. One-year clinical results of Er,Cr:YSGG laser application in addition to scaling and root planing in patients with early to moderate periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Kelbauskiene, Solveiga; Baseviciene, Nomeda; Goharkhay, Kawe; Moritz, Andreas; Machiulskiene, Vita

    2011-07-01

    In 30 patients with periodontitis, a total of 278 teeth exhibiting bleeding on probing, subgingival calculus, and a probing depth between 3-6 mm were examined. For each participant, two treatment types were alternatively applied on the contralateral quadrants: scaling and root planing (SRP) as control, and SRP followed by Er,Cr:YSGG laser application (SRP+laser), as a test method. Five clinical parameters: plaque level, bleeding on probing, probing depth, gingival recession and clinical attachment level were examined at baseline and at 2, 3, 6, 12 months after treatment. Of the total of 1,668 sites examined in all patients, 1,088 sites were found with a probing depth of 3-6 mm. In these sites, differences in clinical parameters between SRP and SRP+laser-treated quadrants were analyzed, assuming the level of p < 0.05 as significant. After 2 months from baseline, the mean probing depth reduction and the clinical attachment level gain were significantly greater in SRP+laser than in SRP quadrants, and remained so throughout the study (p < 0.001). A marked reduction of the bleeding scores occurred in all examined sites, irrespective of the treatment method. However, after 12 months, significantly less teeth exhibited bleeding on probing in SRP+laser quadrants than in SRP quadrants (p < 0.001). The mean plaque and gingival recession levels did not differ between the SRP and SRP+laser quadrants neither before nor after the treatment. The periodontal procedures either using Er,Cr:YSGG laser after SRP or SRP alone, lead to significant improvements in all clinical parameters investigated. However, laser application, as an adjunct to SRP, appeared to be more advantageous. PMID:20549280

  18. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J.; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F.; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tainle; de Bakker, Paul IW; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Charles; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin NA; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John RB; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbæk, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple new genomic loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)1-11. Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to discover loci at which common alleles have modest effects, we performed meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans encompassing 10,128 individuals of European-descent and ~2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed). Replication testing was performed in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. At least six new loci with robust evidence for association were detected, including the JAZF1 (p=5.0×10−14), CDC123/CAMK1D (p=1.2×10−10), TSPAN8/LGR5 (p=1.1×10−9), THADA (p=1.1×10−9), ADAMTS9 (p=1.2×10−8), and NOTCH2 (p=4.1×10−8) gene regions. The large number of loci with relatively small effects indicates the value of large discovery and follow-up samples in identifying additional clues about the inherited basis of T2D. PMID:18372903

  19. Electrophoresis of semiflexible heteropolymers and the ``hydrodynamic Kuhn length''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubynsky, Mykyta V.; Slater, Gary W.

    Semiflexible polymers, such as DNA, are rodlike for short lengths and coil-like for long lengths. For purely geometric properties, such as the end-to-end distance, the crossover between these two behaviors occurs when the polymer length is on the order of the Kuhn length. On the other hand, for the hydrodynamic friction coefficient it is easy to see by comparing the expressions for a rod and a coil that the crossover should occur at the polymer length, termed by us the hydrodynamic Kuhn length, which is larger than the ordinary Kuhn length by a logarithmic factor that can be quite significant. We show that for the problem of electrophoresis of a heteropolymer consisting of several blocks of (in general) different stiffnesses, both of these length scales can be important depending on the details of the problem.

  20. Construction of Covariance Functions with Variable Length Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspari, Gregory; Cohn, Stephen E.; Guo, Jing; Pawson, Steven

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on construction, directly in physical space, of three-dimensional covariance functions parametrized by a tunable length field, and on an application of this theory to reproduce the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 4 (GEOS-4) data assimilation system. These Covariance models are referred to as multi-level or nonseparable, to associate them with the application where a multi-level covariance with a large troposphere to stratosphere length field gradient is used to reproduce the QBO from sparse radiosonde observations in the tropical lower stratosphere. The multi-level covariance functions extend well-known single level covariance functions depending only on a length scale. Generalizations of the first- and third-order autoregressive covariances in three dimensions are given, providing multi-level covariances with zero and three derivatives at zero separation, respectively. Multi-level piecewise rational covariances with two continuous derivatives at zero separation are also provided. Multi-level powerlaw covariances are constructed with continuous derivatives of all orders. Additional multi-level covariance functions are constructed using the Schur product of single and multi-level covariance functions. A multi-level powerlaw covariance used to reproduce the QBO in GEOS-4 is described along with details of the assimilation experiments. The new covariance model is shown to represent the vertical wind shear associated with the QBO much more effectively than in the baseline GEOS-4 system.

  1. Generation and Analysis of a Large-Scale Expressed Sequence Tag Database from a Full-Length Enriched cDNA Library of Developing Leaves of Gossypium hirsutum L

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chaoyou; Fan, Shuli; Song, Meizhen; Yu, Shuxun

    2013-01-01

    Background Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is one of the world’s most economically-important crops. However, its entire genome has not been sequenced, and limited resources are available in GenBank for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying leaf development and senescence. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, 9,874 high-quality ESTs were generated from a normalized, full-length cDNA library derived from pooled RNA isolated from throughout leaf development during the plant blooming stage. After clustering and assembly of these ESTs, 5,191 unique sequences, representative 1,652 contigs and 3,539 singletons, were obtained. The average unique sequence length was 682 bp. Annotation of these unique sequences revealed that 84.4% showed significant homology to sequences in the NCBI non-redundant protein database, and 57.3% had significant hits to known proteins in the Swiss-Prot database. Comparative analysis indicated that our library added 2,400 ESTs and 991 unique sequences to those known for cotton. The unigenes were functionally characterized by gene ontology annotation. We identified 1,339 and 200 unigenes as potential leaf senescence-related genes and transcription factors, respectively. Moreover, nine genes related to leaf senescence and eleven MYB transcription factors were randomly selected for quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), which revealed that these genes were regulated differentially during senescence. The qRT-PCR for three GhYLSs revealed that these genes express express preferentially in senescent leaves. Conclusions/Significance These EST resources will provide valuable sequence information for gene expression profiling analyses and functional genomics studies to elucidate their roles, as well as for studying the mechanisms of leaf development and senescence in cotton and discovering candidate genes related to important agronomic traits of cotton. These data will also facilitate future whole-genome sequence assembly and annotation

  2. Length and Dimensional Measurements at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Swyt, Dennis A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the past, present, and future of length and dimensional measurements at NIST. It covers the evolution of the SI unit of length through its three definitions and the evolution of NBS-NIST dimensional measurement from early linescales and gage blocks to a future of atom-based dimensional standards. Current capabilities include dimensional measurements over a range of fourteen orders of magnitude. Uncertainties of measurements on different types of material artifacts range down to 7×10−8 m at 1 m and 8 picometers (pm) at 300 pm. Current work deals with a broad range of areas of dimensional metrology. These include: large-scale coordinate systems; complex form; microform; surface finish; two-dimensional grids; optical, scanning-electron, atomic-force, and scanning-tunneling microscopies; atomic-scale displacement; and atom-based artifacts.

  3. Density Functional Theory-Derived Group Additivity and Linear Scaling Methods for Prediction of Oxygenate Stability on Metal Catalysts. Adsorption of Open-Ring Alcohol and Polyol Dehydrogenation Intermediates on Pt-Based Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Salciccioli, Michael; Chen, Ying; Vlachos, Dion G.

    2010-11-09

    Semiempirical methods for prediction of thermochemical properties of adsorbed oxygenates are developed. Periodic density functional theory calculations are used to study the relative stability of ethanol, ethylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol dehydrogenation intermediates on Pt(111). For ethylene glycol dehydrogenation intermediates, it is found that the thermodynamically favored intermediates at each level of dehydrogenation are as follows: HOCH2CHOH, HOCHCHOH, HOCHCOH, HOCCOH ≈ HOCHCO, HOCCO, OCCO. Structural and energetic patterns emerge from these C2HxO2 adsorption calculations that lead to the formation of group additive properties for thermochemical property prediction of oxygenates on Pt(111). Finally, linear scaling relationships of atomic binding energy are used to predict the binding energy of the C2HxO2 species on the Ni(111) surface and Ni-Pt-Pt(111) bimetallic surface. It is shown that the linear scaling relationships can accurately predict the binding energy of larger oxygenates as well as of oxygenates on bimetallic catalysts. Corrections for ring strain and weak oxygen-metal and hydrogen-bonding interactions are added to increase the accuracy of group additivity and linear scaling relationships.

  4. THE MASS MIXING LENGTH IN CONVECTIVE STELLAR ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Trampedach, Regner; Stein, Robert F. E-mail: stein@pa.msu.edu

    2011-04-20

    The scale length over which convection mixes mass in a star can be calculated as the inverse of the vertical derivative of the unidirectional (up or down) mass flux. This is related to the mixing length in the mixing length theory of stellar convection. We give the ratio of mass mixing length to pressure scale height for a grid of three-dimensional surface convection simulations, covering from 4300 K to 6900 K on the main sequence, and up to giants at log g = 2.2, all for solar composition. These simulations also confirm what is already known from solar simulations that convection does not proceed by discrete convective elements, but rather as a continuous, slow, smooth, warm upflow and turbulent, entropy deficient, fast down drafts. This convective topology also results in mixing on a scale comparable to the classic mixing length formulation, and is simply a consequence of mass conservation on flows in a stratified atmosphere.

  5. Approximate sample sizes required to estimate length distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.

    2007-01-01

    The sample sizes required to estimate fish length were determined by bootstrapping from reference length distributions. Depending on population characteristics and species-specific maximum lengths, 1-cm length-frequency histograms required 375-1,200 fish to estimate within 10% with 80% confidence, 2.5-cm histograms required 150-425 fish, proportional stock density required 75-140 fish, and mean length required 75-160 fish. In general, smaller species, smaller populations, populations with higher mortality, and simpler length statistics required fewer samples. Indices that require low sample sizes may be suitable for monitoring population status, and when large changes in length are evident, additional sampling effort may be allocated to more precisely define length status with more informative estimators. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  6. IMPEDANCE OF FINITE LENGTH RESISTOR

    SciTech Connect

    KRINSKY, S.; PODOBEDOV, B.; GLUCKSTERN, R.L.

    2005-05-15

    We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity {sigma}, attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency, k >> 1/a. In the equilibrium regime, , the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity {sigma}. In the transient regime, ka{sup 2} >> g, we derive analytic expressions for the impedance and wakefield.

  7. Chromosome-length polymorphism in fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Zolan, M E

    1995-01-01

    The examination of fungal chromosomes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed that length polymorphism is widespread in both sexual and asexual species. This review summarizes characteristics of fungal chromosome-length polymorphism and possible mitotic and meiotic mechanisms of chromosome length change. Most fungal chromosome-length polymorphisms are currently uncharacterized with respect to content and origin. However, it is clear that long tandem repeats, such as tracts of rRNA genes, are frequently variable in length and that other chromosomal rearrangements are suppressed during normal mitotic growth. Dispensable chromosomes and dispensable chromosome regions, which have been well documented for some fungi, also contribute to the variability of the fungal karyotype. For sexual species, meiotic recombination increases the overall karyotypic variability in a population while suppressing genetic translocations. The range of karyotypes observed in fungi indicates that many karyotypic changes may be genetically neutral, at least under some conditions. In addition, new linkage combinations of genes may also be advantageous in allowing adaptation of fungi to new environments. PMID:8531892

  8. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  9. Line Lengths and Starch Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Sandra E.

    1986-01-01

    Investigates readability of different line lengths in advertising body copy, hypothesizing a normal curve with lower scores for shorter and longer lines, and scores above the mean for lines in the middle of the distribution. Finds support for lower scores for short lines and some evidence of two optimum line lengths rather than one. (SKC)

  10. Influence of defects on the critical behavior at the 105 K structural phase transition of SrTiO3: On the origin of the two length scale critical fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hünnefeld, H.; Niemöller, T.; Schneider, J. R.; Rütt, U.; Rodewald, S.; Fleig, J.; Shirane, G.

    2002-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the sharp and the broad component of the critical scattering above the cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition of SrTiO3 has been studied by means of high-resolution triple-crystal diffractometry using 100-200 keV synchrotron radiation in five samples differing with respect to growth technique and oxygen vacancy concentrations. Emphasis is on changes in the critical behavior, the critical temperature, and the strain fields at the transition from bulk to surface. The sharp component was observed only in surface near regions of highly perfect crystals and is coupled to the occurrence of a long-range strain gradient that was identified by an exponential increase of mosaicity, lattice parameter fluctuations, and Bragg-peak intensity when approaching the surface from the bulk of the sample. Vanishing of the sharp component was observed at the polished/etched surface of a platelet cut off the large perfect crystal after release of strain due to free bending of the platelet. The values of the critical temperature observed in the bulk of the different samples vary between 98.7<=Tc<=105.8 K. In the surface near regions of a highly perfect float-zone grown crystal a variation of Tc of about 0.5 K has been found. Concerning the broad component the critical exponent describing the temperature dependence of the inverse correlation length κb varies between 0.73<=νb<=1.19, the exponent for the susceptibility between 1.49<=χb<=2.9, however, the ratio of the two exponents is almost sample independent and equal to χb/νb=2.1 with a variance of 0.2, in good agreement with the theoretical value of 1.97 obtained by LeGouillou and Zinn-Justin [Phys. Rev. B 21, 3976 (1980)]. The occurrence of the sharp component did not affect significantly the critical exponents for the underlying broad component of the critical scattering. The exponents for the sharp component observed in surface near layers of about 100 μ m thickness at the highly perfect float zone and

  11. When does length cause the word length effect?

    PubMed

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J; Surprenant, Aimée M

    2011-03-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining evidence for time-based decay. However, previous studies investigating this effect have confounded length with orthographic neighborhood size. In the present study, Experiments 1A and 1B revealed typical effects of length when short and long words were equated on all relevant dimensions previously identified in the literature except for neighborhood size. In Experiment 2, consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words with a large orthographic neighborhood were better recalled than were CVC words with a small orthographic neighborhood. In Experiments 3 and 4, using two different sets of stimuli, we showed that when short (1-syllable) and long (3-syllable) items were equated for neighborhood size, the word length effect disappeared. Experiment 5 replicated this with spoken recall. We suggest that the word length effect may be better explained by the differences in linguistic and lexical properties of short and long words rather than by length per se. These results add to the growing literature showing problems for theories of memory that include decay offset by rehearsal as a central feature. PMID:21171805

  12. Relationship between ignition processes and the lift-off length of diesel fuel jets.

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, Dennis L.; Idicheria, Cherian A.; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2005-06-01

    The reaction zone of a diesel fuel jet stabilizes at a location downstream of the fuel injector once the initial autoignition phase is over. This distance is referred to as flame lift-off length. Recent investigations have examined the effects of a wide range of parameters (injection pressure, orifice diameter, and ambient gas temperature, density and oxygen concentration) on lift-off length under quiescent diesel conditions. Many of the experimental trends in lift-off length were in agreement with scaling laws developed for turbulent, premixed flame propagation in gas-jet lifted flames at atmospheric conditions. However, several effects did not correlate with the gas-jet scaling laws, suggesting that other mechanisms could be important to lift-off stabilization at diesel conditions. This paper shows experimental evidence that ignition processes affect diesel lift-off stabilization. Experiments were performed in the same optically-accessible combustion vessel as the previous lift-off research. The experimental results show that the ignition quality of a fuel affects lift-off. Fuels with shorter ignition delays generally produce shorter lift-off lengths. In addition, a cool flame is found upstream of, or near the same axial location as, the quasi-steady lift-off length, indicating that first-stage ignition processes affect lift-off. High-speed chemiluminescence imaging also shows that high-temperature self-ignition occasionally occurs in kernels that are upstream of, and detached from, the high-temperature reaction zone downstream, suggesting that the lift-off stabilization is not by flame propagation into upstream reactants in this instance. Finally, analysis of the previous lift-off length database shows that the time-scale for jet mixing from injector-tip orifice to lift-off length collapses to an Arrhenius-type expression, a common method for describing ignition delay in diesel sprays. This Arrhenius-based lift-off length correlation shows comparable accuracy as

  13. Flux saturation length of sediment transport.

    PubMed

    Pähtz, Thomas; Kok, Jasper F; Parteli, Eric J R; Herrmann, Hans J

    2013-11-22

    Sediment transport along the surface drives geophysical phenomena as diverse as wind erosion and dune formation. The main length scale controlling the dynamics of sediment erosion and deposition is the saturation length Ls, which characterizes the flux response to a change in transport conditions. Here we derive, for the first time, an expression predicting Ls as a function of the average sediment velocity under different physical environments. Our expression accounts for both the characteristics of sediment entrainment and the saturation of particle and fluid velocities, and has only two physical parameters which can be estimated directly from independent experiments. We show that our expression is consistent with measurements of Ls in both aeolian and subaqueous transport regimes over at least 5 orders of magnitude in the ratio of fluid and particle density, including on Mars. PMID:24313529

  14. Flux Saturation Length of Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pähtz, Thomas; Kok, Jasper F.; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2013-11-01

    Sediment transport along the surface drives geophysical phenomena as diverse as wind erosion and dune formation. The main length scale controlling the dynamics of sediment erosion and deposition is the saturation length Ls, which characterizes the flux response to a change in transport conditions. Here we derive, for the first time, an expression predicting Ls as a function of the average sediment velocity under different physical environments. Our expression accounts for both the characteristics of sediment entrainment and the saturation of particle and fluid velocities, and has only two physical parameters which can be estimated directly from independent experiments. We show that our expression is consistent with measurements of Ls in both aeolian and subaqueous transport regimes over at least 5 orders of magnitude in the ratio of fluid and particle density, including on Mars.

  15. Average formation lengths of baryons and antibaryons in a string model

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, L.

    2011-01-15

    In this work the investigation of the space-time scales of the hadronization process in the framework of a string model is continued. The average formation lengths of several widely used species of baryons (antibaryons) such as p(p-bar), n(n-bar), {Delta}({Delta}-bar), {Lambda}({Lambda}-bar), and {Sigma}({Sigma}-bar) are studied. It is shown that they depend on electrical charges or, more precisely, on the quark contents of the hadrons. In particular, the average formation lengths of positively charged hadrons, for example, protons, are considerably larger than those of their negatively charged antiparticles, antiprotons. This statement for all nuclear targets and any values of the Bjorken scaling variable x{sub Bj} is fulfilled. The main mechanism is direct production. Additional production mechanism as a result of the decay of resonances gives small contribution. It is shown that the average formation lengths of protons (antiprotons) are slowly increasing (decreasing) functions of x{sub Bj}, whereas the ones of neutrons and antineutrons are slowly decreasing functions of x{sub Bj}. The shape and behavior of average formation lengths for baryons qualitatively coincide with the ones for pseudoscalar mesons obtained earlier.

  16. Foam formation in a downstream digester of a cascade running full-scale biogas plant: Influence of fat, oil and grease addition and abundance of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella.

    PubMed

    Lienen, T; Kleyböcker, A; Verstraete, W; Würdemann, H

    2014-02-01

    The microbial community composition in a full-scale biogas plant fed with sewage sludge and fat, oil and grease (FOG) was investigated over a 15-month period, including two foam formation events. Addition of FOG as a substrate in the biogas plant together with high abundances of Microthrix parvicella were found to promote foam formation in the downstream digester of a cascade of two biogas digesters. Genetic fingerprinting and quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated a higher abundance of M. parvicella in the digester, when the digestion process was accompanied by excessive foaming relative to the reference digesters without disturbance. The creation of foam depended on the