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Sample records for additional lingual infiltration

  1. [Effects of biochar addition into soils in semiarid land on water infiltration under the condition of the same bulk density].

    PubMed

    Qi, Rui-Peng; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Yong-Hao; Wen, Man; Zheng, Ji-Yong

    2014-08-01

    Making clear the effects of biochar addition on soil water infiltration process can provide the scientific basis for the evaluation of the influence of biochar application on soil hydrology in semi-arid region. In this paper, through the soil column simulation method in laboratory, the effects of biochar of three sizes (1-2 mm, 0.25-1 mm and ≤ 0.25 mm) at 4 doses (10, 50, 100 and 150 g x kg(-1)) on the cumulative infiltration, the permeability and the stable infiltration rate of two different soils (anthrosol and aeolian sandy soil) were studied. The results showed that the infiltration capacity of the anthrosol was obviously increased compared to the control, however, the one in the aeolian sandy soil was decreased due to the biochar addition. At 100 minutes after infiltration starting, the averaged cumulative infiltration was increased by 25.1% in the anthrosol with comparison to the control. Contrarily, the averaged cumulative infiltration was decreased by 11.1% in the aeolian sandy soil at 15 minutes after infiltration starting. When the dose was the same, biochar with different particle sizes improved the infiltration for the anthrosol, but for the different dose treatments, the particle size of biochar which showed the greatest improvement was different. As for the aeolian sandy soil, the infiltration increased at the dose of 10 g x kg(-1) after the addition of biochar with different particle sizes, while decreased at the higher dose of 50, 100 and 150 g x kg(-1). The cumulative infiltration of the aeolian sandy soil was decreased with the increase in addition amount of biochar with the same particle size, while it was not so for the anthrosol. The determination coefficient fitted by the Philip infiltration model ranged from 0.965 to 0.999, suggesting this model was suitable for the simulation of soil water infiltration process after biochar application. Statistical analysis of main effects showed that the biochar particle size, the biochar addition amount

  2. Habits of Household Lingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamek, Philip M.

    2004-01-01

    This essay contrasts two approaches to household bilingual education with respect to the notion of identity. The notion of lingualism is presented. Lingualism emphasizes the continuum between monolinguals and bilinguals through a nonquantifying understanding of language (including speech, writing, gestures, and language potential). Kouritzin's…

  3. Adult infiltrating gliomas with WHO 2016 integrated diagnosis: additional prognostic roles of ATRX and TERT.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Molinaro, Annette M; Walsh, Kyle M; Decker, Paul A; Hansen, Helen; Sicotte, Hugues; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; McCoy, Lucie S; Sarkar, Gobinda; Perry, Arie; Giannini, Caterina; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchel S; Wiemels, Joseph L; Bracci, Paige M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lachance, Daniel H; Clarke, Jennifer; Taylor, Jennie W; Luks, Tracy; Wiencke, John K; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2017-03-02

    The "integrated diagnosis" for infiltrating gliomas in the 2016 revised World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system requires assessment of the tumor for IDH mutations and 1p/19q codeletion. Since TERT promoter mutations and ATRX alterations have been shown to be associated with prognosis, we analyzed whether these tumor markers provide additional prognostic information within each of the five WHO 2016 categories. We used data for 1206 patients from the UCSF Adult Glioma Study, the Mayo Clinic and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) with infiltrative glioma, grades II-IV for whom tumor status for IDH, 1p/19q codeletion, ATRX, and TERT had been determined. All cases were assigned to one of 5 groups following the WHO 2016 diagnostic criteria based on their morphologic features, and IDH and 1p/19q codeletion status. These groups are: (1) Oligodendroglioma, IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted; (2) Astrocytoma, IDH-mutant; (3) Glioblastoma, IDH-mutant; (4) Glioblastoma, IDH-wildtype; and (5) Astrocytoma, IDH-wildtype. Within each group, we used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations of overall survival with patient age at diagnosis, grade, and ATRX alteration status and/or TERT promoter mutation status. Among Group 1 IDH-mutant 1p/19q-codeleted oligodendrogliomas, the TERT-WT group had significantly worse overall survival than the TERT-MUT group (HR: 2.72, 95% CI 1.05-7.04, p = 0.04). In both Group 2, IDH-mutant astrocytomas and Group 3, IDH-mutant glioblastomas, neither TERT mutations nor ATRX alterations were significantly associated with survival. Among Group 4, IDH-wildtype glioblastomas, ATRX alterations were associated with favorable outcomes (HR: 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.81, p = 0.01). Among Group 5, IDH-wildtype astrocytomas, the TERT-WT group had significantly better overall survival than the TERT-MUT group (HR: 0.48, 95% CI 0.27-0.87), p = 0.02). Thus, we present evidence that in

  4. Anesthetic efficacy of infiltrations in mandibular anterior teeth.

    PubMed Central

    Yonchak, T.; Reader, A.; Beck, M.; Clark, K.; Meyers, W. J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to measure the degree of anesthesia obtained with a labial infiltration of either 2% lidocaine with 1:50,000 or 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in mandibular anterior teeth. Another objective was to measure the degree of anesthesia obtained with a lingual infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in mandibular anterior teeth. Through use of a repeated-measures design, 40 subjects randomly received a labial infiltration at the lateral incisor apex of either 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:50,000 epinephrine at 2 separate appointments. An additional 40 subjects received a lingual infiltration at the lateral incisor apex of 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. The mandibular anterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained. For the 3 infiltrations, success rates for the lateral incisor ranged from 43 to 50%. Adjacent teeth had success rates of 27 to 63%. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in success between the labial infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and 2% lidocaine with 1:50,000 epinephrine or the lingual infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine when compared with the labial infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Duration of pulpal anesthesia declined steadily for all solutions over the 60 minutes. In conclusion, the success rate of 43-50% and declining duration of pulpal anesthesia over an hour indicates that a labial infiltration of 1.8 mL of either 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 1: 50,000 epinephrine or a lingual infiltration of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine over the

  5. [Submucosal lingual schwannoma].

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Bülent; Bozdemir, Kazım; Ersoy Çallıoğlu, Elif; Kutluhan, Ahmet; Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Schwannoma or neurilemmoma is a slow growing, solitary, and encapsulated benign tumor originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves. Lingual schwannomas are rare. A 46-year-old male patient admitted with a complaint of swelling on the right half of the tongue for one year. An approximately 1x1 cm submucosal mass was detected on the right side of the tongue. The submucosal mass was totally excised under local anesthesia. Pathological examination was consistent with schwannoma. Lingual schwannomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  6. Transient lingual papillitis.

    PubMed

    Kornerup, Ida M; Senye, Mireya; Peters, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    A case of recurrent, clinically innocuous, but painful papules involving the tongue dorsum of a 25-year-old man is presented. The lesions were interpreted to represent a transient lingual papillitis. This a poorly understood, but benign and self-limited condition involving the tongue fungiform papillae, which does not appear to be widely recognized.

  7. Lingualized occlusion. An occlusion for all reasons.

    PubMed

    Parr, G R; Ivanhoe, J R

    1996-01-01

    This authors make practical recommendations for a wide variety of clinical situations, including various anteroposterior and buccolingual arch discrepancies. Many of the ideals of the anatomical and mechanical schools of thought are blended. In addition to being a valuable clinical adjunct, Lingualized Occlusion also has great application in undergraduate dental education. It is a simpler occlusal scheme to teach and learn.

  8. Arch development with trans-force lingual appliances.

    PubMed

    Clark, William J

    2005-01-01

    Trans-Force lingual appliances are designed to correct arch form in patients with contracted dental arches. Interceptive treatment with this new series of pre-activated lingual appliances offers new possibilities for arch development, in combination with fixed appliances. Palatal and lingual appliances insert in horizontal lingual sheaths in molar bands. No activation is required after the appliance is fitted, and this principle is extended to a series of appliances for sagittal and transverse arch development. Both sagittal and transverse appliances have additional components to achieve 3-way expansion where this is indicated. The invisible lingual appliances may be used in correction of all classes of malocclusion at any stage of development, from mixed dentition through permanent dentition, and this approach has wide indications in adult treatment.

  9. Lingual Epithelial Stem Cells and Organoid Culture of Them

    PubMed Central

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    As tongue cancer is one of the major malignant cancers in the world, understanding the mechanism of maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue, which is known to be the origin of tongue cancer, is unquestionably important. However, the actual stem cells that are responsible for the long-term maintenance of the lingual epithelium have not been identified. Moreover, a simple and convenient culture method for lingual epithelial stem cells has not yet been established. Recently, we have shown that Bmi1-positive cells, residing at the second or third layer of the epithelial cell layer at the base of the interpapillary pit (IPP), were slow-cycling and could supply keratinized epithelial cells for over one year, indicating that Bmi1-positive cells are long-term lingual epithelial stem cells. In addition, we have developed a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Here, we discuss current progress in the identification of lingual stem cells and future applications of the lingual culture system for studying the regulatory mechanisms of the lingual epithelium and for regenerative medicine. PMID:26828484

  10. Fabrication of lingual orthodontic appliances: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Ian; Lee, Jang Yeol

    2013-09-01

    Lingual orthodontics is increasing in popularity, with more adults receiving orthodontic treatment and opting for truly invisible appliances that do not have any limitations on the type of tooth movement they can achieve. In addition, there are a growing number of children receiving lingual appliances as they have been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of decalcification. Combining this growth in popularity with advances in computer technology, it is possible to treatment plan, design the appliance and have it custom made all with the click of a button. This article highlights the different methods that have been utilized in the fabrication of lingual appliances.

  11. Extraction treatment in lingual orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Robert B

    2013-09-01

    Contemporary lingual orthodontic appliances offer an aesthetic and accurate means of treating malocclusion. Managing extraction-based treatments with lingual appliances presents a number of challenges. This article discusses the specific biomechanical considerations associated with extraction treatment and outlines clinical techniques that can optimize treatment outcome in these cases.

  12. Ankyloglossia and Lingual Frenotomy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jonathan; Links, Anne; Boss, Emily; Tunkel, David

    2017-02-01

    Objectives (1) Describe trends in the diagnosis of ankyloglossia and the use of lingual frenotomy and (2) analyze patient- and hospital-level factors as compared with the total pediatric discharge population. Study Design National database analysis. Methods We reviewed available data from 1997 to 2012 using the Kids' Inpatient Database, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. All weighted pediatric discharges with ankyloglossia, newborn feeding difficulty, or lingual frenotomy were analyzed for variables of sex, payer, zip code median income, hospital ownership, location/teaching status, bed size, region, and children's hospital status. Chi-square analysis with 95% CIs and odds ratio were used to identify differences between the study group and the total database discharge population. Results Diagnosis of ankyloglossia increased each year of publication (every third year)-with 3934, 5430, 7785, 11,397, 19,459, and 32,837 children, respectively, from 1997 to 2012-with the largest increase in the last 6 years. Similarly, frenotomy increased with 1279, 1633, 2538, 3988, 6900, and 12,406 procedures. Compared with the total discharge population, children with ankyloglossia or frenotomy were more often male (63.6% ankyloglossia, 65.3% frenotomy vs 51.2%), privately insured (60.1%, 62.1% vs 43.6%), from a higher median-income zip code (78.1%, 78.2% vs 68.6%), and in Midwest region (29.3%, 32.3% vs 21.7%). Conclusion These pilot data show increases in diagnoses of ankyloglossia and use of frenotomy. There is a preponderance of children who are male, privately insured, or Midwest residents being diagnosed and treated for ankyloglossia. This broad variation may reflect local practice patterns or imply cultural and socioeconomic bias.

  13. Lingual thyroid: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Quarracino, María; Aguas, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Lingual thyroid is an abnormal formation appearing as the result of a deficient descent during embryological development of the thyroid gland through the thyroglossal duct to its normal pretracheal location. The lesion consists of a tumor mass of thyroid tissue located at the base of the tongue, in the region of the foramen caecum linguae. The size can vary from a few millimeters to several centimeters in diameter. More than 400 cases of lingual thyroid have been documented in the literature to date. Lingual thyroid has been identified in 10% of the tongues examined in some autopsy series. Its identification is of great significance, since it may constitute the only functional thyroid tissue in the body, and may inadvertently be destroyed as a result of histological biopsy procedures. The present study presents a clinical case of lingual thyroid in a 17-year-old female.

  14. Lingual articulation in songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, Roderick A.; Rothgerber, John R.; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lingual articulation in humans is one of the primary means of vocal tract resonance filtering that produces the characteristic vowel formants of speech. In songbirds, the function of the tongue in song has not been thoroughly examined, although recent research has identified the oropharyngeal–esophageal cavity as a resonance filter that is actively tuned to the frequency of the song. In northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), the volume of this cavity is inversely proportional to the frequency of the song above 2 kHz. However, cardinal song extends below this range, leaving the question of whether and how the vocal tract is tracking these low frequencies. We investigated the possible role of the tongue in vocal tract filtering using X-ray cineradiography of northern cardinals. Below 2 kHz, there was prominent tongue elevation in which the tip of the tongue was raised until it seemed to touch the palate. These results suggest that tongue elevation lowers the resonance frequency below 2 kHz by reducing the area of the passage from the oral cavity into the beak. This is consistent with a computational model of the songbird vocal tract in which resonance frequencies are actively adjusted by both changing the volume of the oropharyngeal–esophageal cavity and constricting the opening into the beak. PMID:26685174

  15. Effortless way of bonding a lingual retainer.

    PubMed

    Pai, Vikram; Pai, Ramya; Revenkar, Ameet; Jasoria, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Post orthodontic treatment, retention is one of the most important step for prevention of relapse. Over the years many direct and indirect techniques for placing a bonded lingual retainer have been practiced clinically. Present clinical practice demands a much convenient and effortless technique for bonding a lingual retainer. This article describes a simplified technique of bonding a lingual retainer.

  16. Lingual thyroid: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Amr, Bassem; Monib, Sherif

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lingual thyroid (LT) gland is a rare clinical entity which was found to occur due to the failure of the thyroid gland to descend to its normal cervical location during embryogenesis. The presence of an ectopic thyroid gland located at the base of the tongue may present with symptoms like dysphagia, dysphonia, upper airway obstruction or even hemorrhage at any time from infancy through adulthood. Presentation of case We are presenting a case of 5-year-old girl who presented with lingual thyroid, treated with Suppression treatment followed by elective surgical resection. Discussion Incidence of ectopic lingual thyroid gland is reported as 1:100,000. It is more common in females. Most of presentations due to oropharyngeal obstruction, including dysphagia, dyspnea and dysphonia. Investigations include thyroid function tests, neck US, Technetium scanning and C.T. Conclusion Lingual thyroid is a rare anomaly. Dysphagia and dysphonia are common presenting symptoms. Pathogenesis of this ectopic is unknown. Different types of surgical approaches have been described in the management. PMID:22096763

  17. Lingual thyroid. Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kansal, P.; Sakati, N.; Rifai, A.; Woodhouse, N.

    1987-11-01

    We describe four patients who presented with a lingual thyroid condition (three females and one male, aged between 7 and 22 years). Only the male patient was symptomatic with mild dysphagia and hemoptysis. The diagnosis was suspected in three patients, and was confirmed by iodine 123 or 131 scanning in all patients and by a computed tomographic scan in the one patient studied. The patient with dysphagia received a 10-mCl therapeutic dose of iodine 131 before thyroxine replacement was started. The diagnosis and management of lingual thyroid is discussed. All patients need lifelong thyroxine suppression. Unenhanced computed tomographic scans have a diagnostic appearance due to the iodine content of the ectopic thyroid tissue.

  18. Protrusive Lingual Force and Lingual Diadochokinetic Rates: A Comparative Analysis Between Normal and Lisping Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, James P.

    1978-01-01

    Examined were protrusive lingual force and lingual diadochokinetic rates in 45 normal and 45 front-lisping speakers (7-12-years old). Results revealed that normal speaking Ss scored significantly higher on lingual force and diadochokinetic rate measurements, challenging the theory that lisping is purely a functional articulatory disorder. (CL)

  19. Lingual Kinematics and Coordination in Speech-Disordered Children Exhibiting Differentiated versus Undifferentiated Lingual Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goozee, Justine; Murdoch, Bruce; Ozanne, Anne; Cheng, Yan; Hill, Anne; Gibbon, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    Background: Electropalatographic investigations have revealed that a proportion of children with articulation/phonological disorders exhibit undifferentiated lingual gestures, whereby the whole of the tongue contacts the palate simultaneously during lingual consonant production. These undifferentiated lingual gestures have been interpreted to…

  20. A frequent phenotype for paediatric sleep apnoea: short lingual frenulum

    PubMed Central

    Huseni, Shehlanoor; Lo, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    A short lingual frenulum has been associated with difficulties in sucking, swallowing and speech. The oral dysfunction induced by a short lingual frenulum can lead to oral-facial dysmorphosis, which decreases the size of upper airway support. Such progressive change increases the risk of upper airway collapsibility during sleep. Clinical investigation of the oral cavity was conducted as a part of a clinical evaluation of children suspected of having sleep disordered breathing (SDB) based on complaints, symptoms and signs. Systematic polysomnographic evaluation followed the clinical examination. A retrospective analysis of 150 successively seen children suspected of having SDB was performed, in addition to a comparison of the findings between children with and without short lingual frenula. Among the children, two groups of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) were found: 1) absence of adenotonsils enlargement and short frenula (n=63); and 2) normal frenula and enlarged adenotonsils (n=87). Children in the first group had significantly more abnormal oral anatomy findings, and a positive family of short frenulum and SDB was documented in at least one direct family member in 60 cases. A short lingual frenulum left untreated at birth is associated with OSAS at later age, and a systematic screening for the syndrome should be conducted when this anatomical abnormality is recognised. PMID:27730205

  1. A frequent phenotype for paediatric sleep apnoea: short lingual frenulum.

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, Christian; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Lo, Lauren

    2016-07-01

    A short lingual frenulum has been associated with difficulties in sucking, swallowing and speech. The oral dysfunction induced by a short lingual frenulum can lead to oral-facial dysmorphosis, which decreases the size of upper airway support. Such progressive change increases the risk of upper airway collapsibility during sleep. Clinical investigation of the oral cavity was conducted as a part of a clinical evaluation of children suspected of having sleep disordered breathing (SDB) based on complaints, symptoms and signs. Systematic polysomnographic evaluation followed the clinical examination. A retrospective analysis of 150 successively seen children suspected of having SDB was performed, in addition to a comparison of the findings between children with and without short lingual frenula. Among the children, two groups of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) were found: 1) absence of adenotonsils enlargement and short frenula (n=63); and 2) normal frenula and enlarged adenotonsils (n=87). Children in the first group had significantly more abnormal oral anatomy findings, and a positive family of short frenulum and SDB was documented in at least one direct family member in 60 cases. A short lingual frenulum left untreated at birth is associated with OSAS at later age, and a systematic screening for the syndrome should be conducted when this anatomical abnormality is recognised.

  2. A simple technique for bonding lingual retainer.

    PubMed

    Hattarki, Rohan S; Rastogi, Shikha

    2015-01-01

    The present article describes an easy method to place a bonded lingual retainer. This technique is also helpful in limiting the flow of the acid etchant used for etching and also limiting the flow of the adhesive on to the lingual surfaces of the teeth.

  3. Unusual complication of dental extraction: lingual abscess.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Lalee; Agarwal, Pratibha; Rupa, Vedantam

    2013-01-01

    Acute lingual swelling is a potentially life threatening clinical condition which is encountered very rarely, the differential diagnosis of which includes hemorrhage, infarction, abscess, tumor and edema. Herein we report a case of lingual abscess that presented with acute tongue swelling and respiratory distress after extraction of lower two incisor teeth.

  4. Impact of Surgical Evaluation of Additional Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Advanced Thymoma with Infiltration of Adjacent Structures: The Thoracic Surgeon's View.

    PubMed

    Ried, Michael; Hnevkovsky, Stefanie; Neu, Reiner; von Süßkind-Schwendi, Marietta; Götz, Andrea; Hamer, Okka W; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Background Preoperative radiological assessment is important for clarification of surgical operability for advanced thymic tumors. Objective was to determine the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with cine sequences for evaluation of cardiovascular tumor invasion. Patients and Methods This prospective study included patients with advanced thymoma, who underwent surgical resection. All patients received preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan and cine MRI. Results Tumor infiltration was surgically confirmed in the pericardium (n = 12), myocardium (n = 1), superior caval vein (SCV; n = 3), and aorta (n = 2). A macroscopic complete resection was possible in 10 patients, whereas 2 patients with aortic or myocardial tumor invasion had R2 resection. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 50% for cine MRI compared with 0% for CT scan regarding myocardial tumor infiltration. The PPV for tumor infiltration of the aorta was 50%, with a higher sensitivity for the CT scan (100 vs. 50%). Infiltration of the SCV could be detected slightly better with cine MRI (PPV 75 vs. 66.7%). Conclusion Cine MRI seems to improve the accuracy of preoperative staging of advanced thymoma regarding infiltration of cardiovascular structures and supports the surgical approach.

  5. Effect of phonetics training on lingual awareness.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Patricia; Fucci, Donald

    2003-02-01

    This investigation assessed the effect of phonetics training on lingual awareness in normal adult speakers of English. The study also compared Trained subjects' scores from a study in 2000 by Lohman and Fucci to subjects' posttraining scores in this investigation. Subjects were 36 students (M age=19.7, SD=.7) enrolled in an undergraduate phonetics class. All passed a speech and hearing screening. A pretest-posttest design was used. Subjects received approximately 40 hours of phonetics training over a 10-wk. period. The lingual awareness test required subjects imitate seven syllables and respond to four multiple-choice questions about each syllable. Subjects were aided by a line drawing of the oral cavity. A significant improvement in lingual awareness was found following training. However, scores for only two phonemes (sh and k) improved significantly. No significant difference was found between posttest scores and scores from Lohman and Fucci's Trained group.

  6. Relationship between phonemic and lingual awareness.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Patricia; Fucci, Donald

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to assess the relationship between knowledge of speech sounds (phonemes) and lingual awareness in normal adult speakers of English. The study also examined subjects' descriptions of lingual contact. 36 subjects (M age=19.6, SD=.71) who were enrolled in an undergraduate phonetics class participated. All passed a speech and hearing screening and reported having received no prior speech therapy or classes in articulation, phonetics, or speech science. During the first class meeting, the subjects were given two tests. The measure of phonemic awareness consisted of (a) judging which two (out of three) printed words began (or ended) with the same phoneme, (b) counting, substituting, reversing phonemes in words, and (c) indicating primary stress in two-syllable words. The lingual awareness test consisted of subjects imitating a syllable, then responding to a multiple-choice question regarding (a) tongue position (front to back), (b) tongue height (high to low), (c) contact with the teeth, and (d) contact with other oral cavity structures. Subjects were requested to imitate the syllable prior to answering each question, e.g., "Say tuh. Did you feel your tongue in the front, middle, or back of your mouth?" Seven English phonemes (t, k, s, sh, r, l, and voiceless th) were presented in a consonant-vowel syllable with the central vowel "uh." Subjects were aided by a line drawing of the oral cavity. A significant correlation of .53 was found between the two tests, suggesting that individuals who possess greater awareness of speech sounds tend to exhibit heightened lingual awareness. Sound-symbol knowledge was the best predictor of lingual awareness. Subjects had the most difficulty describing lingual contact for phonemes that are often troublesome for children to articulate (sh, r, l, and s).

  7. Precursor solution additives improve desiccated La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-x infiltrated solid oxide fuel cell cathode performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burye, Theodore E.; Nicholas, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, the addition of the surfactant Triton X-100 or the chelating agent citric acid to Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-x (LSCF) precursor nitrate solutions is shown via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to reduce average infiltrate nano-particle size and improve infiltrate phase purity. In addition, the desiccation of LSCF precursor solutions containing the aforementioned organic solution additives further reduces the average LSCF infiltrate nano-particle size and improves the low-temperature infiltrate phase purity. In particular, CaCl2-desiccation reduces the average size of Triton X-100 derived (TXD) LSCF particles fired at 700 °C from 48 to 22 nm, and reduces the average size of citric acid derived LSCF particles fired at 700 °C from 50 to 41 nm. Modeling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests indicate that particle size reductions alone are responsible for desiccation-induced cathode performance improvements such as CaCl2-desiccated TXD La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-x - Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (LSCF-GDC) cathodes reaching a polarization resistance of 0.17 Ωcm2 at 540 °C, compared to 600 °C for undesiccated TXD LSCF-GDC cathodes. This excellent low-temperature performance, combined with a low open-circuit 540 °C degradation rate, suggests that the desiccation of organic-additive-containing infiltrate precursor solutions may be useful for the development of durable, high-power, low-temperature SOFCs.

  8. Application of lingual tonsillectomy to sleep apnea syndrome involving lingual tonsils.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Kawakatsu, Kenji; Hattori, Chikaya; Hattori, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Yoichi; Yonekura, Arata; Yagisawa, Mikio; Nishimura, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    In sleep apnea syndrome, surgical treatment is applied in obstructive-type cases and some mixed-type cases. If the obstructive part is in the root of the tongue, forward transfer of the tongue, lingual tonsillectomy and laser midline glossectomy are applied. In this study, we demonstrate the surgical technique of lingual tonsillectomy using an ultrasonic coagulating dissector (SonoSurg) with a blade tip shape developed in our department. We conclude that lingual tonsillectomy using SonoSurg, which we have frequently used, should be the first choice of treatment for snoring and sleep apnea caused by hypertrophy of the lingual tonsils from the viewpoints of effectiveness, prevention of hemorrhage, safety and handling.

  9. Effects of Directional Exercise on Lingual Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather M.; O'Brien, Katy; Calleja, Aimee; Corrie, Sarah Newcomb

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the application of known muscle training principles to tongue strengthening exercises and to answer the following research questions: (a) Did lingual strength increase following 9 weeks of training? (b) Did training conducted using an exercise moving the tongue in one direction result in strength changes for tongue movements in…

  10. [Lingual orthodontics: why is it progressing?].

    PubMed

    Fillion, D; Leclerc, J F

    1991-01-01

    At the early stages of the 80's, most of the practitioners and the patients have been seduced by lingual orthodontic. But the difficulties of the technic have rapidly given a disappointment. Today ten years later the authors present the progress which have been realized: the evolution of the brackets, the accuracy of their placement in the lab procedure with the new targ, the making of the wire, the patient's comfort increase. The placement brackets are customized by making an anatomical resin pad. Placement of the brackets have evoluted from a quantized system in two dimensions (Targ 1) to a no quantized system in three dimensions (Class System) and finally to a real quantized system in three dimensions (Targ 2 with a compass of thickness with measures the first order band). Data System DALI (Drawing Arch Lingual Ideal) allows to draw the exact design of the wire. A video tape shows the different laboratory and clinical phases. By using light cured periodontal protection like Barricaid from Caulk: the patients have a greater adaptation with their appliance. All this progress give to lingual orthodontic credibility. Lingual is a reality to day and it's the first concept with customized brackets extremely accuracy, full quantized in the three orders, using the computer progress.

  11. [Lingualized occlusion in the South African context].

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, T G; Geerts, G A V M

    2002-01-01

    The search for the ideal artificial tooth arrangement that maximizes denture stability, comfort, aesthetics, and function has occupied the dental literature for many years and still continues to do so. Of the many occlusal schemes that have been presented to the dental profession, that of lingualized occlusion has emerged as one of the more popular. The popularity of lingualized occlusion stems from the simplicity and flexibility of the concept and from its wide application to clinical practice (Parr & Ivanhoe, 1996). The registration of a repeatable correct centric jaw relation is not always possible. We don't know whether the patient will use centric relation during normal function. It is therefore useful to provide the patient with some freedom of movement around centric. lingualized occlusion provides freedom in centric. For many dentists the arrangement of artificial denture teeth into balanced occlusion is difficult and time consuming. As a result this task is most often performed by the dental technician. In the South African countryside dental laboratories are often far away. If dentists perform the arrangement of the denture teeth, time and costs can be saved. The mounting of denture teeth in lingualized occlusion is simple and fast. This will motivate dentists to arrange denture teeth themselves, with obvious benefits for both the patient and the dentist. The School of Oral Health Sciences of the University of Stellenbosch teaches this concept to its undergraduate students in order to improve the prosthetic service to the large edentulous population of South Africa.

  12. A lingual abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Hsia, Jennifer C; Mendez, Eduardo; Clarridge, Jill E

    2012-04-01

    Lingual abscesses are rare. We describe a case in a healthy female with no recent history of trauma. The organism recovered by culture of drainage material collected prior to antibiotic treatment was Streptococcus intermedius, an organism recognized as flora of the oropharynx and associated with abscess formation. The isolate was resistant to clindamycin, which was the antibiotic therapy that the patient received.

  13. Piezosurgery for the Lingual Split Technique in Lingual Positioned Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Removal

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jing; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jiawei; Qian, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and safety of lingual split technique using piezosurgery for the extraction of lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars with the goal of proposing a more minimally invasive choice for this common surgery. Eighty-nine consecutive patients with 110 lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars requiring extraction were performed the lingual split technique using piezosurgery. One sagittal osteotomy line and 2 transverse osteotomy line were designed for lingual and occlusal bone removal. The success rate, operative time, postoperative outcome, and major complications (including nerve injury, mandible fracture, severe hematoma or edema, and severe pyogenic infection) were documented and analyzed. All impacted mandibular 3rd molars were successfully removed (110/110). The average time of operation was 14.6 minutes (ranged from 7 to 28 minutes). One hundred and seven extraction sites (97.3%) were primary healing. Pain, mouth opening, swelling, and PoSSe scores on postoperative 7-day were 0.34 ± 0.63, 3.88 ± 0.66(cm), 2.4 ± 0.2(cm), and 23.7 ± 5.9, respectively. There were 6 cases (5.5%) had lingual nerve disturbance and 3 cases (2.7%) developed inferior alveolar nerve impairment, and achieved full recovery within 2 months by neurotrophic drug treatment. Our study suggested piezosurgery for lingual split technique provided an effective way for the extraction of lingual positioned and deeply impacted mandibular 3rd molar. PMID:27015214

  14. Morphology of the Lingual and Buccal Papillae in Alpaca (Vicugna pacos) - Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goździewska-Harłajczuk, K; Klećkowska-Nawrot, J; Janeczek, M; Zawadzki, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was the description of the lingual and buccal papillae in adult alpaca (Vicugna pacos) by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tongue consisted of apex, body and root. Four types of lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, conical and circumvallate) in addition to two types of buccal papillae were observed. The filiform papillae, some with secondary papillae, were distributed on both the corpus and apex of the tongue, with stratified epithelium, and layer of keratin coat were recognized. The short (small) cone papillae had pointed top, while bunoform papillae were wide with smooth apex. The much less numerous circumvallate papillae with pseudopapillae on the each rim of the caudal lingual body were present with weak layer of keratin and intra-epithelial taste buds. The small fungiform papillae were found on the dorsal lingual surface, while the large fungiform papillae were situated on the ventral surface of the tongue, especially, in rostral part and were round in shape with numerous gustatory pores and very thin keratin coat. Pseudopapillae were present on the buccal conical 'bunoform' papillae surface, while 'elongate' buccal papillae surface was rather softly folded with thin coat of keratin. Microridges were observed in the less keratinized parts of each type of papillae. The orientation of either lingual or buccal papillae into the throat side facilitates the emptying of oral cavity from nutrient and swallowing of food. In conclusion, the anatomical features of the alpaca tongue are an adaptation to the feeding habits.

  15. Gray Matter Volume of the Lingual Gyrus Mediates the Relationship between Inhibition Function and Divergent Thinking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijie; Qiao, Lei; Chen, Qunlin; Yang, Wenjing; Xu, Mengsi; Yao, Xiaonan; Qiu, Jiang; Yang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research provides converging evidence for the role of posterior regions of the brain (including temporal, occipital, and parietal regions) involved in inhibition on creative thinking, it remains unclear as to how these regions influence individual differences in creative thinking. Thus, we explored the relationship between posterior regions (i.e., hippocampal, parahippocampal, lingual gyrus, precuneus, and cuneus), inhibition function, and divergent thinking (DT) in 128 healthy college students. The results revealed that lower inhibition was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the lingual gyrus, which in turn was associated with higher DT. In addition, GMV in the lingual gyrus mediated the association between inhibition and DT. These results provide new evidence for the role of inhibition in creative thinking. Inhibition may affect the amount of information stored in long-term memory, which, in turn influences DT. PMID:27752250

  16. Gray Matter Volume of the Lingual Gyrus Mediates the Relationship between Inhibition Function and Divergent Thinking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijie; Qiao, Lei; Chen, Qunlin; Yang, Wenjing; Xu, Mengsi; Yao, Xiaonan; Qiu, Jiang; Yang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research provides converging evidence for the role of posterior regions of the brain (including temporal, occipital, and parietal regions) involved in inhibition on creative thinking, it remains unclear as to how these regions influence individual differences in creative thinking. Thus, we explored the relationship between posterior regions (i.e., hippocampal, parahippocampal, lingual gyrus, precuneus, and cuneus), inhibition function, and divergent thinking (DT) in 128 healthy college students. The results revealed that lower inhibition was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the lingual gyrus, which in turn was associated with higher DT. In addition, GMV in the lingual gyrus mediated the association between inhibition and DT. These results provide new evidence for the role of inhibition in creative thinking. Inhibition may affect the amount of information stored in long-term memory, which, in turn influences DT.

  17. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  18. [Comparative studies on the vestibular and lingual osteotomy in the removal of lower wisdom teeth].

    PubMed

    Strukmeier, A; Pape, H D

    1980-01-01

    Retained third molars and/or buds in the left and right mandible were removed unilaterally via a vestibular and lingual osteotomy in 50 patients at the department for oral surgery. Postoperative edema in addition to the operative course was registered with a measurement technique developed by the authors: wound healing and general subjective complaints were also compared.

  19. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the tiger.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Hayakawa, Daisuke; Chen, Huayue; Shoumura, Shizuko

    2004-08-01

    The dorsal lingual surfaces of an adult tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was examined by macroscopical and scanning electron microscopical observations. Filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae were observed. The filiform papillae were distributed over the entire dosal surface of the tongue. The fungiform papillae were present rounded bodies, and more densely distributed on the lingual apex. There were 4 vallate papillae in total on borderline between the lingual body and lingual radix. Each papilla was surrounded by a groove. No foliate papillae were seen on the dorsal surface. Openings of the glandular ducts on the regions of the vallate papillae were found.

  20. Incidence of lingual nerve paraesthesia following mandibular third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Jeevan; Tiwari, Arunesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Context: The surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar is associated with minor but expected complications like pain, swelling, bruising and trismus. The lingual nerve damage sometimes occurs after the removal of mandibular third molar producing impaired sensation or permanent sensory loss. This complication is usually unexpected and unacceptable for the patients particularly if no prior warning has been given. Aims: The aim of the present clinical prospective study was to determine the clinical incidence of lingual nerve injury following mandibular third molar removal and to analyze possible factors for the lingual nerve injury. Settings and Design: Clinical prospective study in the Department of Oral Surgery, Punjab Government Dental College and Hospital, Amritsar. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients were selected randomly, amongst the patients, who reported to our department from January 2009 to December 2009 for the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar. To minimize the risk of lingual nerve injury, the standard terence wards incision was made in all cases and only buccal flap was raised. Statistical Analysis: The small number of paraesthesia precluded statistical analysis. Results: Out of 90 patients, six patients were diagnosed with lingual nerve paraesthesia. The overall incidence rate of lingual nerve injury was 6.6%. Conclusions: It can be concluded that lingual nerve paraesthesia can occur with or without reflection of lingual flap in spite of all the measures taken to protect it. It may be contributed to the fact of anatomical variations of lingual nerve. PMID:22639500

  1. Motor evoked potentials in unilateral lingual paralysis after monohemispheric ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Muellbacher, W.; Artner, C.; Mamoli, B.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The occurrence of a lingual paralysis after unilateral upper motor neuron lesions is an infrequent clinical phenomenon, and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied the cortical motor representations of ipsilateral and contralateral lingual muscles in healthy controls and in a selected group of stroke patients, to clarify the variable occurrence of a lingual paralysis after recent monohemispheric ischaemia.
METHODS—A special bipolar surface electrode was used to record the ipsilateral and contralateral compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) from the lingual muscles after transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the human motor cortex and peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) of the hypoglossal nerve medial to the angle of the jaw. Four patients with a lingual paralysis (group 1) and four patients with symmetric lingual movements (group 2) after monohemispheric first ever stroke were studied and compared with 40 healthy controls.
RESULTS—In controls, TMS of either hemisphere invariably produces CAMPs in the ipsilateral and contralateral lingual muscles, elicited through crossed and uncrossed central motor pathways, respectively. In the 40 healthy controls, TMS of either hemisphere elicited CMAPs of significantly greater amplitudes and shorter onset latencies from the contralateral muscles compared with the ipsilateral responses (p<0.0001). In the patient groups, TMS of the affected hemisphere failed to evoke any CMAP from either lingual side; TMS of the unsevered hemisphere always produced normal ipsilateral and contralateral responses, irrespective of whether the ipsilateral muscles were paralysed or not.
CONCLUSIONS—Bilateral crossed and uncrossed corticonuclear projections are invariably existent in humans. After unilateral interruption of these pathways, some people do exhibit a lingual paralysis whereas others do not. The development of a central lingual paralysis is most likely dependent on

  2. Effects of Lingual Effort on Swallow Pressures Following Radiation Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenius, Kerry; Stierwalt, Julie; LaPointe, Leonard L.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigated the effects of increased oral lingual pressure on pharyngeal pressures during swallowing in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. It was hypothesized that increased oral lingual pressure would result in increased pharyngeal pressures. Method: A within-subject experimental design was…

  3. Spatial and Temporal Lingual Coarticulation and Motor Control in Preadolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zharkova, Natalia; Hewlett, Nigel; Hardcastle, William J.; Lickley, Robin J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors compared coarticulation and lingual kinematics in preadolescents and adults in order to establish whether preadolescents had a greater degree of random variability in tongue posture and whether their patterns of lingual coarticulation differed from those of adults. Method: High-speed ultrasound tongue contour…

  4. A comparative assessment of torque generated by lingual and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos; Bourauel, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bracket type on the labiopalatal moments generated by lingual and conventional brackets. Incognito™ lingual brackets (3M Unitek), STb™ lingual brackets (Light Lingual System; ORMCO), In-Ovation L lingual brackets (DENTSPLY GAC), and conventional 0.018 inch slot brackets (Gemini; 3M Unitek) were bonded on identical maxillary acrylic resin models with levelled and aligned teeth. Each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system and 10 0.0175 × 0.0175 TMA wires were used for each bracket type. The wire was ligated with elastomerics into the Incognito, STb, and conventional brackets and each measurement was repeated once after religation. A 15 degrees buccal root torque (+15 degrees) and then a 15 degrees palatal root torque (-15 degrees) were gradually applied to the right central incisor bracket. After each activation, the bracket returned to its initial position and the moments in the sagittal plane were recorded during these rotations of the bracket. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc multiple comparisons (Tukey test at 0.05 error rate) was conducted to assess the effect on bracket type on the generated moments. The magnitude of maximum moment at +15 degrees ranged 8.8, 8.2, 7.1, and 5.8 Nmm for the Incognito, STb, conventional Gemini, and the In-Ovation L brackets, respectively; similar values were recorded at -15 degrees: 8.6, 8.1, 7.0, and 5.7 Nmm, respectively. The recorded differences of maximum moments were statistically significant, except between the Incognito and STb brackets. Additionally, the torque angles were evaluated at which the crown torque fell well below the minimum levels of 5.0 Nmm, as well as the moment/torque ratio at the last part of the activation/deactivation curve, between 10 and 15 degrees. The lowest torque expression was observed at the self-ligating lingual brackets, followed by the conventional brackets. The Incognito and STb lingual brackets

  5. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the eastern grey kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surface of an adult eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus gigantues) by scanning electron microscopy. The filiform papillae on the lingual apex and anterior body consisted of a main papilla and secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual apex had several processes. The filiform papillae on the lingual posterior body were thread-like in shape. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual posterior body consisted of many slender processes. The fungiform papillae were round in shape. Three vallate papillae with the apex of the triangle directed posteriorly consisted of a groove and pad. Several conical papillae derived from the posterolateral margin of the tongue where foliate papillae have been shown to be distributed in many other animal species. The surface structure of the tongue in the eastern grey kangaroo resembles that of the red kangaroo.

  6. Changes of the lingual epithelium in Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Wistuba, J; Clemen, G

    1998-12-01

    Changes in the lingual epithelium during ontogenesis and after induced metamorphosis in Ambystoma mexicanum are described as observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The epithelium of the tongue is always multilayered in the larva as well as in the adult. It consists of a stratum germinativum with little differentiated basal cells and a stratum superficiale (superficial layer) with specialized superficial cells and goblet cells. Usually, there are more than two layers because of a stratum intermedium consisting of replacement cells. The apical cell membrane of the superficial cells is perforated by fine pores. Its most typical feature are microridges. Maturing superficial cells possess microvilli. Goblet cells occur in early larvae primarily in the centre of the tongue. They spread throughout the dorsal face of the tongue as their numbers increase during ontogenesis. The small apices of the goblet cells are intercalated in the wedges between the superficial cells. Leydig cells are not found on the larval tongue but on that of adults. Due to metamorphosis, the epithelium of the tongue changes. It is furrowed in its anterior part. The furrows house the openings of the lingual glands. The surface is further modulated by ridges which are densely coated by microvilli and which bear the taste buds. The villi of the tongue which lack extrusion pores show cilia and microvilli but lack microridges. The Leydig cells disappear during metamorphosis. In addition to the two types of goblet cells found in different regions of the glandular tubules, goblet cells occur in the caudal part. They secrete directly into the cavity of the mouth. The posterior part is characterised by a dense coat of cilia.

  7. Morphology of the lingual papillae of the eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surfaces of an adult eland (Taurotragus oryx) by scanning electron microscopy. Filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae were observed. The filiform papillae of the lingual apex consisted of a larger main papilla and smaller secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla was U-shaped. The fungiform papillae were round in shape. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papilla was flower-bud shaped. The filiform papillae of the lingual body consisted of a main papilla and were big as compared to that of the lingual apex. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla resembled that of the lingual apes. The lenticular papillae of large size were limited on the lingual prominence. The connective tissue core of the lenticular papilla consisted of numerous small spines. The vallate papillae were located on both sides of the posterolateral aspects. The vallate papillae were flattened-oval shaped and the papillae were surrounded by a semicircular trench. The connective tissue core of the vallate papilla was covered with numerous small spines. The lingual surface of the eland closely resembled that of the family Bovidae.

  8. Lingual Nerve Entrapment in Muscular and Osseous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Piagkou, Maria; Demesticha, Theano; Piagkos, Giannoulis; Georgios, Androutsos; Panagiotis, Skandalakis

    2010-01-01

    Running through the infratemporal fossa is the lingual nerve (i.e. the third branch of the posterior trunk of the mandibular nerve). Due to its location, there are various anatomic structures that might entrap and potentially compress the lingual nerve. These anatomical sites of entrapment are: (a) the partially or completely ossified pterygospinous or pterygoalar ligaments; (b) the large lamina of the lateral plate of the pterygoid process; and (c) the medial fibers of the anterior region of the lateral pterygoid muscle. Due to the connection between these nerve and anatomic structures, a contraction of the lateral pterygoid muscle, for example, might cause a compression of the lingual nerve. Any variations in the course of the lingual nerve can be of clinical significance to surgeons and neurologists because of the significant complications that might occur. To name a few of such complications, lingual nerve entrapment can lead to: (a) numbness, hypoesthesia or even anesthesia of the tongue's mucous glands; (b) anesthesia and loss of taste in the anterior two-thirds of the tongue; (c) anesthesia of the lingual gums; and (d) pain related to speech articulation disorder. Dentists should, therefore, be alert to possible signs of neurovascular compression in regions where the lingual nerve is distributed. PMID:21404967

  9. Medullary carcinoma in a lingual thyroid.

    PubMed

    Yaday, S; Singh, I; Singh, J; Aggarwal, N

    2008-03-01

    Total ectopia of thyroid is a rare phenomenon and malignant change in an ectopic thyroid is even rarer. We report a case of medullary carcinoma in a total ectopic lingual thyroid occurring in a 45-year-old woman who presented with dysphagia, plummy voice and a round sessile mass at the base of the tongue. The mass was extirpated using Trotter's midline approach. Upon examination, it was found to be medullary carcinoma in an ectopic thyroid. Permanent substitution therapy with thyroxine secured the euthyroid status of the patient. The embrylogical basis and a review of literature regarding carcinomatous change in an ectopic thyroid are also discussed. There is a need to investigate for an ectopic thyroid, or even total ectopia, in the case of any smooth mass found at the base of the tongue.

  10. Thyroid cancer in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Giacomo; Vermiglio, Francesco; Moleti, Mariacarla

    2016-11-04

    Ectopy is the most common embryogenetic defect of the thyroid gland, representing between 48 and 61% of all thyroid dysgeneses. Persistence of thyroid tissue in the context of a thyroglossal duct remnant and lingual thyroid tissue are the most common defects. Although most cases of ectopic thyroid are asymptomatic, any disease affecting the thyroid may potentially involve the ectopic tissue, including malignancies. The prevalence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst is around 1% of patients affected with the above thyroid ectopies. We here review the current literature concerning primary thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid tissue on thyroglossal duct cysts and lingual thyroid.

  11. [Simultaneous pulmonar, laryngeal and lingual affectation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Díaz Manzano, J A; Castillo Romero, J L; Padilla Romero, M J; Sánchez Laínez, J J; Castillo Aguilar, C; Cegarra Navarro, M F

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis has lately increased in developed countries. The most frequent affectation is the pulmonar one and in the ORL area the laryngeal. The lingual affectation is exceptional. We present a case of a man 39 years old, with bilateral pulmonar, left vocal cord and mobile tongue affectation, negative Mantoux, positive spit culture and presence of acido-alcohol resistent bacillus in lingual and laryngeal biopsies. After antituberculosis treatment during 6 months the laryngeal and lingual lesions disappeared. We have only found two cases published of simultaneous tuberculosis in these three localisations in the last 30 years.

  12. Infiltration into Fractured Bedrock

    SciTech Connect

    Salve, Rohit; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Jones, Robert

    2007-09-01

    One potential consequence of global climate change and rapid changes in land use is an increased risk of flooding. Proper understanding of floodwater infiltration thus becomes a crucial component of our preparedness to meet the environmental challenges of projected climate change. In this paper, we present the results of a long-term infiltration experiment performed on fractured ash flow tuff. Water was released from a 3 x 4 m{sup 2} infiltration plot (divided into 12 square subplots) with a head of {approx}0.04 m, over a period of {approx}800 days. This experiment revealed peculiar infiltration patterns not amenable to current infiltration models, which were originally developed for infiltration into soils over a short duration. In particular, we observed that in part of the infiltration plot, the infiltration rate abruptly increased a few weeks into the infiltration tests. We suggest that these anomalies result from increases in fracture permeability during infiltration, which may be caused by swelling of clay fillings and/or erosion of infill debris. Interaction of the infiltration water with subsurface natural cavities (lithophysal cavities) could also contribute to such anomalies. This paper provides a conceptual model that partly describes the observed infiltration patterns in fractured rock and highlights some of the pitfalls associated with direct extension of soil infiltration models to fractured rock over a long period.

  13. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  14. Stafne's bone cavity: An unusual case with involvement of the buccal and lingual mandibular plates.

    PubMed

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Figueiredo, Rui; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-02-01

    Lingual mandibular bone defects, also known as Stafne bone cavity (SC), are unilateral asymptomatic radiolucencies, generally seen in the mandibular angle, below the inferior alveolar canal. Although panoramic radiographies normally offer enough information to make a correct diagnosis, additional studies are often required, especially in atypical cases. The present report describes an atypical presentation of a Stafne's bone cavity in a 78 years-old male patient. In this particular case, an asymptomatic and radiolucid lesion was observed during a routine dental examination. The computed tomography (CT) showed an involvement of both lingual and buccal mandibular plates producing a tunnel-like lesion. No history of mandibular trauma or surgery was refered. An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis. Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option. Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report.

  15. Cross-Lingual Lexical Triggers in Statistical Language Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    significant reductions in both perplexity and recognition errors. We also compare our cross-lingual adaptation scheme to monolingual language model adaptation...as an intermedi- ate step. In a monolingual setting, the mutual infor- mation between lexical pairs co-occurring anywhere within a long “window” of...inspiration to propose the follow- ing notion of cross-lingual lexical triggers. In a monolingual setting, a pair of words xyQz is considered a trigger

  16. Lingual Thyroid Excision with Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy Callıoglu, Elif; Bozdemir, Kazım; Ulusoy, Bulent; Oguzhan, Tolga; Korkmaz, M. Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid gland may be detected at any place between foramen caecaum and normal thyroid localization due to inadequacy of the embryological migration of the thyroid gland. It has a prevalence varying between 1/10.000 and 1/100000 in the community. Usually follow-up without treatment is preferred except for obstructive symptoms, bleeding, and suspicion of malignity. Main symptoms are dysphagia, dysphonia, bleeding, dyspnea, and obstructive sleep apnea. In symptomatic cases, the first described method in surgical treatment is open approach since it is a region difficult to have access to. However, this approach has an increased risk of morbidity and postoperative complications. Transoral robotic surgery, which is a minimally invasive surgical procedure, has advantages such as larger three-dimensional point of view and ease of manipulation due to robotic instruments. In this report, a case at the age of 49 who presented to our clinic with obstructive symptoms increasing within the last year and was found to have lingual thyroid and underwent excision of ectopic thyroid tissue by da Vinci surgical system is presented. PMID:26064746

  17. Debonding forces of three different customized bases of a lingual bracket system

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jang-Won; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate whether extension of the custom base is necessary for enhancement of bond strength, by comparing the debonding forces and residual adhesives of 3 different lingual bracket systems. Methods A total of 42 extracted upper premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups of 14 each for bonding with brackets having (1) a conventional limited resin custom base; (2) an extended gold alloy custom base: Incognito™; and (3) an extended resin custom base: KommonBase™. The bonding area was measured by scanning the bracket bases with a 3-dimensional digital scanner. The debonding force was measured with an Instron universal testing machine, which applied an occlusogingival shear force. Results The mean debonding forces were 60.83 N (standard deviation [SD] 10.12), 69.29 N (SD 9.59), and 104.35 N (SD17.84) for the limited resin custom base, extended gold alloy custom base, and extended resin custom base, respectively. The debonding force observed with the extended resin custom base was significantly different from that observed with the other bases. In addition, the adhesive remnant index was significantly higher with the extended gold alloy custom base. Conclusions All 3 custom-base lingual brackets can withstand occlusal and orthodontic forces. We conclude that effective bonding of lingual brackets can be obtained without extension of the custom base. PMID:24228238

  18. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma.

  19. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the jaguar.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2013-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surfaces of an adult jaguar (Panthera onca) by scanning electron microscopy. The tongue of the jaguar was about 17 cm long, and the center of the lingual apex became hollow. There were 7 vallate papillae in total. The filiform papilla on the lingual apex consisted of a larger main papilla and some secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla was mountain-like in shape. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papilla was mushroom-like in shape. The filiform papilla on the anterior part of the lingual body was large and cylinder-like in shape. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla consisted of a big conical papilla and many rod-like papillae. The filiform papilla on the central part of the lingual body was a big conical papilla. The connective tissue core of the filiform papilla consisted of a rod process and bowl-like structure. The vallate papillae were located on both sides of the posterolateral aspects. The vallate papillae were flattened-oval in shape and the papillae were surrounded by a groove and pad. The top of the connective tissue core of the vallate papilla had a rough surface with no spines.

  20. Displacement pattern of the anterior segment using antero-posterior lingual retractor combined with a palatal plate

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyung-Won; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Kim, Kyung A; Park, Ki-Ho; Kim, Seong-Hun; Nelson, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare the effects of two appliances on the en masse retraction of the anterior teeth anchored by temporary skeletal anchorage devices (TSADs). Methods The sample comprised 46 nongrowing hyperdivergent adult patients who planned to undergo upper first premolar extraction using lingual retractors. They were divided into three groups, based on the lingual appliance used: the C-lingual retractor (CLR) group (group 1, n = 16) and two antero-posterior lingual retractor (APLR) groups (n = 30, groups 2 and 3). The APLR group was divided by the posterior tube angulation; posterior tube parallel to the occlusal plane (group 2, n = 15) and distally tipped tube (group 3, n = 15). A retrospective clinical investigation of the skeletal, dental, and soft tissue relationships was performed using lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained pretreatment and post en masse retraction of the anterior teeth. Results All groups achieved significant incisor and canine retraction. The upper posterior teeth did not drift significantly during the retraction period. The APLR group had less angulation change in the anterior dentition, compared to the CLR group. By changing the tube angulation in the APLR, the intrusive force significantly increased in the distally tipped tube of group 3 patients and remarkably reduced the occlusal plane angle. Conclusions Compared to the CLR, the APLR provides better anterior torque control and canine tipping while achieving bodily translation. Furthermore, changing the tube angulation will affect the amount of incisor intrusion, even in patients with similar palatal vault depth, without the need for additional TSADs. PMID:26629475

  1. Anesthetic efficacy of an infiltration in mandibular anterior teeth following an inferior alveolar nerve block.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kenneth; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike; Meyers, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, blinded study was to measure the degree of pulpal anesthesia obtained with an inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block followed by an infiltration in mandibular anterior teeth. Through use of a repeated-measures design, 40 patients randomly received 3 injection combinations at 3 separate appointments: an IAN block followed by a mock lingual infiltration and a mock labial infiltration, an IAN block followed by a mock lingual infiltration and a labial infiltration, and an IAN block followed by a mock labial infiltration and a lingual infiltration. Each IAN block used 3.6 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and each infiltration used 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine administered over the lateral incisor apex. Mandibular anterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 2-minute cycles for 60 minutes following the IAN-infiltration injections. No response from the patient to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained within 15 minutes and the 80 reading was sustained for 60 minutes. Anesthesia was considered a failure if 2 consecutive 80 readings were not obtained during the 60 minutes. The results of this study showed that 100% of the patients had lip numbness with all IAN blocks. For the lateral incisor, the success rate of the IAN block alone was 40% and the failure rate was 30%. For the IAN block plus labial infiltration, the success rate was 62% and the failure rate was 12% for the lateral incisor. There was a significant difference (P < .05) between the IAN block alone and the IAN block plus labial infiltration. In conclusion, a labial infiltration, over the lateral incisor apex, of 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine following an IAN block significantly improved pulpal anesthesia for the lateral incisor compared with the IAN block alone. PMID:15384292

  2. Congenital Midline Tongue Base Mass in An Infant: Lingual Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Mawaddah; See, Goh Bee

    2016-01-01

    Lingual hamartoma is a rare finding of congenital midline posterior tongue mass. The lesion may be seen as a single anomaly or maybe associated with syndrome especially the Oral Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS). Here, we report an otherwise normal and healthy two-month-old boy with a congenital midline base of tongue mass presented with snoring and episodic vomiting since the age of 1 month. Tumour excision from the area of foramen of caecum recovered a pinkish pedunculated tumour. Histopathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyomatous lingual hamartoma. Differential diagnosis, especially for midline tongue mass and other paediatric tongue lesions are discussed. We also discuss the epidemiology, histopathologic features, treatment and prognosis of lingual hamartoma based on the literature review. PMID:27790477

  3. Ectopic lingual goiter treated by transoral robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pellini, R; Mercante, G; Ruscito, P; Cristalli, G; Spriano, G

    2013-10-01

    Multinodular goiter in lingual thyroid is quite rare. Surgical removal is indicated in symptomatic patients and when cancer is suspected. An external approach is most often used, but is associated with morbidity and sequelae. In this study, we present for the first time the technique of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for removal of a massive lingual goiter. Prospective patient data were collected, including demographics, medical history, symptoms, comorbidities and drugs prescribed. The da Vinci Surgical System was used for a transoral approach to the oropharynx. The technique was validated in a 31-year-old woman with signs and symptoms of multinodular goiter presenting since childhood. The procedure required 115 min, with intervals as follows: tracheotomy, 25 min; robot setting time, 20 min; and console time, 70 min. TOR S is feasible in cases of multinodular goiter in a lingual thyroid. The procedure appears to be safe, with quick recovery of swallowing and speech.

  4. Variation in Lingual Nerve Course: A Human Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amery, Samah M.; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran; Naidu, Murali

    2016-01-01

    The lingual nerve is a terminal branch of the mandibular nerve. It is varied in its course and in its relationship to the mandibular alveolar crest, submandibular duct and also the related muscles in the floor of the mouth. This study aims to understand the course of the lingual nerve from the molar area until its insertion into the tongue muscle. This cadaveric research involved the study of 14 hemi-mandibles and consisted of two parts: (i) obtaining morphometrical measurements of the lingual nerve to three landmarks on the alveolar ridge, and (b) understanding non-metrical or morphological appearance of its terminal branches inserting in the ventral surface of the tongue. The mean distance between the fourteen lingual nerves and the alveolar ridge was 12.36 mm, and they were located 12.03 mm from the lower border of the mandible. These distances were varied when near the first molar (M1), second molar (M2) and third molar (M3). The lingual nerve coursed on the floor of the mouth for approximately 25.43 mm before it deviated toward the tongue anywhere between the mesial of M1 and distal of M2. Thirteen lingual nerves were found to loop around the submandibular duct for an average distance of 6.92 mm (95% CI: 5.24 to 8.60 mm). Their looping occurred anywhere between the M2 and M3. In 76.9% of the cases the loop started around the M3 region and the majority (69.2%) of these looping ended at between the first and second molars and at the lingual developmental groove of the second molar. It gave out as many as 4 branches at its terminal end at the ventral surface of the tongue, with the presence of 2 branches being the most common pattern. An awareness of the variations of the lingual nerve is important to prevent any untoward complications or nerve injury and it is hoped that these findings will be useful for planning of surgical procedures related to the alveolar crest, submandibular gland/ duct and surrounding areas. PMID:27662622

  5. Morphology of the filiform lingual papillae in porcupine (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Karan, M; Yilmaz, S; Aydin, A

    2011-04-01

    The light and scanning electron microscopic structure of the filiform lingual papillae was studied in five adult porcupine (three males and two females). The tongue was characterised by a round tip, a rostral median sulcus and a deep lingual fossa which was situated just rostral to a prominent inter-molar eminence corresponding to a torus linguae. The filiform papillae were curved, enclosed a large connective tissue core and were separated by wide inter-papillary zones covered by a thick epithelium. Most filiform papillae had a cylindrical shape, but the rostral and central parts of the tongue contained a number of flat, comb-shaped papillae with rounded tips.

  6. Lingual Propulsive Pressures across Consistencies Generated by the Anteromedian and Posteromedian Tongue by Healthy Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingrich, Laura L.; Stierwalt, Julie A. G.; Hageman, Carlin F.; LaPointe, Leonard L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, the authors investigated lingual propulsive pressures generated in the normal swallow by the anterior and posterior lingual segments for various consistencies and maximum isometric tasks. Method: Lingual pressures for saliva, thin, and honey-thick liquid boluses were measured via the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument…

  7. Multi-Lingual Rehabilitation Terminology; A Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Elizabeth M.

    In order to assess the need and status of sources of multi-lingual rehabilitation terminology references, a questionnaire was sent to 96 related national and international organizations and selected individuals inquiring about the existance of present or developing terminology references. Results of the questionnaires indicated the availability of…

  8. Swallowing Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: Impact of Lingual Pumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argolo, Natalie; Sampaio, Marília; Pinho, Patrícia; Melo, Ailton; Nóbrega, Ana Caline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lingual pumping (LP) is a repetitive, involuntary, anteroposterior movement of the tongue on the soft palate that is executed prior to transferring the food bolus to the pharynx, but we also observed LP when multiple swallows were taken. LP may be associated with rigidity and bradykinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This…

  9. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003-1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste.

  10. Idiopathic Lingual Artery Aneurysm: CT Findings and Endovascular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, R.S.; Fernandez, P.M.; Sattenberg, R.J.; Flynn, M.B.; Heidenreich, J.O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We describe a 65-year-old woman with an asymptomatic idiopathic lingual artery aneurysm which is suspected to be congenital. We review the literature on external carotid artery branch aneurysms, diagnostic evaluation and discuss treatment options for the various types and the specific chosen in the case presented. PMID:20377988

  11. A System for Supporting Cross-Lingual Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capstick, Joanne; Diagne, Abdel Kader; Erbach, Gregor; Uszkoreit, Hans; Leisenberg, Anne; Leisenberg, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    Describes the MULINEX system that supports cross-lingual searching of the World Wide Web. Users can formulate queries, filter the search results and read documents by using their native language. Discusses dictionary-based query translation, multilingual document categorization, and automatic translation that supports French, German, and English.…

  12. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  13. Multi-Lingual, but Not Making It in International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusuma-Powell, Ochan

    2004-01-01

    International schools are increasingly identifying Functionally Multi-Lingual children in their student populations. These students, bilingual or multilingual at surface levels of conversation, have not established academic competence in any single language. In many cases, the teacher may assume that another, more robust language exists, when in…

  14. Techniques for Field Application of Lingual Ultrasound Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gick, Bryan; Bird, Sonya; Wilson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for using ultrasound for lingual imaging in field-related applications. The greatest challenges we have faced distinguishing the field setting from the laboratory setting are the lack of controlled head/transducer movement, and the related issue of tissue compression. Two experiments are reported. First, a pilot study…

  15. Distribution of the lingual foramina in mandibular cortical bone in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Moon Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The interforminal region, between the mandibular foramen, is known as a relatively safe area that is free of anatomic structures, such as inferior alveolar nerve, submandibular fossa, and lingual side of the mandible is occasionally neglected for its low clinical importance. Even in the case of a severely constricted alveolus, perforation of the lingual cortical bone had been intended. However, anterior extension of the inferior alveolar canal, important anatomic structure, such as concavity of lingual bone, lingual foramina, and lingual canal, has recently been reported through various studies, and untypical bleeding by perforation of the lingual plate on implantation has also been reported. Therefore, in this study, we performed radiographic and statistical analysis on distribution and appearance frequencies of the lingual foramina that causes perforation of the mandibular lingual cortical bone to prevent complications, such as untypical bleeding, during surgical procedure. Materials and Methods We measured the horizontal length from a midline of the mandible to the lingual foramina, as well as the horizontal length from the alveolar crest to the lingual foramina and from the lingual foramina to the mandibular border by multi-detector computed tomography of 187 patients, who visited Dankook University Dental Hospital for various reasons from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2012. Results From a total of 187 human mandibles, 110 (58.8%) mandibles had lingual foramina; 39 (20.9%) had bilateral lingual foramen; 34 (18.2%) had the only left lingual foramen; and 37 (19.8%) had the only right lingual foramen. Conclusion When there is consistent bleeding during a surgical procedure, clinicians must consider damages on the branches of the sublingual artery, which penetrate the lingual foramina. Also, when there is a lingual foramina larger than 1 mm in diameter on a pre-implantation computed tomography, clinicians must beware of vessel damage. In order to prevent

  16. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of lingual dystonia induced by speaking.

    PubMed

    Budak, F; Aydın, E; Koçkaya, A; Ilbay, G

    2013-01-01

    Primary lingual dystonia is a rare condition, especially when it is only induced by speaking. Trihexyphenidyl failed to improve the symptoms. Several case series have demonstrated the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection for the management of focal lingual movement disorders. Only 1 case of botulinum toxin injection for primary lingual dystonia induced by speaking has been reported, but this treatment has limited effectiveness. Our patient was treated with botulinum toxin using a superficial approach for injection into the tongue with continuing excellent results. Lingual botulinum toxin injection is a fairly simple, safe and viable treatment option for lingual dystonia induced by speaking.

  17. Contour of lingual surface in lower complete denture formed by polished surface impression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to analyze the shapes of lingual polished surfaces in lower complete dentures formed by polished surface impressions and to provide reference data for use when manufacturing edentulous trays and lower complete dentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-six patients with mandibular edentulism were studied. After lower wax dentures were fabricated, wax was removed from the lingual side of the wax denture and a lingual polished surface impression was obtained with tissue conditioner. The definitive denture was scanned with a three-dimensional scanner, and scanned images were obtained. At the cross-sections of the lingual frenum, lateral incisors, first premolars, first molars, and anterior border of the retromolar pads, three points were marked and eight measurements were taken. The Kruskal-Wallis test and a post hoc analysis with the Mann-Whitney test were performed. RESULTS Each patient showed similar values for the same areas on the left and right sides without a statistically significant difference. The height of the contour of the lingual polished surface at the lingual frenum was halfway between the occlusal plane and lingual border, it moved gradually in a downward direction. The angle from the occlusal plane to the height of the contour of the lingual polished surface was increased as it progressed from the lingual frenum towards the retromolar pads. CONCLUSION The shape of the mandibular lingual polished surface was convex at the lingual frenum, lateral incisors and gradually flattened towards the first molars and retromolar pads. PMID:28018565

  18. Lingual access for third molar surgery: a 20-year retrospective audit.

    PubMed

    Moss, C E; Wake, M J

    1999-08-01

    We describe a technique for obtaining lingual access for the insertion of a wide metal retractor to protect the lingual nerve from accidental damage during third molar surgery. We also report an audit of a single practice over a 20-year period using the technique described. The approach involves raising soft tissues on the lingual side of the lower third molar tooth to allow insertion of a broad Hovell's lingual retractor. We conclude that raising lingual tissues to form a wide tension-free flap and inserting a specifically designed retractor does not increase the incidence of lingual nerve morbidity. Indeed, the overall incidence of lingual nerve damage was particularly low compared with those in other published series.

  19. Monitoring Preferential Flow During Infiltration Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, V.; Votrubova, J.; Sanda, M.; Cislerova, M.

    2006-12-01

    Field ponded infiltration experiments monitored by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) were conducted at the experimental site Liz, Sumava Mts., Southern Bohemia. Single-ring ponded infiltration experiments were carried out repeatedly using a set of permanently installed plastic infiltration rings and additional ring made of concrete. The preferential flow occurring during the infiltration experiment was monitored by means of invasive and non-invasive visualization of flow paths. For the noninvasive visualization two geophysical methods were tested, namely TDR and ERT. Geophysical measurements were taken before, during and after the infiltration. TDR measurements were conducted using Tektronix 1502C cable tester connected to three steel electrodes 1- m long installed vertically in the centre of the infiltration ring. ERT was done using the ARES device (the multi electrode VES employing the Wenner-Schlumberger method). After the initial period of clean water infiltration 10g/l NaCl solute was used to improve the ERT signal. The electrical resistivity images were reconstructed using RES2DINV (Geotomo software). In ERT images the evolution of infiltration processes is clearly visible however the preferential character of the flow is completely smeared. This is clear from the comparison of ERT images with the images of Brilliant Blue dye distribution taken from the dug out horizons at the end of infiltration. In addition, the ERT results show some inconsistencies, which are most probably related to the design and the scale of the ERT network which is not fully consistent with the assumption of the methods employed. The research has been performed in the frame of research projects VaV/650/5/03 and GACR 103/04/0663.

  20. Infiltration in Swelling Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldez, Juan V.; Sposito, Garrison

    1985-01-01

    Infiltration phenomena in swelling soils were investigated theoretically. The approach taken consisted of applying both the approximate analytical techniques developed by J.-Y. Parlange and co-workers and conventional finite difference numerical methods to study the generalized Richards equation for one-dimensional infiltration in a swelling soil. Equations were derived for the ponding time and the post-ponding infiltration rate that are generalizations of the Parlange-Smith model expressions for rigid soils. Ponding times for swelling soils were shown to be shorter than those for nonswelling analogs, and post-ponding infiltration rates in swelling soils were shown to approach zero instead of becoming equal to the hydraulic conductivity, as in rigid soils. These results were confirmed, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with the numerical model, which also provided instantaneous moisture profiles and surface swelling predictions in agreement with field observations. A three-parameter infiltration equation proposed recently by J.-Y. Parlange et al. (1982) was generalized to describe swelling soils and shown to be in good agreement with published laboratory and field data. It appears that the generalized analytical model equations developed can be employed conveniently in hydrologic applications which do not require high accuracy in predictions.

  1. Stafne’s bone cavity: An unusual case with involvement of the buccal and lingual mandibular plates

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Rui; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-01-01

    Lingual mandibular bone defects, also known as Stafne bone cavity (SC), are unilateral asymptomatic radiolucencies, generally seen in the mandibular angle, below the inferior alveolar canal. Although panoramic radiographies normally offer enough information to make a correct diagnosis, additional studies are often required, especially in atypical cases. The present report describes an atypical presentation of a Stafne’s bone cavity in a 78 years-old male patient. In this particular case, an asymptomatic and radiolucid lesion was observed during a routine dental examination. The computed tomography (CT) showed an involvement of both lingual and buccal mandibular plates producing a tunnel-like lesion. No history of mandibular trauma or surgery was refered. An additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was made to discard submandibular gland pathology and to confirm the diagnosis. Since SC is asymptomatic and nonprogressive, a conservative approach based in clinical and radiological follow-ups was considered to be the most suitable treatment option. Key words:Stafne bone cavity, lingual mandibular bone defect, case report. PMID:24596643

  2. Extravasation Mucocele Arising from a Lingual Thyroglossal Duct Remnant

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Nakatani, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although a thyroglossal duct cyst is a congenital anomaly, it can also appear in adults. Despite the presence of embryological remnants, it is still unclear why the cyst should suddenly develop later in life. We report a case of a 46-year-old male with an extravasation mucocele arising from a long-standing lingual thyroglossal duct remnant. MRI demonstrated a lingual cystic lesion near the hyoid bone associated with a suprahyoid tract-like structure masquerading as a thyroglossal duct cyst. However, histopathological examination demonstrated a mucocele secondary to a rupture of a thyroglossal duct remnant with numerous intramural heterotopic salivary glands. We propose a new mechanism of an acquired cystic formation of this congenital disease that excessive production of mucus from heterotopic salivary glands and a physical trauma such as swallowing may lead to extravasation of mucus from the thyroglossal duct. PMID:25861502

  3. Identification of lingual glands and ducts ventrally in pigs' tongues.

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, S E; Josephson, G K

    1989-01-01

    Hitherto unreported tubulo-acinar mucous lingual glands were located ventrally in the free tip of the tongue, just cranial to the attachment of the frenulum linguae in 186 of 400 (47%) of pigs' tongues. The glands were bilateral in 126 (32%) of the tongues. These glands emptied by several ducts onto the ventral surface of the tongue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2606778

  4. Porous body infiltrating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2002-01-01

    A mixture is formed that comprises at least some to about 10 wt % boron nitride and silicon. A body comprising a component that is wetted by or reacts with silicon is contacted with the mixture and the contacted body is infiltrated with silicon from the mixture.

  5. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the Japanese marten.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2007-08-01

    The dorsal lingual surfaces of two adult Japanese marten (Martes melampus) were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Filiform, fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae were observed. A small filiform papilla on the apical surface of the tongue had several pointed processes. A small filiform papilla contained the connective tissue core consisting of several small processes. A large filiform papilla of the lingual body consisted of a main papilla and some secondary papillae. A large filiform papilla contained the connective tissue core consisting of processes of various size. The fungiform papillae are round in shape. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papilla had a top with several round depressions. The four vallate papillae were located on both sides of the posterior end of the lingual body and each papilla was surrounded by groove and crescent pad. A zigzag surface structure appeared on the connective tissue core of the vallate papilla. The foliate papillae were seen on the dorsolateral aspect of the tongue and some ridges and grooves were exposed reciprocally. A zigzag surface structures appeared on the connective tissue cores of the ridges of the foliate papillae.

  6. Interventions in the Alteration on Lingual Frenum: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Priscilla Poliseni; Cardoso, Carolina Louise; Gomes, Erissandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Altered lingual frenum modifies the normal tongue mobility, which may influence the stomatognathic functions, resulting in anatomical, physiological and social damage to the subject. It is necessary that health professionals are aware of the process of evaluation, diagnostics and treatment used today, guiding their intervention. Objective  To perform a systematic review of what are the treatment methods used in cases of lingual frenum alteration. Data Synthesis  The literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, Cochrane and IBECS, delimited by language (Portuguese, English, Spanish), date of publication (January 2000 to January 2014) and studies performed in humans. The selection order used to verify the eligibility of the studies were related to: full text availability; review the abstract; text analysis; final selection. Of the total 443 publications, 26 remained for analysis. The surgical approach was used in all studies, regardless of the study population (infants, children and adults), with a range of tools and techniques employed; speech therapy was recommended in the post surgical in 4 studies. Only 4 studies, all with infants, showed scientific evidence. Conclusion  Surgical intervention is effective for the remission of the limitations caused by the alteration on lingual frenum, but there is a deficit of studies with higher methodological quality. The benefits of speech therapy in the post surgical period are described from improvement in the language of mobility aspects and speech articulation. PMID:27413412

  7. Spatial and temporal lingual coarticulation and motor control in preadolescents.

    PubMed

    Zharkova, Natalia; Hewlett, Nigel; Hardcastle, William J; Lickley, Robin J

    2014-04-01

    PURPOSE In this study, the authors compared coarticulation and lingual kinematics in preadolescents and adults in order to establish whether preadolescents had a greater degree of random variability in tongue posture and whether their patterns of lingual coarticulation differed from those of adults. METHOD High-speed ultrasound tongue contour data synchronized with the acoustic signal were recorded from 15 children (ages 10-12 years) and 15 adults. Tongue shape contours were analyzed at 9 normalized time points during the fricative phase of schwa-fricative-/a/ and schwa-fricative-/i/ sequences with the consonants /s/ and /ʃ/. RESULTS There was no significant age-related difference in random variability. Where a significant vowel effect occurred, the amount of coarticulation was similar in the 2 groups. However, the onset of the coarticulatory effect on preadolescent /ʃ/ was significantly later than on preadolescent /s/, and also later than on adult /s/ and /ʃ/. CONCLUSIONS Preadolescents have adult-like precision of tongue control and adult-like anticipatory lingual coarticulation with respect to spatial characteristics of tongue posture. However, there remains some immaturity in the motor programming of certain complex tongue movements.

  8. A concept to transfer a therapeutic splint position into permanent occlusion with a customized lingual appliance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The role of occlusion concerning temporomandibular disorder is still unclear but seems to be the only component of the stomathognathic system dentists are able to change morphologically. The aim of the paper is to describe the orthodontist’s approach for transferring and maintaining a therapeutic splint position into permanent occlusion using a fully customized lingual appliance. Methods Fixed acrylic bite planes on lower molars were used to maintain a symptom-free condyle position prior to orthodontic treatment. Silicone impressions of the arches including the fixed bite planes were used for the Incognito laboratory procedure. Two digital setups were made. One setup represents the target occlusion. A second setup including the bite planes was used to fabricate an additional set of lower molar brackets. In the leveling stage all teeth except the lower molars were settled to maintain the therapeutic condyle position. Finally, the fixed bite planes were stepwise removed and molar brackets were replaced to establish the permanent occlusion planned with the first setup. Results and discussion The advantage of an individual lingual appliance consists in the high level of congruence between the fabricated setups and the final clinical result. Both the individual scope for design and the precision of the appliance were vitally important in the treatment of a patient with a functional disorder of the masticatory system. PMID:22613064

  9. The heterogeneity of meningioma revealed by multiparameter analysis: infiltrative and non-infiltrative clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gay, Emmanuel; Lages, Elodie; Ramus, Claire; Guttin, Audrey; El Atifi, Michèle; Dupré, Isabelle; Bouamrani, Ali; Salon, Caroline; Ratel, David; Wion, Didier; Berger, François; Issartel, Jean-Paul

    2011-05-01

    Tumor invasion or infiltration of adjacent tissues is the source of clinical challenges in diagnosis as well as prevention and treatment. Among brain tumors, infiltration of the adjacent tissues with diverse pleiotropic mechanisms is frequently encountered in benign meningiomas. We assessed whether a multiparametric analysis of meningiomas based on data from both clinical observations and molecular analyses could provide a consistent and accurate appraisal of invasive and infiltrative phenotypes and help determine the diagnosis of these tumors. Tissue analyses of 37 meningiomas combined enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) assays of two different protein biomarkers (thrombospondin 1 and a phosphorylated form of vimentin) as well as gene expression analyses with oligonucleotide micro-arrays. Up to four different clinical and molecular parameters were then examined for tumor classification. From this study, we were able to cluster 36 out of the 37 tumors into two different subsets corresponding to infiltrative/invasive and non-infiltrative tumors. In addition, meningiomas that invade brain and those that infiltrate the neighboring skull bone exhibited no distinguishable molecular features. Our multi-parameter analysis that combines clinical data, transcriptomic and molecular assays clearly reveals the heterogeneity of meningiomas and distinguishes the intrinsically infiltrative/invasive tumors from the non-infiltrative meningiomas.

  10. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David V.; Baranwal, Rita

    2009-12-08

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  11. [Surgical treatment of short lingual frenulum in children].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Demarchi, Victoria; Martínez Corvalán, María Pía; Razetti, Juan; Boccio, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Ankyloglossia is a congenital anomaly characterized by an abnormally short lingual frenulum resulting in varying degrees of difficulty of tongue mobility. It may be asymptomatic or it may present with breastfeeding difficulties, speech and dentition disorders, and social problems related to the functional limitation of the tongue. While it is a common and known pathology, controversies and diversity of opinions persist regarding the indication, timing and method of surgical correction. We describe our experience with 35 children presenting this condition; they underwent successful surgical treatment.

  12. Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa Rivera, Ivonne; Toro, Doris H.; Gutierrez, Jose; Acosta, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia. PMID:26504883

  13. Polymer infiltration studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchello, Joseph M.

    1991-01-01

    Progress was made on the preparation of carbon fiber composites using advanced polymer resins. Processes reported include powder towpreg process, weaving towpreg made from dry powder prepreg, composite from powder coated towpreg, and toughening of polyimide resin (PMR) composites by semi-interpenetrating networks. Several important areas of polymer infiltration into fiber bundles will be researched. Preparation to towpreg for textile preform weaving and braiding and for automated tow placement is a major goal, as are the continued development of prepregging technology and the various aspects of composite part fabrication.

  14. Polymer infiltration studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchello, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    Polymer infiltration investigations were directed toward development of methods by which to produce advanced composite material for automated part fabrication utilizing textile and robotic technology in the manufacture of subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Significant progress was made during the project on the preparation of carbon fiber composites using advanced polymer resins. The findings and results of the project are summarized in the attached paper entitled 'Powder-Coated Towpreg: Avenues to Near Net Shape Fabrication of High Performance Composite.' Also attached to this report is the second of two patent applications submitted as a result of these studies.

  15. The Role of Ethno-Lingual Relativity in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citron, James L.

    1993-01-01

    The term "ethno-lingual relativity" is defined as a perspective that is not limited by one's own cultural and linguistic experiences, but rather is open to the contrasting cultural and linguistic patterns of other peoples. It is hypothesized that having an ethno-lingually relative perspective can facilitate one's ability to learn a new language.…

  16. The Mutual Symbiosis between Inclusive Bi-Lingual Education and Multicultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Beverly J.; Tong, Fuhui; Lara-Alecio, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors postulate a mutual symbiosis between multicultural and inclusive bi-lingual education. Combining bi-lingual and multicultural education to create a symbiotic relationship can stimulate reform in schools and can promote inclusive educational systems, thereby keeping native languages and cultures alive for minority…

  17. Simultaneous paresthesia of the lingual nerve and inferior alveolar nerve caused by a radicular cyst.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshiki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Akiko; Kondoh, Toshirou; Suzuki, Mami; Noguchi, Kazuhide; Ito, Ko; Seto, Kanichi

    2005-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve is sometimes affected by periapical pathoses and mandibular cysts. However, mandibular intraosseous lesions have not been reported to disturb the lingual nerve. A case of simultaneous paresthesia of the right lingual nerve and the right inferior alveolar nerve is presented. The possible mechanisms of this extremely uncommon condition are discussed.

  18. Lingual lipase activity in the orosensory detection of fat by humans.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Bhushan V; Mattes, Richard D

    2014-06-15

    Lingual lipase generates nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) from dietary fats during oral processing by lipolysis. Lingual lipase in rodents has strong lipolytic activity and plays a critical role in oral detection of fats. The functional activity of lingual lipase during oral processing of high-fat foods in humans remains poorly characterized. Five commonly consumed high-fat foods varying in physical states and fatty acid composition (almond, almond butter, olive oil, walnut, and coconut) were masticated by 15 healthy human subjects at the rate of one chew per second with and without lipase inhibitor orlistat. Salivary NEFA concentrations were measured. To determine the role of lingual lipase in oral fat detection, sensory ratings were obtained from the same 15 human subjects for almond butter with and without orlistat. Lingual lipase was active during oral processing of almond and coconut. No activity of lingual lipase was detected during processing of almond butter. There was only weak evidence lingual lipase is a determinant of oral fat detection. Lingual lipase may only contribute to NEFA generation and oral fat detection of fatty foods that require stronger oral processing effort.

  19. Lingual lipase activity in the orosensory detection of fat by humans

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Bhushan V.

    2014-01-01

    Lingual lipase generates nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) from dietary fats during oral processing by lipolysis. Lingual lipase in rodents has strong lipolytic activity and plays a critical role in oral detection of fats. The functional activity of lingual lipase during oral processing of high-fat foods in humans remains poorly characterized. Five commonly consumed high-fat foods varying in physical states and fatty acid composition (almond, almond butter, olive oil, walnut, and coconut) were masticated by 15 healthy human subjects at the rate of one chew per second with and without lipase inhibitor orlistat. Salivary NEFA concentrations were measured. To determine the role of lingual lipase in oral fat detection, sensory ratings were obtained from the same 15 human subjects for almond butter with and without orlistat. Lingual lipase was active during oral processing of almond and coconut. No activity of lingual lipase was detected during processing of almond butter. There was only weak evidence lingual lipase is a determinant of oral fat detection. Lingual lipase may only contribute to NEFA generation and oral fat detection of fatty foods that require stronger oral processing effort. PMID:24694384

  20. The inflammatory infiltrate of melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel; Saeb-Lima, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytic nevi are frequently accompanied by inflammatory cells of different types, in varied amounts and distributed in different patterns. In the current report, we review the knowledge on inflammation seen in different types of melanocytic nevi. As an additional contribution, we studied the lymphocytic inflammatory component of Duperrat nevus, as well as the cytotoxic component of Sutton nevus, two contributions that we have not found in the literature. We conclude that: (a) Duperrat nevus has a mixed inflammatory reaction that includes histiocytes, foreign-body multinucleated giant cells, polymorphonuclears, lymphocytes (predominantly CD4+) and plasma cells (commonly abundant); (b) common melanocytic nevi with reactive inflammatory infiltrate usually show a CD4+ predominant population; (c) Meyerson nevus commonly shows an inflammatory infiltrate mainly made up of CD4+ T-cells; (d) Sutton nevus with halo phenomenon is accompanied by a dense inflammatory infiltrate with lymphocytes in a CD4:CD8 ratio varying from 1:1 to 1:3 and in which most of the CD8+ T-cells do not express cytotoxic markers; (e) Wiesner nevus commonly shows a spare lymphocytic infiltrate but the nature of the infiltrate has not yet been investigated.

  1. The Multi-Lingual Supplement to the Astronomy Thesaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobbrook, R. M.

    The compilers and translators of the recently released IAU "Astronomy Thesaurus" (affectionately known as TREX), are pleased to announce the availability of the new multi-lingual supplement (ML-TREX) in French, German, Italian and Spanish. The primary terms as well as the non-preferred terms have been translated in the supplement and it is designed enhance the main thesaurus as an online reference tool. Some review copies have been sent out on a limited distribution basis. Although much of current scientific research is reported in English there is a need by librarians to have a reference resource of terminology in a variety of languages. Librarians are aware of the amount of literature in their libraries in all languages both current and historical which must be dealt with and few of us have the multi-lingual skills to cope with it. The supplement is designed to be used as an online reference resource and therefore has been made available via the World Wide Web and an anonymous ftp account at the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The files can be down- loaded directly into any preferred word processor or into a computer system as a "knowledge base" together with the main thesaurus. For more information: LIB@aaoepp.aao.gov.au or http://www.aao.gov.au or the thesaurus directory via anonymous ftp access.

  2. Dorsal Lingual Surface and Halitosis: a Morphological Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Giuseppe, Marzo; Adelaide, Continenza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective The interest in the study of the tongue papillary niches and the related biofilm has increased in recent years because they form a suitable source of periodontal microorganisms and are associated with development of halitosis. Tongue dorsum structure represents a factor favoring a particular and complex bacterial biofilm where periodontal pathogens are frequently found. The aim of this preliminary study was to associate the tongue papillary structure with the biofilm causing halitosis by means of a new clinical protocol. Material and Methods In this study, one subject affected by oral malodor was selected and included. A photograph of lingual dorsum was taken to spot the areas with visible lingual coating. A tongue dorsum impression was obtained, divided and cut with a blade in six parts, according to Winkel Tongue Coated Index by means of the 2-step double-mix impression technique. The contours of the six parts were observed by the stereomicroscope LEICA LED2000 and analyzed by ImageJ software. Results The results showed that the depth of papillae was associated with visible presence of the tongue biofilm and indirectly correlated with halitosis in patients.. Conclusions The morphological papillary structure of the tongue dorsal surface influences the presence of the tongue biofilm. The presented protocol can be further considered in clinical application for a correct diagnosis and a personalized treatment of halitosis. PMID:27789913

  3. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the raccoon dog and fox.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue; Shoumura, Shizuko

    2006-11-01

    The dorsal lingual surfaces of the raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and fox (Vulpes vulpes japonica) were examined by scanning electron microscopical (SEM) observations. The distribution and type of the lingual papillae found in the raccoon dog were similar to those in the fox. Filiform, fungiform, foliate and vallate papillae were observed. The filiform papillae were distributed over the entire dosal surface of the tongue. Each filiform papilla on the apical surface of the tongue had several pointed processes. The filiform papillae of the lingual body consisted of a main papilla and some secondary papillae. The fungiform papillae were present rounded bodies, and more densely distributed on the lingual apex. The foliate papillae were seen on the dorsolateral aspect of the tongue. The vallate papillae were located on both sides of the posterior end of the lingual body. Each papilla was surrounded by groove and crescent pad. On the periphery of the papillae, large conical papillae were observed.

  4. Evaluation of an Infiltration Model with Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Serrana, M.; Gulliver, J. S.; Nieber, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    implemented to calculate infiltration along with a kinematic wave model for overland flow that accounts for short-circuiting of flow. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis on the parameters implemented in the model has been performed. Finally, the field experiments results have been used to quantify the validity of the coupled model.

  5. Polymer infiltration studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchello, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress was made in several areas on the preparation of carbon fiber composites using advanced polymer resins. Polymer infiltration studies dealt with ways of preparing composite materials from advanced polymer resins and carbon fibers. This effort is comprised of an integrated approach to the process of composite part fabrication. The goal is to produce advanced composite materials for automated part fabrication using textile and robotics technology in the manufacture of subsonic and supersonic aircraft. The object is achieved through investigations at the NASA Langley Research Center and by stimulating technology transfer between contract researchers and the aircraft industry. Covered here are literature reviews, a status report on individual projects, current and planned research, publications, and scheduled technical presentations.

  6. Optical detection of intravenous infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    Infiltration of medications during infusion therapy results in complications ranging from erythema and pain to tissue necrosis requiring amputation. Infiltration occurs from improper insertion of the cannula, separation of the cannula from the vein, penetration of the vein by the cannula during movement, and response of the vein to the medication. At present, visual inspection by the clinical staff is the primary means for detecting intravenous (IV) infiltration. An optical sensor was developed to monitor the needle insertion site for signs of IV infiltration. Initial studies on simulated and induced infiltrations on a swine model validated the feasibility of the methodology. The presence of IV infiltration was confirmed by visual inspection of the infusion site and/or absence of blood return in the IV line. Potential sources of error due to illumination changes, motion artifacts, and edema were also investigated. A comparison of the performance of the optical device and blinded expert observers showed that the optical sensor has higher sensitivity and specificity, and shorter detection time than the expert observers. An improved model of the infiltration monitoring device was developed and evaluated in a clinical study on induced infiltrations of healthy adult volunteers. The performance of the device was compared with the observation of a blinded expert observer. The results show that the rates of detection of infiltrations are 98% and 82% for the optical sensor and the observer, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the optical sensor are 0.97 and 0.98, respectively.

  7. [Anatomical and radiological studies on additional mandible teeth anesthesia considering innervation variability].

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, S V; Dydykin, S S; Kuzin, A V

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents studies on nutritional foramina of the mandible. Some nutritional foramina located in the frontal mandibular region on the lingual surface and containing significant blood vessels and nerves are found to be more typical for teeth-bearing mandible. In retromolar area in case of third molars presence intraosseous canals were revealed leading to inferior alveolar nerve canal. One should consider intraligamental and lingual anesthesia by lower incisors extraction. Intraosseous anesthesia and retromolar area infiltration significantly increase anesthesia efficiency by third molar extraction.

  8. Selectivity of lingual nerve fibers to chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The cell bodies of the lingual branch of the trigeminal nerve were localized in the trigeminal ganglion using extracellular recordings together with horseradish peroxidase labeling from the tongue. Individual lingual nerve fibers were characterized with regard to their conduction velocities, receptive fields, and response to thermal, mechanical, and chemical stimuli. Fibers were classified as C, A delta, A beta, cold, and warm. The chemical stimuli included NaCl, KCl, NH4Cl, CaCl2, menthol, nicotine, hexanol, and capsaicin. With increasing salt concentration the latency of the response decreased and the activity increased. The responses elicited by salts (to 2.5 M), but not nonpolar stimuli such as menthol, were reversibly inhibited by 3.5 mM of the tight junction blocker, LaCl3. These data suggest that salts diffuse into stratified squamous epithelia through tight junctions in the stratum corneum and stratum granulosum, whereupon they enter the extracellular space. 11 C fibers were identified and 5 were characterized as polymodal nociceptors. All of the C fibers were activated by one or more of the salts NaCl, KCl, or NH4Cl. Three C fibers were activated by nicotine (1 mM), but none were affected by CaCl2 (1 M), menthol (1 mM), or hexanol (50 mM). However, not all C fibers or even the subpopulation of polymodals were activated by the same salts or by nicotine. Thus, it appears that C fibers display differential responsiveness to chemical stimuli. A delta fibers also showed differential sensitivity to chemicals. Of the 35 characterized A delta mechanoreceptors, 8 responded to NaCl, 9 to KCl, 9 to NH4Cl, 0 to CaCl2, menthol, or hexanol, and 2 to nicotine. 8 of 9 of the cold fibers (characterized as A delta's) responded to menthol, none responded to nicotine, 8 of 16 were inhibited by hexanol, 9 of 19 responded to 2.5 M NH4Cl, 5 of 19 responded to 2.5 M KCl, and 1 of 19 responded to 2.5 M NaCl. In summary, lingual nerve fibers exhibit responsiveness to chemicals

  9. Estimating the Limits of Infiltration in the Urban Appalachian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavin, S. M.; Bain, D.; Hopkins, K. G.; Pfeil-McCullough, E. K.; Copeland, E.

    2014-12-01

    Green infrastructure in urbanized areas commonly uses infiltration systems, such as rain gardens, swales and trenches, to convey surface runoff from impervious surfaces into surrounding soils. However, precipitation inputs can exceed soil infiltration rates, creating a limit to infiltration-based storm water management, particularly in urban areas covered by impervious surfaces. Given the limited availability and varied quality of soil infiltration rate data, we synthesized information from national databases, available field test data, and applicable literature to characterize soil infiltration rate distributions, focusing on Allegheny County, Pennsylvania as a case study. A range of impervious cover conditions was defined by sampling available GIS data (e.g., LiDAR and street edge lines) with analysis windows placed randomly across urbanization gradients. Changes in effective precipitation caused by impervious cover were calculated across these gradients and compared to infiltration rate distributions to identify thresholds in impervious coverage where these limits are exceeded. Many studies have demonstrated the effects of urbanization on infiltration, but the identification of these thresholds will clarify interactions between impervious cover and soil infiltration. These methods can help identify sections of urban areas that require augmentation of infiltration-based systems with additional infrastructural strategies, especially as green infrastructure moves beyond low impact development towards more frequent application during infilling of existing urban systems.

  10. Anatomical Relationship of Lingual Nerve to the Region of Mandibular Third Molar

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Leite Leal Nunes, Carla Maria; de Almeida Lopes, Maria Cândida

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study evaluated the relationship of the lingual nerve with the adjacent anatomical structures of the mandibular third molar region, influencing the dentist to be aware of the variability of these relationships. Material and Methods Samples of 24 human corpse half-heads were selected and divided according with the presence or absence of the mandibular third molars. The lingual nerve (LN) was explored, showing its run from the oblique line until its crossing with the submandibular gland duct. The measurements along the LN and the adjacent anatomical structures were taken at the retromolar, molar and sublingual region with the use of a digital caliper. Results The distance from the LN and the third molar socket, which represents the horizontal distance of the lingual plate to the nerve, on average, was 4.4 mm (SD 2.4 mm). The distance from the LN and the lingual alveolar rim, which represents the vertical relationship between the nerve and the lingual alveolar rim of the third molar socket, on average, was 16.8 mm (SD 5.7 mm). The LN has a varied topography that leaves it very vulnerable during any procedure executed in this region. Conclusions Unless adequate protection of the lingual nerve is acquired by following an adequate surgical technique, the lingual nerve will always be vulnerable to damage during surgical intervention or manipulation in this region. PMID:24478912

  11. An evaluation of torque (moment) on implant/prosthesis with staggered buccal and lingual offset.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, L A; Kruger, B

    1996-06-01

    The supposition that staggered buccal and lingual implant offset is biomechanically advantageous was examined mathematically. The method of evaluation utilized a standard hypothetical geometric configuration from which implants could be staggered buccally and/or lingually in both arches. Torque (moment) values were calculated at the gold screw, abutment screw, and 3.5 mm apical to the head of the implant. Comparisons were made in percentages of change from the hypothetical standard to the buccal and/or lingual implant offset. In the maxillary arch, buccal offset decreased the torque (moment) while lingual offset increased it. If more lingually offset implants were present in the maxillary restoration, the total torque would be greater than if they were all in a straight line. Staggered buccolingual implant alignment often requires abutment reangulation. The resultant line of force produced by occlusal anatomy usually results in buccal inclination in the maxillary arch and lingual inclination in the mandibular arch. As a result, mandibular implant/prostheses are greatly favored over similar maxillary configurations because the mandibular resultant line of force usually passes lingually, closer to the components and supporting bone and considerably less torque is produced. Therefore, the concept of staggered offset for multiple implant-supported prostheses can be utilized on the mandible but is not recommended for the maxilla where maximum uniform buccal implant orientation is advised.

  12. Regimes of oscillation and reed vibrations in lingual organ pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Eric; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2002-05-01

    We compare the sound generation in six lingual organ pipes including two trompette pipes, two oboes pipes, a krummhorn, and a rankett, the latter two of which were described in a previous paper [Cox and Rossing, paper 2aMU8, 142nd ASA meeting]. With the resonator attached, each pipe sounds in distinct regimes of oscillation, separated by discontinuities. The nominal frequencies of the pipes are generally slightly lower than the resonance frequency of the resonator but slightly higher than the natural frequency of the reed. The air mass loading of both the resonator and shallot lowers the reed frequency. Changing the blowing pressure has little effect on the sounding frequency but a modest effect on sound level.

  13. Olanzapine-related repetitive focal seizures with lingual dystonia.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Capasso, Margherita; Frazzini, Valerio; Onofrj, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Olanzapine-related seizures have rarely been reported despite associated proconvulsant risk factors described in the literature: myoclonic status, increased frequency of seizures, tonic-clonic seizures, as well as fatal status epilepticus. We present a psychiatric patient who developed repetitive focal motor seizures and lingual dystonia when olanzapine was added for psychomotor agitation and aggressiveness. Olanzapine was immediately suspended and the seizures progressively disappeared. A control EEG showed no paroxysmal discharges. Olanzapine shares some pharmacological similarities with clozapine, a neuroleptic with a high risk of dose-dependent seizures. This adverse effect should be taken into account, and olanzapine should be used with caution if concomitant circumstances decrease the seizure threshold. [Published with video sequence online].

  14. [Lung infiltrations in Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ciurea-Löchel, A; Ciurea, A; Stey, C; Pestalozzi, B

    2001-08-02

    We report the case of a young patient presenting with cervical lymphadenopathy and interstitial pulmonary infiltrates due to Hodgkin's Disease. Although lung involvement regressed under chemotherapy, we observed new alveolar infiltrates during treatment. Steroid administration after exclusion of an infectious cause was followed by rapid clinical and radiological improvement, indicating the probable presence of pulmonary bleomycine toxicity.

  15. Ring Infiltrate in Staphylococcal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Wallang, Batriti S.; Sharma, Savitri; Sahu, Srikant K.; Mittal, Ruchi

    2013-01-01

    Smear and culture tests of corneal scrapings from a patient with a ring infiltrate confirmed significant growth of a Staphylococcus species resistant to fluoroquinolones. Because of nonresponse to medical management, the patient underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. Staphylococcal infection of the cornea may appear as a ring-like infiltrate that is recalcitrant to medical management. PMID:23100354

  16. Effect of surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation on labial and lingual muscles in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Safi, Mohammed F; Wright-Harp, Wilhelmina; Lucker, Jay R; Payne, Joan C

    2017-01-31

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may have potential as a treatment for muscle weakness as it may improve strength when applied to the orofacial muscles. However, before incorporating this procedure into clinical practice, research is needed to investigate its effects on lingual and facial muscles of speech and mastication. The aim of this study was to determine what effect(s) submental and labial NMES would have on lingual and labial muscle strength in healthy participants. Fourteen healthy adults (27-49 years old) were assigned to two groups (treatment and control). A pretreatment and post-treatment test using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument was used to measure the strength of labial and lingual muscles in both groups. Participants in the treatment group received labial and submental NMES while performing a structured labial, buccal, and lingual exercise program. In contrast, participants in the control group completed the same oral motor exercise program without stimulation.

  17. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the brush-tailed rat kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2014-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surface of an adult brush-tailed rat kangaroo (Bettongia penicillata) by scanning electron microscopy. The filiform and fungiform papillae on the lingual apex and body consisted of a main papilla and secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual apex was cylindrical in shape with a crushed top. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual body had one large and several small processes. The fungiform papillae were round in shape. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papillae had several depressions on its top. The surface of the vallate papillae was rough and the papillae were surrounded by a groove and a pad. Several long conical papillae derived from the posterolateral margin of the tongue where foliate papillae have been shown to be distributed in many other animal species. The long conical papillae were very similar to those of the koala and opossum.

  18. Lingual nerve injury after third molar removal: Unilateral atrophy of fungiform papillae

    PubMed Central

    de-Pablo-Garcia-Cuenca, Alba; Bescós-Atín, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain and sensory changes due to lingual nerve injury are one of the most common alterations that follow surgical removal of third molar. They are usually transient but other less common complications, such as the atrophy of fungiform papillae, have an uncertain prognosis. Case Description: We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who presented a unilateral lingual atrophy of fungiform papillae after third molar extraction accompanied by severe dysesthesia that altered her daily life significantly during the following months and how this complication evolved over time. We conducted a literature review on the different factors that can lead to a lingual nerve injury. Clinical Implications: The clinical evolution of temporary and permanent somatosensitve injuries is an important fact to take into consideration during the postoperative management because it will indicate the lesion prognosis. Key words:Lingual nerve, third molar removal, somatosensitive alteration, papillae atrophy, permanent injury, temporary injury. PMID:24790723

  19. Transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 in a patient with kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Kim, Silvia S; Burns, Jane C

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 that developed after a child received intravenous immunoglobulin and infliximab for acute Kawasaki disease.

  20. Dual ectopic thyroid gland: sonography and scintigraphy of lingual and sublingual thyroid.

    PubMed

    Marković, Vinko; Glavina, Gordana; Eterović, Davor; Punda, Ante; Brdar, Dubravka

    2014-06-01

    Dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid gland is an extraordinarily rare condition. We present 1 patient with subclinical hypothyroidism. The clinical examination revealed that the thyroid gland was not palpable in its usual cervical location, whereas ultrasonography confirmed an empty thyroid bed without any ectopic thyroid tissue in the rest of the neck. The final diagnosis of dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid was established by ultrasound examination through the mouth floor and confirmed by scintigraphy and CT thereafter.

  1. Transient Point Infiltration In The Unsaturated Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buecker-Gittel, M.; Mohrlok, U.

    The risk assessment of leaking sewer pipes gets more and more important due to urban groundwater management and environmental as well as health safety. This requires the quantification and balancing of transport and transformation processes based on the water flow in the unsaturated zone. The water flow from a single sewer leakage could be described as a point infiltration with time varying hydraulic conditions externally and internally. External variations are caused by the discharge in the sewer pipe as well as the state of the leakage itself. Internal variations are the results of microbiological clogging effects associated with the transformation processes. Technical as well as small scale laboratory experiments were conducted in order to investigate the water transport from an transient point infiltration. From the technical scale experiment there was evidence that the water flow takes place under transient conditions when sewage infiltrates into an unsaturated soil. Whereas the small scale experiments investigated the hydraulics of the water transport and the associated so- lute and particle transport in unsaturated soils in detail. The small scale experiment was a two-dimensional representation of such a point infiltration source where the distributed water transport could be measured by several tensiometers in the soil as well as by a selective measurement of the discharge at the bottom of the experimental setup. Several series of experiments were conducted varying the boundary and initial con- ditions in order to derive the important parameters controlling the infiltration of pure water from the point source. The results showed that there is a significant difference between the infiltration rate in the point source and the discharge rate at the bottom, that could be explained by storage processes due to an outflow resistance at the bottom. This effect is overlayn by a decreasing water content decreases over time correlated with a decreasing infiltration

  2. Details of the intralingual topography and morphology of the lingual nerve.

    PubMed

    Rusu, M C; Nimigean, V; Podoleanu, L; Ivaşcu, R V; Niculescu, M C

    2008-09-01

    The lingual nerve supplies the tongue with trigeminal sensory fibers and sensory fibers that originate from the chorda tympani. The aim of this study was to investigate, by dissection, the anatomical features of the lingual nerve at the level of the tongue and to correlate the findings with existing data. Six human adult cadavers dissected bilaterally and 6 specimens of tongue-pharynx-larynx from autopsied adult cadavers were studied. The lingual nerve gives off its terminal branches at the anterior border of the hyoglossus muscle where the anastomotic loops between the lingual and hypoglossal nerves are found. Two morphological types of terminal division of the lingual nerve were seen: a single primary trunk or two primary trunks, a medial one distributed in the middle third of the tongue and a lateral one for the anterior third of the tongue. The primary terminal branches of the lingual nerve were located on the outer surface of the genioglossus muscle, forming a nervous layer over the deep artery of the tongue. The following emerged from the primary trunk(s): thin branches for the ipsilateral mucosa of the ventral surface of the tongue and 4-9 thick secondary trunks, with palisade disposition and translingual courses that followed the outer surface of the genioglossus muscle towards the dorsal mucosa of the ipsilateral part of the tongue, anterior to the circumvallate papillae.

  3. Effect of Ligation Method on Maxillary Arch Force/Moment Systems for a Simulated Lingual Incisor Malalignment

    PubMed Central

    Seru, Surbhi; Romanyk, Dan L; Toogood, Roger W; Carey, Jason P; Major, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of this study were to determine whether there is a difference in the magnitude of forces and moments produced by elastic ligation when compared to passive ligation, and whether these forces and moments propagate differently along the arch for the two ligation types. A lingual incisor malalignment was used in this study. Methods: The Orthodontic Simulator (OSIM) was used to quantify the three-dimensional forces and moments applied on the teeth given a lingually displaced incisor. A repeated measures MANOVA was performed to statistically analyze the data. Results: The interaction factor illustrated convincing evidence that there is a difference in maximum force and moment values for all outcome variables between ligation types considering all tooth positions along the arch. The mean differences for FX and FY between ligation types were found to be clinically significant, with values for elastic ligation consistently higher than passive ligation. Conclusion: It was found that the maximum forces and moments produced by elastic ligation are greater than those produced by passive ligation and that the magnitude of this difference for the mesiodistal and buccolingual forces is clinically relevant. Additionally, it was determined that elastic ligation causes forces and moments to propagate further along the arch than passive ligation for all outcome variables. PMID:25400715

  4. Remediation to improve infiltration into compact soils.

    PubMed

    Olson, Nicholas C; Gulliver, John S; Nieber, John L; Kayhanian, Masoud

    2013-03-15

    Urban development usually involves soil compaction through converting large pervious land into developed land. This change typically increases runoff during runoff events and consequently may add to flooding and additional volume of runoff. The wash off of pollutants may also create numerous water quality and environmental problems for receiving waters. To alleviate this problem many municipalities are considering low impact development. One technique to reduce runoff in an urban area is to improve the soil infiltration. This study is specifically undertaken to investigate tilling and compost addition to improve infiltration rate, and to investigate measurement tools to assess the effectiveness of remediated soil. Soil remediation was performed at three sites in an urban area metropolitan area. Each site was divided into three plots: tilled, tilled with compost addition, and a control plot with no treatment. The infiltration effectiveness within each plot was assessed by measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(sat)) using the modified Philip Dunne (MPD) infiltrometer during pre- and post-treatment. In addition, the use of soil bulk density and soil strength as surrogate parameters for K(sat) was investigated. Results showed that deep tillage was effective at reducing the level of soil strength. Soil strength was approximately half that of the control plot in the first six inches of soil. At two of the sites, tilling was also ineffective at improving the infiltration capacity of the soil. The geometric mean of K(sat) was 0.5-2.3 times that of the control plot, indicating little overall improvement. Compost addition was more effective than tilling by reducing the soil strength and compaction and increasing soil infiltration. The geometric mean of K(sat) on the compost plots was 2.7-5.7 times that of the control plot. No strong correlations were observed before remediation between either soil bulk density or soil strength and K(sat). Simulation results showed

  5. A MODFLOW Infiltration Device Package for Simulating Storm Water Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Jan; Christensen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a MODFLOW Infiltration Device (INFD) Package that can simulate infiltration devices and their two-way interaction with groundwater. The INFD Package relies on a water balance including inflow of storm water, leakage-like seepage through the device faces, overflow, and change in storage. The water balance for the device can be simulated in multiple INFD time steps within a single MODFLOW time step, and infiltration from the device can be routed through the unsaturated zone to the groundwater table. A benchmark test shows that the INFD Package's analytical solution for stage computes exact results for transient behavior. To achieve similar accuracy by the numerical solution of the MODFLOW Surface-Water Routing (SWR1) Process requires many small time steps. Furthermore, the INFD Package includes an improved representation of flow through the INFD sides that results in lower infiltration rates than simulated by SWR1. The INFD Package is also demonstrated in a transient simulation of a hypothetical catchment where two devices interact differently with groundwater. This simulation demonstrates that device and groundwater interaction depends on the thickness of the unsaturated zone because a shallow groundwater table (a likely result from storm water infiltration itself) may occupy retention volume, whereas a thick unsaturated zone may cause a phase shift and a change of amplitude in groundwater table response to a change of infiltration. We thus find that the INFD Package accommodates the simulation of infiltration devices and groundwater in an integrated manner on small as well as large spatial and temporal scales.

  6. Simulation of fluid, heat transport to estimate desert stream infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, J.T.; Izbicki, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In semiarid regions, the contribution of infiltration from intermittent streamflow to ground water recharge may be quantified by comparing simulations of fluid and heat transport beneath stream channels to observed ground temperatures. In addition to quantifying natural recharge, streamflow infiltration estimates provide a means to characterize the physical properties of stream channel sediments and to identify suitable locations for artificial recharge sites. Rates of winter streamflow infiltration along stream channels are estimated based on the cooling effect of infiltrated water on streambed sediments, combined with the simulation of two-dimensional fluid and heat transport using the computer program VS2DH. The cooling effect of ground water is determined by measuring ground temperatures at regular intervals beneath stream channels and nearby channel banks in order to calculate temperature-depth profiles. Additional data inputs included the physical, hydraulic, and thermal properties of unsaturated alluvium, and monthly ground temperatures measurements over an annual cycle. Observed temperatures and simulation results can provide estimates of the minimum threshold for deep infiltration, the variability of infiltration along stream channels, and also the frequency of infiltration events.

  7. Lingual nerve lesion during ranula surgical treatment: case report.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, F; Battista, V; Marelli, S; Valassina, D; Colombo, V; Bardazzi, A; Tarabbia, F; Colletti, G; Rabbiosi, D; Autelitano, L

    2010-10-01

    Iatrogenic lingual nerve (LN) injuries are quite common in oral surgery both in maxillo-facial surgery and in oral surgery. LN runs superficially into the lateral mouth floor just beneath the mucous layer and this position enhances damage frequency. This article lists the different aetiologies of iatrogenic LN injuries and it almost focuses on lesions due to surgical treatment of ranulas. In the case report a LN lesion due to oral ranula excision is discussed; the patient experienced anaesthesia and hyperpatia in the corrisponded tongue side. It was treated with a microneurosugical anastomosis of LN, after amputation neuroma excision. The partial and definitive recovery of perception happened in six months and was deemed satisfying with 70% of functionality restored (results compared with the functionality of the contralateral side). An algorithm for diagnosis and therapy indication for iatrogenic injuries to nerves is also proposed. In case of surgical treatment, funcitonal recovery manifests after 4-6 month; a functional recovery of 70% of total nerve function is possible. The variable that most affects nerve functional recovery is surgical treatment timing; it must be performed as soon as possible.

  8. Use of CO2 laser in lingual and labial frenectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorotti, Renata C.; Bellini, Bruno S.; Cassitas, Nilceu P.; Baldin, Diva H. Z.; Nicola, Ester M. D.

    2000-03-01

    Ankiloglossia or frenum lingual alteration leads to important tongue dysfunction, which, besides discomfort and pain during function, is generally responsible for the difficulty to express specific phonemes. In other cases, a heavy muscular abnormal attachment of labial frenum can promote clinical changes. In such case, an eventual orthodontic therapy is indicated and aesthetic alteration is observed. In both cases, surgical removal is indicated. The surgery, for prevention purposes, must be done as soon as possible, but considering that the majority of patients are young (5 - 14 years old), difficulties during surgery are expected to occur. Correction of speech or orthodontic dysfunction in advanced ages is much more complex and difficult than in childhood. In the present work we demonstrate that the use of CO2 lasers in these cases are advantageous and simple. The laser energy causes the tissue of the frenum to open in the classic shape with no bleeding and no need for suture, reducing the risk of cross- contamination and of postoperative infection. Scarring and other complications are also minimized. A CO2 laser (continuous, 8 W, 10.6 micrometers) was used assisted with local anesthesia. The major advantage of laser is the possibility of its application in early ages, preventing further problems.

  9. Reed vibration in lingual organ pipes without the resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, András; Angster, Judit; Pitsch, Stephan; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2003-02-01

    Vibrations of plucked and blown reeds of lingual organ pipes without the resonators have been investigated. Three rather surprising phenomena are observed: the frequency of the reed plucked by hand is shifted upwards for large-amplitude plucking, the blown frequency is significantly higher than the plucked one, and peaks halfway between the harmonics of the fundamental frequency appear in the spectrum of the reed velocity. The dependence of the plucked frequency on the length of the reed reveals that the vibrating length at small vibrations is 3 mm shorter than the apparent free length. The frequency shift for large-amplitude plucking is explained by the periodic change of the vibrating length during the oscillation. Reed vibrations of the blown pipe can be described by a physical model based on the assumption of air flow between the reed and the shallot. Aerodynamic effects may generate and sustain the oscillation of the reed without acoustic feedback. The appearance of subharmonics is explained by taking into account the periodic modulation of the stress in the reed material by the sound field. Therefore, a parametric instability appears in the differential equation of vibration, leading to the appearance of subharmonics.

  10. Towards cross-lingual alerting for bursty epidemic events

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Online news reports are increasingly becoming a source for event-based early warning systems that detect natural disasters. Harnessing the massive volume of information available from multilingual newswire presents as many challanges as opportunities due to the patterns of reporting complex spatio-temporal events. Results In this article we study the problem of utilising correlated event reports across languages. We track the evolution of 16 disease outbreaks using 5 temporal aberration detection algorithms on text-mined events classified according to disease and outbreak country. Using ProMED reports as a silver standard, comparative analysis of news data for 13 languages over a 129 day trial period showed improved sensitivity, F1 and timeliness across most models using cross-lingual events. We report a detailed case study analysis for Cholera in Angola 2010 which highlights the challenges faced in correlating news events with the silver standard. Conclusions The results show that automated health surveillance using multilingual text mining has the potential to turn low value news into high value alerts if informed choices are used to govern the selection of models and data sources. An implementation of the C2 alerting algorithm using multilingual news is available at the BioCaster portal http://born.nii.ac.jp/?page=globalroundup. PMID:22166371

  11. [Disphagia caused by a lingual thyroid: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Rocha-Ruiz, Ana; Beltrán, Constanza; Harris, Paul R; Orellana, Pilar; García, Cristián; Martínez-Aguayo, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    We report an 11 year-old boy who presented with difficulty in swallowing without symptoms of hypothyroidism. The physical examination revealed a mass at the base of the tongue. The thyroid hormone profile showed a primary hypothyroidism (a serum TSH of 10.8 IU/mL with normal-low thyroxin of 6.0 microg/dL and low triiodothyronine of 57.8 ng/dL). Antithyroid antibodies were negative. The fiberoptic endoscopy showed a reddish mass, without evidence of haemorrhage or ulceration, confirmed as a well circumscribed, hypodense mass in the base of the tongue by computed tomography of the oropharynx and neck. Tc-99-pertechnetate scanning showed an abnormal area of uptake at the base of the tongue and no uptake in the normal thyroid location, concordant with an ectopic lingual thyroid gland. Levothyroxine in a suppressive dose was started that resulted in a reduction of the size of the mass and disappearance of dysphagia.

  12. Positional targets for lingual consonants defined using electromagnetic articulography.

    PubMed

    Yunusova, Yana; Rosenthal, Jeffrey S; Rudy, Krista; Baljko, Melanie; Daskalogiannakis, John

    2012-08-01

    The study examined the positional targets for lingual consonants defined using a point-parameterized approach with Wave (NDI, Waterloo, ON, Canada). The overall goal was to determine which consonants had unique tongue positions with respect to other consonants. Nineteen talkers repeated vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) syllables that included consonants /t, d, s, z, , k, g/ in symmetrical vowel contexts /i, u, a/, embedded in a carrier phrase. Target regions for each consonant, characterized in terms of x,y,z tongue positions at the point of maximum tongue elevation, were extracted. Distances and overlaps were computed between all consonant pairs and compared to the distances and overlaps of their contextual targets. Cognates and postalveolar homorganics were found to share the location of their target regions. On average, alveolar stops showed distinctively different target regions than alveolar fricatives, which in turn showed different target region locations than the postalveolar consonants. Across talker variability in target locations was partially explained by differences in habitual speaking rate and hard palate characteristics.

  13. Vocal-tract filtering by lingual articulation in a parrot.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Gabriël J L; Nelson, Brian S; Suthers, Roderick A

    2004-09-07

    Human speech and bird vocalization are complex communicative behaviors with notable similarities in development and underlying mechanisms. However, there is an important difference between humans and birds in the way vocal complexity is generally produced. Human speech originates from independent modulatory actions of a sound source, e.g., the vibrating vocal folds, and an acoustic filter, formed by the resonances of the vocal tract (formants). Modulation in bird vocalization, in contrast, is thought to originate predominantly from the sound source, whereas the role of the resonance filter is only subsidiary in emphasizing the complex time-frequency patterns of the source (e.g., but see ). However, it has been suggested that, analogous to human speech production, tongue movements observed in parrot vocalizations modulate formant characteristics independently from the vocal source. As yet, direct evidence of such a causal relationship is lacking. In five Monk parakeets, Myiopsitta monachus, we replaced the vocal source, the syrinx, with a small speaker that generated a broad-band sound, and we measured the effects of tongue placement on the sound emitted from the beak. The results show that tongue movements cause significant frequency changes in two formants and cause amplitude changes in all four formants present between 0.5 and 10 kHz. We suggest that lingual articulation may thus in part explain the well-known ability of parrots to mimic human speech, and, even more intriguingly, may also underlie a speech-like formant system in natural parrot vocalizations.

  14. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  15. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-06-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  16. Morphology of the lingual surface of South American fur seal (Arctocephalus australis) and sea lion (Otaria flavescens).

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Serkan; Villar Arias, Silvia; Pérez, William

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to describe the morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae in two species of Otariidae family by stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. We used tongues of two South American Otariidae species. The tongues were elongated and terminated in bifid apex and there was no median sulcus on the dorsal lingual surface. The most numerous type of lingual papilla was filiform in the South American fur seal (SASL) and entire dorsal lingual surface was covered by these filiform papillae but the dorsal surface of the tongue of the South American sea lion was covered by numerous polygonal projections, which were different in size. Fungiform papillae were detected in only SASL and they randomly distributed on the lingual apex and body, and some fungiform papillae were collected into twosome or threesome groups on the posterior part of the lingual body. Circumvallate papilla was found in the center of the lingual radix of South American sea lion. Thread-like conical papillae were common for both species and they located on the lingual radix. We determined that lingual surface morphology was completely different in each species, although they were members of the same family, Otariidae.

  17. Light and scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the common hippopotamus, Hippopotamus amphibius amphibius.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ken; Hama, Natsuki; Shindo, Junji; Kobayashi, Kan; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2009-07-01

    We observed the three-dimensional structures of the external surface and connective tissue cores CTCs, after exfoliation of the epithelium of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, and foliate papillae) of the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius amphibius) using scanning electron microscopy and conventional light microscopy. Following unique features were found; typical vallate papillae with a circumferential furrow were not observable. Instead, numerous large fungiform papillae were rather densely distributed on the posterior of the lingual prominence. Taste buds were observable only on the dorsal epithelium. Serous lingual gland was not seen in the lamina propria; however, mucous-rich mixed lingual glands were found and in a few of orifices were seen on the large fungiform tops. Lingual prominence was diminished their width. Rather long and slender conical papillae were distributed on the lingual prominence and were similar to nonruminant herbivore, that is donkey. Beside this narrow lingual prominence, lateral slopes were situated with numerous short spine-like protrusions. After removal of the epithelium, CTCs of lateral slopes exhibited attenuated flower bud structures. Large-conical papillae were situated on the root of the tongue. These large conical papillae were not seen among ruminants and seen on the lingual root of omnivores and carnivores. It implies that lingual structure of common hippopotamus possessed mixed characteristics between Perissodactyls, Ruminantia, and nonherbivores such as Suiformes because of their unique evolutionally taxonomic position. Moreover, adaptation for soft grass diet and associating easier mastication may be also affecting these mixed morphological features of the tongue.

  18. A comparative evaluation of 4% articaine and 2% lidocaine in mandibular buccal infiltration anesthesia: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Maruthingal, Sunith; Mohan, Dennis; Maroli, Ramesh Kumar; Alahmari, Ali; Alqahtani, Ahmed; Alsadoon, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare 4% articaine and 2% lidocaine local anesthetics in achieving pulpal anesthesia of the lower first permanent molar teeth objectively, and to assess and compare lip and lingual mucosa numbness subjectively. Materials and Methods: All subjects received 1.7 ml of any one anesthetic in the mucobuccal fold adjacent to mandibular first molar teeth; the same individuals received the second infiltration at least 1 week after the first. Later, comparisons for pulpal anesthesia, lip and lingual mucosa numbness between these two anesthetics solutions were made. Results: Articaine showed significant results with P = 0.006 in achieving pulpal anesthesia objectively, when compared with lidocaine. Articaine also showed very high significant results subjectively with P = 0.0006 in achieving lip numbness, when compared with lidocaine. But the results in achieving lingual mucosa numbness with articaine subjectively was not significant with P = 0.01, when compared with lidocaine. Conclusion: Endodontic and operative treatments are one of the most common oral non-surgical procedures done under local anesthesia. The diversity of anesthetic substances currently available on the market requires dental professionals to assess the drug both by its pharmacokinetic and also by its clinical characteristics during dental treatments. Our study used 4% articaine, which is available in the market, for comparison with 2% lidocaine. Further studies are required to use an equal concentration of solutions to achieve more accurate results. PMID:26759799

  19. LNAPL Removal from Unsaturated Porous Media using Surfactant Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2012-11-19

    A series of unsaturated column experiments was performed to evaluate light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) fate and removal during surfactant solution infiltration. Surfactant-LNAPL phase behavior tests were conducted to optimize the remedial solutions. Packed sand and site sediment columns were first processed to establish representative LNAPL smear zone under unsaturated conditions. Infiltration of low-concentration surfactant was then applied in a stepwise flush mode, with 0.3 column pore volume (PV) of solution in each flush. The influence of infiltrated surfactant solution volume and pH on LNAPL removal was assessed. A LNAPL bank was observed at the very front of the first surfactant infiltration in each column, indicating that a very low surfactant concentration is needed to reduce the LNAPL-water interfacial tension sufficiently enough to mobilize trapped LNAPL under unsaturated conditions. More LNAPL was recovered as additional steps of surfactant infiltration were applied. Up to 99% LNAPL was removed after six infiltration steps, with less than 2.0 PV of total surfactant solution application, suggesting surfactant infiltration may be an effective method for vadose zone LNAPL remediation. The influence of pH tested in this study (3.99~10.85) was insignificant because the buffering capacity of the sediment kept the pH in the column higher than the zero point charge, pHzpc, of the sediment and therefore the difference between surfactant sorption was negligible.

  20. Hereditary Amyloidosis with Recurrent Lung Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Revelo, Alberto E.; Magaspi, Crischelle; Maguire, George; Aronow, Wilbert S.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 51 Final Diagnosis: Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy with lung involvement Symptoms: Cough • dyspnea • lethargy Medication: Diflunisal Clinical Procedure: Fiberoptic bronchoscopy with trans-bronchial biopsy Specialty: Pulmonary Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or patholog Background: Amyloidosis is a protein conformational disorder characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils in extracellular tissue. Lung involvement is most commonly caused by secondary AL amyloidosis. The familial autosomal-dominant senile transthyretin (ATTR) disease manifests mainly as polyneuropathy and restrictive cardiomyopathy denoting the name familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP). Rarely, this form manifests with clinical and radiologically relevant respiratory tract symptoms and lung involvement. Case Report: A 51-year-old male former smoker presented with progressive lower-extremity weakness of several months’ duration. He was ultimately diagnosed with chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Subsequently, he was admitted with heart failure symptoms and pulmonary infiltrates and his echocardiogram showed a ‘myocardial speckled pattern’, prompting an endomyocardial biopsy, which showed transthyretin amyloid deposition. He was started on diflunisal. Additionally, serial radiographic imaging of his chest over 3 different admissions for cough, dyspnea, hypoxemia, and lethargy demonstrated recurrent pulmonary infiltrates. A fiberoptic bronchoscopy with trans-bronchial biopsies revealed amyloid deposition in the lung tissue. Conclusions: The clinical presentation of recurrent or persistent pulmonary symptoms and fleeting infiltrates on imaging in a patient with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy is not common; when present, it should raise the suspicion of respiratory tract involvement. PMID:27872470

  1. Lingual CD36 and nutritional status differentially regulate fat preference in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Douglas Braymer, H; Zachary, Hannah; Schreiber, Allyson L; Primeaux, Stefany D

    2017-03-14

    Lingual fatty acid receptors (i.e. CD36) mediate the orosensory perception of fat/fatty acids and may contribute to the susceptibility to develop obesity. The current study tested the hypothesis that fat/fatty acid preference in obesity-prone (OP, Osborne-Mendel) and obesity-resistant (OR, S5B/Pl) rats is mediated by nutritional status and lingual CD36. To determine if nutritional status affected linoleic acid (LA) preference in OP and OR rats, rats were either fasted overnight or fed a high fat diet (60% kcal from fat). In OR rats, fasting increased the preference for higher concentrations of LA (1.0%), while consumption of a high fat diet decreased LA preference. In OP rats, fasting increased the preference for lower concentrations of LA (0.25%), however high fat diet consumption did not alter LA preference. To determine if lingual CD36 mediated the effects of an overnight fast on LA preference, the expression of lingual CD36 mRNA was assessed and the effect of lingual application of CD36 siRNA on LA preference was determined. Fasting increased lingual CD36 mRNA expression in OR rats, but failed to alter lingual CD36 mRNA in OP rats. Following an overnight fast, application of lingual CD36 siRNA led to a decrease in LA preference in OR, but not OP rats. Lingual application of CD36 siRNA was also used to determine if lingual CD36 mediated the intake and preference for a high fat diet in OP and OR rats. CD36 siRNA decreased the preference and intake of high fat diet in OR rats, but not OP rats. The results from this study suggest that the dysregulation of lingual CD36 in OP rats is a potential factor leading to increased fat intake and fat preference and an enhanced susceptibility to develop obesity.

  2. Modeling the abnormally slow infiltration rate in mesoporous films.

    PubMed

    Berli, Claudio L A; Mercuri, Magalí; Bellino, Martín G

    2017-01-18

    Mesoporous films have been shown to exhibit striking behaviors in capillary-driven infiltration experiments. The process has been shown to follow classical Lucas-Washburn dynamics, but the effective pore radius has been calculated from hydrodynamic resistance considerations to be orders of magnitude lower than measured pore dimensions. In addition, the infiltration rate has been observed to decrease with increasing pore diameter, in contrast to the expected trend for capillary-like pores. Here, we present a simple model accounting for the mechanism behind these anomalous effects. We found the infiltration rate to be inversely proportional to the cubed ratio of pore to neck size. This physical scaling correctly modeled both the magnitude of the infiltration rate and its variation with pore diameters, for a wide range of experimental data. The model established a connection between capillary filling dynamics and nanoscale pore structure, which is of practical interest for the design and characterization of mesoporous films.

  3. Cephalometric appraisal of patients treated with fixed lingual orthodontic appliances: historic review and analysis of cases.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, D T; Kuftinec, M M

    1989-06-01

    In the first part of this article, a retrospective look was taken of evolvement and progression in design of the lingual fixed orthodontic appliance. The second part is a retrospective study of treated lingual cases. By the use of standardized cephalometric radiographs, selected treatment parameters were analyzed:--namely, bite opening, changes in mandibular position, inclination, torque and intrusion of incisors, and soft-tissue effects. For the clinician who uses this treatment modality, the most significant effects are the bite opening, intrusion of the mandibular incisors (particularly in extraction cases), and limited reduction of lower lip protrusion. The mandibular plane angle and torque and inclination of incisors did not follow a consistent and predictable pattern. On the basis of the study's findings, it is suggested that lingual fixed appliance therapy is a useful supplement to our treatment modalities; good results are both realistic and possible.

  4. Lingual and fusiform gyri in visual processing: a clinico-pathologic study of superior altitudinal hemianopia.

    PubMed Central

    Bogousslavsky, J; Miklossy, J; Deruaz, J P; Assal, G; Regli, F

    1987-01-01

    A macular-sparing superior altitudinal hemianopia with no visuo-psychic disturbance, except impaired visual learning, was associated with bilateral ischaemic necrosis of the lingual gyrus and only partial involvement of the fusiform gyrus on the left side. It is suggested that bilateral destruction of the lingual gyrus alone is not sufficient to affect complex visual processing. The fusiform gyrus probably has a critical role in colour integration, visuo-spatial processing, facial recognition and corresponding visual imagery. Involvement of the occipitotemporal projection system deep to the lingual gyri probably explained visual memory dysfunction, by a visuo-limbic disconnection. Impaired verbal memory may have been due to posterior involvement of the parahippocampal gyrus and underlying white matter, which may have disconnected the intact speech areas from the left medial temporal structures. Images PMID:3585386

  5. Fine structure of bat deep posterior lingual glands (von Ebner's)

    PubMed

    Azzali, G; Gatti, R; Bucci, G; Orlandini, G

    1989-10-01

    We studied the morphology and ultrastructure of the bat (Pipistrellus k.k. and Rhinolophus f.e.) deep posterior lingual glands (Ebner's glands) during hibernation, summer and after stimulation with pilocarpine. Ebner's glands are formed by serous tubulo-alveolar adenomeres and by an excretory system organized in intercalated ducts, long excretory ducts and a main excretory duct. The latter opens in the vallum which surrounds the circumvallate papillae and in the groove of the foliate papillae. The secretory cells, which lack basal folds, show abundant and dense granules (PAS+, Alcian blue -), microvilli (scarce during hibernation), a Golgi apparatus (well developed during summer and after stimulation with pilocarpine), a large nucleus and RER cisternae stacked at the basal pole. Centrioles, lipid droplets, heterogeneous bodies (in content and density, probably lipofuscin bodies), lysosomal multivesicular bodies and large, dense granules with a microcrystalline structure were also encountered. The lateral membranes of adjacent cells are joined by desmosomes; their interdigitations are neither numerous nor prominent during summer. Microfilaments, often gathered in small bundles, lie in the lateral, peripheral cytoplasm without any relation with desmosomes. In summer and particularly after stimulation with pilocarpine, the apical pole of the secretory cells is characterized by many long microvilli, pedunculated hyaloplasmic protrusions and secretory granules. During hibernation the lumen is filled with secretory material. Myoepithelial cells are arranged among secretory cells or between them and the basal lamina. The short intercalated ducts show similarities with the analogous ducts of the parotid gland. Striated ducts are absent. Excretory ducts are endowed with: a) an inner layer of cuboidal cells characterized by poorly developed cytoplasmic organelles, rare dense granules and a few small microvilli; b) an outer layer of basal cells lying on the basal lamina

  6. [Effectiveness of the GlideScope video laryngoscope in a case of unexpected difficult airway due to lingual tonsil hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Cruz, P; Alarcón, L; Del Castillo, T; Cabrerizo, P; Díaz, S

    2015-05-01

    Lingual tonsil hypertrophy can cause varying degrees of airway obstruction and is considered a risk factor for difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation. We report a case of unexpected difficult airway in a patient with unknown lingual tonsil hypertrophy that was solved with the use of the GlideScope video laryngoscope.

  7. Predicting Differential Item Functioning in Cross-Lingual Testing: The Case of a High Stakes Test in the Kyrgyz Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Todd W.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-lingual tests are assessment instruments created in one language and adapted for use with another language group. Practitioners and researchers use cross-lingual tests for various descriptive, analytical and selection purposes both in comparative studies across nations and within countries marked by linguistic diversity (Hambleton, 2005).…

  8. Morphofunctional structure of the lingual papillae in three species of South American Camelids: Alpaca, guanaco, and llama.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Serkan; Villar Arias, Silvia; Pérez, William

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the anatomical and functional characteristics of the lingual papilla among the Camelidae. For this purpose, tongues of alpaca, guanaco, and llama were used. Numerous long and thin filiform papillae were located in the median groove and none were detected on the rest of the dorsal surface of the lingual apex in alpaca. Secondary papillae originated from the base of some filiform papillae on the ventral surface of alpaca tongue. The bases of some filiform papillae of the lateral surface of the lingual apex were inserted into conspicuous grooves in guanaco and tips of filiform papillae on the dorsal surface of the lingual body were ended by bifurcated apex. On the dorsal surface of the lingual apex of llama, there were no filiform papillae but there were numerous filiform papillae on both the lateral margins of the ventral surface of the lingual apex. Fungiform papillae were distributed randomly on dorsal lingual surface and ventral margins of the tongues of all camelid species. Lenticular papillae were located on the lingual torus and varied in size and topographical distribution for each species. Circumvallate papillae had irregular surfaces in llama and alpaca, and smooth surface in guanaco. In conclusion, llama and alpaca tongues were more similar to each other, and tongues of all camelid species displayed more similarities to those of Bactrian and dromedary camels in comparison with other herbivores and ruminants.

  9. Intraoral Neurinoma of the Lingual Nerve: An Uncommon Tumor in Floor of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Kumar kuppusamy, Santhosh; Ramkumar, Subramaniyam; Narasimhan, Malathi; Azariah Dhiravia Sargunam, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Neurinoma or schwannoma is an uncommon benign tumor that arises primarily from the nerve sheath of Schwann cells. About 25% has been reported in head and neck region extracranially, but only 1% in the intraoral origin. Intraorally, the tongue is the most common site followed by the palate, floor of the mouth, lips and buccal mucosa. In review of literature, intraoral schwannoma of the lingual nerve origin has not been reported frequently. So, we present a case of intraoral neurinoma of the lingual nerve. PMID:24639903

  10. Guided Tissue Regeneration Involving Piercing-Induced Lingual Recession: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Parra, Carlos; Jeong, Y Natalie; Hawley, Charles E

    Recession on the lingual aspect of mandibular incisors may occur in patients with history of tongue piercing and other factitious traumatic habits. Treatment of these areas is challenging due to the site-specific anatomical features of the region. This case report presents a novel approach for a specific type of mandibular lingual defect caused by tongue piercing. A nonresorbable titanium-reinforced barrier membrane combined with an allograft and enamel matrix derivatives was used to promote regeneration of periodontal attachment. Reentry surgery for membrane removal was performed at 8 weeks. The time from initial surgery to final follow-up was 18 months.

  11. Effect of lingual plates on generating intra-oral pressure during swallowing: an experimental study in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although palatal augmentation prostheses (PAPs) can improve dysphagia, their application is compromised in the absence of maxillary abutment teeth. Experimental lingual plates (ELPs) used for raising the tongue may be employed as alternative to PAPs. Methods Influence of different ELP designs, plateau (P–type) and drop-shaped (D–type), on the intra–oral pressure during swallowing were tested. Eleven healthy dentate volunteers, with a mean age of 35.5±10.5 years, participated in this study. Tongue pressure on the hard palate was measured using an ultra-thin sensor sheet with five measuring points, whilst performing dry, 5–ml and 15–ml water swallows, with and without the ELPs in situ. Additional pressure sensors were installed in the lingual aspects of the ELPs, and on the vestibular aspect of the lower molars for measuring sublingual and oral vestibule pressures, respectively. Each measurement was recorded thrice. A repeated measures ANOVA was employed to verify differences in duration, maximal magnitude and integrated value for the different experimental situations. Tukey’s post hoc test was performed for comparison testing. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results The sequence of tongue–palate contact on the median line of the hard palate without ELPs was maintained, except for the 15 ml P–type swallow. Tongue pressure started earlier with the D–type but reached its peak nearly at the same time as without ELPs. The peak magnitude and cumulative tongue pressure against the hard palate decreased by wearing ELPs (p<0.05), but was inconsistent between the two types of ELPs and for the different swallowing volumes. Both, maximum and cumulative vestibular pressures were mostly similar or larger with P–type than that with D–type. Conclusion D-type and P-type ELPs seem to have the inverse effect of PAPs on the palatal tongue pressure during swallowing. These first counterintuitive findings do not yet justify rejecting the

  12. Improving Detection of IV Infiltrates in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, MD, Colleen; Langer, Melissa; Burke, Susan; El Metwally, MD, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Neonates and infants in the neonatal intensive care unit suffer significant morbidity when intravenous (IV) catheters infiltrate. The underreporting of adverse events through hospital voluntary reporting systems, such as ours, can complicate the monitoring of low incidence events, like IV infiltrates. Based on severe cases of IV infiltrates observed in our neonatal intensive care unit, we attempted to improve the detection of all infiltrates and reduce the incidence of Stage 4 infiltrates. We developed, and initiated the use of, an evidence-based guideline for the improved surveillance, prevention, and management of IV infiltrates, with corresponding educational interventions for faculty and staff. We instituted the use of a checklist for compliance with guidelines, and as a mechanism of surveillance. The baseline incidence rate of IV infiltrates, determined by the voluntary reporting system, was 5 per 1000 line days. Following initiation of the guidelines and checklist, the IV infiltrate rate increased to 9 per 1000 line days. In most months, the detection of IV infiltrates was improved by use of the checklist. During the post-intervention period the rate of Stage 4 infiltrates, as measured by usage of nitroglycerin ointment, was significantly reduced. In conclusion, the detection of IV infiltrates was improved following our quality improvement interventions. Further, use of an evidence-based guideline for managing infiltrates may reduce the most severe infiltrate injuries. PMID:26734388

  13. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION POTENTIAL FROM STORMWATER INFILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior to urbanization, ground water recharge resulted from infiltration of precipitation through pervious surfaces, including grasslands and woods. This infiltration water was relatively uncontaminated. With urbanization, the permeable soil surface area through which recharge by...

  14. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration... gain due to infiltration as much as possible without impinging on health and comfort and within...

  15. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration... gain due to infiltration as much as possible without impinging on health and comfort and within...

  16. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration... gain due to infiltration as much as possible without impinging on health and comfort and within...

  17. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration... gain due to infiltration as much as possible without impinging on health and comfort and within...

  18. Developing Bi-Lingual Skills for Translation through an Online Multimedia-Supported Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eser, Oktay; Saltan, Fatih; Ersanli, Ceylan Yangin; Erdem, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Recent research shows that bi-lingual competence is one of the necessary skills that a translator needs in order to translate (PACTE, 2003). Apart from the mother tongue, a translator must have a command of other working languages. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the online multimedia-supported learning environment concerning…

  19. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin “Versacryl.” Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. Results: The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P < 0.05). In both types of mandibular dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges in the construction of mandibular complete dentures improved denture retention. PMID:26539387

  20. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis: A case with accompanying short lingual frenulum

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ehsan; Rabbani, Masoud; Jafarpishe, Mohammad Saleh; Nazem, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare cause of nasal obstruction. We presented a case of CNPAS with accompanying short lingual frenulum. Surgical dilatation without osteotomy was used, and the infant had normal growth and development. In these cases, the less invasive surgical methods can be effective. PMID:27656604

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopic Structure of the Lingual Papillae of the Common Opossum (Didelphis marsupialis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigenori; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2005-08-01

    The mammalian tongue has evolved for specialized functions in different species. The structure of its papillae tells about the animal's diet, habit, and taxonomy. The opossum has four kinds of lingual papillae (filiform, conical, fungiform, vallate). Scanning electron microscopy of the external features, connective tissue cores, and corrosion casts of the microvasculature show the filiform papillae have a spearhead-like main process and spiny accessory processes around the apical part of the main process. The shape and number of both processes depend on their position on the tongue. On the apex, the main processes have shovel-like capillary networks and the accessory processes have small conical networks. On the lingual radix, the processes have small capillary loops. In the patch region, conical papillae have capillaries arranged as a full sail curving posteriorly. The fungiform papillae are scattered among the filiform papillae and have capillary baskets beneath each taste bud. Giant fungiform papillae on the tongue tip are three to four times larger than the ones on the lingual body. Capillaries of giant papillae form a fan-shaped network. The opossum has three vallate papillae arranged in a triangle. Their tops have secondary capillary loops but not their lateral surfaces. Mucosal folds on the posterolateral border have irregular, fingerlike projections with cylindrical capillary networks. These findings and the structure of the rest of the masticatory apparatus suggest the lingual papillae of opossum have kept their ancestral carnivorous features but also developed the herbivore characteristics of other marsupials.

  2. Treatment of mandibular anterior crowding with incisor extraction using lingual orthodontics: a case report.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Divya; Shetty, Sandeep; Mascarenhas, Rohan; Husain, Akhter

    2010-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman presented with a labially displaced mandibular right central incisor with severe attrition. Her maxillary dentition was well-aligned, and she had a straight profile. The respective central incisor was extracted. Subsequently, all teeth were aligned and the extraction space was closed with 2D lingual brackets. The result was esthetically pleasing.

  3. Cognitive Learning Styles in "Traditional" Audio-Lingual and Suggestopedic Language Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayuk, Milla

    The need for cognitive style mapping and student grouping in order to enhance learning and retention in foreign language instruction is examined. The four components of classical audio-lingual language instruction, listening, speaking, reading, and writing, are discussed. Different learning modalities are considered, including visual, auditory,…

  4. Bi-Lingual Newspaper as an Expression of a Fake Multicultural Educational Policy in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratz, Lea; Reingold, Roni; Abuhatzira, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    The current paper analyzes a unique educational text that may be used to follow the educational policy of the State of Israel towards the community of Jewish immigrants from Ethiopia. The text which was analyzed was a bi-lingual newspaper called "Nugget News" which is published under the sponsorship of the Israeli Ministry of Education,…

  5. Quantitative Lingual, Pharyngeal and Laryngeal Ultrasonography in Swallowing Research: A Technical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chi-Fishman, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    Because of its distinct advantage in radiation-free soft tissue imaging, ultrasonography has been widely used to study lingual, pharyngeal, hyoid, laryngeal, and even esophageal action during swallowing in individuals of all ages. Qualitative ultrasonographic observations have made considerable contributions to our understanding of deglutition.…

  6. Kinematic Investigation of Lingual Movement in Words of Increasing Length in Acquired Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle-Meyer, Carly J.; Goozee, Justine V.; Murdoch, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    The current study aimed to use electromagnetic articulography (EMA) to investigate the effect of increasing word length on lingual kinematics in acquired apraxia of speech (AOS). Tongue-tip and tongue-back movement was recorded for five speakers with AOS and a concomitant aphasia (mean age = 53.6 years; SD = 12.60) during target consonant…

  7. The use of the CO2 laser for lingual frenectomy and excisional biopsy.

    PubMed

    Bullock, N

    1995-11-01

    With the availability of CO2 laser technology, surgical cases that were previously referred out of the general dental practice to specialists can now be treated by the general dentist, with less difficulty than is commonly associated with traditional surgical procedures. This article will demonstrate two cases using the CO2 laser: lingual frenectomy and excisional biopsy.

  8. Frenectomy with anterior lingual sulcoplasty for an implant-supported overdenture: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Perri de Carvalho, Paulo Sergio; Janjacomo, Luiz Antonio; Ponzoni, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    This clinical report describes the deepening of a patient's anterior mandibular lingual sulcus in combination with frenectomy and the use of an acrylic resin guiding device fixed to an osseointegrated dental implant to maintain the patency of the new sulcular depth.

  9. Multiple lingual cusps trait on mandibular premolars and hypoconulid reduction trait on mandibular first molar in living Jordanian population. Intra- and inter-trait interactions.

    PubMed

    Khraisat, Ameen; Alsoleihat, Firas; Subramani, Karthikeyan; Al-Rabab'ah, Mohammad A; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Abu-Tahun, Ibrahim

    2013-09-01

    The objective was to determine the expression and fluctuating asymmetry of two dental morphological traits in the living Jordanians: The lingual cusp number on the lower premolars (LP1 and LP2) and the hypoconulid (distal cusp) reduction on the lower first molar (LM1). In addition, both intra- trait and inter- trait interactions were analyzed. Three hundred school children (15.5 +/- 0.4 years) were involved. Impressions for the mandibular dental arches were taken, and dental casts were reproduced. The above-mentioned traits were observed. Paired sample t test and nonparametric correlation analysis were used for data analysis. Three-cusped LP1 was found in 11.40 % of the examined students, while the two-cusped LP1 was found in 88.60%. In comparison, the Three-cusped LP2 was found in 61.40% while the two-cusped LP2 was found in 38.60% of the observed subjects. The frequencies of the 4-cusped and 5-cusped LM1 were found to be 8.65% and 91.35%, respectively. Nonparametric correlation analysis revealed positive and statistically significant association between the expression of two lingual cusps on LP1 and on LP2 in both genders (p < 0.01), while there was no significant correlation between expression of two lingual cusps on either LP1 or LP2 and the hypoconulid loss on LM1 in both genders (p > 0.05). Bilateralism was highly significant in the tested traits in both genders (p < 0.001). This finding might be a sign of relatively low environmental stresses experienced by the living Jordanians and/or great ability of its individuals to buffer the adverse effects of such stresses on dental development. This study is a useful addition to the existing literature in that it examines a previously poorly characterized population and assists in placing the contemporary Jordanian population within the current framework of human population groups globally.

  10. Effect of different labio-lingual spaces in tray designs on the displacement of and pressure against a mobile tooth.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y; Tsuru, K; Kishita, C; Kamashita, Y; Hamano, T; Nagaoka, E

    2008-09-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effect of custom tray designs on the displacement of mobile tooth and local impression pressures during the impression procedure, using partially edentulous simulation models with six anterior teeth containing a mobile tooth prepared in previous studies. The custom trays were designed by altering the thickness of the respective spaces on the labial and lingual sides of the remaining tooth arch. In previous studies, the mobile tooth was displaced in the labial direction and local impression pressures of the mobile tooth were greater against the lingual side than the labial side for all custom tray designs. Furthermore, the custom trays perforated with holes on the lingual side were effective to reduce mobile tooth displacement, labial and lingual impression pressures against the mobile tooth, and the differences between them. Therefore, the present study was performed focusing on the labial and lingual thickness of spaces in custom tray designs. It was found that mobile tooth displacement, labial and lingual impression pressures against the mobile teeth and their differences were less in trays with spaces>3.0 mm thick on both the labial and lingual sides, but markedly greater in trays with a 1.5 mm-thick space on the labial side. These results indicate that the thickness of spaces on the labial side in the tray should not be reduced to prevent mobile tooth displacement.

  11. Microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.; Currier, R.P.; Barbero, R.S.; Espinoza, B.F.; Elliott, N.

    1991-12-31

    A microwave assisted process for production of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. A simple apparatus combining a chemical vapor infiltration reactor with a conventional 700 W multimode oven is described. Microwave induced inverted thermal gradients are exploited with the ultimate goal of reducing processing times on complex shapes. Thermal gradients in stacks of SiC (Nicalon) cloths have been measured using optical thermometry. Initial results on the ``inside out`` deposition of SiC via decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane in hydrogen are presented. Several key processing issues are identified and discussed. 5 refs.

  12. A novel experiment for measuring infiltration into seasonal frozen soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demand, Dominic; Weiler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Large parts of the northern hemisphere have at least seasonal frozen soils. Depending on the initial soil water content infiltration capacity can be reduced through pore blockage of ice. Many studies dealing with this topic used numerical modelling for estimating the effect of frozen soils on infiltration. Only a few studies investigated the influences of seasonal frozen soils on infiltration and runoff generation in field experiments. Some authors point out that preferential flow can be an important factor under frozen conditions, but only qualitative information are available so far. A missing methodology makes it hard to measure and quantify infiltration into frozen soils, especially the role of preferential flow. Therefore, a novel multi-method approach for measuring the influences of seasonal frozen soil on infiltration is presented. Sprinkling experiments with a rate of 50 mm/h were performed at frozen soil plots under wet and dry initial conditions in a grassland field site in the Black Forest, Germany. Additionally, two different water temperatures were used for the sprinkling experiments (~2°C and ~10°C). Thermal infrared imagery was tested for continuous, in-situ monitoring of the spatiotemporal soil thermal state during infiltration and the possibility to derive information on water flow. A dye tracer (Brilliant Blue FCF) was added to the infiltrating water and analyzed by image analysis for flow patterns and depth distribution. Thermal infrared imagery and dye tracer were used for the first time in field experiments in frozen soils and were tested for their potential to show the effect of preferential flow under frozen conditions. These information were related to observed soil moisture and temperature profiles measured with capacitance probes in five depths. Furthermore timing and amount of surface runoff was examined for all plots. Brilliant Blue flow patterns and surface runoff were compared against unfrozen soils with similar initial conditions

  13. Dimensional changes in height of labial alveolar bone of proclined lower incisor after lingual positioning by orthodontic treatment: A cephalometric study on adult Bengali population

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The study aims to know whether modern orthodontic treatment procedure do actually cause permanent bone loss at the alveolar bone crest or improve alveolar bone morphology on labial aspect of permanent incisors which are to be moved lingually. Settings and Design: Manual tracings of pre and post treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs were used. Material and Method: The cephalometric radiographs of 34 adult bengali subjects whose orthodontic treatment involved lingual positioning of procumbent mandibular central incisors were examined to determine the morphologic changes (bone height) in the labial alveolar bone that resulted from orthodontic treatment. Result: Comparison of tracings of radiographs taken before and after treatment indicated that 57.6% shows an increase in labial alveolar bone height, 30.3% shows decreased value and 12.1% shows no change with the decrease in the angulation between long axis of lower incisor and mandibular plane (GoGn). In the increase group there is a significant increase in the distance ‘incisal edge to D point’ whereas this dimension decreased significantly in the rest of the cases. In addition, a significant positive correlation (r = 0.56) was found between the changes in the distance from the incisal edge to the ‘D’ point and the alveolar bone height. But no significant relation was found between alveolar bone height and decrease in angulation of lower incisor either in the ‘increase group’ (r = 0.13, p > 0.05) or in the ‘decrease group’ (r = 0.37, p > 0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicate that during orthodontic treatment that involves lingual positioning of procumbent teeth but no intrusion, an increase in the amount of buccal alveolar bone may take place. PMID:25684908

  14. [Lymphoid infiltrates in the lung].

    PubMed

    Szalontai, K; Krenács, L; Csanádi, J; Ugocsai, K; Kraszkó, P

    1993-11-07

    The authors reviewed material of 10 year period (1980-1990) of the Department of Pulmonology, Albert Szent-Györgyi University of Medicine, Deszk, Hungary, and selected 14 patients from the files who considered to belong in one of the lymphoproliferative conditions (4 low grade and 4 high grade lymphomas of B-cell type, 1 angiocentric, 1 mediastinal lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 3 Hodgkin's lymphoma cases and 1 pleural pseudolymphoma). Every patient admitted with prominent pulmonary symptoms. The diagnoses were based on histology and immunohistochemistry of tissue samples and autopsy. One high grade B-cell and the angiocentric malignant lymphoma proved to be primary pulmonary process. No specific radiomorphological signs were found, which could be characteristic for the pulmonary lympho-reticular infiltrations and also to distinct the primary and secondary ones. The lung infiltrations in the most of the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cases with low grade malignancy appeared imitating tuberculosis, while the high grade group and Hodgkin's lymphomas displayed confusion with any primary or multiple tumors.

  15. Characterization of interstitial infiltrating cells in Berger's disease.

    PubMed

    Sabadini, E; Castiglione, A; Colasanti, G; Ferrario, F; Civardi, R; Fellin, G; D'Amico, G

    1988-10-01

    The role of infiltrating blood-borne cells in the pathogenesis of renal damage in human glomerulonephritis is under active investigation. We have evaluated leukocyte infiltrates (number of cells/mm2) in the renal interstitium of 21 patients with Berger's disease and eight normal kidneys with monoclonal antibodies and a four-layer immunoperoxidase technique. In our population of patients, the number of infiltrating T-lymphocytes (OKT11+ cells) was significantly higher (median, 132) than in the normal kidneys (median, 60). This increase was mainly due to T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes (OKT8+ cells; median, 68), while T-helper/inducer lymphocytes (Leu 3A+ cells) and monocytes were in the normal range. T-lymphocyte infiltration was more marked in ten patients with impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at the time of biopsy (median, 167) than in patients with normal GFR (median, 88). In addition, ten patients who showed deterioration of renal function during the subsequent follow-up, whatever their serum creatinine levels at the time of biopsy, had significantly more total T cells (median, 269), OKT8+ cells (median, 143), and Leu 3A+ cells (median, 105) than 11 patients with persistently stable GFR and normal controls. More data are necessary to establish whether this T-lymphocyte infiltration is the consequence of a cell-mediated mechanism acting in the interstitium, concomitant with the immune-complex-mediated mechanism acting in the glomerulus, or is a nonspecific consequence of the tubulointerstitial damage induced by the immunologically mediated glomerular disease.

  16. Investigating Unstable Water Infiltration into Alcohol Contaminated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, H. C.; Smith, J. E.; Henry, E. J.; Brodsky, Y.

    2009-05-01

    A new mechanism causing highly focused, unstable flow exists in soils contaminated with alcohols due to their surface-activity. For example, surface-active compounds can significantly decrease the interfacial tension of the air-water interface and change the pressure-head of the soil water; directly affecting water flow and solute transport in the vadose zone. This study evaluated the fundamental effects of surface-active alcohols on water infiltration into contaminated soils under controlled laboratory conditions. A small scale 3-D glass flow cell and a mini disk tension infiltrometer were used to monitor the rates and physical characteristics of water infiltration from a constant head point source into sands of various textures contaminated with a butanol solution. The results confirmed that water infiltration into these soils is fundamentally and substantially different than the current understanding of infiltration patterns, including previously described mechanisms of wetting front instability. In butanol-contaminated soils, the wetting fronts exhibited highly focused flow with smaller wetted soil volumes, deeper penetration and substantially higher infiltration rates. In addition, the extent of fingered focused flow was confirmed to be texturally dependent, decreasing with grain size and dependent on the constant head boundary. This study characterized a new mechanism of focused, unstable flow with significant implications for groundwater management and solute transport in alcohol contaminated soils.

  17. Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites made by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, A.J.; Lowden, R.A.; Stinton, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    A process was developed for the fabrication of ceramic-fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites by chemical vapor infiltration. The ceramic composites were prepared by making fibrous preforms from multiple layers of SiC cloth and forming the silicon-carbide matrix for each component specimen by infiltrating the fibrous preform by a chemical vapor deposition process. A major goal of the work was achieved when infiltration was accomplished in hours instead of weeks by combining the thermal-gradient and forced-gas-flow techniques. Composites that possessed moderate flexural strength and high strain to failure were produced. In addition, the strength of the composites decreased gradually after the maximum strength was obtained, demonstrating that the composites had the desired high toughness and avoided the typical brittle behavior of monolithic ceramics.

  18. Removal of the residual roots of mandibular wisdom teeth in the lingual space of the mandible via endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z Q; Huang, Z X; Wang, Y Y; Hu, W J; Fan, S; Zhang, D M; Chen, W L

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the reliability of the use of endoscopy for removal of the residual roots of mandibular wisdom teeth in the lingual space of the mandible. Seven patients with residual roots of the mandibular wisdom teeth remaining in the lingual space were treated via endoscopy, and the results of their treatments were reviewed retrospectively. The study found that the residual roots of the mandibular wisdom teeth in the lingual space were removed successfully via endoscopy. The average duration of surgery for each case was 5 min, and no complications were observed in any case. There is little risk involved with removing the residual roots of mandibular wisdom teeth in the lingual space via endoscopy and the procedure is safe and fast. We conclude that it is worth promoting this clinical procedure for current and future use.

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of type III collagen expression in the lingual mucosa of rats during organogenesis of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi; Asami, Tomoichiro; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Aoyagi, Hidekazu

    2008-07-01

    We examined the distribution of immunofluorescence due to immunostaining of type III collagen, differential interference contrast (DIC) images and images obtained in the transmission mode after toluidine blue staining by laser-scanning microscopy of semi-ultrathin sections of epoxy resin-embedded samples, during morphogenesis of the filiform papillae, keratinization of the lingual epithelium, and myogenesis of the rat tongue. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was distributed widely in the mesenchymal connective tissue in fetuses on day 15 after conception (E15), at which time the lingual epithelium was composed of one or two layers of cuboidal cells and the lingual muscle was barely recognizable. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was clearly detected on the lamina propria in fetuses on E17 and E19, and it was relatively distinct just beneath the lingual epithelium. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was sparsely distributed on the connective tissue around the developing lingual muscle. In fetuses on E19, the epithelium became clearly stratified and squamous. At postnatal stages from newborn (P0) to postnatal day 14 (P14), keratinization of the lingual epithelium advanced gradually with the development of filiform papillae. On P0, myogenesis of the tongue was almost completed. The intensity of the fluorescence immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen at postnatal stages was almost same as that on E19. The immunoreactivity around the fully mature muscle was relatively distinct between P0 and P14. Thus, type III collagen appeared in conjunction with the morphogenesis of filiform papillae and the keratinization of the lingual epithelium as well as in the connective tissue that surrounded the lingual muscle during myogenesis of the rat tongue.

  20. Topographic relationship between root apex of mesially and horizontally impacted mandibular third molar and lingual plate: cross-sectional analysis using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongmiao; He, Xiaotong; Wang, Yanling; Zhou, Guangchao; Sun, Chao; Yang, Lianfeng; Bai, Jianling; Gao, Jun; Wu, Yunong; Cheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the topographic relationship between root apex of the mesially and horizontally impacted mandibular third molar and lingual plate of mandible. The original cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data of 364 teeth from 223 patients were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The topographic relationship between root apex and lingual plate on cross-sectional CBCT images was classified as non-contact (99), contact (145) and perforation (120). The cross-sectional morphology of lingual plate at the level of root apex was defined as parallel (28), undercut (38), slanted (29) and round (4). The distribution of topographic relationship between root apex and lingual plate significantly associated with gender, impaction depth, root number and lingual plate morphology. Moreover, the average bone thickness of lingual cortex and distance between root apex and the outer surface of lingual plate were 1.02 and 1.39 mm, respectively. Furthermore, multivariate regression analyses identified impaction depth and lingual plate morphology as the risk factors for the contact and perforation subtypes between root apex and lingual plate. Collectively, our findings reveal the topographic proximity of root apex of impacted mandibular third molar to the lingual plate, which might be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications during tooth extraction. PMID:27991572

  1. Topographic relationship between root apex of mesially and horizontally impacted mandibular third molar and lingual plate: cross-sectional analysis using CBCT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmiao; He, Xiaotong; Wang, Yanling; Zhou, Guangchao; Sun, Chao; Yang, Lianfeng; Bai, Jianling; Gao, Jun; Wu, Yunong; Cheng, Jie

    2016-12-19

    The present study was aimed to determine the topographic relationship between root apex of the mesially and horizontally impacted mandibular third molar and lingual plate of mandible. The original cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data of 364 teeth from 223 patients were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The topographic relationship between root apex and lingual plate on cross-sectional CBCT images was classified as non-contact (99), contact (145) and perforation (120). The cross-sectional morphology of lingual plate at the level of root apex was defined as parallel (28), undercut (38), slanted (29) and round (4). The distribution of topographic relationship between root apex and lingual plate significantly associated with gender, impaction depth, root number and lingual plate morphology. Moreover, the average bone thickness of lingual cortex and distance between root apex and the outer surface of lingual plate were 1.02 and 1.39 mm, respectively. Furthermore, multivariate regression analyses identified impaction depth and lingual plate morphology as the risk factors for the contact and perforation subtypes between root apex and lingual plate. Collectively, our findings reveal the topographic proximity of root apex of impacted mandibular third molar to the lingual plate, which might be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications during tooth extraction.

  2. Effects of auditory disruption of lingual tactile sensitivity in skilled and unskilled speaking conditions.

    PubMed

    Krummel, S; Petrosino, L; Fucci, D

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of disruption of the auditory feedback channel on lingual vibrotactile thresholds obtained under skilled and unskilled speaking conditions. Each of 22 adults was asked to read an English (skilled) and French (unskilled) passage under conditions of normal and altered auditory feedback. Bilateral presentation of masking noise was utilized to disrupt auditory feedback. Before each of the experimental sessions and immediately following a reading, lingual vibrotactile thresholds were obtained. Analysis indicated that the mean differences in the pre- and postvibrotactile threshold measurements of the skilled auditory disrupted condition varied significantly from the mean differences in the pre- and postvibrotactile threshold measurements of the three other conditions. The role of feedback in the speech production of skilled and unskilled speakers is discussed.

  3. Lingual frenectomy and alveolar tap production: an acoustic and perceptual study.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Zuleica A; Marchesan, I Q; Oliveira, L R; Svicero, M A F; Pereira, L C K; Madureira, S

    2013-12-01

    In this phonetic study, productions of the consonant in the stressed syllable position of the word arara as produced by 13 subjects with short and/or anterior lingual frenulum were compared before and after lingual frenectomy. The results from the measurement of the stressed consonant duration and from the identification of the consonant manners of articulation based on the inspection of spectral characteristics are discussed and related to the answers to a perceptual identification test. After surgery, the number of tap productions did not increase, but alveolar productions did. These clinically relevant findings show frenectomy improved tongue mobility, but, as temporal controls were not totally re-established after surgery and 6-month speech therapy sessions, the production of the alveolar tap remained largely unchanged.

  4. Reduction of neonatal pain following administration of 25% lingual dextrose: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Sinojia, Ankit; Dongara, Ashish

    2013-06-01

    Neonates experience painful procedures during routine care. Orally administered, sweet tasting solutions are commonly used in management of neonatal pain. We conducted a double-blind randomized control trial in neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Shri Krishna Hospital, Karamsad-Gujarat-India, of lingual administration of 25% dextrose vs. no intervention, to evaluate reduction of pain following oropharyngeal infant feeding tube insertions. Pain was assessed using Premature Infant Pain Profile score. Almost all the patients in the control group (98%) experienced moderate-to-severe pain as compared with the intervention group (71%). Mean Premature Infant Pain Profile score was statistically significantly lower in the intervention group (8.21) as compared with control group (10.31). (p < 0.001, 95% CI 1.090-3.102). Lingual 25% dextrose is an effective analgesic for relieving pain during orogastric tube insertion.

  5. Transient unilateral combined paresis of the hypoglossal nerve and lingual nerve following intubation anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Hulya; Besir, Ahmet; Cekic, Bahanur; Kosucu, Muge; Geze, Sukran

    2014-01-01

    Nerve damage may occur in the pharyngolaryngeal region during general anesthesia. The most frequently injured nerves are the hypoglossal, lingual and recurrent laryngeal. These injuries may arise in association with several factors, such as laryngoscopy, endotracheal intubation and tube insertion, cuff pressure, mask ventilation, the triple airway maneuver, the oropharyngeal airway, manner of intubation tube insertion, head and neck position and aspiration. Nerve injuries in this region may take the form of an isolated single nerve or of paresis of two nerves together in the form of hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (Tapia's syndrome). However, combined injury of the lingual and hypoglossal nerves following intubation anesthesia is a much rarer condition. The risk of this damage can be reduced with precautionary measures. We describe a case of combined unilateral nervus hypoglossus and nervus lingualis paresis developing after intubation anesthesia.

  6. Variations in the buccal-lingual alveolar bone thickness of impacted mandibular third molar: our classification and treatment perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jing; Zheng, Jia-Wei; Yang, Chi; Qian, Wen-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Selecting either buccal or lingual approach for the mandibular third molar surgical extraction has been an intense debate for years. The aim of this observational retrospective study was to classify the molar based on the proximity to the external cortical bone, and analyze the position of inferior alveolar canal (IAC) of each type. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) data of 110 deeply impacted mandibular third molars from 91 consecutive patients were analyzed. A new classification based on the mean deduction value (MD) of buccal-lingual alveolar bone thickness was proposed: MD≥1 mm was classified as buccal position, 1 mm>MD>−1 mm was classified as central position, MD≤−1 mm was classified as lingual position. The study samples were distributed as: buccal position (1.8%) in 2 subjects, central position (10.9%) in 12 and lingual position (87.3%) in 96. Ninety-six molars (87.3%) contacted the IAC. The buccal and inferior IAC course were the most common types in impacted third molar, especially in lingually positioned ones. Our study suggested that amongst deeply impacted mandibular third molars, lingual position occupies the largest proportion, followed by the central, and then the buccal type. PMID:26759181

  7. Minimally Invasive Approach to the Lingual and Hypoglossal Nerves in the Adult Rat.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Edward John; Phillips, Grady W; Gratton, Michael Anne; Long, John P; Varvares, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Surgical manipulation of the sensory and motor nerves of the rat tongue is often employed in studies evaluating the oral cavity functions of mastication and deglutition. A noninvasive, atraumatic approach that will then facilitate sufficient manipulation of these structures is required. In this study, we detail an approach that consistently allows identification of the hypoglossal (motor) and lingual (sensory) nerves of the rat. Six Wistar rats (250-500 g) were anesthetized and dissected either as fresh tissue (N = 3) or following transcardial perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde (N = 3). Both fixed and non-fixed specimens of the rat head and neck were incised in the right submandibular region. The first animal in each group was used to gain a basic understanding of the regional muscular anatomy with reference to the hypoglossal and lingual nerves. Subsequent animals were used for the development of an efficient and minimally invasive approach to these nerves. The resultant approach begins as an incision through skin and platysma, followed by medial reflection of the digastric muscle. This allows visualization of the hypoglossal nerve in the region of the bifurcation of the common trunk into medial and lateral subdivisions. Next, the lingual nerve dissection is approached by reflection rostrally of the transversus mandibularis muscle and a caudal reflection of the mylohyoid muscle. This dissection reveals the geniohyoid muscle which when separated bluntly using forceps, exposes the lingual nerve. The anatomical approach described and illustrated herein will aid investigators in consistent identification of these two nerves as fundamental methods of their projects.

  8. Laser midline glossectomy and lingual tonsillectomy as treatments for sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Arata; Kawakatsu, Kenji; Suzuki, Kenji; Nishimura, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    Preservation treatments for sleep respiratory disorders, such as the use of a dental device and the technique of nasal continuous positive air pressure, cause discomfort to the patient and are not radical treatments. Therefore, we performed operative therapy instead. Laser midline glossectomy was performed to treat constriction at the root of the tongue in 16 patients diagnosed with sleep apnea syndrome. We also tried lingual tonsil excision using the Harmonic Scalpel in three patients with stenosis at the base of the tongue.

  9. C. dubliniensis in an immunocompetent patient with metal lingual frenulum piercing.

    PubMed

    Ventolini, Gary; Tsai, Peihsuan; Moore, Lee David

    2016-12-01

    Candida spp. are opportunistic unicellular fungi, known to cause oral, vaginal, lung and occasionally systemic infections. Characteristically, they colonize the oral cavity, the mucosal surfaces of the cheek, palate, and tongue. Usually harmless, oral Candidas may become pathogenic under immunosuppressive conditions, dentures presence, or salivary flow impairment. Accurate species identification is important because C. dubliniensis can rapidly develop fluconazole resistance. We report C. dubliniensis in an immunocompetent patient with a metal lingual frenulum piercing.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Laser Microsurgical Median Glossotomy for Resection of Lingual Dermoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Corvers, Kristien; Hens, Greet; Meulemans, Jeroen; Delaere, Pierre; Hermans, Robert; Vander Poorten, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Dermoid cysts are epithelial-lined cavities with skin adnexae in the capsule. Only 7% is present in the head and neck. Between 2004 and 2013, four patients with a lingual dermoid cyst underwent a microsurgical carbon dioxide laser resection via a median sagittal glossotomy approach. This approach is an elegant technique combining superior visualization, hemostasis, and little postoperative edema with good wound healing, allowing for perfect function preservation of the tongue. PMID:27504448

  11. Mucocele of the glands of Blandin-Nuhn after lingual frenectomy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Thiago de Santana; Filho, Paulo Ricardo Saquete Martins; Piva, Marta Rabello; Khalil Karam, Frederick

    2012-11-01

    Mucoceles are the most common lesions of the minor salivary glands and typically appear as a fluctuant, bluish, nontender, submucosal swelling with a normal overlying mucosa. Mucoceles of the glands of Blandin-Nuhn (in the anterior portion of the ventral surface of the tongue) have been considered to be uncommon. This article reports an unusual case of a large extravasation mucocele involving the ventral surface of the tongue, which appeared after a lingual frenectomy.

  12. Infiltration tests on fractured compacted clay

    SciTech Connect

    McBrayer, M.C.; Mauldon, M.; Drumm, E.C.; Wilson, G.V.

    1997-05-01

    Desiccation and freeze-thaw of compacted clay barriers may result in cracks that serve as preferential flow paths. A series of infiltration tests on compacted kaolin samples was conducted to explore the importance of preferential flow paths during infiltration, and their effect on the infiltration rate. Clod size at the time of compaction was found to have a strong influence on both the rate and depth of infiltration. The authors suggest that flow and infiltration through fractured clay may be described in terms of two stages: an initial dynamic stage in which the infiltration rate is initially high but decreases rapidly due to the clay swelling and closing fractures, and a steady-state stage usually characterized by k{sub sat}, during which the infiltration rate is relatively constant. The study has shown that cracks do not fully heal upon hydration and readily reopen during subsequent dehydration. Infiltration rates during the dynamic stage of infiltration, while cracks are closing, are orders of magnitude higher than the steady-state rate used to estimate k{sub sat}, for barrier evaluation.

  13. Fluid infiltration pressure for hydrophobic nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jingwen; Li, Long; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Dongyan; Huang, Baoling; Li, Zhigang

    2015-03-01

    We investigate water infiltration pressure for hydrophobic nanochannels through molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the entrance energy barrier significantly raises the infiltration pressure, which makes the classic Young-Laplace equation invalid for nanochannels. As the channel surface is tuned from superhydrophobic to hydrophobic, the infiltration pressure is greatly reduced mainly due to the decrease of the capillary pressure (Young-Laplace equation) caused by the contact angle change, while the contribution of the entrance energy barrier to the infiltration pressure, which is termed entrance barrier pressure, increases from 25% to 60%.

  14. Lingual ultrastructure of the long-finned pilot whale (Globicephala melas).

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D C; Wang, A; Nicolas, J; Pfeiffer, C J

    2001-12-01

    Microscopic studies on the cetacean tongue are limited and, to date, only a few ultrastructural reports on dolphins have been published. This report presents the initial description of the lingual ultrastructure of the long-finned pilot whale. The lingual integumental surface was smooth, lacking papillae, although flaking of outer stratum corneum cells could be observed at high resolution. The keratinocytes of the stratum spinosum of the epidermis resembled those of cetacean skin on other regions of the body. The similarities included the presence of cytoplasmic lipid droplets around the nuclei of stratutm spinosum cells, a lingual feature not seen in terrestrial mammals. Keratin intermediate filaments were numerous and occasionally formed aggregates of circular whorls. At cell surfaces, bundles of keratin intermediate filaments were frequently observed inserting into desmosomal plaques. Pigment granules were not evident and organelles were sparse. Stratum corneal cells contained nuclear remnants (parakeratosis) and small multivesicular bodies, and the corneal layer was approximately 18 cells thick. The nuclei of the stratum basale keratinocytes possessed exceptionally numerous and deep clefts. The dermis was nondistinctive. The skeletal muscle of the tongue was arranged in widely separated fasiculi containing small numbers of muscle fibres. Typical fine structure of skeletal muscle bands and tubular elements was observed by transmission electron microscopy.

  15. A case of difficult airway due to lingual tonsillar hypertrophy in a patient with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Koichi; Ikeda, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Seiji; Makita, Koshi

    2003-09-01

    In this report, we describe airway management of symptomatic lingual tonsillar hypertrophy in a pediatric patient with Down's syndrome. Besides obstructive sleep apnea, the history included a small atrial septal defect with mild aortic regurgitation and Moyamoya disease. Anesthesia was induced with IV administration of 1 mg/kg of propofol, followed by inhalation of sevoflurane in 100% oxygen. Muscle relaxants were not used on induction. Rigid laryngoscopy could not visualize the epiglottis because of hypertrophied tonsillar tissue, and mask ventilation became difficult when spontaneous breathing stopped. We avoided using a laryngeal mask airway because of a slight bleeding tendency presumably caused by preoperative antiplatelet therapy. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy through the nasal cavity in combination with jet ventilation successfully identified the glottis and allowed nasotracheal intubation to be accomplished. After lingual tonsillectomy, the patient was extubated on the seventh postoperative day, after supraglottic edema had resolved. Fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation under inhaled anesthesia may therefore be preferable in pediatric or uncooperative patients with symptomatic lingual tonsillar hypertrophy.

  16. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium.

    PubMed

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Klein, Ophir D; Barlow, Linda A

    2014-08-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation.

  17. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Klein, Ophir D.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation. PMID:24993944

  18. Transient lingual papillitis: A retrospective study of 11 cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tosios, Konstantinos I.; Nikitakis, Nikolaos G.; Kamperos, Georgios; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Background Transient lingual papillitis (TLP) is a common, under-diagnosed, inflammatory hyperplasia of one or multiple fungiform lingual that has an acute onset, and is painful and transient in nature. Material and Methods Eleven cases of TLP were diagnosed based on their clinical features. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, symptoms, individual or family history of similar lesions, medical history, management and follow-up were extracted from the patients’ records. The English literature was reviewed on TLP differential diagnosis, pathogenesis and management. Results The study group included 8 females and 3 males (age: 10-53 years, mean age 31.7±12.88 years). Seven cases were classified as generalized form of TLP and 4 as localized form. Nine cases were symptomatic. Time to onset ranged from 1 to 14 days. A specific causative factor was not identified in any case and management was symptomatic. Conclusions Although TLP is not considered as a rare entity, available information is limited. Diagnosis is rendered clinically, while biopsy is required in cases with a differential diagnostic dilemma. TLP should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute, painful tongue nodules. Key words:Transient lingual papillitis, fungiform papillary glossitis, tongue, nodules. PMID:28149482

  19. Comparative morphological study on the tongue and lingual papillae of horses (Perissodactyla) and selected ruminantia (Artiodactyla).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Jackowiak, H; Frackowiak, H; Yoshimura, K; Kumakura, M; Kobayashi, K

    2005-01-01

    A common characteristic of horses, Rocky Mountain goats, and cattle is that they all have a well developed lingual prominence on the dorsal surface of the posterior area of the tongue. Foliate papillae were found in the horse studied but not in the goat or in cattle. The horse filiform papillae had a long and slender external form with a thin and slender CTC, while in the goat and cattle the external form consisted of a large thick main process and the CTC consisted of a bundle of numerous rod-shaped protrusions. The special papilla found on the lingual prominence resembled larger filiform-like papillae in the horses; however, in the goat and cattle it was a very thick and large tongue like papillae. The horses had two large vallate papillae, while the goat and cattle had 15 or more vallate papillae at the posterior area of the lingual prominence. This suggests that the fine structure of horse tongues may display a more primitive pattern than that present in goats and cattle.

  20. Modulation of prey capture kinematics and the role of lingual sensory feedback in the lizard Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Schaerlaeken, Vicky; Meyers, Jay J; Herrel, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Most organisms feed on a variety of prey that may differ dramatically in their physical and behavioural characteristics (e.g. mobility, mass, texture, etc.). Thus the ability to modulate prey capture behaviour in accordance with the characteristics of the food appears crucial. In animals that use rapid tongue movements to capture prey (frogs and chameleons), the coordination of jaws and tongue is based on visual cues gathered prior to the prey capture event. However, most iguanian lizards have much slower tongue-based prey capture systems suggesting that sensory feedback from the tongue may play an important role in coordinating jaw and tongue movements. We investigated the modulation of prey capture kinematics in the agamid lizard Pogona vitticeps when feeding on a range of food items differing in their physical characteristics. As the lizard is a dietary generalist, we expected it to be able to modulate its prey capture kinematics as a function of the (mechanical) demands imposed by the prey. Additionally, we investigated the role of lingual sensory feedback by transecting the trigeminal sensory afferents. Our findings demonstrated that P. vitticeps modulates its prey capture kinematics according to specific prey properties (e.g. size). In addition, transection of the trigeminal sensory nerves had a strong effect on prey capture kinematics. However, significant prey type effects and prey type by transection effects suggest that other sources of sensory information are also used to modulate the prey capture kinematics in P. vitticeps.

  1. Infiltration as Ventilation: Weather-Induced Dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Turner, William J.N.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of outdoor air ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants to which occupants are exposed. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. In most homes, especially older homes, weather-driven infiltration provides the dominant fraction of the total ventilation. As we seek to provide good indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate nor under-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to evaluate correctly the contribution infiltration makes to the total outdoor air ventilation rate. Because weather-driven infiltration is dependent on building air leakage and weather-induced pressure differences, a given amount of air leakage will provide different amounts of infiltration. Varying rates of infiltration will provide different levels of contaminant dilution and hence effective ventilation. This paper derives these interactions and then calculates the impact of weather-driven infiltration for different climates. A new “N-factor” is introduced to provide a convenient method for calculating the ventilation contribution of infiltration for over 1,000 locations across North America. The results of this work could be used in indoor air quality standards (specifically ASHRAE 62.2) to account for the contribution of weather-driven infiltration towards the dilution of indoor pollutants.

  2. Net-Infiltration map of the Navajo Sandstone outcrop area in western Washington County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, Victor M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in the arid southwestern United States and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration and recharge becomes critically important for inventorying groundwater resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. A Geographic Information System (GIS)-based model utilizing readily available soils, topographic, precipitation, and outcrop data has been developed for predicting net infiltration to exposed and soil-covered areas of the Navajo Sandstone outcrop of southwestern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is an important regional bedrock aquifer. The GIS model determines the net-infiltration percentage of precipitation by using an empirical equation. This relation is derived from least squares linear regression between three surficial parameters (soil coarseness, topographic slope, and downgradient distance from outcrop) and the percentage of estimated net infiltration based on environmental tracer data from excavations and boreholes at Sand Hollow Reservoir in the southeastern part of the study area.Processed GIS raster layers are applied as parameters in the empirical equation for determining net infiltration for soil-covered areas as a percentage of precipitation. This net-infiltration percentage is multiplied by average annual Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) precipitation data to obtain an infiltration rate for each model cell. Additionally, net infiltration on exposed outcrop areas is set to 10 percent of precipitation on the basis of borehole net-infiltration estimates. Soils and outcrop net-infiltration rates are merged to form a final map.Areas of low, medium, and high potential for ground-water recharge have been identified, and estimates of net infiltration range from 0.1 to 66 millimeters per year (mm/yr). Estimated net-infiltration rates of less than 10 mm/yr are considered low, rates of 10 to 50 mm/yr are

  3. The effect of masking noise on acoustic-phonetic contrasts in post-lingually deafened cochlear implant users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vick, Jennell C.; Perkell, Joseph S.; Stockmann, Ellen; Zandipour, Majid; Lane, Harlan; Tiede, Mark

    2003-10-01

    This study examined the effect on the vowel contrast distance (average inter-vowel distance in the F1-F2 plane) of gradually decreasing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the auditory feedback of a post-lingually deafened cochlear implant (CI) user at 1-month and 1-year following CI processor activation. Masking noise, mixed with normal levels of speech feedback, was presented through the headpiece of a research sound processor to the CI user. As a control, an analogous procedure was used for a normal-hearing speaker where the masking noise and speech feedback were delivered over headphones. The SNR was gradually decreased over seven steps as the speakers produced ten repetitions of two vowel contrasts (æ\\/[g\\/] and i\\/u). Speech SPL and vowel contrast distance were measured at all seven masking noise levels. Data from both subjects showed that SPL gradually increased with decreased SNR, while contrast distance decreased. The effect was greater after 1 year of experience with a CI than at 1 month. The effect in the NH speaker was similar to that noted in the CI user after 1 year of experience. Data from additional subjects will be analyzed and reported. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. R01 DC03007.

  4. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  5. Impingement of a drop train enhance the liquid infiltration into a closed end hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanada, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Eri; Muraki, Shunsuke

    2016-11-01

    Liquid infiltration is an important process for cleaning inside fine holes. However, it is difficult to infiltrate liquid into closed end holes having small diameter. Because the surface tension prevents the deformation of gas-liquid interface for entering them. In this study we observed the liquid infiltration process into a closed end hole by applying external pressure under two ways, i.e. gradual pressurization with a hand pump and impingement of a droplet train. As a result, it is found that the amount of dissolved air into liquid by applying pressure is small, and it has small effect for the liquid infiltration. In addition, it is also found that the high liquid infiltration rate can be achieved by applying a droplet train impact. It is observed that the trapped bubbles inside the holes were ejected by repetition of droplet impingement.

  6. Geophysical methods for monitoring infiltration in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquet, Yves; Pessel, Marc; Saintenoy, Albane

    2015-04-01

    Geophysics provides useful tools for monitoring water infiltration in soil essentially because they are non-invasive and have a good time-resolution. We present some results obtained on different soils using two geophysical techniques: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Infiltration in a loamy soil was monitored using a 2D Wenner array set up under a tension disc infiltrometer. A good imaging of the infiltration bulb below the infiltrometer could be achieved provided a sufficient resistivity contrast between the wet and the dry soil zones. ERT data could be used to invert soil hydraulic properties. However, we found that the information provided by the ERT could be of limited importance in regard to the information provided by the infiltration rate dynamics if the ERT spatial resolution is not small enough to capture the details of the infiltration front at the limit between the wet and dry soil zones. GPR was found to be a good tool to monitor the progression of the infiltration front in a sandy soil. By combining a water transport simulation model (HYDRUS-1D), a method for transforming water content into dielectric permittivity values (CRIM), and an electromagnetic wave propagation model (GprMax), the Mualem-van Genuchten hydraulic parameters could be retrieved from radargrams obtained under constant or falling head infiltration experiments. Both ERT and GPR methods have pros and cons. Time and spatial resolutions are of prime importance to achieve a sufficient sensitivity to all soil hydraulic parameters. Two exploration fields are suggested: the combination of different geophysical methods to explore infiltration in heterogeneous soils, and the development of integrated infiltrometers that allow geophysical measurements while monitoring water infiltration rate in soil.

  7. Lingual orthodontics in the new era treatment according to criteria for occlusion and aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fukawa, Ryuzo

    2009-12-01

    There has been remarkable progress in the field of orthodontics with the advent of CAD/CAM technology since the beginning of the 21st century. In lingual orthodontics, brackets designed and manufactured with a CAD/CAM system [1] are now available to produce more efficient tooth movement with reduced frictional resistance. The use of implant anchors for absolute anchorage has eliminated the need for excessive tipping of the molars with anchorage bends, which compromises periodontal health, as well as the need for application of heavy extraoral forces, thus providing more reasonable treatment options for both the patient and orthodontist.

  8. Managing landscape disturbances to increase watershed infiltration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural land undergoing conversion to conventional urban development can drastically increase runoff and degrade water quality. A study of landscape management for improving watershed infiltration was conducted using readily available runoff data from experimental watersheds. This article focus...

  9. Chemical vapor infiltration using microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Devlin, David J.; Currier, Robert P.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Barbero, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    A method for producing reinforced ceramic composite articles by means of chemical vapor infiltration and deposition in which an inverted temperature gradient is utilized. Microwave energy is the source of heat for the process.

  10. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration...-to-ceiling and wall-to-floor connections shall be caulked or otherwise sealed. When walls...

  11. Dosimetric implications of the infiltrated injection

    SciTech Connect

    Castronovo, F.P.; McKusick, K.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Following inadvertent infiltration of a radiopharmaceutical, there is variable and uncertain uptake in target tissue. Concomitantly, there is also a concern for the radiation dose to the infiltrated site. This investigation determined the clearance and radiation burdens from various radiopharmaceutical infiltrates in a rat model. Nine separate sites were studied for: Tc-99m microspheres; Tc-99m MDP; Ga-67 citrate; and Tl-201 chloride. Following sc injection on the shaven posteriors of anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, gamma camera and computer data were collected up to 24 hours. The resulting data were expressed semilogarithmically as the mean (N = 9) of the ''% retained at site'' as a f(time) after injection. Nonparticulate agents showed a tri-exponential release pattern from each site, whereas the microspheres remained for an extended period of time. Using these pharma-cokinetic curves, the % remaining at each site for various times, and rems/mCi per lcc infiltrate was determined.

  12. Mathematical Analysis and Optimization of Infiltration Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H.-C.; Gottlieb, D.; Marion, M.; Sheldon, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A variety of infiltration techniques can be used to fabricate solid materials, particularly composites. In general these processes can be described with at least one time dependent partial differential equation describing the evolution of the solid phase, coupled to one or more partial differential equations describing mass transport through a porous structure. This paper presents a detailed mathematical analysis of a relatively simple set of equations which is used to describe chemical vapor infiltration. The results demonstrate that the process is controlled by only two parameters, alpha and beta. The optimization problem associated with minimizing the infiltration time is also considered. Allowing alpha and beta to vary with time leads to significant reductions in the infiltration time, compared with the conventional case where alpha and beta are treated as constants.

  13. Accessory mental foramina, incisive nerve plexus and lingual canals with unusual emergence paths: Report of two rare cases

    PubMed Central

    Haghanifar, Sina; Poorsattar Bejeh Mir, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Being knowledgeable of neurovascularization of anterior mandible is crucial for successful local anesthesia and for safe minor and major oral surgeries of this part. The first case was 62 years old and was found to have two accessory mental foramina with buccal emergence on the left side and two accessory mental foramina with buccal and lingual emergence paths on the right side (overall five mental foramina). Incisive nerve plexus with multiple cephalic branching was obvious on both sides. The second case was 60 years of age and had two lingual foramina on the lingual side with two accessory foramina on the buccal side of the symphysis. Considering our findings, a pre-operation limited cone beam computed tomography is suggested to avoid inadvertent damage, especially when planning a surgery in the mandibular inter-mental region. PMID:25767360

  14. A field method for measurement of infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.I.

    1963-01-01

    The determination of infiltration--the downward entry of water into a soil (or sediment)--is receiving increasing attention in hydrologic studies because of the need for more quantitative data on all phases of the hydrologic cycle. A measure of infiltration, the infiltration rate, is usually determined in the field by flooding basins or furrows, sprinkling, or measuring water entry from cylinders (infiltrometer rings). Rates determined by ponding in large areas are considered most reliable, but the high cost usually dictates that infiltrometer rings, preferably 2 feet in diameter or larger, be used. The hydrology of subsurface materials is critical in the study of infiltration. The zone controlling the rate of infiltration is usually the least permeable zone. Many other factors affect infiltration rate--the sediment (soil) structure, the condition of the sediment surface, the distribution of soil moisture or soil- moisture tension, the chemical and physical nature of the sediments, the head of applied water, the depth to ground water, the chemical quality and the turbidity of the applied water, the temperature of the water and the sediments, the percentage of entrapped air in the sediments, the atmospheric pressure, the length of time of application of water, the biological activity in the sediments, and the type of equipment or method used. It is concluded that specific values of the infiltration rate for a particular type of sediment are probably nonexistent and that measured rates are primarily for comparative use. A standard field-test method for determining infiltration rates by means of single- or double-ring infiltrometers is described and the construction, installation, and operation of the infiltrometers are discussed in detail.

  15. Photonic crystal waveguide created by selective infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Bedoya, A.; Domachuk, P.; Grillet, C.; Monat, C.; Mägi, E. C.; Li, E.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2012-06-01

    The marriage of photonics and microfluidics ("optofluidics") uses the inherent mobility of fluids to reversibly tune photonic structures beyond traditional fabrication methods by infiltrating voids in said structures. Photonic crystals (PhCs) strongly control light on the wavelength scale and are well suited to optofluidic tuning because their periodic airhole microstructure is a natural candidate for housing liquids. The infiltration of a single row of holes in the PhC matrix modifies the effective refractive index allowing optical modes to be guided by the PhC bandgap. In this work we present the first experimental demonstration of a reconfigurable single mode W1 photonic crystal defect waveguide created by selective liquid infiltration. We modified a hexagonal silicon planar photonic crystal membrane by selectively filling a single row of air holes with ~300nm resolution, using high refractive index ionic liquid. The modification creates optical confinement in the infiltrated region and allows propagation of a single optical waveguide mode. We describe the challenges arising from the infiltration process and the liquid/solid surface interaction in the photonic crystal. We include a detailed comparison between analytic and numerical modeling and experimental results, and introduce a new approach to create an offset photonic crystal cavity by varying the nature of the selective infiltration process.

  16. Infiltration and instability in dune erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmsten, Margaret L.; Holman, Robert A.

    2011-10-01

    Forecasting dune erosion prior to a storm or over longer periods requires knowledge of the fluid forces on the dune sediments. To improve our predictive capability for this process, we propose a new model in which dune slumping occurs when water, which infiltrates horizontally into the dune, increases the overburden sufficiently to destabilize the dune. Horizontal infiltration is driven by suction of water from swash into the dune via capillary action and is a surprisingly strong process with rapid time scales. Because the elevated pore water concentrations increase the apparent cohesion of the wetted sediments, we also propose that the entire volume of wetted sand slumps as a unit when the dune becomes unstable and erosion can be modeled based on the force balance on a sliding block. Several versions of this model were tested, including a numerical infiltration model, a simplified infiltration equation, and an equation based on offshore wave forcing, rather than known forcing at the dune. The model was tested using data from a large-scale laboratory experiment with a storm hydrograph to investigate the time dependence of dune erosion. Predicting slope stability using a numerical infiltration model with known forcing explained 72% of the observed variance in erosion rate, while a simplified stability and infiltration model explained 58%. Error statistics suggest that we captured the majority of the physics controlling dune erosion in this laboratory experiment and that the simplified model will be useful as a forecasting tool.

  17. Modelling infiltration processes in frozen soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireson, A. M.; Barbour, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the hydrological processes in soils subject to significant freeze-thaw is fraught by "experimental vagaries and theoretical imponderables" (Miller 1980, Applications of soil physics). The infiltration of snowmelt water and the subsequent transmission of unfrozen water during thawing, is governed by hydraulic conductivity values which are changing with both ice and unfrozen water content. Water held within pores is subject to capillary forces, which results in a freezing point depression (i.e. water remains in the liquid state slightly below 0°C). As the temperature drops below zero, water freezes first in the larger pores, and then in progressively smaller pores. Since the larger pores also are the first to empty by drainage, these pores may be air filled during freezing, while smaller water filled pores freeze. This explains why an unsaturated, frozen soil may still have a considerable infiltration capacity. Infiltration into frozen soil is a critical phenomena related to the risk of flooding in the Canadian prairies, controlling the partitioning of snowmelt into either infiltration or runoff. We propose a new model, based on conceptualizing the pore space as a bundle of capillary tubes (with significant differences to the capillary bundle model of Wannatabe and Flury, 2008, WRR, doi:10.1029/2008WR007102) which allows any air-filled macropores to contribute to the potential infiltration capacity of the soil. The patterns of infiltration and water movement during freeze-thaw from the model are compared to field observations from the Canadian prairies and Boreal Plains.

  18. Epinephrine Affects Pharmacokinetics of Ropivacaine Infiltrated Into Palate.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Yasuda, Asako; Sunada, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Pulpal anesthesia success rates for ropivacaine following maxillary infiltration anesthesia seem to be low. We investigated the hypothesis that the addition of epinephrine would affect the pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine by retaining ropivacaine in the mucosa of the injected area through the time-dependent distribution of ropivacaine in the rat maxilla and serum following maxillary infiltration anesthesia using (3)H-labeled ropivacaine. We then examined the vasoactivity of ropivacaine with or without epinephrine on local peripheral blood flow. The addition of epinephrine to ropivacaine increased ropivacaine concentrations in the palatal mucosa and adjacent maxilla by more than 3 times that of plain ropivacaine at 20 minutes. By observing the autoradiogram of (3)H-ropivacaine, plain ropivacaine in the maxilla was remarkably reduced 20 minutes after injection. However, it was definitely retained in the palatal mucosa, hard palate, adjacent maxilla, and maxillary nerve after the administration with epinephrine. Ropivacaine with epinephrine significantly decreased labial blood flow. This study suggests that 10 μg/mL epinephrine added to 0.5% ropivacaine could improve anesthetic efficacy and duration for maxillary infiltration anesthesia over plain ropivacaine.

  19. Epinephrine Affects Pharmacokinetics of Ropivacaine Infiltrated Into Palate

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Yasuda, Asako; Sunada, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Pulpal anesthesia success rates for ropivacaine following maxillary infiltration anesthesia seem to be low. We investigated the hypothesis that the addition of epinephrine would affect the pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine by retaining ropivacaine in the mucosa of the injected area through the time-dependent distribution of ropivacaine in the rat maxilla and serum following maxillary infiltration anesthesia using 3H-labeled ropivacaine. We then examined the vasoactivity of ropivacaine with or without epinephrine on local peripheral blood flow. The addition of epinephrine to ropivacaine increased ropivacaine concentrations in the palatal mucosa and adjacent maxilla by more than 3 times that of plain ropivacaine at 20 minutes. By observing the autoradiogram of 3H-ropivacaine, plain ropivacaine in the maxilla was remarkably reduced 20 minutes after injection. However, it was definitely retained in the palatal mucosa, hard palate, adjacent maxilla, and maxillary nerve after the administration with epinephrine. Ropivacaine with epinephrine significantly decreased labial blood flow. This study suggests that 10 μg/mL epinephrine added to 0.5% ropivacaine could improve anesthetic efficacy and duration for maxillary infiltration anesthesia over plain ropivacaine. PMID:27269664

  20. Management of a coronally advanced lingual flap in regenerative osseous surgery: a case series introducing a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Marco; Stacchi, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    One of the crucial factors in the success of guided bone regeneration procedures is the correct management of the soft tissues. This allows for stable primary wound closure without tension, which can result in premature exposure of the augmentation area, jeopardizing the final outcome. The use of vertical and periosteal incisions to passivate buccal and lingual flaps in the posterior mandible is often limited by anatomical factors. This paper reports on a series of 69 consecutive cases introducing a novel surgical technique to release and advance the lingual flap coronally in a safe and predictable manner.

  1. [Treatment of advanced periodontal and periapical lesion caused by malformed lingual groove with guided tissue regeneration: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-ming; Sun, Qing-Feng; Yang, Pi-shan

    2005-08-01

    This paper reported one case with severe periodontal lesions caused by malformed lingual groove treated by guided tissue regeneration. The periodontal lesion was exposed palatally after the tooth had been treated with root canal therapy, the alveolar bone and the root surface was prepared, an unabsorbable member of e-PTFE was placed into the wound,and removed after 4 weeks, the patient was followed up for 3 years. The lesion recovered well three years after the operation, all of the periodontal tissue was in a healthy condition. It is advisable that guided periodontal tissue regeneration can be used as a new method to treat periodontal destruction induced by malformed lingual groove.

  2. Early lingual frenectomy assisted by CO2 laser helps prevention and treatment of functional alterations caused by ankyloglossia.

    PubMed

    Fiorotti, Renata C; Bertolini, Milene M; Nicola, Jorge H; Nicola, Ester M D

    2004-11-01

    Incorrectly produced speech sounds, the presence of dentofacial alterations and acquired functional adaptations may be due to a short and inadequate lingual frenum. When frenectomy is indicated, it should be performed as early as possible to prevent functional alterations. This study presents a literature review on correct lingual positioning in relation to orthodontic and phonetic function as well as an assessment of 15 patients who underwent frenectomy utilizing the carbon dioxide laser. The results demonstrated that this technique is safe, effective and perfect for use in young children and can be performed in an outpatient unit.

  3. Identification of stem cells that maintain and regenerate lingual keratinized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Komai, Yoshihiro; Tokuyama, Yoko; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Ohe, Shuichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-05-01

    Lingual keratinized epithelial cells, which constitute the filiform papillae of the tongue, have one of the most rapid tissue turnover rates in the mammalian body and are thought to be the source of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. However, the mechanism of tissue maintenance and regeneration is largely unknown for these cells. Here, we show that stem cells positive for Bmi1, keratin 14 and keratin 5 are present in the base but not at the very bottom of the interpapillary pit (observed most frequently in the second or third layer (position +2 or +3) from the basal cells). Using a multicolour lineage tracing method, we demonstrated that one stem cell per interpapillary pit survives long-term. The cells were shown to be unipotent stem cells for keratinized epithelial cells but not for taste bud cells, and were found to usually be in a slow-growing or resting state; however, on irradiation-induced injury, the cells rapidly entered the cell cycle and regenerated tongue epithelium. The elimination of Bmi1-positive stem cells significantly suppressed the regeneration. Taken together, these results suggest that the stem cells identified in this study are important for tissue maintenance and regeneration of the lingual epithelium.

  4. The lingual dorsal surface of the blue-tongue skink (Tiliqua scincoides).

    PubMed

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Germanà, G P; Levanti, M B

    2009-10-01

    The blue-tongue lizard (Tiliqua scincoides) is a variety of large skink common throughout Australia. There are seven species of Tiliqua and all of them have long bodies, short limbs and short and robust tails. T. scincoides occurs in a wide range of habitats; its diet is omnivorous. When threatened, it opens the mouth and protrudes its characteristic large fleshy cobalt blue tongue. It is currently found as a popular species and also as a pet animal in the European countries. No data are available in literature about the morphology of the tongue of T. scincoides; therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate by means of scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy, the anatomy of the dorsal lingual surface. Our results demonstrate the presence of a tongue tip with a smooth surface without papillae. The foretongue was characterized by a stratified epithelium with foliate-like papillae and deep inter-papillar spaces in the middle part and cylindrical papillae with a flat surface in the lateral parts. All the posterior area of the tongue was characterized by more compacted papillae and the inter-papillar spaces were very narrow. Light microscopy showed the presence of melanin throughout the tongue. No taste buds were recognized on the lingual dorsal surface. Therefore, the papillae probably have a mechanical function showing an important role in the swallowing phase. The morphology of the tongue surface can be correlated to the diet and, different roles, as in other examined species, can be hypothesized for different areas.

  5. [Morpho-functional characteristics of the lingual epithelium after administration of hydra peptide morphogen].

    PubMed

    Kulaeva, V V; Bykov, V L

    2007-01-01

    Using histological, morphometric and quantitative histoenzymological methods, the changes of lingual epithelium were studied in 40 outbred albino mice after 5 intraperitoneal injections of 100 micrograms of hydra peptide morphogen (HPM) per 1 kg of body weight. Administration of HPM was found to increase the total thickness of epithelial layer on the dorsal tongue surface in the interpapillary regions, while in the area of filiform papillae these changes were not significant. On the ventral tongue surface HPM induced a marked increase of total thickness of the epithelial layer as compared to that in control animals. Mitotic activity was increased in the epithelium covering the ventral surface and in the interpapillary regions on the dorsal tongue surface. Histoenzymologic study which involved the demonstration of NADH-diaphorase, succinate- and lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, followed by a cytophotometric evaluation of enzyme activity, has shown a stimulatory effect of HPM on the activity of all the enzymes studied, which was most pronounced in respect to LDH and was maximally expressed on the dorsal tongue surface. These findings collectively suggest that HPM exerts a stimulatory effect on proliferation activity and metabolism of lingual epithelium, which is differentially expressed in its variuoe topographical zones.

  6. Torque control in lingual orthodontics with lever arm mechanics: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aravind, M; Shivaprakash, G; Ramesh, G C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this report is to illustrate treatment mechanics for torque control in lingual mechanotherapy using a lever arm and transpalatal arch (TPA) tab system during en masse retraction of anterior teeth. An 18-year-old female with bimaxillary dentoalveolar proclination with crowding was treated with a lever arm-TPA tab system. The retraction tabs bent into the TPA placed across the maxillary second molars were used as anchorage. The retraction force on the maxillary anterior teeth was applied using lever arm hooks soldered between the lateral incisors and canines on a lingual mushroom archwire. By applying a retraction force to the lever arm hooks, the maxillary anterior teeth experienced greater palatal root movement as compared to the conventional retraction forces applied at the crown level. The tabs, placed high in the TPA, produced a distal tipping moment on the maxillary second molars, reinforcing their anchorage. The retraction force applied to the long lever arm hooks from the TPA tabs at the level of center of resistance (CRes) of anterior and posterior teeth is advantageous mainly in two aspects. First, it reinforces the anchorage, and second, it favors the palatal root movement of anterior teeth, thus obtaining better control over the torque during en masse retraction.

  7. Evaluating lingual carcinoma for surgical management: what does volumetric measurement with MRI offer?

    PubMed Central

    Boland, P W; Watt-Smith, S R; Pataridis, K; Alvey, C; Golding, S J

    2010-01-01

    MRI plays a crucial but under utilized role in the surgical management of lingual squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Measurement of three-dimensional tumour volume (TV) has the potential to guide management of clinically negative cervical lymph nodes and address deficiencies in current TNM staging criteria This work studied the value of MRI-measured TV as a predictor of 2 year disease-related survival (DRS) and disease-free survival (DFS), as well as occult cervical lymph node metastasis (OM) in lingual cancer. TV was determined by manually segmenting the tumour contour in each image slice and using the resulting pixel value to calculate the three-dimensional extent of disease. TV was also compared with the more established measure of tumour thickness (TT) Significant differences in DRS (χ2(1) = 7.7, Hazard ratio (HR) = 7.3, p = 0.005) and DFS (χ2(1) = 5.6, HR = 4.3, p = 0.02) at two years were found using a cut-off of 8 cm3. Similarly, a significant relationship between TV and occult cervical lymph node metastasis was discovered using a 3 cm3 cut-off (OR = 6.7, p = 0.02, Fisher's Exact Test). PMID:20965903

  8. Comparison of three different orthodontic wires for bonded lingual retainer fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Tancan; Gul, Nisa; Alan, Melike Busra; Ramoglu, Sabri Ilhan

    2012-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the detachment force, amount of deformation, fracture mode, and pull-out force of 3 different wires used for bonded lingual retainer fabrication. Methods We tested 0.0215-inch five-stranded wire (PentaOne, Masel; group I), 0.016 × 0.022-inch dead-soft eight-braided wire (Bond-A-Braid, Reliance; group II), and 0.0195-inch dead-soft coaxial wire (Respond, Ormco; group III). To test detachment force, deformation, and fracture mode, we embedded 94 lower incisor teeth in acrylic blocks in pairs. Retainer wires were bonded to the teeth and vertically directed force was applied to the wire. To test pull-out force, wires were embedded in composite that was placed in a hole at the center of an acrylic block. Tensile force was applied along the long axis of the wire. Results Detachment force and mode of fracture were not different between groups. Deformation was significantly higher in groups II and III than in group I (p < 0.001). Mean pull-out force was significantly higher for group I compared to groups II and III (p < 0.001). Conclusions Detachment force and fracture mode were similar for all wires, but greater deformations were seen in dead-soft wires. Wire pull-out force was significantly higher for five-stranded coaxial wire than for the other wires tested. Five-stranded coaxial wires are suggested for use in bonded lingual retainers. PMID:23112930

  9. Neural network pattern recognition of lingual-palatal pressure for automated detection of swallow.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Aaron J; Krival, Kate R; Ridgel, Angela L; Hahn, Elizabeth C; Tyler, Dustin J

    2015-04-01

    We describe a novel device and method for real-time measurement of lingual-palatal pressure and automatic identification of the oral transfer phase of deglutition. Clinical measurement of the oral transport phase of swallowing is a complicated process requiring either placement of obstructive sensors or sitting within a fluoroscope or articulograph for recording. Existing detection algorithms distinguish oral events with EMG, sound, and pressure signals from the head and neck, but are imprecise and frequently result in false detection. We placed seven pressure sensors on a molded mouthpiece fitting over the upper teeth and hard palate and recorded pressure during a variety of swallow and non-swallow activities. Pressure measures and swallow times from 12 healthy and 7 Parkinson's subjects provided training data for a time-delay artificial neural network to categorize the recordings as swallow or non-swallow events. User-specific neural networks properly categorized 96 % of swallow and non-swallow events, while a generalized population-trained network was able to properly categorize 93 % of swallow and non-swallow events across all recordings. Lingual-palatal pressure signals are sufficient to selectively and specifically recognize the initiation of swallowing in healthy and dysphagic patients.

  10. Morphological study of the lingual papillae of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, J F; Barbosa, M; De Paz, F J

    2008-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of giant pandas, there are few descriptions of their morphology and even fewer of their microscopic anatomy and the ultrastructure of their organs. In this study of the complete tongue of an adult male giant panda, we describe the morphology of its lingual surface, the different types of papillae, their characteristics and topographic distribution. It was seen that there are four main types of lingual papillae: filiform, conical, fungiform and vallate. There was no sign of foliate papillae, tuberculum intermolare or sublingua. Papilla distribution was not limited to the dorsum of the tongue, but was also seen on the anterior and ventral surfaces of the tongue. In the anterior third of the midline there is a smooth area with no papillae at all. Morphology of the microgrooves and pores is similar to that observed in other mammals. The papillae share characteristics encountered in Carnivora and herbivorous species of mammals. A narrow bamboo-based diet and specialized manner of eating have together resulted in modification of the tongue of a carnivoran, giving it some characteristics typical of an herbivore. PMID:18254792

  11. Separate and distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue, lingual tissue and taste papilla development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Grosse, Ann S.; Iwatsuki, Ken; Mishina, Yuji; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Mistretta, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    Although canonical Wnt signaling is known to regulate taste papilla induction and numbers, roles for noncanonical Wnt pathways in tongue and taste papilla development have not been explored. With mutant mice and whole tongue organ cultures we demonstrate that Wnt5a protein and message are within anterior tongue mesenchyme across embryo stages from the initiation of tongue formation, through papilla placode appearance and taste papilla development. The Wnt5a mutant tongue is severely shortened, with an ankyloglossia, and lingual mesenchyme is disorganized. However, fungiform papilla morphology, number and innervation are preserved, as is expression of the papilla marker, Shh. These data demonstrate that the genetic regulation for tongue size and shape can be separated from that directing lingual papilla development. Preserved number of papillae in a shortened tongue results in an increased density of fungiform papillae in the mutant tongues. In tongue organ cultures, exogenous Wnt5a profoundly suppresses papilla formation and simultaneously decreases canonical Wnt signaling as measured by the TOPGAL reporter. These findings suggest that Wnt5a antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling to dictate papilla number and spacing. In all, distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue size, fungiform papilla patterning and development are shown and a necessary balance between non-canonical and canonical Wnt paths in regulating tongue growth and fungiform papillae is proposed in a model, through the Ror2 receptor. PMID:22024319

  12. Effects of thermocycling on the degree of cure of two lingual retainer composites.

    PubMed

    Catalbas, Bulent; Uysal, Tancan; Nur, Metin; Demir, Abdullah; Gunduz, Beniz

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of thermocycling on the degree of cure (DC) and water sorption behavior of two lingual retainer composites. A total of 50 composite specimens, 5 mm diameter and 2 mm height, were prepared using Light Cure Retainer (LCR) (Reliance) and Transbond Lingual Retainer (TLR) (3M Unitek). After 40-second curing with a halogen light and after 24-hour water storage, the composite specimens were subjected to different thermocycling regimes. Absorbance peaks to monitor the DC were recorded using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, while water sorption was calculated in microg/mm(3). On DC, significant differences among the different thermocycling regimes were observed only for the TLR specimens (p<0.05). On water sorption behavior, an increase in the number of thermal cycles resulted in increased water sorption for both composites, but the statistical differences in these groups were not significant. On the effect of thermocycling up to 20,000 cycles, present findings showed that LCR was less affected than TLR. Further, LCR exhibited higher DC and lower water sorption values than TLR after thermal cycling.

  13. Adaptation of the communicative brain to post-lingual deafness. Evidence from functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Lazard, Diane S; Innes-Brown, Hamish; Barone, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Not having access to one sense profoundly modifies our interactions with the environment, in turn producing changes in brain organization. Deafness and its rehabilitation by cochlear implantation offer a unique model of brain adaptation during sensory deprivation and recovery. Functional imaging allows the study of brain plasticity as a function of the times of deafness and implantation. Even long after the end of the sensitive period for auditory brain physiological maturation, some plasticity may be observed. In this way the mature brain that becomes deaf after language acquisition can adapt to its modified sensory inputs. Oral communication difficulties induced by post-lingual deafness shape cortical reorganization of brain networks already specialized for processing oral language. Left hemisphere language specialization tends to be more preserved than functions of the right hemisphere. We hypothesize that the right hemisphere offers cognitive resources re-purposed to palliate difficulties in left hemisphere speech processing due to sensory and auditory memory degradation. If cochlear implantation is considered, this reorganization during deafness may influence speech understanding outcomes positively or negatively. Understanding brain plasticity during post-lingual deafness should thus inform the development of cognitive rehabilitation, which promotes positive reorganization of the brain networks that process oral language before surgery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Human Auditory Neuroimaging.

  14. Solid oxide fuel cell cathode infiltrate particle size control and oxygen surface exchange resistance determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burye, Theodore E.

    Over the past decade, nano-sized Mixed Ionic Electronic Conducting (MIEC) -- micro-sized Ionic Conducting (IC) composite cathodes produced by the infiltration method have received much attention in the literature due to their low polarization resistance (RP) at intermediate (500-700°C) operating temperatures. Small infiltrated MIEC oxide nano-particle size and low intrinsic MIEC oxygen surface exchange resistance (Rs) have been two critical factors allowing these Nano-Micro-Composite Cathodes (NMCCs) to achieve high performance and/or low temperature operation. Unfortunately, previous studies have not found a reliable method to control or reduce infiltrated nano-particle size. In addition, controversy exists on the best MIEC infiltrate composition because: 1) Rs measurements on infiltrated MIEC particles are presently unavailable in the literature, and 2) bulk and thin film Rs measurements on nominally identical MIEC compositions often vary by up to 3 orders of magnitude. Here, two processing techniques, precursor nitrate solution desiccation and ceria oxide pre-infiltration, were developed to systematically produce a reduction in the average La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe 0.2O3-delta (LSCF) infiltrated nano-particle size from 50 nm to 22 nm. This particle size reduction reduced the SOFC operating temperature, (defined as the temperature where RP=0.1 Ocm 2) from 650°C to 540°C. In addition, Rs values for infiltrated MIEC particles were determined for the first time through finite element modeling calculations on 3D Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscope (FIB-SEM) reconstructions of electrochemically characterized infiltrated electrodes.

  15. Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant could be exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago. The vast majority of homes in the United States and indeed the world are ventilated through natural means such as infiltration caused by air leakage. Newer homes in the western world are tight and require mechanical ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate norunder-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 specifies how much mechanical ventilation is considered necessary to provide acceptable indoor air quality, but that standard is weak on how infiltration can contribute towards meeting the total requirement. In the past ASHRAE Standard 136 was used to do this, but new theoretical approaches and expanded weather data have made that standard out of date. This article will describe how to properly treat infiltration as an equivalent ventilation approach and then use new data and these new approaches to demonstrate how these calculations might be done both in general and to update Standard 136.

  16. Sorptivity and liquid infiltration into dry soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culligan, Patricia J.; Ivanov, Vladimir; Germaine, John T.

    2005-10-01

    The sorptivity S quantifies the effect of capillarity on liquid movement in a porous material. For liquid infiltration into an initially dry material, S is a parameter that is contingent on both liquid and material properties as well as the maximum liquid content behind the infiltrating front, θm. Scaling analyses are used to derive a dimensionless, intrinsic sorptivity S∗ that is constant for different liquids, Miller-similar materials and different values of θm. The analyses confirm that S is dependent on β1/2, where β = cos ϕ is a measure of the wettability of the liquid. They also indicate a power law relationship between S and Se(av), the average liquid saturation behind the infiltrating front. Seventeen water and eleven Soltrol 220 horizontal infiltration experiments are reported in uniform, dry sand. Test results show that water is partially wetting in the sand. They also confirm that S∝Se(av)d, where d = 3.2 for the experimental conditions. The usefulness of a general, dimensionless Boltzmann variable is demonstrated to normalize infiltration profiles for the different liquids. An approximate method for sorptivity calculation is shown to provide an accurate estimate of S∗.

  17. Greatly Increased Toughness of Infiltrated Spider Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Mo; Pippel, Eckhard; Gösele, Ulrich; Dresbach, Christian; Qin, Yong; Chandran, C. Vinod; Bräuniger, Thomas; Hause, Gerd; Knez, Mato

    2009-04-01

    In nature, tiny amounts of inorganic impurities, such as metals, are incorporated in the protein structures of some biomaterials and lead to unusual mechanical properties of those materials. A desire to produce these biomimicking new materials has stimulated materials scientists, and diverse approaches have been attempted. In contrast, research to improve the mechanical properties of biomaterials themselves by direct metal incorporation into inner protein structures has rarely been tried because of the difficulty of developing a method that can infiltrate metals into biomaterials, resulting in a metal-incorporated protein matrix. We demonstrated that metals can be intentionally infiltrated into inner protein structures of biomaterials through multiple pulsed vapor-phase infiltration performed with equipment conventionally used for atomic layer deposition (ALD). We infiltrated zinc (Zn), titanium (Ti), or aluminum (Al), combined with water from corresponding ALD precursors, into spider dragline silks and observed greatly improved toughness of the resulting silks. The presence of the infiltrated metals such as Al or Ti was verified by energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra measured inside the treated silks. This result of enhanced toughness of spider silk could potentially serve as a model for a more general approach to enhance the strength and toughness of other biomaterials.

  18. Incorporating infiltration modelling in urban flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumadar, A. S.; Pathirana, A.; Gersonius, B.; Zevenbergen, C.

    2008-06-01

    Increasing frequency and intensity of flood events in urban areas can be linked to increase in impervious area due to urbanization, exacerbated by climate change. The established approach of conveying storm water by conventional drainage systems has contributed to magnification of runoff volume and peak flows beyond those of undeveloped catchments. Furthermore, the continuous upgrading of such conventional systems is costly and unsustainable in the long term. Sustainable drainage systems aim at addressing the adverse effects associated with conventional systems, by mimicking the natural drainage processes, encouraging infiltration and storage of storm water. In this study we model one of the key components of SuDS, the infiltration basins, in order to assert the benefits of the approach. Infiltration modelling was incorporated in the detention storage unit within the one-dimensional urban storm water management model, EPA-SWMM 5.0. By introduction of infiltration modelling in the storage, the flow attenuation performance of the unit was considerably improved. The study also examines the catchment scale impact of both source and regional control storage/infiltration systems. Based on the findings of two case study areas modelled with the proposed options, it was observed that source control systems have a greater and much more natural impact at a catchment level, with respect to flow attenuation, compared to regional control systems of which capacity is equivalent to the sum of source control capacity at the catchment.

  19. 40 CFR 35.927-1 - Infiltration/inflow analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Infiltration/inflow analysis. 35.927-1... Infiltration/inflow analysis. (a) The infiltration/inflow analysis shall demonstrate the nonexistence or possible existence of excessive infiltration/inflow in the sewer system. The analysis should identify...

  20. Spatial and temporal variations of ponded infiltration in a grid of permanent infiltration rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votrubová, Jana; Dohnal, Michal; Dušek, Jaromír; Vogel, Tomáš; Tesař, Miroslav; Císlerová, Milena

    2016-04-01

    The soil at Liz experimental site (Volynka headwater catchment, Sumava Mountains, southern Bohemia) has been subject to a long term research on the soil infiltration properties since 2003. For this purpose, 18 permanent infiltration rings were installed at a gently sloped grass-covered experimental plot (300 sq.m). Using this set-up, the single-ring ponded infiltration experiments have been conducted annually. Since 2005, a procedure of repeating the same ponded infiltration experiments in two successive days has been implemented. For the soil type of the study area (sandy loam developed upon gneiss bedrock), a large spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties had been reported before. The focus of the present study has been primarily the temporal variability of the soil infiltration properties. Results of a supplementary dye-tracer experiment conducted in 2005 demonstrate that in the soil studied the infiltration process is strongly dominated by preferential flow. As expected, infiltration rates varied considerably among the infiltration ring. With regard to the impact of the initial soil moisture conditions, general decrease of the infiltration rates observed on two subsequent days was detected. Surprisingly, the spatial variations between separate measuring points were vastly overridden by a huge overall increase of the infiltration rates observed throughout the years. The observed variability of the experimental data was further examined in numerical simulations of hypothetical scenarios reflecting possible variations of soil profile and experimental set-up. Axisymmetric 3D simulations were performed using S2D code. The dual-continuum model was able to describe part of the variability of infiltration curves associated with soil structure heterogeneity. None of the tested factors could explain the wide range of infiltration rate variations observed. Nevertheless, better agreement between simulated and observed infiltration characteristics could be achieved

  1. Influence of the initial soil water content on Beerkan water infiltration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassabatere, L.; Loizeau, S.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Winiarski, T.; Rossier, Y.; Delolme, C.; Gaudet, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding and modeling of water flow in the vadose zone are important with regards water management and infiltration devices design. Water infiltration process clearly depends on initial soil water content, in particular for sandy soils with high organic matter content. This study investigates the influence of initial water content on water infiltration in a hydrophobic sandy soil and on the related derivation of hydraulic parameters using the BEST algorithm (Lassabatere et al., 2006). The studied sandy soil has a high total organic content decreasing from 3.5% (w/w) at the surface to 0.5% (w/w) below 1cm depth. The highest TOC at surface was due to the presence of a dense biofilm and resulted in a high surface hydrophobicity under dry conditions (low initial water contents). The water infiltration experiments consisted in infiltrating known volumes of water through a simple ring at null pressure head (Beerkan method). The infiltrations were performed during three successive days after a dry period with a storm event between the first and the second day (5 mm) and another between the second and the third day (35 mm). These events resulted in an increase in initial water contents, from less than 5% for the first day to around 10% for the last day. Experiments were performed for appropriate conditions for Beerkan experiments: initial water contents below 1/4 of the saturated water content and uniform water profile resulting from water redistribution after each rainfall event. The analysis of the infiltration data clearly highlights the strong effect of hydrophobicity. For the driest initial conditions (first day), infiltration rates increased with time, whereas they decreased with time for wetter conditions. Such a decrease agreed with the principles of water infiltration without hydrophobicity. In addition, total cumulative infiltrations were far higher for the wettest conditions. Regarding hydraulic characterization, only the data obtained during the last

  2. Opal photonic crystals infiltrated with chalcogenide glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Astratov, V. N.; Adawi, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Tikhomirov, V. K.; Lyubin, V.; Lidzey, D. G.; Ariu, M.; Reynolds, A. L.

    2001-06-25

    Composite opal structures for nonlinear applications are obtained by infiltration with chalcogenide glasses As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and AsSe by precipitation from solution. Analysis of spatially resolved optical spectra reveals that the glass aggregates into submillimeter areas inside the opal. These areas exhibit large shifts in the optical stop bands by up to 80 nm, and by comparison with modelling are shown to have uniform glass filling factors of opal pores up to 40%. Characterization of the domain structure of the opals prior to infiltration by large area angle-resolved spectroscopy is an important step in the analysis of the properties of the infiltrated regions. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Parametric Study of Reactive Melt Infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Colella, Phillip

    2000-01-01

    Reactive melt infiltration is viewed as a promising means of achieving near-net shape manufacturing with quick processing time and at low cost. Since the reactants and products are, in general, of varying density, overall conservation of mass dictates that there is a force related to chemical conversion which can directly influence infiltration behavior. In effect, the driving pressure forces may compete with the forces from chemical conversion, affecting the advancement of the front. We have developed a two-dimensional numerical code to examine these effects, using reaction-formed silicon carbide as a model system for this process. We have examined a range of initial porosities, pore radii, and reaction rates in order to investigate their effects on infiltration dynamics.

  4. Can Cross-Cultural Understanding Aid Second Language Acquisition? Toward a Theory of Ethno-Lingual Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citron, James L.

    1995-01-01

    The term "ethno-lingual relativity" is a perspective that is not limited by one's own cultural and linguistic experiences, but rather is open to the contrasting cultural and linguistic patterns of other peoples. This article explores the hypothesis that having such a perspective might facilitate second language acquisition. (19 references)…

  5. Changes in force associated with the amount of aligner activation and lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Ren, Chaochao; Wang, Zheyao; Zhao, Pai; Wang, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to measure the orthodontic forces generated by thermoplastic aligners and investigate the possible influences of different activations for lingual bodily movements on orthodontic forces, and their attenuation. Methods Thermoplastic material of 1.0-mm in thickness was used to manufacture aligners for 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 mm activations for lingual bodily movements of the maxillary central incisor. The orthodontic force in the lingual direction delivered by the thermoplastic aligners was measured using a micro-stress sensor system for the invisible orthodontic technique, and was monitored for 2 weeks. Results Orthodontic force increased with the amount of activation of the aligner in the initial measurements. The attenuation speed in the 0.6 mm group was faster than that of the other groups (p < 0.05). All aligners demonstrated rapid relaxation in the first 8 hours, which then decreased slowly and plateaued on day 4 or 5. Conclusions The amount of activation had a substantial influence on the orthodontic force imparted by the aligners. The results suggest that the activation of lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor should not exceed 0.5 mm. The initial 4 or 5 days is important with respect to orthodontic treatment incorporating an aligner. PMID:27019820

  6. Establishment of a novel lingual organoid culture system: generation of organoids having mature keratinized epithelium from adult epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-15

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  7. Intercultural Interactions of Mono-Cultural, Mono-Lingual Local Students in Small Group Learning Activities: A Bourdieusian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Cassandra; Fozdar, Farida; Volet, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the understandings and experiences of mono-cultural, mono-lingual local students in relation to intercultural interactions within small group learning activities at university. Bourdieu's concepts of field, habitus and capital are employed to illuminate a number of barriers to intercultural interaction. Using qualitative…

  8. The Role of Music in Speech Intelligibility of Learners with Post Lingual Hearing Impairment in Selected Units in Lusaka District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katongo, Emily Mwamba; Ndhlovu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to establish the role of music in speech intelligibility of learners with Post Lingual Hearing Impairment (PLHI) and strategies teachers used to enhance speech intelligibility in learners with PLHI in selected special units for the deaf in Lusaka district. The study used a descriptive research design. Qualitative and quantitative…

  9. Establishment of a Novel Lingual Organoid Culture System: Generation of Organoids Having Mature Keratinized Epithelium from Adult Epithelial Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-01

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  10. Analysis of Speech Disorders in Acute Pseudobulbar Palsy: a Longitudinal Study of a Patient with Lingual Paralysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroy-Malherbe, V.; Chevrie-Muller, C.; Rigoard, M. T.; Arabia, C.

    1998-01-01

    This case report describes the case of a 52-year-old man with bilateral central lingual paralysis following a myocardial infarction. Analysis of speech recordings 15 days and 18 months after the attack were acoustically analyzed. The case demonstrates the usefulness of acoustic analysis to detect slight acoustic differences. (DB)

  11. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique

    PubMed Central

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Triviño, Tarcila; Velasco, Leandro; Lombardo, Luca; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. METHODS: The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D) and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth were selected and 14 measurements were calculated to determine the shape and size of dental arches. RESULTS: Shapiro-Wilk test determined small arch shape by means of 25th percentile (P25%) - an average percentile for the medium arch; and a large one determined by means of 75th percentile (P75%). T-test revealed differences between males and females in the size of 12 dental arches. CONCLUSION: The straight-wire arch shape used in the lingual straight wire technique is a parabolic-shaped arch, slightly flattened on its anterior portion. Due to similarity among dental arch sizes shown by males and females, a more simplified diagram chart was designed. PMID:25715725

  12. A Cross-Lingual Similarity Measure for Detecting Biomedical Term Translations

    PubMed Central

    Bollegala, Danushka; Kontonatsios, Georgios; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Bilingual dictionaries for technical terms such as biomedical terms are an important resource for machine translation systems as well as for humans who would like to understand a concept described in a foreign language. Often a biomedical term is first proposed in English and later it is manually translated to other languages. Despite the fact that there are large monolingual lexicons of biomedical terms, only a fraction of those term lexicons are translated to other languages. Manually compiling large-scale bilingual dictionaries for technical domains is a challenging task because it is difficult to find a sufficiently large number of bilingual experts. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting most similar translation candidates for a biomedical term specified in one language (source) from another language (target). Specifically, a biomedical term in a language is represented using two types of features: (a) intrinsic features that consist of character n-grams extracted from the term under consideration, and (b) extrinsic features that consist of unigrams and bigrams extracted from the contextual windows surrounding the term under consideration. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure using each of those feature types. First, to reduce the dimensionality of the feature space in each language, we propose prototype vector projection (PVP)—a non-negative lower-dimensional vector projection method. Second, we propose a method to learn a mapping between the feature spaces in the source and target language using partial least squares regression (PLSR). The proposed method requires only a small number of training instances to learn a cross-lingual similarity measure. The proposed PVP method outperforms popular dimensionality reduction methods such as the singular value decomposition (SVD) and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) in a nearest neighbor prediction task. Moreover, our experimental results covering several language pairs such as

  13. Attenuation of pressor response following intubation: Efficacy of nitro-glycerine lingual spray

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Indira; Naithani, Udita; Dadheech, Vinod Kumar; Pradeep, D. S.; Meena, Khemraj; Verma, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The role of nitro-glycerine (NTG) lingual spray for attenuation of the hemodynamic response associated with intubation is not much investigated. We conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy of NTG lingual pump or pen spray in attenuation of intubation induced hemodynamic responses and to elucidate the optimum dose. Material and Methods: In a prospective randomized controlled trial, 90 adult patients of ASA I, II, 18-60 year posted for elective general surgery under general anesthesia with intubation were randomly allocated to three groups as Group C (control) - receiving no NTG spray, Group N1 – receiving 1 NTG spray and Group N2 – receiving 2 NTG spray one minute before intubation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate were recorded at baseline, just before intubation (i.e., 60 s just after induction and NTG spray), immediately after intubation, at 1, 2, 5 and 10 min after intubation. Results: Incidence of hypertension was significantly higher in Group C (60%, n = 18) as compared to Group N1 and N2 (10%, n = 3 each), P < 0.01. Mean value of SBP, DBP and MAP showed a significant rise as compared to baseline, following intubation in control group (15.31% in SBP, 12.12% in DBP, 17.77% in MAP) that persisted till 5 min, while no significant rise was observed in Group N1 and N2. There was a trend toward fall in blood pressure in Group N2 (4.95% fall in SBP, 4.72% fall in MAP) 1-min following spray, which was clinically insignificant. Mean value of SBP, DBP and MAP was significantly higher in Group C than in Group N1, which was in turn greater than Group N2 (Group C > N1> N2), P < 0.05. However, incidence of tachycardia was comparable in three groups (70% in group C, 63.33% in Group N1 and 67.77% in Group N2, P > 0.05). Conclusions: We concluded that the NTG lingual spray in dose of 0.4 mg (1 spray) or 0.8 mg (2 sprays) was effective in attenuation of intubation induced

  14. A cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting biomedical term translations.

    PubMed

    Bollegala, Danushka; Kontonatsios, Georgios; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Bilingual dictionaries for technical terms such as biomedical terms are an important resource for machine translation systems as well as for humans who would like to understand a concept described in a foreign language. Often a biomedical term is first proposed in English and later it is manually translated to other languages. Despite the fact that there are large monolingual lexicons of biomedical terms, only a fraction of those term lexicons are translated to other languages. Manually compiling large-scale bilingual dictionaries for technical domains is a challenging task because it is difficult to find a sufficiently large number of bilingual experts. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure for detecting most similar translation candidates for a biomedical term specified in one language (source) from another language (target). Specifically, a biomedical term in a language is represented using two types of features: (a) intrinsic features that consist of character n-grams extracted from the term under consideration, and (b) extrinsic features that consist of unigrams and bigrams extracted from the contextual windows surrounding the term under consideration. We propose a cross-lingual similarity measure using each of those feature types. First, to reduce the dimensionality of the feature space in each language, we propose prototype vector projection (PVP)--a non-negative lower-dimensional vector projection method. Second, we propose a method to learn a mapping between the feature spaces in the source and target language using partial least squares regression (PLSR). The proposed method requires only a small number of training instances to learn a cross-lingual similarity measure. The proposed PVP method outperforms popular dimensionality reduction methods such as the singular value decomposition (SVD) and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) in a nearest neighbor prediction task. Moreover, our experimental results covering several language pairs such as

  15. Pressureless infiltration of aluminum metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Y.; Nukami, T.; Flemings, M.C.

    1995-08-01

    Pressureless infiltration of ceramic preforms by molten aluminum is described. The preforms are SiC with varying amounts of particulate Al, Ti, and Ni. Infiltrants employed are pure Al and Al-12.5 wt pct Si. It is shown that a pressure differential within the preform is required for infiltration, and measurements are made of pressure changes in the preforms during infiltration. Results indicate that atmospheric pressure is essential for infiltration but that capillarity may play a role as well.

  16. Effects of fast halogen and plasma arc curing lights on the surface hardness of orthodontic adhesives for lingual retainers.

    PubMed

    Uşümez, Serdar; Büyükyilmaz, Tamer; Karaman, Ali Ihya

    2003-06-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) identify the optimum cure times of 2 different lingual retainer adhesives with a conventional halogen, a fast halogen, and a plasma arc light by measuring Vickers surface hardness, and (2) determine whether different lights produce similar surface hardness values for the same adhesive resin material. The investigated plasma arc curing unit was the PowerPac (American Dental Technologies, Corpus Christi, Tex), and the fast halogen unit was the Optilux 501 (Kerr, Orange, Calif). A conventional curing unit, the Ortholux XT (3M Dental Products, St. Paul, Minn) was used as the control. Two orthodontic lingual retainer adhesives were used: Transbond Lingual Retainer (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and Light Cure Retainer (Reliance Orthodontic Products, Itasca, Ill). Concise (3M Dental Products) and diluted Concise were used as controls. Transbond Lingual Retainer was polymerized by the PowerPac light in 6 seconds, by the Optilux in 10 seconds, and by the conventional halogen light in 20 seconds. The minimum curing times for Light Cure Retainer adhesive were 15 seconds for PowerPac, 10 seconds for Optilux, and 40 seconds for conventional halogen. Surface hardness values for each resin did not differ significantly with different curing units. However, different adhesives demonstrated significantly different surface hardness values. Final Vickers surface hardness values (averaged across curing units) of Transbond Lingual Retainer, Concise, diluted Concise, and Light Cure Retainer were 62.8, 52.4, 46.0, and 40.4, respectively. Plasma arc or fast halogen units polymerize resin composite adhesive in much shorter times than do conventional curing units, without a significant loss in surface hardness. Therefore, these units are suggested for clinical use to save chairside time.

  17. Lingual ulcer as the only sign of recurrent mycobacterial infection in an HIV/AIDS-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; González-Ramírez, Imelda; Mosqueda-Gómez, Juan Luis; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Reyes-Gutiérrez, Edgardo; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2005-01-01

    The report describes an HIV/AIDS patient seen at a referral center in Mexico City, in whom a mycobacterial infection in the oral mucosa, probably tuberculosis (TB) was identified. The purpose is to describe the clinical and histological findings in an HIV-infected patient, who after being treated successfully for tuberculous lymphangitis 4 years ago, presented with a lingual ulcer as the only suggestive sign of recurrence of mycobacterial infection, probably M. tuberculosis. A 39-year-old man seen in the HIV clinic of the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" in Mexico City since 1991 for HIV infection. In 1999 the patient developed tuberculous lymphangitis; he was managed with a 4-drug regimen for 12 months, with improvement of local and systemic symptoms. In May of 2003, the patient presented a painful superficial lingual ulcer, 0.7 cm in diameter, well circumscribed, crateriform with slightly elevated, irregular and indurated borders, of 4 months duration. The histopathological examination showed chronic granulomatous inflammation with giant multinucleated cells, suggestive of mycobacterial infection, and recurrence of TB was considered. Rifampin, isoniazide, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and streptomycin were administered. The lingual lesion improved with partial healing at the first week and total remission at 45 days after the beginning of the antituberculous treatment. In June, 2003, the patient began highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) that included two NRTIs and one NNRTI. At 7 months of follow-up, the patient remains free of lingual lesions. The particularity of the present case is that the lingual ulcer was the only sign of infection by mycobacteria, suggestive of TB, in an HIV/AIDS patient that probably represented a recurrence of a previous episode.

  18. Japanese/English Blog Distillation and Cross-Lingual Blog Analysis with Multilingual Wikipedia Entries as Fundamental Knowledge Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakasaki, Hiroyuki; Kawaba, Mariko; Yokomoto, Daisuke; Utsuro, Takehito; Fukuhara, Tomohiro

    The overall goal of this paper is to cross-lingually analyze multilingual blogs collected with a topic keyword. The framework of collecting multilingual blogs with a topic keyword is designed as the blog feed retrieval procedure. In this paper, we take an approach of collecting blog feeds rather than blog posts, mainly because we regard the former as a larger information unit in the blogosphere and prefer it as the information source for cross-lingual blog analysis. In the blog feed retrieval procedure, we also regard Wikipedia as a large scale ontological knowledge base for conceptually indexing the blogosphere. The underlying motivation of employing Wikipedia is in linking a knowledge base of well known facts and relatively neutral opinions with rather raw, user generated media like blogs, which include less well known facts and much more radical opinions. In our framework, first, in order to collect candidates of blog feeds for a given query, we use existing Web search engine APIs, which return a ranked list of blog posts, given a topic keyword. Next, we re-rank the list of blog feeds according to the number of hits of the topic keyword as well as closely related terms extracted from the Wikipedia entry in each blog feed. We compare the proposed blog feed retrieval method to existing Web search engine APIs and achieve significant improvement. We then apply the proposed blog distillation framework to the task of cross-lingually analyzing multilingual blogs collected with a topic keyword. Here, we cross-lingually and cross-culturally compare less well known facts and opinions that are closely related to a given topic. Results of cross-lingual blog analysis support the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  19. Bond strengths of lingual orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins cured by transillumination.

    PubMed

    King, L; Smith, R T; Wendt, S L; Behrents, R G

    1987-04-01

    A method of curing light-cured composite resins by transillumination to cement acid-etched fixed partial dentures was adapted to bond solid mesh-backed lingual orthodontic brackets. Results of this investigation showed that the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins were significantly less (P less than 0.05) than the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets cemented with traditional adhesives and orthodontic composite resins. Notwithstanding, the bond strengths achieved with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins should be adequate to withstand the forces of mastication and orthodontic movements. There was no correlation of bond strengths of the brackets cemented with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins when compared to the faciolingual widths of the teeth.

  20. Lingualized integration: tooth molds and an occlusal scheme for edentulous implant patients.

    PubMed

    Lang, B R; Razzoog, M E

    1992-01-01

    The interface of bone and soft tissue to dental implants has been extensively documented, while the influence of biomechanics and the occlusal interface continues to be overlooked. Yet that same occlusal interface may ultimately be the prime factor in the lifetime survival rate of dental implants. What is lacking, for the practitioner, is a clear concept of the occlusal rehabilitation which is required and appropriate for the totally edentulous implant patient. Lingualized integration represents an occlusal scheme using specific tooth molds designed to improve the likelihood of maximum intercuspation and an absence of deflective occlusal contacts, provide cusp height for selective occlusal reshaping, and achieve a natural and pleasing appearance. Factors in the articulation and arrangement of the posterior teeth to assure the attainment of the fundamental goals of comfort, function, and appearance in occlusal rehabilitation for edentulous implant patients are included.

  1. Clinical ergotism with lingual ischemia induced by clarithromycin-ergotamine interaction.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, R S; Dart, R C; Gomez, H F

    1996-02-26

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including erythromycin and troleandomycin, is associated with clinically significant adverse drug interactions. This results from macrolide inhibition of cytochrome P-450 metabolism of numerous xenobiotics, resulting in elevated serum drug levels and clinical intoxication. Animal studies, however, suggest that clarithromycin, the newest approved macrolide antibiotic, has has less potential for adverse drug reactions. We describe a patient who, on her fifth day of clarithromycin therapy, developed clinical ergotism (i.e., hypertension, lingual ischemia, and peripheral cyanosis) several hours after administration of her usual 2-mg dose of ergotamine tartrate. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical ergotism precipitated by clarithromycin-ergotamine interaction and suggests that, like other macrolide antibiotics, ergot preparations should be avoided in patients who are taking clarithromycin.

  2. Determining the distance from the lingual frenum anterior attachment to the lower incisors' incisal edges.

    PubMed

    Mahboub, Farhang; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Molavi, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Occlusal rims are used to determine the jaw relationships in the transverse and vertical dimensions and estimate the inter-occlusal distance in edentulous patients. It is important to find ways to determine the height and shape of the occlusal rims correctly. This study was undertaken to determine the exact distance from the oral cavity floor to the incisal edges of mandibular incisors to serve as a guide for adjusting the height of the mandibular occlusal rim. Methods. Forty patients were selected and special trays were fabricated to prepare accurate stone casts on which the measurements were made at 0.01-mm accuracy. Two marks were placed on the casts at the incisal edges of mandibular incisors and at anterior attachment of lingual frenum. Then the distance between these two marks was determined on the vertical spindle of a surveyor using a digital Vernier measuring tool and recorded. Results. The results showed that the mean and standard deviation of the distances between the oral cavity floor and the incisal edges of lower incisors were 14.35 ± 1.68 mm, with a range of 10.2‒17.02 mm. The mean distances in males and females were 15.42 ± 0.97 and 13.28 ± 1.57 mm, respectively. T-test showed significant differences in this distance between males and females, with greater distances in males. Conclusion. The distance between the oral cavity floor and the incisal edges of mandibular incisors at anterior attachment of lingual frenum might be a proper criterion for the initial adjustment of occlusal rims.

  3. Determining the distance from the lingual frenum anterior attachment to the lower incisors’ incisal edges

    PubMed Central

    Mahboub, Farhang; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Molavi, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Occlusal rims are used to determine the jaw relationships in the transverse and vertical dimensions and estimate the inter-occlusal distance in edentulous patients. It is important to find ways to determine the height and shape of the occlusal rims correctly. This study was undertaken to determine the exact distance from the oral cavity floor to the incisal edges of mandibular incisors to serve as a guide for adjusting the height of the mandibular occlusal rim. Methods. Forty patients were selected and special trays were fabricated to prepare accurate stone casts on which the measurements were made at 0.01-mm accuracy. Two marks were placed on the casts at the incisal edges of mandibular incisors and at anterior attachment of lingual frenum. Then the distance between these two marks was determined on the vertical spindle of a surveyor using a digital Vernier measuring tool and recorded. Results. The results showed that the mean and standard deviation of the distances between the oral cavity floor and the incisal edges of lower incisors were 14.35 ± 1.68 mm, with a range of 10.2‒17.02 mm. The mean distances in males and females were 15.42 ± 0.97 and 13.28 ± 1.57 mm, respectively. T-test showed significant differences in this distance between males and females, with greater distances in males. Conclusion. The distance between the oral cavity floor and the incisal edges of mandibular incisors at anterior attachment of lingual frenum might be a proper criterion for the initial adjustment of occlusal rims. PMID:28096953

  4. An Infiltration Exercise for Introductory Soil Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbarick, K. A.; Ippolito, J. A.; Butters, G.; Sorge, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    One of the largest challenges in teaching introductory soil science is explaining the dynamics of soil infiltration. To aid students in understanding the concept and to further engage them in active learning in the soils laboratory course, we developed an exercise using Decagon Mini-Disk Infiltrometers with a tension head (h[subscript o]) of 2 cm.…

  5. Disinfection of secondary effluents by infiltration percolation.

    PubMed

    Makni, H

    2001-01-01

    Among the most attractive applications of reclaimed wastewater are: irrigation of public parks, sports fields, golf courses and market gardening. These uses require advanced wastewater treatment including disinfection. According to WHO guidelines (1989) and current rules and regulations in Tunisia, faecal coliform levels have to be reduced to < 10(3) or 10(2) CFU/100 mL. In Tunisia, most wastewater plants are only secondary treatment and, in order to meet health related regulations, the effluents need to be disinfected. However, it is usual for secondary effluents to need filtration prior to disinfection. Effectiveness of conventional disinfection processes, such as chlorination and UV radiation, are dependent upon the oxidation level and the levels of suspended solids of the treated water. Ozonation is relatively expensive and energy consuming. The consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of conventional techniques, their reliability, investment needs and operational costs will lead to the use of less sophisticated alternative techniques for certain facilities. Among alternative techniques, soil aquifer treatment and infiltration percolation through sand beds have been studied in Arizona, Israel, France, Spain and Morocco. Infiltration percolation plants have been intermittently fed with secondary or high quality primary effluents which percolated through 1.5-2 m unsaturated coarse sand and were recovered by under-drains. In such infiltration percolation facilities, microorganisms were eliminated through numerous physical, physicochemical and biological inter-related processes (mechanical filtration, adsorption and microbial degradation respectively). Efficiency of faecal coliform removal was dependent upon the water detention times in the filtering medium and on the oxidation of the filtered water. Effluents of Sfax town aerated ponds were infiltrated through 1.5 m deep sand columns in order to determine the performance of infiltration percolation in the

  6. Managed aquifer recharge of treated wastewater: water quality changes resulting from infiltration through the vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Elise; Toze, Simon; Patterson, Bradley; Higginson, Simon

    2011-11-01

    Secondary treated wastewater was infiltrated through a 9 m-thick calcareous vadose zone during a 39 month managed aquifer recharge (MAR) field trial to determine potential improvements in the recycled water quality. The water quality improvements of the recycled water were based on changes in the chemistry and microbiology of (i) the recycled water prior to infiltration relative to (ii) groundwater immediately down-gradient from the infiltration gallery. Changes in the average concentrations of several constituents in the recycled water were identified with reductions of 30% for phosphorous, 66% for fluoride, 62% for iron and 51% for total organic carbon when the secondary treated wastewater was infiltrated at an applied rate of 17.5 L per minute with a residence time of approximately four days in the vadose zone and less than two days in the aquifer. Reductions were also noted for oxazepam and temazepam among the pharmaceuticals tested and for a range of microbial pathogens, but reductions were harder to quantify as their magnitudes varied over time. Total nitrogen and carbamazepine persisted in groundwater down-gradient from the infiltration galleries. Infiltration does potentially offer a range of water quality improvements over direct injection to the water table without passage through the unsaturated zone; however, additional treatment options for the non-potable water may still need to be considered, depending on the receiving environment or the end use of the recovered water.

  7. Differential Activation of Infiltrating Monocyte-Derived Cells After Mild and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Trahanas, Diane M; Cuda, Carla M; Perlman, Harris; Schwulst, Steven J

    2015-03-01

    Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the brain. Although embryologically and functionally distinct, they are morphologically similar to peripheral monocyte-derived cells, resulting in a poor ability to discriminate between the two cell types. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid and reliable method to simultaneously characterize, quantify, and discriminate between whole populations of myeloid cells from the brain in a murine model of traumatic brain injury. Male C57BL/6 mice underwent traumatic brain injury (n = 16) or sham injury (n = 14). Brains were harvested at 24 h after injury. Multiparameter flow cytometry and sequential gating analysis were performed, allowing for discrimination between microglia and infiltrating leukocytes as well as for the characterization and quantification of individual subtypes within the infiltrating population. The proportion of infiltrating leukocytes within the brain increased with the severity of injury, and the predominant cell types within the infiltrating population were monocyte derived (P = 0.01). In addition, the severity of injury altered the overall makeup of the infiltrating monocyte-derived cells. In conclusion, we describe a flow cytometry-based technique for gross discrimination between infiltrating leukocytes and microglia as well as the ability to simultaneously characterize and quantify individual myeloid subtypes and their maturation states within these populations.

  8. Residue cover effects on soil erosion and the infiltration in black soil under simulated rainfall experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yan; Xie, Yun; Liu, Yuxin; Liu, Hongyuan; Ren, Xiaoyu

    2016-12-01

    Residue cover is widely used in the Northeastern China Black Soil Region for soil erosion control due to the large annual production of crop residues. Quantitative evaluations of the residue cover effects on preventing soil loss and on the cumulative infiltration amount are thus desirable. Herein, rainfall simulation experiments were conducted using simulators and soil flumes to study the effects of residue cover on soil erosion and infiltration under various rainfall events. Laboratory experiments were designed utilizing five levels of residue cover (bare, 15%, 35%, 55% and 75%), four rainfall intensities (30 mm/h, 60 mm/h, 90 mm/h and 120 mm/h), two soil moistures (dry and wet run) and a fixed slope of 7%. The results indicated that residue cover strongly affects runoff, soil loss and infiltration. Equations for predicting the soil loss ratio and infiltration ratio (the ratio of residue cover soil to bare soil) are herein proposed based on nonlinear curve regression. An empirical approach presented as the infiltration ratios multiplied Philip's equation derived from bare soil was established for estimating the cumulative infiltration amounts under various residue covers. The equation was demonstrated to be suitable for infiltration prediction for black soil by the root mean square error value and 1:1 line method. In addition, the relationship between the residue cover and biomass of corn residues was provided in order to enable accurate measurement of the residue coverage. These derived equations could be used for soil erosion and infiltration prediction under no-till and residue cover management conditions in the black soil region.

  9. Passive Microwave Observation of Soil Water Infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Rawls, Walter J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Parlange, Marc B.

    1997-01-01

    Infiltration is a time varying process of water entry into soil. Experiments were conducted here using truck based microwave radiometers to observe small plots during and following sprinkler irrigation. Experiments were conducted on a sandy loam soil in 1994 and a silt loam in 1995. Sandy loam soils typically have higher infiltration capabilities than clays. For the sandy loam the observed brightness temperature (TB) quickly reached a nominally constant value during irrigation. When the irrigation was stopped the TB began to increase as drainage took place. The irrigation rates in 1995 with the silt loam soil exceeded the saturated conductivity of the soil. During irrigation the TB values exhibited a pattern that suggests the occurrence of coherent reflection, a rarely observed phenomena under natural conditions. These results suggested the existence of a sharp dielectric boundary (wet over dry soil) that was increasing in depth with time.

  10. Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists (COMIS) fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.; Rayner-Hooson, A.

    1990-05-01

    The COMIS workshop (Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists) was a joint research effort to develop a multizone infiltration mode. This workshop (October 1988--September 1989) was hosted by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Applied Science Division. The task of the workshop was to develop a detailed multizone infiltration program taking crack flow, HVAC-systems, single-sided ventilation and transport mechanism through large openings into account. This work was accomplished not by investigating into numerical description of physical phenomena but by reviewing the literature for the best suitable algorithm. The numerical description of physical phenomena is clearly a task of IEA-Annex XX Air Flow Patterns in Buildings,'' which will be finished in September 1991. Multigas tracer measurements and wind tunnel data will be used to check the model. The agenda integrated all participants' contributions into a single model containing a large library of modules. The user-friendly program is aimed at researchers and building professionals. From its announcement in December 1986, COMIS was well received by the research community. Due to the internationality of the group, several national and international research programmes were co-ordinated with the COMIS workshop. Colleagues for France, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, People's Republic of China, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States of America were working together on the development of the model. Even though this kind of co-operation is well known in other fields of research, e.g., high energy physics; for the field of building physics it is a new approach. This document contains an overview about infiltration modelling as well as the physics and the mathematics behind the COMIS model. 91 refs., 38 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Rainwater Channelization and Infiltration in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Durian, Douglas; Dreyfus, Remi; Compass Team

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-2D experimental set-up composed of a random close packing of mono-disperse glass beads. We determine effects of grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the formation and infiltration of water channels. For hydrophilic granular media, rainwater initially infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil creating a uniform horizontal wetting front before instabilities occur and grow to form water channels. For hydrophobic media, rainwater ponds on the soil surface rather than infiltrates and water channels may still occur at a later time when the hydraulic pressure of the ponding water exceeds the capillary repellency of the soil. We probe the kinetics of the fingering instabilities that serve as precursors for the growth and drainage of water channels. We also examine the effects of several different methods on improving rainwater channelization such as varying the level of pre-saturation, modifying the soil surface flatness, and adding superabsorbent hydrogel particles.

  12. Delivery after Operation for Deeply Infiltrating Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Allerstorfer, Christina; Enzelsberger, Simon H.; Shebl, Omar Josef; Mayer, Richard Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background. It has been suggested that, during pregnancy, endometriosis can cause a variety of disease-related complications. Objectives. The purpose of the study was to find out if women with histologically confirmed endometriosis do have a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome and if they suffer from a higher rate of complications during labor. Study Design. 51 women who underwent surgery because of deeply infiltrating endometriosis in the General Hospital Linz and the Women's General Hospital Linz and who gave birth in the Women's General Hospital Linz after the surgery were included in our survey. Results. 31 women (60.8%) had a spontaneous delivery and in 20 women (39.2%) a caesarean section was performed. There were no cases of third- and fourth-degree perineal lacerations. Collectively there were 4 cases (7.8%) of preterm delivery and one case (2.0%) of premature rupture of membranes. In two women (6.5%) a retained placenta was diagnosed. Conclusions. Our study is the first description on delivery modes after surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis. We did not find an elevated risk for perineal or vaginal laceration in women with a history of surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis, even when a resection of the rectum or of the posterior vaginal wall had been performed. PMID:27517050

  13. Induced infiltration in aquifers with ambient flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John L.

    1993-10-01

    Well water quality depends on the relative amounts of water drawn from the pumped aquifer and nearby surface water bodies, such as streams, lakes, and wetlands. Although a surface water body may normally gain water from the aquifer, pumping can reverse gradients, causing it to lose water near the well. Surface water then enters the well by induced infiltration. Two-dimensional vertically integrated models of induced infiltration are developed for various combinations of aquifer geometry and sources of recharge. The models, which have applications in wellhead protection, aquifer pollution characterization, and aquifer remediation, are presented graphically. They show that the propensity for and rate of induced infiltration are enhanced by higher pumping rates, proximity of the well to the stream, and the presence of nearby barrier boundaries. The propensity and rate are reduced by the presence of other surface water bodies. Ambient groundwater discharge rate to the surface water body also plays a role, but not its source, whether it is from local vertical recharge, lateral inflow, or both. The results are also largely indifferent to whether the aquifer transmissivity is assumed to be a constant, or a function of water table elevation. Finally, if the well is close enough to the surface water body, say, less than 5% of the aquifer width, then the aquifer acts as if it were semi-infinite.

  14. Humic substance formation during wastewater infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L. ); Hildmann-Smed, R.; Filip, Z.K. , Langen . Inst. fuer Wasser-, Boden- und Lufthygiene); Jenssen, P.D. . Centre for Soil and Environmental Research)

    1991-01-01

    Soil infiltration of wastewater effluents is a widely practiced method of treatment and disposal/reuse throughout the world. Renovation of the wastewater results from a wide variety of complex physicochemical and biological processes. One set of processes is speculated to involve the accumulation of organic matter by filtration and sorption followed by formation of humic substances. This humic substance formation can effect the performance of soil treatment systems by contributing to soil pore clogging and reduction in hydraulic capacity, and by yielding reactive substances and an enhancement of purification processes. While there has been a wealth of research into the nature and genesis of humic substances in terrestrial environments, there has been limited research of humic substance formation during soil infiltration of wastewater. The purpose of the research reported herein was to determine if humic substances can form under conditions typical of those present during wastewater infiltration into natural soil systems. This work was conducted during 1989 to 1990 as a collaborative effort between the Centre for Soil and Environmental Research, located in Aas, Norway and the Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene located in Langen, West Germany. 11 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Goodness, gracious, great balls of fire: A case of transient lingual papillitis following consumption of an Atomic Fireball.

    PubMed

    Raji, Kehinde; Ranario, Jennifer; Ogunmakin, Kehinde

    2016-05-15

    Transient lingual papillitis is a benign condition characterized by the inflammation of one or more fungiform papillae on the dorsolateral tongue. Although it is a common condition that affects more than half of the population, few cases have been reported in the dermatological literature. Therefore, it is a condition uncommonly recognized by dermatologists though it has a distinct clinical presentation that may be easily diagnosed by clinicians familiar with the entity. We report an interesting case of transient lingual papillitis in a 27 year-old healthy woman following the consumption of the hard candy, Atomic Fireball. We describe treatment and resolution of the condition, and its recurrence following re-exposure to the identified culprit. This report further reviews the literature to illustrate the clinical manifestations, etiology, differential diagnosis, course, and treatment of this condition.

  16. Sensory disturbances of buccal and lingual nerve by muscle compression: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alvira-González, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies on cadavers dissection have shown that collateral branches of the trigeminal nerve cross muscle bundles on their way, being a possible etiological factor of some nerve disturbances. Case Report A 45-year-old man attended to the Temporomandibular Joint and Orofacial Pain Unit of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology in Hospital Odontològic of Barcelona University, referring tingling in the left hemifacial región and ipsilateral lingual side for one year, with discomfort when shaving or skin compression. Discussion Several branches of the trigeminal nerve follow a path through the masticatory muscles, being the lingual nerve and buccal nerve the most involved. The hyperactivity of the muscle bundles that are crossed by nerve structures generates a compression that could explain certain orofacial neuropathies (numbness and / or pain) in which a clear etiologic factor can not be identified. Key words:Buccal nerve, paresthesia, idiopathic trigeminal sensory neuropathy. PMID:26855715

  17. Comparative morphological study on the stereo-structure of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores of the American beaver (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Shindo, Junji; Yoshimura, Ken; Kobayashi, Kan

    2006-02-01

    The lingual papillae and the connective tissue cores (CTC) of the American beaver were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. The tongue of American beaver was about 9 cm in length, 3.5 cm in width, and has a lingual prominence. Four types of papillae (filiform, fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae) were observed. The filiform papillae can be classified into three types (filiform, large filiform and dorm-like papillae). Filiform papillae distributed on the anterior tongue and posterior of the lingual prominence consisted of a posterior thick main process and several small accessory processes. After removal of the epithelium, the CTCs of the filiform papillae had U-shaped, horseshoe-like primary cores with 10-15 rod-shaped small accessory cores. Large filiform papillae were distributed at the anterior margin of the lingual prominence. Dome-like papillae were distributed at the top of lingual prominence. Fungiform papillae were observed two types. Fungiform papillae, which were distributed at the anterior tongue, were round shaped. Fungiform papillae of the posterior of the lingual prominence were large and surrounded with a papillary groove. At the posterior of the tongue, three vallate papillae were arranged in a triangular pattern. Foliate papillae were on 22 to 25 parallel ridges and grooves.

  18. Microvasculature of the lingual papillae in primates and insectivores--fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, N; Okada, S

    1994-10-01

    The microvascular architecture of the fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae was investigated under scanning electron microscope in man, common squirrel monkeys, common marmosets, common tree shrews (primates), large Japanese moles and dwarf shrews (insectivores) utilizing microvascular corrosion casts. The fungiform papilla of the lingual apex in man was supplied by an intrapapillary capillary network with a globular pattern. It was composed of 10-15 capillary loops in a circular arrangement and 5-7 thick capillaries in the center. The fungiform papilla of the lingual body was supplied by a dense capillary network on the top and lateral surfaces. That in other primates was supplied by a cylindrical capillary network and loop formation was seen on the top surface. That in insectivores was supplied by a thin cylindrical network with coarse meshes, at the tips of which were observed 2 or 3 capillary rings in the mole and only one in the dwarf shrew. The vallate papilla in primates was supplied by an intrapapillary capillary network with a globular pattern, and showed irregularly tortuous capillary loops on its top surface. The vallum was supplied by a capillary network in man and usually one or two rows of loops arranged in a circle in other primates. The vallate papilla in insectivores was supplied by a doughnut-like capillary network with a recess on the top surface, and an indistinctly low vallum by a low undulating network. The foliate papillae were most developed in man, and each lobule was supplied by capillaries passing longitudinal to it and capillary loops in 5-10 regular rows on the top, but 3-5 rudimentary lobules in the squirrel monkey and marmoset. In the two species, each lobule was supplied by one arteriole, one venule and a coarse capillary network continuing from the interpapillary network. No foliate papilla was observed, but large conical papillae were noted in the tree shrew and insectivores. In conclusion, the intrapapillary vasculature appeared

  19. Sugar-activated ion transport in canine lingual epithelium. Implications for sugar taste transduction

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    There is good evidence indicating that ion-transport pathways in the apical regions of lingual epithelial cells, including taste bud cells, may play a role in salt taste reception. In this article, we present evidence that, in the case of the dog, there also exists a sugar- activated ion-transport pathway that is linked to sugar taste transduction. Evidence was drawn from two parallel lines of experiments: (a) ion-transport studies on the isolated canine lingual epithelium, and (b) recordings from the canine chorda tympani. The results in vitro showed that both mono- and disaccharides in the mucosal bath stimulate a dose-dependent increase in the short-circuit current over the concentration range coincident with mammalian sugar taste responses. Transepithelial current evoked by glucose, fructose, or sucrose in either 30 mM NaCl or in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (K-H) was partially blocked by amiloride. Among current carriers activated by saccharides, the current response was greater with Na than with K. Ion flux measurements in K-H during stimulation with 3-O-methylglucose showed that the sugar-evoked current was due to an increase in the Na influx. Ouabain or amiloride reduced the sugar-evoked Na influx without effect on sugar transport as measured with tritiated 3-O-methylglucose. Amiloride inhibited the canine chorda tympani response to 0.5 M NaCl by 70-80% and the response to 0.5 M KCl by approximately 40%. This agreed with the percent inhibition by amiloride of the short-circuit current supported in vitro by NaCl and KCl. Amiloride also partially inhibited the chorda tympani responses to sucrose and to fructose. The results indicate that in the dog: (a) the ion transporter subserving Na taste also subserves part of the response to K, and (b) a sugar-activated, Na- preferring ion-transport system is one mechanism mediating sugar taste transduction. Results in the literature indicate a similar sweet taste mechanism for humans. PMID:3171536

  20. Functional and comparative study of lingual papillae in four species of bear (Ursidae) by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pastor, J F; Barbosa, M; de Paz, F J; García, M; Ferrero, E

    2011-10-01

    The eight current species of bear (Ursidae) are widely distributed throughout Europe, Asia, and America. They are mainly encountered in the northern hemisphere, except for the spectacled bear and the sun bear, which are also found in the south of the equator. Adaptations of the masticatory apparatus (teeth, tongue, and musculature) to diet are one of the factors that imply the greatest structural changes in the cranium. This diet may be carnivorous, herbivorous, melliferous, or insectivorous, with one type of food predominating according to the time of year. The way in which food is eaten determines the morphology of the lingual surface; generally speaking, all bears put their mouth to the food, which, initially, they lick or they let the food stick to their tongue, as occurs when insects are eaten. As in all mammals, a distinction can be made between mechanical and gustatory papillae and the development and distribution of which depend on the species and their eating habits. In this study of the complete tongues of four species of adult bears, we describe the morphology of the lingual surfaces, the different types of papillae, their characteristics, and topographic distribution. It was seen that there were five main types of lingual papillae: filiform, conical, fungiform, foliate, and vallate. Morphology of the microgrooves and pores was similar to that observed in other mammals. In general, there were no great differences among the four species of bears studied, perhaps due to the similarity in the kind of food they consume in captivity.

  1. 3D evaluation of the lingual fracture line after a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Plooij, J M; Naphausen, M T P; Maal, T J J; Xi, T; Rangel, F A; Swennnen, G; de Koning, M; Borstlap, W A; Bergé, S J

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this prospective observational study was to evaluate whether cone beam CT (CBCT) is a useful tool for analyzing the fracture line in a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO). The patient group consisted of 40 consecutive patients (9 males and 31 females) with a mandibular hypoplasia who underwent a BSSO advancement (Hunsuck modification; n=80 splits) between September 2006 and July 2008. The mean age at the time of surgery was 34 years (range 17-61 years). A newly developed lingual split scale was used to categorize the path of the fracture line on the lingual side of the ramus based on one-day postoperative data sets reconstructed from CBCT data. Although all splits (n=80) were performed according to the standardized protocol, only 51% of the fracture lines run according to the Hunsuck's description, whereas 33% ran through the mandibular canal and 16% split otherwise. The split pattern was influenced by the length of the medial osteotomy (p=0.01). In conclusion, 3D imaging is a useful tool for analyzing the surgical outcome of a BSSO and has the potential to provide substantial data on the position of the proximal segments as a result of the lingual fracture line.

  2. Analysis of rainfall infiltration law in unsaturated soil slope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-rong; Qian, Ya-jun; Wang, Zhang-chun; Zhao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In the study of unsaturated soil slope stability under rainfall infiltration, it is worth continuing to explore how much rainfall infiltrates into the slope in a rain process, and the amount of rainfall infiltrating into slope is the important factor influencing the stability. Therefore, rainfall infiltration capacity is an important issue of unsaturated seepage analysis for slope. On the basis of previous studies, rainfall infiltration law of unsaturated soil slope is analyzed. Considering the characteristics of slope and rainfall, the key factors affecting rainfall infiltration of slope, including hydraulic properties, water storage capacity (θs - θr), soil types, rainfall intensities, and antecedent and subsequent infiltration rates on unsaturated soil slope, are discussed by using theory analysis and numerical simulation technology. Based on critical factors changing, this paper presents three calculation models of rainfall infiltrability for unsaturated slope, including (1) infiltration model considering rainfall intensity; (2) effective rainfall model considering antecedent rainfall; (3) infiltration model considering comprehensive factors. Based on the technology of system response, the relationship of rainfall and infiltration is described, and the prototype of regression model of rainfall infiltration is given, in order to determine the amount of rain penetration during a rain process.

  3. Lamellar leukocyte infiltration and involvement of IL-6 during oligofructose-induced equine laminitis development.

    PubMed

    Visser, Michelle B; Pollitt, Christopher C

    2011-11-15

    Laminitis is known to involve deregulation of proteases and destruction of the lamellar basement membrane with the host inflammatory response also playing a role. Leukocyte infiltration has been well characterized in the black walnut model of laminitis induction, but not in carbohydrate induced models. Increased gene expression of multiple cytokines, including IL-6, has also been implicated in laminitis development. Using real time PCR, immunohistochemistry and zymography methods, we characterize leukocyte infiltration and IL-6 gene expression in oligofructose (OF) induced laminitis. As well, we use two in vitro models to investigate a role for IL-6 in protease regulation. Laminitis was induced in normal standardbred horses (n=5) by alimentary OF dosing and lamellar biopsies were obtained throughout the 48 h experimental period. Lamellar explants and keratinocytes were also isolated from clinically normal horses for in vitro experiments. We found infiltration of calprotectin-positive leukocytes (monocytes and neutrophils) at 18-24h post oligofructose dosing, while IL-6 gene expression was increased as early as 12h post dosing. Additionally, while we found that IL-6 did not cause significant BM damage in vitro, it did result in increased secreted proMMP-9 levels from lamellar explants. Thus, we find that leukocyte infiltration does occur during oligofructose-induced laminitis development, however, IL-6 gene expression in the lamellae may precede leukocyte infiltration. Additionally, we show IL-6 plays a role in increasing the level of proMMP-9 in vivo in a manner that does not involve keratinocytes.

  4. Snapshots of the Universe: A Multi-Lingual Astronomy Art Book

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, Rachael; Jackson, L.; Carlberg, J.; Johnson, K.; Marchand, R.; Sivakoff, G.; Czekala, I.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Drosback, M.; Gugliucci, N.; Martinez, O.; Wong, A.; Zasowski, G.; Skies, Dark; Kids, Bright

    2012-05-01

    Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) is a dynamic education and public outreach organization at the University of Virginia, focused on enhancing elementary level science education in rural and underserved communities. DSBK thrives on the efforts of undergraduate, graduate and post-doctoral volunteers. Early in the program, our volunteers encountered difficulties connecting with “English as a second language” students. To meet that challenge, DSBK volunteers created art with short descriptions of astronomical objects in both Spanish and English to help communicate concepts across the language barrier. Building on this initial success, our simple art project has evolved into a full educational children’s book targeted at 2nd - 5th grade students. Though originally in Spanish and English, a partnership with the University of Alberta (Canada) has produced a French translation of the text, broadening the outreach potential of the book. Here we present our 'Snapshots of the Universe' for broad distribution to classrooms, school libraries and homes, with emphasis on those serving multi-lingual populations, as a unique tool for introducing astronomy concepts at the elementary school level.

  5. Extraoral surgical correction of lingual entrapment in a Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides).

    PubMed

    Grosset, Claire; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Waymire, Andrew; Puchalski, Sarah M; Steffey, Michele A

    2013-12-01

    An adult female Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides) presented with a ventral displacement of the hyoid apparatus, associated with distension of the intermandibular sublingual space and of the gular skin, causing difficulties with prehension and deglutition of food and water. Physical examination revealed that the tongue was able to move normally and could be replaced into a normal anatomical position by external compression of the distended ventral intermandibular region. A mild hypoalbuminemia was the only remarkable finding of the biochemistry panel. Radiographs and computed tomography scan of the head and neck regions confirmed a normal hyoid apparatus. An extraoral surgical reconstruction of the distended intermandibular skin was performed: the excess skin was incised and resected and the margins of the incision were sutured with appropriate tissue tension to obtain a good apposition and prevent ventral displacement of the hyoid apparatus. Postoperative complication included airway obstruction by a large amount of respiratory secretions, which were successfully aspirated from the trachea. A supportive elastic bandage was placed at the level of the beak commissure during the following 24 hours in order to reduce downward pressure on the suture line and minimize the risk of dehiscence of the suture. The goose resumed eating within 4 hours following the surgery and oxygen supplementation was discontinued after 24 hours. Respiration was assessed as normal and the tongue remained permanently in normal position. The lingual entrapment did not recur during the following 18 months.

  6. Multiscale structural analysis of mouse lingual myoarchitecture employing diffusion spectrum magnetic resonance imaging and multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gaige, Terry A; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Dai, Guangping; Cabral, Victor C; Wang, Ruopeng; Nam, Yoon Sung; Engelward, Bevin P; Wedeen, Van J; So, Peter T C; Gilbert, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    The tongue consists of a complex, multiscale array of myofibers that comprise the anatomical underpinning of lingual mechanical function. 3-D myoarchitecture was imaged in mouse tongues with diffusion spectrum magnetic resonance imaging (DSI) at 9.4 T (b(max) 7000 smm, 150-microm isotropic voxels), a method that derives the preferential diffusion of water/voxel, and high-throughput (10 fps) two-photon microscope (TPM). Net fiber alignment was represented for each method in terms of the local maxima of an orientational distribution function (ODF) derived from the local diffusion (DSI) and 3-D structural autocorrelation (TPM), respectively. Mesoscale myofiber tracts were generated by alignment of the principal orientation vectors of the ODFs. These data revealed a consistent relationship between the properties of the respective ODFs and the virtual superimposition of the distributed mesoscale myofiber tracts. The identification of a mesoscale anatomical construct, which specifically links the microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales, provides a method for relating the orientation and distribution of cells and subcellular components with overall tissue morphology, thus contributing to the development of multiscale methods for mechanical analysis.

  7. Scanning electron microscopical study of the lingual epithelium of green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Levanti, M B; Ciriaco, E

    2008-08-01

    During the last few years, green iguanas (Iguana iguana) have turned out to be one of the most popular pets. They are omnivorous. In their way of feeding, this crucial function is performed by capturing of the preys and mostly, this is carried out by the tongue. The role of the tongue is also fundamental during the intra-oral transport and during the swallowing of food. This has been reported in several studies about chameleons, agamids and iguanids, nevertheless published data about the mechanisms of capturing and swallowing the prey, and the morphological descriptions about the tongue epithelium, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this present study was to analyse the morphology of the lingual epithelium in green iguanas by scanning electron microscopy. Three different areas were demonstrated on the tongue surface: the tongue tip, characterized by a smooth epithelium without papillae, a foretongue, completely covered by numerous closely packed cylindriform papillae, and a hindtongue with conical-like papillae. Some taste buds were recognized on the middle and the posterior parts of the tongue. Different functional roles could be hypothesized for the three tongue areas: the tongue tip could have a role related to the movements of the prey immediately after the capturing, while the middle papillae and the hindtongue could have an important role concerning the swallowing phase.

  8. Stereo architecture of the connective tissue cores of the lingual papillae in the treeshrew (Tupaia glis).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Wanichanon, C

    1992-12-01

    The stereo architecture of the lingual connective tissue cores (CTC) in the treeshrew (Tupaia glis) (which has the primitive characteristics of primates) was observed by scanning electron microscopy, and compared to that of other animal orders. The tongue of the treeshrew has three vallate papillae which are situated in the posterior part of the tongue, while some macaques have several vallate papillae. Among numerous filiform papillae, fungiform papillae are sporadically distributed. A filiform papilla consists of a bundle of several slender spine-like processes arranged in a circle at the basal margin. After removal of the epithelium, the CTC of the filiform papilla looks like a human hand raised with the palm facing towards the tongue tip. The fungiform CTC in the threeshrew is columnar in shape (rather similar to that of Insectivora and Rodentia) and at the top there are several round depressions for taste buds. In the treeshrew several large rod-shaped processes are derived from the postero-lateral margin of the tongue, as in Carnivora (dogs and cats), where foliate papillae are located in many other animal species. The treeshrew has numerous characteristics similar to those of the crab-eating macaque (Primates), but at the same time it has some characteristics similar to those of Insectivora, Rodentia, Carnivora and Artiodactyla.

  9. Isolated blunt lingual artery injury secondary to a road traffic accident: diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Mawaddah, Azman; Goh, Bee See; Kew, Thean Yean; Rozman, Zakaria

    2012-04-01

    Neurologic and airway compromise as a result of traumatic vascular injuries to the neck region often lead to more severe complications and thus require special consideration. Furthermore, these cases pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to healthcare providers. Here, we report a case of a 28-year-old motorcyclist presenting with progressively enlarged Zone 2 neck swelling on the left side following a high impact collision. There were no symptoms or signs suggesting neurologic or laryngeal injury. Computed tomography angiogram of the neck revealed signs of an active arterial bleed. The apparent vascular injury was managed by close observation for signs of airway compromise, urgent angiogram, and selective catheter embolisation of the left lingual artery. The patient subsequently recovered without further operative exploration of the neck. At 6 months post-trauma, the neck swelling fully subsided with no complications from angioembolisation. This case illustrates the individualised treatment and multidisciplinary approach in managing such cases. We review our rationale for this diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  10. Lingual frenectomy: a comparison between the conventional surgical and laser procedure.

    PubMed

    De Santis, D; Gerosa, R; Graziani, P F; Zanotti, G; Rossini, N; Castellani, R; Bissolotti, G; Chiarini, L; Nocini, P F; Bertossi, D

    2013-08-01

    Aim: Ankyloglossia, commonly known as tongue-tie, is a congenital oral anomaly characterized by a short lingual frenulum that may contribute to feeding, speech and mechanical problems. The purpose of this study is to compare the advantages of laser vis-à-vis conventional frenectomy in both intra- and post-surgical phases. Methods: This study took into consideration two patients, who were respectively 9 and 10-year-old. The first one underwent a common surgical procedure. A Nd:Yap laser device with a micropulsed wavelength of 1340 nm and power of 8 watts was used for the second. The postsurgical discomfort and healing characteristics were evaluated. Results: The results indicated that the Nd:Yap laser has the following advantages when compared to the conventional frenectomy: 1) soft tissue cutting was efficient, with no bleeding, giving a clear operative field; 2) there was no need to use sutures; 3) the surgery was less time-consuming; 4) there was no postsurgical infection and no need for analgesics or antibiotics; 5) wound contraction and scarring were decreased or eliminated; 6) despite the initial slowness of the healing process, the complete and final recovery was faster. Conclusion: Considering the above elements, it is possible to assert that the laser frenectomy has a series of unquestionable advantages if compared to the conventional surgical technique.

  11. Course and distribution of the lingual nerve in the ventral tongue region: anatomical considerations for frenectomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hun-Mu; Woo, Yong-Je; Won, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Da-Hye; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the sublingual and intralingual courses of the lingual nerve (LN) in the ventral tongue region, providing a clinical guide for safe surgical procedures such as frenectomy. We evaluated 16 specimens (32 sides) by gross observation after detailed dissections, and a further 6 specimens were examined after Sihler staining. All specimens were harvested from embalmed Korean cadavers. We classified the innervation patterns of the LN into 5 types and confirmed the distribution of the LN in the tip of the tongue. The classification of the LN was made with reference to a line formed by the interlacing of the styloglossus and genioglossus muscles. Based on the course of LN and the presence of a tiny twig (twigs directly innervating the ventral mucosa of the tongue, TM) directly innervating the sublingual mucosa, the course of the LN was classified as being straight, curved, or vertical and with or without the TM. Straight, curved, and vertical courses without the TM were seen in 9.4%, 46.9%, and 18.8% of the cases, respectively. Straight and curved courses with the TM were observed in 6.3% and 18.8% of the cases, respectively. Sihler staining revealed that the tongue tip is innervated by the LN. These findings indicate that surgical manipulations at the ventral tongue region might damage the LN and result in numbness of the tongue tip, and provide a useful anatomic reference for various surgical procedures involving the ventral tongue region.

  12. Telltale Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TIL) in Oral, Head & Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yu; Xie, Yuying; Tan, Yee Sun; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Nör, Jacques; Wolf, Gregory T.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence gleaned from recent studies on the role of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) suggests that cancer is not only a genetic disease but also an immunologic disease. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) has been a significant model to study cancer cell-immune cell interactions. First, immune cell infiltration is an important feature of these tumors. Second, HNSCC frequently develops resistance to immunogenic cytotoxicity, which provides a window to decipher how tumors engage the immune system to establish immune tolerance. Finally, chemoradiation therapy, as a central modality for HNSCC treatment, has been shown to elicit immune activation. The presence of effector immune cells in the tumor microenvironment is often associated with superior clinical response to adjuvant therapy. On the other hand, an activated immune system, in addition to limiting tumor initiation and progression, could also exert selective pressure to promote the growth of less immunogenic tumors, as a pivotal immunoediting process. But it remains unclear how cancer cell signaling regulates tumor immunogenicity and how to mitigate HNSCC-potentiated TIL suppression. In this review, we will revisit the prognostic role of TILs in HNSCC, and collectively discuss how cancer cell machinery impacts upon the plasticity of TILs. PMID:27553942

  13. Characterization of inflammatory cell infiltration in feline allergic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Taglinger, K; Day, M J; Foster, A P

    2007-11-01

    Sixteen cats with allergic dermatitis and six control cats with no skin disease were examined. Lymphoid and histiocytic cells in skin sections were examined immunohistochemically and mast cells were identified by toluidine blue staining. The 16 allergic cats showed one or more of several features (alopecia, eosinophilic plaques or granulomas, papulocrusting lesions), and histopathological findings were diverse. In control cats there were no cells that expressed IgM or MAC387, a few that were immunolabelled for IgG, IgA or CD3, and moderate numbers of mast cells. In allergic cats, positively labelled inflammatory cells were generally more numerous in lesional than in non-lesional skin sections, and were particularly associated with the superficial dermis and perifollicular areas. There were low numbers of plasma cells expressing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin; moderate numbers of MHC II-, MAC387- and CD3-positive cells; and moderate to numerous mast cells. MHC class II expression was associated with inflammatory cells morphologically consistent with dermal dendritic cells and macrophages, and epidermal Langerhans cells. Dendritic cells expressing MHC class II were usually associated with an infiltrate of CD3 lymphocytes, suggesting that these cells participate in maintenance of the local immune response by presenting antigen to T lymphocytes. These findings confirm that feline allergic skin disease is characterized by infiltration of activated antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in addition to increased numbers of dermal mast cells. This pattern mimics the dermal inflammation that occurs in the chronic phase of both canine and human atopic dermatitis.

  14. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  15. Stir mixing and pressureless infiltration synthesis of aluminum alloy metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Benjamin Franklin

    2009-12-01

    Pressureless liquid metal infiltration of suitably packed compacts of spherical shaped 47 nm size 70:30 Delta:Gamma Al2O3 mixed with a 7/2 ratio of elemental Al and Mg powders was used to study (i) the kinetics of pressureless infiltration processing of Al2O 3 nanoparticle-A206 alloy composites, (ii) the optimal processing variables to maximize material property responses, (iii) the development of multimodal microstructures in terms of feature size. The major experimental variables included: infiltration temperature (850 to 950°C), infiltration time (1--5 hours), and powder composition (0--50 wt% Al2O 3). All experiments were conducted under UHP nitrogen atmosphere. Under the conditions studied, compacts with a maximum of 20 wt% nanoparticles were successfully infiltrated with A206 alloy aluminum, and the degree of infiltration measured by the percentage of residual porosity depended on infiltration time, temperature and nanoparticle content. By examining responses including percent porosity, and macrohardness, empirical models for correlating processing conditions with material properties and microstructure were developed. The addition of increasing weight percentage of Al2O3 nanoparticles resulted in a decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion greater than that predicted by the rule of mixtures due to the mechanical constraint of the nanoparticles on the matrix. Likewise, the damping capacity of the 10 wt% and 20 wt% reinforced nanocomposites increased with increasing weight percentage up to 280% greater than the base alloy. The key microstructural observations in the pressureless infiltrated composites include: (1) a bimodal structure of micro-scale grains, exhibiting Al-Cu-Mg precipitates dispersed within the grains; (2) amorphous and crystalline interfaces between the Al-alloy grains and the nanocomposite regions; (3) infiltrated nanoparticle agglomerates having nanoscale channels forming a nanoscale substructure; (4) mixed nanoscale reinforcements of

  16. SIFCON (Slurry Infiltrated Fiber Concrete) with Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Phtogrphsf tpe and Identifatio % flowt tests teyYiinders U& U6 10 LE~~ 150 1 3= O-4 slurries also contained microsilica . Three different fiber types...Ash Infiltration tests and selected mixes Water Facility 26025 tap water Kirtland A.F. Base well no. 2 All Microsilica EMS 960 (bagged) Elkem...the end instead of the two. When there are the three sets of numbers, the first set indicates the percent of microsilica with respect to the cement in

  17. Wireless application in intravenous infiltration detection system.

    PubMed

    Alley, Matthew S; Naramore, William J; Chou, Nee-Yin; Winchester, Leonard W

    2008-01-01

    The IrDA wireless protocol has been applied to a fiber optics based point-of-care system for the detection of intravenous infiltration. The system is used for monitoring patients under infusion therapy. It is optimized for portability by incorporating a battery source and wireless communication. The IrDA protocol provides secure data communication between the electronic module of the system and the PDAs carried by the nurses. The PDA is used for initiating the actions of the electronic module and for data transfer. Security is provided by specially designed software and hardware.

  18. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy simulating an infiltrative myocardial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, A; Loperfido, F; Pennestrì, F

    1985-01-01

    Congestive heart failure developed in a patient with low electrocardiographic QRS voltages, diffuse thickening of the septum and free cardiac wall, and a reduction in left ventricular internal diameter, which suggested an infiltrative heart muscle disease. Histological examination at necropsy showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy. Myocardial disarray of type 1A disorganisation was extensive and equally distributed in the ventricular septum and the left anterior and left posterior ventricular free walls. Severe fibrosis (40%) was also present and may have been a possible cause of the electrocardiographic abnormalities as well as of the lack of ventricular dilatation. Images PMID:4041302

  19. Uncertainty and variability of infiltration at Yucca Mountain: Part 1. Numerical model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, Stuart A.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission investigated climate and infiltration at Yucca Mountain to (i) understand important controls and uncertainties influencing percolation through the unsaturated zone on multimillennial time scales and (ii) provide flux boundary conditions for up to 1 million years in performance assessment models of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. This first part of a two-part series describes a procedure for abstracting the results from detailed numerical simulations of local-scale infiltration into a site-scale model considering uncertainty and variability in distributed net infiltration. Part 2 describes site-scale model results and corroboration. A detailed one-dimensional numerical model was used to estimate bare-soil net infiltration at the scales of hours and meters for 442 soil, bedrock, and climate combinations. The set of results are abstracted into three parametric response functions for decadal-average bare-soil infiltration given hydraulic and climatic parameters. The three abstractions describe deep soil, shallow soil over a coarser layer, and shallow soil over a finer layer. The site-scale model considers spatial variability and uncertainty of the input parameters on a 30 m grid, using the abstractions independently in each cell. Two additional abstractions account for overland flow and vegetation. The model uses Monte Carlo simulation, with all input parameters uncertain and spatially variable, to calculate the mean and standard deviation of net infiltration in each grid cell for selected climate states. Using abstractions rather than detailed simulations speeds calculation of infiltration realizations by many orders of magnitude relative to a detailed simulation.

  20. Effect of carbon nanofibers on the infiltration and thermal conductivity of carbon/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jinsong; Luo, Ruiying; Yan, Ying

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} The CNFs improve the infiltration rate and thermal properties of carbon/carbon composites. {yields} The densification rate increases with the CNF content increasing at the beginning of infiltration. {yields} The values of the thermal conductivity of the composite obtain their maximum values at 5 wt.%. -- Abstract: Preforms containing 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.% carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were fabricated by spreading layers of carbon cloth, and infiltrated using the electrified preform heating chemical vapor infiltration method (ECVI) under atmospheric pressure. Initial thermal gradients were determined. Resistivity and density evolutions with infiltration time have been recorded. Scanning electron microscopy, polarized light micrograph and X-ray diffraction technique were used to analyze the experiment results. The results showed that the infiltration rate increased with the rising of CNF content, and after 120 h of infiltration, the density was the highest when the CNF content was 5 wt.%, but the composite could not be densified efficiently as the CNF content ranged from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. CNF-reinforced C/C composites have enhanced thermal conductivity, the values at 5 wt.% were increased by nearly 5.5-24.1% in the X-Y direction and 153.8-251.3% in the Z direction compared to those with no CNFs. When the additive content was increased to 20 wt.%, due to the holes and cavities in the CNF web and between carbon cloth and matrix, the thermal conductivities in the X-Y and Z directions decreased from their maximum values at 5 wt.%.

  1. PROSPECTS FOR ENHANCED GROUNDWATER RECHARGE VIA INFILTRATION OF URBAN STORMWATER RUNOFF: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rain garden is an urban storm water best management practice that is used to infiltrate runoff close to its source, thereby disconnecting impervious area while providing an avenue for groundwater recharge. Groundwater recharge may provide additional benefits to aquatic ecosys...

  2. Modulation, individual variation and the role of lingual sensory afferents in the control of prey transport in the lizard Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Schaerlaeken, Vicky; Herrel, Anthony; Meyers, J J

    2008-07-01

    Most organisms feed on a variety of food items that may differ dramatically in their physical and behavioural characteristics (e.g. mobility, mass, texture, etc.). Thus the ability to modulate prey transport behaviour in accordance with the characteristics of the food appears crucial. Consequently, prey reduction and transport movements must be adjusted to the natural variation in material properties of the food, between and within feeding sequences and transport cycles. Here we describe an investigation of (1) the ability of the agamid lizard Pogona vitticeps to modulate prey transport kinematics when feeding on a range of food items differing in their physical characteristics and (2) the role of sensory feedback in controlling jaw and tongue movements by bilateral transection of the lingual trigeminal sensory afferents. Our findings demonstrate that P. vitticeps modulates the kinematics of its feeding behaviour in response to the mechanical demands imposed by different food types. In addition, transection of the trigeminal sensory afferents has an effect on the movements of jaws and tongue during transport, and increases the duration of transport cycles needed to process a given food type. However, after transection, transport cycles were still different for different food types suggesting that other sources of sensory information are also used to modulate prey transport in the lizard P. vitticeps.

  3. Hippocampal T cell infiltration promotes neuroinflammation and cognitive decline in a mouse model of tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Cyril; Dorothée, Guillaume; Hunot, Stéphane; Martin, Elodie; Monnet, Yann; Duchamp, Marie; Dong, Yuan; Légeron, François-Pierre; Leboucher, Antoine; Burnouf, Sylvie; Faivre, Emilie; Carvalho, Kévin; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Zommer, Nadège; Demeyer, Dominique; Jouy, Nathalie; Sazdovitch, Veronique; Schraen-Maschke, Susanna; Delarasse, Cécile; Buée, Luc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the combined presence of amyloid plaques and tau pathology, the latter being correlated with the progression of clinical symptoms. Neuroinflammatory changes are thought to be major contributors to Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology, even if their precise role still remains largely debated. Notably, to what extent immune responses contribute to cognitive impairments promoted by tau pathology remains poorly understood. To address this question, we took advantage of the THY-Tau22 mouse model that progressively develops hippocampal tau pathology paralleling cognitive deficits and reappraised the interrelationship between tau pathology and brain immune responses. In addition to conventional astroglial and microglial responses, we identified a CD8-positive T cell infiltration in the hippocampus of tau transgenic mice associated with an early chemokine response, notably involving CCL3. Interestingly, CD8-positive lymphocyte infiltration was also observed in the cortex of patients exhibiting frontemporal dementia with P301L tau mutation. To gain insights into the functional involvement of T cell infiltration in the pathophysiological development of tauopathy in THY-Tau22 mice, we chronically depleted T cells using anti-CD3 antibody. Such anti-CD3 treatment prevented hippocampal T cell infiltration in tau transgenic animals and reverted spatial memory deficits, in absence of tau pathology modulation. Altogether, these data support an instrumental role of hippocampal T cell infiltration in tau-driven pathophysiology and cognitive impairments in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. PMID:27818384

  4. Evaluation of resin infiltration on demineralized root surface: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Matin, Khairul; Shimada, Yasushi; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2017-03-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of resin infiltration on root caries induced by Streptococcus mutans biofilms. Human premolar specimens were divided to 5 groups: negative control (NC), Clearfil SE Bond (SEB), Icon-etch120s+Icon-infiltrant (HA120), Icon-etch10s+Icon-infiltrant (HA10) and K-etchant10s+Icon-infiltrant (PA10). The resin penetration was observed by fluorescent microscope. Biofilm-induced demineralization was conducted again and observed by swept-source optical coherence tomography and confocal laser scanning microscope. The maximum resin penetration depth (PDmax), lesion depth increase (∆LD), frequency of cervical enamel loss and dentinoenamel junction separation length were measured and statistically analyzed. HA120 showed 138.00±49.25 µm PDmax that was significantly larger than PA10 and SEB (p<0.05). SEB created 136.58±64.73 µm coating layers. HA120 and SEB showed significantly lower ∆LD than NC (p<0.05). Resin infiltration with 120s-HCl pretreatment has got a good penetration ability and preventive effect on root caries, however, an additional risk factor of cervical enamel loss was identified.

  5. Migration of induced-infiltrated stream water into nearby aquifers due to seasonal ground water withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Chen, X

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of stream-aquifer interaction due to ground water extraction has traditionally focused on the determination of the amount of water depleted in the stream. Less attention has been paid to the movement of infiltrated stream water inside aquifer, particularly for agricultural areas. This paper presents a method of using particle-tracking techniques to evaluate the transport of the leaked stream water in the nearby aquifers. Simple stream-aquifer conditions are used to demonstrate the usefulness of the analysis. Travel times, pathlines, and influence zones of stream water were determined between a stream and nearby pumping wells for seasonal ground water extraction areas. When water quantity is a concern, the analyses provide additional information about stream depletion; when water quality is an issue, they offer information for wellhead protection. Analyses were conducted for transient conditions, and both pumping and nonpumping periods were considered. According to the results from the simulation examples, migration of infiltrated stream water into the nearby aquifers is generally slow and most infiltrated stream water does not arrive at the pumping well at the end of a 90-day irrigation season. Infiltrated stream water may remain in the aquifer for several years before arriving at the pumping well. For aquifers with a regional hydraulic gradient toward streams, part of the infiltrated stream water may discharge back to streams during a recovery period.

  6. Integrated loading rate determination for wastewater infiltration system sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Jenssen, P.D. . Centre for Soil and Environmental Research); Siegrist, R.L. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the principal parameters used in wastewater system design is the hydraulic loading rate. Historically the determination of the loading rate has been a straight forward process involving selection of a rate based on soil texture or water percolation rate. Research and experience over the past decade has provided additional insight into the complex processes occurring within wastewater-amended soil systems and has suggested the fallacy of this approach. A mean grain size vs. sorting (MESO) diagram constitutes a new basis for soil classification for wastewater infiltration system design. Crude characterization of the soil hydraulic properties is possible according to the MESO Diagram and loading rate as well as certain purification aspects can be assessed from the diagram. In this paper, an approach is described based on the MESO Diagram that integrates soil properties and wastewater pretreatment to yield a loading rate. 53 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Temperature sensitivity of photonic crystal fibers infiltrated with ethanol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu Van, Lanh; Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Kasztelanic, Rafał; Cao Long, Van; Klimczak, Mariusz; Le Van, Hieu; Trippenbach, Marek; Buczyński, Ryszard

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a numerical study on the optimization of dispersion of a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with water-ethanol mixtures. The advantage of such an approach stems from the fact that the dependence of the refractive index on temperature is larger in liquids than in solid materials. Here, we examine photonic crystal fibers with a regular, hexagonal lattice and with various geometrical and material parameters, such as different number of rings of holes, various lattice constants and the size of core and air-holes. Additionally, for the optimized structure with flat dispersion characteristics, we analyze the influence of temperature and concentration of the ethanol solution on the dispersion characteristic and the zero dispersion wavelength shift of the fundamental mode.

  8. Neural crest contribution to lingual mesenchyme, epithelium and developing taste papillae and taste buds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Mishina, Yuji; Mistretta, Charlotte M

    2012-08-15

    The epithelium of mammalian tongue hosts most of the taste buds that transduce gustatory stimuli into neural signals. In the field of taste biology, taste bud cells have been described as arising from "local epithelium", in distinction from many other receptor organs that are derived from neurogenic ectoderm including neural crest (NC). In fact, contribution of NC to both epithelium and mesenchyme in the developing tongue is not fully understood. In the present study we used two independent, well-characterized mouse lines, Wnt1-Cre and P0-Cre that express Cre recombinase in a NC-specific manner, in combination with two Cre reporter mouse lines, R26R and ZEG, and demonstrate a contribution of NC-derived cells to both tongue mesenchyme and epithelium including taste papillae and taste buds. In tongue mesenchyme, distribution of NC-derived cells is in close association with taste papillae. In tongue epithelium, labeled cells are observed in an initial scattered distribution and progress to a clustered pattern between papillae, and within papillae and early taste buds. This provides evidence for a contribution of NC to lingual epithelium. Together with previous reports for the origin of taste bud cells from local epithelium in postnatal mouse, we propose that NC cells migrate into and reside in the epithelium of the tongue primordium at an early embryonic stage, acquire epithelial cell phenotypes, and undergo cell proliferation and differentiation that is involved in the development of taste papillae and taste buds. Our findings lead to a new concept about derivation of taste bud cells that include a NC origin.

  9. Effects of varying fixed lingual apex positions on tongue pressure during straw drinking.

    PubMed

    Hara, M; Ishida, R; Ohkubo, M; Sugiyama, T; Abe, S

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the impact of tongue-thrusting on lingual pressure during fluid intake with a straw. In this study, 12 healthy young dentate individuals (two women and 10 men; 19-33 years) were instructed to drink 15 mL of water with a regular drinking straw at 37 °C, when indicated by the investigator. Participants drank after adjusting tongue position to one of the following patterns: (i) Holding the tip of the straw between the lips (Normal Position: NP), (ii) Sticking out the tongue to the vermilion zone of the lower lip and inserting the straw 1 cm past the front teeth (Tongue-thrusting Position: TP). Five recordings were conducted for each participant in a randomised order. To measure tongue pressure during swallowing, a specially designed 0.1-mm thick sensor sheet (Nitta, Osaka, Japan) with a tactile system for measurement of pressure distribution (I-SCAN; Nitta) was used. Duration, maximal magnitude and integrated value of tongue pressure were analysed based on the wave of tongue pressure recorded while water was swallowed. Magnitude, duration and integrated value of tongue pressure were significantly lower in TP than in NP at the median line (Ch1-3). Magnitude and integrated value of tongue pressure at the lateral part of the tongue (Ch5) were significantly lower in TP than in NP. When duration, maximal magnitude and integrated values were compared by channel, no significant differences were observed in NP, but a significant difference was found between Ch3 and the lateral areas Ch4/Ch 5 in TP. When the tongue was thrust forward, movement dynamics of the entire tongue changed and influenced contact between the tongue and palate during liquid intake with a straw. The impact was noticeably weaker on the median line than in lateral areas.

  10. Ephrin-B/EphB signaling is required for normal innervation of lingual gustatory papillae

    PubMed Central

    Treffy, Randall William; Collins, David; Hoshino, Natalia; Ton, Son; Katsevman, Gennadiy Aleksandrovich; Oleksiak, Michael; Runge, Elizabeth Marie; Cho, David; Russo, Matthew; Spec, Andrej; Gomulka, Jennifer; Henkemeyer, Mark; Rochlin, Michael William

    2016-01-01

    The innervation of taste buds is an excellent model system for studying the guidance of axons during targeting because of their discrete nature and the high fidelity of innervation. The pre-gustatory epithelium of fungiform papillae is known to secrete diffusible axon guidance cues such as BDNF and Sema3A that attract and repel, respectively, geniculate ganglion axons during targeting, but diffusible factors alone are unlikely to explain how taste axon terminals are restricted to their territories within the taste bud. Non-diffusible cell surface proteins such as Ephs and ephrins can act as receptors and/or ligands for one another and are known to control axon terminal positioning in several parts of the nervous system, but they have not been studied in the gustatory system. We report that ephrin-B2 linked β-galactosidase staining and immunostaining was present along the dorsal epithelium of the mouse tongue as early as E15.5, but was not detected at E14.5, when axons first enter the epithelium. Ephrin-B1 immunolabeling was barely detected in the epithelium and found at a somewhat higher concentration in the mesenchyme subjacent to the epithelium. EphB1 and EphB2 were detected in lingual sensory afferents in vivo and geniculate neurites in vitro. Ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 were similarly effective in repelling or suppressing outgrowth by geniculate neurites in vitro. These in vitro effects were independent of the neurotrophin used to promote outgrowth, but were reduced by elevated levels of laminin. In vivo, mice null for EphB1 and EphB2 exhibited decreased gustatory innervation of fungiform papillae. These data provide evidence that ephrin-B forward signaling is necessary for normal gustatory innervation of the mammalian tongue. PMID:27035151

  11. One-stage dorsal lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty for the treatment of failed hypospadias repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Bin; Xu, Yue-Min; Fu, Qiang; Sa, Ying-Long; Zhang, Jiong; Xie, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients who underwent one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty using a lingual mucosal graft (LMG) after failed hypospadias repairs. Inclusion criteria included a history of failed hypospadias repair, insufficiency of the local skin that made a reoperation with skin flaps difficult, and necessity of an oral mucosal graft urethroplasty. Patients were excluded if they had undergone a failed hypospadias repair using the foreskin or a multistage repair urethroplasty. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 110 patients with failed hypospadias repairs were treated in our center. Of these patients, 56 underwent a one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty using LMG. The median age was 21.8 years (range: 4–45 years). Of the 56 patients, one-stage onlay LMG urethroplasty was performed in 42 patients (group 1), and a modified Snodgrass technique using one-stage inlay LMG urethroplasty was performed in 14 (group 2). The median LMG urethroplasty length was 5.6 ± 1.6 cm (range: 4–13 cm). The mean follow-up was 34.7 months (range: 10–58 months), and complications developed in 12 of 56 patients (21.4%), including urethrocutaneous fistulas in 7 (6 in group 1, 1 in group 2) and neourethral strictures in 5 (4 in group 1, 1 in group 2). The total success rate was 78.6%. Our survey suggests that one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty with LMG may be an effective option to treat the patients with less available skin after failed hypospadias repairs; LMG harvesting is easy and safe, irrespective of the patient's age. PMID:26228042

  12. Single stage circumferential lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in near obliterative bulbar urethra stricture: A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Umesh; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Garg, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Aims: This is a prospective study of the use and efficacy of a novel technique of circumferential tubularised lingual mucosal graft (LMG) in obliterative and near obliterative bulbar urethral stricture of >2 cm where excisional and augmented anastomotic urethroplasty are not feasible. Materials and Methods: The stenotic urethral segment was opened dorsally in midline and fibrosed urethra was excised taking care to preserve the healthy spongiosum tissue. LMG (av. Length 3 cm) was placed from one end of corporal body towards spongy tissue in a circumferential manner. Another LMG was placed in similar manner to deal with longer stricture. The urethra was tubularised over 14 Fr silicone catheter. Results: A total of 12 men, of mean age 47 years underwent this procedure. The mean follow up period was 11 months starting from July 2014 till manuscript submission. Follow up included voiding cystourethrogram at 3 weeks, cystoscopy at 3 months (one patient didn’t turned up) and subsequent follow up. Mean stricture length was 4.66 cm (range, 3–8.5 cm) and mean operative time was 195 min. (range, 160 to 200 min.). The technique was successful (normal voiding with no need for any post-operative procedure) in 11(91.6%) patients. One patient developed early recurrence at 4 month of surgery and had anastomotic stricture which was successfully managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Conclusion: Single stage circumferential tubularised graft urethroplasty is an excellent technique for strictures that include segments of obliterative and near obliterative diseased urethra. It provide a wider neourethra than patch graft urethroplasty. PMID:27141182

  13. Structure-function studies of Bubalus bubalis lingual antimicrobial peptide analogs.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Dhruba Jyoti; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Satish

    2009-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides expressed on different epithelial lining are major components of the innate immune system. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence of Bubalus bubalis lingual antimicrobial peptide (LAP) cDNA (Accession No. DQ458768), five overlapping peptides LAP(23-55), LAP(42-64), LAP(21-64), LAP(1-26) and LAP(1-64) were synthesized using solid phase fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry. Circular Dichroism spectroscopy of synthesized peptides revealed predominantly beta-structure for LAP(23-55,) LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64) with less alpha-helix in different solutions. Quantitation of secondary structure indicated the highest beta-structure for all these three peptides in membrane mimetic SDS solution. The helicogenic solvent TFE could not induce helix in LAP(23-55) however TFE induced helical propensity was observed in LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64). The quantitation of secondary structure indicated the highest ordered structure for LAP(23-55) followed by LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64). The antibacterial activity of LAP(23-55) was found to be more potent against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogens, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium followed by LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) also showed similar trend with lowest value for LAP(23-55) followed by LAP(42-64) and LAP(21-64). Haemolysis and cytotoxicity was observed above 3 fold for LAP(21-64,) above six fold for LAP(23-55) and LAP(42-64) of their MIC. The LAP(1-26) and LAP(1-64) could not produce any characteristic CD spectra and did not show any antimicrobial activity, indicating that N- terminal of the peptide negates the antimicrobial activity.

  14. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  15. Prognostic value of tumor infiltrating NK cells and macrophages in stage II+III esophageal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao; Shi, Liangrong; Wu, Changping; Jiang, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the immunobiology of tumor microenvironment has recently translated into new therapeutic approach against human cancers. Besides the role of immune cells mediating adaptive immune responses, the tumor infiltrating components of the innate immune system including, neutrophils, mast cells, NK cells, and macrophages, also role importantly in anti-tumor immunity. In our present study, we retrospectively analyzed the prognostic value of the densities of tumor infiltrating NK cells and macrophages in esophageal cancer tissues derived from stage II+III patients. Our results showed that the density of the infiltrating NK cells in tumor stroma was significantly associated with nodal status. In addition, the densities of the infiltrating NK cells in tumor nest, and the infiltrating macrophages in tumor nest as well as in tumor stroma, were significantly associated with patients' postoperative prognoses. Furthermore, the combination of infiltrating NK cells in tumor nest and stroma, or the combination of infiltrating macrophages in tumor nest and stroma, could also be used as important prognostic tool in predicting the survival of the stage II+III esophageal cancer patients. PMID:27736796

  16. Infiltrating monocytes in liver injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Brempelis, Katherine J; Crispe, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Noninfectious liver injury causes many acute and chronic liver diseases around the globe, and particularly in developed nations. Bone marrow-derived monocytes infiltrate the damaged liver tissue and are a critical component of the innate immune response that may drive injury resolution or host death in the short term or chronic inflammation, fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in the long term. Monocytes often play dual roles in liver injury—both perpetuating inflammation and promoting resolution of inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, we will address the role that monocytes play in different experimental forms of noninfectious liver injury; considering in particular the importance of the transition from inflammatory Ly6Chi monocytes to pro-resolution Ly6Clo monocyte-derived macrophages and the consequences of this transition for disease progression and resolution. PMID:27990288

  17. Infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, William C.; Thiros, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    The ground-water hydrology of Panguitch Valley and adjacent areas, south-central Utah, was studied during 1988-90. One objective of the study was to measure ground-water recharge from infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water. Water-level and soil-moisture data were used to estimate travel times for water moving down through the soil profile, and to compare quantities of water reaching the water table after application of flood and sprinkler irrigation. During this study, estimates of travel times from land surface to the water table ranged from 11 days in June 1989 to 2 days in September 1989. Estimates of irrigation water recharging the ground-water system ranged from 25 to 75 percent of the water applied to the flood-irrigated field. Virtually no recharge was apparent for the sprinkler-irrigated field.

  18. Explicit infiltration equations and the Lambert W-function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, J.-Y.; Barry, D. A.; Haverkamp, R.

    The Green and Ampt infiltration formula, as well as the Talsma and Parlange formula, are two-parameter equations that are both expressible in terms of Lambert W-functions. These representations are used to derive explicit, simple and accurate approximations for each case. The two infiltration formulas are limiting cases that can be deduced from an existing three-parameter infiltration equation, the third parameter allowing for interpolation between the limiting cases. Besides the limiting cases, there is another case for which the three-parameter infiltration equation yields an exact solution. The three-parameter equation can be solved by fixed-point iteration, a scheme which can be exploited to obtain a sequence of increasingly complex explicit infiltration equations. For routine use, a simple, explicit approximation to the three-parameter infiltration equation is derived. This approximation eliminates the need to iterate for most practical circumstances.

  19. Infiltration modeling guidelines for commercial building energy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gowri, Krishnan; Winiarski, David W.; Jarnagin, Ronald E.

    2009-09-30

    This report presents a methodology for modeling air infiltration in EnergyPlus to account for envelope air barrier characteristics. Based on a review of various infiltration modeling options available in EnergyPlus and sensitivity analysis, the linear wind velocity coefficient based on DOE-2 infiltration model is recommended. The methodology described in this report can be used to calculate the EnergyPlus infiltration input for any given building level infiltration rate specified at known pressure difference. The sensitivity analysis shows that EnergyPlus calculates the wind speed based on zone altitude, and the linear wind velocity coefficient represents the variation in infiltration heat loss consistent with building location and weather data.

  20. [Pseudotumorous cardiac infiltration in a patient with acute monoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orts, M; Ribera, J M; Calatrava, A; Larrouse, E; Catalán, R; Navarro, J T; Millá, F; Feliu, E

    1996-04-13

    Although cardiac infiltration is common in advanced stage of acute leukaemia, it is not usually diagnosed at life and it is extremely rare for it to become pseudotumoral. A 25-years-old patient with an acute monoblastic leukaemia who had a leukaemic infiltration which affected the main part of the left ventricle at the time of diagnosis, is referred. The heart infiltration was detected by a two dimension echocardiography. In spite of a massive infiltration, heart failure was not present and the left ventricle's ejection fraction was 50%. Even though chemotherapy was administered, the patient died four days after diagnosis due to septic shock of respiratory origin. The most relevant autopsy finding was a widespread pseudotumoral infiltration of the left ventricle, the back side of the right ventricle and the interventricular wall. The pseudotumoral infiltration of the heart by acute leukaemia is uncommon and must be differentiated from granulocytic sarcoma. The usefulness of the different diagnostic procedures is discussed.

  1. Influence of ligation method on friction resistance of lingual brackets with different second-order angulations: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Graziane Olímpio; Gimenez, Carla Maria Melleiro; Prieto, Lucas; Prieto, Marcos Gabriel do Lago; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate stainless steel archwire static friction in active and passive self-ligating lingual and conventional brackets with second-order angulations. Methods: Two conventional lingual brackets for canines (STb light/Ormco; PSWb/Tecnident), and two self-ligating brackets, one active (In-Ovation L/GAC) and the other passive (3D/ Forestadent), were evaluated. A stainless steel archwire was used at 0°, 3° and 5° angulations. Metal ligatures, conventional elastic ligatures, and low friction elastic ligatures were also tested. A universal testing machine applied friction between brackets and wires, simulating sliding mechanics, to produce 2-mm sliding at 3 mm/minute speed. Results: Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between brackets and angulations (p < 0.001). Tukey test indicated that the highest frictional resistance values were observed at 5° angulation for In-Ovation L, PSWb bracket with non conventional ligature, and STb bracket with metal ligature. As for 3D, PSWb with conventional or metal ligatures, and STb brackets with non conventional ligature, showed significantly lower static frictional resistance with 0° angulation. At 0° angulation, STb brackets with metal ties, In-Ovation L brackets and 3D brackets had the lowest frictional resistance. Conclusions: As the angulation increased from 0° to 3°, static friction resistance increased. When angulation increased from 3° to 5°, static friction resistance increased or remained the same. Self-ligating 3D and In-Ovation L brackets, as well as conventional STb brackets, seem to be the best option when sliding mechanics is used to perform lingual orthodontic treatment. PMID:27653262

  2. Biochars impact on water infiltration and water quality through a compacted subsoil layer.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jeff; Sigua, Gilbert; Watts, Don; Cantrell, Keri; Shumaker, Paul; Szogi, Ariel; Johnson, Mark G; Spokas, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Soils in the SE USA Coastal Plain region frequently have a compacted subsoil layer (E horizon), which is a barrier for water infiltration. Four different biochars were evaluated to increase water infiltration through a compacted horizon from a Norfolk soil (fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic, Typic Kandiudult). In addition, we also evaluated biochars effect on water quality. Biochars were produced by pyrolysis at 500 °C from pine chips (Pinus taeda), poultry litter (Gallus domesticus) feedstocks, and as blends (50:50 and 80:20) of pine chip:poultry litter. Prior to pyrolysis, the feedstocks were pelletized and sieved to >2-mm pellets. Each biochar was mixed with the subsoil at 20 g/kg (w/w) and the mixture was placed in columns. The columns were leached four times with Milli-Q water over 128 d of incubation. Except for the biochar produced from poultry litter, all other applied biochars resulted in significant water infiltration increases (0.157-0.219 mL min(-1); p<0.05) compared to the control (0.095 mL min(-1)). However, water infiltration in each treatment were influenced by additional water leaching. Leachates were enriched in PO4, SO4, Cl, Na, and K after addition of poultry litter biochar, however, their concentrations declined in pine chip blended biochar treatments and after multiple leaching. Adding biochars (except 100% poultry litter biochar) to a compacted subsoil layer can initially improve water infiltration, but, additional leaching revealed that the effect remained only for the 50:50 pine chip:poultry litter blended biochar while it declined in other biochar treatments.

  3. Reactive Melt Infiltration Of Silicon Into Porous Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, Donald R.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    1994-01-01

    Report describes study of synthesis of silicon carbide and related ceramics by reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon/molybdenum alloys into porous carbon preforms. Reactive melt infiltration has potential for making components in nearly net shape, performed in less time and at lower temperature. Object of study to determine effect of initial pore volume fraction, pore size, and infiltration material on quality of resultant product.

  4. Focal lingual dystonia, urinary incontinence, and sensory deficits secondary to low voltage electrocution: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, J R; McAninch, S A

    2002-07-01

    Electrocution injuries are well reported in review articles and cases of high voltage electrocution injury are abundant. However, reports of low voltage electrocution injury are few. A case is presented of low voltage shock from a 120 volt AC source with presentation, acute and chronic course, and a five year follow up. The patient experienced several unusual complications of low voltage electrocution: a persistent right tongue deviation, which initially presents as an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy, but subsequently manifests as a focal lingual dystonia; total body paresthesia with urinary incontinence; and persistent sensory deficits to the face and tongue.

  5. Tooth surface floss loss: unusual interproximal and lingual cervical lesions as a result of bizarre dental flossing.

    PubMed

    Gow, Alex M; Kelleher, Martin G

    2003-01-01

    There are many reported cases of cervical abrasion/erosion cavities in the literature with various theories offered in support of their pathogenesis. The vast majority of these cases involve the labial cervical regions of the affected teeth. This case report describes an unusual dental presentation of severe lingual cervical and interproximal lesions predominantly affecting the upper and lower anterior and premolar teeth. The differential diagnosis is presented, along with the likely cause of the lesions: in this case, a bizarre oral hygiene technique. The proposed treatment plan is outlined and the problems associated with restoring such cavities are highlighted.

  6. Urethral reconstruction with a 3D porous bacterial cellulose scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Lv, Xiang-Guo; Li, Zhe; Song, Lu-Jie; Feng, Chao; Xie, Min-Kai; Li, Chao; Li, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Hong; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Chen, Shi-Yan; Wang, Hua-Ping; Xu, Yue-Min

    2015-09-11

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of urethral reconstruction with a three-dimensional (3D) porous bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model. A novel 3D porous BC scaffold was prepared by gelatin sponge interfering in the BC fermentation process. Rabbit lingual keratinocytes were isolated, expanded, and seeded onto 3D porous BC. BC alone (group 1, N  =  10), 3D porous BC alone (group 2, N  =  10), and 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes (group 3, N  =  10) were used to repair rabbit ventral urethral defects (2.0   ×   0.8 cm). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that BC consisted of a compact laminate while 3D porous BC was composed of a porous sheet buttressed by a dense outer layer. The average pore diameter and porosity of the 3D porous BC were 4.23   ±   1.14 μm and 67.00   ±   6.80%, respectively. At 3 months postoperatively, macroscopic examinations and retrograde urethrograms of urethras revealed that all urethras maintained wide calibers in group 3. Strictures were found in all rabbits in groups 1 and 2. Histologically, at 1 month postoperatively, intact epithelium occurred in group 3, and discontinued epithelium was found in groups 1 and 2. However, groups 2 and 3 exhibited similar epithelial regeneration, which was superior to that of group 1 at 3 months (p  <  0.05). Comparisons of smooth muscle content and endothelia density among the three groups revealed a significant increase at each time point (p  <  0.05). Our results demonstrated that 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes enhanced urethral tissue regeneration. 3D porous BC could potentially be used as an optimized scaffold for urethral reconstruction.

  7. Attempt to assess the infiltration of enamel made with experimental preparation using a scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The resin infiltration technique, a minimally invasive method, involves the saturation, strengthening, and stabilization of demineralized enamel by a mixture of polymer resins without the need to use rotary tools or the risk of losing healthy tooth structures. Aim of the study To design and synthesize an experimental infiltrant with potential bacteriostatic properties.To compare the depth of infiltration of the designed experimental preparation with the infiltrant available in the market using a scanning electron microscope. Material and Methods Composition of the experimental infiltrant was established after analysis of 1H NMR spectra of the commercially available compounds that can penetrate pores of demineralized enamel. As the infiltrant should have bacteriostatic features by definition, an addition of 1% of monomer containing metronidazole was made. Thirty extracted human teeth were soaked in an acidic solution, which was to provide appropriate conditions for demineralization of enamel. Afterward, each tooth was divided along the coronal-root axis into two zones. One zone had experimental preparation applied to it (the test group), while the other had commercially available Icon (the control group). The teeth were dissected along the long axis and described above underwent initial observation with use of a Hitachi S-4200 scanning electron microscope. Results It was found that all samples contained only oxygen and carbon, regardless of the concentration of additions introduced into them. The occurrence of carbon is partially because it is a component of the preparation in question and partially because of sputtering of the sample with it. Hydrogen is also a component of the preparation, as a result of its phase composition; however, it cannot be detected by the EDS method. Conclusions SEM, in combination with X-ray microanalysis, does not allow one to explicitly assess the depth of penetration of infiltration preparations into enamel.In order to

  8. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-08-01

    A two-step forced chemical vapor infiltration process was developed that reduced infiltration times for 4.45 cm dia. by 1.27 cm thick Nicalon{sup +} fiber preforms by two thirds while maintaining final densities near 90 %. In the first stage of the process, micro-voids within fiber bundles in the cloth were uniformly infiltrated throughout the preform. In the second stage, the deposition rate was increased to more rapidly fill the macro-voids between bundles within the cloth and between layers of cloth. By varying the thermal gradient across the preform uniform infiltration rates were maintained and high final densities achieved.

  9. Modeling residential fine particulate matter infiltration for exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Hystad, Perry U; Setton, Eleanor M; Allen, Ryan W; Keller, Peter C; Brauer, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Individuals spend the majority of their time indoors; therefore, estimating infiltration of outdoor-generated fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) can help reduce exposure misclassification in epidemiological studies. As indoor measurements in individual homes are not feasible in large epidemiological studies, we evaluated the potential of using readily available data to predict infiltration of ambient PM(2.5) into residences. Indoor and outdoor light scattering measurements were collected for 84 homes in Seattle, Washington, USA, and Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, to estimate residential infiltration efficiencies. Meteorological variables and spatial property assessment data (SPAD), containing detailed housing characteristics for individual residences, were compiled for both study areas using a geographic information system. Multiple linear regression was used to construct models of infiltration based on these data. Heating (October to February) and non-heating (March to September) season accounted for 36% of the yearly variation in detached residential infiltration. Two SPAD housing characteristic variables, low building value, and heating with forced air, predicted 37% of the variation found between detached residential infiltration during the heating season. The final model, incorporating temperature and the two SPAD housing characteristic variables, with a seasonal interaction term, explained 54% of detached residential infiltration. Residences with low building values had higher infiltration efficiencies than other residences, which could lead to greater exposure gradients between low and high socioeconomic status individuals than previously identified using only ambient PM(2.5) concentrations. This modeling approach holds promise for incorporating infiltration efficiencies into large epidemiology studies, thereby reducing exposure misclassification.

  10. Approach to Cutaneous Lymphoid Infiltrates: When to Consider Lymphoma?

    PubMed Central

    Charli-Joseph, Yann Vincent; Gatica-Torres, Michelle; Pincus, Laura Beth

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates (CLIs) are common in routine dermatopathology. However, differentiating a reactive CLI from a malignant lymphocytic infiltrate is often a significant challenge since many inflammatory dermatoses can clinically and/or histopathologically mimic cutaneous lymphomas, coined pseudolymphomas. We conducted a literature review from 1966 to July 1, 2015, at PubMed.gov using the search terms: Cutaneous lymphoma, cutaneous pseudolymphoma, cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, simulants/mimics/imitators of cutaneous lymphomas, and cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates. The diagnostic approach to CLIs and the most common differential imitators of lymphoma is discussed herein based on six predominant morphologic and immunophenotypic, histopathologic patterns: (1) Superficial dermal T-cell infiltrates (2) superficial and deep dermal perivascular and/or nodular natural killer/T-cell infiltrates (3) pan-dermal diffuse T-cell infiltrates (4) panniculitic T-cell infiltrates (5) small cell predominant B-cell infiltrates, and (6) large-cell predominant B-cell infiltrates. Since no single histopathological feature is sufficient to discern between a benign and a malignant CLI, the overall balance of clinical, histopathological, immunophenotypic, and molecular features should be considered carefully to establish a diagnosis. Despite advances in ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry and molecular clonality, these studies often display specificity and sensitivity limitations. Therefore, proper clinicopathological correlation still remains the gold standard for the precise diagnosis of CLIs. PMID:27512181

  11. Endodontic-periodontal management of a maxillary lateral incisor with an associated radicular lingual groove and severe periapical osseous destruction--a case report.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Amit; Yadav, Priya; Gandhi, Taru

    2012-01-01

    Radicular lingual grooves are morphological defects, which are found most frequently in maxillary anterior teeth and are a predisposing factor for periodontal disease. They are easily overlooked as aetiologic factors, as these grooves are covered by periodontal tissues. This case report presents a successful management of a case of a maxillary lateral incisor with an associated radicular lingual groove and severe periapical osseous destruction in a 30-year-old female patient. A combination of endodontic treatment, radiculoplasty to eliminate the radicular lingual groove, and periapical surgery to eliminate the periapical osseous defect was used. At two-year follow-up, the patient was comfortable and complete resolution of the periapical pathology was evident.

  12. Surface Roughness of Initial Enamel Caries Lesions in Human Teeth After Resin Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Wolfgang H.; Meyer, Ann-Kathrin; Naumova, Ella A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low viscosity resin infiltration of initial caries lesions is a modern microinvasive method to treat initial cries lesions. However, only scarce information is available about the long-term surface alterations of infiltrated lesions. Methods: Twenty-eight premolar teeth exhibiting non-cavitated initial caries lesions (International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS code 1&2)) were divided into two groups, one of which was infiltrated with resin, and the other remained untreated. The teeth underwent two thermocycling procedures. The surface roughness was determined quantitatively, and the results were evaluated statistically. In addition, the surfaces of the lesions were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the surface was analyzed visually with respect to surface irregularities. Results: The results showed a reduction in the surface roughness that was significant after 2500 thermocycles compared to the untreated surface. In the control specimens, no change in the surface roughness was found. The qualitative SEM data also showed a smooth surface after thermocycling, which supported the statistical findings. Conclusion: After thermocycling, resin-infiltrated enamel surfaces become smoother and had no additional risk for plaque accumulation. PMID:27733877

  13. Peripheral nerve catheters and local anesthetic infiltration in perioperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Christopher K; Mariano, Edward R; Kaye, Alan David; Lissauer, Jonathan; Mancuso, Kenneth; Prabhakar, Amit; Urman, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) and local infiltration analgesia (LIA) represent valuable options for controlling perioperative pain. PNCs have been increasingly utilized to provide both surgical anesthesia and prolonged postoperative analgesia for a wide variety of procedures. PNCs can be more technically challenging to place than typical single-injection nerve blocks (SINB), and familiarity with the indications, contraindications, relevant anatomy, and appropriate technical skills is a prerequisite for the placement of any PNC. PNCs include risks of peripheral nerve injury, damage to adjacent anatomic structures, local anesthetic toxicity, intravascular injection, risks associated with motor block, risks of unnoticed injury to the insensate limb, and risks of sedation associated with PNC placement. In addition to these common risks, there are specific risks unique to each PNC insertion site. LIA strategies have emerged that seek to provide the benefit of targeted local anesthesia while minimizing collateral motor block and increasing the applicability of durable local anesthesia beyond the extremities. LIA involves the injection and/or infusion of a local anesthetic near the site of surgical incision to provide targeted analgesia. A wide variety of techniques have been described, including single-injection intraoperative wound infiltration, indwelling wound infusion catheters, and the recent high-volume LIA technique associated with joint replacement surgery. The efficacy of these techniques varies depending on specific procedures and anatomic locations. The recent incorporation of ultra-long-acting liposomal bupivacaine preparations has the potential to dramatically increase the utility of single-injection LIA. LIA represents a promising yet under-investigated method of postoperative pain control.

  14. Chronically inflamed human tissues are infiltrated by highly differentiated Th17 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pène, Jérôme; Chevalier, Sylvie; Preisser, Laurence; Vénéreau, Emilie; Guilleux, Marie-Hélène; Ghannam, Soufiane; Molès, Jean-Pierre; Danger, Yannic; Ravon, Elisa; Lesaux, Sabine; Yssel, Hans; Gascan, Hugues

    2008-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are characterized by local tissue injury caused by immunocompetent cells, in particular CD4(+) T lymphocytes, that are involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders via the production of distinctive sets of cytokines. Here, we have characterized single CD4(+) T cells that infiltrate inflamed tissue taken from patients with psoriasis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or allergic asthma. Results from a cytokine production and gene profile analysis identified a population of in vivo differentiatedretinoid-related orphan receptor gamma-expressing T cells, producing high levels of IL-17, that can represent up to 30% of infiltrating T lymphocytes. Activated Th17 cells produced IL-26, TNF-alpha, lymphotoxin-beta, and IL-22. IL-17 and IL-22 concentrations secreted by tissue infiltrating Th17 cells could reach up to 100 nM and were inversely correlated with the production of Th1- and Th2-associated cytokines. In addition, tissue-infiltrating Th17 cells are also characterized by high cell surface expression of CCR6, a chemokine receptor that was not expressed by Th1 and Th2 cells, isolated from the same lesions, and by the production of CCL20/MIP3alpha, a CCR6 ligand, associated with tissue infiltration. Culture supernatants of activated Th17 cells, isolated from psoriatic lesions, induced the expression of gene products associated with inflammation and abnormal keratinocyte differentiation in an IL-17 and IL-22-dependent manner. These results show that tissue-infiltrating Th17 cells contribute to human chronic inflammatory disease via the production of several inflammatory cytokines and the creation of an environment contributing to their migration and sequestration at sites of inflammation.

  15. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  16. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  17. Bmi1-positive cells in the lingual epithelium could serve as cancer stem cells in tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Atsumi, Naho; Nakamura, Naohiro; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Omachi, Taichi; Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Ishigaki, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kazuho; Ohsugi, Haruyuki; Tokuyama, Yoko; Imahashi, Yuki; Hisha, Hiroko; Yoshida, Naoko; Kumano, Keiki; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-12-22

    We recently reported that the polycomb complex protein Bmi1 is a marker for lingual epithelial stem cells (LESCs), which are involved in the long-term maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue in the physiological state. However, the precise role of LESCs in generating tongue tumors and Bmi1-positive cell lineage dynamics in tongue cancers are unclear. Here, using a mouse model of chemically (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide: 4-NQO) induced tongue cancer and the multicolor lineage tracing method, we found that each unit of the tumor was generated by a single cell and that the assembly of such cells formed a polyclonal tumor. Although many Bmi1-positive cells within the tongue cancer specimens failed to proliferate, some proliferated continuously and supplied tumor cells to the surrounding area. This process eventually led to the formation of areas derived from single cells after 1-3 months, as determined using the multicolor lineage tracing method, indicating that such cells could serve as cancer stem cells. These results indicate that LESCs could serve as the origin for tongue cancer and that cancer stem cells are present in tongue tumors.

  18. Scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the adult Spotted seal, Phoca largha.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ken; Shindo, Junji; Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Kobayashi, Kan; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    We observed the external surface and connective tissue cores (CTCs) of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae) of adult Spotted seals (Phoca largha) using SEM and light microscopy. The tongue was V-shaped and its apex was rather rounded. On the dorsal surface from apex to the one-third posterior of the tongue, the lingual mucosa was densely covered by filiform papillae, with a scatted distribution of dome-like fungiform papillae, which have orthokeratinized epithelium. At the posterior part of the tongue, filiform papillae were totally diminished and their epithelium was parakeratinized. Approximately 6-7 vallate papillae were arranged in a V-shape on the posterior of the tongue. After removal of the epithelium, the CTCs of the filiform papillae that were distributed at apex consisted of a primary core and approximately 5-6 rod-shaped small accessory cores. The CTCs of filiform papillae that were distributed at anterior part of the tongue lacked primary protrusions and possessed approximately 10-15 rod shaped small accessory cores that were arranged in a horseshoe manner. The CTCs offungiform papillae had cylindrical primary cores and were fringed with accessory protrusion. In the Vallate papillae, taste buds were only seen at the dorsal epithelium.

  19. Bmi1-positive cells in the lingual epithelium could serve as cancer stem cells in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Atsumi, Naho; Nakamura, Naohiro; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Omachi, Taichi; Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Ishigaki, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kazuho; Ohsugi, Haruyuki; Tokuyama, Yoko; Imahashi, Yuki; Hisha, Hiroko; Yoshida, Naoko; Kumano, Keiki; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that the polycomb complex protein Bmi1 is a marker for lingual epithelial stem cells (LESCs), which are involved in the long-term maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue in the physiological state. However, the precise role of LESCs in generating tongue tumors and Bmi1-positive cell lineage dynamics in tongue cancers are unclear. Here, using a mouse model of chemically (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide: 4-NQO) induced tongue cancer and the multicolor lineage tracing method, we found that each unit of the tumor was generated by a single cell and that the assembly of such cells formed a polyclonal tumor. Although many Bmi1-positive cells within the tongue cancer specimens failed to proliferate, some proliferated continuously and supplied tumor cells to the surrounding area. This process eventually led to the formation of areas derived from single cells after 1–3 months, as determined using the multicolor lineage tracing method, indicating that such cells could serve as cancer stem cells. These results indicate that LESCs could serve as the origin for tongue cancer and that cancer stem cells are present in tongue tumors. PMID:28004815

  20. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E; Barlow, Linda A

    2015-05-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells.

  1. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells. PMID:26020789

  2. A comparative study of lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in urethral stricture disease: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Gupta, Depak Kumar; Ghosh, Bastab; Bera, Malay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: A prospective study to compare the outcomes of lingual versus buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in patients with long segment anterior urethral strictures disease. Materials and Methods: The study included 30 patients for buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty (group I) and 30 patients for lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty (group II) for treatment of long segment (>3 cm) incomplete anterior urethral stricture disease using single-stage dorsal onlay free oral mucosal graft urethroplasty by Barbagli's technique between February 2013 to September 2014. All patients underwent complete evaluation of the stricture including inspection of the oral cavity. Results: The results of urethroplasty in between two group were not significant (P > 0.05) in terms of Qmax (P = 0.63), mean postoperative AUA symptom score (P = 0.83), operative time (P = 0.302) intra operative blood loss (P = 0.708), duration of postoperative hospitalization (P = 0.83), but slurring of speech complications was seen in group II, but not in group I. Long-term complications of salivary disturbance, tightness of the mouth, persistent pain at graft site, perioral numbness, seen only in group I (BMGU). Conclusion: LMG urethroplasty is an excellent alternative to BMG urethroplasty with comparable results of urethroplasty and minimal donor site complications. PMID:27141184

  3. Modeling the establishment of preferential flow during infiltration in a heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Slimene, Erij; Lassabatere, Laurent; Winiarski, Thierry; Gourdon, Remy

    2015-04-01

    Large cities are mostly situated in areas close to water resources in order to meet the water needs of their populations. Alluvial soils harbor large aquifers that are used to supply water, the Rhone-Alpes region being a good illustration. However, the increase of soil sealing has led to the development of best management practices such as infiltration basins which are aimed at infiltrating stormwater in order to reduce the amount of water collected and treated in usual systems. Yet, these infiltration basins are mainly settled over highly permeable geologic formations so as to ensure water infiltration and a proper functioning of these infiltration basins. Most of these formations are strongly heterogeneous, since they are made of different materials with contrasting sedimentological properties (e.g. particle size distribution) and transfer properties. This paper addresses flow modeling during the infiltration phase in the vadose zone underneath infiltration basins settled over a strongly heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit. In particular, we want to pinpoint numerically the worst conditions with regards to preferential flow, in terms of initial hydric conditions (initial water contents) and imposed flow rates. For this purpose, a numerical study is proposed on the basis of previous studies offering a sedimentological description of the subsoil with the detail of its architecture and a precise description of the different lithofacies and their hydraulic properties. Considering this, we worked on a section (13.5m long and 2.5m high) for which a complete sedimentological and hydraulic description had already been performed. Water infiltration was modeled for different initial and boundary conditions (mostly the values of the flux imposed at surface). At first, different numerical tests and adjustments have been made including mesh optimization with regards to both accuracy and computation time. Following these tests, the "tight" mesh has been validated since it

  4. Influence of experimental set-up on the infiltration characteristics during managed aquifer recharge operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Thomas; Vanzella de Melo, Julio Augusto; Stefan, Catalin

    2016-04-01

    due to the short distance to the sidewalls in the column, resulting in an almost only vertical water flow. The water saturation degree is generally higher in the column due to the almost non-existing horizontal water flow, as observed in the lysimeter. Additionally, the consumption of oxygen for the biodegradation of organic matter is overestimated in the column compared with the lysimeter due to the fact that the whole column surface during wetting cycles is ponded. In case of the lysimeter only the infiltration basin is flooded during the wetting cycles whereas the surrounding surface area to the walls is almost dry resulting in a more continuously exchange of oxygen.

  5. The infiltration, and prognostic importance, of Th1 lymphocytes vary in molecular subgroups of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Agnes; Lundberg, Ida V; Eklöf, Vincy; Wikberg, Maria L; Öberg, Åke; Palmqvist, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Giving strong prognostic information, T‐cell infiltration is on the verge of becoming an additional component in the routine clinical setting for classification of colorectal cancer (CRC). With a view to further improving the tools for prognostic evaluation, we have studied how Th1 lymphocyte infiltration correlates with prognosis not only by quantity, but also by subsite, within CRCs with different molecular characteristics (microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype status, and BRAF and KRAS mutational status). We evaluated the Th1 marker T‐bet by immunohistochemistry in 418 archival tumour tissue samples from patients who underwent surgical resection for CRC. We found that a high number of infiltrating Th1 lymphocytes is strongly associated with an improved prognosis in patients with CRC, irrespective of intratumoural subsite, and that both extent of infiltration and patient outcome differ according to molecular subgroup. In brief, microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype‐high and BRAF mutated tumours showed increased infiltration of Th1 lymphocytes, and the most pronounced prognostic effect of Th1 infiltration was found in these tumours. Interestingly, BRAF mutated tumours were found to be more highly infiltrated by Th1 lymphocytes than BRAF wild‐type tumours whereas the opposite was seen for KRAS mutated tumours. These differences could be explained at least partly by our finding that BRAF mutated, in contrast to KRAS mutated, CRC cell lines and tumour specimens expressed higher levels of the Th1‐attracting chemokine CXCL10, and reduced levels of CCL22 and TGFB1, stimulating Th2/Treg recruitment and polarisation. In conclusion, the strong prognostic importance of Th1 lymphocyte infiltration in CRC was found at all subsites evaluated, and it remained significant in multivariable analyses, indicating that T‐bet may be a valuable marker in the clinical setting. Our results also indicate that T‐bet is of

  6. 40 CFR 35.927-1 - Infiltration/inflow analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... estimated total costs for transportation and treatment of the infiltration/inflow. Cost-effectiveness... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Infiltration/inflow analysis. 35.927-1 Section 35.927-1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER...

  7. MEASUREMENTS OF INFILTRATION RATES IN COMPACTED URBAN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous research hs identified significant reductions in infiltration rates in disturbed urban soils, More than 150 prior tests were conducted in predominately sandy and clayey urban soils in the Birmingham and Mobile, AL areas. Infiltration in Clayey soils ws found to be affect...

  8. Characteristics of water infiltration in layered water repellent soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrophobic soil can influence soil water infiltration, but information regarding the impacts of different levels of hydrophobicity within a layered soil profile is limited. An infiltration study was conducted to determine the effects of different levels of hydrophobicity and the position of the hyd...

  9. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. 311.35 Section 311.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are...

  10. 40 CFR 35.927-1 - Infiltration/inflow analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... possible existence of excessive infiltration/inflow in the sewer system. The analysis should identify the presence, flow rate, and type of infiltration/inflow conditions which exist in the sewer system. (b) For... analysis guidelines (Appendix A to this subpart) should be consulted with respect to this determination....

  11. [Characteristics of water infiltration in urban soils of Nanjing City].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ling; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Yuan, Da-Gang

    2008-02-01

    By using dual-ring method, this paper measured the water infiltration rate in urban soils under representative land use patterns in Nanjing City, and studied the characteristics of water infiltration in the soils with different compaction degree. The results showed that there was a great difference in the infiltration rate among the soils with different compactness. Soil infiltration rate decreased with increasing bulk density and decreasing porosity, and the water-transport-limiting layer existed in heavily compacted soils resulted in a dramatic decrease of final stabilized infiltration rate. There was a significant linear relationship between the initial and final infiltration rates in the same soil though their absolute values had a great difference. The urban soils in Nanjing City had a wide range of final infiltration rate varied from 1 mm X h(-1) to 679 mm X h(-1), which was highly related to the soil compactness, structural status, and skeleton grain contents. The decrease of urban soil infiltration rate could induce the increase of runoff and of the probability and intensity of flooding.

  12. Approximate furrow infiltration model for time-variable ponding depth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A methodology is proposed for estimating furrow infiltration under time-variable ponding depth conditions. The methodology approximates the solution to the two-dimensional Richards equation, and is a modification of a procedure that was originally proposed for computing infiltration under constant ...

  13. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Santoiemma, Phillip P; Powell, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in ovarian cancer is prognostic for increased survival while increases in immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are associated with poor outcomes. Approaches that bolster tumor-reactive TILs may limit tumor progression. However, identifying tumor-reactive TILs in ovarian cancer has been challenging, though adoptive TIL therapy in patients has been encouraging. Other forms of TIL immunomodulation remain under investigation including Treg depletion, antibody-based checkpoint modification, activation and amplification using dendritic cells, antigen presenting cells or IL-2 cytokine culture, adjuvant cytokine injections, and gene-engineered T-cells. Many approaches to TIL manipulation inhibit ovarian cancer progression in preclinical or clinical studies as monotherapy. Here, we review the impact of TILs in ovarian cancer and attempts to mobilize TILs to halt tumor progression. We conclude that effective TIL therapy for ovarian cancer is at the brink of translation and optimal TIL activity may require combined methodologies to deliver clinically-relevant treatment.

  14. Modeling of meltwater infiltration in subfreezing snow

    SciTech Connect

    Illangasekare, T.H.; Walter, R.J. Jr.; Meier, M.F.; Pfeffer, W.T. )

    1990-05-01

    A mathematical model which incorporates the processes that influence water flow and heat transfer in subfreezing snow was developed. Among the aspects of snow included are density and grain-size heterogeneities, capillary-pressure gradients, meltwater refreezing, time dependent hydraulic and thermal parameters, and heat conduction. From this conceptual mathematical model a numerical model of two-dimensional meltwater infiltration was developed. Results from various test cases show which data are most important to measure accurately in the field, in order to determine how the snowpack will respond to an introduction of meltwater. These simulations also show the importance of the orientation of the various layers which make up the snowpack and how randomly distributed heterogeneities can produce two-dimensional flow of meltwater under unsaturated conditions. Finally, it is demonstrated that various assumptions related to density and porosity variations, dimensionality of flow, capillary effects, etc., which have been made by past investigators for ideal situations may not be valid under many circumstances, and several suggestions are made for improving predictions of meltwater behavior. Sensitivity analysis showed that the model is most sensitive to changes in bulk density, residual saturation of wet snow and meltwater supply rates, whereas changes in snow temperature and mean grain size had less marked effect.

  15. Simplified modeling for infiltration and radon entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    Air leakage in the envelopes of residential buildings is the primary mechanism for provided ventilation to those buildings. For radon the same mechanisms that drive the ventilation, drive the radon entry This paper attempts to provide a simplified physical model that can be used to understand the interactions between the building leakage distribution, the forces that drive infiltration and ventilation, and indoor radon concentrations, Combining both ventilation and entry modeling together allows an estimation of Radon concentration and exposure to be made and demonstrates how changes in the envelope or ventilation system would affect it. This paper will develop simplified modeling approaches for estimating both ventilation rate and radon entry rate based on the air tightness of the envelope and the driving forces. These approaches will use conventional leakage values (i.e. effective leakage area ) to quantify the air tightness and include natural and mechanical driving forces. This paper will introduce a simplified parameter, the Radon Leakage Area, that quantifies the resistance to radon entry. To be practical for dwellings, modeling of the occupant exposures to indoor pollutants must be simple to use and not require unreasonable input data. This paper presents the derivation of the simplified physical model, and applies that model to representative situations to explore the tendencies to be expected under different circumstances.

  16. Testing the Addition of Topographic Features for Field Scale Infiltration Excess Water Quality Modeling in SWAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collick, A.; Easton, Z. M.; Kleinman, P. J. A.; Sommerlot, A.; White, M. J.; Harmel, D.; Fuka, D.

    2014-12-01

    Watershed planners and managers need reliable tools that can capture the spatial and temporal complexity of agricultural landscapes, and water quality models are increasingly relied upon to represent P loss from agricultural watersheds. While a significant amount of modeling work has attempted to incorporate factors controlling P loss (e.g. representing solubility, manure types, timing and application type), these models still typically require significant calibration and are thus difficult to apply meaningfully in areas without copious data with which to calibrate. This is partially because these models were never really intended as field scale tools, while we are trying to use them to define different hydrologic pathways, area weighted potential energy (slopes and saturated conductivities), and the resulting lag time of P in different transport states. The movement of water within the landscape as surface (or near-surface) storm runoff and interflow is driven by gravity, topography, contributing area and soil and landuse characteristics, which play roles in concentrating water flows. Soil surveys have played a key role in the development of pedology and spatially derived pedon soil maps have become valuable datasets for natural resource management. Unfortunately, the soil surveys, commonly available at ~1:20,000 scale, are not designed to provide the high-resolution models of the soil continuum required in field scale environmental modeling applications and site specific crop and water quality management. The goal of this project is to test a methodology designed initially for representing saturation excess hydrology in the SWAT model to incorporate topographic attributes, and resulting spatially explicit soil morphology, that are missing from standard SWAT model initializations.

  17. Infiltration of fibrous preform in the centrifugal force field

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshinori; Shirayanagi, Itaru; Sakai, Yoshibumi; Tozawa, Yasuhisa

    1994-12-31

    The pressure to infiltrate molten aluminum into alumina short fiber preform was generated by centrifugal force, and the start pressure for the infiltration was measured. The fundamental equation of infiltration phenomenon was derived from the equation of the conservation of momentum of fluid flow in the porous media in the centrifugal force field. One-dimensional solution of the equation was obtained to discuss the characteristics of fluid flow in a centrifugal force field. It was made clear that centrifugal force is effective as a motive force to infiltrate molten metal into fibrous preform, the pressure distribution of molten metal in the preform is different from that predicted by D`Arcy`s law and the infiltration is enhanced by centrifugal force.

  18. Observation of infiltration experiments with time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Ursula; Ganz, Christina; Altfelder, Sven; Günther, Thomas; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus; Grissemann, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Recent progress in the development of resistivity equipment enables the real time observation of infiltration processes through the vadose zone. In order to study the advantages and limitations of the method infiltration experiments are carried out for different soil types at various locations. All sites are subsequently excavated and investigated in detail. For an improved verification of the resistivity data the most recent experiment is conducted using a colour tracer. Two infiltration experiments are carried out in sandy soil. The location is Fuhrberg, close to Hannover, Germany. The area has been intensively studied for soil research purposes for more than 30 years. During both infiltration experiments water (110 l/80 l) is infiltrated for a period of 4.5 h and 8 h, respectively, and the infiltration process is observed by ERT. The resistivity measurements are conducted using a 3D-dipole-dipole configuration with electrode distances of 20 cm in the centre of the infiltration field. The whole resistivity array consists of 200 and 300 electrodes, respectively. The second experiment uses increased electrode spacing in the border area in order to enable the resolution of the deeper groundwater table (3.5 m during the second experiment compared to about 1.2 m for the first experiment). Immediately after completion of the resistivity measurements TDR and tensiometer measurements are carried out in 5-8 slices of the excavated infiltration area over a period of several days. The colour tracer used during the second experiment clearly outlines the infiltration plume with sharp outer limits. The ERT inversion depicts the shape of the plume successfully. Time lapse ERT interpretation reveals the development of the plume in time. The combination of ERT interpretation and TDR measurements enables the construction of the relationship between water content and resistivity as reconstructed by ERT using an Archie approach. By using this function water content changes can be

  19. Reactive Infiltration of Silicon Melt Through Microporous Amorphous Carbon Preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangsuwan, P.; Tewari, S. N.; Gatica, J. E.; Singh, M.; Dickerson, R.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of unidirectional capillary infiltration of silicon melt into microporous carbon preforms have been investigated as a function of the pore morphology and melt temperature. The infiltrated specimens showed alternating bands of dark and bright regions, which corresponded to the unreacted free carbon and free silicon regions, respectively. The decrease in the infiltration front velocity for increasing infiltration distances, is in qualitative agreement with the closed-form solution of capillarity driven fluid flow through constant cross section cylindrical pores. However, drastic changes in the thermal response and infiltration front morphologies were observed for minute differences in the preforms microstructure. This suggests the need for a dynamic percolation model that would account for the exothermic nature of the silicon-carbon chemical reaction and the associated pore closing phenomenon.

  20. Spatial and temporal infiltration dynamics during managed aquifer recharge.

    PubMed

    Racz, Andrew J; Fisher, Andrew T; Schmidt, Calla M; Lockwood, Brian S; Los Huertos, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Natural groundwater recharge is inherently difficult to quantify and predict, largely because it comprises a series of processes that are spatially distributed and temporally variable. Infiltration ponds used for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) provide an opportunity to quantify recharge processes across multiple scales under semi-controlled conditions. We instrumented a 3-ha MAR infiltration pond to measure and compare infiltration patterns determined using whole-pond and point-specific methods. Whole-pond infiltration was determined by closing a transient water budget (accounting for inputs, outputs, and changes in storage), whereas point-specific infiltration rates were determined using heat as a tracer and time series analysis at eight locations in the base of the pond. Whole-pond infiltration, normalized for wetted area, rose rapidly to more than 1.0 m/d at the start of MAR operations (increasing as pond stage rose), was sustained at high rates for the next 40 d, and then decreased to less than 0.1 m/d by the end of the recharge season. Point-specific infiltration rates indicated high spatial and temporal variability, with the mean of measured values generally being lower than rates indicated by whole-pond calculations. Colocated measurements of head gradients within saturated soils below the pond were combined with infiltration rates to calculate soil hydraulic conductivity. Observations indicate a brief period of increasing saturated hydraulic conductivity, followed by a decrease of one to two orders of magnitude during the next 50 to 75 d. Locations indicating the most rapid infiltration shifted laterally during MAR operation, and we suggest that infiltration may function as a "variable source area" processes, conceptually similar to catchment runoff.

  1. The temperature dependence of ponded infiltration under isothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Murphy, F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple temperature-sensitive modification to the Green and Ampt infiltration equation is described; this assumes that the temperature dependence of the hydraulic conductivity is reciprocally equal to the temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid water, and that both the transmission zone saturation and the wetting front matric potential gradient are independent of temperature. This modified Green and Ampt equation is compared with ponded, isothermal infiltration experiments run on repacked columns of Olympic Sand and Aiken Loam at 5, 25, and 60??C. Experimental results showed increases in infiltration rates of at least 300% between 5 and 60??C for both soil materials, with subsequent increases in cumulative infiltration of even greater magnitudes for the loam. There is good agreement between measured and predicted initial infiltration rates at 25??C for both soil materials, yet at 60??C, the predicted results overestimate initial infiltration rates for the sand and underestimate initial rates for the loam. Measurements of the wetting depth vs. cumulative infiltration indicate that the transmission zone saturation increased with increasing temperature for both soil materials. In spite of this increased saturation with temperature, the final infiltration rates at both 25 and 60??C were predicted accurately using the modified Green and Ampt equation. This suggests that increased saturation occurred primarily in dead-end pore spaces, so that transmission zone hydraulic conductivities were unaffected by these temperature-induced changes in saturation. In conclusion, except for initial infiltration rates at 60??C, the measured influence of temperature on infiltration rates was fully accounted for by the temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid water. ?? 1991.

  2. Effect of Injection Pressure of Infiltration Anesthesia to the Jawbone

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    To obtain effective infiltration anesthesia in the jawbone, high concentrations of local anesthetic are needed. However, to reduce pain experienced by patients during local anesthetic administration, low-pressure injection is recommended for subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia. Currently, there are no studies regarding the effect of injection pressure on infiltration anesthesia, and a standard injection pressure has not been clearly determined. Hence, the effect of injection pressure of subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia on local anesthetic infiltration to the jawbone was considered by directly measuring lidocaine concentration in the jawbone. Japanese white male rabbits were used as test animals. After inducing general anesthesia with oxygen and sevoflurane, cannulation to the femoral artery was performed and arterial pressure was continuously recorded. Subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia was performed by injecting 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine containing 1/80,000 adrenaline, and injection pressure was monitored by a pressure transducer for 40 seconds. After specified time intervals (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes), jawbone and blood samples were collected, and the concentration of lidocaine at each time interval was measured. The mean injection pressure was divided into 4 groups (100 ± 50 mm Hg, 200 ± 50 mm Hg, 300 ± 50 mm Hg, and 400 ± 50 mm Hg), and comparison statistical analysis between these 4 groups was performed. No significant change in blood pressure during infiltration anesthesia was observed in any of the 4 groups. Lidocaine concentration in the blood and jawbone were highest 10 minutes after the infiltration anesthesia in all 4 groups and decreased thereafter. Lidocaine concentration in the jawbone increased as injection pressure increased, while serum lidocaine concentration was significantly lower. This suggests that when injection pressure of subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia is low, infiltration of local anesthetic to the jawbone may

  3. Characterizing Heterogeneity in Infiltration Rates During Managed Aquifer Recharge.

    PubMed

    Mawer, Chloe; Parsekian, Andrew; Pidlisecky, Adam; Knight, Rosemary

    2016-11-01

    Infiltration rate is the key parameter that describes how water moves from the surface into a groundwater aquifer during managed aquifer recharge (MAR). Characterization of infiltration rate heterogeneity in space and time is valuable information for MAR system operation. In this study, we utilized fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) observations and the phase shift of the diurnal temperature signal between two vertically co-located fiber optic cables to characterize infiltration rate spatially and temporally in a MAR basin. The FO-DTS measurements revealed spatial heterogeneity of infiltration rate: approximately 78% of the recharge water infiltrated through 50% of the pond bottom on average. We also introduced a metric for quantifying how the infiltration rate in a recharge pond changes over time, which enables FO-DTS to be used as a method for monitoring MAR and informing maintenance decisions. By monitoring this metric, we found high-spatial variability in how rapidly infiltration rate changed during the test period. We attributed this variability to biological pore clogging and found a relationship between high initial infiltration rate and the most rapid pore clogging. We found a strong relationship (R(2)  = 0.8) between observed maximum infiltration rates and electrical resistivity measurements from electrical resistivity tomography data taken in the same basin when dry. This result shows that the combined acquisition of DTS and ERT data can improve the design and operation of a MAR pond significantly by providing the critical information needed about spatial variability in parameters controlling infiltration rates.

  4. Apoptosis of tumor infiltrating effector TIM-3+CD8+ T cells in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chiao-Wen; Dutta, Avijit; Chang, Li-Yuan; Mahalingam, Jayashri; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Hsu, Chen-Yu; Huang, Ching-Tai; Su, Wan-Ting; Chu, Yu-Yi; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2015-10-23

    TIM-3 functions to enforce CD8+ T cell exhaustion, a dysfunctional state associated with the tolerization of tumor microenvironment. Here we report apoptosis of IFN-γ competent TIM-3+ population of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells in colon cancer. In humans suffering from colorectal cancer, TIM-3+ population is higher in cancer tissue-resident relative to peripheral blood CD8+ T cells. Both the TIM-3+ and TIM-3- cancer tissue-resident CD8+ T cells secrete IFN-γ of comparable levels, although apoptotic cells are more in TIM-3+ compared to TIM-3- population. In mouse CT26 colon tumor model, majority of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells express TIM-3 and execute cytolysis function with higher effector cytokine secretion and apoptosis in TIM-3+ compared to TIM-3- population. The tumor cells secrete galectin-9, which increases apoptosis of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. Galectin-9/TIM-3 signaling blockade with anti-TIM-3 antibody reduces the apoptosis and in addition, inhibits tumor growth in mice. The blockade increases therapeutic efficacy of cyclophosphamide to treat tumor in mice as well. These results reveal a previously unexplored role of TIM-3 on tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells in vivo.

  5. Primed neutrophil infiltrations into multiple organs in child physical abuse cases: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Ogata, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    Physical abuse of the elderly induces a massive primed neutrophil infiltration into the lung and liver through chemotaxis by interleukin (IL)-8, similar to cases of traumatic or hemorrhagic shock. Here, we used immunohistochemical analyses to investigate this infiltration in cases of physically abused children. In addition, we examined the expression of neutrophil elastase (NE) as the inflammatory mediator and α1-antitrypsin (AAT) as the elastase inhibitor. The number of neutrophils in the abuse cases was increased significantly in the heart, lung, liver, and kidney, compared with that of control cases. IL-8-positive cells and NE-positive cells in all organs of abuse cases were significantly greater than those in control cases. Large quantities of oxidized AAT, which fails to inactivate NE and results in tissue damage, was detected in the liver of abuse cases. Neutrophil infiltration showed positive correlation with the degree of systemic accumulation of non-fatal injuries caused by repetitive abusive behavior. Although further investigation using more autopsy samples is necessary, results of our preliminary study indicate that massive neutrophil infiltration induced by IL-8 in multiple organs is a new complementary diagnostic indicator of physical abuse in children. Moreover, the demonstration of NE-positive cells and oxidized AAT provides firm evidence of tissue damage.

  6. Brain tumour and infiltrations dosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy combined with 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sâmia F; Campos, Tarcísio P R

    2012-04-01

    This article presents a dosimetric investigation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy for brain tumour control. The study was conducted through computational simulation in MCNP5 code, using a precise and discrete voxel model of a human head, in which a hypothetical brain tumour was incorporated. A boron concentration ratio of 1:5 for healthy-tissue: tumour was considered. Absorbed and biologically weighted dose rates and neutron fluency in the voxel model were evaluated. The absorbed dose rate results were exported to SISCODES software, which generates the isodose surfaces on the brain. Analyses were performed to clarify the relevance of boron concentrations in occult infiltrations far from the target tumour, with boron concentration ratios of 1:1 up to 1:50 for healthy-tissue:infiltrations and healthy-tissue:tumour. The average biologically weighted dose rates at tumour area exceed up to 40 times the surrounding healthy tissue dose rates. In addition, the biologically weighted dose rates from boron have the main contribution at the infiltrations, especially far from primary tumour. In conclusion, BNCT combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy is an alternative technique for brain tumour treatment because it intensifies dose deposition at the tumour and at infiltrations, sparing healthy brain tissue.

  7. Selective infiltration and storage of picoliter volumes of liquids into sealed SU-8 microwells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Christoph; Schmalz, Tobias; Karnutsch, Christian

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the selective infiltration and storage of picoliter volumes of water and IPA in arrays of sealed SU-8 microwells. Microwells, with a volume of approximately 300 picoliters, are fabricated employing photolithography and a polymer onto polymer lamination method to seal the structures with a thin cover of SU-8 and PDMS in order to suppress the evaporation of the infiltrated liquids. A glass capillary is used to punch through the SU-8/PDMS cover and to infiltrate the liquid of interest into the microwells. The influence of the mixing ratio of the PDMS and its curing agent is studied and the results show that a lower ratio of 2:1 suppresses the evaporation more when compared to the standard mixing ratio of 10:1. In regards to water and IPA, the dwell time in the reservoirs was increased by approximately 50 % and 450 % respectively. Depending on the physical properties of the microwells and the liquids, the SU-8/PDMS cover suppresses the evaporation up to 32 mins for water and 463 mins for IPA, respectively, until the microwell is completely empty again. Additionally, multiple infiltrations of the same microwell are demonstrated using two immiscible liquids IPA and paraffin oil. Based on the popular polymers SU-8 and PDMS, the sealed microwell structures are scalable and combinable with different glass capillaries according to the needs of future analytical research and medical diagnostics.

  8. On the impact of entrapped air in infiltration under ponding conditions: Part a: Preferential air flow path effects on infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbord, N.; Mizrahi, G.; Furman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Entrapped air effects on infiltration under ponding conditions could be important for massive infiltration of managed aquifer recharge or soil aquifer treatment. Earlier studies found that under ponding conditions air could reduce infiltration by 70-90%. Most studies have dealt with entrapped air effects when soil surface topography is flat. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of: (1) irregular surface topography on preferential air flow path development; (2) preferential air flow path on infiltration; and (3) hydraulic head on infiltration when air is trapped. Column experiments were used to investigate these particular effects. A 140 cm deep and 30 cm wide column packed with silica sand was used under two boundary conditions: in the first, air can only escape vertically upward through the soil surface; in the second, air is free to escape. The surface was flooded with 13 liters of water, with ponding depth decreasing with time. Two soil surface conditions were tested: flat surface and irregular. It was found that in irregular surfaces, stable air flow through preferential paths was developed in the high altitude zones. Flat surface topography caused unstable air flow through random paths. Comparison between irregular and flat surface topography showed that the entrapped air pressure was lower and the infiltration rate was about 40% higher in the irregular surface topography than in the flat surface topography. No difference of infiltration rate between flat and irregular surface topography was observed when air was free to escape along the infiltration path. It was also found that at the first stage of infiltration, higher hydraulic heads caused higher entrapped air pressures and lower infiltration rates. In contrast, higher hydraulic head results in higher infiltration rate, when air was free to escape. Our results suggest that during ponding conditions: (1) preferential air flow paths develop at high surface zones of irregular topography

  9. Pathogenetic Mechanisms of Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Tosti, Claudia; Pinzauti, Serena; Santulli, Pietro; Chapron, Charles; Petraglia, Felice

    2015-09-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecologic disease, affecting women of reproductive age associated with chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and infertility. Ovarian endometrioma (OMA), superficial peritoneal endometriosis (SPE), and deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) are, till now, recognized as major phenotypes. The discussion is to know whether they share the same pathogenetic mechanisms. Till today, DIE is recognized as the most severe clinical form of endometriosis and has a complex clinical management. The DIE lesions have been considered in the present article, without distinguishing between the anterior (bladder) or the posterior (vagina, uterosacral ligaments, rectum, and ureter) compartment. The present knowledge indicates that hormonal function (estrogen and progesterone receptors) and immunological factors, such as peritoneal macrophages, natural killer cells, and lymphocytes, are critically altered in DIE. The aggressive behavior of DIE may be explained by the highly decreased apoptosis (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells [NF-kB], B-cell lymphoma 2 [Blc-2], and anti-Mullerian hormone) and by the increased proliferation activity related to oxidative stress (NF-kB, reactive oxygen species, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), advanced oxidation protein product). Invasive mechanisms are more expressed (matrix metalloproteinases and activins) in DIE in comparison to the OMA and SPE. Correlated with the increased invasiveness are the data on very high expression of neuroangiogenesis (nerve growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and intercellular adhesion molecule) genes in DIE. Therefore, at the present time, several of the DIE pathogenetic features result specific in comparison to other endometriosis phenotypes, pleading for the existence of a specific entity. These evidence of specific pathogenetic features of DIE may explain the more severe symptomatology related to this form of endometriosis and suggest

  10. Anatomical and histological structure of the tongue and histochemical characteristics of the lingual salivary glands in the Chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar, Gray 1830).

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, S; Sağsöz, H; Akbalik, M E

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to examine the morphology of the tongue and the histochemical features of the lingual salivary glands in this species. 2. The tongue was elongated, terminating in a rather sharp, dagger-like apex. On the surface of the tongue and situated between the body and root of the tongue, two rows of conical papillae, the sharp apices of which pointed towards the posterior part of the tongue, were observed. The keratinised epithelium lining the dorsal surface lacked typical gustatory papillae. However, it was observed that taste buds were present in the epithelium of the lingual body and root. The tongue was supported by a structure composed of hyaline cartilage, the paraglossum, which extended from the lingual root to the apex. Simple branched tubular glands, which were encapsulated by connective tissue, were embedded within the submucosa in the body (anterior salivary glands) and root (posterior salivary glands) of the tongue. It was observed that the secretion of the lingual glands contained neutral mucins, proteoglycans containing carboxylic acid, weak and strong sulphated groups, N-acetylated sialomucins, but lacked glycogen. 3. It was demonstrated that, the general morphological features, papillary distribution of the tongue and the histological structure of the mucosa epithelium and the supportive elements displayed similarity to those of other domestic avian species. It was also determined that, in view of the particular feeding types, in the partridge, the presence of the papillary crest was not correlated with diet.

  11. Tyfu i Fyny/Growing up Interactive Bi-Lingual Resources to Support the Delivery of Sex and Relationships Education for Students Aged 5 to 12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of new interactive, bi-lingual Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) resources called Tyfu i Fyny/Growing Up, suitable for students aged between five and 12 years. It also discusses the evidence used to support the development of the resources, the support provided for teachers and…

  12. Controls on the variability of net infiltration to desert sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; McKinney, T.S.; Zhdanov, M.S.; Watt, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in and climates and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration becomes critically important for accurately inventorying water resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. This paper presents a conceptual model of net infiltration to desert sandstone and then develops an empirical equation for its spatial quantification at the watershed scale using linear least squares inversion methods for evaluating controlling parameters (independent variables) based on estimated net infiltration rates (dependent variables). Net infiltration rates used for this regression analysis were calculated from environmental tracers in boreholes and more than 3000 linear meters of vadose zone excavations in an upland basin in southwestern Utah underlain by Navajo sandstone. Soil coarseness, distance to upgradient outcrop, and topographic slope were shown to be the primary physical parameters controlling the spatial variability of net infiltration. Although the method should be transferable to other desert sandstone settings for determining the relative spatial distribution of net infiltration, further study is needed to evaluate the effects of other potential parameters such as slope aspect, outcrop parameters, and climate on absolute net infiltration rates. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Correlation effects during liquid infiltration into hydrophobic nanoporous media

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, V. D. Belogorlov, A. A.; Byrkin, V. A.; Lisichkin, G. V.; Tronin, V. N.; Troyan, V. I.

    2011-03-15

    To explain the thermal effects observed during the infiltration of a nonwetting liquid into a disordered nanoporous medium, we have constructed a model that includes correlation effects in a disordered medium. It is based on analytical methods of the percolation theory. The infiltration of a porous medium is considered as the infiltration of pores in an infinite cluster of interconnected pores. Using the model of randomly situated spheres (RSS), we have been able to take into account the correlation effect of the spatial arrangement and connectivity of pores in the medium. The other correlation effect of the mutual arrangement of filled and empty pores on the shell of an infinite percolation cluster of filled pores determines the infiltration fluctuation probability. This probability has been calculated analytically. Allowance for these correlation effects during infiltration and defiltration makes it possible to suggest a physical mechanism of the contact angle hysteresis and to calculate the dependences of the contact angles on the degree of infiltration, porosity of the medium, and temperature. Based on the suggested model, we have managed to describe the temperature dependences of the infiltration and defiltration pressures and the thermal effects that accompany the absorption of energy by disordered porous medium-nonwetting liquid systems with various porosities in a unified way.

  14. Clinicopathological features of infiltrating lobular carcinomas comparing with infiltrating ductal carcinomas: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infiltrating lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most common type of invasive breast cancers and it has been reported to have some unique biologic and epidemiologic characteristics. Methods Clinicopathological features of 95 patients with ILC, their relapse free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively investigated and compared with those of 3,621 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma-not otherwise specified (IDC-NOS) between January 1984 and December 2005. Results ILC constitutes 2.3% of all invasive breast cancers. There were no difference between the ILC and the IDC-NOS groups regarding age at diagnosis, tumor size, nodal status, and treatment modalities except hormone therapy. The ILC group showed more estrogen receptor expression, less HER-2 expression and higher bilaterality. RFS and OS of the ILC patients were similar to those of the IDC. IDC-NOS metastasized more frequently to the lung and bone, whereas, ILC to the bone and ovary. Conclusions The incidence of ILC was relatively low in Korean breast cancer patients. Comparing to IDC-NOS ILC showed some different features such as higher estrogen receptor expression, less HER-2 expression, higher bilaterality and preferred metastatic sites of bone and ovary. Contralateral cancers and bone and ovary evaluation should be considered when monitoring ILC patients. PMID:20423478

  15. On The Valuation of Infiltration towards Meeting Residential Ventilation Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. In most homes, especially existing homes, infiltration provides the dominant fraction of the ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate nor under-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago.

  16. Nutrient infiltrate concentrations from three permeable pavement types.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert A; Borst, Michael

    2015-12-01

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, New Jersey, that incorporated permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). Each permeable pavement type has four, 54.9-m(2), lined sections that direct all infiltrate into 5.7-m(3) tanks enabling complete volume collection and sampling. This paper highlights the results from a 12-month period when samples were collected from 13 rainfall/runoff events and analyzed for nitrogen species, orthophosphate, and organic carbon. Differences in infiltrate concentrations among the three permeable pavement types were assessed and compared with concentrations in rainwater samples and impervious asphalt runoff samples, which were collected as controls. Contrary to expectations based on the literature, the PA infiltrate had significantly larger total nitrogen (TN) concentrations than runoff and infiltrate from the other two permeable pavement types, indicating that nitrogen leached from materials in the PA strata. There was no significant difference in TN concentration between runoff and infiltrate from either PICP or PC, but TN in runoff was significantly larger than in the rainwater, suggesting meaningful inter-event dry deposition. Similar to other permeable pavement studies, nitrate was the dominant nitrogen species in the infiltrate. The PA infiltrate had significantly larger nitrite and ammonia concentrations than PICP and PC, and this was presumably linked to unexpectedly high pH in the PA infiltrate that greatly exceeded the optimal pH range for nitrifying bacteria. Contrary to the nitrogen results, the PA infiltrate had significantly smaller orthophosphate concentrations than in rainwater, runoff, and infiltrate from PICP

  17. Rational approach to pulmonary infiltrates in leukemia and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-09-01

    At present, a number of invasive diagnostic techniques can be used to diagnose the cause of lung infiltrates in patients with hematologic malignancies or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. Bronchoscopy with measurement of biomarkers in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) will most likely become the preferred method to diagnose infectious causes of pulmonary infiltrates. However, there is no uniform approach regarding the technical parameters of the lavage procedure in cancer patients. Diagnostic protocols vary by region, center, and the expertise of the staff. This mini review discusses the issues surrounding diffuse pulmonary infiltrates and provides some recommendations to deal with these issues.

  18. Retrospective study of the bone morphology in the posterior mandibular region. Evaluation of the prevalence and the degree of lingual concavity and their possible complications

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Marques, José; Almendros-Marqués, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    Background In order to choose the appropriate implant size and to prevent complications, an oral surgeon must know the size and shape of the mandible. In the posterior mandibular region, a lingual undercut is often found and could represent a difficulty hard to manage if a lingual or buccal perforation occur. A large series of computed tomography (CT) images of the mandibular first molar was evaluated and the bone morphology, the prevalence and the degree of the lingual concavity in the first molar region were studied. Material and Methods One hundred and fifty-one computed tomography (CT) examinations of patients were retrospectively evaluated to determine anatomical variations in bone morphology in the submandibular fossa region. Results A total of 151 subjects were included, consisting of 64 males (M) (42.4%) and 87 females (F) (57.6%). The under-cut type ridge was present in 64.2% of the cases. The concavity angle was 66.6 ± 8.9° (M) and 71.6 ± 8.4° (F) and the linear concavity depth 4.5 ± 2.3 mm (M) and 3.1 ± 1.7 mm (F) (p>0.05). Conclusions Mandibles with any lingual concavity present a potential increased risk of lingual cortical perforation during implant placement surgery. CT imaging allows characterizing the anatomy of the submandibular fossa and provides other important information for the preoperative assessment of the posterior mandible for dental implants placement. Key words:Anatomy, computed tomography, dental implants, intraoperative complications, mandible, panoramic radiography, radiographic examination. PMID:27694785

  19. Effects of surface characteristics on infiltration patterns in an arid shrub desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Ping; Li, Xin-Rong; Xiao, Hong-Lang; Berndtsson, Ronny; Pan, Yan-Xia

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation is often the sole source of water replenishment in arid and semi-arid areas and, thus, plays a pertinent role in sustaining desert ecosystems. Revegetation over 40 years using mainly Artemisia ordosica and Caragana korshinskii at Shapotou Desert Experimental Research Station near Lanzhou, China, has established a dwarf-shrub and microbiotic soil crust cover on the stabilized sand dunes. The redistribution of infiltrated moisture through percolation, root extraction, and evapotranspiration pathways was investigated. Three sets of time-domain reflectometry (TDR) probes were inserted horizontally at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40 cm depths below the ground surface in a soil pit. The three sets of TDR probes were installed in dwarf-shrub sites of A. ordosica and C. korshinskii community with and without a microbiotic soil crust cover, and an additional set was placed in a bare sand dune area that had neither vegetation nor a microbiotic soil crust present. Volumetric soil moisture content was recorded at hourly intervals and used in the assessment of infiltration for the different surface covers. Infiltration varied greatly, from 7.5 cm to more than 45 cm, depending upon rainfall quantity and soil surface conditions. In the shrub community area without microbiotic soil crust cover, infiltration increased due to preferential flow associated with root tunnels. The microbiotic soil crust cover had a significant negative influence on the infiltration for small rainfall events (10 mm), restricting the infiltration depth to less than 20 cm and increasing soil moisture content just beneath the soil profile of 10 cm, whereas it was not as strong or clear for larger rainfall events (60 mm). For small rainfall events, the wetting front depth for the three kinds of surface cover was as follows: shrub community without microbiotic soil crust > bare area > shrub community with microbiotic soil crust. In contrast, for large rainfall events, infiltration was similar in shrub

  20. Estimating infiltration rates for intermittent streams in the semiarid southwest: implications for ecosystem processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, H. D.; Meixner, T.; Lohse, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Directional climate change may lead to increased aridity and fewer precipitation events across the American southwest. Determining infiltration fluxes during monsoonal rainstorms may be the key to predicting how changing precipitation frequency will affect groundwater percolation and potential recharge. Our study focuses on the following research question: How much water infiltrates- and at what rates- during flow events in ephemeral streams? An additional topic we hope to address as the project processes progresses is the link between intermittent flow variably and its affecteffect on water availability as it applies to ecosystem processes, from vegetation growth and diversity to insect populations, etc. As water is the limiting factor for ecosystem health and dynamics in the semi-arid southwest, the value of measuring and modeling variably saturated porous media is incredibly high. In order to address these topics, twelve intermittent stream sections in southern Arizona have been chosen for infiltration flux analysis. These twelve locations have been instrumented with vertical profiles of iButton temperature sensors in the streambed subsurface along several transects per reach. The iButton sensors log temperature hourly at depths of 0, 10, and 30cm, or in some locations at depths of 10, 30, and 50cm where possible. Deployed in protective metal housings directly in the sediment, they represent more dynamic possibilities for accurate infiltration measurements compared to their predecessors which were deployed in PVC pipe in sediment. The vertical profile temperature recordings may be analyzed by observing the propagation of amplitude and phase shifts that occur in the presence of water as you move deeper into the soil profile. Using temperature as a proxy for water infiltration rates makes flux estimations more reasonable in these highly unpredictable variably saturated zones. Temperature data is paired with modified TidbiT data-loggers which record electrical

  1. On-site infiltration of road runoff using pervious pavements with subjacent infiltration trenches as source control strategy.

    PubMed

    Fach, S; Dierkes, C

    2011-01-01

    The focus in this work was on subsoil infiltration of stormwater from parking lots. With regard to operation, reduced infiltration performance due to clogging and pollutants in seepage, which may contribute to contaminate groundwater, are of interest. The experimental investigation covered a pervious pavement with a subjacent infiltration trench draining an impervious area of 2 ha. In order to consider seasonal effects on the infiltration performance, the hydraulic conductivity was measured tri-monthly during monitoring with a mobile sprinkling unit. To assess natural deposits jointing, road bed, gravel of infiltration trenches and subsoil were analysed prior to commencement of monitoring for heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic and mineral oil type hydrocarbons. Furthermore, from 22 storm events, water samples of rainfall, surface runoff, seepage and ground water were analysed with regard to the above mentioned pollutants. The study showed that the material used for the joints had a major impact on the initial as well as the final infiltration rates. Due to its poor hydraulic conductivity, limestone gravel should not be used as jointing. Furthermore, it is recommended that materials for the infiltration facilities are ensured free of any contaminants prior to construction. Polycyclic aromatic and mineral oil type hydrocarbons were, with the exception of surface runoff, below detection limits. Heavy metal concentrations of groundwater were with the exception of lead (because of high background concentrations), below the permissible limits.

  2. The Development of a Bi-Lingual Assessment Instrument to Measure Agentic and Communal Consumer Motives in English and French.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mike; Bartier, Anne-Laure; Lown, Josh; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Consumer behavior is driven, in part, by the degree to which goods and services appeal to underlying motives for agency and communion. The purpose of this research was to develop a brief individual differences measure of these motivations for use in behavioral research and theoretical and applied consumer psychology and marketing studies. We employed a bi-lingual scale development procedure to create the 10-item Agentic and Communal Consumer Motivation Inventory (ACCMI) in English and French. Two studies show that the ACCMI is language invariant, demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity with consumer, motivational, and interpersonal constructs, and predicts evaluations of products described in agentic and communal terms, respectively, in both languages. The general conclusion of this research is that agency and communion provide a useful framework for understanding and studying consumer buying motivations. Discussion focuses on the relevance of motivational factors for studying human behavior and the applied utility of the ACCMI.

  3. Outcome of buccal mucosa and lingual mucosa graft urethroplasty in the management of urethral strictures: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sharad; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the outcome of buccal and lingual mucosa graft (LMG) augmentation urethroplasty along with donor sites morbidities in anterior urethra stricture. Subjects and Methods: From September 2010 to January 2014, 125 patients underwent single stage augmentation urethroplasty. They were randomly divided into two groups to receive either buccal mucosa graft (BMG) or LMG. The patients were prospectively followed for complications and outcome. Results: Baseline characteristics such as mean age, etiology, stricture length, and location were comparable in both groups. Overall success rate for Group 1 and Group 2 were 69.2% and 80%, respectively. Mean follow-up periods were 28.2 and 25 months in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. Conclusions: LMG provides the better outcome with fewer immediate and delayed complications as compared to BMG. The length of stricture and width of graft were main factors affecting the outcome. PMID:26834399

  4. The Development of a Bi-Lingual Assessment Instrument to Measure Agentic and Communal Consumer Motives in English and French

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Mike; Bartier, Anne-Laure; Lown, Josh; Hopwood, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Consumer behavior is driven, in part, by the degree to which goods and services appeal to underlying motives for agency and communion. The purpose of this research was to develop a brief individual differences measure of these motivations for use in behavioral research and theoretical and applied consumer psychology and marketing studies. We employed a bi-lingual scale development procedure to create the 10-item Agentic and Communal Consumer Motivation Inventory (ACCMI) in English and French. Two studies show that the ACCMI is language invariant, demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity with consumer, motivational, and interpersonal constructs, and predicts evaluations of products described in agentic and communal terms, respectively, in both languages. The general conclusion of this research is that agency and communion provide a useful framework for understanding and studying consumer buying motivations. Discussion focuses on the relevance of motivational factors for studying human behavior and the applied utility of the ACCMI. PMID:27563295

  5. Study of water infiltration in a lightweight green roof substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomankova, Klara; Holeckova, Martina; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Snehota, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Green roofs have a positive impact on the environment (e.g. improving microclimate and air quality in cities, reducing solar absorbance and storm water). A laboratory infiltration experiment was conducted on the narrow flume serving as 2D vertical model of a green roof. The lightweight Optigreen substrate Type M was used (depth of 20 cm). The front wall of the flume was transparent and inspected by digital camera. The experiment was designed to measure pressure head, volumetric water content and calculate water retention in the substrate. Experiment comprised three artificial rainfall intensities with different values of initial water content of the substrate. The experimental results confirmed that green roofs have the ability to retain rainwater and thus have a beneficial effect on reducing runoff. In the experiment with the artificial 10 minutes rainfall event (total precipitation of 29 mm), the air dry substrate retained 95.9 % of precipitation. On the other hand for moist initial condition 4.2 % of precipitations amount was captured in the substrate. Additionally, the analysis of images taken during the experiment confirmed preferential flow and uneven advancement of the wetting front. The research was realized as a part of the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings supported by the EU and with financial support from the Czech Science Foundation under project number 14-10455P.

  6. Light and scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the common raccoon, Procyon lotor.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Yoshimura, Ken; Shindo, Junji; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2010-08-01

    We observed the external surface and connective tissue cores (CTCs), after exfoliation of the epithelium of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform, foliate and vallate papillae) of the common raccoon (Procyon lotor) using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. The tongue was elongated and their two-third width was almost fixed. Numerous filiform papillae were distributed along the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and fungiform papillae were distributed between the filiform papillae. Eight vallate papillae that had a weak circumferential ridge were distributed in a V-shape in the posterior part of the tongue and numerous taste buds were observable in the circumferential furrows of vallate papillae. Weak fold-like foliate papillae were observable at the lateral edge in the posterior part of the tongue and a few salivary duct orifices were observable beneath the foliate papillae. An islet-like structure with numerous taste buds, was observable on the deep part of the salivary duct of foliate papillae. Large conical papillae were distributed at the posterior part and root of the tongue. After removal of epithelium, filiform papillae of CTCs were appeared to be a thumb or cone-like main core and associating several finger-like short accessory cores. These cores were surrounded an oval concavity. The main core was situated behind the concavity and associated with accessory cores. CTCs of fungiform papillae were cylinder-like with numerous vertically running ridges and with a few concavities seen at the top of the cores. CTCs of vallate papillae and their surrounded circumferential ridge were covered with numerous pimple-like protrusions. The lingual papillae of Common raccoon's tongue had morphological feature of carnivore species.

  7. Simulation of Groundwater Mounding Beneath Hypothetical Stormwater Infiltration Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carleton, Glen B.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater mounding occurs beneath stormwater management structures designed to infiltrate stormwater runoff. Concentrating recharge in a small area can cause groundwater mounding that affects the basements of nearby homes and other structures. Methods for quantitatively predicting the height and extent of groundwater mounding beneath and near stormwater Finite-difference groundwater-flow simulations of infiltration from hypothetical stormwater infiltration structures (which are typically constructed as basins or dry wells) were done for 10-acre and 1-acre developments. Aquifer and stormwater-runoff characteristics in the model were changed to determine which factors are most likely to have the greatest effect on simulating the maximum height and maximum extent of groundwater mounding. Aquifer characteristics that were changed include soil permeability, aquifer thickness, and specific yield. Stormwater-runoff variables that were changed include magnitude of design storm, percentage of impervious area, infiltration-structure depth (maximum depth of standing water), and infiltration-basin shape. Values used for all variables are representative of typical physical conditions and stormwater management designs in New Jersey but do not include all possible values. Results are considered to be a representative, but not all-inclusive, subset of likely results. Maximum heights of simulated groundwater mounds beneath stormwater infiltration structures are the most sensitive to (show the greatest change with changes to) soil permeability. The maximum height of the groundwater mound is higher when values of soil permeability, aquifer thickness, or specific yield are decreased or when basin depth is increased or the basin shape is square (and values of other variables are held constant). Changing soil permeability, aquifer thickness, specific yield, infiltration-structure depth, or infiltration-structure shape does not change the volume of water infiltrated, it changes the

  8. Measuring Spatial Infiltration in Stormwater Control Measures: Results and Implications

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide background information on research conducted by EPA-ORD on the use of soil moisture sensors in bioretention/bioinfiltration technologies to evaluate infiltration mechanisms and compares monitoring results to simplified modeling assumptions. A serie...

  9. Cermet materials prepared by combustion synthesis and metal infiltration

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J.B.; Dunmead, S.D.; Halverson, D.C.; Landingham, R.L.

    1991-01-29

    Ceramic-metal composites (cermets) are made by a combination of self-propagating high temperature combustion synthesis and molten metal infiltration. Solid-gas, solid-solid and solid-liquid reactions of a powder compact produce a porous ceramic body which is infiltrated by molten metal to produce a composite body of higher density. AlN-Al and many other materials can be produced. 6 figures.

  10. Infiltration of Sand Into Gravel Riverbeds With Alternate Bar Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardson, R.; Wydzga, M. A.; Venditti, J. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Stacey, M. T.; Dracup, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The hyporheic zone, which is comprised of the interconnected pore spaces in the bed of gravel rivers, plays a variety of roles in river health. It serves as a nutrient reservoir and refuge for aquatic organisms; supports surface water-groundwater exchange, which can mitigate flooding and improve water supply reliability; and stores organic matter, heavy metals, and other pollutants. When fine sediment (sand and silt) fills the pore spaces of the hyporheic zone, these functions are compromised. A number of one-dimensional laboratory studies have explored infiltration of sand into stable, flat (plane-bed), gravel riverbeds. The depth and volumetric content of sand infiltrated under such conditions are functions of sediment supply and the grain size distributions of the bed (gravel) and the sand in bedload. This study examines whether the relationships established in plane-bed experiments suffice to explain infiltration into a bed with alternate-bar topography. We present results from an infiltration experiment performed on a 2.7m x 55m laboratory flume at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory in Minneapolis. In this experiment, sand (D50 = 0.4mm) was infiltrated into a gravel (D50 = 9.2mm) bed with alternate bars, under low flow (35 lps). After infiltration, the bed was excavated at 3-6 sites in each of 5 cross-sections, chosen to represent a variety of topographic and flow conditions (e.g. head of bar, top of bar and deep channel, cross-channel). Bed samples are analyzed for depth of infiltration, sand content, and grain size distribution. We present the spatial patterns of depth and content of sand infiltrated, in relation to bed surface topography and surface water flow path. Ongoing research will couple the characteristics of this spatial pattern with sediment routing.

  11. Linking denitrification and infiltration rates during managed groundwater recharge.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Calla M; Fisher, Andrew T; Racz, Andrew J; Lockwood, Brian S; Huertos, Marc Los

    2011-11-15

    We quantify relations between rates of in situ denitrification and saturated infiltration through shallow, sandy soils during managed groundwater recharge. We used thermal methods to determine time series of point-specific flow rates, and chemical and isotopic methods to assess denitrification progress. Zero order denitrification rates between 3 and 300 μmol L(-1) d(-1) were measured during infiltration. Denitrification was not detected at times and locations where the infiltration rate exceeded a threshold of 0.7 ± 0.2 m d(-1). Pore water profiles of oxygen and nitrate concentration indicated a deepening of the redoxocline at high flow rates, which reduced the thickness of the zone favorable for denitrification. Denitrification rates were positively correlated with infiltration rates below the infiltration threshold, suggesting that for a given set of sediment characteristics, there is an optimal infiltration rate for achieving maximum nitrate load reduction and improvements to water supply during managed groundwater recharge. The extent to which results from this study may be extended to other managed and natural hydrologic settings remains to be determined, but the approach taken in this study should be broadly applicable, and provides a quantitative link between shallow hydrologic and biogeochemical processes.

  12. Simulating bioclogging effects on dynamic riverbed permeability and infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomer, Michelle E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Maier, Ulrich; Schmidt, Christian; Thullner, Martin; Ulrich, Craig; Flipo, Nicolas; Rubin, Yoram

    2016-04-01

    Bioclogging in rivers can detrimentally impact aquifer recharge. This is particularly so in dry regions, where losing rivers are common, and where disconnection between surface water and groundwater (leading to the development of an unsaturated zone) can occur. Reduction in riverbed permeability due to biomass growth is a time-variable parameter that is often neglected, yet permeability reduction from bioclogging can introduce order of magnitude changes in seepage fluxes from rivers over short (i.e., monthly) timescales. To address the combined effects of bioclogging and disconnection on infiltration, we developed numerical representations of bioclogging processes within a one-dimensional, variably saturated flow model representing losing-connected and losing-disconnected rivers. We tested these formulations using a synthetic case study informed with biological data obtained from the Russian River, California, USA. Our findings show that modeled biomass growth reduced seepage for losing-connected and losing-disconnected rivers. However, for rivers undergoing disconnection, infiltration declines occurred only after the system was fully disconnected. Before full disconnection, biologically induced permeability declines were not significant enough to offset the infiltration gains introduced by disconnection. The two effects combine to lead to a characteristic infiltration curve where peak infiltration magnitude and timing is controlled by permeability declines relative to hydraulic gradient gains. Biomass growth was found to hasten the onset of full disconnection; a condition we term `effective disconnection'. Our results show that river infiltration can respond dynamically to bioclogging and subsequent permeability declines that are highly dependent on river connection status.

  13. Modelling of percolation rate of stormwater from underground infiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Burszta-Adamiak, Ewa; Lomotowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Underground or surface stormwater storage tank systems that enable the infiltration of water into the ground are basic elements used in Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS). So far, the design methods for such facilities have not taken into account the phenomenon of ground clogging during stormwater infiltration. Top layer sealing of the filter bed influences the infiltration rate of water into the ground. This study presents an original mathematical model describing changes in the infiltration rate variability in the phases of filling and emptying the storage and infiltration tank systems, which enables the determination of the degree of top ground layer clogging. The input data for modelling were obtained from studies conducted on experimental sites on objects constructed on a semi-technological scale. The experiment conducted has proven that the application of the model developed for the phase of water infiltration enables us to estimate the degree of module clogging. However, this method is more suitable for reservoirs embedded in more permeable soils than for those located in cohesive soils.

  14. Horizontal Fluid Infiltration: A New Measurement Device and Some Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culligan, P. J.; Ivanov, V. M.; Germiane, J. T.

    2003-12-01

    Fluid infiltration in the vadose zone has been the subject of study since the early 1900s. Understanding infiltration processes is important to numerous problems, including forecasting moisture distribution following soil irrigation, estimating the potential for leachate generation during landfill cover design, and predicting contaminant transport to groundwater following a surface spill. Many models have been developed to describe fluid infiltration, including the well-known models by Jean-Yves Parlange and his co-workers (e.g., Smith and Parlange, Water Resources Research, 14(3), 1978). These models predict the time-rate of infiltration and the cumulative volume of infiltration based on parameters, such as sorptivity, that are often obtained from laboratory experiments. The proper design of these experiments, and appreciation of the factors controlling parameters derived from them, is therefore key to the accuracy of such models. This paper describes a new experimental setup to observe fluid infiltration under one-dimensional capillary dominated flow. Dry soil is packed in a horizontal 700 mm long polycarbonate channel that is 25.5 mm x 25.5 mm in cross-section. The top of the channel is open to the atmosphere. The upstream end of the channel is connected, via a three-valve chamber, to an infiltrant container placed on an electronic balance. Initial flooding and final draining of the three-valve chamber can be controlled without disturbing conditions in the column. The height of the infiltrant container can be adjusted to control the fluid inlet head. The end of the column is capped with a seal that allows the free exit of air. During an experiment, fluid is introduced at the upstream end of the column at a fixed head. The position of the infiltration front and the cumulative mass of fluid flowing into the column are both observed with time. At the end of each experiment, the fluid saturation along the column is obtained by sampling from the top, open surface of

  15. Occurrence and severity of enamel decalcification adjacent to bracket bases and sub-bracket lesions during orthodontic treatment with two different lingual appliances

    PubMed Central

    Klang, Elisabeth; Helms, Hans-Joachim; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Using lingual enamel surfaces for bracket placement not only has esthetic advantages, but may also be suitable in terms of reducing frequencies of enamel decalcifications. Objective: To test the null-hypothesis that there is no significant difference in enamel decalcification or cavitation incidence adjacent to and beneath bracket bases between two lingual multi-bracket (MB) appliances that are different in terms of design, material composition, and manufacturing technology (group A: WIN, DW-LingualSystems; group B: Incognito, 3M-Unitek), taking into account patient- and treatment-related variables on white spot lesion (WSL) formation. Methods: Standardized, digital, top-view photographs of 630 consecutive subjects (16214 teeth; n Incognito = 237/6076 teeth; n WIN = 393/10138 teeth; mean age: 17.47±7.8; m/f 43.2/56.8%) with completed lingual MB treatment of the upper and lower permanent teeth 1–7 were screened for decalcification or cavitation adjacent to and beneath the bracket bases before and after treatment, scored from 0 to 7. Non-parametric ANOVA was used for main effects ‘appliance type’, ‘gender’, ‘treatment complexity’, ‘grouped age’ (≤16/>16 years), and ‘treatment duration’ as covariable, at an α-level of 5%. Results: About 2.57% [5.94%] of all teeth in group A [B] developed decalcifications. Subject-related incidence was 9.59% [16.17%] for upper incisors in group A [B], and 12.98% [25.74%] for all teeth 16–46. There were significant effects by gender, age, and treatment duration. Conclusion: The null-hypothesis was rejected: sub-bracket lesions were significantly less frequent in group A, while frequencies of WSL adjacent to brackets were not significantly affected by appliance type. In view of the overall low incidences of lingual post-orthodontic white-spot lesions, the use of lingual appliances is advocated as a valid strategy for a reduction of enamel decalcifications during orthodontic treatment. PMID

  16. Hydrologic impact of urbanization with extensive stormwater infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Luca; Mark, Ole; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten; Deletic, Ana; Roldin, Maria; Binning, Philip John

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel modeling analysis of a 40-year-long dataset to examine the impact of urbanization, with widespread stormwater infiltration, on groundwater levels and the water balance of a watershed. A dataset on the hydrologic impact of urbanization with extensive stormwater infiltration is not widely available, and is important because many municipalities are considering infiltration as an alternative to traditional stormwater systems. This study analyzes groundwater level observations from an urban catchment located in Perth, Western Australia. The groundwater observation data cover approximately a 40-year-long period where land use changes (particularly due to urbanization) occurred; moreover, the monitored area contains both undeveloped and urbanized areas where stormwater infiltration is common practice via soakwells (shallow vertical infiltration wells). The data is analyzed using a distributed and dynamic hydrological model to simulate the groundwater response. The model explicitly couples a soakwell model with a groundwater model so that the performance of the soakwells is reduced by the increase of groundwater levels. The groundwater observation data is used to setup, calibrate and validate a coupled MIKE SHE-MIKE URBAN groundwater model and the model is used to quantify the extent of groundwater rise as a result of the urbanization process. The modeled urbanization processes included the irrigation of new established private and public gardens, the reduction of evapotranspiration due to a decrease in green areas, and the development of artificial stormwater infiltration. The study demonstrates that urbanization with stormwater infiltration affects the whole catchment water balance, increasing recharge and decreasing evapotranspiration. These changes lead to a rise in the groundwater table and an increase in the probability of groundwater seepage above terrain.

  17. Solute Breakthrough During Recurrent Ponded Infiltration Into Heterogeneous Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotkova, M.; Snehota, M.; Cislerova, M.

    2009-12-01

    Water flow during recurrent ponded infiltration may be influenced by presence of entrapped air in heterogeneous soils. It is assumed that variations of the entrapped air volume cause changes of the water content and flow patterns, with consequences for the solute transport. The aim of this contribution is to investigate the effect of entrapped air on dispersion by means of experiments in laboratory. Two undisturbed samples of sandy loam soils were collected at the experimental sites in the Šumava Mountains and the Jizera Mountains (Czech Republic). Recurrent ponded infiltration, conducted on each soil sample consisted of two or more infiltration runs. The same level of ponding was maintained during each infiltration run at the top of the sample. Water drained freely through the perforated plate at the bottom of the sample. First infiltration run was done into naturally dry soil while subsequent runs were conducted into wetter soil. Suction pressure heads in three heights were continuously measured by tensiometers. Water contents were monitored by TDR probes also in three heights. Outflow fluxes were recorded continuously during the experiments as well as the weight of the sample. During each infiltration run the concentration pulse of potassium bromide solution was applied at the top of the soil core during steady state flow and breakthrough curve was acquired by electrochemical in-line analysis of bromide ions in the effluent. Soil hydraulic properties were obtained by fitting the measured flux, water content and pressure data by the dual permeability model. The dispersion coefficients were determined by fitting a one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation to each breakthrough curve. Differences in the shape of the breakthrough curves obtained for individual infiltration runs will be discussed on the poster. This research has been supported by GACR 103/08/1552.

  18. Solute breakthrough during recurrent ponded infiltration into heterogeneous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotkova, Martina; Snehota, Michal; Dohnal, Michal; Cislerova, Milena

    2010-05-01

    Water flow during recurrent ponded infiltration may be influenced by presence of entrapped air in heterogeneous soils. It is assumed that variations of the entrapped air volume cause changes of the water content and flow patterns, with consequences for the solute transport. The aim of this contribution is to investigate the effect of entrapped air on dispersion by means of experiments in laboratory. Two undisturbed samples of sandy loam soils were collected at the experimental sites in the Šumava Mountains and the Jizera Mountains (Czech Republic). Packed sample of fine quartz sand was used as a reference. Recurrent ponded infiltration, conducted on each soil sample consisted of two or more infiltration runs. The same level of ponding was maintained during each infiltration run at the top of the sample. Water drained freely through the perforated plate at the bottom of the sample. First infiltration run was done into naturally dry soil while subsequent runs were conducted into wetter soil. Suction pressure heads in three heights were continuously measured by tensiometers. Water contents were monitored by TDR probes also in three heights. Outflow fluxes were recorded continuously during the experiments as well as the weight of the sample. During each infiltration run the concentration pulse of potassium bromide solution was applied at the top of the soil core during steady state flow and breakthrough curve was acquired by electrochemical in-line analysis of bromide ions in the effluent. Soil hydraulic properties were obtained by fitting the measured flux, water content and pressure data by the dual permeability model. The dispersion coefficients were determined by fitting a one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation to each breakthrough curve. Differences in the shape of the breakthrough curves obtained for individual infiltration runs will be discussed on the poster. This research has been supported by GACR 103/08/1552.

  19. Infiltration front monitoring using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxarango, Laurent; Audebert, Marine; Guyard, Helene; Clement, Remi

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) geophysical method is commonly used to identify the spatial distribution of electrical resisitivity in the soil at the field scale. Recent progress in commercial acquisition systems allows repeating fast acquisitions (10 min) in order to monitor a 3D dynamic phenomenon. Since the ERT method is sensitive to moisture content variations, it can thus be used to delineate the infiltration shape during water infiltration. In heterogeneous conditions, the 3D infiltration shape is a crucial information because it could differ significantly from the homogeneous behavior. In a first step, the ERT method is validated at small scale (<1m) studying a suction infiltrometer test. The experiment is carried out in a pit filled with a homogenous silty-sandy soil. It is instrumented by 17 resistivity probes and 3 commercial capacitive moisture content probes to provide local measurements of the moisture content variation. The Multiple Inversion and Clustering Strategy (MICS) (Audebert et al 2014) is used to delineate the infiltration patern. A satisfying agreement between infiltration delineation and sensor measurements is obtained with a few centimeter accuracy on the moisture front location. In a second step, the same methodology is applied at a larger scale (> 10m). Two examples of leachate injection monitoring in municipal solid waste landfills are used to put forward benefits and limitations of the ERT-MICS method. Effective infiltration porosities in a range between 3% and 8% support the assumption of a flow in heterogeneous media. Audebert, M., R. Clément, N. Touze-Foltz, T. Günther, S. Moreau, and C. Duquennoi (2014), Time-lapse ERT interpretation methodology for leachate injection monitoring based on multiple inversions and a clustering strategy (MICS), Journal of Applied Geophysics, 111, 320-333. Keywords: ERT, infiltration front, field survey

  20. A quick and inexpensive method to quantify spatially variable infiltration capacity for artificial recharge ponds using photographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, Daniele; Barahona-Palomo, Marco; Bolster, Diogo; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    SummaryThe efficiency of artificial surface ponds (SPs) for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is mostly controlled by the topmost portion of the soil. The most significant soil property controlling recharge is the infiltration capacity (Ic), which is highly variable in space. Assessing its spatial distribution in detail is prohibitive in practice due to high costs, time effort, and limited site accessibility. We present an alternative method for a quick and low-cost quantitative estimation of the spatial distribution of Ic based on satellite images. The fact that hydraulic properties of topsoils and color intensities of digital images depend on some common factors such as moisture content, nature and organization of grains, proportion of iron, and organic and clay content among others, allow us to infer infiltration capacities from color intensities. The relationship between these two variables is site specific and requires calibration. A pilot SP site in Catalonia (Spain) is used as an application example. Two high-resolution digital images of the site are provided at no cost by the local cartographic institute as well as from a popular Internet-based map server. An initial set of local infiltration experiments, randomly located, were found to correlate to color intensities of the digital images. This relationship was then validated against additional independent measurements. The resulting maps of infiltration were then used to estimate the total maximum infiltration of the artificial pond area, the results being consistent with an independent flooding test performed at the site.

  1. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: Fall 2010 Tracer Infiltration Test (White Paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Greenwood, William J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Horner, Jacob A.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2011-04-14

    The primary objectives of the tracer infiltration test were to 1) determine whether field-scale hydraulic properties for the compacted roadbed materials and underlying Hanford fm. sediments comprising the zone of water table fluctuation beneath the site are consistent with estimates based laboratory-scale measurements on core samples and 2) characterize wetting front advancement and distribution of soil moisture achieved for the selected application rate. These primary objectives were met. The test successfully demonstrated that 1) the remaining 2 to 3 ft of compacted roadbed material below the infiltration gallery does not limit infiltration rates to levels that would be expected to eliminate near surface application as a viable amendment delivery approach and 2) the combined aqueous and geophysical monitoring approaches employed at this site, with some operational adjustments based on lessons learned, provides an effective means of assessing wetting front advancement and the distribution of soil moisture achieved for a given solution application. Reasonably good agreement between predicted and observed tracer and moisture front advancement rates was observed. During the first tracer infiltration test, which used a solution application rate of 0.7 cm/hr, tracer arrivals were observed at the water table (10 to 12 ft below the bottom of the infiltration gallery) after approximately 5 days, for an advancement rate of approximately 2 ft/day. This advancement rate is generally consistent with pre-test modeling results that predicted tracer arrival at the water table after approximately 5 days (see Figure 8, bottom left panel). This agreement indicates that hydraulic property values specified in the model for the compacted roadbed materials and underlying Hanford formation sediments, which were based on laboratory-scale measurements, are reasonable estimates of actual field-scale conditions. Additional work is needed to develop a working relationship between resistivity

  2. Testing a new automated single ring infiltrometer for Beerkan infiltration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Prima, Simone; Lassabatère, Laurent; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    The Beerkan method along with BEST algorithms is an alternative technique to conventional laboratory or field measurements for rapid and low-cost estimation of soil hydraulic properties. The Beerkan method is simple to conduct but requires an operator to pour known volumes of water through the ring and can be time-consuming. To alleviate this need, a new cheap infiltrometer equipped with a data acquisition system, allowing automation of Beerkan infiltration experiments, was recently designed and is presented in a companion paper. Yet, it has never been tested against a wide range of experimental conditions (soils, initial water saturation, etc.). In this paper, we tested the automated infiltrometer with the aim to validate its applicability to the Beerkan infiltration experiment under several experimental circumstances. In addition, we assessed the accuracy of BEST methods on the data obtained with the infiltrometer for the estimation of saturated soil hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity. For this purpose, we used both analytically generated and real experimental data. The analytically generated data simulate infiltration experiments carried out with the infiltrometer on five contrasting soils from UNSODA database and different initial water contents. The total volume of water to be infiltrated and the volume increments are fixed by the infiltrometer characteristics. Then, inverse analysis of the analytically generated data was performed using the three available BEST algorithms to derive saturated soil hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity that were compared to the reference values. The results of the analytical assessment showed that the infiltrometer along with BEST methods could lead to accurate estimates in most cases thus validating the design of the studied infiltrometer and its combination with BEST algorithms. Some soils (mostly loam) and some hydric conditions (high initial water contents) may lead to misestimate soil properties or failure of BEST

  3. Sand infiltration into a gravel bed: A mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, A.; Berni, C.

    2016-11-01

    Fine sediment infiltration into a river bed is a physical process affected by different human actions and has several environmental, socioeconomic, and river morphology consequences. A theoretical model is proposed herein aiming to reproduce the fine sediment content depth profile resulting from the infiltration of fine sediment into an initially clean gravel bed. The model is based on the probability of infiltrating particles to be trapped in a pore throat formed by three bed particles. The model is tested against previous experimental results and is found to reproduce adequately the occurrence of the two infiltration mechanisms reported by previous studies: bridging and unimpeded static percolation. Theoretical depth profiles are found to underestimate fine sediment content at the bed subsurface (below 2-3 gravel diameter depth) compared to the laboratory results. This may be due to hyporheic flow that is not taken into account in our model. In flow experiments, the particles previously infiltrated and deposited might be destabilized by pore water flow and their fall down to the bed might be magnified.

  4. Infiltration History and Spatial Variability Derived from Chloride Mass Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, J. C.; Jaimes, A.; Woocay, A.

    2007-12-01

    Chloride mass balance was applied to drill cuttings collected from the unsaturated zone surrounding the Yucca Mountain Project. Samples correspond to four Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program boreholes where air was used as the drilling fluid to preserve sample integrity. Infiltration dates before present and pore velocities were calculated using a range of annual chloride deposition rates obtained from the literature. The lower chloride loading corresponds to contemporary values, and the upper loading corresponds to an attempt to correct for either past greater chloride deposition or a past higher precipitation with chloride concentration remaining constant. In each borehole, pore velocities present two distinct slopes corresponding to different infiltration regimes. The first one, near the surface, presents the slowest infiltration rate. The second pore velocity corresponds to a past wetter period (late Pleistocene to early Holocene) with much faster pore velocities. Results indicate that pore velocities among the boreholes differ at most by a factor of approximately 3.5. Boreholes located in areas of little or gradual slope present faster infiltration rates than those in areas of greater slope. Borehole NC-EWDP-22S, near Fortymile Wash east of Yucca Mountain, exhibits the most rapid pore velocities where as boreholes further from the wash demonstrate lower velocities. These results denote the effects climate change, and runoff and run-on at the surface have over infiltration rates in arid regions.

  5. Lichen Planus With Predominate Plasma Cell Infiltrate: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Huyenlan; Seyffert, Jennifer; Lountzis, Nektarios I; Altman, Howard B; Oram, Christian; Purcell, Stephen M

    2017-02-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a mucocutaneous inflammatory dermatitis of idiopathic origin that can involve the skin, mucous membranes, hair, and nails. LP has an associated set of characteristic histopathologic findings which include hyperkeratosis, vacuolization of the basal layer, Civatte bodies, wedge-shaped hypergranulosis, band-like lymphocytic infiltrate at the dermal epidermal junction, eosinophilic colloid bodies in the papillary dermis, and pigment incontinence. The infiltrate is usually composed of lymphocytes with few histiocytes, mast cells, and macrophages. The presence of plasma cell predominant infiltrate in LP has only been reported in four previous cases and 2 other cases of lichen nitidus. The authors report another 2 cases of LP with predominate plasma cell infiltrate in 2 female patients on the legs. The differential includes a drug-induced lichenoid reaction with predominate plasma cell infiltrate. However, there have been no case reports of that type of reaction. Because plasma cells are seen commonly in certain infectious diseases, malignancy, and macroglobulinemia, it is prudent to rule out those entities. Our patients responded well with a class 1 topical steroid, with improvement of their lower leg lesions within 1 month of treatment.

  6. Trench infiltration for managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; Watt, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock is increasingly being utilized to enhance resources and maintain sustainable groundwater development practices. One such target is the Navajo Sandstone, an extensive regional aquifer located throughout the Colorado Plateau of the western United States. Spreading-basin and bank-filtration projects along the sandstone outcrop's western edge in southwestern Utah have recently been implemented to meet growth-related water demands. This paper reports on a new cost-effective surface-infiltration technique utilizing trenches for enhancing managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock. A 48-day infiltration trench experiment on outcropping Navajo Sandstone was conducted to evaluate this alternative surface-spreading artificial recharge method. Final infiltration rates through the bottom of the trench were about 0.5 m/day. These infiltration rates were an order of magnitude higher than rates from a previous surface-spreading experiment at the same site. The higher rates were likely caused by a combination of factors including the removal of lower permeability soil and surficial caliche deposits, access to open vertical sandstone fractures, a reduction in physical clogging associated with silt and biofilm layers, minimizing viscosity effects by maintaining isothermal conditions, minimizing chemical clogging caused by carbonate mineral precipitation associated with algal photosynthesis, and diminished gas clogging associated with trapped air and biogenic gases. This pilot study illustrates the viability of trench infiltration for enhancing surface spreading of managed aquifer recharge to permeable bedrock. ?? 2010.

  7. CT of chronic infiltrative lung disease: Prevalence of mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Niimi, Hiroshi; Kang, Eun-Young; Kwong, S.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to determine the prevalence of mediastinal lymph node enlargement at CT in patients with diffuse infiltrative lung disease. The study was retrospective and included 175 consecutive patients with diffuse infiltrative lung diseases. Diagnoses included idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 61), usual interstitial pneumonia associated with collagen vascular disease (CVD) (n = 20), idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) (n = 22), extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) (n = 17), and sarcoidosis (n = 55). Fifty-eight age-matched patients with CT of the chest performed for unrelated conditions served as controls. The presence, number, and sites of enlarged nodes (short axis {ge}10 mm in diameter) were recorded. Enlarged mediastinal nodes were present in 118 of 175 patients (67%) with infiltrative lung disease and 3 of 58 controls (5%) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of enlarged nodes was 84% (46 of 55) in sarcoidosis, 67% (41 of 61) in IPF, 70% (14 of 20) in CVD, 53% (9 of 17) in EAA, and 36% (8 of 22) in BOOP. The mean number of enlarged nodes was higher in sarcoidosis (mean 3.2) than in the other infiltrative diseases (mean 1.2) (p < 0.001). Enlarged nodes were most commonly present in station 10R, followed by 7, 4R, and 5. Patients with infiltrative lung disease frequently have enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. However, in diseases other than sarcoid, usually only one or two nodes are enlarged and their maximal short axis diameter is <15 mm. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Comparison of Infiltrability Measurements in the Thornbush Savanna, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, Nikolaus; Gröngröft, Alexander; Eschenbach, Annette

    2010-05-01

    Large proportions of Namibian Savannas are affected by strong bush encroachment leading to a reduction in grazing capacity. Especially woody plant encroachment is expected to have an impact on hydrology by increasing plant transpiration, bare soil evaporation and reducing soil water availability (HUXMAN et al. 2005). Although the processes are not fully understood, the role of soil water balance is highlighted by many studies. Especially the small-scale interactions of vegetation and soil are of high relevance. To characterize the water balance of different sites in the Namibian thornbush savanna long-term studies were conducted. In addition we applied three methods to quantify the infiltration rate (IR) at four central Namibian thornbush savanna sites differing in soil texture and vegetation type: a single ring (own construction, 14 cm inner diameter), a disc-infiltrometer (Eijkelkamp Agrisearch Equipment BV) and a hood infiltrometer (UGT Umwelt-Geräte-Technik GmbH). At each site, the measurements we conducted along short transect lines (15 m) in positions with differing plant influence (canopy of Acacia trees and shrubs, grass and dwarf-shrub tussocks, bare soil, termitaria). All three methods resulted in different mean IR as well as spatial distribution patterns. Using statistical analysis by ANOVA, dominant controlling variables were elaborated. The poster will demonstrate which of the methods is defensible with respect to the research question. References : HUXMAN, T. E., B. P. WILCOX, et al. (2005): Ecohydrological implications of woody plant encroachment. Ecology 86(2): 308-319. Acknowledgment: The work was founded by BMBF within the Project Biota South (support code 01LC 0624 A2).

  9. Practical molecular pathologic diagnosis of infiltrating gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Melike; Perry, Arie

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to better understanding of glioma tumorigenesis and biology. Numerous glioma biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive value have been identified. Although some of these markers are already part of the routine clinical management of glioma patients, data regarding others are limited and difficult to apply routinely. In addition, multiple methods for molecular subclassification have been proposed either together with or as an alternative to the current morphologic classification and grading scheme. This article reviews the literature regarding glioma biomarkers and offers a few practical suggestions.

  10. A hydrologic analysis for the infiltration basins planned on Jeju Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Kang, T.; Lee, J.; Kang, S.

    2010-12-01

    Urban development is a cause of expansion of impervious area. It reduces infiltration of rain water and may increase runoff volume from storms. Infiltration basins can be a method to receive storm water and to let the water move into the soil. The contents of the study include a hydrologic analysis on a site and an evaluation of the capacity of infiltration basins planned on the site. Most region of Jeju Island, Korea is highly pervious. Three infiltration basins were designed on the area of the Jeju English Education City. To evaluate adequacy of the capacities of the infiltration basins, infiltration rates were measured and storm water runoff was simulated. Infiltration rates on the surface of the reserved land for infiltration basins were measured by a standard double ring infiltrometer or a small infiltrometer. A FORTRAN version of SWMM was modified to incorporate the infiltration basin and the basic equations of the infiltration basin are same as those of the infiltration trench used in MIDUSS. The code modified was used to simulate storm runoff from watersheds, infiltration from the infiltration basins, and reservoir routing of the infiltration basins. The saturated hydraulic conductivities on the reserved sites were measured by 0.0068, 0.0038, and 0.00017 cm/sec. The return period of the design rainfall is fifty years. The following results were obtained from a hydrologic analysis on the watersheds and the infiltration basins to be built. The two infiltration basins with higher infiltration rates have adequate capacities to infiltrate the total water inflow to the basins. Some water, however releases from the other infiltration basin and the capacity of the basin is not sufficient to infiltrate the total runoff after the land use change. A channel is needed in which the water released from the less pervious basin flows. The hydrologic analysis method of the study can be used for capacity evaluation of future infiltration basins on highly pervious areas in

  11. Influence of Deforestation on Infiltration and Erosion in the Brazilian Caatinga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, P. A.; Souza, E.; Gomes, R. J.; Jacques, Y.; Cantalice, J. R. B.; Wilcox, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Population growth and changes in land use are leading to increasing rates of deforestation and land degradation in the Brazilian Caatinga—a semiarid tropical forest. The influence of deforestation and subsequent recovery on soil hydrological properties and erosion are poorly understood. To investigate the influence of forest regeneration stage on soil hydrological processes, we conducted small plot rainfall simulation experiments on (1) a degraded pasture, recently abandoned; (2) an abandoned pasture left for natural recovery in the past seven years; (3) a 40 year old regenerating forestland; and (4) an old-growth forestland. In addition, we determined infiltration rates using single rings (following the Beerkan Method) and in the laboratory we applied the constant head method to soil core samples. Hydraulic parameters will be obtained using the BEST method with SciLab software and statistical analysis of the data will be carried in R. We found that infiltration rates were highest and erosion the lowest in the old-growth forest. Surprisingly, differences in both infiltration and erosion rates were quite small in the other sites. These results suggest that significant time is required following deforestation for recovery of soil hydrological properties.

  12. Characterisation of the surface structure of 3D printed scaffolds for cell infiltration and surgical suturing.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cantu, Laura; Gleadall, Andrew; Faris, Callum; Segal, Joel; Shakesheff, Kevin; Yang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    3D printing is of great interest for tissue engineering scaffolds due to the ability to form complex geometries and control internal structures, including porosity and pore size. The porous structure of scaffolds plays an important role in cell ingrowth and nutrition infusion. Although the internal porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds have been frequently studied, the surface porosity and pore size, which are critical for cell infiltration and mass transport, have not been investigated. The surface geometry can differ considerably from the internal scaffold structure depending on the 3D printing process. It is vital to be able to control the surface geometry of scaffolds as well as the internal structure to fabricate optimal architectures. This work presents a method to control the surface porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds. Six scaffold designs have been printed with surface porosities ranging from 3% to 21%. We have characterised the overall scaffold porosity and surface porosity using optical microscopy and microCT. It has been found that surface porosity has a significant impact on cell infiltration and proliferation. In addition, the porosity of the surface has been found to have an effect on mechanical properties and on the forces required to penetrate the scaffold with a surgical suturing needle. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the surface geometry of extrusion-based 3D printed scaffolds and demonstrates the importance of surface geometry in cell infiltration and clinical manipulation.

  13. Fracture resistance of porcelain veneered zirconia crowns with exposed lingual zirconia for anterior teeth after thermal cycling: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Amir Rad, Fatemeh A.; Succaria, Faysal G.; Morgano, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of problem In some clinical conditions minimally invasive complete crown tooth preparations are indicated. This is especially true when gross removal of tooth structure would weaken the remaining tooth or violate the vitality of the dental pulp. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of (1) exposed lingual zirconia with veneered zirconia crowns, and (2) reduced lingual thickness of monolithic lithium disilicate crowns on the fracture resistance of the crowns after cyclic loading. Metal-ceramic crowns with exposed lingual metal served as controls. Materials and methods Twenty-four maxillary central incisor crowns were fabricated in identical shape on metal testing dies in 3 groups: metal-ceramic crowns (MC, n = 8), veneered zirconia crowns (VZ, n = 8), and monolithic lithium disilicate crowns (MO, n = 8). A conservative preparation design with 0.75 mm lingual clearance was used for each crown system. All crowns were cemented to their corresponding crown preparations with self-adhesive resin cement (Multilink Automix). The crowns were subjected to 1000 cycles of thermal cycling, then cyclic loading of 111 N by means of a stainless steel ball, and 50,000 cycles of loading were applied for the fatigue test. Fatigue loading was followed by a continuously increasing compressive load, at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. The compressive load (N) required to cause failure was recorded. Means were calculated and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α = .05). Results There was a significant difference between MO vs. MC (P = .0001), MO vs. VZ (P = .0001), and VZ vs. MC (P = .012). Conclusions There was a significant difference in the mean fracture resistance of MC, VZ, and MO crowns in this in vitro study. The MC group recorded the highest mean fracture strength. PMID:26082571

  14. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Volume, Bolus Viscosity, and Gustation on Swallowing Apnea Onset Relative to Lingual Bolus Propulsion Onset in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiss, Susan G.; Strauss, Monica; Treole, Kathleen; Stuart, Andrew; Boutilier, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the normal relation of swallowing apnea (SA) onset relative to lingual bolus propulsion along with factors that may alter this relation. Forty adults, composed of 10 men and 10 women in each of 2 age groups (i.e., 20-30 and 63-79 years) participated. SA onset was assessed during 5- and 20-ml bolus volumes…

  15. Sequestration of Sr-90 Subsurface Contamination in the Hanford 100-N Area by Surface Infiltration of a Ca-Citrate-Phosphate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Oostrom, Martinus; Moore, R. C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Williams, Mark D.; Zhong, Lirong; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; McKinley, James P.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Covert, Matthew A.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Garcia, Ben J.

    2009-03-01

    subsurface area. However, the use of real-time surface and cross-borehole geophysics can be used to track the infiltrating Ca-citrate-PO4 front so some adjustments can be made in the infiltration rate to precipitate apatite in desired zones. In addition, the reactive transport code used in this study with field scale physical parameters for sediments can be used to evaluate infiltration strategies along with preliminary water infiltration tests at field scale.

  16. Improved infiltration of stem cells on electrospun nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Shabani, Iman; Haddadi-Asl, Vahid; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Babaeijandaghi, Farshad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2009-04-24

    Nanofibrous scaffolds have been recently used in the field of tissue engineering because of their nano-size structure which promotes cell attachment, function, proliferation and infiltration. In this study, nanofibrous polyethersulfone (PES) scaffolds was prepared via electrospinning. The scaffolds were surface modified by plasma treatment and collagen grafting. The surface changes then investigated by contact angle measurements and FTIR-ATR. The results proved grafting of the collagen on nanofibers surface and increased hydrophilicity after plasma treatment and collagen grafting. The cell interaction study was done using stem cells because of their ability to differentiate to different kinds of cell lines. The cells had normal morphology on nanofibers and showed very high infiltration through collagen grafted PES nanofibers. This infiltration capability is very useful and needed to make 3D scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  17. Characterizing ponded infiltration in a dry cracked clay soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, J.; Wösten, J. H. M.

    1984-02-01

    Ponded infiltration in a dry cracked clay soil was studied in large blocks of soil (upper surface area 1500 cm 2, height 25-40 cm) using physical and morphological methods. Blocks were encased in gypsum. Physical measurements included: (1) infiltration rates into the block and into subsoil below the block during shallow ponding; (2) D- θ relations of soil in the block; and (3) depth and degree of wetting in soil adjacent to the cracks. Cracks in the block were then filled with a gypsum slurry. Morphological measurements included Quantimet ® counts of the surface area ( A) and the peripheral length ( L) of the gypsum-filled cracks, using in situ drawings. Simulation of horizontal infiltration from the cracks, using D( θ)- and L-values, yielded results that agreed well with in situ measurements, demonstrating the mutual compatibility of the morphological and physical methods.

  18. Infiltrating intramuscular spindle cell lipoma of the face.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rajni V; Duncan, Lyn M; Austen, William G; Nielsen, G Petur

    2009-10-01

    Spindle cell lipoma is a benign lipomatous tumor, which usually arises on the back of the neck, shoulder or upper back of males in the third to seventh decade of life. We report herein an unusual infiltrating intramuscular spindle cell lipoma arising in the nose of a 53-year-old man. The patient presented with a 0.5-cm 'cyst' of the nose, just above the right alar crease, which was removed. Four years later, the lesion recurred and was re-excised. Histologically, a proliferation of mature adipocytes, ropey collagen fibers and spindle cells within a myxoid stroma was present in the subcutaneous tissue and infiltrated between skeletal muscle fibers. Nine cases of intramuscular spindle cell lipoma with histological examination have previously been reported and have involved the oral cavity and muscles of the extremities. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an infiltrating intramuscular spindle cell lipoma arising on the face.

  19. CT appearance of focal fatty infiltration of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, R.A.; Korobkin, M.; Ram, P.C.; Thompson, W.M.

    1982-08-01

    Focal fatty infiltration of the liver is an entity that may be confused with liver metastasis on computed tomography (CT). The imaging results and medical records of 16 patients with CT appearance suggestive of focal fatty liver were reviewed, three of whom had the simultaneous presence of metastitic liver disease. Focal fatty liver often has a distinctive appearance with CT, usually with a nonspherical shape, absence of mass effect, and density close to water. Liver metastases are usually round or oval, and unless cystic or necrotic, they have CT attenuation values closer to normal liver parenchyma than water. A radionuclide liver scan almost always resolves any confusion about the differential diagnosis of focal fatty liver: a well defined focus of photon deficiency is due to neoplasm rather than focal fatty infiltration. Sonography sometimes helps to confirm the CT impression, but may be misleading if the diagnosis of focal or diffuse fatty infiltration is not suspected before the examination.

  20. Runoff production on a slope with randomly distributed infiltrabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouche, E.; Harel, M.

    2013-12-01

    Runoff generated on one- and two-dimensional slopes with randomly distributed infiltrability is studied in the queuing theory and connectivity frameworks. The equivalence between the runoff-runon equation and the customers waiting time in a single server queue provides a theoretical link between the statistical descriptions of infiltrability and that of runoff flow rate. Different distributions of infiltrability, representing soil heterogeneities at different scales, are considered. Numerical simulations validate these results and improve our understanding of runoff-runon process. All of the quantities describing the generation of runoff (runoff one-point statistics) and its organization into patterns (patterns statistics and connectivity) are studied as functions of rainfall rate and runoff dimensionality.

  1. Explicit infiltration function for boreholes under constant head conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnell, A. C.; Lazarovitch, N.; Warrick, A. W.

    2009-10-01

    Infiltration per unit area of the source region from discs, strips and furrows has previously been shown to be the sum of the one-dimensional infiltration and an edge effect term. Here we apply the same approach to examine infiltration under a constant head from boreholes (both lined and unlined). A critical empirical parameter (γ) in the edge effect term is related to the radius of the borehole, soil hydraulic properties, boundary and initial conditions. For lined boreholes, γ has a narrow range and for the examples investigated, a constant value of 1.06 introduces less than 5% error compared to using the case-specific γ value. For unlined boreholes, γ is larger, ranging between 1.02 and 3.16 for the examples investigated, and should be estimated for specific conditions.

  2. Strain characteristics of selectively infiltrated photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, WenBing; Wang, Ying; Tian, Jie

    2015-07-01

    To obtain the strain sensing for the high sensitivity PCF (Photonic Crystal Fibers), the high refractive index mixture is infiltrated into the air hole of the PCF. In this paper, we propose to adjust the infiltrated length of the air hole in order to make the loss maximum. The goal is to realize the PCF sensor with high sensitive strain. The experimental results show that the strain sensitivity is about 4.36 pm / μ ɛ when the infiltrated length is 30mm and the refractive index of the liquid is 1.5. The experimental results are consistent with the simulation ones. This kind of device can apply to the ultrasensitive strain sensing.

  3. Association between Inflammatory Infiltrates and Isolated Monosomy 22/del(22q) in Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patrícia Henriques; Teodósio, Cristina; Otero, Álvaro; Sousa, Pablo; Ortiz, Javier; Macias, María del Carmen García; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Nieto, Ana Belén; Lopes, María Celeste; de Oliveira, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Meningiomas contain highly variable levels of infiltrating tissue macrophages (TiMa) and other immune cells. In this study we investigated the potential association between the number and immunophenotype of inflammatory and other immune cells infiltrating the tumor as evaluated by multiparameter flow cytometry, and the clinico-biological, cytogenetic and gene expression profile (GEP) of 75 meningioma patients. Overall, our results showed a close association between the amount and cellular composition of the inflammatory and other immune cell infiltrates and the cytogenetic profile of the tumors. Notably, tumors with isolated monosomy 22/del(22q) showed greater numbers of TiMa, NK cells and (recently)-activated CD69+ lymphocytes versus meningiomas with diploid and complex karyotypes. In addition, in the former cytogenetic subgroup of meningiomas, tumor-infiltrating TiMa also showed a more activated and functionally mature phenotype, as reflected by a greater fraction of CD69+, CD63+, CD16+ and CD33+ cells. GEP at the mRNA level showed a unique GEP among meningiomas with an isolated monosomy 22/del(22q) versus all other cases, which consisted of increased expression of genes involved in inflammatory/immune response, associated with an M1 TiMa phenotype. Altogether, these results suggest that loss of expression of specific genes coded in chromosome 22 (e.g. MIF) is closely associated with an increased homing and potentially also anti-tumoral effect of TiMa, which could contribute to explain the better outcome of this specific good-prognosis cytogenetic subgroup of meningiomas. PMID:24098347

  4. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  5. Effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Baeten, Coen . E-mail: C.Baeten@surgery.azm.nl; Castermans, Karolien; Lammering, Guido; Hillen, Femke; Wouters, Bradly G.; Hillen, Harry; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Baeten, Cornelius G.M.I.

    2006-11-15

    Background: We and others have shown that angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration are important prognostic factors in rectal cancer. However, little is known about its possible changes in response to radiotherapy (RTX), which is frequently given to rectal tumors as a neoadjuvant treatment to improve the prognosis. We therefore investigated the biologic effects of RTX on these parameters using fresh-frozen biopsy samples of tumor and normal mucosa tissue before and after RTX. Methods: Biopsy samples were taken from a total of 34 patients before and after either a short course or long course of RTX combined with chemotherapy. The following parameters were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction: Microvessel density, leukocyte infiltration, proliferating epithelial and tumor cells, proliferating endothelial cells, adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells, and the angiogenic mRNA profile. Results: The tumor biopsy samples taken after RTX treatment demonstrated a significant decrease in microvessel density and the number of proliferating tumor cells and proliferating endothelial cells (p < 0.001). In contrast, the leukocyte infiltration, the levels of basic fibroblast growth factor in carcinoma tissue, and the adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells in normal as well as carcinoma tissue increased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data show that together with an overall decrease in tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation, RTX results in an increase in the expression of adhesion molecules that stimulate leukocyte infiltration. This suggests the possibility that, in addition to its direct cytotoxic effect, radiation may also stimulate an immunologic tumor response that could contribute to the documented improvement in local tumor control and distal failure rate of rectal cancers.

  6. Time-lapse 3D ground-penetrating radar during plot-scale infiltration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allroggen, Niklas; Jackisch, Conrad; Tronicke, Jens

    2016-04-01

    In electrical resistive soils, surface-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is known as the geophysical tool providing the highest spatial resolution. Thus, 2D and 3D GPR surveys are commonly used for imaging subsurface structures or estimating soil moisture content. Due to its sensitivity to soil moisture and its non-invasive character, GPR provides a large potential to monitor soil moisture variation at high temporal and spatial resolution. As shown in previous experiments, the acquisition of time-lapse GPR data under field conditions requires a high data quality in terms of repeatability as well as spatial and temporal resolution. We present hydrogeophysical field experiments at the plot scale (1m x 1m), during which we record time-lapse 3D GPR. For GPR data acquisition, we use a pulseEKKO PRO GPR system equipped with a pair of 500 MHz antennas in combination with a specially designed metal-free measuring platform. Additionally, we collect tracer and soil moisture data, which are used to improve the interpretation of the GPR data with special focus on preferential flow paths and their structured advective flow field. After an accurate time-lapse GPR data processing, we compare 3D reflection events before and after infiltration and quantitatively interpret their relative time-shift in terms of soil moisture variations. Thereby, we are able to account for basically all of the infiltrated water. The first experiments demonstrate the general applicability of our experimental approach but are limited by the number of acquired time steps and measurement during the sprinkling period (the time of the highest temporal dynamics) are not possible at all. Based on this experience we redesign our experimental setup to continuously collect GPR data during irrigation and infiltration. Thereby, we strongly increase the temporal resolution of our measurements, improve the interpretability of the GPR data, and monitor the temporal and spatial dynamics of shallow subsurface

  7. Evaluating breast lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates: a multiparameter immunohistochemical study, including assessment of IgG4.

    PubMed

    Berg, Aaron N; Soma, Lorinda; Clark, Beth Z; Swerdlow, Steven H; Roth, Christine G

    2015-08-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in the breast, a modified skin appendage, include lymphocytic lobulitis, other nonspecific benign proliferations, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)-type lymphoma. Distinguishing these entities, all of which may be B-cell rich and may have associated sclerosis, can be difficult. In addition, the proportion that represents IgG4-related disease is unknown, and the similarity of MALT lymphomas to primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma is uncertain. To address these questions, the clinical, histologic, and immunohistochemical features of 50 benign and malignant breast lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates (10 lymphocytic lobulitis, 1 granulomatous, 19 not otherwise specified, 20 MALT lymphomas) were evaluated. Compared with the MALT lymphomas, benign cases had a less dense infiltrate (P < .001), fewer but more histologically apparent germinal centers (P < .001), and more marked fibrosis (P < .0001). Greater than 60% B cells were present in 23% (7/30) benign cases versus 75% (15/20) MALT lymphomas (P = .0003). Plasma cells were predominantly IgG+ in 83% (24/29) benign cases and predominantly IgM+ in 73% (14/19) MALT lymphomas (P < .0001). None of the benign cases had greater than 50 IgG4+ plasma cells/high-power field, and only 1 lymphocytic lobulitis case had an IgG4/IgG ratio exceeding 40% and no clinical evidence for extramammary IgG4-related disease. Although there may be some overlapping features, routine histopathology together with limited immunohistochemical stains can distinguish benign from neoplastic lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in the breast. Despite frequent sclerosis, the breast is not a common site of unrecognized IgG4-related sclerosing disease. Although there are similarities, breast MALT lymphomas can be separated from cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma.

  8. Metal/ceramic composites via infiltration of an interconnected wood-derived ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Thomas E.

    The use of composites is increasing as they afford scientists and engineers the ability to combine the advantageous properties of each constituent phase, e.g. metal ductility and ceramic stiffness. With respect to materials design, biomimetics is garnering increasing attention due to the complex, yet efficient, natural microstructures. One such biomimetic, or in this case 'bio-derived,' curiosity is wood-derived ceramic, which is made by either replicating or converting wood into a ceramic. The resulting porous and anisotropic material retains the precursor microstructure. The wide variety of precursors can yield materials with a range of pore sizes and distribution of pores. The purpose of this work was to study the processing, microstructure, and properties of aluminum/silicon carbide composites. The composites were made by infiltrating molten aluminum into porous wood-derived SIC, which was produced by the reactive melt-infiltration of silicon into pyrolyzed wood. The composite microstructure consisted of interconnected SiC surrounding Al-alloy 'fibers.' The strength, modulus, and toughness were measured in both longitudinal and transverse orientations. The Al → SiC load transfer was investigated with high-energy X-ray diffraction in combination with in-situ compressive loading. The properties in flexure were found to decrease with increasing temperature. Despite the complex microstructure, predictions of the composite flexural modulus and longitudinal fracture toughness were obtained using simple models: Halpin-Tsai bounds and the Ashby et al. model of the effect of ductile particle-reinforcements on the toughness of brittle materials (Ashby et al. 1989), respectively. In addition, the Al/SiC research inspired the investigation of carbon-reinforced copper composites. The goal was to explore the feasibility of making a high-thermal conductivity composite by infiltrating copper into wood-derived carbon. Results indicated that Cu/C composites could be made with

  9. Comparison between the collagen intensity and mast cell density in the lingual muscles and myocardium of autopsied chronic chagasic and nonchagasic patients.

    PubMed

    Roldão, José A; Beghini, Marcela; Ramalho, Luciana S; Porto, Carla Souza; Rodrigues, Denise B R; Teixeira, Vicente P A; de Lima Pereira, Sanívia A

    2012-08-01

    In chronic Chagas' disease (CD), an increase in collagen intensity and mast cell density has been described individually in the myocardium and tongue muscles. The aim of this study was to compare the percentage of collagen, mast cell tryptase (MCT) density, and mast cell chymase (MCH) density in the lingual muscles and myocardium from autopsied chagasic (CP) and nonchagasic patients (NCP). The selected cases were divided into two groups: (1) CP (n = 10) and (2) NCP (n = 10). Fragments were removed from the tongue and heart. After histological processing, the slices were stained with picrosirius, and immunohistochemistry was performed for MCH and MCT. The CP group showed the highest MCH and MCT densities and the highest percentage of collagen in the lingual muscles and myocardium when compared with the NCP group (p < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was observed between the collagen intensity and MCH density in the myocardium of the CP group. Although there are no reports in the literature of MCT and MCH in CD, its higher densities as well as higher percentage of collagen were found in the lingual muscles and myocardium in the CP group, suggesting that tryptase and chymase are associated with the pathogenesis of CD in these organs. Furthermore, the positive and significant correlation between the percentage of collagen and MCH density in the myocardium of the CP group suggests that the chymase is associated with fibrosis in CD, as demonstrated in other diseases.

  10. Streamflow, Infiltration, and Recharge in Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Stephanie J.

    2007-01-01

    Infiltration events in channels that flow only sporadically produce focused recharge to the Tesuque aquifer in the Espa?ola Basin. The current study examined the quantity and timing of streamflow and associated infiltration in Arroyo Hondo, an unregulated mountain-front stream that enters the basin from the western slope of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Traditional methods of stream gaging were combined with environmental-tracer based methods to provide the estimates. The study was conducted during a three-year period, October 1999?October 2002. The period was characterized by generally low precipitation and runoff. Summer monsoonal rains produced four brief periods of streamflow in water year 2000, only three of which extended beyond the mountain front, and negligible runoff in subsequent years. The largest peak flow during summer monsoon events was 0.59 cubic meters per second. Snowmelt was the main contributor to annual streamflow. Snowmelt produced more cumulative flow downstream from the mountain front during the study period than summer monsoonal rains. The presence or absence of streamflow downstream of the mountain front was determined by interpretation of streambed thermographs. Infiltration rates were estimated by numerical modeling of transient vertical streambed temperature profiles. Snowmelt extended throughout the instrumented reach during the spring of 2001. Flow was recorded at a station two kilometers downstream from the mountain front for six consecutive days in March. Inverse modeling of this event indicated an average infiltration rate of 1.4 meters per day at this location. For the entire study reach, the estimated total annual volume of infiltration ranged from 17,100 to 246,000 m3 during water years 2000 and 2001. During water year 2002, due to severe drought, streamflow and streambed infiltration in the study reach were both zero.

  11. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vanderborght, J.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that

  12. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vogel, H.

    2011-12-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flowpaths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that this

  13. SIMULATION OF NET INFILTRATION FOR MODERN AND POTENTIAL FUTURE CLIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Heveal

    2000-06-16

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes enhancements made to the infiltration model documented in Flint et al. (1996) and documents an analysis using the enhanced model to generate spatial and temporal distributions over a model domain encompassing the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada. Net infiltration is the component of infiltrated precipitation, snowmelt, or surface water run-on that has percolated below the zone of evapotranspiration as defined by the depth of the effective root zone, the average depth below the ground surface (at a given location) from which water is removed by evapotranspiration. The estimates of net infiltration are used for defining the upper boundary condition for the site-scale 3-dimensional Unsaturated-Zone Ground Water Flow and Transport (UZ flow and transport) Model (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The UZ flow and transport model is one of several process models abstracted by the Total System Performance Assessment model to evaluate expected performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in terms of radionuclide transport (CRWMS M&O 1998). The net-infiltration model is important for assessing potential repository-system performance because output from this model provides the upper boundary condition for the UZ flow and transport model that is used to generate flow fields for evaluating potential radionuclide transport through the unsaturated zone. Estimates of net infiltration are provided as raster-based, 2-dimensional grids of spatially distributed, time-averaged rates for three different climate stages estimated as likely conditions for the next 10,000 years beyond the present. Each climate stage is represented using a lower bound, a mean, and an upper bound climate and corresponding net-infiltration scenario for representing uncertainty in the characterization of daily climate conditions for each climate stage, as well as potential climate variability within each climate stage. The set of nine raster grid maps provide spatially

  14. Infiltration and permeability testing at geokinetics oil shale site

    SciTech Connect

    Hoylman, E.W.; Quinn, G.W.

    1984-03-01

    Infiltration (double-rint) and pressure permeability (packer) tests were conducted in or near true in-situ oil shale retorts and at adjacent undisturbed locations to obtain comparative data to evaluate the potential for groundwater pollution due to increased fluid migration resulting from this retorting methodology. Tests were performed at the Geokinetics oil shale site located in Section 2, Township 14 South, Range 22 East, Uintah County, Utah. Test results suggest a slight increase in surface infiltration rates and hydraulic conductivity in or near the retort areas. It is expected that this type of true in-situ retorting will pose very little, if any, threat to groundwater resources in the area.

  15. Intracystic papillary breast carcinoma with areas of infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Martín Gutiérrez, Silvia; Nieto Gallo, María Antonia; Noguero Meseguera, Rosario; Rodríguez Prieto, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Intracystic papillary carcinoma of the breast associated with areas of infiltration is rare in that it constitutes less than 1% of breast cancers. After initial radiological study, these tumors show lesions with little likelihood of malignancy in a high proportion of cases. Two cases of intracystic papillary carcinoma associated with infiltration were diagnosed at the Breast Unit of Hospital Infanta Cristina. In both cases, the reason for consultation arose after palpation of a nodule and the initial radiographic analyses showed lesions with little likelihood of malignancy. PMID:24893058

  16. Local infiltrative anesthesia for transaxillary subpectoral breast implants.

    PubMed

    Mottura, A A

    1995-01-01

    Breast augmentations using a transaxillary subpectoral approach are usually performed under general anesthesia. This article describes a technique that uses local infiltrative anesthesia in breast augmentation, adenomastectomies with immediate breast reconstruction, and when placing breast expansors. Large anesthetic solutions with vasoconstrictor and long-acting effects are prepared. The axila, the subpectoral space, and a surrounding area of 3 cm outside the demarcation limits are infiltrated. Minimal bleeding, long-lasting effects, and a considerable postoperative analgesic effect are some of the advantages of this procedure.

  17. Assessing the feasibility of yttria-stabilized zirconia in novel designs as mandibular anterior fixed lingual retention following orthodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Matthew

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility of yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) in fixed lingual retention as an alternative to stainless steel. Exploratory Y-TZP specimens were milled to establish design parameters. Next, specimens were milled according to ASTM standard C1161-13 and subjected to four-point flexural test to determine materials properties. Finite Element (FE) Analysis was employed to evaluate nine novel cross-sectional designs and compared to stainless steel wire. Each design was analyzed under the loading conditions to determine von Mises and bond stress. The most promising design was fabricated to assess accuracy and precision of current CAD/CAM milling technology. The superior design had a 1.0 x 0.5 mm semi-elliptical cross section and was shown to be fabricated reliably. Overall, the milling indicated a maximum percent standard deviation of 9.3 and maximum percent error of 13.5 with a cost of $30 per specimen. Y-TZP can be reliably milled to dimensions comparable to currently available metallic retainer wires. Further research is necessary to determine the success of bonding protocol and clinical longevity of Y-TZP fixed retainers. Advanced technology is necessary to connect the intraoral scan to an aesthetic and patient-specific Y-TZP fixed retainer.

  18. Combined adductor canal block with periarticular infiltration versus periarticular infiltration for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinhui; Gao, Fuqiang; Sun, Wei; Guo, Wanshou; Li, Zirong; Wang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Both adductor canal block (ACB) and periarticular infiltration (PI) have been shown to reduce pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without the motor blockade. However, the efficacy and safety of combined ACB with PI (ACB + PI) as compared to PI alone for analgesia after TKA remains controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to compare the effects of ACB + PI with PI alone on pain controll after TKA. Methods: PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify studies comparing ACB + PI with PI alone for TKA patients. The primary outcomes included pain score with rest or activity and morphine consumption. Secondary outcomes were distance walked, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Relevant data were analyzed using RevMan v5.3. Results: Three studies involving 337 patients were included. Combined ACB with PI was associated with longer distances walked than PI alone (MD = 7.27, 95% CI: 0.43–14.12, P = 0.04) on postoperative day 1. The outcomes of pain, morphine consumption, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications were not statistically different between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Our meta-analysis suggests that combined ACB with PI may achieve earlier ambulation for patients after TKA without a reduction in analgesia when compared to PI alone in the early postoperative period. There were no significant differences in morphine consumption, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications between the 2 groups. However, owing to the variation of included studies, no firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:28033266

  19. Extrapedicular Infiltration Anesthesia as an Improved Method of Local Anesthesia for Unipedicular Percutaneous Vertebroplasty or Percutaneous Kyphoplasty

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This report introduces extrapedicular infiltration anesthesia as an improved method of local anesthesia for unipedicular percutaneous vertebroplasty or percutaneous kyphoplasty. Method. From March 2015 to March 2016, 44 patients (11 males and 33 females) with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with a mean age of 71.4 ± 8.8 years (range: 60 to 89) received percutaneous vertebroplasty or percutaneous kyphoplasty. 24 patients were managed with conventional local infiltration anesthesia (CLIA) and 20 patients with both CLIA and extrapedicular infiltration anesthesia (EPIA). Patients evaluated intraoperative pain by means of the visual analogue score and were monitored during the procedure for additional sedative analgesia needs and for adverse nerve root effects. Results. VAS of CLIA + EPIA and CLIA group was 2.5 ± 0.7 and 4.3 ± 1.0, respectively, and there was significant difference (P = 0.001). In CLIA group, 1 patient required additional sedative analgesia, but in CLIA + EPIA group, no patients required that. In the two groups, no adverse nerve root effects were noted. Summary. Extrapedicular infiltration anesthesia provided good local anesthetic effects without significant complications. This method deserves further consideration for use in unipedicular percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty. PMID:27766261

  20. On Porosity Formation in Metal Matrix Composites Made with Dual-Scale Fiber Reinforcements Using Pressure Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadi, Reihaneh; Pillai, Krishna M.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This is the first such study on porosity formation phenomena observed in dual-scale fiber preforms during the synthesis of metal matrix composites (MMCs) using the gas pressure infiltration process. In this paper, different mechanisms of porosity formation during pressure infiltration of Al-Si alloys into Nextel™ 3D-woven ceramic fabric reinforcements (a dual-porosity or dual-scale porous medium) are studied. The effect of processing conditions on porosity content of the ceramic fabric infiltrated by the alloys through the gas PIP (PIP stands for "Pressure Infiltration Process" in which liquid metal is injected under pressure into a mold packed with reinforcing fibers.) is investigated. Relative density (RD), defined as the ratio of the actual MMC density and the density obtained at ideal 100 pct saturation of the preform, was used to quantify the overall porosity. Increasing the infiltration temperature led to an increase in RD due to reduced viscosity of liquid metal and enhanced wettability leading to improved feedability of the liquid metal. Similarly, increasing the infiltration pressure led to enhanced penetration of fiber tows and resulted in higher RD and reduced porosity. For the first time, the modified Capillary number ( Ca*), which is found to predict formation of porosity in polymer matrix composites quite well, is employed to study porosity in MMCs made using PIP. It is observed that in the high Ca* regime which is common in PIP, the overall porosity shows a strong downward trend with increasing Ca*. In addition, the effect of matrix shrinkage on porosity content of the samples is studied through using a zero-shrinkage Al-Si alloy as the matrix; usage of this alloy as the matrix led to a reduction in porosity content.

  1. Infiltrating to Win: The Conduct of Border Denial Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-04

    initiative from bases in adjacent safe haven countries. Covert cross-border infiltration allows states such as Russia to pursue aggressive geopolitical...such as Russia to pursue aggressive geopolitical policies while maintaining plausible deniability to the international...military’s proper role combating North Vietnamese aggression during the Vietnam War. This discussion leads to the examination pre-Vietnam War US Army

  2. Shallow infiltration processes in arid watersheds at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L. Hevesi, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A conceptual model of shallow infiltration processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was developed for use in hydrologic flow models to characterize net infiltration (the penetration of the wetting front below the zone influenced by evapotranspiration). The model categorizes the surface of the site into four infiltration zones. These zones were identified as ridgetops, sideslopes, terraces, and active channels on the basis of water-content changes with depth and time. The maximum depth of measured water-content change at a specific site is a function of surface storage capacity, the timing and magnitude of precipitation, evapotranspiration, and the degree of saturation of surficial materials overlying fractured bedrock. Measured water-content profiles for the four zones indicated that the potential for net infiltration is higher when evapotranspiration is low (i.e winter, cloudy periods), where surface concentration of water is likely to occur (i.e. depressions, channels), where surface storage capacity is low, and where fractured bedrock is close to the surface.

  3. Shallow infiltration processes in arid watersheds at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.; Hevesi, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A conceptual model of shallow infiltration processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was developed for use in hydrologic flow models to characterize net infiltration (the penetration of the wetting front below the zone influenced by evapotranspiration). The model categorizes the surface of the site into four infiltration zones. These zones were identified as ridgetops, sideslopes, terraces, and active channels on the basis of water-content changes with depth and time. The maximum depth of measured water-content change at a specific site is a function of surface storage capacity, the timing and magnitude of precipitation, evapotranspiration, and the degree of saturation of surficial materials overlying fractured bedrock. Measured water-content profiles for the four zones indicated that the potential for net infiltration is higher when evapotranspiration is low (i.e. winter, cloudy periods), where surface concentration of water is likely to occur (i.e. depressions, channels), where surface storage capacity is low, and where fractured bedrock is close to the surface.

  4. Augmented mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Małgorzata; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Tuka, Elżbieta; Danilewicz, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent investigations have taken into account the role of mast cells in prostate cancer formation, analyzing their dual functions (as tumour growth promoters and tumour growth inhibitors). The aim of our study was to compare mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer and in benign prostate hyperplasia. We also attempted to find possible relationships among mast cell infiltration and microvessel density, Gleason score, as well as serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Material and methods The investigation was confined to evaluations of material from prostate needle biopsies, carried out in 26 patients with prostate cancer, and of 14 specimens diagnosed as benign hyperplasia. The numbers of tryptase positive mast cells and CD34 positive vessels were determined using a computer image analysis system. In the patients with prostate cancer, both mast cell infiltrates and microvessel density were significantly increased, as compared to the control patients. Results Significant positive correlations were identified between the mean numbers of mast cells and microvessel densities, both in the prostate cancer group and in the control group. Moreover, significant positive correlations were observed between Gleason score on one hand and the number of mast cells and microvessel density on the other. The correlations between PSA serum levels and both mast cell infiltration and microvessel density were positive, but not in a statistically significant way. Conclusions The reported investigations may support the assumption of mast cell promoter function in prostate cancer development, whereas no evidence was found for their opposite PMID:24592126

  5. Use of thermal data to estimate infiltration, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    LeCain, Gary D.; Kurzmack, Mark

    2001-04-29

    Temperature and pressure monitoring in a vertical borehole in Pagany Wash, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, measured disruptions of the natural gradients associated with the February, 1998, El Nino precipitation events. The temperature and pressure disruptions indicated infiltration and percolation through the 12.1 m of Pagany Wash alluvium and deep percolation to greater than 35.2 m into the Yucca Mountain Tuff.

  6. Manufacturing of three-dimensionally microstructured nanocomposites through microfluidic infiltration.

    PubMed

    Dermanaki-Farahani, Rouhollah; Lebel, Louis Laberge; Therriault, Daniel

    2014-03-12

    Microstructured composite beams reinforced with complex three-dimensionally (3D) patterned nanocomposite microfilaments are fabricated via nanocomposite infiltration of 3D interconnected microfluidic networks. The manufacturing of the reinforced beams begins with the fabrication of microfluidic networks, which involves layer-by-layer deposition of fugitive ink filaments using a dispensing robot, filling the empty space between filaments using a low viscosity resin, curing the resin and finally removing the ink. Self-supported 3D structures with other geometries and many layers (e.g. a few hundreds layers) could be built using this method. The resulting tubular microfluidic networks are then infiltrated with thermosetting nanocomposite suspensions containing nanofillers (e.g. single-walled carbon nanotubes), and subsequently cured. The infiltration is done by applying a pressure gradient between two ends of the empty network (either by applying a vacuum or vacuum-assisted microinjection). Prior to the infiltration, the nanocomposite suspensions are prepared by dispersing nanofillers into polymer matrices using ultrasonication and three-roll mixing methods. The nanocomposites (i.e. materials infiltrated) are then solidified under UV exposure/heat cure, resulting in a 3D-reinforced composite structure. The technique presented here enables the design of functional nanocomposite macroscopic products for microengineering applications such as actuators and sensors.

  7. Falling head ponded infiltration in the nonlinear limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triadis, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Green and Ampt infiltration solution represents only an extreme example of behavior within a larger class of very nonlinear, delta function diffusivity soils. The mathematical analysis of these soils is greatly simplified by the existence of a sharp wetting front below the soil surface. Solutions for more realistic delta function soil models have recently been presented for infiltration under surface saturation without ponding. After general formulation of the problem, solutions for a full suite of delta function soils are derived for ponded surface water depleted by infiltration. Exact expressions for the cumulative infiltration as a function of time, or the drainage time as a function of the initial ponded depth may take implicit or parametric forms, and are supplemented by simple asymptotic expressions valid for small times, and small and large initial ponded depths. As with surface saturation without ponding, the Green-Ampt model overestimates the effect of the soil hydraulic conductivity. At the opposing extreme, a low-conductivity model is identified that also takes a very simple mathematical form and appears to be more accurate than the Green-Ampt model for larger ponded depths. Between these two, the nonlinear limit of Gardner's soil is recommended as a physically valid first approximation. Relative discrepancies between different soil models are observed to reach a maximum for intermediate values of the dimensionless initial ponded depth, and in general are smaller than for surface saturation without ponding.

  8. Evaluation of Surface Infiltration Testing Procedures in Permeable Pavement Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete provides limited guidance on how to select testing locations, so research is needed to evaluate how testing sites should be selected and how results should be interpreted to assess surface ...

  9. Unilateral apical infiltrate as an initial presentation of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Tice, A W

    1981-11-01

    A unilateral, apical, pulmonary infiltrate was seen in an Air Force weapon systems officer stationed in the Philippines as an initial presentation of pulmonary sarcoidosis. The most obvious diagnosis for that geographic area is tuberculosis. Diagnosis must be pursued to evaluate all differential possibilities, with resort to open-lung or bronchoscopic biopsy, if necessary.

  10. Liquid Metal Infiltration Processing of Metallic Composites: A Critical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree Manu, K. M.; Ajay Raag, L.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Gupta, Manoj; Pai, B. C.

    2016-10-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) are one of the advanced materials widely used for aerospace, automotive, defense, and general engineering applications. MMC can be tailored to have superior properties such as enhanced high-temperature performance, high specific strength and stiffness, increased wear resistance, better thermal and mechanical fatigue, and creep resistance than those of unreinforced alloys. To fabricate such composites with ideal properties, the processing technique has to ensure high volume fraction of reinforcement incorporation, uniform distribution of the reinforcement, and acceptable adhesion between the matrix and the reinforcing phase without unwanted interfacial reactions which degrades the mechanical properties. A number of processing techniques such as stir casting/vortex method, powder metallurgy, infiltration, casting etc. have been developed to synthesize MMC employing a variety of alloy and the reinforcement's combinations. Among these, infiltration process is widely used for making MMC with high volume fraction of reinforcements and offers many more advantages compared to other conventional manufacturing processes. The present paper critically reviews the various infiltration techniques used for making the MMC, their process parameters, characteristics, and selected studies carried out worldwide and by authors on the development of metal ceramic composites by squeeze infiltration process.

  11. Concrete grinding residue characterization and influence on infiltration.

    PubMed

    DeSutter, T; Prunty, L; Bell, J

    2011-01-01

    Concrete grinding residue (CGR) is a slurry byproduct created by concrete pavement maintenance operations. Disposal of CGR slurry is presently regulated on the basis of very minimal information. The least immediate expense is incurred by spreading CGR slurry directly on vegetated roadway ditches and embankments. The direct disposal impacts to environmental quality in terms of soil physical or chemical properties are not known. Five CGR materials from widely dispersed sites in the United States were analyzed for particle size distribution and evaluated with a suite of USEPA physical and chemical analyses. Values found for the parameters examined are not considered harmful. An infiltration column study was also conducted in which two CGRs were mixed at 8 and 25% by weight and also surface applied 2.5 mm deep with two contrasting (relatively fine and coarse textured) soils. With the finer soil, statistically (p < 0.05) significant decrease in infiltration time (increased infiltration rate) was associated with the 25% and surface-applied CGR treatments, compared with the untreated control soil. The results indicate that excessive application of CGR may increase water infiltration into soil in the short-term. This should be kept in mind, but does not appear to be generally detrimental.

  12. Perfluorocarbon tracer method for air-infiltration measurements

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, R.N.

    1982-09-23

    A method of measuring air infiltration rates suitable for use in rooms of homes and buildings comprises the steps of emitting perfluorocarbons in the room to be measured, sampling the air containing the emitted perfluorocarbons over a period of time, and analyzing the samples at a laboratory or other facility.

  13. Failure mechanism of the polymer infiltration of carbon nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchheim, Jakob; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2016-11-01

    Polymer melt infiltration is one of the feasible methods for manufacturing filter membranes out of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on large scales. Practically, however, its process suffers from low yields, and the mechanism behind this failure is rather poorly understood. Here, we investigate a failure mechanism of polymer melt infiltration of vertical aligned (VA-) CNTs. In penetrating the VA-CNT interstices, polymer melts exert a capillarity-induced attractive force laterally on CNTs at the moving meniscus, leading to locally agglomerated macroscale bunches. Such a large configurational change can deform and distort individual CNTs so much as to cause buckling or breakdown of the alignment. In view of membrane manufacturing, this irreversible distortion of nanotubes is detrimental, as it could block the transport path of the membranes. The failure mechanism of the polymer melt infiltration is largely attributed to steric hindrance and an energy penalty of confined polymer chains. Euler beam theory and scaling analysis affirm that CNTs with low aspect ratio, thick walls and sparse distribution can maintain their vertical alignment. Our results can enrich a mechanistic understanding of the polymer melt infiltration process and offer guidelines to the facile large-scale manufacturing of the CNT-polymer filter membranes.

  14. Weed management using goats: Effects on water infiltration rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Goats are used increasingly for weed control, fire fuel reduction and ecological restoration. The high stocking rates typical of these applications have been reported to decrease the rate of water infiltration in goat pastures. The hypothesis that annual goat browsing for weed control decreases infi...

  15. Spatial distribution of pollution in an urban stormwater infiltration basin.

    PubMed

    Dechesne, Magali; Barraud, Sylvie; Bardin, Jean-Pascal

    2004-08-01

    Infiltration basins are frequently used for stormwater drainage. Because stormwater is polluted in highly toxic compounds, assessment of pollution retention by infiltration basins is necessary. Indeed, if basins are not effective in trapping pollution, deep soil and groundwater may be contaminated. This study's objective is to investigate soil pollution in infiltration basins: spatial distribution of soil pollution, optimisation of the number of soil samples and a contamination indicator are presented. It is part of a global project on long-term impact of stormwater infiltration on groundwater. Soil sampling was done on a basin in suburban Lyon (France). Samples were collected at different depths and analysed for nutrients, heavy metals, hydrocarbons and grain size. Pollutant concentrations decrease rapidly with depth while pH, mineralisation and grain size increase. Sustainable metal concentrations are reached at a 30-cm depth, even after 14 years of operation; hydrocarbon pollution is deeper. Principal component analysis shows how pollutants affect each level. The topsoil is different from other levels. Three specifically located points are enough to estimate the mass of pollution trapped by the basin with a 26% error. The proposed contamination indicator is calculated using either average level concentrations or maximum level concentrations. In both cases, the topsoil layer appears polluted but evaluation of lower levels is dependent on the choice of input concentrations.

  16. Parameter estimation and infiltration tests at the repeat facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, P.; Armstrong, P.; Winn, B.

    1983-11-01

    Work performed in the reconfigurable passive evaluation analysis and test (REPEAT) facility is reviewed. The physical characteristics of the building and the instrumentation are described. Collected data are discussed. Treatment of parameter estimation ensures with example calculations. Infiltration instrumentation and tests are described. Flow visualization studies are discussed.

  17. Effects of white grubs on soil water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Romero-López, A A; Rodríguez-Palacios, E; Alarcón-Gutiérrez, E; Geissert, D; Barois, I

    2015-04-01

    Water infiltration rates k were measured in mesocosms with soil and "white grubs" of Ancognatha falsa (Arrow) (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae). Three third instars of A. falsa and three adult earthworms Pontoscolex corethrurus were selected, weighted, and introduced into the mesocosms setting three treatments: soil + A. falsa, soil + P. corethrurus, and control (soil without any macroorganism). The experiment had a completely random design with four replicates per treatment (n = 4). The infiltration rates of soil matrix were assessed in each mesocosms with a minidisk tension infiltrometer. Six measurements were made along the experiment. Results showed that larvae of A. falsa promoted a higher water infiltration in the soil, compared to the control. On day 7, k values were similar among treatments, but k values after 28 days and up to 100 days were much higher in the A. falsa treatment (k = 0.00025 cm s(-1)) if compared to control (k = 0.00011 cm s(-1)) and P. corethrurus (k = 0.00008 cm s(-1)) treatments. The k values were significantly higher in the presence of larvae of A. falsa compared to the control and P. corethrurus treatments. The larvae of A. falsa are potential candidates for new assays on soil water infiltration with different tensions to evaluate the role of pores and holes created by the larvae on soils.

  18. Chemical Analysis for Chitin as a Measure of Fungal Infiltration of Cellulosic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    the addition of 50 n’.illiliters of I 2N hydrochloric acid). Store at .~lO0 C. (11) Bushnell-Haas medium (12) Glucosamine hydrochloride (I milliliter...Infiltration Cellu!.jsic Materials Fungus-Induced Deterioration Glucosamine A TRACT (Cl~ i~s ,.v.ra. ia. ~V ~~~~~a . y d Sd.niIl ~ By block ni b.,) A chemical...EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE 3. Approach to the Problem. Carry out laboratory experiments to investigate variables as: shelf life of stock glucosamine , digestion

  19. Acute lacunar infarcts in CLIPPERS: is the chronic infiltrative lymphocytic perivascular disease process to blame?

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Quencer, Robert

    2013-12-01

    CLIPPERS (chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids) is a recently described chronic inflammatory disorder involving the brainstem with characteristic imaging findings. Since it was originally described in 2002, only a handful of cases have been reported in the literature. We describe two additional cases of CLIPPERS with characteristic clinical and radiological findings. Besides the previously described MR findings, one of the cases also demonstrated multiple basal ganglia lacunar infarcts, a finding which has not been previously reported. We hypothesize that the lacunar infarcts are caused by this chronic infiltrative perivascular disease process.

  20. Acute Lacunar Infarcts in CLIPPERS: Is the Chronic Infiltrative Lymphocytic Perivascular Disease Process to Blame?

    PubMed Central

    Saigal, Gaurav; Quencer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Summary CLIPPERS (chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids) is a recently described chronic inflammatory disorder involving the brainstem with characteristic imaging findings. Since it was originally described in 2002, only a handful of cases have been reported in the literature. We describe two additional cases of CLIPPERS with characteristic clinical and radiological findings. Besides the previously described MR findings, one of the cases also demonstrated multiple basal ganglia lacunar infarcts, a finding which has not been previously reported. We hypothesize that the lacunar infarcts are caused by this chronic infiltrative perivascular disease process. PMID:24355180

  1. A loss-based, magnetic field sensor implemented in a ferrofluid infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Candiani, A.; Argyros, A.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Lwin, R.; Selleri, S.; Pissadakis, S.

    2014-03-17

    We report an in-fiber magnetic field sensor based on magneto-driven optical loss effects, while being implemented in a ferrofluid infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fiber. We demonstrate that magnetic field flux changes up to 2000 gauss can be detected when the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the fiber axis. In addition, the sensor exhibits high polarization sensitivity for the interrogated wavelengths, providing the possibility of both field flux and direction measurements. The underlying physical and guidance mechanisms of this sensing transduction are further investigated using spectrophotometric, light scattering measurements, and numerical simulations, suggesting photonic Hall effect as the dominant physical, transducing mechanism.

  2. Investigations of infiltration processes from flooded areas by column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrlok, U.; Bethge, E.; Golalipour, A.

    2009-04-01

    In case of inundation of flood plains during flood events there is an increased risk of groundwater contamination due to infiltration of increasingly polluted river water. Specifically in densely populated regions, this groundwater may be used as source for drinking water supply. For the evaluation of this a detailed quantitative understanding of the infiltration processes under such conditions is required. In this context the infiltration related to a flood event can be described by three phases. The first phase is defined by the saturation of the unsaturated soils. Within the second phase infiltration takes place under almost saturated conditions determined by the hydraulic load of the flood water level. The drainage of the soils due to falling groundwater table is characterizing the third phase. Investigations by soil columns gave a detailed insight into the infiltration processes caused by flooding. Inflow at the soil top was established by a fixed water table fed by a Mariotte bottle. Free outflow and a groundwater table were used as lower boundary condition. Inflow and outflow volume were monitored. The evolution of the matrix pressure was observed by micro-tensiometers installed at several depths within the soil column. The flow processes during phase one and two were characterized by a tracer test. Some of the experiments were repeated in order to study the influence of preliminary events. Main results were a difference in infiltration due to the lower boundary condition with regard to inflow rate, outflow dynamics and matrix pressure evolution which is directly related to the water content evolution. Further, the influence of preliminary events was different for the different boundary conditions. A replacement of pre-event water could be observed which was confirmed by volume balances calculated for the infiltration experiments. Although these water balances were almost closed significant dynamics of the matrix pressure remained in soil column in the

  3. Seismic tomography Technology for the Water Infiltration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. Descour

    2001-04-30

    NSA Engineering, Inc., conducted seismic tomography surveys in Niche No.3 in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and Alcove No.8 in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) cross drift as part of the Infiltration Experiment being conducted in Niche No.3. NSA Engineering is a direct support contractor to the Yucca Mountain Project. This report documents the work performed from August 14 through 30, 2000, prior to the beginning of the infiltration experiment. The objective of the seismic tomography survey was to investigate the flow path of water between access drifts and more specifically to (Kramer 2000): (1) Conduct a baseline seismic tomography survey prior to the infiltration experiment; (2) Produce 2-D and 3-D tomographic images of the rock volume between Alcove No.8 and Niche No.3; (3) Correlate tomography results with published structural and lithological features, and with other geophysical data such as ground penetrating radar (GPR); and (4) Results of this survey will form a baseline with which to compare subsequent changes to the rock mass. These changes may be as a result of the water infiltration tests that could be conducted in Alcove No.8 in 2001. The scope of this reported work is to use the velocity tomograms to: (a) assess the structures and lithologic features within the surveyed area and/or volume between the two access drifts; and (b) provide information on the structural state of the rock mass as inferred by the velocity signatures of the rock prior to the beginning of the infiltration experiment.

  4. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vanderborght, Jan; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2012-08-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is, the water content and pressure head are not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state behind the front. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macropores. Since flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the porous medium, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be directly linked to structural properties of the material. A critical question is how to define averaged state variables at the larger scale. We propose a novel approach based on flux-weighted averaging of pressure head, and compare its performance to alternative methods for averaging. Further, we suggest some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be related to morphological characteristics of infiltration fronts in quantitative terms. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We demonstrate our approach using numerical case studies for infiltration into two-dimensional heterogeneous media using three different structure models with distinct differences in connectivity. Our results indicate that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic structures that are elongated in the direction of flow enforce it. We observe a good agreement between front morphology and effective hydraulic non-equilibrium. A detailed comparison of averaged state variables with results from an upscaled model that includes hydraulic non-equilibrium outlines potential improvements in the description of non-equilibrium dynamics

  5. Development of a Test Cell to Evaluate Embankment Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, T. L.

    2002-02-25

    Envirocare of Utah, Inc. (Envirocare) has developed and constructed a test pad to evaluate potential infiltration through the designed cover system over the low-level radioactive waste disposal embankments incorporated at the facility. The general design of the test pad follows the recommendations set forth in the Alternative Cover Assessment Program (ACAP) that is currently funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess potential alternatives to conventional landfill cover designs. The bulk of the test pad is below grade with dimensions approximately 16 feet wide by 28 feet long. The base of the test pad is a lysimeter built to the same dimensions as compliance lysimeters within the disposal embankments at Envirocare. The lysimeter collects all liquids to a single low point and directs the liquids through monitoring instruments within a manhole outside the test pad. The lysimeter is constructed to simulate the ''top of waste'' condition in Envirocare's embankments; consequently, the top of the lysimeter is sloped at an angle of approximately 2.8 percent, the design top slope of the embankment. A replica of the embankment cover is constructed directly above the lysimeter. This cover is constructed exactly the same as final cover is constructed upon the waste disposal embankments, utilizing the same QA/QC measures. Permanent monitoring equipment has been placed during construction at specific intervals throughout the test pad. Monitoring equipment consists of water content reflectometers (WCRs), matric water potential sensors (heat dissipation units; HDUs), and temperature probes. The monitoring equipment provides cross-sectional data of the moisture content and temperatures throughout the constructed cover. Additionally, surface water runoff is collected through a drainage trough and measured in order to perform a water balance over the entire test pad. To aid in the assessment, data collected from the site meteorological stat ion will be used

  6. Infiltration under snow cover: Modeling approaches and predictive uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Jessica; Moeck, Christian; Brunner, Philip; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Groundwater recharge from snowmelt represents a temporal redistribution of precipitation. This is extremely important because the rate and timing of snowpack drainage has substantial consequences to aquifer recharge patterns, which in turn affect groundwater availability throughout the rest of the year. The modeling methods developed to estimate drainage from a snowpack, which typically rely on temporally-dense point-measurements or temporally-limited spatially-dispersed calibration data, range in complexity from the simple degree-day method to more complex and physically-based energy balance approaches. While the gamut of snowmelt models are routinely used to aid in water resource management, a comparison of snowmelt models' predictive uncertainties had previously not been done. Therefore, we established a snowmelt model calibration dataset that is both temporally dense and represents the integrated snowmelt infiltration signal for the Vers Chez le Brandt research catchment, which functions as a rather unique natural lysimeter. We then evaluated the uncertainty associated with the degree-day, a modified degree-day and energy balance snowmelt model predictions using the null-space Monte Carlo approach. All three melt models underestimate total snowpack drainage, underestimate the rate of early and midwinter drainage and overestimate spring snowmelt rates. The actual rate of snowpack water loss is more constant over the course of the entire winter season than the snowmelt models would imply, indicating that mid-winter melt can contribute as significantly as springtime snowmelt to groundwater recharge in low alpine settings. Further, actual groundwater recharge could be between 2 and 31% greater than snowmelt models suggest, over the total winter season. This study shows that snowmelt model predictions can have considerable uncertainty, which may be reduced by the inclusion of more data that allows for the use of more complex approaches such as the energy balance

  7. Depletion of enteric bacteria diminishes leukocyte infiltration following doxorubicin-induced small intestinal damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jacquelyn S.; King, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims While enteric bacteria have been shown to play a critical role in other forms of intestinal damage, their role in mediating the response to the chemotherapeutic drug Doxorubicin (Doxo) is unclear. In this study, we used a mouse model of intestinal bacterial depletion to evaluate the role enteric bacteria play in mediating Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and, more specifically, in mediating chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration following Doxo treatment. An understanding of this pathway may allow for development of intervention strategies to reduce chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage. Methods Mice were treated with (Abx) or without (NoAbx) oral antibiotics in drinking water for four weeks and then with Doxo. Jejunal tissues were collected at various time points following Doxo treatment and stained and analyzed for apoptosis, crypt damage and restitution, and macrophage and neutrophil number. In addition, RNA expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL1-β, IL-10) and cytokines (CCL2, CC7, KC) was assessed by qRT-PCR. Results In NoAbx mice Doxo-induced damage was associated with rapid induction of apoptosis in jejunal crypt epithelium and an increase weight loss and crypt loss. In addition, we observed an increase in immune-modulating chemokines CCL2, CCL7 and KC and infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils. In contrast, while still positive for induction of apoptosis following Doxo treatment, Abx mice showed neither the overall weight loss nor crypt loss seen in NoAbx mice nor the increased chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration. Conclusion Enteric bacteria play a critical role in Doxo-induced small intestinal damage and are associated with an increase in immune-modulating chemokines and cells. Manipulation of enteric bacteria or the damage pathway may allow for prevention or treatment of chemotherapy-induced small intestinal damage. PMID:28257503

  8. Observations on infiltration of silicon carbide compacts with an aluminium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    The melt infiltration of ceramic particulates permits an opportunity to observe such fundamental materials phenomena as nucleation, dynamic wetting and growth in constrained environments. Experimental observations are presented on the infiltration behavior and matrix microstructures that form when porous compacts of platelet-shaped single crystals of alpha- (hexagonal) silicon carbide are infiltrated with a liquid 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration process involved counter gravity infiltration of suitably tamped and preheated compacts of silicon carbide platelets under an external pressure in a special pressure chamber for a set period, then by solidification of the infiltrant metal in the interstices of the bed at atmospheric pressure.

  9. Infiltration/cure modeling of resin transfer molded composite materials using advanced fiber architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loos, Alfred C.; Weideman, Mark H.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Kranbuehl, David E.; Kinsley, Philip J.; Hart, Sean M.

    1991-01-01

    A model was developed which can be used to simulate infiltration and cure of textile composites by resin transfer molding. Fabric preforms were resin infiltrated and cured using model generated optimized one-step infiltration/cure protocols. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing (FDEMS) was used to monitor in situ resin infiltration and cure during processing. FDEMS measurements of infiltration time, resin viscosity, and resin degree of cure agreed well with values predicted by the simulation model. Textile composites fabricated using a one-step infiltration/cure procedure were uniformly resin impregnated and void free. Fiber volume fraction measurements by the resin digestion method compared well with values predicted using the model.

  10. Nutrient transport and transformation beneath an infiltration basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.; Rolston, D.E.; Bradner, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to examine nutrient transport and transformation beneath an infiltration basin used for the disposal of treated wastewater. Removal of nitrogen from infiltrating water by denitrification was negligible beneath the basin, probably because of subsurface aeration as a result of daily interruptions in basin loading. Retention of organic nitrogen in the upper 4.6 m of the unsaturated zone (water table depth of approximately 11 m) during basin loading resulted in concentrations of nitrate as much as 10 times that of the applied treated wastewater, following basin 'rest' periods of several weeks, which allowed time for mineralization and nitrification. Approximately 90% of the phosphorus in treated wastewater was removed within the upper 4.6 m of the subsurface, primarily by adsorption reactions, with abundant iron and aluminum oxyhydroxides occurring as soil coatings. A reduction in the flow rate of infiltrating water arriving at the water table may explain the accumulation of relatively coarse (>0.45 ??m), organic forms of nitrogen and phosphorus slightly below the water table. Mineralization and nitrification reactions at this second location of organic nitrogen accumulation contributed to concentrations of nitrate as much as three times that of the applied treated wastewater. Phosphorus, which accumulated below the water table, was immobilized by adsorption or precipitation reactions during basin rest periods.Field experiments were conducted to examine nutrient transport and transformation beneath an infiltration basin used for the disposal of treated wastewater. Removal of nitrogen from infiltrating water by denitrification was negligible beneath the basin, probably because of subsurface aeration as a result of daily interruptions in basin loading. Retention of organic nitrogen in the upper 4.6 m of the unsaturated zone (water table depth of approximately 11 m) during basin loading resulted in concentrations of nitrate as much as 10

  11. Vadose Zone Infiltration Rates from Sr isotope Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K.; Maher, K.; DePaolo, D. J.; DePaolo, D. J.; Conrad, M.

    2001-12-01

    Predicting infiltration rates and recharge through the vadose zone in arid regions is difficult and hence developing methods for the measurement of infiltration rates is important. We have been investigating the use of Sr isotope measurements for determining infiltration at the 200 Area plateau on the Hanford reservation in central Washington. In this context, infiltration affects the transport of contaminants to the water table as well as recharge of the groundwater system. Using Sr isotopes for this purpose requires drill core and water samples from the vadose zone, although leaches of the cores can substitute for water samples. Complementary information, including some constraints on regional recharge, can also be obtained using water samples from groundwater monitoring wells. The VZ method is based on the fact that the Sr isotope ratio of soil water just below the surface is often set by dissolution of aeolian material including carbonate, and this ratio is different from the average value in the deeper underlying vadose zone rock matrix. As water infiltrates, the Sr isotopic composition of the water changes toward the rock values as a result of Sr released from the rocks by weathering reactions. The rate of change with depth of the Sr isotope ratio of the vadose zone water is a function ultimately of q/R; the ratio of the infiltration flux (q) to the bulk rock weathering rate (R). Where it is possible to evaluate R, q can be estimated. As data accumulate it may be possible to improve the calibration of the method. At Hanford the vadose zone rock material is mostly unconsolidated sand, silt, and gravel of broadly granitic composition, which constitute the Hanford and Ringold formations. Annual precipitation is about 160 mm/yr. Drilling and coring of a ca. 70m hole to the water table in 1999 as part of the Hanford groundwater monitoring program, in a relatively undisturbed area of the site, allowed us to generate a unique Sr isotope data set. The Sr isotope

  12. Lingual electrotactile stimulation as an alternative sensory feedback pathway for brain-computer interface applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. Adam; Walton, Léo M.; Tyler, Mitch; Williams, Justin

    2012-08-01

    This article describes a new method of providing feedback during a brain-computer interface movement task using a non-invasive, high-resolution electrotactile vision substitution system. We compared the accuracy and movement times during a center-out cursor movement task, and found that the task performance with tactile feedback was comparable to visual feedback for 11 participants. These subjects were able to modulate the chosen BCI EEG features during both feedback modalities, indicating that the type of feedback chosen does not matter provided that the task information is clearly conveyed through the chosen medium. In addition, we tested a blind subject with the tactile feedback system, and found that the training time, accuracy, and movement times were indistinguishable from results obtained from subjects using visual feedback. We believe that BCI systems with alternative feedback pathways should be explored, allowing individuals with severe motor disabilities and accompanying reduced visual and sensory capabilities to effectively use a BCI.

  13. Effects of olanzapine on the elevation of macrophage infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in female rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingsheng; He, Meng; Deng, Chao; Wang, Hongqin; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2014-12-01

    The metabolic side-effects of olanzapine have undermined drug compliance and increased concern for this otherwise-effective treatment for schizophrenia. As obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with low-grade inflammation, and olanzapine-induced weight gain has three typical stages, the current study investigated the inflammatory effects of olanzapine in three treatment stages. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally with olanzapine (1 mg/kg three times daily) or vehicle for one week, two weeks, and five weeks. Olanzapine significantly increased body weight and white visceral fat deposition in all three treatment stages compared to control. Olanzapine enhanced average adipocyte size and level of macrophage infiltration in white adipose tissue (WAT) compared to control, with levels of macrophage infiltration increased over time. There was a high correlation between adipocyte size and macrophage infiltration rate. Olanzapine also caused increased macrophage infiltration in brown adipose tissue (BAT), but not liver. Additionally, pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 were upregulated by olanzapine in the hypothalamus, WAT, and BAT compared to control, but not the liver. Finally, plasma triglycerides were elevated by olanzapine compared to control, but not total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) or low density lipoprotein (LDL). These findings indicate that olanzapine-induced inflammation and adiposity are closely related, and that peripheral low-grade inflammation develops during olanzapine treatment.

  14. Changes in Stiffness of Resin-infiltrated Demineralized Dentin after Remineralization with a Bottom-up Biomimetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Li-sha; Huffman, Bradford P.; Arola, Dwayne D.; Kim, Young Kyung; Mai, Sui; Elsalanty, Mohammed E.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined changes in elastic modulus, mineral density and ultrastructure of resin-infiltrated dentin after biomimetic remineralization. Sixty demineralized dentin beams were infiltrated with Clearfil Tri-S Bond, One-Step or Prime&Bond NT. They were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for one week to maximize water sorption before determining the baseline elastic moduli. For each adhesive (N=20), half of the beams remained immersed in SBF (control). The rest were immersed in a biomimetic remineralization medium. The elastic moduli were measured weekly for 15 additional weeks. Representative remineralized specimens were evaluated with X-ray microtomography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The elastic moduli of control resin-infiltrated dentin remained consistently low, while those immersed in the biomimetic remineralization medium increased by 55–118% after 4-months. X-ray microtomography of the remineralized specimens revealed decreases in mineral density from the beam surface to the beam core that was indicative of external mineral aggregation and internal mineral deposition. Interfibrillar and intrafibrillar remineralization of resin-sparse intertubular dentin were seen under TEM together with remineralized peritubular dentin. Biomimetic remineralization occurs by diffusion of nanoprecursors and biomimetic analogs in completely demineralized resin-infiltrated dentin and proceeds without the contribution of materials released from a mineralized dentin base. PMID:19887126

  15. Immunohistochemical study of the local inflammatory infiltrate in spontaneous canine transmissible venereal tumour at different stages of growth.

    PubMed

    Pérez, J; Day, M J; Mozos, E

    1998-07-08

    In this study, the immunohistochemical distribution of CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD79 (B lymphocytes and plasma cells), IgG, IgM, IgA, IgG subclasses (IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4) L1 (macrophages) and MHC Class II antigen was analysed in the inflammatory infiltrates associated with spontaneous canine transmissible venereal tumours (CTVT) at different stages of growth. With all antibodies used, except IgM and IgA, the number of immunoreactive cells was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the infiltrate of CTVT undergoing spontaneous regression or with stable growth (14 cases), than in tumours undergoing progressive growth (nine cases). This result suggests that T lymphocytes in addition to B cells, plasma cells expressing IgG, IgG2 and IgG4, and macrophages participate in the effective immune response against CTVT and mediate spontaneous regression of the tumour. MHC Class II antigen was expressed by infiltrating lymphocytes and macrophages, and also by fibroblasts within and around the tumours. Class II was also expressed by a variable number of neoplastic cells, particularly those in regressing or stable tumours with a marked lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. This suggests that the expression of Class II by neoplastic cells is associated with the effective immune response and regression of CTVT.

  16. Nano-structured composite cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells via an infiltration/impregnation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhiyi; Xia, Changrong; Chen, Fanglin

    2010-02-12

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high temperature energy conversion devices working efficiently and environmental friendly. SOFC requires a functional cathode with high electrocatalytic activity for the electrochemical reduction of oxygen. The electrode is often fabricated at high temperature to achieve good bonding between the electrode and electrolyte. The high temperature not only limits material choice but also results in coarse particles with low electrocatalytic activity. Nano-structured electrodes fabricated at low temperature by an infiltration/impregnation technique have shown many advantages including superior activity and wider range of material choices. The impregnation technique involves depositing nanoparticle catalysts into a pre-sintered electrode backbone. Two basic types of nano-structures are developed since the electrode is usually a composite consists of an electrolyte and an electrocatalyst. One is infiltrating electronically conducting nano-catalyst into a single phase ionic conducting backbone, while the other is infiltrating ionically conducting nanoparticles into a single phase electronically conducting backbone. In addition, nanoparticles of the electrocatalyst, electrolyte and other oxides have also been infiltrated into mixed conducting backbones. These nano-structured cathodes are reviewed here regarding the preparation methods, their electrochemical performance, and stability upon thermal cycling.

  17. Thermal conductivity enhancement of laser induced graphene foam upon P3HT infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. K.; Luong, D. X.; Bougher, T. L.; Kalaitzidou, K.; Tour, J. M.; Cola, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Significant research has been dedicated to the exploration of high thermal conductivity polymer composite materials with conductive filler particles for use in heat transfer applications. However, poor particle dispersibility and interfacial phonon scattering have limited the effective composite thermal conductivity. Three-dimensional foams with high ligament thermal conductivity offer a potential solution to the two aforementioned problems but are traditionally fabricated through expensive and/or complex manufacturing methods. Here, laser induced graphene foams, fabricated through a simple and cost effective laser ablation method, are infiltrated with poly(3-hexylthiophene) in a step-wise fashion to demonstrate the impact of polymer on the thermal conductivity of the composite system. Surprisingly, the addition of polymer results in a drastic (250%) improvement in material thermal conductivity, enhancing the graphene foam's thermal conductivity from 0.68 W/m-K to 1.72 W/m-K for the fully infiltrated composite material. Graphene foam density measurements and theoretical models are utilized to estimate the effective ribbon thermal conductivity as a function of polymer filling. Here, it is proposed that the polymer solution acts as a binding material, which draws graphene ligaments together through elastocapillary coalescence and bonds these ligaments upon drying, resulting in greatly reduced contact resistance within the foam and an effective thermal conductivity improvement greater than what would be expected from the addition of polymer alone.

  18. Immunophenotypic characterization of lymphoid cell infiltrates in vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Sosa, S; Aguirre-Lombardo, M; Jimenez-Brito, G; Ruiz-Argüelles, A

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of vitiligo is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the nature of lymphoid cells infiltrating depigmented areas of skin in vitiligo. Immunochemical procedures were carried out in biopsies from 20 patients with active lesions to search for cells expressing CD1a, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20, CD25, CD30, CD56, CD68 and CD79a. Results indicate that early lesions are infiltrated mainly by dendritic cells, whereas older lesions display significantly lower proportions of these cells and increased percentages of mature T cells. This finding might suggest that the autoimmune reactivity towards melanocyte antigens might be T cell-dependent and antigen-driven. It is possible that a non-immune offence of melanocytes is responsible for the exposure of intracellular antigens, while autoreactivity might be a secondary, self-perpetuating mechanism. PMID:23607858

  19. Integrated modelling for the evaluation of infiltration effects.

    PubMed

    Schulz, N; Baur, R; Krebs, P

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study is the estimation of the potential benefits of sewer pipe rehabilitation for the performance of the drainage system and the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) as well as for the receiving water quality. The relation of sewer system status and the infiltration rate is assessed based on statistical analysis of 470 km of CCTV (Closed Circuit Television) inspected sewers of the city of Dresden. The potential reduction of infiltration rates and the consequent performance improvements of the urban wastewater system are simulated as a function of rehabilitation activities in the network. The integrated model is applied to an artificial system with input from a real sewer network. In this paper, the general design of the integrated model and its data requirements are presented. For an exemplary study, the consequences of the simulations are discussed with respect to the prioritisation of rehabilitation activities in the network.

  20. Post-granulite facies fluid infiltration in the Adirondack Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.; Valley, J.W.

    1988-06-01

    Granulite facies lithologies from the Adirondack Mountains of New York contain alteration assemblages composed dominantly of calcite +/- chlorite +/- sericite. These assemblages document fluid infiltration at middle to upper crustal levels. Cathodoluminescence of samples from the Marcy anorthosite massif indicates that the late fluid infiltration is more widespread than initially indicated by transmitted-light petrography alone. Samples that appear unaltered in transmitted light show extensive anastomosing veins of calcite (< 0.05 mm wide) along grain boundaries, in crosscutting fractures, and along mineral cleavages. The presence of the retrograde calcite documents paleopermeability in crystalline rocks and is related to the formation of high-density CO/sub 2/-rich fluid inclusions. Recognition of this process has important implications for studies of granulite genesis and the geophysical properties of the crust.

  1. Real Time Electrical Monittoring of the Soil Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losinno, B.; Sainato, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Infiltration into the soil plays a key role in the agricultural field. Standard methodologies to determine basic infiltration rate are altered by the presence of preferential flow pathways in the soil. At intensive livestock farms, previous studies showed that in areas with high stocking rates and consequently high levels of trampling, both the basic infiltration rate measured in the field as a field such as saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) measured in laboratory had values significantly lower than those obtained in the areas without animals. Therefore, the evaluation of the infiltration process as an entry of pollutants into the profile is of importance in determining indicators of vulnerability to groundwater contamination. Geoelectrical methodology was used in combination with tracers to study the movement of water flow. A salty solution was used as tracer as it progresses along the profile. It is assumed that the water flow rate is similar to that of the applied solution. Geolelctric surveys can measure the apparent electrical resistivity inverse of the ECa, apparent electrical conductivity) in real time and thus determine the direction and speed of water flow through the profile. The aim of this study was to detect and characterize potential preferential flow pathways, comparing sectors where the high trampling by animals has generated high compaction, with areas without animals. We chose two sites: one located under high trampling at path between the pens of a feedlot placed at a lower position which receives runoff from feedlots. The background site was chosen at a pasture plot, with sporadic presence of animals. The soil is silty-loamy. In each of the sites sprinkler irrigation was performed in a square of 4 m x 4 m with saline solution of potassium bromide (concentration 5 g / l). After the irrigation, dipole - dipole survey was done with a line of stainless steel electrodes spaced 20 cm. while the flow is penetrating into the ground. Two dimension

  2. Cognition and resective surgery for diffuse infiltrative glioma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Klein, Martin; Duffau, Hugues; De Witt Hamer, Philip C

    2012-06-01

    Compared to classical oncological outcome measures such as time to progression and survival, the importance of cognitive functioning in patients with diffuse infiltrative brain tumors has only recently been recognized. Apart from the relatively low incidence and the invariably fatal outcome of gliomas, the general assumption that cognitive assessment is time-consuming and burdensome contributes to this notion. Our understanding of the effects of brain surgery on cognition, for instance, is largely based on studies in surgical patients with refractory epilepsy, with only a limited number of studies in surgical patients with gliomas. The impact of other factors affecting cognition in glioma patients such as direct tumor effects, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and medical treatment, including anti-epileptic drugs and steroids, have been studied more extensively. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of cognition in patients with diffuse infiltrative gliomas and the impact of resective surgery as well as other tumor and treatment-related factors.

  3. Ordered nanoscale domains by infiltration of block copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Seth B.; Elam, Jeffrey; Tseng, Yu-Chih; Peng, Qing

    2016-11-08

    A method of preparing tunable inorganic patterned nanofeatures by infiltration of a block copolymer scaffold having a plurality of self-assembled periodic polymer microdomains. The method may be used sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS), related to atomic layer deposition (ALD). The method includes selecting a metal precursor that is configured to selectively react with the copolymer unit defining the microdomain but is substantially non-reactive with another polymer unit of the copolymer. A tunable inorganic features is selectively formed on the microdomain to form a hybrid organic/inorganic composite material of the metal precursor and a co-reactant. The organic component may be optionally removed to obtain an inorganic features with patterned nanostructures defined by the configuration of the microdomain.

  4. Infiltrating lipomatosis of the face: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Aadithya B.; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Kumar, Priya; Arora, Shelly; Aggarwal, Neha; Sultana, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Infiltrating lipomatosis of the face is a very rare entity which is characterized by the collection of non-encapsulated mature adipocytes infiltrating local tissues, resulting in craniofacial deformities. Psychomotor development of the patients is normal, esthetics often being the primary concern to seek treatment. The presentation is always unilateral with hypertrophy of hard and soft structures on the affected side of the face. The pathogenesis of the condition is unclear. This condition shows a wide phenotypic range, uncertain prognosis with high rates of recurrence after surgery, and variable post-op cosmetic improvement. The condition shows no gender predilection, with most of the cases presenting in and beyond the second decade of life. Here, we present a series of four cases presenting in varying age groups with history of recurrence in three cases. PMID:23633877

  5. Dupuytren Disease Infiltrating a Full-Thickness Skin Graft.

    PubMed

    Wade, Ryckie George; Igali, Laszlo; Figus, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Although the role of the skin in the development and propagation of Dupuytren disease remains unclear, dermofasciectomy and full-thickness skin grafting (FTSG) appears to delay recurrence. In 2011, a 71-year-old, left-handed man presented with recurrent Dupuytren disease in the dominant hand. In 1991, he originally underwent a primary dermofasciectomy and FTSG for Dupuytren disease involving the palmar skin. Twenty years later, the left middle finger was drawn into flexion by a recurrent cord, and the old graft and adjacent palmar skin were clinically involved by fibromatosis. We performed a revision dermofasciectomy and FTSG. Microscopic analysis of the excised graft demonstrated dense infiltration of the entire skin graft by Dupuytren disease, with areas of active and burnt-out fibromatosis distinct from hypertrophic scarring. This report of Dupuytren fibromatosis infiltrating a skin graft raises questions about the pathophysiology of Dupuytren disease.

  6. Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N.

    1996-12-01

    In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

  7. Capillarity in isothermal infiltration of alumina fiber preforms with aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, V.J.; Mortensen, A. . Dept. of Materials Science); Compton, L.M. )

    1994-10-01

    Models derived in petroleum engineering and soil science for flow of two immiscible fluids in a porous medium are extended to the infiltration of ceramic preforms by a liquid metal. SAFFIL alumina fiber preforms are infiltrated with an aluminum matrix in a series of interrupted unidirectional and isothermal experiments at various low applied pressures, to measure profiles of the volume fraction of metal along the length of the preforms. Comparison of experimental data with theory reveals the existence of a pressure-dependent incubation time for wetting of the alumina preforms by molten aluminum at 973 K. If this incubation time is taken into account, experimental curves of metal distribution are well predicted by theory, confirming the validity of the models after initiation of flow.

  8. Gravity-driven infiltration instability in initially dry nonhorizontal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J. ); Wheatcraft, S.W. )

    1994-09-01

    Experimental evidence demonstrating gravity-driven wetting front instability in an initially dry natural fracture is presented. An experimental approach is developed using a transparent analog rough-walled fracture to explore gravity-driven instability. Three different boundary conditions were observed to produce unstable fronts in the analog fracture: application of fluid at less than the imbibition capacity, inversion of a density-stratified system, and redistribution of flow at the cessation of stable infiltration. The redistribution boundary condition (analogous to the cessation of ponded infiltration) is considered in a series of systematic experiments. Gravitational gradient and magnitude of the fluid input were varied during experimentation. Qualitative observations imply that finger development is strongly correlated to the structure of the imbibition front at the onset of flow redistribution. Measurements of finger width is compared to theoretical predictions based on linear stability theory. 28 refs., 11 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Anion Absorption by Etiolated Wheat Leaves after Vacuum Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, I. R.; Macklon, A. E. S.

    1972-01-01

    Chloride and phosphate uptake by leaf segments of green and etiolated 7-day-old seedlings of Triticum aestivum L. cultivar Capelle is enhanced by light. In the range from 1.0 to 10 millimolar KCl, maximal rates of uptake were obtained with 1.5-millimeter segments. Above 1.5 millimeters, ion diffusion through the cut edge was the rate-limiting factor, uptake being proportional to the amount of cut edge, but vacuum infiltration of the tissue overcame this limitation, allowing uptake to be independent of segment length. No deleterious effects of vacuum infiltration were observed, and it is suggested that the technique offers a convenient alternative to existing methods in the study of foliar absorption. PMID:16657949

  10. Scaling relations in the diffusive infiltration in fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2016-11-01

    In a recent work on fluid infiltration in a Hele-Shaw cell with the pore-block geometry of Sierpinski carpets (SCs), the area filled by the invading fluid was shown to scale as F ˜tn , with n <1 /2 , thus providing a macroscopic realization of anomalous diffusion [Filipovitch et al., Water Resour. Res. 52, 5167 (2016), 10.1002/2016WR018667]. The results agree with simulations of a diffusion equation with constant pressure at one of the borders of those fractals, but the exponent n is very different from the anomalous exponent ν =1 /DW of single-particle diffusion in the same fractals (DW is the random-walk dimension). Here we use a scaling approach to show that those exponents are related as n =ν (DF-DB) , where DF and DB are the fractal dimensions of the bulk and the border from which diffusing particles come, respectively. This relation is supported by accurate numerical estimates in two SCs and in two generalized Menger sponges (MSs), in which we performed simulations of single-particle random walks (RWs) with a rigid impermeable border and of a diffusive infiltration model in which that border is permanently filled with diffusing particles. This study includes one MS whose external border is also fractal. The exponent relation is also consistent with the recent simulational and experimental results on fluid infiltration in SCs, and explains the approximate quadratic dependence of n on DF in these fractals. We also show that the mean-square displacement of single-particle RWs has log-periodic oscillations, whose periods are similar for fractals with the same scaling factor in the generator (even with different embedding dimensions), which is consistent with the discrete scale invariance scenario. The roughness of a diffusion front defined in the infiltration problem also shows this type of oscillation, which is enhanced in fractals with narrow channels between large lacunas.

  11. Scale-up and modeling of forced chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Starr, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    The forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process has been scaled-up from a maximum of 7.6 cm dia. disk to fabrication of 24 cm dia. disks, 1.6 cm in thickness. The components are turbine rotor subelements produced from polar weave Tyranno fibers preforms. The disks were subjected to non-destructive testing and spin-tested to high rpm. The processing conditions were modeled with the GTCVI code to aid in optimization.

  12. A Study of Healthy Adults' Oro-lingual Effort During Swallowing Using OroPress, A New Portable Wireless Measurement Tool.

    PubMed

    Manning, Molly; Casey, Vincent; Conway, Richard; Saunders, Jean; Perry, Alison

    2016-06-01

    OroPress is a new, low profile, portable, wireless tool that enables stable measurement of tongue pressure during isometric ('pushing') tasks and, more importantly, during swallowing. Using this tool, a pressure-time product, the OroPress Absolute (OPA) parameter, has been developed as a representative measure of lingual effort during swallowing. In a sample of 57 adults aged 20-80+ years, of both sexes and without dysphagia, tongue-palate contact pressures generated while swallowing 5 ml, 10 ml of water and 5 ml custard, were recorded using OroPress. Data were examined for effects of gender, age and bolus condition (consistency, volume). OPA was tested for stability of measure and then correlated with the criterion standard, peak pressure recorded when swallowing (PMax(SW)). Swallowing pressures (PMax(SW), OPA) were positively correlated with bolus viscosity. No significant age and gender differences were found. Excellent stability of measure (test, re-test reliability) was demonstrated and OPA was positively correlated with PMax(SW). OroPress produces valid, reliable and reproducible measurements and improved accuracy of oro-lingual pressure measurement during swallowing. With such a tool, interventions/therapy can be proactive and principled as outcomes are better validated. To enhance specificity of intervention, measurement parameters need to reflect the pressure and temporal qualities of swallow function. OPA has the potential to describe differences in effort made, and ability to sustain pressures, in adults without dysphagia. The results of these studies will enable more accurate examination of the oral phase of swallowing as we establish this highly accurate sensor as a criterion standard for oro-lingual pressure measurement in clinical populations.

  13. Effects of voltage perturbation of the lingual receptive field on chorda tympani responses to Na+ and K+ salts in the rat: implications for gustatory transduction

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Taste sensory responses from the chorda tympani nerve of the rat were recorded with the lingual receptive field under current or voltage clamp. Consistent with previous results (Ye, Q., G. L. Heck, and J. A. DeSimone. 1993. Journal of Neurophysiology. 70:167-178), responses to NaCl were highly sensitive to lingual voltage clamp condition. This can be attributed to changes in the electrochemical driving force for Na+ ions through apical membrane transducer channels in taste cells. In contrast, responses to KCl over the concentration range 50-500 mM were insensitive to the voltage clamp condition of the receptive field. These results indicate the absence of K+ conductances comparable to those for Na+ in the apical membranes of taste cells. This was supported by the strong anion dependence of K salt responses. At zero current clamp, the potassium gluconate (KGlu) threshold was > 250 mM, and onset kinetics were slow (12 s to reach half-maximal response). Faster onset kinetics and larger responses to KGlu occurred at negative voltage clamp (-50 mV). This indicates that when K+ ion is transported as a current, and thereby uncoupled from gluconate mobility, its rate of delivery to the K+ taste transducer increases. Analysis of conductances shows that the paracellular pathway in the lingual epithelium is 28 times more permeable to KCl than to KGlu. Responses to KGlu under negative voltage clamp were not affected by agents that are K+ channel blockers in other systems. The results indicate that K salt taste transduction is under paracellular diffusion control, which limits chemoreception efficiency. We conclude that rat K salt taste occurs by means of a subtight junctional transducer for K+ ions with access limited by anion mobility. The data suggest that this transducer is not cation selective which also accounts for the voltage and amiloride insensitive part of the response to NaCl. PMID:7876827

  14. Is the lingual forming part of the incisor a structural entity? Evidences from the fragilitas ossium (fro/fro) mouse mutation and the TGFbeta1 overexpressing transgenic strain.

    PubMed

    Opsahl, S; Septier, D; Aubin, I; Guenet, J-L; Sreenath, T; Kulkarni, A; Vermelin, L; Goldberg, M

    2005-02-01

    Our objective was to study the teeth of a mutant mice fro/fro that display severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta. One day and 8 week-old fro/fro and +/fro heterozygote mice (wild type, WT) were processed for light and scanning electron microscopy. The genetic defect, shown to be located on chromosome 8, induced alveolar bone and teeth hypomineralisation. Due to defective cell proliferation in the fro/fro, the distal growth of the mandibular incisors was impaired. Immunolabelling revealed an increase of chondroitin/dermatan sulphate, whereas no difference was detected in dental tissues for decorin and biglycan. Amelogenin expression was decreased in the incisor and enhanced in the molar. Dentin sialoprotein was below the level of detection in the fro/fro, whereas osteonectin and osteopontin were unchanged. The main target of the mutation was seen in the lingual part of the incisor near the apex where dentine formation was delayed. In the molars, bulbous roots with obliteration of the pulp chamber were seen. In the TGFbeta1 overexpressing mice, the lingual root-analogue part of the incisor was missing. In the molar, short roots, circumpulpal dentine of the osteodentine type and pulp obliteration were seen. It may be noted that, although the mutant and transgenic strains mutations are two different genetic alterations not related to the same defective gene, in both cases the expression of the dentin sialoprotein is altered. Altogether, the present data suggest that the lingual forming part of the incisor seems to be an anatomical entity bearing its own biological specificities.

  15. Movement of water infiltrated from a recharge basin to wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Leary, David R.; Izbicki, John A.; Moran, Jean E.; Meeth, Tanya; Nakagawa, Brandon; Metzger, Loren; Bonds, Chris; Singleton, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Local surface water and stormflow were infiltrated intermittently from a 40-ha basin between September 2003 and September 2007 to determine the feasibility of recharging alluvial aquifers pumped for public supply, near Stockton, California. Infiltration of water produced a pressure response that propagated through unconsolidated alluvial-fan deposits to 125 m below land surface (bls) in 5 d and through deeper, more consolidated alluvial deposits to 194 m bls in 25 d, resulting in increased water levels in nearby monitoring wells. The top of the saturated zone near the basin fluctuates seasonally from depths of about 15 to 20 m. Since the start of recharge, water infiltrated from the basin has reached depths as great as 165 m bls. On the basis of sulfur hexafluoride tracer test data, basin water moved downward through the saturated alluvial deposits until reaching more permeable zones about 110 m bls. Once reaching these permeable zones, water moved rapidly to nearby pumping wells at rates as high as 13 m/d. Flow to wells through highly permeable material was confirmed on the basis of flowmeter logging, and simulated numerically using a two-dimensional radial groundwater flow model. Arsenic concentrations increased slightly as a result of recharge from 2 to 6 μg/L immediately below the basin. Although few water-quality issues were identified during sample collection, high groundwater velocities and short travel times to nearby wells may have implications for groundwater management at this and at other sites in heterogeneous alluvial aquifers.

  16. Reducing chemical vapour infiltration time for ceramic matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Timms, L. A.; Westby, W.; Prentice, C.; Jaglin, D.; Shatwell, R. A.; Binner, J. G. P.

    2001-02-01

    Conventional routes to producing ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require the use of high temperatures to sinter the individual ceramic particles of the matrix together. Sintering temperatures are typically much higher than the upper temperature limits of the fibres. This paper details preliminary work carried out on producing a CMC via chemical vapour infiltration (CVI), a process that involves lower processing temperatures, thus avoiding fibre degradation. The CVI process has been modified and supplemented in an attempt to reduce the CVI process time and to lower the cost of this typically expensive process. To this end microwave-enhanced CVI (MECVI) has been chosen, along with two alternative pre-infiltration steps: electrophoretic infiltration and vacuum bagging. The system under investigation is based on silicon carbide fibres within a silicon carbide matrix (SiCf/SiC). The results demonstrate that both approaches result in an enhanced initial density and a consequent significant reduction in the time required for the MECVI processing step. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used as a non-destructive, density evaluation technique. Initial results indicate that the presence of the SiC powder in the pre-form changes the deposition profile during the MECVI process.

  17. Pulmonary Infiltrates in Immunosuppressed Patients: Analysis of a Diagnostic Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Danés, Cristina; González-Martín, Julián; Pumarola, Tomàs; Rañó, Ana; Benito, Natividad; Torres, Antoni; Moreno, Asunción; Rovira, Montserrat; Puig de la Bellacasa, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    A diagnostic protocol was started to study the etiology of pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients. The diagnostic yields of the different techniques were analyzed, with special emphasis on the importance of the sample quality and the role of rapid techniques in the diagnostic strategy. In total, 241 patients with newly developed pulmonary infiltrates within a period of 19 months were included. Noninvasive or invasive evaluation was performed according to the characteristics of the infiltrates. Diagnosis was achieved in 202 patients (84%); 173 patients (72%) had pneumonia, and specific etiologic agents were found in 114 (66%). Bronchoaspirate and bronchoalveolar lavage showed the highest yields, either on global analysis (23 of 35 specimens [66%] and 70 of 134 specimens [52%], respectively) or on analysis of each type of pneumonia. A tendency toward better results with optimal-quality samples was observed, and a statistically significant difference was found in sputum bacterial culture. Rapid diagnostic tests yielded results in 71 of 114 (62.2%) diagnoses of etiological pneumonia. PMID:12037077

  18. Movement of water infiltrated from a recharge basin to wells.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, David R; Izbicki, John A; Moran, Jean E; Meeth, Tanya; Nakagawa, Brandon; Metzger, Loren; Bonds, Chris; Singleton, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Local surface water and stormflow were infiltrated intermittently from a 40-ha basin between September 2003 and September 2007 to determine the feasibility of recharging alluvial aquifers pumped for public supply, near Stockton, California. Infiltration of water produced a pressure response that propagated through unconsolidated alluvial-fan deposits to 125 m below land surface (bls) in 5 d and through deeper, more consolidated alluvial deposits to 194 m bls in 25 d, resulting in increased water levels in nearby monitoring wells. The top of the saturated zone near the basin fluctuates seasonally from depths of about 15 to 20 m. Since the start of recharge, water infiltrated from the basin has reached depths as great as 165 m bls. On the basis of sulfur hexafluoride tracer test data, basin water moved downward through the saturated alluvial deposits until reaching more permeable zones about 110 m bls. Once reaching these permeable zones, water moved rapidly to nearby pumping wells at rates as high as 13 m/d. Flow to wells through highly permeable material was confirmed on the basis of flowmeter logging, and simulated numerically using a two-dimensional radial groundwater flow model. Arsenic concentrations increased slightly as a result of recharge from 2 to 6 µg/L immediately below the basin. Although few water-quality issues were identified during sample collection, high groundwater velocities and short travel times to nearby wells may have implications for groundwater management at this and at other sites in heterogeneous alluvial aquifers.

  19. Detailed analysis of inflammatory cell infiltration in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Väyrynen, J P; Tuomisto, A; Klintrup, K; Mäkelä, J; Karttunen, T J; Mäkinen, M J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Higher-grade inflammatory infiltrate is a promising marker for better prognosis in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the knowledge on the interrelationships between different inflammatory cells and classifications is fragmentary. Methods: We analysed the densities of eight types of inflammatory cells in a prospectively recruited group of 117 CRC patients and determined their interrelationships and contributions to Klintrup–Mäkinen (K–M) score of overall peritumoural inflammation. We characterised the inflammatory infiltrate in relation to stage and recurrences in 24-month follow-up. Results: There were high positive correlations between the inflammatory cell densities, with the exception of mast cells and CD1a+ immature dendritic cells. High K–M score associated with high peri- and intratumoural densities of CD3+, CD8+, CD68+, CD83+, and FoxP3+ cells and neutrophils. Advanced stage associated with low K–M score, as well as low CD3+, CD8+, CD83+, and FoxP3+ cell counts, of which low K–M score, low CD3+ T-cell count, and low FoxP3+ T-cell count were linked to higher recurrence rate. Conclusion: The density of CRC inflammatory infiltrate declines as stage advances. Especially, low K–M score and low T-cell counts predict higher recurrence rate. The high positive correlations between the individual inflammatory markers support the value of overall inflammatory reaction scoring. PMID:24008661

  20. The most painful site of maxillary anterior infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Roohollah; Nazari, Hesamedin; Bolourchi, Peik; Khazaei, Saber; Parirokh, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the most painful site of infiltration injection in the anterior part of maxilla. Materials and Methods: This single-blinded clinical trial was conducted on thirty healthy volunteers. The participants received three maxillary infiltrations injected at the region of central and lateral incisors as well as canines at three separated appointments with a 2-week interval. The outcome variable was pain that measured immediately after needle insertion (time = 0) and during injection of anesthetic solution in 5, 30, and 55 s by a visual analog scale. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16 using Friedman test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in terms of needle insertion pain and during injection (time = 0, 5, 30, and 55 s) (P = 0.319, P = 0.849, P = 0.627, and P = 0.939, respectively) in the three injection sites. Conclusion: The pain intensity of infiltration was not associated with injection sites in the anterior maxilla. PMID:28182062