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Sample records for additional mechanistic insights

  1. Helical-Peptide-Catalyzed Enantioselective Michael Addition Reactions and Their Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Atsushi; Umeno, Tomohiro; Doi, Mitsunobu; Akagawa, Kengo; Kudo, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-08-05

    Helical peptide foldamer catalyzed Michael addition reactions of nitroalkane or dialkyl malonate to α,β-unsaturated ketones are reported along with the mechanistic considerations of the enantio-induction. A wide variety of α,β-unsaturated ketones, including β-aryl, β-alkyl enones, and cyclic enones, were found to be catalyzed by the helical peptide to give Michael adducts with high enantioselectivities (up to 99%). On the basis of X-ray crystallographic analysis and depsipeptide study, the amide protons, N(2)-H and N(3)-H, at the N terminus in the α-helical peptide catalyst were crucial for activating Michael donors, while the N-terminal primary amine activated Michael acceptors through the formation of iminium ion intermediates.

  2. To be or not to be butterfly: New mechanistic insights in the Aza-Michael asymmetric addition of lithium (R)-N-benzyl-N-(α-methylbenzyl)amide.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Carlos T; Díez, David; Garrido, Narciso M

    2014-09-30

    The asymmetric Aza-Michael addition of homochiral lithium benzylamides to α,β-unsaturated esters represents an extended protocol to obtain enantioenriched β-amino esters. An exhaustive mechanistic revision of the originally proposed mechanism is reported, developing a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics protocol for the asymmetric Aza-Michael reaction of homochiral lithium benzylamides. Explicit and implicit solvent schemes were considered, together with a proper account of long-range dispersion forces, evaluated through a density functional theory benchmark of different functionals. Theoretical results showed that the diastereoselectivity is mainly controlled by the N-α-methylbenzyl moiety placing, deriving a Si/Re 99:1 diastereoselective ratio, in good agreement with reported experimental results. The main transition state geometries are two transition state conformers in a "V-stacked" orientation of the amide's phenyl rings, differing in the tetrahydrofuran molecule arrangement coordinated to the metal center. Extensive conformational sampling and quantum-level refinement give reasonable good speed/accuracy results, allowing this protocol to be extended to other similar Aza-Michael reaction systems.

  3. Ligand interactions with galactose oxidase: mechanistic insights.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, M M; Whittaker, J W

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between galactose oxidase and small molecules have been explored using a combination of optical absorption, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to detect complex formation and characterize the products. Anions bind directly to the cupric center in both active and inactive galactose oxidase, converting to complexes with optical and EPR spectra that are distinctly different from those of the starting aquo enzyme. Azide binding is coupled to stoichiometric proton uptake by the enzyme, reflecting the generation of a strong base (pKa > 9) in the active site anion adduct. At low temperature, the aquo enzyme converts to a form that exhibits the characteristic optical and EPR spectra of an anion complex, apparently reflecting deprotonation of the coordinated water. Anion binding results in a loss of the optical transition arising from coordinated tyrosine, implying displacement of the axial tyrosine ligand on forming the adduct. Nitric oxide binds to galactose oxidase, forming a specific complex exhibiting an unusual EPR spectrum with all g values below 2. The absence of Cu splitting in this spectrum and the observation that the cupric EPR signal from the active site metal ion is not significantly decreased in the complex suggest a nonmetal interaction site for NO in galactose oxidase. These results have been interpreted in terms of a mechanistic scheme where substrate binding displaces a tyrosinate ligand from the active site cupric ion, generating a base that may serve to deprotonate the coordinated hydroxyl group of the substrate, activating it for oxidation. The protein-NO interactions may probe a nonmetal O2 binding site in this enzyme. PMID:8386015

  4. Behavioral and mechanistic insight into rodent empathy.

    PubMed

    Sivaselvachandran, Sivaani; Acland, Erinn L; Abdallah, Salsabil; Martin, Loren J

    2016-06-14

    Empathy is a psychological construct that allows individuals to understand and share the emotions of others. The ability to share emotional states relies on basic social mechanisms, such as mimicry and emotional contagion, which are considered building blocks for empathy. Mimicking another's emotional or physical state is essential for successful social interactions and is found in a number of animal species. For the current review we focus on emotional state sharing in rodents, a core feature of empathy that is often measured using pain and fear as proxies; we also discuss prosociality in rodents. The evidence for empathy in rodents shows that rats and mice consistently imitate arousal states and behaviors of conspecifics and will even sacrifice personal gain to relieve the distress of a conspecific. These behaviors support basic processes that are crucial for the survival of individual animals and give us insight into the neural mechanisms that govern empathy-related behaviors.

  5. Mechanistic Insights of Vitamin D Anticancer Effects.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingyu; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is a secosteroid hormone that regulates many biological functions in addition to its classical role in maintaining calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Vitamin D deficiency appears to predispose individuals to increased risk of developing a number of cancers. Compelling epidemiological and experimental evidence supports a role for vitamin D in cancer prevention and treatment in many types of cancers. Preclinical studies show that 1,25D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, and its analogs have antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo through multiple mechanisms including the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and the suppression of inflammation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. 1,25D3 also potentiates the effect of chemotherapeutic agents and other agents in the combination treatment. In this review, the antitumor effects of 1,25D3 and the potential underlying mechanisms will be discussed. The current findings support the application of 1,25D3 in cancer prevention and treatment.

  6. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery. PMID:25981301

  7. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-09-15

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery.

  8. Mechanistic insights into acyclovir-polyethylene glycol 20000 binary dispersions

    PubMed Central

    Venkateskumar, Krishnamoorthy; Parasuraman, Subramani; Gunasunderi, Raju; Sureshkumar, Krishnan; Nayak, M. Muralidhar; Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Kassen, Khoo; Kai, Heng Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to provide a mechanistic insight into solubility enhancement and dissolution of acyclovir (ACY) by polyethylene glycol20000 (PEG20000). Materials and Methods: Solid dispersions with differing ratios of drug (ACY) and carrier (PEG20000) were prepared and evaluated by phase solubility, in vitro release studies, kinetic analysis, in situ perfusion, and in vitro permeation studies. Solid state characterization was also done by Powder X-Ray Diffraction (PXRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis and surface morphology was assessed by Polarizing Microscopic Image (PMI) analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) analysis. Results: Thermodynamic parameters proved the solubilization effect of carrier. The aqueous solubility and dissolution of ACY were increased in all samples. Formation of solid solution, crystallinity reduction, and absence of interaction between drug and carrier was proved by XRD, DSC, and FTIR analysis. The particle size reduction and change in surface morphology were confirmed by SEM and AFM and analysis. The permeation coefficient and amount of drug diffused was higher in samples as compared to ACY. The stability was high in dispersions, and it was proved by NMR analysis. Conclusion: The mechanical insights into the enhancement of solubility and dissolution could be used as a platform to improve the aqueous solubility for other poor water soluble drugs. PMID:28123988

  9. Human endotoxemia: a model for mechanistic insight and therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Stephen F

    2005-12-01

    The diversity of phenotypic manifestations, comorbidities, and therapeutic algorithms in patients with severe inflammation have confounded efforts to translate mechanistic insights from the bench top to the bedside. This dilemma has negatively impacted upon many therapeutic interventions that exhibited seemingly well-reasoned preclinical portfolios. Prudence urges the assessment of potent immunoregulatory therapies, wherever possible, in models that replicate the clinical phenotype absent overt manifestations of genetically or environmentally modified processes. The healthy human model of endotoxin administration (systemic or endobronchial) provides such an opportunity and has been used to great advantage for gaining insight into mechanisms of disease and for determination of therapeutic signal strength. When thoughtfully interpreted, the model may provide proof of principle as well as lessen the unpredictability of clinical responses. Although the broad characteristics of this model are well described in the literature, it is recognized that this model does not fully replicate the magnitude of initial inflammatory stress nor the latent spectrum of inflammation/sepsis-inducible organ system pathologies. Nevertheless, the similarities between the early, transient clinical phenotype, inducible physiochemical change, and biochemical pathway activation of this model to the early hyperdynamic phase of resuscitated injury and infection are striking. Rational testing of a therapeutic mechanism requires a quantifiable and reproducibly altered marker of the hypothetical mechanism. Given the modest nature of endotoxin induced insult, interventions that demonstrate target specific efficacy in conjunction with attenuated phenotype responses are more likely to exhibit efficacy within lower risk patient populations. By contrast, the model cannot predict clinical efficacy among higher risk patients nor in those who have endured extended periods of inflammatory stress.

  10. Acyclovir-Polyethylene Glycol 6000 Binary Dispersions: Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Venkateskumar, Krishnamoorthy; Parasuraman, Subramani; Gunasunderi, Raju; Sureshkumar, Krishnan; Nayak, M Muralidhar; Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Khoo, Khassen; Kai, Heng Wei

    2016-12-21

    The dissolution and subsequent oral bioavailability of acyclovir (ACY) is limited by its poor aqueous solubility. An attempt has been made in this work to provide mechanistic insights into the solubility enhancement and dissolution of ACY by using the water-soluble carrier polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000). Solid dispersions with varying ratios of the drug (ACY) and carrier (PEG6000) were prepared and evaluated by phase solubility, in vitro release studies, kinetic analysis, in situ perfusion, and in vitro permeation studies. Solid state characterization was done by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, and surface morphology was assessed by polarizing microscopic image analysis, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Thermodynamic parameters indicated the solubilization effect of the carrier. The aqueous solubility and dissolution of ACY was found to be higher in all samples. The findings of XRD, DSC, FTIR and NMR analysis confirmed the formation of solid solution, crystallinity reduction, and the absence of interaction between the drug and carrier. SEM and AFM analysis reports ratified the particle size reduction and change in the surface morphology in samples. The permeation coefficient and amount of ACY diffused were higher in samples in comparison to pure ACY. Stability was found to be higher in dispersions. The results suggest that the study findings provided clear mechanical insights into the solubility and dissolution enhancement of ACY in PEG6000, and such findings could lay the platform for resolving the poor aqueous solubility issues in formulation development.

  11. Circadian rhythms and addiction: Mechanistic insights and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan W.; Williams, Wilbur P.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes, may increase the risk for substance abuse and relapse. Moreover, polymorphisms in circadian genes and an evening chronotype have been linked to mood and addiction disorders, and recent efforts suggest an association with the function of reward neurocircuitry. Animal studies are beginning to determine how altered circadian gene function results in drug induced neuroplasticity and behaviors. Many studies suggest a critical role for circadian rhythms in reward-related pathways in the brain and indicate that drugs of abuse directly affect the central circadian pacemaker. In this review, we highlight key findings demonstrating the importance of circadian rhythms in addiction, and how future studies will reveal important mechanistic insights into the involvement of circadian rhythms in drug addiction. PMID:24731209

  12. Circadian rhythms and addiction: mechanistic insights and future directions.

    PubMed

    Logan, Ryan W; Williams, Wilbur P; McClung, Colleen A

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes may increase the risk for substance abuse and relapse. Moreover, polymorphisms in circadian genes and an evening chronotype have been linked to mood and addiction disorders, and recent efforts suggest an association with the function of reward neurocircuitry. Animal studies are beginning to determine how altered circadian gene function results in drug-induced neuroplasticity and behaviors. Many studies suggest a critical role for circadian rhythms in reward-related pathways in the brain and indicate that drugs of abuse directly affect the central circadian pacemaker. In this review, we highlight key findings demonstrating the importance of circadian rhythms in addiction and how future studies will reveal important mechanistic insights into the involvement of circadian rhythms in drug addiction.

  13. Mechanistic insights into influenza vaccine-associated narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S. Sohail; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously reported an increased frequency of antibodies to hypocretin (HCRT) receptor 2 in sera obtained from narcoleptic patients who received the European AS03-adjuvanted vaccine Pandemrix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, s.a.) for the global influenza A H1N1 pandemic in 2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09]. These antibodies cross-reacted with a particular fragment of influenza nucleoprotein (NP) – one of the proteins naturally contained in the virus used to make seasonal influenza vaccine and pandemic influenza vaccines. The purpose of this commentary is to provide additional insights and interpretations of the findings and share additional data not presented in the original paper to help the reader appreciate the key messages of that publication. First, a brief background to narcolepsy and vaccine-induced narcolepsy will be provided. Then, additional insights and clarification will be provided on the following topics: 1) the critical difference identified in the adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines, 2) the contributing factor likely for the discordant association of narcolepsy between the AS03-adjuvanted pandemic vaccines Pandemrix and Arepanrix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, s.a.), 3) the significance of detecting HCRT receptor 2 (HCRTr2) antibodies in some Finnish control subjects, 4) the approach used for the detection of HCRTr2 antibodies in vaccine-associated narcolepsy, and 5) the plausibility of the proposed mechanism involving HCRTr2 modulation in vaccine-associated narcolepsy. PMID:27031682

  14. Mechanistic Insight in the Function of Phosphite Additives for Protection of LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 Cathode in High Voltage Li-Ion Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Meinan; Su, Chi-Cheung; Peebles, Cameron; Feng, Zhenxing; Connell, Justin G; Liao, Chen; Wang, Yan; Shkrob, Ilya A; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2016-05-11

    Triethlylphosphite (TEP) and tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TTFP) have been evaluated as electrolyte additives for high-voltage Li-ion battery cells using a Ni-rich layered cathode material LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM523) and the conventional carbonate electrolyte. The repeated charge/discharge cycling for cells containing 1 wt % of these additives was performed using an NCM523/graphite full cell operated at the voltage window from 3.0-4.6 V. During the initial charge process, these additives decompose on the cathode surface at a lower oxidation potential than the baseline electrolyte. Impedance spectroscopy and post-test analyses indicate the formation of protective coatings by both additives on the cathode surface that prevent oxidative breakdown of the electrolyte. However, only TTFP containing cells demonstrate the improved capacity retention and Coulombic efficiency. For TEP, the protective coating is also formed, but low Li(+) ion mobility through the interphase layer results in inferior performance. These observations are rationalized through the inhibition of electrocatalytic centers present on the cathode surface and the formation of organophosphate deposits isolating the cathode surface from the electrolyte. The difference between the two phosphites clearly originates in the different properties of the resulting phosphate coatings, which may be in Li(+) ion conductivity through such materials.

  15. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nicholas R.; Laroche, Fabrice J.F.; Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients. PMID:27165361

  16. Enhancer function: mechanistic and genome-wide insights come together.

    PubMed

    Plank, Jennifer L; Dean, Ann

    2014-07-03

    Enhancers establish spatial or temporal patterns of gene expression that are critical for development, yet our understanding of how these DNA cis-regulatory elements function from a distance to increase transcription of their target genes and shape the cellular transcriptome has been gleaned primarily from studies of individual genes or gene families. High-throughput sequencing studies place enhancer-gene interactions within the 3D context of chromosome folding, inviting a new look at enhancer function and stimulating provocative new questions. Here, we integrate these whole-genome studies with recent mechanistic studies to illuminate how enhancers physically interact with target genes, how enhancer activity is regulated during development, and the role of noncoding RNAs transcribed from enhancers in their function.

  17. Assembly Line Polyketide Synthases: Mechanistic Insights and Unsolved Problems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two hallmarks of assembly line polyketide synthases have motivated an interest in these unusual multienzyme systems, their stereospecificity and their capacity for directional biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge regarding the mechanistic origins of these two remarkable features, using the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase as a prototype. Of the 10 stereocenters in 6-deoxyerythronolide B, the stereochemistry of nine carbon atoms is directly set by ketoreductase domains, which catalyze epimerization and/or diastereospecific reduction reactions. The 10th stereocenter is established by the sequential action of three enzymatic domains. Thus, the problem has been reduced to a challenge in mainstream enzymology, where fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the structural basis for this exquisite stereochemical control by relatively well-defined active sites. In contrast, testable mechanistic hypotheses for the phenomenon of vectorial biosynthesis are only just beginning to emerge. Starting from an elegant theoretical framework for understanding coupled vectorial processes in biology [Jencks, W. P. (1980) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas Mol. Biol. 51, 75–106], we present a simple model that can explain assembly line polyketide biosynthesis as a coupled vectorial process. Our model, which highlights the important role of domain–domain interactions, not only is consistent with recent observations but also is amenable to further experimental verification and refinement. Ultimately, a definitive view of the coordinated motions within and between polyketide synthase modules will require a combination of structural, kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational tools and could be one of the most exciting frontiers in 21st Century enzymology. PMID:24779441

  18. Toxic Neuropathies: Mechanistic Insights Based On A Chemical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    LoPachin, Richard M.; Gavin, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) and acrylamide (ACR) are considered to be prototypical among chemical toxicants that cause central-peripheral axonopathies characterized by distal axon swelling and degeneration. Because the demise of distal regions was assumed to be causally related to the onset of neurotoxicity, substantial effort was devoted to deciphering the respective mechanisms. Continued research, however, revealed that expression of the presumed hallmark morphological features was dependent upon the daily rate of toxicant exposure. Indeed, many studies reported that the corresponding axonopathic changes were late developing effects that occurred independent of behavioral and/or functional neurotoxicity. This suggested that the toxic axonopathy classification might be based on epiphenomena related to dose-rate. Therefore, the goal of this mini-review is to discuss how quantitative morphometric analyses and the establishment of dose-dependent relationships helped distinguish primary, mechanistically relevant toxicant effects from non-specific consequences. Perhaps more importantly, we will discuss how knowledge of neurotoxicant chemical nature can guide molecular-level research toward a better, more rational understanding of mechanism. Our discussion will focus on HD, the neurotoxic γ-diketone metabolite of the industrial solvents n-hexane and methyl-n-butyl ketone. Early investigations suggested that HD caused giant neurofilamentous axonal swellings and eventual degeneration in CNS and PNS. However, as our review will point out, this interpretation underwent several iterations as the understanding of γ-diketone chemistry improved and more quantitative experimental approaches were implemented. The chemical concepts and design strategies discussed in this mini-review are broadly applicable to the mechanistic studies of other chemicals (e.g., n-propyl bromine, methyl methacrylate) that cause toxic neuropathies. PMID:25218479

  19. Mechanistic insight into sonochemical biodiesel synthesis using heterogeneous base catalyst.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Hanif A; Chakma, Sankar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effect of ultrasound on transesterification reaction is well known. Heterogeneous (or solid) catalysts for biodiesel synthesis have merit that they do not contaminate the byproduct of glycerol. In this paper, we have attempted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasound-enhanced biodiesel synthesis with the base-catalyst of CaO. A statistical design of experiments (Box-Behnken) was used to identify the influence of temperature, alcohol to oil molar ratio and catalyst loading on transesterification yield. The optimum values of these parameters for the highest yield were identified through Response Surface Method (with a quadratic model) and ANOVA. These values are: temperature=62 °C, molar ratio=10:1 and catalyst loading=6 wt.%. The activation energy was determined as 82.3 kJ/mol, which is higher than that for homogeneous catalyzed system (for both acidic and basic catalyst). The experimental results have been analyzed vis-à-vis simulations of cavitation bubble dynamics. Due to 3-phase heterogeneity of the system, the yield was dominated by intrinsic kinetics, and the optimum temperature for the highest yield was close to boiling point of methanol. At this temperature, the influence of cavitation bubbles (in terms of both sonochemical and sonophysical effect) is negligible, and ultrasonic micro-streaming provided necessary convection in the system. The influence of all parameters on the reaction system was found to be strongly inter-dependent.

  20. Environmental perception and epigenetic memory: mechanistic insight through FLC

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott; Dean, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin plays a central role in orchestrating gene regulation at the transcriptional level. However, our understanding of how chromatin states are altered in response to environmental and developmental cues, and then maintained epigenetically over many cell divisions, remains poor. The floral repressor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) in Arabidopsis thaliana is a useful system to address these questions. FLC is transcriptionally repressed during exposure to cold temperatures, allowing studies of how environmental conditions alter expression states at the chromatin level. FLC repression is also epigenetically maintained during subsequent development in warm conditions, so that exposure to cold may be remembered. This memory depends on molecular complexes that are highly conserved among eukaryotes, making FLC not only interesting as a paradigm for understanding biological decision-making in plants, but also an important system for elucidating chromatin-based gene regulation more generally. In this review, we summarize our understanding of how cold temperature induces a switch in the FLC chromatin state, and how this state is epigenetically remembered. We also discuss how the epigenetic state of FLC is reprogrammed in the seed to ensure a requirement for cold exposure in the next generation. Significance Statement FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) regulation provides a paradigm for understanding how chromatin can be modulated to determine gene expression in a developmental context. This review describes our current mechanistic understanding of how FLC expression is genetically specified and epigenetically regulated throughout the plant life cycle, and how this determines plant life-history strategy. PMID:25929799

  1. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukiko K; Omaye, Stanley T

    2012-06-19

    Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual's behavior and motivation, novel science-based strategies should be considered for prevention and therapy for the diseases. Metabolism and immune system are linked. Both overnutrition and infection result in inflammation through nutrient and pathogen sensing systems which recognize compounds with structural similarities. Dietary macronutrients (fats and sugars) can induce inflammation through activation of an innate immune receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Long-term intake of diets high in fats and meats appear to induce chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, endotoxicity, and metabolic diseases. Recent investigations support the idea of the involvement of intestinal bacteria in host metabolism and preventative and therapeutic potentials of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for metabolic diseases. Specific intestinal bacteria seem to serve as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sources through LPS and/or bacterial translocation into the circulation due to a vulnerable microbial barrier and increased intestinal permeability and to play a role in systemic inflammation and progression of metabolic diseases. This review focuses on mechanistic links between metabolic diseases (mainly obesity and type 2 diabetes), chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, intestinal environment, and nutrition and prospective views of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for the diseases.

  2. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual’s behavior and motivation, novel science-based strategies should be considered for prevention and therapy for the diseases. Metabolism and immune system are linked. Both overnutrition and infection result in inflammation through nutrient and pathogen sensing systems which recognize compounds with structural similarities. Dietary macronutrients (fats and sugars) can induce inflammation through activation of an innate immune receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Long-term intake of diets high in fats and meats appear to induce chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, endotoxicity, and metabolic diseases. Recent investigations support the idea of the involvement of intestinal bacteria in host metabolism and preventative and therapeutic potentials of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for metabolic diseases. Specific intestinal bacteria seem to serve as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sources through LPS and/or bacterial translocation into the circulation due to a vulnerable microbial barrier and increased intestinal permeability and to play a role in systemic inflammation and progression of metabolic diseases. This review focuses on mechanistic links between metabolic diseases (mainly obesity and type 2 diabetes), chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, intestinal environment, and nutrition and prospective views of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for the diseases. PMID:22713169

  3. Mechanistic Insights into Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Asymmetric Iron Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenberg, Jessica

    Our group has been focused on replacing toxic and expensive precious metal catalysts with iron for the synthesis of enantiopure compounds for industrial applications. During an investigation into the mechanism of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation with our first generation iron-(P-N-N-P) catalysts we found substantial evidence for zero-valent iron nanoparticles coated in chiral ligand acting as the active site. Extensive experimental and computational experiments were undertaken which included NMR, DFT, reaction profile analysis, substoichiometric poisoning, electron microscope imaging, XPS and multiphasic analysis, all of which supported the fact that NPs were the active species in catalysis. Reversibility of this asymmetric reaction on the nanoparticle surface was then probed using oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols, yielding modest enantiopurity and high turnover frequencies (TOF) for a range of aromatic alcohols. Efficient dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane for hydrogen evolution and the formation of B-N oligomers was also shown using the NP system, yielding highly active systems, with a maximum TOF of 3.66 H2/s-1 . We have also begun to focus on the development of iron catalysts for asymmetric direct hydrogenation of ketones using hydrogen gas. New chiral iron-(P-N-P) catalysts were developed and shown to be quite active and selective for a wide range of substrates. Mechanistic investigations primarily using NMR and DFT indicated that a highly active trans-dihydride species was being formed during catalyst activation. Lastly, a new library of chiral P-N-P and P-NH-P ligands were developed, as well as their corresponding iron complexes, some of which show promise for the development of future generations of active asymmetric direct hydrogenation catalysts.

  4. Structural and mechanistic insights into hepatitis C viral translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus uses an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to control viral protein synthesis by directly recruiting ribosomes to the translation-start site in the viral mRNA. Structural insights coupled with biochemical studies have revealed that the IRES substitutes for the activities of translation-initiation factors by binding and inducing conformational changes in the 40S ribosomal subunit. Direct interactions of the IRES with initiation factor eIF3 are also crucial for efficient translation initiation, providing clues to the role of eIF3 in protein synthesis.

  5. Emerging Mechanistic Insights into AAA Complexes Regulating Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M.; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates. The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases, shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship. Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  6. Membrane Active Antimicrobial Peptides: Translating Mechanistic Insights to Design

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianguo; Koh, Jun-Jie; Liu, Shouping; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Verma, Chandra S.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising next generation antibiotics that hold great potential for combating bacterial resistance. AMPs can be both bacteriostatic and bactericidal, induce rapid killing and display a lower propensity to develop resistance than do conventional antibiotics. Despite significant progress in the past 30 years, no peptide antibiotic has reached the clinic yet. Poor understanding of the action mechanisms and lack of rational design principles have been the two major obstacles that have slowed progress. Technological developments are now enabling multidisciplinary approaches including molecular dynamics simulations combined with biophysics and microbiology toward providing valuable insights into the interactions of AMPs with membranes at atomic level. This has led to increasingly robust models of the mechanisms of action of AMPs and has begun to contribute meaningfully toward the discovery of new AMPs. This review discusses the detailed action mechanisms that have been put forward, with detailed atomistic insights into how the AMPs interact with bacterial membranes. The review further discusses how this knowledge is exploited toward developing design principles for novel AMPs. Finally, the current status, associated challenges, and future directions for the development of AMP therapeutics are discussed. PMID:28261050

  7. Membrane Active Antimicrobial Peptides: Translating Mechanistic Insights to Design.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianguo; Koh, Jun-Jie; Liu, Shouping; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Verma, Chandra S; Beuerman, Roger W

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising next generation antibiotics that hold great potential for combating bacterial resistance. AMPs can be both bacteriostatic and bactericidal, induce rapid killing and display a lower propensity to develop resistance than do conventional antibiotics. Despite significant progress in the past 30 years, no peptide antibiotic has reached the clinic yet. Poor understanding of the action mechanisms and lack of rational design principles have been the two major obstacles that have slowed progress. Technological developments are now enabling multidisciplinary approaches including molecular dynamics simulations combined with biophysics and microbiology toward providing valuable insights into the interactions of AMPs with membranes at atomic level. This has led to increasingly robust models of the mechanisms of action of AMPs and has begun to contribute meaningfully toward the discovery of new AMPs. This review discusses the detailed action mechanisms that have been put forward, with detailed atomistic insights into how the AMPs interact with bacterial membranes. The review further discusses how this knowledge is exploited toward developing design principles for novel AMPs. Finally, the current status, associated challenges, and future directions for the development of AMP therapeutics are discussed.

  8. Simple Sugar Intake and Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Epidemiological and Mechanistic Insight

    PubMed Central

    Laguna, Juan Carlos; Alegret, Marta; Roglans, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Sugar intake has dramatically increased during the last few decades. Specifically, there has been a clear trend towards higher consumption of fructose and high fructose corn syrup, which are the most common added sugars in processed food, soft drinks and other sweetened beverages. Although still controversial, this rising trend in simple sugar consumption has been positively associated with weight gain and obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Interestingly, all of these metabolic alterations have also been related to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence coming from epidemiological studies and data from animal models relating the consumption of simple sugars, and specifically fructose, with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and to gain insight into the putative molecular mechanisms involved. PMID:25533006

  9. Transformation of heavy metal speciation during sludge drying: mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Huanxin; Ma, Xue-Wen; Fu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Liu, Zan; Tian, Li-Xun; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-01-30

    Speciation can fundamentally affect on the stability and toxicity of heavy metals in sludge from wastewater treatment plants. This research investigated the speciation of heavy metals in sludge from both municipal and industrial sources, and metal speciation change as a result of drying process to reduce sludge volume. The changes in sludge properties including sludge moisture content, temperature, density, and electrical conductivity were also monitored to provide insights into the mechanisms causing the change in heavy metal speciation. The results show that the drying process generally stabilized the Cr, Cu, Cd and Pb in sludge by transforming acid-soluble, reducible and oxidizable species into structurally stable forms. Such transformation and stabilization occurred regardless of the sludge source and type, and were primarily caused by the changes in sludge properties associated with decomposition of organic matter and sulfide. The results enhanced our understanding of the geochemical behavior of heavy metals in municipal sludge, and are useful for designing a treatment system for environment-friendly disposal of sludge.

  10. Obesity and cancer: mechanistic insights from transdisciplinary studies

    PubMed Central

    Allott, Emma H.; Hursting, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a range of health outcomes that are of clinical and public health significance, including cancer. Herein, we summarize epidemiologic and preclinical evidence for an association between obesity and increased risk of breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, we describe data from observational studies of weight change in humans and from calorie restriction studies in mouse models which support a potential role for weight loss in counteracting tumor-promoting properties of obesity in breast and prostate cancers. Given that weight loss is challenging to achieve and maintain, we also consider evidence linking treatments for obesity-associated co-morbidities, including metformin, statins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Finally, we highlight several challenges that should be considered when conducting epidemiologic and preclinical research in the area of obesity and cancer, including the measurement of obesity in population-based studies, the timing of obesity and weight change in relation to tumor latency and cancer diagnosis, and the heterogeneous nature of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Given that obesity is a complex trait, comprised of behavioral, epidemiologic and molecular/metabolic factors, we argue that a transdisciplinary approach is the key to understanding the mechanisms linking obesity and cancer. As such, this review highlights the critical need to integrate evidence from both epidemiologic and preclinical studies to gain insight into both biologic and non-biologic mechanisms contributing to the obesity-cancer link. PMID:26373570

  11. Obesity and cancer: mechanistic insights from transdisciplinary studies.

    PubMed

    Allott, Emma H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is associated with a range of health outcomes that are of clinical and public health significance, including cancer. Herein, we summarize epidemiologic and preclinical evidence for an association between obesity and increased risk of breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, we describe data from observational studies of weight change in humans and from calorie-restriction studies in mouse models that support a potential role for weight loss in counteracting tumor-promoting properties of obesity in breast and prostate cancers. Given that weight loss is challenging to achieve and maintain, we also consider evidence linking treatments for obesity-associated co-morbidities, including metformin, statins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Finally, we highlight several challenges that should be considered when conducting epidemiologic and preclinical research in the area of obesity and cancer, including the measurement of obesity in population-based studies, the timing of obesity and weight change in relation to tumor latency and cancer diagnosis, and the heterogeneous nature of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Given that obesity is a complex trait, comprised of behavioral, epidemiologic and molecular/metabolic factors, we argue that a transdisciplinary approach is the key to understanding the mechanisms linking obesity and cancer. As such, this review highlights the critical need to integrate evidence from both epidemiologic and preclinical studies to gain insight into both biologic and non-biologic mechanisms contributing to the obesity-cancer link.

  12. Mechanistic Insight into the Biosynthesis and Detoxification of Fumonisin Mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Kevin M N; Renaud, Justin B; McDowell, Tim; Sumarah, Mark W

    2016-09-16

    Fumonisins, notably FB1, FB2, FB3, and FB4, are economically important mycotoxins produced by a number Fusarium sp. that occur on corn, rice, and sorghum as well as by Aspergillus sp. on grapes. The fumonisin scaffold is comprised of a C18 polyketide backbone functionalized with two tricarballylic esters and an alanine derived amine. These functional groups contribute to fumonisin's ability to inhibit sphingolipid biosynthesis in animals, plants, and yeasts. We report for the first time the isolation and structure elucidation of two classes of nonaminated fumonisins (FPy and FLa) produced by Aspergillus welwitschiae. Using a Lemna minor (duckweed) bioassay, these new compounds were significantly less toxic in comparison to the fumonisin B mycotoxins, providing new insight into the mechanism of fumonisin toxicity. Time course fermentations monitoring the production of FB4, FPy4, and FLa4, as well as (13)C and (15)N stable isotope incorporation, suggest a novel postbiosynthetic oxidative deamination process for fumonisins. This pathway was further supported by a feeding study with FB1, a fumonisin not produced by Aspergillus sp., which resulted in its transformation to FPy1. This study demonstrates that Aspergillus have the ability to produce enzymes that could be used for fumonisin detoxification.

  13. Transformation of heavy metal speciation during sludge drying: mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huan-Xin; Ma, Xue-Wen; Fu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Liu, Zan; Tian, Li-Xun; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-01-30

    Speciation can fundamentally affect on the stability and toxicity of heavy metals in sludge from wastewater treatment plants. This research investigated the speciation of heavy metals in sludge from both municipal and industrial sources, and metal speciation change as a result of drying process to reduce sludge volume. The changes in sludge properties including sludge moisture content, temperature, density, and electrical conductivity were also monitored to provide insights into the mechanisms causing the change in heavy metal speciation. The results show that the drying process generally stabilized Cr, Cu, Cd, and Pb in sludge by transforming acid-soluble, reducible, and oxidizable species into structurally stable forms. Such transformation and stabilization occurred regardless of the sludge source and type, and were primarily caused by the changes in sludge properties associated with decomposition of organic matter and sulfide. The results enhanced our understanding of the geochemical behavior of heavy metals in municipal sludge, and are useful for designing a treatment system for environment-friendly disposal of sludge.

  14. Mechanistic insights into phosphoprotein-binding FHA domains.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiangyang; Van Doren, Steven R

    2008-08-01

    [Structure: see text]. FHA domains are protein modules that switch signals in diverse biological pathways by monitoring the phosphorylation of threonine residues of target proteins. As part of the effort to gain insight into cellular avoidance of cancer, FHA domains involved in the cellular response to DNA damage have been especially well-characterized. The complete protein where the FHA domain resides and the interaction partners determine the nature of the signaling. Thus, a key biochemical question is how do FHA domains pick out their partners from among thousands of alternatives in the cell? This Account discusses the structure, affinity, and specificity of FHA domains and the formation of their functional structure. Although FHA domains share sequence identity at only five loop residues, they all fold into a beta-sandwich of two beta-sheets. The conserved arginine and serine of the recognition loops recognize the phosphorylation of the threonine targeted. Side chains emanating from loops that join beta-strand 4 with 5, 6 with 7, or 10 with 11 make specific contacts with amino acids of the ligand that tailor sequence preferences. Many FHA domains choose a partner in extended conformation, somewhat according to the residue three after the phosphothreonine in sequence (pT + 3 position). One group of FHA domains chooses a short carboxylate-containing side chain at pT + 3. Another group chooses a long, branched aliphatic side chain. A third group prefers other hydrophobic or uncharged polar side chains at pT + 3. However, another FHA domain instead chooses on the basis of pT - 2, pT - 3, and pT + 1 positions. An FHA domain from a marker of human cancer instead chooses a much longer protein fragment that adds a beta-strand to its beta-sheet and that presents hydrophobic residues from a novel helix to the usual recognition surface. This novel recognition site and more remote sites for the binding of other types of protein partners were predicted for the entire family

  15. Cobalt-Catalyzed C(sp(2))-H Borylation: Mechanistic Insights Inspire Catalyst Design.

    PubMed

    Obligacion, Jennifer V; Semproni, Scott P; Pappas, Iraklis; Chirik, Paul J

    2016-08-24

    A comprehensive study into the mechanism of bis(phosphino)pyridine (PNP) cobalt-catalyzed C-H borylation of 2,6-lutidine using B2Pin2 (Pin = pinacolate) has been conducted. The experimentally observed rate law, deuterium kinetic isotope effects, and identification of the catalyst resting state support turnover limiting C-H activation from a fully characterized cobalt(I) boryl intermediate. Monitoring the catalytic reaction as a function of time revealed that borylation of the 4-position of the pincer in the cobalt catalyst was faster than arene borylation. Cyclic voltammetry established the electron withdrawing influence of 4-BPin, which slows the rate of C-H oxidative addition and hence overall catalytic turnover. This mechanistic insight inspired the next generation of 4-substituted PNP cobalt catalysts with electron donating and sterically blocking methyl and pyrrolidinyl substituents that exhibited increased activity for the C-H borylation of unactivated arenes. The rationally designed catalysts promote effective turnover with stoichiometric quantities of arene substrate and B2Pin2. Kinetic studies on the improved catalyst, 4-(H)2BPin, established a change in turnover limiting step from C-H oxidative addition to C-B reductive elimination. The iridium congener of the optimized cobalt catalyst, 6-(H)2BPin, was prepared and crystallographically characterized and proved inactive for C-H borylation, a result of the high kinetic barrier for reductive elimination from octahedral Ir(III) complexes.

  16. Matchmaking in Catalyst-Transfer Polycondensation: Optimizing Catalysts based on Mechanistic Insight.

    PubMed

    Leone, Amanda K; McNeil, Anne J

    2016-12-20

    Catalyst-transfer polycondensation (CTP) has emerged as a useful living, chain-growth polymerization method for synthesizing conjugated (hetero)arene-based polymers with targetable molecular weights, narrow dispersities, and controllable copolymer sequences-all properties that significantly influence their performance in devices. Over the past decade, several phosphine- and carbene-ligated Ni- and Pd-based precatalysts have been shown to be effective in CTP. One current limitation is that these traditional CTP catalysts lead to nonliving, non-chain-growth behavior when complex monomer scaffolds are utilized. Because these monomers are often found in the highest-performing materials, there is a significant need to identify alternative CTP catalysts. Recent mechanistic insight into CTP has laid the foundation for designing new catalysts to expand the CTP monomer scope. Building off this insight, we have designed and implemented model systems to identify effective catalysts by understanding their underlying mechanistic behaviors and systematically modifying catalyst structures to improve their chain-growth behavior. In this Account, we describe how each catalyst parameter-the ancillary ligand(s), reactive ligand(s), and transition metal-influences CTP. As an example, ancillary ligands often dictate the turnover-limiting step of the catalytic cycle, and perhaps more importantly, they can be used to promote the formation of the key intermediate (a metal-arene associative complex) and its subsequent reactivity. The fidelity of this intermediate is central to the mechanism for the living, chain-growth polymerization. Reactive ligands, on the other hand, can be used to improve catalyst solubility and accelerate initiation. Additional advantages of the reactive ligand include providing access points for postpolymerization modification and synthesizing polymers directly off surfaces. While the most frequently used CTP catalysts contain nickel, palladium-based catalysts

  17. Mechanistic Insights on the Photosensitized Chemistry of a Fatty Acid at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment and many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol, and cloud formation are, at one stage or another, strongly impacted by physical and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Here, the photoinduced chemistry of an air/water interface coated with nonanoic acid—a fatty acid surfactant we use as a proxy for chemically complex natural aqueous surface microlayers—was investigated as a source of volatile and semivolatile reactive organic species. The carboxylic acid coating significantly increased the propensity of photosensitizers, chosen to mimic those observed in real environmental waters, to partition to the interface and enhance reactivity there. Photochemical formation of functionalized and unsaturated compounds was systematically observed upon irradiation of these coated surfaces. The role of a coated interface appears to be critical in providing a concentrated medium allowing radical–radical reactions to occur in parallel with molecular oxygen additions. Mechanistic insights are provided from extensive analysis of products observed in both gas and aqueous phases by online switchable reagent ion-time of flight-mass spectrometry and by off-line ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to a Q Exactive high resolution mass spectrometer through heated electrospray ionization, respectively. PMID:27611489

  18. The Cycloaddition of the Benzimidazolium Ylides with Alkynes: New Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Moldoveanu, Costel; Zbancioc, Gheorghita; Mantu, Dorina; Maftei, Dan; Mangalagiu, Ionel

    2016-01-01

    New insights concerning the reaction mechanism in the cycloaddition reaction of benzimidazolium ylides to activated alkynes are presented. The proposed pathway leading both to 2-(1H-pyrrol-1-yl)anilines and to pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalin-4(5H)-ones involves an opening of the imidazole ring from the cycloaddition product, followed by a nucleophilic attack of the aminic nitrogen to a proximal carbonyl group and the elimination of a leaving group. The mechanistic considerations are fully supported by experimental data, including the XRD resolved structure of the key reaction intermediate. PMID:27224656

  19. Natural Variation of Plant Metabolism: Genetic Mechanisms, Interpretive Caveats, and Evolutionary and Mechanistic Insights1

    PubMed Central

    Soltis, Nicole E.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Combining quantitative genetics studies with metabolomics/metabolic profiling platforms, genomics, and transcriptomics is creating significant progress in identifying the causal genes controlling natural variation in metabolite accumulations and profiles. In this review, we discuss key mechanistic and evolutionary insights that are arising from these studies. This includes the potential role of transport and other processes in leading to a separation of the site of mechanistic causation and metabolic consequence. A reilluminated observation is the potential for genomic variation in the organelle to alter phenotypic variation alone and in epistatic interaction with the nuclear genetic variation. These studies are also highlighting new aspects of metabolic pleiotropy both in terms of the breadth of loci altering metabolic variation as well as the potential for broader effects on plant defense regulation of the metabolic variation than has previously been predicted. We also illustrate caveats that can be overlooked when translating quantitative genetics descriptors such as heritability and per-locus r2 to mechanistic or evolutionary interpretations. PMID:26272883

  20. Cross-study and cross-omics comparisons of three nephrotoxic compounds reveal mechanistic insights and new candidate biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Matheis, Katja A.; Com, Emmanuelle; Gautier, Jean-Charles; Guerreiro, Nelson; Brandenburg, Arnd; Gmuender, Hans; Sposny, Alexandra; Hewitt, Philip; Amberg, Alexander; Boernsen, Olaf; Riefke, Bjoern; Hoffmann, Dana; Mally, Angela; Kalkuhl, Arno; Suter, Laura; Dieterle, Frank; Staedtler, Frank

    2011-04-15

    The European InnoMed-PredTox project was a collaborative effort between 15 pharmaceutical companies, 2 small and mid-sized enterprises, and 3 universities with the goal of delivering deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms of kidney and liver toxicity and to identify mechanism-linked diagnostic or prognostic safety biomarker candidates by combining conventional toxicological parameters with 'omics' data. Mechanistic toxicity studies with 16 different compounds, 2 dose levels, and 3 time points were performed in male Crl: WI(Han) rats. Three of the 16 investigated compounds, BI-3 (FP007SE), Gentamicin (FP009SF), and IMM125 (FP013NO), induced kidney proximal tubule damage (PTD). In addition to histopathology and clinical chemistry, transcriptomics microarray and proteomics 2D-DIGE analysis were performed. Data from the three PTD studies were combined for a cross-study and cross-omics meta-analysis of the target organ. The mechanistic interpretation of kidney PTD-associated deregulated transcripts revealed, in addition to previously described kidney damage transcript biomarkers such as KIM-1, CLU and TIMP-1, a number of additional deregulated pathways congruent with histopathology observations on a single animal basis, including a specific effect on the complement system. The identification of new, more specific biomarker candidates for PTD was most successful when transcriptomics data were used. Combining transcriptomics data with proteomics data added extra value.

  1. Mechanistic Insight and Management of Diabetic Nephropathy: Recent Progress and Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Rui; Gui, Dingkun; Zheng, Liyang; Zhai, Ruonan

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most serious microvascular complication of diabetes and the largest single cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in many developed countries. DN is also associated with an increased cardiovascular mortality. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors. Hyperglycemia, hypertension, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors. However, the exact mechanisms of DN are unclear. Despite the benefits derived from strict control of glucose and blood pressure, as well as inhibition of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, many patients continue to enter into ESRD. Thus, there is urgent need for improving mechanistic understanding of DN and then developing new and effective therapeutic approaches to delay the progression of DN. This review focuses on recent progress and future perspective about mechanistic insight and management of DN. Some preclinical relevant studies are highlighted and new perspectives of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for delaying DN progression are discussed in detail. These findings strengthen the therapeutic rationale for TCM in the treatment of DN and also provide new insights into the development of novel drugs for the prevention of DN. However, feasibility and safety of these therapeutic approaches and the clinical applicability of TCM in human DN need to be further investigated. PMID:28386567

  2. Mechanistic insight into site-restricted monoubiquitination of FANCD2 by Ube2t, FANCL, and FANCI.

    PubMed

    Alpi, Arno F; Pace, Paul E; Babu, M Madan; Patel, Ketan J

    2008-12-26

    A key step in the Fanconi anemia (FA) tumor suppressor pathway is the site-specific monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 protein. Genetic studies indicate that this crucial modification requires eight known FA gene products and the E2-conjugating enzyme Ube2t. Here, we minimally reconstitute this monoubiquitination reaction with Ube2t and the FANCL protein, revealing that monoubiquitination is stimulated by a conserved RWD-like domain in FANCL. Furthermore, addition of the FANCI protein enhances monoubiquitination and also restricts it to the in vivo substrate lysine residue on FANCD2. This work therefore establishes a system that provides mechanistic insight into the functions of FANCL and FANCI in the catalysis of FANCD2 monoubiquitination.

  3. Mechanistic insights on the cycloisomerization of polyunsaturated precursors catalyzed by platinum and gold complexes.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Elena; Marco-Contelles, José

    2009-08-18

    Organometallic chemistry provides powerful tools for the stereocontrolled synthesis of heterocycles and carbocycles. The electrophilic transition metals Pt(II) and Au(I, III) are efficient catalysts in these transitions and promote a variety of organic transformations of unsaturated precursors. These reactions produce functionalized cyclic and acyclic scaffolds for the synthesis of natural and non-natural products efficiently, under mild conditions, and with excellent chemoselectivity. Because these transformations are strongly substrate-dependent, they are versatile and may yield diverse molecular scaffolds. Therefore, synthetic chemists need a mechanistic interpretation to optimize this reaction process and design a new generation of catalysts. However, so far, no intermediate species has been isolated or characterized, so the formulated mechanistic hypotheses have been primarily based on labeling studies or trapping reactions. Recently, theoretical DFT studies have become a useful tool in our research, giving us insights into the key intermediates and into a variety of plausible reaction pathways. In this Account, we present a comprehensive mechanistic overview of transformations promoted by Pt and Au in a non-nucleophilic medium based on quantum-mechanical studies. The calculations are consistent with the experimental observations and provide fundamental insights into the versatility of these reaction processes. The reactivity of these metals results from their peculiar Lewis acid properties: the alkynophilic character of these soft metals and the pi-acid activation of unsaturated groups promotes the intra- or intermolecular attack of a nucleophile. 1,n-Enynes (n = 3-8) are particularly important precursors, and their transformation may yield a variety of cycloadducts depending on the molecular structure. However, the calculations suggest that these different cyclizations would have closely related reaction mechanisms, and we propose a unified mechanistic

  4. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  5. Mechanistic and Evolutionary Insights from Comparative Enzymology of Phosphomonoesterases and Phosphodiesterases across the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; AlSadhan, Ishraq; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Ressl, Susanne; Wiersma-Koch, Helen; Borland, Jamar; Brown, Clayton L; Johnson, Tory A; Singh, Zorawar; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-11-02

    from existing promiscuous templates. More generally, comparative enzymology and analysis of catalytic promiscuity can provide mechanistic and evolutionary insights.

  6. Can ligand addition to soil enhance Cd phytoextraction? A mechanistic model study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongbing; Schneider, André; Nguyen, Christophe; Sterckeman, Thibault

    2014-11-01

    Phytoextraction is a potential method for cleaning Cd-polluted soils. Ligand addition to soil is expected to enhance Cd phytoextraction. However, experimental results show that this addition has contradictory effects on plant Cd uptake. A mechanistic model simulating the reaction kinetics (adsorption on solid phase, complexation in solution), transport (convection, diffusion) and root absorption (symplastic, apoplastic) of Cd and its complexes in soil was developed. This was used to calculate plant Cd uptake with and without ligand addition in a great number of combinations of soil, ligand and plant characteristics, varying the parameters within defined domains. Ligand addition generally strongly reduced hydrated Cd (Cd(2+)) concentration in soil solution through Cd complexation. Dissociation of Cd complex ([Formula: see text]) could not compensate for this reduction, which greatly lowered Cd(2+) symplastic uptake by roots. The apoplastic uptake of [Formula: see text] was not sufficient to compensate for the decrease in symplastic uptake. This explained why in the majority of the cases, ligand addition resulted in the reduction of the simulated Cd phytoextraction. A few results showed an enhanced phytoextraction in very particular conditions (strong plant transpiration with high apoplastic Cd uptake capacity), but this enhancement was very limited, making chelant-enhanced phytoextraction poorly efficient for Cd.

  7. Pterostilbene-mediated Nrf2 activation: Mechanistic insights on Keap1:Nrf2 interface.

    PubMed

    Bhakkiyalakshmi, Elango; Dineshkumar, Kesavan; Karthik, Suresh; Sireesh, Dornadula; Hopper, Waheeta; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Ramkumar, Kunka Mohanram

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors has become a promising strategy to develop novel lead molecules against variety of stress. Hence, Keap1-Nrf2 system plays an important role in oxidative/electrophilic stress associated disorders. Our earlier studies identified pterostilbene (PTS), a natural analogue of resveratrol, as a potent Nrf2 activator and Keap1-Nrf2 PPI inhibitor as assessed by luciferase complementation assay. In this study, we further identified the potential of PTS in Nrf2 activation and ARE-driven downstream target genes expression by nuclear translocation experiments and ARE-luciferase reporter assay, respectively. Further, the luciferase complementation assay identified that PTS inhibits Keap1-Nrf2 PPI in both dose and time-dependent manner. Computational studies using molecular docking and dynamic simulation revealed that PTS directly interacts with the basic amino acids of kelch domain of Keap1 and perturb Keap1-Nrf2 interaction pattern. This manuscript not only shows the binding determinants of Keap1-Nrf2 proteins but also provides mechanistic insights on Nrf2 activation potential of PTS.

  8. Mechanistic insights into electrocatalytic CO2 reduction within [Ru(II)(tpy)(NN)X]n+ architectures.

    PubMed

    White, Travis A; Maji, Somnath; Ott, Sascha

    2014-10-28

    A series of Ru(II)-polypyridyl complexes of the design [Ru(II)(tpy)(NN)X](n+) (tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; NN = bidentate polypyridine; X = Cl(-) or CH3CN; n = 1 or 2) have been synthesized and analyzed for their ability to function as electrocatalysts in the reduction of CO2 to CO. Varying the electron-donating/withdrawing character of the NN polypyridyl ligand has allowed for modification of electron density at the formally Ru(II) metal center. Complexes where X = Cl(-) display ligand substitution for CH3CN with differing rates of Cl(-) dissociation (k-Cl), therefore providing a degree of insight into the electron density and thus the chemical activity at the Ru(II) center. Detailed analysis of the cyclic voltammograms under argon vs. CO2 atmospheres using multiple switching potentials and scan rates ranging from ν = 25-2000 mV s(-1) has painted a picture of how monodentate ligand lability due to NN polypyridyl electron-donating character is related to electrocatalytic CO2 reduction activity of Ru(II)-polypyridyl complexes. From these studies, multiple mechanistic pathways towards generating the catalytically active [Ru(tpy(-))(NN(-))CO2](0) species are proposed and differ via the order of electrochemical and chemical processes.

  9. Mechanistic Insights into Reversible Photoactivation in Proteins of the GFP Family

    PubMed Central

    Gayda, Susan; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Light-controlled modification of the fluorescence emission properties of proteins of the GFP family is of crucial importance for many imaging applications including superresolution microscopy. Here, we have studied the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein mIrisGFP using optical spectroscopy. By analyzing the pH dependence of isomerization and protonation equilibria and the isomerization kinetics, we have obtained insight into the coupling of the chromophore to the surrounding protein moiety and a better understanding of the photoswitching mechanism. A different acid-base environment of the chromophore’s protonating group in its two isomeric forms, which can be inferred from the x-ray structures of IrisFP, is key to the photoswitching function and ensures that isomerization and protonation are correlated. Amino acids near the chromophore, especially Glu212, rearrange upon isomerization, and Glu212 protonation modulates the chromophore pKa. In mIrisGFP, the cis chromophore protonates in two steps, with pKcis of 5.3 and 6, which is much lower than pKtrans (>10). Based on these results, we have put forward a mechanistic scheme that explains how the combination of isomeric and acid-base properties of the chromophore in its protein environment can produce negative and positive photoswitching modes. PMID:23260054

  10. Exploring novel mechanistic insights in Alzheimer’s disease by assessing reliability of protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ashutosh; Younesi, Erfan; Sahadevan, Sudeep; Zimmermann, Joerg; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Protein interaction networks are widely used in computational biology as a graphical means of representing higher-level systemic functions in a computable form. Although, many algorithms exist that seamlessly collect and measure protein interaction information in network models, they often do not provide novel mechanistic insights using quantitative criteria. Measuring information content and knowledge representation in network models about disease mechanisms becomes crucial particularly when exploring new target candidates in a well-defined functional context of a potential disease mechanism. To this end, we have developed a knowledge-based scoring approach that uses literature-derived protein interaction features to quantify protein interaction confidence. Thereby, we introduce the novel concept of knowledge cliffs, regions of the interaction network where a significant gap between high scoring and low scoring interactions is observed, representing a divide between established and emerging knowledge on disease mechanism. To show the application of this approach, we constructed and assessed reliability of a protein-protein interaction model specific to Alzheimer’s disease, which led to screening, and prioritization of four novel protein candidates. Evaluation of the identified candidates showed that two of them are already followed in clinical trials for testing potential AD drugs. PMID:26346705

  11. Structural, mechanistic and functional insight into gliotoxin bis-thiomethylation in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Stephen K.; Bock, Tobias; Hering, Vanessa; Owens, Rebecca A.; Jones, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    Gliotoxin is an epipolythiodioxopiperazine (ETP) class toxin, contains a disulfide bridge that mediates its toxic effects via redox cycling and is produced by the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Self-resistance against gliotoxin is effected by the gliotoxin oxidase GliT, and attenuation of gliotoxin biosynthesis is catalysed by gliotoxin S-methyltransferase GtmA. Here we describe the X-ray crystal structures of GtmA-apo (1.66 Å), GtmA complexed to S-adenosylhomocysteine (1.33 Å) and GtmA complexed to S-adenosylmethionine (2.28 Å), providing mechanistic insights into this important biotransformation. We further reveal that simultaneous elimination of the ability of A. fumigatus to dissipate highly reactive dithiol gliotoxin, via deletion of GliT and GtmA, results in the most significant hypersensitivity to exogenous gliotoxin observed to date. Indeed, quantitative proteomic analysis of ΔgliT::ΔgtmA reveals an uncontrolled over-activation of the gli-cluster upon gliotoxin exposure. The data presented herein reveal, for the first time, the extreme risk associated with intracellular dithiol gliotoxin biosynthesis—in the absence of an efficient dismutation capacity. Significantly, a previously concealed protective role for GtmA and functionality of ETP bis-thiomethylation as an ancestral protection strategy against dithiol compounds is now evident. PMID:28179499

  12. Mechanistic insights from comparing intrinsic clearance values between human liver microsomes and hepatocytes to guide drug design.

    PubMed

    Di, Li; Keefer, Christopher; Scott, Dennis O; Strelevitz, Timothy J; Chang, George; Bi, Yi-An; Lai, Yurong; Duckworth, Jonathon; Fenner, Katherine; Troutman, Matthew D; Obach, R Scott

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic stability of drug candidates are often determined in both liver microsome and hepatocyte assays. Comparison of intrinsic clearance values between the two assays provides additional information to guide drug design. Intrinsic clearance values from human liver microsomes and hepatocytes were compared for a set of commercial drugs with known metabolic pathways and transporter characteristics. The results showed that for compounds that were predominately metabolized by CYP mediated mechanisms, the intrinsic clearance values from the two assays were comparable. For compounds with non-CYP pathways, such as UGT and AO, intrinsic clearance was faster in hepatocytes than in microsomes. Substrates of uptake or efflux transporters in this study did not have significant differences of intrinsic clearance between microsomes and hepatocytes, when uptake into the hepatocytes was not the rate-limiting step. When hepatic uptake was rate limiting, intrinsic clearance in microsomes was faster than that in hepatocytes, which was more prevalent for compounds with rapid metabolism. Low passive permeability can limit the exposure to drug molecules to the metabolizing enzymes in the hepatocytes in relationship to the rate of metabolism. The faster the rate of metabolism, the higher permeability is needed for molecule to enter the cells and not becoming rate-limiting. The findings are very useful for drug discovery programs to gain additional insights on mechanistic information to help drug design without added experiments. Follow-up studies can then be designed to address specific questions.

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas putida F1 growth on benzoate and citrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are capable to proliferate under diverse environmental conditions and thus have a significant bioremediation potential. To enhance our understanding of their metabolic versatility, this study explores the changes in the proteome and physiology of Pseudomonas putida F1 resulting from its growth on benzoate, a moderate toxic compound that can be catabolized, and citrate, a carbon source that is assimilated through central metabolic pathways. A series of repetitive batch cultivations were performed to ensure a complete adaptation of the bacteria to each of these contrasting carbon sources. After several growth cycles, cell growth stabilized at the maximum level and exhibited a reproducible growth profile. The specific growth rates measured for benzoate (1.01 ± 0.11 h-1) and citrate (1.11 ± 0.12 h-1) were similar, while a higher yield was observed for benzoate (0.6 and 0.3 g cell mass per g of benzoate and citrate, respectively), reflecting the different degrees of carbon reduction in the two substrates. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed an enrichment of several oxygenases/dehydrogenases in benzoate-grown cells, indicative of the higher carbon reduction of benzoate. Moreover, the upregulation of all 14 proteins implicated in benzoate degradation via the catechol ortho-cleavage pathway was observed, while several stress-response proteins were increased to aid cells to cope with benzoate toxicity. Unexpectedly, citrate posed more challenges than benzoate in the maintenance of pH homeostasis, as indicated by the enhancement of the Na+/H+ antiporter and carbonic anhydrase. The study provides important mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas adaptation to varying carbon sources that are of great relevance to bioremediation efforts. PMID:24156539

  14. Exploring soil organic matter-mineral interactions: mechanistic insights at the nanometer and molecular length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomb, C.; Qafoku, N. P.; Grate, J. W.; Hufschmid, R.; Browning, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    With elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic emissions and disruption to the carbon cycle, the effects of climate change are being accelerated. Approximately 80% of Earth's terrestrial organic carbon is stored in soil, and the residence time of this carbon can range from hours to millenia. Understanding the dynamics of this carbon pool in the carbon cycle is crucial to both predicting climate and sustaining ecosystem services. Soil organic carbon is known to be strongly associated with high surface area clay minerals. The nature of these interactions is not well understood primarily due to the heterogeneity of soil, as much of the current knowledge relies on experiments that take a top-down approach using bulk experimental measurements. Our work seeks to probe physical, chemical, and molecular-level interactions at the organic-mineral interface using a bottom-up approach that establishes a model system where complexity can be built in systematically. By performing in situ techniques such as dynamic force spectroscopy, a technique where organic molecules can be brought into contact with mineral surfaces in a controlled manner using an atomic force microscope, we demonstrate the ability to mechanistically probe the energy landscape of individual organic molecules with mineral surfaces. We demonstrate the ability to measure the binding energies of soil-inspired organic functional groups (including carboxylic acid, amine, methyl, and phosphate) with clay and mineral surfaces as a function of solution chemistry. This effort can provide researchers with both guiding principles about carbon dynamics at the sub-nanometer length scale and insights into early aggregation events, where organic-mineral interactions play a significant role.

  15. Twist-ing cell fate: mechanistic insights into the role of twist in lineage specification/differentiation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Cakouros, D; Raices, R M; Gronthos, S; Glackin, C A

    2010-08-15

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), are multipotent cells that give rise to multiple lineages including osteoblasts, adipocytes, muscle, and fibroblasts. MSCs are useful for clinical applications such as cell therapy because they can be isolated from an individual and expanded for use in tissue repair, as well as other therapeutic applications, without immune rejection. However, one of the key problems in the use of MSCs for these applications is the efficiency of these cells to engraft and fully regenerate damaged tissues. Therefore, to optimize this process, a comprehensive understanding of the key regulators of MSCs self-renewal and maintenance are critical to the success of future cell therapy as well as other clinical applications. The basic helix loop helix transcription factor, Twist, plays a master regulatory role in all of these processes and, therefore, a thorough understanding of the mechanistic insights in the role of Twist in lineage specification/differentiation and tumorigenesis is vital to the success of future clinical applications for the therapeutic use of MSCs. In this article, we highlight the basic mechanisms and signaling pathways that are important to MSC fate, maintenance, and differentiation, as well as the critical role that Twist plays in these processes. In addition, we review the known literature suggesting a critical role for Twist in the generation of cancer stem cells, as this information may contribute to a broader understanding of stem cell biology and stem-cell-based therapeutics.

  16. Toward a mechanistic understanding of the effect of biochar addition on soil water retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S.; Chang, N.; Guo, M.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar (BC) is a carbon-rich product produced by thermal degradation of biomass in an oxygen-free environment, whose application to sediment is said to improve water retention. However, BC produced from different feedstocks and pyrolyzed at different temperatures have distinct properties, which may alter water retention in ways difficult to predict a priori. Our goal is to develop a mechanistic understanding of BC addition on water retention by examining the impact of BC from two feedstocks, poultry litter (PL) and hardwood (HW), on the soil-water retention curves (SWRC) of a uniform sand and a sandy loam (SL). For experiments with sand, BC and sand were sieved to the same particle size (~ 0.547 mm) to minimize effects of BC addition on particle size distribution. Experiments with SL contained the same sieved BC. PL and HW bicohars were added at 2 and 7% (w/w), and water retention was measured from 0 to -4.38 × 106 cm-H2O. Both BCs increased porosities for sand and SL, up to 39 and 13% for sand and SL, respectively, with 7% HW BC addition. The primary cause for these increases was the internal porosity of BC particles. While the matric potential for air-entry was unchanged with BC addition, BC amendment increased water retention for sand and SL in the capillary region (0 to -15,000 cm-H2O) by an average of 26 and 33 % for 7% PL and HW BC in sand, respectively, but only 7 and 14 % for 7% PL and HW BC in SL. The most dramatic influence of BC amendment on water retention occurred in the adsorption region (< -15,000 cm-H2O), where water retention increased by a factor of 11 and 22 for 7% PL and HW BC in sand, respectively, but by 140 and 190 % for 7% PL and HW BC in SL, respectively. The impact of BC on water retention in these sediments is explained primarily by the additional surface area and internal porosity of PL and HW BC particles. van Genuchten (VG) models were fitted to the water retention data. For SL where the impact of BC addition on water retention was

  17. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2011-12-22

    Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases but with notable differences, such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional cocrystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently bound transition state mimic provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

  18. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 Å resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases, but with notable differences such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional co-crystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently-bound transition state mimic, provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily. PMID:22035792

  19. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally. PMID:24459184

  20. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-02-11

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally.

  1. Mechanistic insight into the photoredox catalysis of anti-Markovnikov alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Romero, Nathan A.; Nicewicz, David A.

    2014-11-12

    Here, we describe our efforts to understand the key mechanistic aspects of the previously reported alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions using 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium (Mes-Acr+) as a photoredox catalyst. Importantly, we are able to detect alkene cation radical intermediates, and confirm that phenylthiyl radical is capable of oxidizing the persistent acridinyl radical in a fast process that unites the catalytic activity of the photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) manifolds. Additionally, we present evidence that diphenyl disulfide ((PhS)2) operates on a common catalytic cycle with thiophenol (PhSH) by way of photolytic cleaveage of the disulfide bond. Transition structure analysis of the HAT step usingmore » DFT reveals that the activation barrier for H atom donation from PhSH is significantly lower than 2-phenylmalononitrile (PMN) due to structural reorganization. In the early stages of the reaction, Mes-Acr+ is observed to engage in off-cycle adduct formation, presumably as buildup of PhS– becomes significant. The kinetic differences between PhSH and (PhS)2 as HAT catalysts indicate that the proton transfer step may have significant rate limiting influence.« less

  2. Mechanistic insight into the photoredox catalysis of anti-Markovnikov alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Nathan A.; Nicewicz, David A.

    2014-11-12

    Here, we describe our efforts to understand the key mechanistic aspects of the previously reported alkene hydrofunctionalization reactions using 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium (Mes-Acr+) as a photoredox catalyst. Importantly, we are able to detect alkene cation radical intermediates, and confirm that phenylthiyl radical is capable of oxidizing the persistent acridinyl radical in a fast process that unites the catalytic activity of the photoredox and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) manifolds. Additionally, we present evidence that diphenyl disulfide ((PhS)2) operates on a common catalytic cycle with thiophenol (PhSH) by way of photolytic cleaveage of the disulfide bond. Transition structure analysis of the HAT step using DFT reveals that the activation barrier for H atom donation from PhSH is significantly lower than 2-phenylmalononitrile (PMN) due to structural reorganization. In the early stages of the reaction, Mes-Acr+ is observed to engage in off-cycle adduct formation, presumably as buildup of PhS becomes significant. The kinetic differences between PhSH and (PhS)2 as HAT catalysts indicate that the proton transfer step may have significant rate limiting influence.

  3. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Diana V; Salazar, Sara B; Lopes, Maria M; Mira, Nuno P

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 < VG99 < VG216) and the highly susceptible laboratory strain KUE100 were selected for further studies. When suddenly challenged with acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can

  4. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Diana V.; Salazar, Sara B.; Lopes, Maria M.; Mira, Nuno P.

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 < VG99 < VG216) and the highly susceptible laboratory strain KUE100 were selected for further studies. When suddenly challenged with acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can

  5. Glycation of Lysozyme by Glycolaldehyde Provides New Mechanistic Insights in Diabetes-Related Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Laura; Maya-Aguirre, Carlos Andrés; Pauwels, Kris; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Ortega-Castro, Joaquin; Frau, Juan; Donoso, Josefa; Adrover, Miquel

    2017-03-14

    Glycation occurs in vivo as a result of the nonenzymatic reaction of carbohydrates (and/or their autoxidation products) with proteins, DNA, or lipids. Protein glycation causes loss-of-function and, consequently, the development of diabetic-related diseases. Glycation also boosts protein aggregation, which can be directly related with the higher prevalence of aggregating diseases in diabetic people. However, the molecular mechanism connecting glycation with aggregation still remains unclear. Previously we described mechanistically how glycation of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) with ribose induced its aggregation. Here we address the question of whether the ribose-induced aggregation is a general process or it depends on the chemical nature of the glycating agent. Glycation of HEWL with glycolaldehyde occurs through two different scenarios depending on the HEWL concentration regime (both within the micromolar range). At low HEWL concentration, non-cross-linking fluorescent advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are formed on Lys side chains, which do not change the protein structure but inhibit its enzymatic activity. These AGEs have little impact on HEWL surface hydrophobicity and, therefore, a negligible effect on its aggregation propensity. Upon increasing HEWL concentration, the glycation mechanism shifts toward the formation of intermolecular cross-links, which triggers a polymerization cascade involving the formation of insoluble spherical-like aggregates. These results notably differ with the aggregation-modulation mechanism of ribosylated HEWL directed by hydrophobic interactions. Additionally, their comparison constitutes the first experimental evidence showing that the mechanism underlying the aggregation of a glycated protein depends on the chemical nature of the glycating agent.

  6. Singlet oxygen oxidation of isolated and cellular DNA: product formation and mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Martinez, Glaucia R; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    This survey focuses on recent aspects of the singlet oxygen oxidation of the guanine moiety of nucleosides, oligonucleotides, isolated and cellular DNA that has been shown to be the exclusive DNA target for this biologically relevant photogenerated oxidant. A large body of mechanistic data is now available from studies performed on nucleosides in both aprotic solvents and aqueous solutions. A common process to both reaction conditions is the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine by reduction of 8-hydroperoxyguanine that arises from the rearrangement of initially formed endoperoxide across the 4,8-bond of the purine moiety. However, in organic solvent the hydroperoxide is converted as a major degradation pathway into a dioxirane that subsequently decomposes into a complex pattern of oxidation products. A different reaction that involved the formation of a highly reactive quinonoid intermediate consecutively to the loss of a water molecule from the 8-hydroperoxide has been shown to occur in aqueous solution. Subsequent addition of a water molecule at C5 leads to the generation of a spiroiminodihy-dantoin compound via a rearrangement that involves an acyl shift. However, in both isolated and cellular DNA the latter decomposition pathway is at the best a minor process, because only 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine has been found to be generated. It is interesting to point out that singlet oxygen has been shown to contribute predominantly to the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine in the DNA of bacterial and human cells upon exposure to UVA radiation. It may be added that the formation of secondary singlet-oxygen oxidation products of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, including spiroiminodihydantoin and oxaluric acid that were characterized in nucleosides and oligonucleotide, respectively, have not yet been found in cellular DNA.

  7. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A.; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  8. Mechanistic insights related to the design and construction of lithium single ion conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahlinger, Gregory

    Lithium single ion conductors are a class of electrolytes, typically designed for lithium ion batteries, with the potential to improve the performance of these batteries. The benefits of single ion conductors arise out of the fact that their immobile anions are not capable of concentrating near the anode of the battery, causing an increase in resistance as the battery is discharged. Unfortunately lithium single ion conductors suffer severe drawbacks in their conductivity which have been attributed to diverse causes. Because of the low success rate of single ion conductors in the literature and previous work in the Baker group, I have chosen to investigate mechanistic questions related to the design and construction of these materials, without engineering new materials. An attractive design strategy for the screening of immobile anion moieties for single ion conductors would be the use of the copper catalyzed alkyne azide (CUAAC) "click" reaction in order to efficiently introduce anions onto a polymer or nanoparticle support in a way that is efficient and tunable. A variable added by this strategy would be the presence of a 1,2,3-triazole moiety which is without any significant precedent in the lithium ion electrolyte literature. In order to assess the impact of the triazole in on the conductivity of an electrolyte a series of model compounds were synthesized containing a variable number of triazoles in an otherwise poly(ethylene glycol) like oligomer chain. The model compounds were subjected to differential scanning calorimetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and in one case single crystal X-ray diffraction, and solvent shells were modeled for lithium with and without triazoles using ab initio quantum chemistry calculations. It was concluded that the triazole is not significantly stronger than an ether oxygen as a ligand in the electrolytes, however the triazole has a substantial dipole which exerts some deleterious effects on the conductivity, leading to

  9. New mechanistic insights in the NH3-SCR reactions at low temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Selleri, Tomasso; Nova, Isabella; ...

    2016-05-06

    The present study is focused on the investigation of the low temperature Standard SCR reaction mechanism over Fe- and Cu-promoted zeolites. Different techniques are employed, including in situ DRIFTS, transient reaction analysis and chemical trapping techniques. The results present strong evidence of nitrite formation in the oxidative activation of NO and of their role in SCR reactions. These elements lead to a deeper understanding of the standard SCR chemistry at low temperature and can potentially improve the consistency of mechanistic mathematical models. Furthermore, comprehension of the mechanism on a fundamental level can contribute to the development of improved SCR catalysts.

  10. New mechanistic insights in the NH3-SCR reactions at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Selleri, Tomasso; Nova, Isabella; Tronconi, Enrico; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2016-05-06

    The present study is focused on the investigation of the low temperature Standard SCR reaction mechanism over Fe- and Cu-promoted zeolites. Different techniques are employed, including in situ DRIFTS, transient reaction analysis and chemical trapping techniques. The results present strong evidence of nitrite formation in the oxidative activation of NO and of their role in SCR reactions. These elements lead to a deeper understanding of the standard SCR chemistry at low temperature and can potentially improve the consistency of mechanistic mathematical models. Furthermore, comprehension of the mechanism on a fundamental level can contribute to the development of improved SCR catalysts.

  11. Catalytic intermolecular amination of C-H bonds: method development and mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Kristin Williams; Du Bois, J

    2007-01-24

    Reaction methodology for intermolecular C-H amination of benzylic and 3 degrees C-H bonds is described. This process uses the starting alkane as the limiting reagent, gives optically pure tetrasubstituted amines through stereospecific insertion into enantiomeric 3 degrees centers, displays high chemoselectivity for benzylic oxidation, and enables the facile preparation of isotopically enriched 15N-labeled compounds. Access to substituted amines, amino alcohols, and diamines is thereby made possible in a single transformation. Important information relevant to understanding the initial steps in the catalytic cycle, reaction chemoselectivity, the nature of the active oxidant, and pathways for catalyst inactivation has been gained through mechanistic analysis; these studies are also presented.

  12. Mechanistic Insight in the Function of Phosphite Additives for Protection of LiNi 0.5 Co 0.2 Mn 0.3 O 2 Cathode in High Voltage Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect

    He, Meinan; Su, Chi-Cheung; Peebles, Cameron; Feng, Zhenxing; Connell, Justin G.; Liao, Chen; Wang, Yan; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2016-05-11

    Triethlylphosphite (TEP) and tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TTFP) have been evaluated as electrolyte additives for high-voltage Li-ion battery cells using a Ni-rich layered cathode material LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM523) and the conventional carbonate electrolyte. The repeated charge/discharge cycling for cells containing 1 wt% of these additives was performed using an NCM523/graphite full cell operated at the voltage window from 3.0 to 4.6 V. During the initial charge process, these additives decompose on the cathode surface at a lower oxidation potential than the baseline electrolyte. Impedance spectroscopy and post-test analyses indicate the formation of protective coatings by both additives on the cathode surface that prevent oxidative breakdown of the electrolyte. However, only TTFP containing cells demonstrate the improved capacity retention and Coulombic efficiency. For TEP, the protective coating is also formed, but low Li+ ion mobility through the interphase layer results in inferior performance. These observations are rationalized through the inhibition of electrocatalytic centers present on the cathode surface and the formation of organophosphate deposits isolating the cathode surface from the electrolyte. The difference between the two phosphites clearly originates in the different properties of the resulting phosphate coatings, which may be in Li+ ion conductivity through such materials.

  13. Mechanistic insights on immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-tuberculosis co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki M; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Larsson, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Immunosenescence is marked by accelerated degradation of host immune responses leading to the onset of opportunistic infections, where senescent T cells show remarkably higher ontogenic defects as compared to healthy T cells. The mechanistic association between T-cell immunosenescence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, and functional T-cell responses in HIV-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection remains to be elaborately discussed. Here, we discussed the association of immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-TB co-infection and reviewed the role played by mediators of immune deterioration in HIV-TB co-infection necessitating the importance of designing therapeutic strategies against HIV disease progression and pathogenesis. PMID:25674514

  14. Mechanistic insight into digoxin inactivation by Eggerthella lenta augments our understanding of its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Haiser, Henry J; Seim, Kristen L; Balskus, Emily P; Turnbaugh, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a key role in pharmacology, yet the mechanisms responsible remain unclear, impeding efforts toward personalized medicine. We recently identified a cytochrome-encoding operon in the common gut Actinobacterium Eggerthella lenta that is transcriptionally activated by the cardiac drug digoxin. These genes represent a predictive microbial biomarker for the inactivation of digoxin. Gnotobiotic mouse experiments revealed that increased protein intake can limit microbial drug inactivation. Here, we present a biochemical rationale for how the proteins encoded by this operon might inactivate digoxin through substrate promiscuity. We discuss digoxin signaling in eukaryotic systems, and consider the possibility that endogenous digoxin-like molecules may have selected for microbial digoxin inactivation. Finally, we highlight the diverse contributions of gut microbes to drug metabolism, present a generalized approach to studying microbe-drug interactions, and argue that mechanistic studies will pave the way for the clinical application of this work.

  15. A structural classification of carbohydrate epimerases: From mechanistic insights to practical applications.

    PubMed

    Van Overtveldt, Stevie; Verhaeghe, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; van den Bergh, Tom; Beerens, Koen; Desmet, Tom

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, carbohydrate epimerases have attracted a lot of attention as efficient biocatalysts that can convert abundant sugars (e.g.d-fructose) directly into rare counterparts (e.g.d-psicose). Despite increased research activities, no review about these enzymes has been published in more than a decade, meaning that their full potential is hard to appreciate. Here, we present an overview of all known carbohydrate epimerases based on a classification in structural families, which links every substrate specificity to a well-defined reaction mechanism. The mechanism can even be predicted for enzymes that have not yet been characterized or that lack structural information. In this review, the different families are discussed in detail, both structurally and mechanistically, with special reference to recent examples in the literature. Furthermore, the value of understanding the reaction mechanism will be illustrated by making the link to possible application and engineering targets.

  16. Mechanistic insight into the ribosome biogenesis functions of the ancient protein KsgA

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith; Rife, Jason P.; Culver, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Summary While the general blueprint of ribosome biogenesis is evolutionarily conserved, most details have diverged considerably. A striking exception to this divergence is the universally conserved KsgA/Dim1p enzyme family, which modifies two adjacent adenosines in the terminal helix of small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA). While localization of KsgA on 30S subunits (SSUs) and genetic interaction data have suggested that KsgA acts as a ribosome biogenesis factor, mechanistic details and a rationale for its extreme conservation are still lacking. To begin to address these questions we have characterized the function of E. coli KsgA in vivo using both a ksgA deletion strain and a methyltransferase deficient form of this protein. Our data reveals cold sensitivity and altered ribosomal profiles are associated with a ΔksgA genotype in E. coli. Our work also indicates that loss of KsgA alters 16S rRNA processing. These findings allow KsgAs role in SSU biogenesis to be integrated into the network of other identified factors. Moreover, a methyltransferase-inactive form of KsgA, which we show to be deleterious to cell growth, profoundly impairs ribosome biogenesis prompting discussion of KsgA as a possible anti-microbial drug target. These unexpected data suggest that methylation is a second layer of function for KsgA and that its critical role is as a supervisor of biogenesis of SSUs in vivo. These new findings and this proposed regulatory role offer a mechanistic explanation for the extreme conservation of the KsgA/Dim1p enzyme family. PMID:18990185

  17. Mechanistic insights into hydroacylation with non-chelating aldehydes†Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods, reaction procedures, characterization data. CCDC 1012849. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c4sc02026jClick here for additional data file.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen K; Bruch, Achim; Dong, Vy M

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a small-bite-angle diphosphine bis(dicyclohexylphosphino)methane (dcpm) and [Rh(cod)OMe]2 catalyses the hydroacylation of 2-vinylphenols with a wide range of non-chelating aldehydes. Here we present a detailed experimental study that elucidates the factors contributing to the broad aldehyde scope and high reactivity. A variety of catalytically relevant intermediates were isolated and a [Rh(dcpm)(vinylphenolate)] complex was identified as the major catalytically relevant species. A variety of off-cycle intermediates were also identified that can re-enter the catalytic cycle by substrate- or 1,5-cyclooctadiene-mediated pathways. Saturation kinetics with respect to the 2-vinylphenol were observed, and this may contribute to the high selectivity for hydroacylation over aldehyde decarbonylation. A series of deuterium labelling experiments and Hammett studies support the oxidative addition of Rh to the aldehyde C-H bond as an irreversible and turnover-limiting step. The small bite angle of dcpm is crucial for lowering the barrier of this step and providing excellent reactivity with a variety of aldehydes.

  18. Rhodium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Chiral Spiro-9-silabifluorenes by Dehydrogenative Silylation: Mechanistic Insights into the Construction of Tetraorganosilicon Stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masahito; Takeuchi, Yutaro; Yamauchi, Kanae; Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-18

    Mechanistic insight into the construction of quaternary silicon chiral centers by rhodium-catalyzed synthesis of spiro-9-silabifluorenes through dehydrogenative silylation is reported. The C2 -symmetric bisphosphine ligand, BINAP, was effective in controlling enantioselectivity, and axially chiral spiro-9-silabifluorenes were obtained in excellent yields with high enantiomeric excess. Monitoring of the reaction revealed the presence of a monohydrosilane intermediate as a mixture of two constitutional isomers. The reaction proceeded through two consecutive dehydrogenative silylations, and the absolute configuration was determined in the first silylative cyclization. Competitive reactions with electron-rich and electron-deficient dihydrosilanes indicated that the rate of silylative cyclization increased with decreasing electron density on the silicon atom of the starting dihydrosilane. Further investigation disclosed a rare interconversion between the two constitutional isomers of the monohydrosilane intermediate with retention of the absolute configuration.

  19. Mechanistic insights into the oxidation of substituted phenols via hydrogen atom abstraction by a cupric-superoxo complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Peterson, Ryan L; Ohkubo, Kei; Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Himes, Richard A; Woertink, Julia; Moore, Cathy D; Solomon, Edward I; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2014-07-16

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the inherent reactivity patterns for copper(I)-O2 adducts, a new cupric-superoxo complex [(DMM-tmpa)Cu(II)(O2(•-))](+) (2) [DMM-tmpa = tris((4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridin-2-yl)methyl)amine] has been synthesized and studied in phenol oxidation-oxygenation reactions. Compound 2 is characterized by UV-vis, resonance Raman, and EPR spectroscopies. Its reactions with a series of para-substituted 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols (p-X-DTBPs) afford 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DTBQ) in up to 50% yields. Significant deuterium kinetic isotope effects and a positive correlation of second-order rate constants (k2) compared to rate constants for p-X-DTBPs plus cumylperoxyl radical reactions indicate a mechanism that involves rate-limiting hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). A weak correlation of (k(B)T/e) ln k2 versus E(ox) of p-X-DTBP indicates that the HAT reactions proceed via a partial transfer of charge rather than a complete transfer of charge in the electron transfer/proton transfer pathway. Product analyses, (18)O-labeling experiments, and separate reactivity employing the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical provide further mechanistic insights. After initial HAT, a second molar equiv of 2 couples to the phenoxyl radical initially formed, giving a Cu(II)-OO-(ArO') intermediate, which proceeds in the case of p-OR-DTBP substrates via a two-electron oxidation reaction involving hydrolysis steps which liberate H2O2 and the corresponding alcohol. By contrast, four-electron oxygenation (O-O cleavage) mainly occurs for p-R-DTBP which gives (18)O-labeled DTBQ and elimination of the R group.

  20. Mechanistic Insights into the Oxidation of Substituted Phenols via Hydrogen Atom Abstraction by a Cupric–Superoxo Complex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the inherent reactivity patterns for copper(I)–O2 adducts, a new cupric–superoxo complex [(DMM-tmpa)CuII(O2•–)]+ (2) [DMM-tmpa = tris((4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridin-2-yl)methyl)amine] has been synthesized and studied in phenol oxidation–oxygenation reactions. Compound 2 is characterized by UV–vis, resonance Raman, and EPR spectroscopies. Its reactions with a series of para-substituted 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols (p-X-DTBPs) afford 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DTBQ) in up to 50% yields. Significant deuterium kinetic isotope effects and a positive correlation of second-order rate constants (k2) compared to rate constants for p-X-DTBPs plus cumylperoxyl radical reactions indicate a mechanism that involves rate-limiting hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). A weak correlation of (kBT/e) ln k2 versus Eox of p-X-DTBP indicates that the HAT reactions proceed via a partial transfer of charge rather than a complete transfer of charge in the electron transfer/proton transfer pathway. Product analyses, 18O-labeling experiments, and separate reactivity employing the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical provide further mechanistic insights. After initial HAT, a second molar equiv of 2 couples to the phenoxyl radical initially formed, giving a CuII–OO–(ArO′) intermediate, which proceeds in the case of p-OR-DTBP substrates via a two-electron oxidation reaction involving hydrolysis steps which liberate H2O2 and the corresponding alcohol. By contrast, four-electron oxygenation (O–O cleavage) mainly occurs for p-R-DTBP which gives 18O-labeled DTBQ and elimination of the R group. PMID:24953129

  1. Allosteric Modulation of Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptors: Mechanistic Insight through Metadynamics and Essential Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grazioso, Giovanni; Sgrignani, Jacopo; Capelli, Romina; Matera, Carlo; Dallanoce, Clelia; De Amici, Marco; Cavalli, Andrea

    2015-12-28

    Increasing attention has recently been devoted to allosteric modulators, as they can provide inherent advantages over classic receptor agonists. In the field of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), the main advantage is that allosteric modulators can trigger pharmacological responses, limiting receptor desensitization. Most of the known allosteric ligands are "positive allosteric modulators" (PAMs), which increase both sensitivity to receptor agonists and current amplitude. Intriguingly, some allosteric modulators are also able to activate the α7 receptor (α7-nAChR) even in the absence of orthosteric agonists. These compounds have been named "ago-allosteric modulators" and GAT107 has been studied in depth because of its unique mechanism of action. We here investigate by molecular dynamics simulations, metadynamics, and essential dynamics the activation mechanism of α7-nAChR, in the presence of different nicotinic modulators. We determine the free energy profiles associated with the closed-to-open motion of the loop C, and we highlight mechanistic differences observed in the presence of different modulators. In particular, we demonstrate that GAT107 triggers conformational motions and cross-talk similar to those observed when the α7-nACh receptor is in complex with both an agonist and an allosteric modulator.

  2. Mechanistic insights on organocatalytic enantioselective decarboxylative protonation by epicinchona-thiourea hybrid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Arkajyoti; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-12-07

    Mechanism and the origin of enantioselectivity in the decarboxylative protonation of α-amino malonate hemiester promoted by epicinchona-thiourea hybrid organocatalyst is established by using the DFT(M06-2X/6-311+G**//ONIOM2) computational methods. The origin of stereoselectivity rendered by this hybrid bifunctional catalyst in asymmetric protonation is investigated for the first time using suitable transition-state models. A detailed conformational analysis of N-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)]phenylthiourea-based epicinchonidine reveals the potential for a bifunctional mode of activation of the substrate α-amino malonate hemiester through hydrogen bonding. Six different conformer families differing in characteristic dihedral angles are identified within a range of 16 kcal/mol with respect to the lowest energy conformer. Different likely mechanistic pathways obtained through detailed analysis of the transition states and intermediates are compared. It is identified that in the preferred pathway, the decarboxylation is followed by a direct proton transfer from the chiral quinuclidinium moiety to the enolate carbon as opposed to a conventional protonation at the enolate oxygen followed by a keto-enol tautomerization. The factors responsible for high levels of observed stereoselectivity are traced to interesting hydrogen-bonding interactions offered by the thiourea-cinchona bifunctional framework. The predicted stereoselectivities using computed Gibbs free energies of diastereomeric transition states are in fair agreement with the experimental stereoselectivities.

  3. Mechanistic insights into flow induced segregation in blood and other multicomponent suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Graham, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Blood is a multicomponent suspension comprising mostly of red-blood-cells (RBCs) along with trace amounts of leukocytes and platelets. Under normal flow conditions both the leukocytes and the platelets segregate near the vessel walls, a phenomenon commonly known as margination. The key physical differences between RBCs, leukocytes, and platelets are their relative size and rigidity: leukocytes are larger than RBCs and platelets smaller, but both are considerably stiffer than RBCs. In this work we study the blood flow problem using a model system of fluid-filled elastic capsule mixtures. Using boundary integral (BI) simulations we delineate the effect of size and rigidity on the segregation behavior, and relate these to the observations of leukocyte and platelet margination in blood. Further, we introduce a novel Monte Carlo simulation technique, which incorporates two of the key transport mechanisms in confined suspensions: the wall-induced migration and hydrodynamic pair collisions. The model accurately reproduces the results of BI simulations and provides a mechanistic understanding of the margination phenomena. In particular, it clarifies the important role of heterogeneous pair collisions (collisions between two different species) on the observed margination behavior.

  4. Substrate promiscuity in DNA methyltransferase M.PvuII. A mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan; Roca, Maite; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2012-07-28

    M.PvuII is a DNA methyltransferase from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris that catalyzes methylation of cytosine at the N4 position. This enzyme also displays promiscuous activity catalyzing methylation of adenine at the N6 position. In this work we use QM/MM methods to investigate the reaction mechanism of this promiscuous activity. We found that N6 methylation in M.PvuII takes place by means of a stepwise mechanism in which deprotonation of the exocyclic amino group is followed by the methyl transfer. Deprotonation involves two residues of the active site, Ser53 and Asp96, while methylation takes place directly from the AdoMet cofactor to the target nitrogen atom. The same reaction mechanism was described for cytosine methylation in the same enzyme, while the reversal timing, that is methylation followed by deprotonation, has been described in M.TaqI, an enzyme that catalyzes the N6-adenine DNA methylation from Thermus aquaticus. These mechanistic findings can be useful to understand the evolutionary paths followed by N-methyltransferases.

  5. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  6. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  7. Carcinogenicity and mechanistic insights on the behavior of epoxides and epoxide-forming chemicals.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Ronald L

    2002-12-01

    Many epoxides and their precursors are high production volume chemicals that have major uses in the polymer industry and as intermediates in the manufacture of other chemicals. Several of these chemicals were demonstrated to be carcinogenic in laboratory animal studies conducted by the Ramazzini Foundation (e.g., vinyl chloride, acrylonitrile, styrene, styrene oxide, and benzene) and by the National Toxicology Program (e.g., ethylene oxide, 1,3-butadiene, isoprene, chloroprene, acrylonitrile, glycidol, and benzene). The most common sites of tumor induction were lung, liver, harderian gland, and circulatory system in mice; Zymbal's gland and brain in rats; and mammary gland and forestomach in both species. Differences in cancer outcome among studies of epoxide chemicals may be related to differences in study design (e.g., dose, duration, and route of exposure; observation period; animal strains), as well as biological factors affecting target organ dosimetry of the DNA-reactive epoxide (toxicokinetics) and tissue response (toxicodynamics). N7-Alkylguanine, N1-alkyladenine, and cyclic etheno adducts, as well as K-ras and p53 mutations, have been detected in animals and/or workers exposed to several of these chemicals. The classifications of these chemical carcinogens by IARC and NTP are based on animal and human data and results of mechanistic studies. Reducing occupational and environmental exposures to these chemicals will certainly reduce human cancer risks.

  8. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Rodrigue, Garry R; Fitch, J Patrick; Wilson, David M

    2002-04-15

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polbeta-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polbeta-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity.

  9. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A.; Rodrigue, Garry R.; Fitch, J. Patrick; Wilson, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polβ-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polβ-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity. PMID:11937636

  10. Structure-based Mechanistic Insights into Terminal Amide Synthase in Nosiheptide-Represented Thiopeptides Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shanshan; Guo, Heng; Zhang, Tianlong; Han, Li; Yao, Pengfei; Zhang, Yan; Rong, Naiyan; Yu, Yi; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Ding, Jianping; Wang, Renxiao; Liu, Wen; Cao, Chunyang

    2015-01-01

    Nosiheptide is a parent compound of thiopeptide family that exhibit potent activities against various bacterial pathogens. Its C-terminal amide formation is catalyzed by NosA, which is an unusual strategy for maturating certain thiopeptides by processing their precursor peptides featuring a serine extension. We here report the crystal structure of truncated NosA1-111 variant, revealing three key elements, including basic lysine 49 (K49), acidic glutamic acid 101 (E101) and flexible C-terminal loop NosA112-151, are crucial to the catalytic terminal amide formation in nosiheptide biosynthesis. The side-chain of residue K49 and the C-terminal loop fasten the substrate through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The side-chain of residue E101 enhances nucleophilic attack of H2O to the methyl imine intermediate, leading to Cα-N bond cleavage and nosiheptide maturation. The sequence alignment of NosA and its homologs NocA, PbtH, TpdK and BerI, and the enzymatic assay suggest that the mechanistic studies on NosA present an intriguing paradigm about how NosA family members function during thiopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:26244829

  11. Mechanistic insights on platinum- and palladium-pincer catalyzed coupling and cyclopropanation reactions between olefins.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Ramanan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-07-21

    The mechanism of M(II)-PNP-pincer catalyzed reaction between (i) ethene, (ii) trans-butene with 2-methylbut-2-ene, 2,3-dimethylbut-2-ene and tert-butylbutene is examined by using density functional theory methods (where M = Pt or Pd). All key intermediates and transition states involved in the reaction are precisely located on the respective potential energy surfaces using the popular DFT functionals such as mPW1K, M06-2X, and B3LYP in conjunction with the 6-31+G** basis set. The reaction between these olefins can lead to a linear coupling product or a substituted cyclopropane. The energetic comparison between coupling as well as cyclopropanation pathways involving four pairs of olefins for both platinum (1-4) and palladium (5-8) catalyzed reactions is performed. The key events in the lower energy pathway in the mechanistic course involves (i) a C-C bond formation between the metal bound olefin (ethene or trans-butene) and a free olefin, and (ii) two successive [1,2] hydrogen migrations in the ensuing carbocationic intermediates (1c-4c, and 1d-4d), toward the formation of the coupling product. The computed barriers for these steps in the reaction of metal bound ethene to free tert-butylbutene (or other butenes) are found to be much lower than the corresponding steps when trans-butene is bound to the metal pincer. The Gibbs free energy differences between the transition states leading to the coupling product (TS(d-e)) and that responsible for cyclopropanated product (TS(d-g)) are found to be diminishingly closer in the case of the platinum pincer as compared to that in the palladium system. The computed energetics indicate that the coupled product prefers to remain as a metal olefin complex, consistent with the earlier experimental reports.

  12. Mechanistic insights into the effects of climate change on larval cod.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Trond; Stock, Charles; Drinkwater, Kenneth F; Curchitser, Enrique N

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the biophysical mechanisms that shape variability in fisheries recruitment is critical for estimating the effects of climate change on fisheries. In this study, we used an Earth System Model (ESM) and a mechanistic individual-based model (IBM) for larval fish to analyze how climate change may impact the growth and survival of larval cod in the North Atlantic. We focused our analysis on five regions that span the current geographical range of cod and are known to contain important spawning populations. Under the SRES A2 (high emissions) scenario, the ESM-projected surface ocean temperatures are expected to increase by >1 °C for 3 of the 5 regions, and stratification is expected to increase at all sites between 1950-1999 and 2050-2099. This enhanced stratification is projected to decrease large (>5 μm ESD) phytoplankton productivity and mesozooplankton biomass at all 5 sites. Higher temperatures are projected to increase larval metabolic costs, which combined with decreased food resources will reduce larval weight, increase the probability of larvae dying from starvation and increase larval exposure to visual and invertebrate predators at most sites. If current concentrations of piscivore and invertebrate predators are maintained, larval survival is projected to decrease at all five sites by 2050-2099. In contrast to past observed responses to climate variability in which warm anomalies led to better recruitment in cold-water stocks, our simulations indicated that reduced prey availability under climate change may cause a reduction in larval survival despite higher temperatures in these regions. In the lower prey environment projected under climate change, higher metabolic costs due to higher temperatures outweigh the advantages of higher growth potential, leading to negative effects on northern cod stocks. Our results provide an important first large-scale assessment of the impacts of climate change on larval cod in the North Atlantic.

  13. Mechanistic Insight into the Chemical Exfoliation and Functionalization of Ti3C2 MXene.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pooja; Mishra, Avanish; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Singh, Abhishek K

    2016-09-14

    MXene, a two-dimensional layer of transition metal carbides/nitrides, showed great promise for energy storage, sensing, and electronic applications. MXene are chemically exfoliated from the bulk MAX phase; however, mechanistic understanding of exfoliation and subsequent functionalization of these technologically important materials is still lacking. Here, using density-functional theory we show that exfoliation of Ti3C2 MXene proceeds via HF insertion through edges of Ti3AlC2 MAX phase. Spontaneous dissociation of HF and subsequent termination of edge Ti atoms by H/F weakens Al-MXene bonds. Consequent opening of the interlayer gap allows further insertion of HF that leads to the formation of AlF3 and H2, which eventually come out of the MAX, leaving fluorinated MXene behind. Density of state and electron localization function shows robust binding between F/OH and Ti, which makes it very difficult to obtain controlled functionalized or pristine MXene. Analysis of the calculated Gibbs free energy (ΔG) shows fully fluorinated MXene to be lowest in energy, whereas the formation of pristine MXene is thermodynamically least favorable. In the presence of water, mixed functionalized Ti3C2Fx(OH)1-x (x ranges from 0 to 1) MXene can be obtained. The ΔG values for the mixed functionalized MXenes are very close in energy, indicating the random and nonuniform functionalization of MXene. The microscopic understanding gained here unveils the challenges in exfoliation and controlling the functionalization of MXene, which is essential for its practical application.

  14. Understanding impacts of climatic extremes on diarrheal disease epidemics: Insights from mechanistic disease propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    An epidemic outbreak of diarrheal diseases (primarily cholera) in Haiti in 2010 is a reminder that our understanding on disease triggers, transmission and spreading mechanisms is incomplete. Cholera can occur in two forms - epidemic (defined as sudden outbreak in a historically disease free region) and endemic (recurrence and persistence of the disease for several consecutive years). Examples of countries with epidemic cholera include Pakistan (2008), Congo (2008), and most recently Haiti (2010). A significant difference between endemic and epidemic regions is the mortality rate, i.e., 1% or lower in an endemic regions versus 3-7% during recent epidemic outbreaks. A fundamentally transformational approach - a warning system with several months prediction lead time - is needed to prevent disease outbreak and minimize its impact on population. Lack of information on spatial and temporal variability of disease incidence as well as transmission in human population continues to be significant challenge in the development of early-warning systems for cholera. Using satellite data on regional hydroclimatic processes, water and sanitation infrastructure indices, and biological pathogen growth information, here we present a Simple, Mechanistic, Adaptive, Remote sensing based Regional Transmission or SMART model to (i) identify regions of potential cholera outbreaks and (ii) quantify mechanism of spread of the disease in previously disease free region. Our results indicate that epidemic regions are located near regional rivers and are characterized by sporadic outbreaks, which are likely to be initiated during episodes of prevailing warm air temperature with low river flows, creating favorable environmental conditions for the growth of cholera bacteria. Heavy rainfall, through inundation or breakdown of sanitary infrastructure, accelerates interaction between contaminated water and human activities, resulting in an epidemic. We discuss the above findings in light of

  15. Mechanistic insight into the reaction catalysed by bacterial type II dehydroquinases.

    PubMed

    Coderch, Claire; Lence, Emilio; Peón, Antonio; Lamb, Heather; Hawkins, Alastair R; Gago, Federico; González-Bello, Concepción

    2014-03-15

    DHQ2 (type II dehydroquinase), which is an essential enzyme in Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis and does not have any counterpart in humans, is recognized to be an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents. Computational and biochemical studies that help understand in atomic detail the catalytic mechanism of these bacterial enzymes are reported in the present paper. A previously unknown key role of certain conserved residues of these enzymes, as well as the structural changes responsible for triggering the release of the product from the active site, were identified. Asp89*/Asp88* from a neighbouring enzyme subunit proved to be the residue responsible for the deprotonation of the essential tyrosine to afford the catalytic tyrosinate, which triggers the enzymatic process. The essentiality of this residue is supported by results from site-directed mutagenesis. For H. pylori DHQ2, this reaction takes place through the assistance of a water molecule, whereas for M. tuberculosis DHQ2, the tyrosine is directly deprotonated by the aspartate residue. The participation of a water molecule in this deprotonation reaction is supported by solvent isotope effects and proton inventory studies. MD simulation studies provide details of the required motions for the catalytic turnover, which provides a complete overview of the catalytic cycle. The product is expelled from the active site by the essential arginine residue and after a large conformational change of a loop containing two conserved arginine residues (Arg109/Arg108 and Arg113/Arg112), which reveals a previously unknown key role for these residues. The present study highlights the key role of the aspartate residue whose blockage could be useful in the rational design of inhibitors and the mechanistic differences between both enzymes.

  16. Extracellular regulation of type IIa receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases: mechanistic insights from structural analyses

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Charlotte H.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Aricescu, A. Radu

    2016-01-01

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) exhibit a wide repertoire of cellular signalling functions. In particular, type IIa RPTP family members have recently been highlighted as hubs for extracellular interactions in neurons, regulating neuronal extension and guidance, as well as synaptic organisation. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress of structural biology investigations into the architecture of type IIa RPTP ectodomains and their interactions with extracellular ligands. Structural insights, in combination with biophysical and cellular studies, allow us to begin to piece together molecular mechanisms for the transduction and integration of type IIa RPTP signals and to propose hypotheses for future experimental validation. PMID:25234613

  17. A genetic cause of Alzheimer disease: mechanistic insights from Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Frances K; Al-Janabi, Tamara; Hardy, John; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Nizetic, Dean; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Strydom, André

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome, which arises in individuals carrying an extra copy of chromosome 21, is associated with a greatly increased risk of early-onset Alzheimer disease. It is thought that this risk is conferred by the presence of three copies of the gene encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP)--an Alzheimer disease risk factor--although the possession of extra copies of other chromosome 21 genes may also play a part. Further study of the mechanisms underlying the development of Alzheimer disease in people with Down syndrome could provide insights into the mechanisms that cause dementia in the general population.

  18. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events. PMID:28120925

  19. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events.

  20. Inflammation Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans: Insights from Data-Driven and Mechanistic Models into Survival and Death.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Andrew; Mi, Qi; Puccio, Ava; Okonkwo, David; Buliga, Marius; Constantine, Gregory; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex mediator of morbidity and mortality. We have previously demonstrated the utility of both data-driven and mechanistic models in settings of traumatic injury. We hypothesized that differential dynamic inflammation programs characterize TBI survivors vs. non-survivors, and sought to leverage computational modeling to derive novel insights into this life/death bifurcation. Thirteen inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were determined using Luminex™ in serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 31 TBI patients over 5 days. In this cohort, 5 were non-survivors (Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS] score = 1) and 26 were survivors (GOS > 1). A Pearson correlation analysis of initial injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS]) vs. GOS suggested that survivors and non-survivors had distinct clinical response trajectories to injury. Statistically significant differences in interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were observed between TBI survivors vs. non-survivors over 5 days. Principal Component Analysis and Dynamic Bayesian Network inference suggested differential roles of chemokines, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10, based upon which an ordinary differential equation model of TBI was generated. This model was calibrated separately to the time course data of TBI survivors vs. non-survivors as a function of initial GCS. Analysis of parameter values in ensembles of simulations from these models suggested differences in microglial and damage responses in TBI survivors vs. non-survivors. These studies suggest the utility of combined data-driven and mechanistic models in the context of human TBI.

  1. Stereochemistry and Mechanistic Insight in the [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] Annulations of Ketenes and Imines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhanhui; He, Wei; Cheng, Baoxiang; Xu, Jiaxi

    2016-06-03

    The stereochemistry and mechanistic insight in the annulations of one ketene molecule with two imine molecules ([2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annulation) are studied by using six-membered 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline as an imine probe. A concerted hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition mechanism is proposed to explain the stereochemical outcomes. In most cases, the zwitterionic 2-aza-1,3-butadiene-type intermediates, generated from ketenes and imines, undergo endo hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition with the second imine molecule. For ketenes with electron-donating substituents, (2,4)-cis-(4,5)-cis-[2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annuladducts formed stereospecifically, while, for ketenes with electron-accepting substituents, (2,4)-cis-(4,5)-trans-[2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annuladducts are generated stereospecifically. The [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annulations of aryloxyketenes and 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline give stereodivergent products due to the occurrence of the stepwise nucleophilic annulation. However, in the [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annulations of seven-membered cyclic imine dibenzo[b,f][1,4]oxazepine, the zwitterionic aza-butadiene-type intermediates exclusively undergo exo hetero-Diels-Alder cycloadditions with another molecule of imine to yield (2,4)-trans-(4,5)-trans-[2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annuladducts stereospecifically, regardless of the ketene substituents. The mechanistic model not only discloses the nature of the [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annulations, but also can be used to explain and predict the stereochemistry of the [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annuladducts from different ketenes and imines.

  2. Inflammation Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans: Insights from Data-Driven and Mechanistic Models into Survival and Death

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Andrew; Mi, Qi; Puccio, Ava; Okonkwo, David; Buliga, Marius; Constantine, Gregory; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex mediator of morbidity and mortality. We have previously demonstrated the utility of both data-driven and mechanistic models in settings of traumatic injury. We hypothesized that differential dynamic inflammation programs characterize TBI survivors vs. non-survivors, and sought to leverage computational modeling to derive novel insights into this life/death bifurcation. Thirteen inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were determined using Luminex™ in serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 31 TBI patients over 5 days. In this cohort, 5 were non-survivors (Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS] score = 1) and 26 were survivors (GOS > 1). A Pearson correlation analysis of initial injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS]) vs. GOS suggested that survivors and non-survivors had distinct clinical response trajectories to injury. Statistically significant differences in interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were observed between TBI survivors vs. non-survivors over 5 days. Principal Component Analysis and Dynamic Bayesian Network inference suggested differential roles of chemokines, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10, based upon which an ordinary differential equation model of TBI was generated. This model was calibrated separately to the time course data of TBI survivors vs. non-survivors as a function of initial GCS. Analysis of parameter values in ensembles of simulations from these models suggested differences in microglial and damage responses in TBI survivors vs. non-survivors. These studies suggest the utility of combined data-driven and mechanistic models in the context of human TBI. PMID:27729864

  3. Mechanistic insights into chemical and photochemical transformations of bismuth vanadate photoanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Francesca M.; Cooper, Jason K.; Kunzelmann, Viktoria; McDowell, Matthew T.; Yu, Jie; Larson, David M.; Borys, Nicholas J.; Abelyan, Christine; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Yu, Kin Man; Yang, Jinhui; Chen, Le; Shaner, Matthew R.; Spurgeon, Joshua; Houle, Frances A.; Persson, Kristin A.; Sharp, Ian D.

    2016-07-01

    Artificial photosynthesis relies on the availability of semiconductors that are chemically stable and can efficiently capture solar energy. Although metal oxide semiconductors have been investigated for their promise to resist oxidative attack, materials in this class can suffer from chemical and photochemical instability. Here we present a methodology for evaluating corrosion mechanisms and apply it to bismuth vanadate, a state-of-the-art photoanode. Analysis of changing morphology and composition under solar water splitting conditions reveals chemical instabilities that are not predicted from thermodynamic considerations of stable solid oxide phases, as represented by the Pourbaix diagram for the system. Computational modelling indicates that photoexcited charge carriers accumulated at the surface destabilize the lattice, and that self-passivation by formation of a chemically stable surface phase is kinetically hindered. Although chemical stability of metal oxides cannot be assumed, insight into corrosion mechanisms aids development of protection strategies and discovery of semiconductors with improved stability.

  4. Mechanistic insights into chemical and photochemical transformations of bismuth vanadate photoanodes

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Francesca M.; Cooper, Jason K.; Kunzelmann, Viktoria; McDowell, Matthew T.; Yu, Jie; Larson, David M.; Borys, Nicholas J.; Abelyan, Christine; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Yu, Kin Man; Yang, Jinhui; Chen, Le; Shaner, Matthew R.; Spurgeon, Joshua; Houle, Frances A.; Persson, Kristin A.; Sharp, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial photosynthesis relies on the availability of semiconductors that are chemically stable and can efficiently capture solar energy. Although metal oxide semiconductors have been investigated for their promise to resist oxidative attack, materials in this class can suffer from chemical and photochemical instability. Here we present a methodology for evaluating corrosion mechanisms and apply it to bismuth vanadate, a state-of-the-art photoanode. Analysis of changing morphology and composition under solar water splitting conditions reveals chemical instabilities that are not predicted from thermodynamic considerations of stable solid oxide phases, as represented by the Pourbaix diagram for the system. Computational modelling indicates that photoexcited charge carriers accumulated at the surface destabilize the lattice, and that self-passivation by formation of a chemically stable surface phase is kinetically hindered. Although chemical stability of metal oxides cannot be assumed, insight into corrosion mechanisms aids development of protection strategies and discovery of semiconductors with improved stability. PMID:27377305

  5. Mechanistic insights into chemical and photochemical transformations of bismuth vanadate photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Toma, Francesca M; Cooper, Jason K; Kunzelmann, Viktoria; McDowell, Matthew T; Yu, Jie; Larson, David M; Borys, Nicholas J; Abelyan, Christine; Beeman, Jeffrey W; Yu, Kin Man; Yang, Jinhui; Chen, Le; Shaner, Matthew R; Spurgeon, Joshua; Houle, Frances A; Persson, Kristin A; Sharp, Ian D

    2016-07-05

    Artificial photosynthesis relies on the availability of semiconductors that are chemically stable and can efficiently capture solar energy. Although metal oxide semiconductors have been investigated for their promise to resist oxidative attack, materials in this class can suffer from chemical and photochemical instability. Here we present a methodology for evaluating corrosion mechanisms and apply it to bismuth vanadate, a state-of-the-art photoanode. Analysis of changing morphology and composition under solar water splitting conditions reveals chemical instabilities that are not predicted from thermodynamic considerations of stable solid oxide phases, as represented by the Pourbaix diagram for the system. Computational modelling indicates that photoexcited charge carriers accumulated at the surface destabilize the lattice, and that self-passivation by formation of a chemically stable surface phase is kinetically hindered. Although chemical stability of metal oxides cannot be assumed, insight into corrosion mechanisms aids development of protection strategies and discovery of semiconductors with improved stability.

  6. Structure of the vacuolar H+-ATPase rotary motor reveals new mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Shaun; Phillips, Clair; Huss, Markus; Tiburcy, Felix; Wieczorek, Helmut; Trinick, John; Harrison, Michael A; Muench, Stephen P

    2015-03-03

    Vacuolar H(+)-ATPases are multisubunit complexes that operate with rotary mechanics and are essential for membrane proton transport throughout eukaryotes. Here we report a ∼ 1 nm resolution reconstruction of a V-ATPase in a different conformational state from that previously reported for a lower-resolution yeast model. The stator network of the V-ATPase (and by implication that of other rotary ATPases) does not change conformation in different catalytic states, and hence must be relatively rigid. We also demonstrate that a conserved bearing in the catalytic domain is electrostatic, contributing to the extraordinarily high efficiency of rotary ATPases. Analysis of the rotor axle/membrane pump interface suggests how rotary ATPases accommodate different c ring stoichiometries while maintaining high efficiency. The model provides evidence for a half channel in the proton pump, supporting theoretical models of ion translocation. Our refined model therefore provides new insights into the structure and mechanics of the V-ATPases.

  7. 1,4-Addition of TMSCCl₃ to nitroalkenes: efficient reaction conditions and mechanistic understanding.

    PubMed

    Wu, Na; Wahl, Benoit; Woodward, Simon; Lewis, William

    2014-06-16

    Improved synthetic conditions allow preparation of TMSCCl3 in good yield (70%) and excellent purity. Compounds of the type NBu4X [X=Ph3SiF2 (TBAT), F (tetrabutylammonium fluoride, TBAF), OAc, Cl and Br] act as catalytic promoters for 1,4-additions to a range of cyclic and acyclic nitroalkenes, in THF at 0-25 °C, typically in moderate to excellent yields (37-95%). TBAT is the most effective promoter and bromide the least effective. Multinuclear NMR studies ((1)H, (19)F, (13)C and (29)Si) under anaerobic conditions indicate that addition of TMSCCl3 to TBAT (both 0.13 M) at -20 °C, in the absence of nitroalkene, leads immediately to mixtures of Me3SiF, Ph3SiF and NBu4CCl3. The latter is stable to at least 0 °C and does not add nitroalkene from -20 to 0 °C, even after extended periods. Nitroalkene, in the presence of TMSCCl3 (both 0.13 M at -20 °C), when treated with TBAT, leads to immediate formation of the 1,4-addition product, suggesting the reaction proceeds via a transient [Me3Si(alkene)CCl3] species, in which (alkene) indicates an Si⋅⋅⋅O coordinated nitroalkene. The anaerobic catalytic chain is propagated through the kinetic nitronate anion resulting from 1,4 CCl3(-) addition to the nitroalkene. This is demonstrated by the fact that isolated NBu4[CH2=NO2] is an efficient promoter. Use of H2C=CH(CH2)2CH=CHNO2 in air affords radical-derived bicyclic products arising from aerobic oxidation.

  8. 1,4-Addition of TMSCCl3 to Nitroalkenes: Efficient Reaction Conditions and Mechanistic Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Na; Wahl, Benoit; Woodward, Simon; Lewis, William

    2014-01-01

    Improved synthetic conditions allow preparation of TMSCCl3 in good yield (70 %) and excellent purity. Compounds of the type NBu4X [X=Ph3SiF2 (TBAT), F (tetrabutylammonium fluoride, TBAF), OAc, Cl and Br] act as catalytic promoters for 1,4-additions to a range of cyclic and acyclic nitroalkenes, in THF at 0–25 °C, typically in moderate to excellent yields (37–95 %). TBAT is the most effective promoter and bromide the least effective. Multinuclear NMR studies (1H, 19F, 13C and 29Si) under anaerobic conditions indicate that addition of TMSCCl3 to TBAT (both 0.13 M) at −20 °C, in the absence of nitroalkene, leads immediately to mixtures of Me3SiF, Ph3SiF and NBu4CCl3. The latter is stable to at least 0 °C and does not add nitroalkene from −20 to 0 °C, even after extended periods. Nitroalkene, in the presence of TMSCCl3 (both 0.13 M at −20 °C), when treated with TBAT, leads to immediate formation of the 1,4-addition product, suggesting the reaction proceeds via a transient [Me3Si(alkene)CCl3] species, in which (alkene) indicates an Si⋅⋅⋅O coordinated nitroalkene. The anaerobic catalytic chain is propagated through the kinetic nitronate anion resulting from 1,4 CCl3− addition to the nitroalkene. This is demonstrated by the fact that isolated NBu4[CH2−NO2] is an efficient promoter. Use of H2C−CH(CH2)2CH−CHNO2 in air affords radical-derived bicyclic products arising from aerobic oxidation. PMID:24849249

  9. Mechanistic Insights from Structural Analyses of Ran-GTPase-Driven Nuclear Export of Proteins and RNAs.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-22

    Understanding how macromolecules are rapidly exchanged between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes is a fundamental problem in biology. Exportins are Ran-GTPase-dependent nuclear transport factors that belong to the karyopherin-β family and mediate nuclear export of a plethora of proteins and RNAs, except for bulk mRNA nuclear export. Exportins bind cargo macromolecules in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner in the nucleus, forming exportin-cargo-Ran-GTP complexes (nuclear export complexes). Transient weak interactions between exportins and nucleoporins containing characteristic FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat motifs facilitate nuclear pore complex passage of nuclear export complexes. In the cytoplasm, nuclear export complexes are disassembled, thereby releasing the cargo. GTP hydrolysis by Ran promoted in the cytoplasm makes the disassembly reaction virtually irreversible and provides thermodynamic driving force for the overall export reaction. In the past decade, X-ray crystallography of some of the exportins in various functional states coupled with functional analyses, single-particle electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and small-angle solution X-ray scattering has provided rich insights into the mechanism of cargo binding and release and also begins to elucidate how exportins interact with the FG repeat motifs. The knowledge gained from structural analyses of nuclear export is being translated into development of clinically useful inhibitors of nuclear export to treat human diseases such as cancer and influenza.

  10. New insights into mechanistic photoisomerization of ethylene-bridged azobenzene from ab initio multiple spawning simulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihong; Wang, Yating; Fang, Qiu

    2017-02-14

    Ethylene-bridged azobenzene (br-AB) has aroused broad interests due to its unique photoswitching properties. Numerous dynamical simulations have been performed for the br-AB photoisomerization, which focused mainly on the conformational effect and the funnel role of minimum-energy conical intersection (MECI) on the mechanism. In the present work, we use the "full quantum" ab initio multiple spawning method to simulate the br-AB photoisomerization, which provides new insights into the mechanism. Upon irradiation of br-AB to the first excited singlet state (S1), most of the excess energies are trapped in the azo-moiety. Since the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution is slower than the S1 relaxation processes, the nonadiabatic transition from S1 to the ground state (S0) occurs in the vicinity of high-energy crossing seam and even the largest probabilities of the S1 → S0 transition are not distributed in the MECI regions. Once decaying to the S0 state through the high-energy region, the subsequent isomerization and re-formation of the initial isomer are ultrafast processes in the S0 state. It is the nonergodic behavior of the S1 and S0 dynamics that is mainly responsible for the unique photoswitching properties of the ethylene-bridged azobenzene, which will be discussed in detail.

  11. Structural and mechanistic insights into an archaeal DNA-guided Argonaute protein.

    PubMed

    Willkomm, Sarah; Oellig, Christine A; Zander, Adrian; Restle, Tobias; Keegan, Ronan; Grohmann, Dina; Schneider, Sabine

    2017-03-20

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins in eukaryotes are known as key players in post-transcriptional gene silencing(1), while recent studies on prokaryotic Agos hint at their role in the protection against invading DNA(2,3). Here, we present crystal structures of the apo enzyme and a binary Ago-guide complex of the archaeal Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (Mj) Ago. Binding of a guide DNA leads to large structural rearrangements. This includes the structural transformation of a hinge region containing a switch helix, which has been shown for human Ago2 to be critical for the dynamic target search process(4-6). To identify key residues crucial for MjAgo function, we analysed the effect of several MjAgo mutants. We observe that the nature of the 3' and 5' nucleotides in particular, as well as the switch helix, appear to impact MjAgo cleavage activity. In summary, we provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that drive DNA-guided DNA silencing by an archaeal Ago.

  12. Kynurenine pathway metabolomics predicts and provides mechanistic insight into multiple sclerosis progression

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chai K.; Bilgin, Ayse; Lovejoy, David B.; Tan, Vanessa; Bustamante, Sonia; Taylor, Bruce V.; Bessede, Alban; Brew, Bruce J.; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan metabolism results from chronic inflammation and is known to exacerbate progression of neurodegenerative disease. To gain insights into the links between inflammation, the KP and multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, we investigated the KP metabolomics profile of MS patients. Most significantly, we found aberrant levels of two key KP metabolites, kynurenic acid (KA) and quinolinic acid (QA). The balance between these metabolites is important as it determines overall excitotoxic activity at the N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor. We also identified that serum KP metabolic signatures in patients can discriminate clinical MS subtypes with high sensitivity and specificity. A C5.0 Decision Tree classification model discriminated the clinical subtypes of MS with a sensitivity of 91%. After validation in another independent cohort, sensitivity was maintained at 85%. Collectively, our studies suggest that abnormalities in the KP may be associated with the switch from early-mild stage MS to debilitating progressive forms of MS and that analysis of KP metabolites in MS patient serum may have application as MS disease biomarkers. PMID:28155867

  13. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, Xinmei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-07-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur-DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur-feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs.

  14. New insights into mechanistic photoisomerization of ethylene-bridged azobenzene from ab initio multiple spawning simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihong; Wang, Yating; Fang, Qiu

    2017-02-01

    Ethylene-bridged azobenzene (br-AB) has aroused broad interests due to its unique photoswitching properties. Numerous dynamical simulations have been performed for the br-AB photoisomerization, which focused mainly on the conformational effect and the funnel role of minimum-energy conical intersection (MECI) on the mechanism. In the present work, we use the "full quantum" ab initio multiple spawning method to simulate the br-AB photoisomerization, which provides new insights into the mechanism. Upon irradiation of br-AB to the first excited singlet state (S1), most of the excess energies are trapped in the azo-moiety. Since the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution is slower than the S1 relaxation processes, the nonadiabatic transition from S1 to the ground state (S0) occurs in the vicinity of high-energy crossing seam and even the largest probabilities of the S1 → S0 transition are not distributed in the MECI regions. Once decaying to the S0 state through the high-energy region, the subsequent isomerization and re-formation of the initial isomer are ultrafast processes in the S0 state. It is the nonergodic behavior of the S1 and S0 dynamics that is mainly responsible for the unique photoswitching properties of the ethylene-bridged azobenzene, which will be discussed in detail.

  15. Mechanistic insights into the Structure and Dynamics of Entangled and Hydrated Lambda-Phage DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Uematsu, Takashi; Svanberg, Christer; Jacobsson, Per; Swenson, Jan; Zäch, Michael; Trehan, Rajendar; Armstrong, George; Sengupta, Bidisha

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic dynamics of DNA plays crucial role in DNA-protein interactions and has been emphasized as a possible key component for in vivo chromatin organization. We have prepared entangled DNA micro tube above the overlap concentration by exploiting the complementary cohesive ends of λ-phage DNA, which is confirmed by atomic force microscopy and agarose gel electrophoresis. Photon correlation spectroscopy further confirmed that the entangled solutions are found to exhibit the classical hydrodynamics of a single chain segment on length scales smaller than the hydrodynamic length scale of single λ-phage DNA molecule. We also observed that in 41.6% (gm water/gm DNA) hydrated state, λ-phage DNA exhibits a dynamic transition temperature (Tdt) at 187 K and a crossover temperature (Tc) at 246 K. Computational insight reveals that the observed structure and dynamics of entangled λ-phage DNA are distinctively different from the behavior of the corresponding unentangled DNA with open cohesive ends, which is reminiscent with our experimental observation. PMID:22515820

  16. Mechanistic insights on N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed annulations: the role of base-assisted proton transfers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pragya; Patni, Priya A; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2011-07-15

    The density functional theory investigation on the mechanism of NHC-catalyzed cycloannulation reaction of the homoenolate derived from butenal with pentenone is studied. The M06-2X/6-31+G** and B3LYP/6-31+G** levels of theory, including the effect of continuum solvation in dichloromethane and tetrahydrofuran, are employed. Several mechanistic scenarios are examined for each elementary step by identifying the key intermediates and the corresponding transition states interconnecting them on the respective potential energy surfaces. Both assisted and unassisted pathways for important proton transfer steps are considered, respectively, with and without the explicit inclusion of base (DBU) in the corresponding transition states. The barrier for the crucial proton transfer steps involved in the formation of the Breslow intermediate as well as in the subsequent steps is found to be significantly lowered by explicit inclusion of DBU. The energetic comparison between two key pathways, depicted as path A and path B, respectively, leading to cyclopentene and cyclopentanone derivatives, is performed. The major mechanistic bifurcation has been identified as emanating from the site of enolization of the initial zwitterionic intermediate resulting from the addition of a homoenolate equivalent to enone. If the enolization occurs nearer to the NHC moiety, the reaction is likely to proceed through path A, leading to cyclopentene. The enolization away from NHC leads to cyclopentanone product through path B. The computed results are generally in good agreement with the reported experimental results.

  17. Organocatalyzed asymmetric Michael addition by an efficient bifunctional carbohydrate-thiourea hybrid with mechanistic DFT analysis.

    PubMed

    Azad, Chandra S; Khan, Imran A; Narula, Anudeep K

    2016-12-28

    A series of thiourea based bifunctional organocatalysts having d-glucose as a core scaffold were synthesized and examined as catalysts for the asymmetric Michael addition reaction of aryl/alkyl trans-β-nitrostyrenes over cyclohexanone and other Michael donors having active methylene. Excellent enantioselectivities (<95%), diastereoselectivities (<99%), and yields (<99%) were attained under solvent free conditions using 10 mol% of 1d0. The obtained results were explained through DFT calculations using the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) basic set. The QM/MM calculations revealed the role of cyclohexanone as a solvent as well as reactant in the rate determining step imparting 31.91 kcal mol(-1) of energy towards the product formation.

  18. A Mechanistic Study of Halogen Addition and Photoelimination from π-Conjugated Tellurophenes.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Elisa I; Lanterna, Anabel E; Lough, Alan J; Scaiano, Juan C; Seferos, Dwight S

    2016-03-02

    The ability to drive reactivity using visible light is of importance for many disciplines of chemistry and has significant implications for sustainable chemistry. Identifying photochemically active compounds and understanding photochemical mechanisms is important for the development of useful materials for synthesis and catalysis. Here we report a series of photoactive diphenyltellurophene compounds bearing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents synthesized by alkyne coupling/ring closing or palladium-catalyzed ipso-arylation chemistry. The redox chemistry of these compounds was studied with respect to oxidative addition and photoelimination of bromine, which is of importance for energy storage reactions involving X2. The oxidative addition reaction mechanism was studied using density functional theory, the results of which support a three-step mechanism involving the formation of an initial η(1) association complex, a monobrominated intermediate, and finally the dibrominated product. All of the tellurophene derivatives undergo photoreduction using 430, 447, or 617 nm light depending on the absorption properties of the compound. Compounds bearing electron-withdrawing substituents have the highest photochemical quantum efficiencies in the presence of an alkene trap, with efficiencies of up to 42.4% for a pentafluorophenyl-functionalized tellurophene. The photoelimination reaction was studied in detail through bromine trapping experiments and laser flash photolysis, and a mechanism is proposed. The photoreaction, which occurs by release of bromine radicals, is competitive with intersystem crossing to the triplet state of the brominated species, as evidenced by the formation of singlet oxygen. These findings should be useful for the design of new photochemically active compounds supported by main-group elements.

  19. Mechanistic Insights into Two-Phase Radical C–H Arylations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational studies of radical C–H arylations highlight the interplay between chemical and physical rate processes in these multiphase reactions. Anomalous concentration dependences observed here may be reconciled by considering the role of phase transfer processes that mediate concentrations in each phase. In addition, understanding interactions through phase boundaries enables their use in optimization of reaction performance. PMID:26640819

  20. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Christian A.; Reineke, Kai; Knorr, Dietrich; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2015-01-01

    Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C.) botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT) processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores. We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near) isothermal HPT treatments at 300–1200 MPa at 30–75°C for 1 s to 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone), large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated) or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer) spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed first order kinetics. Dipicolinic acid release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective) physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced) germination at ≤450 MPa/≤45°C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60–70°C. Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores compared with the resistance of spores from other C. botulinum types could allow for the implementation of

  1. The Microbial Signature Provides Insight into the Mechanistic Basis of Coral Success across Reef Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Leggat, William; Bongaerts, Pim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For ecosystems vulnerable to environmental change, understanding the spatiotemporal stability of functionally crucial symbioses is fundamental to determining the mechanisms by which these ecosystems may persist. The coral Pachyseris speciosa is a successful environmental generalist that succeeds in diverse reef habitats. The generalist nature of this coral suggests it may have the capacity to form functionally significant microbial partnerships to facilitate access to a range of nutritional sources within different habitats. Here, we propose that coral is a metaorganism hosting three functionally distinct microbial interactions: a ubiquitous core microbiome of very few symbiotic host-selected bacteria, a microbiome of spatially and/or regionally explicit core microbes filling functional niches (<100 phylotypes), and a highly variable bacterial community that is responsive to biotic and abiotic processes across spatial and temporal scales (>100,000 phylotypes). We find that this coral hosts upwards of 170,000 distinct phylotypes and provide evidence for the persistence of a select group of bacteria in corals across environmental habitats of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. We further show that a higher number of bacteria are consistently associated with corals on mesophotic reefs than on shallow reefs. An increase in microbial diversity with depth suggests reliance by this coral on bacteria for nutrient acquisition on reefs exposed to nutrient upwelling. Understanding the complex microbial communities of host organisms across broad biotic and abiotic environments as functionally distinct microbiomes can provide insight into those interactions that are ubiquitous niche symbioses and those that provide competitive advantage within the hosts’ environment. PMID:27460792

  2. Selective inhibition of aggregation/fibrillation of bovine serum albumin by osmolytes: Mechanistic and energetics insights

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Moumita

    2017-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is an important transport protein of the blood and its aggregation/fibrillation would adversely affect its transport ability leading to metabolic disorder. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of fibrillation/aggregation of BSA and design of suitable inhibitor molecules for stabilizing its native conformation, are of utmost importance. The qualitative and quantitative aspects of the effect of osmolytes (proline, hydroxyproline, glycine betaine, sarcosine and sorbitol) on heat induced aggregation/fibrillation of BSA at physiological pH (pH 7.4) have been studied employing a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, Rayleigh scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Formation of fibrils by BSA under the given conditions was confirmed from increase in fluorescence emission intensities of Thioflavin T over a time period of 600 minutes and TEM images. Absence of change in fluorescence emission intensities of 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) in presence of native and aggregated BSA signify the absence of any amorphous aggregates. ITC results have provided important insights on the energetics of interaction of these osmolytes with different stages of the fibrillar aggregates of BSA, thereby suggesting the possible modes/mechanism of inhibition of BSA fibrillation by these osmolytes. The heats of interaction of the osmolytes with different stages of fibrillation of BSA do not follow a trend, suggesting that the interactions of stages of BSA aggregates are osmolyte specific. Among the osmolytes used here, we found glycine betaine to be supporting and promoting the aggregation process while hydroxyproline to be maximally efficient in suppressing the fibrillation process of BSA, followed by sorbitol, sarcosine and proline in the following order of their decreasing potency: Hydroxyproline> Sorbitol> Sarcosine> Proline> Glycine betaine. PMID:28207877

  3. Mechanistic Insights into Ring Cleavage and Contraction of Benzene over a Titanium Hydride Cluster.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaohui; Luo, Gen; Luo, Lun; Hu, Shaowei; Luo, Yi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2016-09-14

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage of benzene by transition metals is of great fundamental interest and practical importance, as this transformation is involved in the production of fuels and other important chemicals in the industrial hydrocracking of naphtha on solid catalysts. Although this transformation is thought to rely on cooperation of multiple metal sites, molecular-level information on the reaction mechanism has remained scarce to date. Here, we report the DFT studies of the ring cleavage and contraction of benzene by a molecular trinuclear titanium hydride cluster. Our studies suggest that the reaction is initiated by benzene coordination, followed by H2 release, C6H6 hydrometalation, repeated C-C and C-H bond cleavage and formation to give a MeC5H4 unit, and insertion of a Ti atom into the MeC5H4 unit with release of H2 to give a metallacycle product. The C-C bond cleavage and ring contraction of toluene can also occur in a similar fashion, though some details are different due to the presence of the methyl substituent. Obviously, the facile release of H2 from the metal hydride cluster to provide electrons and to alter the charge population at the metal centers, in combination with the flexible metal-hydride connections and dynamic redox behavior of the trimetallic framework, has enabled this unusual transformation to occur. This work has not only provided unprecedented insights into the activation and transformation of benzene over a multimetallic framework but it may also offer help in the design of new molecular catalysts for the activation and transformation of inactive aromatics.

  4. Structural and mechanistic insights into Mcm2-7 double-hexamer assembly and function

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Fernandez-Cid, Alejandra; Riera, Alberto; Tognetti, Sivia; Yuan, Zuanning; Stillman, Bruce; Speck, Christian

    2014-10-15

    Eukaryotic cells license each DNA replication origin during G1 phase by assembling a prereplication complex that contains a Mcm2–7 (minichromosome maintenance proteins 2–7) double hexamer. During S phase, each Mcm2–7 hexamer forms the core of a replicative DNA helicase. However, the mechanisms of origin licensing and helicase activation are poorly understood. The helicase loaders ORC–Cdc6 function to recruit a single Cdt1–Mcm2–7 heptamer to replication origins prior to Cdt1 release and ORC–Cdc6–Mcm2–7 complex formation, but how the second Mcm2–7 hexamer is recruited to promote double-hexamer formation is not well understood. Here, structural evidence for intermediates consisting of an ORC–Cdc6–Mcm2–7 complex and an ORC–Cdc6–Mcm2–7–Mcm2–7 complex are reported, which together provide new insights into DNA licensing. Detailed structural analysis of the loaded Mcm2–7 double-hexamer complex demonstrates that the two hexamers are interlocked and misaligned along the DNA axis and lack ATP hydrolysis activity that is essential for DNA helicase activity. Moreover, we show that the head-to-head juxtaposition of the Mcm2–7 double hexamer generates a new protein interaction surface that creates a multisubunit-binding site for an S-phase protein kinase that is known to activate DNA replication. The data suggest how the double hexamer is assembled and how helicase activity is regulated during DNA licensing, with implications for cell cycle control of DNA replication and genome stability.

  5. Structural and mechanistic insights into Mcm2-7 double-hexamer assembly and function

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Fernandez-Cid, Alejandra; ...

    2014-10-15

    Eukaryotic cells license each DNA replication origin during G1 phase by assembling a prereplication complex that contains a Mcm2–7 (minichromosome maintenance proteins 2–7) double hexamer. During S phase, each Mcm2–7 hexamer forms the core of a replicative DNA helicase. However, the mechanisms of origin licensing and helicase activation are poorly understood. The helicase loaders ORC–Cdc6 function to recruit a single Cdt1–Mcm2–7 heptamer to replication origins prior to Cdt1 release and ORC–Cdc6–Mcm2–7 complex formation, but how the second Mcm2–7 hexamer is recruited to promote double-hexamer formation is not well understood. Here, structural evidence for intermediates consisting of an ORC–Cdc6–Mcm2–7 complex andmore » an ORC–Cdc6–Mcm2–7–Mcm2–7 complex are reported, which together provide new insights into DNA licensing. Detailed structural analysis of the loaded Mcm2–7 double-hexamer complex demonstrates that the two hexamers are interlocked and misaligned along the DNA axis and lack ATP hydrolysis activity that is essential for DNA helicase activity. Moreover, we show that the head-to-head juxtaposition of the Mcm2–7 double hexamer generates a new protein interaction surface that creates a multisubunit-binding site for an S-phase protein kinase that is known to activate DNA replication. The data suggest how the double hexamer is assembled and how helicase activity is regulated during DNA licensing, with implications for cell cycle control of DNA replication and genome stability.« less

  6. A mechanistic investigation of oxidative addition of methyl iodide to [Tp*Rh(CO)(L)].

    PubMed

    Chauby, Valérie; Daran, Jean-Claude; Serra-Le Berre, Carole; Malbosc, François; Kalck, Philippe; Delgado Gonzalez, Oscar; Haslam, Claire E; Haynes, Anthony

    2002-06-17

    Reaction of methyl iodide with square planar [kappa(2)-Tp*Rh(CO)(PMe(3))] 1a (Tp* = HB(3,5-Me(2)pz)(3)) at room temperature affords [kappa(3)-Tp*Rh(CO)(PMe(3))(Me)]I 2a, which was fully characterized by spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The pseudooctahedral geometry of cationic 2a, which contains a kappa(3)-coordinated Tp* ligand, indicates a reaction mechanism in which nucleophilic attack by Rh on MeI is accompanied by coordination of the pendant pyrazolyl group. In solution 2a transforms slowly into a neutral (acetyl)(iodo) rhodium complex [kappa(3)-Tp*Rh(PMe(3))(COMe)I] 3a, for which an X-ray crystal structure is also reported. Kinetic studies on the reactions of [kappa(2)-Tp*Rh(CO)(L)] (L = PMe(3), PMe(2)Ph, PMePh(2), PPh(3), CO)] with MeI show second-order behavior with large negative activation entropies, consistent with an S(N)2 mechanism. The second-order rate constants correlate well with phosphine basicity. For L = CO, reaction with MeI gives an acetyl complex, [kappa(3)-Tp*Rh(CO)(COMe)I]. The bis(pyrazolyl)borate complexes [kappa(2)-Bp*Rh(CO)(L)] (L = PPh(3), CO) are much less reactive toward MeI than the Tp* analogues, indicating the importance of the third pyrazolyl group and the accessibility of a kappa(3) coordination mode. The results strengthen the evidence in favor of an S(N)2 mechanism for oxidative addition of MeI to square planar d(8) transition metal complexes.

  7. Mechanistic insight into the substrate specificity of 1,2-β-oligoglucan phosphorylase from Lachnoclostridium phytofermentans

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Masahiro; Tanaka, Nobukiyo; Furukawa, Nayuta; Nihira, Takanori; Kodutsumi, Yuki; Takahashi, Yuta; Sugimoto, Naohisa; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Fushinobu, Shinya; Taguchi, Hayao; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Glycoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolysis of oligosaccharides into sugar phosphates. Recently, we found a novel phosphorylase acting on β-1,2-glucooligosaccharides with degrees of polymerization of 3 or more (1,2-β-oligoglucan phosphorylase, SOGP) in glycoside hydrolase family (GH) 94. Here, we characterized SOGP from Lachnoclostridium phytofermentans (LpSOGP) and determined its crystal structure. LpSOGP is a monomeric enzyme that contains a unique β-sandwich domain (Ndom1) at its N-terminus. Unlike the dimeric GH94 enzymes possessing catalytic pockets at their dimer interface, LpSOGP has a catalytic pocket between Ndom1 and the catalytic domain. In the complex structure of LpSOGP with sophorose, sophorose binds at subsites +1 to +2. Notably, the Glc moiety at subsite +1 is flipped compared with the corresponding ligands in other GH94 enzymes. This inversion suggests the great distortion of the glycosidic bond between subsites −1 and +1, which is likely unfavorable for substrate binding. Compensation for this disadvantage at subsite +2 can be accounted for by the small distortion of the glycosidic bond in the sophorose molecule. Therefore, the binding mode at subsites +1 and +2 defines the substrate specificity of LpSOGP, which provides mechanistic insights into the substrate specificity of a phosphorylase acting on β-1,2-glucooligosaccharides. PMID:28198470

  8. Molecular interaction between natural IgG and ficolin - mechanistic insights on adaptive-innate immune crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Saswati; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Lifeng; Anand, Ganesh S.; Ding, Jeak L.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we found that natural IgG (nIgG; a non-specific immunoglobulin of adaptive immunity) is not quiescent, but plays a crucial role in immediate immune defense by collaborating with ficolin (an innate immune protein). However, how the nIgG and ficolin interplay and what factors control the complex formation during infection is unknown. Here, we found that mild acidosis and hypocalcaemia induced by infection- inflammation condition increased the nIgG:ficolin complex formation. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry delineated the binding interfaces to the CH2-CH3 region of nIgG Fc and P-subdomain of ficolin FBG domain. Infection condition exposes novel binding sites. Site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance analyses of peptides, derived from nIgG and ficolin, defined the interacting residues between the proteins. These results provide mechanistic insights on the interaction between two molecules representing the adaptive and innate immune pathways, prompting potential development of immunomodulatory/prophylactic peptides tunable to prevailing infection conditions.

  9. Fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules provides mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2011-03-23

    Dental thermal pain is a significant health problem in daily life and dentistry. There is a long-standing question regarding the phenomenon that cold stimulation evokes sharper and more shooting pain sensations than hot stimulation. This phenomenon, however, outlives the well-known hydrodynamic theory used to explain dental thermal pain mechanism. Here, we present a mathematical model based on the hypothesis that hot or cold stimulation-induced different directions of dentinal fluid flow and the corresponding odontoblast movements in dentinal microtubules contribute to different dental pain responses. We coupled a computational fluid dynamics model, describing the fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules, with a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, describing the discharge behavior of intradental neuron. The simulated results agreed well with existing experimental measurements. We thence demonstrated theoretically that intradental mechano-sensitive nociceptors are not "equally sensitive" to inward (into the pulp) and outward (away from the pulp) fluid flows, providing mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain. The model developed here could enable better diagnosis in endodontics which requires an understanding of pulpal histology, neurology and physiology, as well as their dynamic response to the thermal stimulation used in dental practices.

  10. Mechanistic Insights into the Mode of Action of Bifunctional Pyrrolidine-Squaramide-Derived Organocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Roca-López, David; Uria, Uxue; Reyes, Efraim; Carrillo, Luisa; Jørgensen, Karl Anker; Vicario, Jose L; Merino, Pedro

    2016-01-18

    The catalytic modes of action of three squaramide-derived bifunctional organocatalysts have been investigated using DFT methods. The [5+2] cycloaddition between oxidopyrylium ylides and enals was used as the model reaction. Two primary modes were possible for the different catalysts studied. The preference for one mode over the other was due to the possibility of additional favorable π-π interactions between the hydrogen-bond activated pyrylium ylide and an electron-deficient aromatic ring bonded to the squaramide NH group. The model can be extended to other reactions catalyzed by the same catalysts, such as formal [2+2] cycloadditions between nitroalkenes and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. The computational results were in excellent concurrence with the available experimental reports on the observed total enantioselectivity and differences in diastereoselectivity depending on the substrate and the reaction.

  11. Mechanistic insights into the bleaching of melanin by alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A W; Garrett, B; Naqvi, K R; Fülöp, A; Godfrey, S P; Marsh, J M; Chechik, V

    2017-03-18

    This work aims to determine the roles of reactive oxygen species HO∙ and HO2(-) in the bleaching of melanins by alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments using melanosomes isolated from human hair indicated that the HO∙ radical generated in the outside solution does not contribute significantly to bleaching. However, studies using soluble Sepia melanin demonstrated that both HO2(-) and HO∙ will individually bleach melanin. Additionally, when both oxidants are present, bleaching is increased dramatically in both rate and extent. Careful experimental design enabled the separation of the roles and effects of these key reactive species, HO∙ and HO2(-). Rationalisation of the results presented, and review of previous literature, allowed the postulation of a simplified general scheme whereby the strong oxidant HO∙ is able to pre-oxidise melanin units to o-quinones enabling more facile ring opening by the more nucleophilic HO2(-). In this manner the efficiency of the roles of both species is maximised.

  12. Is targeting eNOS a key mechanistic insight of cardiovascular defensive potentials of statins?

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Kathuria, Sonam; Taneja, Gaurav; Kalra, Sanjeev; Mahadevan, Nanjaian

    2012-01-01

    Statins are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidemia and associated cardiovascular abnormalities including atherosclerosis, hypertension and coronary heart disease. Needless to mention, statins have cholesterol-lowering effects by means of inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis. Besides cholesterol-lowering effects, statins possess pleiotropic anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-platelet and anti-fibrotic properties, which may additionally play imperative roles in statins-mediated cardiovascular protection. However, the precise mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular defensive potential of statins have not completely been elucidated. Intriguingly, a considerable number of studies demonstrated the potential modulatory role of statins on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), a key enzyme involved in the regulation of cardiovascular function by generating endothelium-derived relaxing factor (often represented 'nitric oxide'). Worthy of note is that vascular generation of nitric oxide has beneficial anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and vasodilatory actions. The upregulation of eNOS by statins is mediated through inhibition of synthesis of isoprenoids and subsequent prevention of isoprenylation of small GTPase Rho, whereas statin-induced activation of eNOS is mediated through activation of phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) signals. Additionally, statins enhance eNOS activation by abrogating caveolin-1 expression in vascular endothelium. In light of this view-point, we suggest in this review that eNOS upregulation and activation, in part, could play a fundamental role in the cardiovascular defensive potential of statins. The eNOS modulatory role of statins may have an imperative influence on the functional regulation of cardiovascular system and may offer new perspectives for the better use of statins in ameliorating cardiovascular disorders.

  13. HCl uptake by volcanic ash in the high temperature eruption plume: Mechanistic insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayris, Paul M.; Delmelle, Pierre; Cimarelli, Corrado; Maters, Elena C.; Suzuki, Yujiro J.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-11-01

    The injection of HCl into the stratosphere by large volcanic eruptions has long been considered to be of minor importance. This is due to the widespread assumption that any HCl will be efficiently taken up by hydrometeors in the cooling plume. However, this assumption does not account for the possibility that prior scavenging processes can act within the high temperature core of the eruption plume. The adsorption of HCl onto ash surfaces to form soluble -Cl salts is a hitherto unconstrained scavenging mechanism, and their fate within the atmosphere and environment is uncertain. Here, we investigate the capacity of volcanic glasses of tephrite, phonolite, dacite and rhyolite composition to adsorb HCl. The experiments are conducted in the presence of He-SO2-CO2 mixtures at temperatures of 200-800 °C. Our experimental findings show that only the tephrite and phonolite glasses exhibit significant reactivity to HCl, which show optimal efficiency of uptake at 400-600 °C. The primary reaction product formed during adsorption is halite (NaCl), in addition to minor quantities of Ca-, K-, Al- and Fe-bearing chlorides. Uptake of HCl by glass surfaces is sustained by the outward diffusion of Na+ and other Cl-reactive cations via exchange with H+. Simple mathematical models can be used to yield Na diffusion coefficients for the four experimental glasses, and suggest that a varying structural role for Na within the glass network governs the capacity for HCl retention. The uptake of HCl under experimental conditions is limited above 500 °C by a Cl-induced dehydroxylation process, but the presence of H2O in the hydrous plume may sustain or even enhance adsorption. The present experimental data, combined with cooling gradients obtained from established plume evolution models, lead us to conclude that HCl adsorption within the eruption plume core can be a more significant scavenging mechanism in large explosive eruptions than previously considered. We additionally highlight the

  14. Mechanistic insight into the norepinephrine-induced fibrosis in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Akihito; Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Perera, Buddhini; Toki, Sayaka; Ogino, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Yoko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Raynaud’s phenomenon is frequently observed in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, and cold- or stress-induced norepinephrine (NE) has been speculated to be associated with vasoconstriction. Objective was to elucidate the role of NE in fibrosis in SSc. IL-6 is a potent stimulator of collagen production in fibroblasts. NE enhanced IL-6 production and proliferation more significantly in SSc fibroblasts than in normal fibroblasts. Furthermore, the production of IL-6 and phosphorylation of p38 in SSc fibroblasts was enhanced by adrenergic receptor (AR)β agonist, isoproterenol, but not ARα agonist, oxymetazoline. ARβ blocker, propranolol, inhibited NE-induced IL-6 production and phosphorylation of p38 in SSc fibroblasts. NE-induced IL-6 was significantly inhibited by p38 inhibitor, SB203580, suggesting that NE-induced phosphorylation of p38 via ARβ enhances IL-6 production in SSc fibroblasts. NE-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 via ARα inhibited IL-6 production in SSc fibroblasts. Combined treatment with NE and endothelin-1 resulted in an additive increase in IL-6 production in SSc fibroblasts. NE-induced IL-6/IL-6 receptor trans-signaling increased the production of collagen type I in SSc fibroblasts, and both propranolol and SB203580 inhibited NE-induced collagen production. These results suggest that cold exposure and/or emotional stress-induced NE might contribute to the skin fibrosis via potentiation of IL-6 production from fibroblasts in SSc. PMID:27650973

  15. Structural and mechanistic insights into regulation of the retromer coat by TBC1d5

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Da; Zhang, Jin-San; Li, Fang; Wang, Jing; Deng, Zhihui; White, Mark A.; Osborne, Douglas G.; Phillips-Krawczak, Christine; Gomez, Timothy S.; Li, Haiying; Singla, Amika; Burstein, Ezra; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Retromer is a membrane coat complex that is recruited to endosomes by the small GTPase Rab7 and sorting nexin 3. The timing of this interaction and consequent endosomal dynamics are thought to be regulated by the guanine nucleotide cycle of Rab7. Here we demonstrate that TBC1d5, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rab7, is a high-affinity ligand of the retromer cargo selective complex VPS26/VPS29/VPS35. The crystal structure of the TBC1d5 GAP domain bound to VPS29 and complementary biochemical and cellular data show that a loop from TBC1d5 binds to a conserved hydrophobic pocket on VPS29 opposite the VPS29–VPS35 interface. Additional data suggest that a distinct loop of the GAP domain may contact VPS35. Loss of TBC1d5 causes defective retromer-dependent trafficking of receptors. Our findings illustrate how retromer recruits a GAP, which is likely to be involved in the timing of Rab7 inactivation leading to membrane uncoating, with important consequences for receptor trafficking. PMID:27827364

  16. Environmental stressors and cardio-metabolic disease: part II–mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Mette; Gori, Tommaso; Schmidt, Frank P.; Rao, Xiaoquan; Brook, Frank R.; Chen, Lung Chi; Brook, Robert D.; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors can act as facilitators of chronic non-communicable diseases. Ambient noise and air pollution collectively outrank all other environmental risk factors in importance, contributing to over 75% of the disease and disability burden associated with known environmental risk factors. In the first part of this review, we discussed the global burden and epidemiologic evidence supporting the importance of these novel risk factors as facilitators of cardiometabolic disease. In this part, we will discuss pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for noise and air pollution-mediated effects. Akin to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, a considerable body of evidence suggests that these environmental agents induce low-grade inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular dysfunction, and autonomic nervous system imbalance, thereby facilitating the development of diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Through their impact on traditional risk factors and via additional novel mechanisms, environmental risk factors may have much larger impact on cardiovascular events than currently appreciated. In the second part of this review, we discuss deficiencies and gaps in knowledge and opportunities for new research. PMID:27460891

  17. Mechanistic Insight into the Oxidation of Organic Phenylselenides by H2 O2.

    PubMed

    Ribaudo, Giovanni; Bellanda, Massimo; Menegazzo, Ileana; Wolters, Lando P; Bortoli, Marco; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Orian, Laura

    2017-02-16

    The oxidation of organic phenylselenides by H2 O2 is investigated in model compounds, namely, n-butyl phenyl selenide (PhSe(nBu)), bis(phenylselanyl)methane (PhSeMeSePh), diphenyl diselenide (PhSeSePh), and 1,2-bis(phenylselanyl)ethane (PhSeEtSePh). Through a combined experimental ((1) H and (77) Se NMR) and computational approach, we characterize the direct oxidation of monoselenide to selenoxide, the stepwise double oxidation of PhSeMeSePh that leads to different diastereomeric diselenoxides, the complete oxidation of the diphenyldiselenide that leads to selenium-selenium bond cleavage, and the subsequent formation of the phenylseleninic product. The oxidation of PhSeEtSePh also results in the formation of phenylseleninic acid along with 1-(vinylseleninyl)benzene, which is derived from a side elimination reaction. The evidence of a direct mechanism, in addition to an autocatalytic mechanism that emerges from kinetic studies, is discussed. By considering our observations of diselenides with chalcogen atoms that are separated by alkyl spacers of different length, a rationale for the advantage of diselenide versus monoselenide catalysts is presented.

  18. Mechanistic insights into biomimetic carbonic anhydrase action catalyzed by doped carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    PubMed

    Verma, Manju; Deshpande, Parag A

    2017-03-29

    Electronic structural analyses of hydrogen terminated metal doped carbon nanotube/graphene (M-CNT/Gr, MN3-CNT/Gr, M = Ru/Rh) and ruthenium cluster decorated carbon nanotube/graphene (Ru4-CNT/Gr) were carried out for examining the biomimetic catalytic activity towards CO2 hydration reaction. The carbonic anhydrase action was followed for the reaction of CO2 with H2O resulting in a bicarbonate ion and a proton. All the catalysts were found to be active for CO2 hydration and the mechanism proved them to be biomimetic. Interconversion of CO2 to a HCO3(-) ion took place with five elementary steps viz. OH(-) formation by H2O dissociation, linear CO2 complexation, CO2 bending by nucleophilic attack of an OH(-) ion over CO2, HCO3(-) ion formation by intramolecular proton migration and HCO3(-) ion displacement by H2O addition. Free energy landscapes over the catalysts were developed for CO2 hydration reaction. The activation energies of H2O dissociation and CO2 bending were observed to be substantially smaller over Ru4-CNT when compared to those over the other catalysts. Ru4-CNT was found to be the best catalyst for CO2 hydration with the rate limiting step being HCO3(-) ion formation.

  19. Mass Spectrometry Based Mechanistic Insights into Formation of Tris Conjugates: Implications on Protein Biopharmaceutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabadi, Pradeep G.; Sankaran, Praveen Kallamvalliillam; Palanivelu, Dinesh V.; Adhikary, Laxmi; Khedkar, Anand; Chatterjee, Amarnath

    2016-10-01

    We present here extensive mass spectrometric studies on the formation of a Tris conjugate with a therapeutic monoclonal antibody. The results not only demonstrate the reactive nature of the Tris molecule but also the sequence and reaction conditions that trigger this reactivity. The results corroborate the fact that proteins are, in general, prone to conjugation and/or adduct formation reactions and any modification due to this essentially leads to formation of impurities in a protein sample. Further, the results demonstrate that the conjugation reaction happens via a succinimide intermediate and has sequence specificity. Additionally, the data presented in this study also shows that the Tris formation is produced in-solution and is not an in-source phenomenon. We believe that the facts given here will open further avenues on exploration of Tris as a conjugating agent as well as ensure that the use of Tris or any ionic buffer in the process of producing a biopharmaceutical drug is monitored closely for the presence of such conjugate formation.

  20. Structural and Mechanistic Insight into the Listeria monocytogenes Two-enzyme Lipoteichoic Acid Synthesis System*

    PubMed Central

    Campeotto, Ivan; Percy, Matthew G.; MacDonald, James T.; Förster, Andreas; Freemont, Paul S.; Gründling, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component required for proper cell growth in many Gram-positive bacteria. In Listeria monocytogenes, two enzymes are required for the synthesis of this polyglycerolphosphate polymer. The LTA primase LtaPLm initiates LTA synthesis by transferring the first glycerolphosphate (GroP) subunit onto the glycolipid anchor and the LTA synthase LtaSLm extends the polymer by the repeated addition of GroP subunits to the tip of the growing chain. Here, we present the crystal structures of the enzymatic domains of LtaPLm and LtaSLm. Although the enzymes share the same fold, substantial differences in the cavity of the catalytic site and surface charge distribution contribute to enzyme specialization. The eLtaSLm structure was also determined in complex with GroP revealing a second GroP binding site. Mutational analysis confirmed an essential function for this binding site and allowed us to propose a model for the binding of the growing chain. PMID:25128528

  1. Chiral bora[1]ferrocenophanes: syntheses, mechanistic insights, and ring-opening polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Saeid; Bhattacharjee, Hridaynath; Khozeimeh Sarbisheh, Elaheh; Quail, J Wilson; Müller, Jens

    2014-12-01

    A series of new boron-bridged [1]ferrocenophanes ([1]FCPs) was prepared by salt-metathesis reactions between enantiomerically pure dilithioferrocenes and amino(dichloro)boranes (Et2 NBCl2 , iPr2 NBCl2 , or tBu(Me3 Si)NBCl2 ). The dilithioferrocenes were prepared in situ by lithium-bromine exchange from the respective planar-chiral dibromides (Sp ,Sp )-[1-Br-2-(HR2 C)H3 C5 ]2 Fe (R=Me or Et). In most of the cases, mixtures of the targeted [1]FCPs 4 and the unwanted 1,1'-bis(boryl)ferrocenes 5 were formed. The product ratio depends on the bulkiness of the amino group, the speed of addition of the amino(dichloro)borane, the alkyl group on Cp rings, and in particular on the reaction temperature. The formation of strained [1]FCPs is strongly favored by increased reaction temperatures. Secondly, CHEt2 groups at Cp rings favored the formation of the targeted [1]FCPs stronger than CHMe2 groups. These discoveries open up new possibilities to further suppress the formation of unwanted byproducts by a careful choice of the reaction temperature and through tailoring the bulkiness of CHR2 groups on ferrocene. Thermal ring-opening polymerizations of selected boron-bridged [1]FCPs gave metallopolymers with a Mw of 10 kDa (GPC).

  2. Mechanistic insight into cadmium-induced inactivation of the Bloom protein

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei; Bazeille, Nicolas; Henry, Etienne; Zhang, Bo; Deprez, Eric; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a toxic metal that inactivates DNA-repair proteins via multiple mechanisms, including zinc substitution. In this study, we investigated the effect of Cd2+ on the Bloom protein (BLM), a DNA-repair helicase carrying a zinc-binding domain (ZBD) and playing a critical role to ensure genomic stability. One characteristics of BLM-deficient cells is the elevated rate of sister chromatid exchanges, a phenomenon that is also induced by Cd2+. Here, we show that Cd2+ strongly inhibits both ATPase and helicase activities of BLM. Cd2+ primarily prevents BLM-DNA interaction via its binding to sulfhydryl groups of solvent-exposed cysteine residues and, concomitantly, promotes the formation of large BLM multimers/aggregates. In contrast to previously described Cd2+ effects on other zinc-containing DNA-repair proteins, the ZBD appears to play a minor role in the Cd2+-mediated inhibition. While the Cd2+-dependent formation of inactive multimers and the defect of DNA-binding were fully reversible upon addition of EDTA, the inhibition of the DNA unwinding activity was not counteracted by EDTA, indicating another mechanism of inhibition by Cd2+ relative to the targeting of a catalytic residue. Altogether, our results provide new clues for understanding the mechanism behind the ZBD-independent inactivation of BLM by Cd2+ leading to accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks. PMID:27194376

  3. Computational Investigation of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Models: Characterization of Singly and Doubly Protonated Intermediates and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes catalyze hydrogen oxidation and production efficiently with binuclear Fe metal centers. Recently the bioinspired H2-producing model system Fe2(adt)(CO)2(dppv)2 (adt=azadithiolate and dppv=diphosphine) was synthesized and studied experimentally. In this system, the azadithiolate bridge facilitates the formation of a doubly protonated ammonium-hydride species through a proton relay. Herein computational methods are utilized to examine this system in the various oxidation states and protonation states along proposed mechanistic pathways for H2 production. The calculated results agree well with the experimental data for the geometries, CO vibrational stretching frequencies, and reduction potentials. The calculations illustrate that the NH···HFe dihydrogen bonding distance in the doubly protonated species is highly sensitive to the effects of ion-pairing between the ammonium and BF4– counterions, which are present in the crystal structure, in that the inclusion of BF4– counterions leads to a significantly longer dihydrogen bond. The non-hydride Fe center was found to be the site of reduction for terminal hydride species and unsymmetric bridging hydride species, whereas the reduced symmetric bridging hydride species exhibited spin delocalization between the Fe centers. According to both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of the relative pKa values, the Fed center of the neutral species is more basic than the amine, and the bridging hydride species is more thermodynamically stable than the terminal hydride species. The calculations implicate a possible pathway for H2 evolution that involves an intermediate with H2 weakly bonded to one Fe, a short H2 distance similar to the molecular bond length, the spin density delocalized over the two Fe centers, and a nearly symmetrically bridged CO ligand. Overall, this study illustrates the mechanistic roles of the ammonium-hydride interaction, flexibility of the bridging CO

  4. Photoaffinity Ligand for the Inhalational Anesthetic Sevoflurane Allows Mechanistic Insight into Potassium Channel Modulation.

    PubMed

    Woll, Kellie A; Peng, Wesley; Liang, Qiansheng; Zhi, Lianteng; Jacobs, Jack A; Maciunas, Lina; Bhanu, Natarajan; Garcia, Benjamin A; Covarrubias, Manuel; Loll, Patrick J; Dailey, William P; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2017-04-03

    Sevoflurane is a commonly used inhaled general anesthetic. Despite this, its mechanism of action remains largely elusive. Compared to other anesthetics, sevoflurane exhibits distinct functional activity. In particular, sevoflurane is a positive modulator of voltage-gated Shaker-related potassium channels (Kv1.x), which are key regulators of action potentials. Here, we report the synthesis and validation of azisevoflurane, a photoaffinity ligand for the direct identification of sevoflurane binding sites in the Kv1.2 channel. Azisevoflurane retains major sevoflurane protein binding interactions and pharmacological properties within in vivo models. Photoactivation of azisevoflurane induces adduction to amino acid residues that accurately reported sevoflurane protein binding sites in model proteins. Pharmacologically relevant concentrations of azisevoflurane analogously potentiated wild-type Kv1.2 and the established mutant Kv1.2 G329T. In wild-type Kv1.2 channels, azisevoflurane photolabeled Leu317 within the internal S4-S5 linker, a vital helix that couples the voltage sensor to the pore region. A residue lining the same binding cavity was photolabeled by azisevoflurane and protected by sevoflurane in the Kv1.2 G329T. Mutagenesis of Leu317 in WT Kv1.2 abolished sevoflurane voltage-dependent positive modulation. Azisevoflurane additionally photolabeled a second distinct site at Thr384 near the external selectivity filter in the Kv1.2 G329T mutant. The identified sevoflurane binding sites are located in critical regions involved in gating of Kv channels and related ion channels. Azisevoflurane has thus emerged as a new tool to discover inhaled anesthetic targets and binding sites and investigate contributions of these targets to general anesthesia.

  5. HCl uptake by volcanic ash in the high temperature eruption plume: mechanistic insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayris, P. M.; Delmelle, P.; Cimarelli, C.; Maters, E. C.; Suzuki, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of HCl into the stratosphere by large volcanic eruptions is considered to be little importance, due to the efficient incorporation of the former into hydrometeors within the cooling plume. However, HCl is also adsorbed onto ash surfaces to form soluble -Cl salts within the high temperature core of the eruption plume, and the atmospheric and environmental significance of this process is uncertain. We investigate the capacity of volcanic glasses with tephrite, phonolite, dacite, and rhyolite compositions to adsorb HCl at temperatures of 200-800°C in the presence of SO2, CO2 and He. Experiments show that only tephrite and phonolite glasses are significantly reactive to HCl, exhibiting optimal uptake at 400-600°C. The primary reaction product formed during adsorption is NaCl, but Ca-, K-, Al- and Fe- chlorides are also identified. Uptake of HCl by glass surfaces is sustained by interdiffusion of Na+ and other Cl-reactive cations with H+. Diffusion coefficient calculations yield Na diffusion coefficients for the four glasses, suggesting that the structural role for Na within the glass network governs the capacity for HCl retention. The uptake of HCl under experimental conditions is limited above 500°C by a Cl-induced dehydroxylation process, but the presence of H2O in the hydrous eruption plume may sustain or enhance adsorption. The experimental data, combined with simulated plume cooling profiles, suggest that HCl adsorption can be a significant scavenging mechanism in large explosive eruptions, particularly in peralkaline systems. The fate of adsorbed HCl is variable; some may be retained on ash surfaces within pyroclastic flows, while chloride-coated ash in the stratosphere could promote the formation of reactive Cl species associated with O3 destruction. Additionally, Fe- and Cl-bearing salts emplaced on ash surfaces by HCl adsorption within the plume cores of large explosive eruptions may increase the ocean fertilising potential of such events.

  6. Methane to acetic acid over Cu-exchanged zeolites: mechanistic insights from a site-specific carbonylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Mathies, Guinevere; Gunther, William R; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-02-11

    The selective low temperature oxidation of methane is an attractive yet challenging pathway to convert abundant natural gas into value added chemicals. Copper-exchanged ZSM-5 and mordenite (MOR) zeolites have received attention due to their ability to oxidize methane into methanol using molecular oxygen. In this work, the conversion of methane into acetic acid is demonstrated using Cu-MOR by coupling oxidation with carbonylation reactions. The carbonylation reaction, known to occur predominantly in the 8-membered ring (8MR) pockets of MOR, is used as a site-specific probe to gain insight into important mechanistic differences existing between Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 during methane oxidation. For the tandem reaction sequence, Cu-MOR generated drastically higher amounts of acetic acid when compared to Cu-ZSM-5 (22 vs 4 μmol/g). Preferential titration with sodium showed a direct correlation between the number of acid sites in the 8MR pockets in MOR and acetic acid yield, indicating that methoxy species present in the MOR side pockets undergo carbonylation. Coupled spectroscopic and reactivity measurements were used to identify the genesis of the oxidation sites and to validate the migration of methoxy species from the oxidation site to the carbonylation site. Our results indicate that the Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) sites previously associated with methane oxidation in both Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 are oxidation active but carbonylation inactive. In turn, combined UV-vis and EPR spectroscopic studies showed that a novel Cu(2+) site is formed at Cu/Al <0.2 in MOR. These sites oxidize methane and promote the migration of the product to a Brønsted acid site in the 8MR to undergo carbonylation.

  7. Mechanistic Details of Pd(II)-Catalyzed C-H Iodination with Molecular I2: Oxidative Addition vs Electrophilic Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Haines, Brandon E; Xu, Huiying; Verma, Pritha; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Yu, Jin-Quan; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2015-07-22

    Transition metal-catalyzed C-H bond halogenation is an important alternative to the highly utilized directed-lithiation methods and increases the accessibility of the synthetically valuable aryl halide compounds. However, this approach often requires impractical reagents, such as IOAc, or strong co-oxidants. Therefore, the development of methodology utilizing inexpensive oxidants and catalyst containing earth-abundant transition metals under mild experimental conditions would represent a significant advance in the field. Success in this endeavor requires a full understanding of the mechanisms and reactivity governing principles of this process. Here, we report intimate mechanistic details of the Pd(II)-catalyzed C-H iodination with molecular I2 as the sole oxidant. Namely, we elucidate the impact of the: (a) Pd-directing group (DG) interaction, (b) nature of oxidant, and (c) nature of the functionalized C-H bond [C(sp(2))-H vs C(sp(3))-H] on the Pd(II)/Pd(IV) redox and Pd(II)/Pd(II) redox-neutral mechanisms of this reaction. We find that both monomeric and dimeric Pd(II) species may act as an active catalyst during the reaction, which preferentially proceeds via the Pd(II)/Pd(II) redox-neutral electrophilic cleavage (EC) pathway for all studied substrates with a functionalized C(sp(2))-H bond. In general, a strong Pd-DG interaction increases the EC iodination barrier and reduces the I-I oxidative addition (OA) barrier. However, the increase in Pd-DG interaction alone is not enough to make the mechanistic switch from EC to OA: This occurs only upon changing to substrates with a functionalized C(sp(3))-H bond. We also investigated the impact of the nature of the electrophile on the C(sp(2))-H bond halogenation. We predicted molecular bromine (Br2) to be more effective electrophile for the C(sp(2))-H halogenation than I2. Subsequent experiments on the stoichiometric C(sp(2))-H bromination by Pd(OAc)2 and Br2 confirmed this prediction.The findings of this study advance

  8. Organophotocatalysis: Insights into the Mechanistic Aspects of Thiourea-Mediated Intermolecular [2+2] Photocycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Vallavoju, Nandini; Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Pemberton, Barry C; Jockusch, Steffen; Sibi, Mukund P; Sivaguru, Jayaraman

    2016-04-25

    Mechanistic investigations of the intermolecular [2+2] photocycloaddition of coumarin with tetramethylethylene mediated by thiourea catalysts reveal that the reaction is enabled by a combination of minimized aggregation, enhanced intersystem crossing, and altered excited-state lifetime(s). These results clarify how the excited-state reactivity can be manipulated through catalyst-substrate interactions and reveal a third mechanistic pathway for thiourea-mediated organo-photocatalysis.

  9. Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in zebrafish: in vivo mechanistic insights from transcriptome analysis, phenotype anchoring and targeted gene expression validation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    adipogenesis, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction, endocrine disruption and metabolic disorders. This study provides important mechanistic insights into mercury-induced liver toxicity in a whole-animal physiology context, which will help in understanding the syndromes caused by mercury poisoning. The molecular conservation of mercury-induced hepatotoxicity between zebrafish and human cell line reveals the feasibility of using zebrafish to model molecular toxicity in human for toxicant risk assessments. PMID:20353558

  10. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D.; Rey, Félix A.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single “fusion loop”. We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal “tail” that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens. PMID:27783711

  11. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc.

    PubMed

    Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Bignon, Eduardo A; Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D; Rey, Félix A

    2016-10-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single "fusion loop". We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal "tail" that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens.

  12. Characterising the inhibitory actions of ceramide upon insulin signaling in different skeletal muscle cell models: a mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Rana; Khoury, Rhéa; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Turban, Sophie; Loiseau, Nicolas; Lipina, Christopher; Stretton, Clare; Bourron, Olivier; Ferré, Pascal; Foufelle, Fabienne; Hundal, Harinder S; Hajduch, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Ceramides are known to promote insulin resistance in a number of metabolically important tissues including skeletal muscle, the predominant site of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Depending on cell type, these lipid intermediates have been shown to inhibit protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), a key mediator of the metabolic actions of insulin, via two distinct pathways: one involving the action of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isoforms, and the second dependent on protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A). The main aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms by which ceramide inhibits PKB/Akt in three different skeletal muscle-derived cell culture models; rat L6 myotubes, mouse C2C12 myotubes and primary human skeletal muscle cells. Our findings indicate that the mechanism by which ceramide acts to repress PKB/Akt is related to the myocellular abundance of caveolin-enriched domains (CEM) present at the plasma membrane. Here, we show that ceramide-enriched-CEMs are markedly more abundant in L6 myotubes compared to C2C12 myotubes, consistent with their previously reported role in coordinating aPKC-directed repression of PKB/Akt in L6 muscle cells. In contrast, a PP2A-dependent pathway predominantly mediates ceramide-induced inhibition of PKB/Akt in C2C12 myotubes. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that ceramide engages an aPKC-dependent pathway to suppress insulin-induced PKB/Akt activation in palmitate-treated cultured human muscle cells as well as in muscle cells from diabetic patients. Collectively, this work identifies key mechanistic differences, which may be linked to variations in plasma membrane composition, underlying the insulin-desensitising effects of ceramide in different skeletal muscle cell models that are extensively used in signal transduction and metabolic studies.

  13. Biophysical properties of presynaptic short-term plasticity in hippocampal neurons: insights from electrophysiology, imaging and mechanistic models

    PubMed Central

    Dutta Roy, Ranjita; Stefan, Melanie I.; Rosenmund, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons show different types of short-term plasticity (STP). Some exhibit facilitation of their synaptic responses and others depression. In this review we discuss presynaptic biophysical properties behind heterogeneity in STP in hippocampal neurons such as alterations in vesicle priming and docking, fusion, neurotransmitter filling and vesicle replenishment. We look into what types of information electrophysiology, imaging and mechanistic models have given about the time scales and relative impact of the different properties on STP with an emphasis on the use of mechanistic models as complementary tools to experimental procedures. Taken together this tells us that it is possible for a multitude of different mechanisms to underlie the same STP pattern, even though some are more important in specific cases, and that mechanistic models can be used to integrate the biophysical properties to see which mechanisms are more important in specific cases of STP. PMID:24904286

  14. Mechanistic insight into the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase method for organochalcogenate-protected metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Jimenez, Francisco

    The primary objective of this thesis research was to explore the mechanism of the Brust---Schiffrin two--phase method, which has been widely used for preparing the thiolate--protected metal nanoparticles with the core diameter less than 5nm; to synthesize and characterize the ligand--protected gold nanoparticles using dialkyl ditelluride with different alkyl chain length as ligand precursor; and to develop a new synthetic route for obtaining ultra--small (< 2 nm) gold nanoparticels covered by tellurium-anchoring ligands. Since the Brust---Schiffrin two--phase method was first reported in 1994, many groups have tried to identify the precursors of metal ions prior to the addition of NaBH4. The widely accepted assumption has been that the addition of thiol reduces Au(III) to Au(I) and forms [AuSR] n--like polymers. Recently Lennox and coworkers have demonstrated that the metal precursor before the addition of the reductant is TOA metal(I) halide complex [TOA][MX2], and not [MSR]n--like polymers. Our Raman spectroscopic investigations showed that, in a typical BSM synthesis, no metal(M)---sulfur(S) bonds were formed after thiol addition. These observations provide independent spectroscopic confirmation of the recent work by Lennox and co--workers. On the basis of Raman, NMR, and surface plasmon resonance characterizations, we found that before the formation of any metal-chalcogen bonds, metal nucleation centers/NPs were first formed inside the inverse micelles of the tetrabutylammonium bromide in the organic solvent, where the metal ions were reduced by NaBH4. The ensuing formation of the metal---chalcogen bonds between the naked metal NPs inside the micelles and the organochalcogen ligands in the organic solvent is the mechanism by which the further growth of the metal core can be controlled. This proposed mechanism has been further examined in the formation of Ag and Cu nanoparticles. This new mechanistic understanding enabled the design of some specifically targeted

  15. Reduction of α,β-Unsaturated Ketones by Old Yellow Enzymes: Mechanistic Insights from Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Richard; Reetz, Manfred T

    2015-11-25

    Enoate reductases catalyze the reduction of activated C═C bonds with high enantioselectivity. The oxidative half-reaction, which involves the addition of a hydride and a proton to opposite faces of the C═C bond, has been studied for the first time by hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM). The reduction of 2-cyclohexen-1-one by YqjM from Bacillus subtilis was selected as the model system. Two-dimensional QM/MM (B3LYP-D/OPLS2005) reaction pathways suggest that the hydride and proton are added as distinct steps, with the former step preceding the latter. Furthermore, we present interesting insights into the reactivity of this enzyme, including the weak binding of the substrate in the active site, the role of the two active site histidine residues for polarization of the substrate C═O bond, structural details of the transition states to hydride and proton transfer, and the role of Tyr196 as proton donor. The information presented here will be useful for the future design of enantioselective YqjM mutants for other substrates.

  16. New Mechanistic Insight from Substrate- and Product-Bound Structures of the Metal-Dependent Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Lyase DddQ.

    PubMed

    Brummett, Adam E; Dey, Mishtu

    2016-11-08

    The marine microbial catabolism of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) by the lyase pathway liberates ∼300 million tons of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) per year, which plays a major role in the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur. Recent biochemical and structural studies of some DMSP lyases, including DddQ, reveal the importance of divalent transition metal ions in assisting DMSP cleavage. While DddQ is believed to be zinc-dependent primarily on the basis of structural studies, excess zinc inhibits the enzyme. We examine the importance of iron in regulating the DMSP β-elimination reaction catalyzed by DddQ as our as-isolated purple-colored enzyme possesses ∼0.5 Fe/subunit. The UV-visible spectrum exhibited a feature at 550 nm, consistent with a tyrosinate-Fe(III) ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition. Incubation of as-isolated DddQ with added iron increases the intensity of the 550 nm peak, whereas addition of dithionite causes a bleaching as Fe(III) is reduced. Both the Fe(III) oxidized and Fe(II) reduced species are active, with similar kcat values and 2-fold differences in their Km values for DMSP. The slow turnover of Fe(III)-bound DddQ allowed us to capture a substrate-bound form of the enzyme. Our DMSP-Fe(III)-DddQ structure reveals conformational changes associated with substrate binding and shows that DMSP is positioned optimally to bind iron and is in the proximity of Tyr 120 that acts as a Lewis base to initiate catalysis. The structures of Tris-, DMSP-, and acrylate-bound forms of Fe(III)-DddQ reported here illustrate various states of the enzyme along the reaction pathway. These results provide new insights into DMSP lyase catalysis and have broader significance for understanding the mechanism of oceanic DMS production.

  17. Physiological constraints on organismal response to global warming: Mechanistic insights from clinally varying populations and implications for assessing endangerment.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Joseph; Spotila, James R

    2006-03-22

    Recent syntheses indicate that global warming affects diverse biological processes, but also highlight the potential for some species to adapt behaviourally or evolutionarily to rapid climate change. Far less attention has addressed the alternative, that organisms lacking this ability may face extinction, a fate projected to befall one-quarter of global biodiversity. This conclusion is controversial, in part because there exist few mechanistic studies that show how climate change could precipitate extinction. We provide a concrete, mechanistic example of warming as a stressor of organisms that are closely adapted to cool climates from a comparative analysis of organismal tolerance among clinally varying populations along a natural thermal gradient. We found that two montane salamanders exhibit significant metabolic depression at temperatures within the natural thermal range experienced by low and middle elevation populations. Moreover, the magnitude of depression was inversely related to native elevation, suggesting that low elevation populations are already living near the limit of their physiological tolerances. If this finding generally applies to other montane specialists, the prognosis for biodiversity loss in typically diverse montane systems is sobering. We propose that indices of warming-induced stress tolerance may provide a critical new tool for quantitative assessments of endangerment due to anthropogenic climate change across diverse species.

  18. RNA-Seq-based toxicogenomic assessment of fresh frozen and formalin-fixed tissues yields similar mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Scott S; Phadke, Dhiral P; Mav, Deepak; Holmgren, Stephanie; Gao, Yuan; Xie, Bin; Shin, Joo Heon; Shah, Ruchir R; Merrick, B Alex; Tice, Raymond R

    2015-07-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) pathology specimens represent a potentially vast resource for transcriptomic-based biomarker discovery. We present here a comparison of results from a whole transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis of RNA extracted from fresh frozen and FFPE livers. The samples were derived from rats exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ) and a corresponding set of control animals. Principal components analysis indicated that samples were separated in the two groups representing presence or absence of chemical exposure, both in fresh frozen and FFPE sample types. Sixty-five percent of the differentially expressed transcripts (AFB1 vs. controls) in fresh frozen samples were also differentially expressed in FFPE samples (overlap significance: P < 0.0001). Genomic signature and gene set analysis of AFB1 differentially expressed transcript lists indicated highly similar results between fresh frozen and FFPE at the level of chemogenomic signatures (i.e., single chemical/dose/duration elicited transcriptomic signatures), mechanistic and pathology signatures, biological processes, canonical pathways and transcription factor networks. Overall, our results suggest that similar hypotheses about the biological mechanism of toxicity would be formulated from fresh frozen and FFPE samples. These results indicate that phenotypically anchored archival specimens represent a potentially informative resource for signature-based biomarker discovery and mechanistic characterization of toxicity.

  19. Mechanistic Insight into the Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation of 2-Acetyl-1-Arythydrazines in Water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weirong; Liu, Tao; Huang, Caiyun; Zhang, Jing; Man, Xiaoping

    2017-03-02

    A mechanistic study of the Cp*Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H functionalization of 2-acetyl-1-arythydrazines with diazo compounds in water was carried out by using density functional theory calculations. The results reveal that the acetyl-bonded N-H deprotonation is prior to the phenyl C-H activation. The mechanisms from protonation by acetic acid disagree with the proposal by the Wang group. Different from the Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activation reported by experimental literature, the rate-determining step of the whole catalytic cycle with an overall barrier of 31.7 kcal mol(-1) (IV → TS12-P') is the protonation process of hydroxy O rather than the C-H bond cleavage step. The present theoretical study rationalizes the experimental observation at the molecular level.

  20. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), inflammation, and endothelial progenitor cells-New mechanistic insights of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Statins have been shown to favorably affect the prognosis of patients with risk factors to atherosclerosis-both as a primary and a secondary prevention. The beneficial effects observed with statin therapy are not merely related to changes in lipid profile but also are due to a positive effect on vascular inflammation and on immune-modulation of T lymphocytes and endothelial progenitor stem cells (EPCs). This dual effect has been demonstrated mainly in clinical trials where a change in endothelial function was observed within hours, much earlier than the effects of statins on the lipid profile (weeks). Based on all the knowledge that we have today questions were raised as to the mechanistic pathways that may explain the process of atherosclerosis and through this pathway to find better solutions and therapies to prevent and fight atherosclerosis. Our review will focus on the new updates in the field of inflammation and stem cells in vascular biology-in relation with atherosclerosis.

  1. Mechanistic insight into ultrasound induced enhancement of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Parthenium hysterophorus for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shuchi; Agarwal, Mayank; Sarma, Shyamali; Goyal, Arun; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents investigations into mechanism of ultrasound assisted bioethanol synthesis using Parthenium hysterophorus biomass through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) mode. Approach of coupling experimental results to mathematical model for SSF using Genetic Algorithm based optimization has been adopted. Comparison of model parameters for experiments with mechanical shaking and sonication (10% duty cycle) give an interesting mechanistic account of influence of ultrasound on SSF system. A 4-fold rise in ethanol and cell mass productivity is seen with ultrasound. The analysis reveals following facets of influence of ultrasound on SSF: increase in Monod constant for glucose for cell growth, maximal specific growth rate and inhibition constant of cell growth by glucose and reduction in specific cell death rate. Values of inhibition constant of cell growth by ethanol (K3E), and constants for growth associated (a) and non-growth associated (b) ethanol production remained unaltered with sonication. Beneficial effects of ultrasound are attributed to enhanced cellulose hydrolysis, enhanced trans-membrane transport of substrate and products as well as dilution of the toxic substances due to micro-convection induced by ultrasound. Intrinsic physiological functioning of cells remained unaffected by ultrasound as indicated by unaltered values of K3E, a and b.

  2. Mechanistic Insights into the Bifunctional Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase Carbapenem Synthase by Active Site Saturation Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Ryan M.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    The carbapenem class of β-lactam antibiotics is known for its remarkable potency, antibacterial spectrum and resistance to β-lactamase-mediated inactivation. While the biosynthesis of structurally “complex” carbapenems, such as thienamycin, share initial biochemical steps with carbapenem-3-carboxylate (“simple” carbapenem), the requisite inversion at C5 and formation of the characteristic α,β-unsaturated carboxylate are different in origin between the two groups. Here we consider carbapenem synthase, a mechanistically distinct bifunctional non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate-dependent enzyme responsible for the terminal reactions, C5 epimerization and desaturation, in simple carbapenem production. Interestingly, this enzyme accepts two stereoisomeric substrates and transforms each to a common active antibiotic. Owing both to enzyme and product instability, resort to saturation mutagenesis of active site and selected second-sphere residues gave clearly differing profiles of CarC tolerance to structural modification. Guided by a crystal structure and the mutational data, in silico docking was used to suggest the positioning of each disastereomeric substrate in the active site. The two orientations relative to the reactive iron-oxo center are manifest in the two distinct reactions, C5-epimerization and C2/3-desaturation. These observations favor a two-step reaction scheme involving two complete oxidative cycles as opposed to a single catalytic cycle in which an active site tyrosine, Tyr67, after hydrogen donation to achieve bicyclic ring inversion, is further hypothesized to serve as a radical carrier. PMID:23611403

  3. Mechanistic Photochemistry of Methyl-4-hydroxycinnamate Chromophore and Its One-Water Complexes: Insights from MS-CASPT2 Study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Ying; Li, Chun-Xiang; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong

    2016-08-04

    Herein we computationally studied the excited-state properties and decay dynamics of methyl-4-hydroxycinnamate (OMpCA) in the lowest three electronic states, that is, (1)ππ*, (1)nπ*, and S0 using combined MS-CASPT2 and CASSCF electronic structure methods. We found that one-water hydration can significantly stabilize and destabilize the vertical excitation energies of the spectroscopically bright (1)ππ* and dark (1)nπ* excited singlet states, respectively; in contrast, it has a much smaller effect on the (1)ππ* and (1)nπ* adiabatic excitation energies. Mechanistically, we located two (1)ππ* excited-state relaxation channels. One is the internal conversion to the dark (1)nπ* state, and the other is the (1)ππ* photoisomerization that eventually leads the system to a (1)ππ*/S0 conical intersection region, near which the radiationless internal conversion to the S0 state occurs. These two (1)ππ* relaxation pathways play distinct roles in OMpCA and its two one-water complexes (OMpCA-W1 and OMpCA-W2). In OMpCA, the predominant (1)ππ* decay route is the state-switching to the dark (1)nπ* state, while in one-water complexes, the importance of the (1)ππ* photoisomerization is significantly enhanced because the internal conversion to the (1)nπ* state is heavily suppressed due to the one-water hydration.

  4. Toward a mechanistic understanding of patterns in biomineralization and new insights for old dogmas in geological settings (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; Hamm, L.; Giuffre, A. J.; Han, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    The ability of organisms to mineralize tissues into skeletons and other functional structures is a remarkable achievement of biology. Yet, the physical basis for how macromolecules regulate the placement and onset of mineral formation is not well established. Efforts to understand nucleation onto organic substrates have produced two, seemingly contradictory, lines of thought: The biomineralization community widely assumes the organic matrix promotes nucleation through stereochemical matching to guide the organization of solute ions, while materials synthesis groups use simple binding assays to correlate high binding strength with good promoters of nucleation. This study reconciles the two views and provides a mechanistic explanation for template-directed nucleation by correlating heterogeneous nucleation barriers with crystal-substrate binding free energies. Using surface assembled monolayers (SAM) as simple model systems, we first measure the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto model substrates that present different functional group chemistries (carboxyl, thiol, phosphate, hydroxyl) and conformations (C11, C16 chain lengths). We find rates are substrate-specific and obey predictions of classical nucleation theory at supersaturations that extend above the solubility of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Analysis of the kinetic data shows the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation is reduced by minimizing the interfacial free energy of the system, γ. We then use dynamic force spectroscopy to independently measure calcite-substrate binding free energies, ΔGb. Moreover, we show that within the classical theory of nucleation, γ and ΔGb should be linearly related. The results bear out this prediction and demonstrate that low energy barriers to nucleation correlate with strong crystal-substrate binding. This relationship is general to all functional group chemistries and conformations. These findings reconcile the long-standing concept of templated nucleation through

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae Endohexosaminidase D, Structural and Mechanistic Insight into Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in Family 85 Glycoside Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D.; Macauley, M; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    Endo-?-d-glucosaminidases from family 85 of glycoside hydrolases (GH85 endohexosaminidases) act to cleave the glycosidic linkage between the two N-acetylglucosamine units that make up the chitobiose core of N-glycans. Endohexosaminidase D (Endo-D), produced by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is believed to contribute to the virulence of this organism by playing a role in the deglycosylation of IgG antibodies. Endohexosaminidases have received significant attention for this reason and, moreover, because they are powerful tools for chemoenzymatic synthesis of proteins having defined glycoforms. Here we describe mechanistic and structural studies of the catalytic domain (SpGH85) of Endo-D that provide compelling support for GH85 enzymes using a catalytic mechanism involving substrate-assisted catalysis. Furthermore, the structure of SpGH85 in complex with the mechanism-based competitive inhibitor NAG-thiazoline (Kd = 28 ?m) provides a coherent rationale for previous mutagenesis studies of Endo-D and other related GH85 enzymes. We also find GH85, GH56, and GH18 enzymes have a similar configuration of catalytic residues. Notably, GH85 enzymes have an asparagine in place of the aspartate residue found in these other families of glycosidases. We propose that this residue, as the imidic acid tautomer, acts analogously to the key catalytic aspartate of GH56 and GH18 enzymes. This topographically conserved arrangement of the asparagine residue and a conserved glutamic acid, coupled with previous kinetic studies, suggests these enzymes may use an unusual proton shuttle to coordinate effective general acid and base catalysis to aid cleavage of the glycosidic bond. These results collectively provide a blueprint that may be used to facilitate protein engineering of these enzymes to improve their function as biocatalysts for synthesizing glycoproteins having defined glycoforms and also may serve as a guide for generating inhibitors of GH85 enzymes.

  6. Copper versus thioether-centered oxidation: mechanistic insights into the non-innocent redox behavior of tripodal benzimidazolylaminothioether ligands.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alanis, Paulina R; Sánchez Eguía, Brenda N; Ugalde-Saldívar, Víctor M; Regla, Ignacio; Demare, Patricia; Aullón, Gabriel; Castillo, Ivan

    2013-05-03

    A series of Cu(+) complexes with ligands that feature varying numbers of benzimidazole/thioether donors and methylene or ethylene linkers between the central nitrogen atom and the thioether sulfur atoms have been spectroscopically and electrochemically characterized. Cyclic voltammetry measurements indicated that the highest Cu(2+)/Cu(+) redox potentials correspond to sulfur-rich coordination environments, with values decreasing as the thioether donors are replaced by nitrogen-donating benzimidazoles. Both Cu(2+) and Cu(+) complexes were studied by DFT. Their electronic properties were determined by analyzing their frontier orbitals, relative energies, and the contributions to the orbitals involved in redox processes, which revealed that the HOMOs of the more sulfur-rich copper complexes, particularly those with methylene linkers (-N-CH2-S-), show significant aromatic thioether character. Thus, the theoretically predicted initial oxidation at the sulfur atom of the methylene-bridged ligands agrees with the experimentally determined oxidation waves in the voltammograms of the NS3- and N2S2-type ligands as being ligand-based, as opposed to the copper-based processes of the ethylene-bridged Cu(+) complexes. The electrochemical and theoretical results are consistent with our previously reported mechanistic proposal for Cu(2+)-promoted oxidative C-S bond cleavage, which in this work resulted in the isolation and complete characterization (including by X-ray crystallography) of the decomposition products of two ligands employed, further supporting the novel reactivity pathway invoked. The combined results raise the possibility that the reactions of copper-thioether complexes in chemical and biochemical systems occur with redox participation of the sulfur atom.

  7. Reduction of O2 slow component by priming exercise: novel mechanistic insights from time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Poole, David C; Barstow, Thomas J; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiwaki, Masato; Okushima, Dai; Koga, Shunsaku

    2015-01-01

    Novel time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS), with adipose tissue thickness correction, was used to test the hypotheses that heavy priming exercise reduces the V̇O2 slow component (V̇O2SC) (1) by elevating microvascular [Hb] volume at multiple sites within the quadriceps femoris (2) rather than reducing the heterogeneity of muscle deoxygenation kinetics. Twelve subjects completed two 6-min bouts of heavy work rate exercise, separated by 6 min of unloaded cycling. Priming exercise induced faster overall V̇O2 kinetics consequent to a substantial reduction in the V̇O2SC (0.27 ± 0.12 vs. 0.11 ± 0.09 L·min−1, P < 0.05) with an unchanged primary V̇O2 time constant. An increased baseline for the primed bout [total (Hb + Mb)] (197.5 ± 21.6 vs. 210.7 ± 22.5 μmol L−1, P < 0.01), reflecting increased microvascular [Hb] volume, correlated significantly with the V̇O2SC reduction. At multiple sites within the quadriceps femoris, priming exercise reduced the baseline and slowed the increase in [deoxy (Hb + Mb)]. Changes in the intersite coefficient of variation in the time delay and time constant of [deoxy (Hb + Mb)] during the second bout were not correlated with the V̇O2SC reduction. These results support a mechanistic link between priming exercise-induced increase in muscle [Hb] volume and the reduced V̇O2SC that serves to speed overall V̇O2 kinetics. However, reduction in the heterogeneity of muscle deoxygenation kinetics does not appear to be an obligatory feature of the priming response. PMID:26109190

  8. Structure and mutational analysis of the PhoN protein of Salmonella typhimurium provide insight into mechanistic details.

    PubMed

    Makde, Ravindra D; Mahajan, Suresh K; Kumar, Vinay

    2007-02-27

    The Salmonella typhimurium PhoN protein is a nonspecific acid phosphatase and belongs to the phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 (PAP2) superfamily. We report here the crystal structures of phosphate-bound PhoN, the PhoN-tungstate complex, and the T159D mutant of PhoN along with functional characterization of three mutants: L39T, T159D, and D201N. Invariant active site residues, Lys-123, Arg-130, Ser-156, Gly-157, His-158, and Arg-191, interact with phosphate and tungstate oxyanions. Ser-156 also accepts a hydrogen bond from Thr-159. The T159D mutation, surprisingly, severely diminishes phosphatase activity, apparently by disturbing the active site scaffold: Arg-191 is swung out of the active site resulting in conformational changes in His-158 and His-197 residues. Our results reveal a hitherto unknown functional role of Arg-191, namely, restricting the active conformation of catalytic His-158 and His-197 residues. Consistent with the conserved nature of Asp-201 in the PAP2 superfamily, the D201N mutation completely abolished phosphatase activity. On the basis of this observation and in silico analysis we suggest that the crucial mechanistic role of Asp-201 is to stabilize the positive charge on the phosphohistidine intermediate generated by the transfer of phosphoryl to the nucleophile, His-197, located within hydrogen bond distance to the invariant Asp-201. This is in contrast to earlier suggestions that Asp-201 stabilizes His-197 and the His197-Asp201 dyad facilitates formation of the phosphoenzyme intermediate through a charge-relay system. Finally, the L39T mutation in the conserved polyproline motif (39LPPPP43) of dimeric PhoN leads to a marginal reduction in activity, in contrast to the nearly 50-fold reduction observed for monomeric Prevotella intermedia acid phosphatase, suggesting that the varying quaternary structure of PhoN orthologues may have functional significance.

  9. A Mechanistic Understanding of a Binary Additive System to Synergistically Boost Efficiency in All-Polymer Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Jin; Ahn, Sunyong; Wang, Dong Hwan; Park, Chan Eon

    2015-01-01

    All-polymer solar cells are herein presented utilizing the PBDTTT-CT donor and the P(NDI2OD-T2) acceptor with 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) binary solvent additives. A systematic study of the polymer/polymer bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells processed from the binary additives revealed that the microstructures and photophysics were quite different from those of a pristine system. The combination of DIO and CN with a DIO/CN ratio of 3:1 (3 vol% DIO, 1 vol% CN and 96 vol% o-DCB) led to suitable penetrating polymer networks, efficient charge generation and balanced charge transport, which were all beneficial to improving the efficiency. This improvement is attributed to increase in power conversion efficiency from 2.81% for a device without additives to 4.39% for a device with the binary processing additives. A detailed investigation indicates that the changes in the polymer:polymer interactions resulted in the formation of a percolating nasnoscale morphology upon processing with the binary additives. Depth profile measurements with a two-dimensional grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering confirm this optimum phase feature. Furthermore impedance spectroscopy also finds evidence for synergistically boosting the device performance. PMID:26658472

  10. A Mechanistic Understanding of a Binary Additive System to Synergistically Boost Efficiency in All-Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yu Jin; Ahn, Sunyong; Wang, Dong Hwan; Park, Chan Eon

    2015-12-01

    All-polymer solar cells are herein presented utilizing the PBDTTT-CT donor and the P(NDI2OD-T2) acceptor with 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) binary solvent additives. A systematic study of the polymer/polymer bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells processed from the binary additives revealed that the microstructures and photophysics were quite different from those of a pristine system. The combination of DIO and CN with a DIO/CN ratio of 3:1 (3 vol% DIO, 1 vol% CN and 96 vol% o-DCB) led to suitable penetrating polymer networks, efficient charge generation and balanced charge transport, which were all beneficial to improving the efficiency. This improvement is attributed to increase in power conversion efficiency from 2.81% for a device without additives to 4.39% for a device with the binary processing additives. A detailed investigation indicates that the changes in the polymer:polymer interactions resulted in the formation of a percolating nasnoscale morphology upon processing with the binary additives. Depth profile measurements with a two-dimensional grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering confirm this optimum phase feature. Furthermore impedance spectroscopy also finds evidence for synergistically boosting the device performance.

  11. A Mechanistic Understanding of a Binary Additive System to Synergistically Boost Efficiency in All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Jin; Ahn, Sunyong; Wang, Dong Hwan; Park, Chan Eon

    2015-12-11

    All-polymer solar cells are herein presented utilizing the PBDTTT-CT donor and the P(NDI2OD-T2) acceptor with 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) binary solvent additives. A systematic study of the polymer/polymer bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells processed from the binary additives revealed that the microstructures and photophysics were quite different from those of a pristine system. The combination of DIO and CN with a DIO/CN ratio of 3:1 (3 vol% DIO, 1 vol% CN and 96 vol% o-DCB) led to suitable penetrating polymer networks, efficient charge generation and balanced charge transport, which were all beneficial to improving the efficiency. This improvement is attributed to increase in power conversion efficiency from 2.81% for a device without additives to 4.39% for a device with the binary processing additives. A detailed investigation indicates that the changes in the polymer:polymer interactions resulted in the formation of a percolating nasnoscale morphology upon processing with the binary additives. Depth profile measurements with a two-dimensional grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering confirm this optimum phase feature. Furthermore impedance spectroscopy also finds evidence for synergistically boosting the device performance.

  12. Reaction of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) with primary amines: mechanistic insights from isotope effects and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Heuts, Dominic P H M; Gummadova, Jennet O; Pang, Jiayun; Rigby, Stephen E J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2011-08-26

    Human vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial copper-dependent amine oxidase involved in the recruitment and extravasation of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. VAP-1 is an important therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. We expressed soluble VAP-1 in HEK293 EBNA1 cells at levels suitable for detailed mechanistic studies with model substrates. Using the model substrate benzylamine, we analyzed the steady-state kinetic parameters of VAP-1 as a function of solution pH. We found two macroscopic pK(a) values that defined a bell-shaped plot of turnover number k(cat,app) as a function of pH, representing ionizable groups in the enzyme-substrate complex. The dependence of (k(cat)/K(m))(app) on pH revealed a single pK(a) value (∼9) that we assigned to ionization of the amine group in free benzylamine substrate. A kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 6 to 7.6 on (k(cat)/K(m))(app) over the pH range of 6 to 10 was observed with d(2)-benzylamine. Over the same pH range, the KIE on k(cat) was found to be close to unity. The unusual KIE values on (k(cat)/K(m))(app) were rationalized using a mechanistic scheme that includes the possibility of multiple isotopically sensitive steps. We also report the analysis of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) using para-substituted protiated and deuterated phenylethylamines. With phenylethylamines we observed a large KIE on k(cat,app) (8.01 ± 0.28 with phenylethylamine), indicating that C-H bond breakage is limiting for 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone reduction. Poor correlations were observed between steady-state rate constants and QSAR parameters. We show the importance of combining KIE, QSAR, and structural studies to gain insight into the complexity of the VAP-1 steady-state mechanism.

  13. The crystal structure of a sodium galactose transporter reveals mechanistic insights into Na[superscript +]/sugar symport

    SciTech Connect

    Faham, S.; Watanabe, A.; Besserer, G.M.; Cascio, D.; Specht, A.; Hirayama, B.A.; Wright, E.M.; Abramson, J.

    2009-08-27

    Membrane transporters that use energy stored in sodium gradients to drive nutrients into cells constitute a major class of proteins. We report the crystal structure of a member of the solute sodium symporters (SSS), the Vibrio parahaemolyticus sodium/galactose symporter (vSGLT). The -3.0 angstrom structure contains 14 transmembrane (TM) helices in an inward-facing conformation with a core structure of inverted repeats of 5 TM helices (TM2 to TM6 and TM7 to TM11). Galactose is bound in the center of the core, occluded from the outside solutions by hydrophobic residues. Surprisingly, the architecture of the core is similar to that of the leucine transporter (LeuT) from a different gene family. Modeling the outward-facing conformation based on the LeuT structure, in conjunction with biophysical data, provides insight into structural rearrangements for active transport.

  14. Silver Vanadium Diphosphate Ag2VP2O8: Electrochemistry and Characterization of Reduced Material providing Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Esther S.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Chen, Po-Jen; Menard, Melissa C.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Silver vanadium phosphorous oxides (AgwVxPyOz) are notable battery cathode materials due to their high energy density and demonstrated ability to form in-situ Ag metal nanostructured electrically conductive networks within the cathode. While analogous silver vanadium diphosphate materials have been prepared, electrochemical evaluations of these diphosphate based materials have been limited. We report here the first electrochemical study of a silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag2VP2O8, where the structural differences associated with phosphorous oxides versus diphosphates profoundly affect the associated electrochemistry. Reminiscent of Ag2VO2PO4 reduction, in-situ formation of silver metal nanoparticles was observed with reduction of Ag2VP2O8. However, counter to Ag2VO2PO4 reduction, Ag2VP2O8 demonstrates a significant decrease in conductivity upon continued electrochemical reduction. Structural analysis contrasting the crystallography of the parent Ag2VP2O8 with that of the proposed Li2VP2O8 reduction product is employed to gain insight into the observed electrochemical reduction behavior, where the structural rigidity associated with the diphosphate anion may be associated with the observed particle fracturing upon deep electrochemical reduction. Further, the diphosphate anion structure may be associated with the high thermal stability of the partially reduced Ag2VP2O8 materials, which bodes well for enhanced safety of batteries incorporating this material. PMID:25866419

  15. Mechanistic insights into osmolyte action in protein stabilization under harsh conditions: N-methylacetamide in glycine betaine-urea mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Narendra; Kishore, Nand

    2014-10-01

    Glycine betaine (GB), a small naturally occurring osmolyte, stabilizes proteins and counteracts harsh denaturing conditions such as extremes of temperature, cellular dehydration, and presence of high concentration of urea. In spite of several studies on understanding mechanism of protein stabilization and counteraction of these harsh conditions by osmolytes, studies centred on GB, one of the most important osmolyte, are scarce, hence, there is need for more investigations. To explore mechanism of protein stabilization and counteraction of denaturing property of urea by GB, molecular dynamics studies of N-methylacetamide (NMA), a model peptide representing denatured state of a protein, in the presence of GB, urea, and GB-urea mixture were carried out. The results show that GB and urea work such that the strength of GB as a protecting osmolyte is increased and the denaturing ability of urea is decreased in the GB-urea mixture. It can be inferred that GB counteracts urea by decreasing its hydrophobic interactions with proteins. The mutual interactions between GB and urea also play an important role in protein stabilization. This study provides insights on osmolyte induced counteraction of denaturing property of urea.

  16. Mechanistic insights on the responses of plant and ecosystem gas exchange to global environmental change: lessons from Biosphere 2.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A; Rucks, Jessica S; Aubanell, Gerard

    2014-09-01

    Scaling up leaf processes to canopy/ecosystem level fluxes is critical for examining feedbacks between vegetation and climate. Collectively, studies from Biosphere 2 Laboratory have provided important insight of leaf-to-ecosystem investigations of multiple environmental parameters that were not before possible in enclosed or field studies. B2L has been a testing lab for the applicability of new technologies such as spectral approaches to detect spatial and temporal changes in photosynthesis within canopies, or for the development of cavity ring-down isotope applications for ecosystem evapotranspiration. Short and long term changes in atmospheric CO2, drought or temperature allowed for intensive investigation of the interactions between photosynthesis and leaf, soil and ecosystem respiration. Experiments conducted in the rainforest biome have provided some of the most comprehensive dataset to date on the effects of climate change variables on tropical ecosystems. Results from these studies have been later corroborated in natural rainforest ecosystems and have improved the predictive capabilities of models that now show increased resilience of tropics to climate change. Studies of temperature and CO2 effects on ecosystem respiration and its leaf and soil components have helped reconsider the use of simple first-order kinetics for characterizing respiration in models. The B2L also provided opportunities to quantify the rhizosphere priming effect, or establish the relationships between net primary productivity, atmospheric CO2 and isoprene emissions.

  17. Mechanistic Insights into Validoxylamine A 7'-Phosphate Synthesis by VldE Using the Structure of the Entire Product Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalier, Michael C.; Yim, Young-Sun; Asamizu, Shumpei; Neau, David; Almabruk, Khaled H.; Mahmud, Taifo; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2013-09-09

    The pseudo-glycosyltransferase VldE catalyzes non-glycosidic C-N coupling between an unsaturated cyclitol and a saturated aminocyclitol with the conservation of the stereochemical configuration of the substrates to form validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, the biosynthetic precursor of the antibiotic validamycin A. To study the molecular basis of its mechanism, the three-dimensional structures of VldE from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus was determined in apo form, in complex with GDP, in complex with GDP and validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, and in complex with GDP and trehalose. The structure of VldE with the catalytic site in both an “open” and “closed” conformation is also described. With these structures, the preferred binding of the guanine moiety by VldE, rather than the uracil moiety as seen in OtsA could be explained. The elucidation of the VldE structure in complex with the entirety of its products provides insight into the internal return mechanism by which catalysis occurs with a net retention of the stereochemical configuration of the donated cyclitol.

  18. Mechanistic insights into c-di-GMP–dependent control of the biofilm regulator FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Bruno Y.; Krasteva, Petya V.; Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S.; Sondermann, Holger; Navarro, Marcos V. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation during chronic infections confers increased fitness, antibiotic tolerance, and cytotoxicity. In many pathogens, the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to collaborative, sessile biofilms represents a regulated process orchestrated by the intracellular second-messenger c-di-GMP. A main effector for c-di-GMP signaling in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the transcription regulator FleQ. FleQ is a bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) with a central AAA+ ATPase σ54-interaction domain, flanked by a C-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif and a divergent N-terminal receiver domain. Together with a second ATPase, FleN, FleQ regulates the expression of flagellar and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes in response to cellular c-di-GMP. Here we report structural and functional data that reveal an unexpected mode of c-di-GMP recognition that is associated with major conformational rearrangements in FleQ. Crystal structures of FleQ’s AAA+ ATPase domain in its apo-state or bound to ADP or ATP-γ-S show conformations reminiscent of the activated ring-shaped assemblies of other bEBPs. As revealed by the structure of c-di-GMP–complexed FleQ, the second messenger interacts with the AAA+ ATPase domain at a site distinct from the ATP binding pocket. c-di-GMP interaction leads to active site obstruction, hexameric ring destabilization, and discrete quaternary structure transitions. Solution and cell-based studies confirm coupling of the ATPase active site and c-di-GMP binding, as well as the functional significance of crystallographic interprotomer interfaces. Taken together, our data offer unprecedented insight into conserved regulatory mechanisms of gene expression under direct c-di-GMP control via FleQ and FleQ-like bEBPs. PMID:26712005

  19. Traveling-wave Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals Additional Mechanistic Details in the Stabilization of Protein Complex Ions through Tuned Salt Additives

    PubMed Central

    Han, Linjie; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Ion mobility–mass spectrometry is often applied to the structural elucidation of multiprotein assemblies in cases where X-ray crystallography or NMR experiments have proved challenging. Such applications are growing steadily as we continue to probe regions of the proteome that are less-accessible to such high-resolution structural biology tools. Since ion mobility measures protein structure in the absence of bulk solvent, strategies designed to more-broadly stabilize native-like protein structures in the gas-phase would greatly enable the application of such measurements to challenging structural targets. Recently, we have begun investigating the ability of salt-based solution additives that remain bound to protein ions in the gas-phase to stabilize native-like protein structures. These experiments, which utilize collision induced unfolding and collision induced dissociation in a tandem mass spectrometry mode to measure protein stability, seek to develop a rank-order similar to the Hofmeister series that categorizes the general ability of different anions and cations to stabilize gas-phase protein structure. Here, we study magnesium chloride as a potential stabilizing additive for protein structures in vacuo, and find that the addition of this salt to solutions prior to nano-electrospray ionization dramatically enhances multiprotein complex structural stability in the gas-phase. Based on these experiments, we also refine the physical mechanism of cation-based protein complex ion stabilization by tracking the unfolding transitions experienced by cation-bound complexes. Upon comparison with unbound proteins, we find strong evidence that stabilizing cations act to tether protein complex structure. We conclude by putting the results reported here in context, and by projecting the future applications of this method. PMID:23539363

  20. Crystal Structure of the Isopropylzinc Alkoxide of Pyrimidyl Alkanol: Mechanistic Insights for Asymmetric Autocatalysis with Amplification of Enantiomeric Excess.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Arimasa; Abe, Takaaki; Hara, Atsushi; Tobita, Takayuki; Sasagawa, Taisuke; Kawasaki, Tsuneomi; Soai, Kenso

    2015-12-07

    Asymmetric amplification during self-replication is a key feature that is used to explain the origin of homochirality. Asymmetric autocatalysis of pyrimidyl alkanol in the asymmetric addition of diisopropylzinc to pyrimidine-5-carbaldehyde is a unique example of this phenomenon. Crystallization of zinc alkoxides of this 5-pyrimidyl alkanol and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of the alkoxide crystals reveal the existence of tetramer or higher oligomer structures in this asymmetric autocatalytic system.

  1. Indium-mediated asymmetric Barbier-type propargylations: additions to aldehydes and ketones and mechanistic investigation of the organoindium reagents.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Terra D; Hirayama, Lacie C; Buckley, Jannise J; Singaram, Bakthan

    2012-01-20

    We report a simple, efficient, and general method for the indium-mediated enantioselective propargylation of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes under Barbier-type conditions in a one-pot synthesis affording the corresponding chiral alcohol products in very good yield (up to 90%) and enantiomeric excess (up to 95%). The extension of this methodology to ketones demonstrated the need for electrophilic ketones more reactive than acetophenone as the reaction would not proceed with just acetophenone. Using the Lewis acid indium triflate [In(OTf)(3)] induced regioselective formation of the corresponding homoallenic alcohol product from acetophenone. However, this methodology demonstrated excellent chemoselectivity in formation of only the corresponding secondary homopropargylic alcohol product in the presence of a ketone functionality. Investigation of the organoindium intermediates under our reaction conditions shows the formation of allenylindium species, and we suggest that these species contain an indium(III) center. In addition, we have observed the presence of a shiny, indium(0) nugget throughout the reaction, irrespective of the stoichiometry, indicating disproportionation of indium halide byproduct formed during the reaction.

  2. Mechanistic Insights of Ethanol Steam Reforming over Ni–CeO x (111): The Importance of Hydroxyl Groups for Suppressing Coke Formation

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Zongyuan; Duchoň, Tomáš; Wang, Huanru; ...

    2015-07-30

    We have studied the reaction of ethanol and water over Ni–CeO2-x(111) model surfaces to elucidate the mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. Our results provide insights about the importance of hydroxyl groups to the ESR reaction over Ni-based catalysts. Systematically, we have investigated the reaction of ethanol on Ni–CeO2-x(111) at varying Ce³⁺ concentrations (CeO1.8–2.0) with absence/presence of water using a combination of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Consistent with previous reports, upon annealing, metallic Ni formed on reduced ceria while NiO was the main component on fully oxidized ceria. Ni⁰ is themore » active phase leading to both the C–C and C–H cleavage of ethanol but is also responsible for carbon accumulation or coking. We have identified a Ni₃C phase that formed prior to the formation of coke. At temperatures above 600K, the lattice oxygen from ceria and the hydroxyl groups from water interact cooperatively in the removal of coke, likely through a strong metal–support interaction between nickel and ceria that facilitates oxygen transfer.« less

  3. HPRT-Deficiency Dysregulates cAMP-PKA Signaling and Phosphodiesterase 10A Expression: Mechanistic Insight and Potential Target for Lesch-Nyhan Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Murray, Fiona; Barron, Nikki

    2013-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND) is the result of mutations in the X-linked gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT). LND gives rise to severe neurological anomalies including mental retardation, dystonia, chorea, pyramidal signs and a compulsive and aggressive behavior to self injure. The neurological phenotype in LND has been shown to reflect aberrant dopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia, however there are little data correlating the defect in purine metabolism to the neural-related abnormalities. In the present studies, we find that HPRT-deficient neuronal cell lines have reduced CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) expression and intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP), which correlates with attenuated CREB-dependent transcriptional activity and a reduced phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) substrates such as synapsin (p-syn I). Of interest, we found increased expression of phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) in HPRT-deficient cell lines and that the PDE10 inhibitor papaverine and PDE10A siRNA restored cAMP/PKA signaling. Furthermore, reconstitution of HPRT expression in mutant cells partly increased cAMP signaling synapsin phosphorylation. In conclusion, our data show that HPRT-deficiency alters cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, which is in part due to the increased of PDE10A expression and activity. These findings suggest a mechanistic insight into the possible causes of LND and highlight PDE10A as a possible therapeutic target for this intractable neurological disease. PMID:23691025

  4. Mechanistic Insights of Ethanol Steam Reforming over Ni–CeO x (111): The Importance of Hydroxyl Groups for Suppressing Coke Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zongyuan; Duchoň, Tomáš; Wang, Huanru; Peterson, Erik W.; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Zhou, Jing; Matolín, Vladimir; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Rodriguez, José A.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-07-30

    We have studied the reaction of ethanol and water over Ni–CeO2-x(111) model surfaces to elucidate the mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. Our results provide insights about the importance of hydroxyl groups to the ESR reaction over Ni-based catalysts. Systematically, we have investigated the reaction of ethanol on Ni–CeO2-x(111) at varying Ce³⁺ concentrations (CeO1.8–2.0) with absence/presence of water using a combination of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Consistent with previous reports, upon annealing, metallic Ni formed on reduced ceria while NiO was the main component on fully oxidized ceria. Ni⁰ is the active phase leading to both the C–C and C–H cleavage of ethanol but is also responsible for carbon accumulation or coking. We have identified a Ni₃C phase that formed prior to the formation of coke. At temperatures above 600K, the lattice oxygen from ceria and the hydroxyl groups from water interact cooperatively in the removal of coke, likely through a strong metal–support interaction between nickel and ceria that facilitates oxygen transfer.

  5. Advances in psoriasis physiopathology and treatments: Up to date of mechanistic insights and perspectives of novel therapies based on innovative skin drug delivery systems (ISDDS).

    PubMed

    Sala, M; Elaissari, A; Fessi, H

    2016-10-10

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting mainly the skin but which can be complicated by psoriatic arthritis (PsA).This autoimmune skin disorder concerns 2-5% of the world population. To date, the physiopathology of psoriasis is not still completely elucidated but many researches are ongoing which have led for example to the discovery of the Th17/Th22 pathway. The conventional therapeutic approaches (local or systemic route) appeal to various classes of drugs with complex mechanisms of action and non-negligible side effects. Although there is no therapy capable to cure psoriasis, the current goal is to relieve symptoms as longer as possible with a good benefit/risk ratio. That is one of the principal limits of conventional antipsoriatic drugs. New formulations based on nanoencapsulation are a promising opportunity to answer to this limit by offering an optimization of the conventional antipsoriatic drug use (higher activity, lower side effects and frequency of application, etc.). Herein, we tried to put in perspective the mechanistic insights (histological and immunological views) proposed into scientific literature these last years in order to have a better comprehension of psoriasis physiopathology resulting in skin lesions and PsA. The therapeutic armamentarium and the different strategies in the management of psoriasis are discussed in greater details. To finish, the field of encapsulation in nanoparticles is broached in order to put forward recent advances in innovative skin drug delivery systems (ISDDSs) of antipsoriatic active agents for a better efficacy, safety and compliance.

  6. Mechanistic Insight into a Sugar-Accelerated Tin-Catalyzed Cascade Synthesis of α-Hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone from Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Sho; Matsuo, Takeaki; Motokura, Ken; Sakamoto, Yasuharu; Miyaji, Akimitsu; Baba, Toshihide

    2015-11-01

    Applications of the formose reaction, which involves the formation of sugars from formaldehyde, have previously been confined to the selective synthesis of unprotected sugars. Herein, it is demonstrated that α-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone (HBL), which is one of the most important intermediates in pharmaceutical syntheses, can be produced from paraformaldehyde. In the developed reaction system, homogeneous tin chloride exhibits high catalytic activity and the addition of mono- and disaccharides accelerates the formation of HBL. These observations suggest that the formose reaction may serve as a feasible pathway for the synthesis of important chemicals.

  7. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses reveal mechanistic insight into the adaption of marine Bacillus subtilis C01 to alumina nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mu, Dashuai; Yu, Xiuxia; Xu, Zhenxing; Du, Zongjun; Chen, Guanjun

    2016-07-21

    An increasing number of studies have investigated the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on microbial systems; however, few existing reports have focused on the defense mechanisms of bacteria against NPs. Whether secondary metabolism biosynthesis is a response to NP stress and contributes to the adaption of bacteria to NPs is unclear. Here, a significant induction in the surfactin production and biofilm formation were detected by adding Al2O3 NPs to the B. subtilis fermentation broth. Physiological analysis showed that Al2O3 NP stress could also affect the cell and colony morphogenesis and inhibit the motility and sporulation. Exogenously adding commercial surfactin restored the swarming motility. Additionally, a suite of toxicity assays analyzing membrane damage, cellular ROS generation, electron transport activity and membrane potential was used to determine the molecular mechanisms of toxicity of Al2O3 NPs. Furthermore, whole transcriptomic analysis was used to elucidate the mechanisms of B. subtilis adaption to Al2O3 NPs. These results revealed several mechanisms by which marine B. subtilis C01 adapt to Al2O3 NPs. Additionally, this study broadens the applications of nanomaterials and describes the important effects on secondary metabolism and multicellularity regulation by using Al2O3 NPs or other nano-products.

  8. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses reveal mechanistic insight into the adaption of marine Bacillus subtilis C01 to alumina nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Dashuai; Yu, Xiuxia; Xu, Zhenxing; Du, Zongjun; Chen, Guanjun

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have investigated the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on microbial systems; however, few existing reports have focused on the defense mechanisms of bacteria against NPs. Whether secondary metabolism biosynthesis is a response to NP stress and contributes to the adaption of bacteria to NPs is unclear. Here, a significant induction in the surfactin production and biofilm formation were detected by adding Al2O3 NPs to the B. subtilis fermentation broth. Physiological analysis showed that Al2O3 NP stress could also affect the cell and colony morphogenesis and inhibit the motility and sporulation. Exogenously adding commercial surfactin restored the swarming motility. Additionally, a suite of toxicity assays analyzing membrane damage, cellular ROS generation, electron transport activity and membrane potential was used to determine the molecular mechanisms of toxicity of Al2O3 NPs. Furthermore, whole transcriptomic analysis was used to elucidate the mechanisms of B. subtilis adaption to Al2O3 NPs. These results revealed several mechanisms by which marine B. subtilis C01 adapt to Al2O3 NPs. Additionally, this study broadens the applications of nanomaterials and describes the important effects on secondary metabolism and multicellularity regulation by using Al2O3 NPs or other nano-products. PMID:27440502

  9. Phorbol ester and A23187 have additive but mechanistically separate effects on vasopressin action in rabbit collecting tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Y; Jacobson, H R; Breyer, M D

    1988-01-01

    AVP on CCT at 37 degrees C. (b) When stimulated simultaneously these two intracellular mediators are additive in their antagonism of AVP action. These results suggest that stimulated PIP2 breakdown may be an important modulator of water transport in CCT. (c) Different mechanisms underlie PKC and Ca-mediated suppression of the AVP-induced water transport. The inhibition of AVP action by increased [Ca++]i is primarily pre-cAMP, and involves a cyclooxygenase metabolite(s) of arachidonic acid, while the inhibition by PKC is post-cAMP, and independent of cyclooxygenase products of arachidonic acid. Images PMID:3130397

  10. Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation with decacationic functionalized fullerenes: oxygen independent photokilling in presence of azide and new mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Rui; Wang, Min; Huang, Ying-Ying; Landi, Giacomo; Vecchio, Daniela; Chiang, Long Y; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Functionalized fullerenes are becoming of wide interest to mediate photodynamic therapy (PDT) of diseases such as cancers and infections. We recently reported the synthesis of two new decacationic fullerene monoadducts: C60[>M(C3N6+C3)2]−(I−)10(LC14) and its derivative with a light-harvesting antenna conjugated as a C60[>CPAF-(MN6+C3)2]−(I−)10nanostructure (LC15). We studied the ability of these compounds to mediate PDT of human cancer cells in vitro when excited by UVA light or by white light. Here we report the synthesis of a new fullerene derivative C60[>M(C3N6+C3)2][>M(C3N6C3)2]−(I−)10(LC16 derived from LC14), as a malonatebisadduct containing a covalently-bound deca-tertiary amine arm. We investigated the relative abilities of the three compounds to generate singlet oxygen (1O2), hydroxyl radicals (HO·), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) after excitation by UVA or by white light. We used three different classes of pathogenic microbial cells (Gram-positive bacterium, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, and fungal yeast Candida albicans). LC15 was the most powerful broad spectrum antimicrobial fullerenylphotosensitizer (FPS) followed by LC16 and LC14 was least powerful. Killing depended on both fullerene monoadduct concentration and light fluence. UVA was five times more effective than white light for killing, but not for generation of ROS and relative absorption was greater in white spectral region. Bacterial killing was not much inhibited by addition of azide anions and in some cases was potentiated. In the absence of oxygen, microbial photokilling was highly potentiated (up to 5 logs) by addition of azide anions. We conclude that molecular functional addends that encourage a Type-I electron-transfer mechanism increase the ability of photoactivated fullerene monoadducts to kill microbial cells. Oxygen-independent photokilling is possible with fullerene monoadducts in the presence of azide anions

  11. Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation with decacationic functionalized fullerenes: oxygen-independent photokilling in presence of azide and new mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Yin, Rui; Wang, Min; Huang, Ying-Ying; Landi, Giacomo; Vecchio, Daniela; Chiang, Long Y; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Functionalized fullerenes are gaining wide interest for mediating photodynamic therapy (PDT) of diseases such as cancers and infections. We recently reported the synthesis of two new decacationic fullerene monoadducts: C60[>M(C3N6(+)C3)2]-(I(-))10(LC14) and its derivative with a light-harvesting antenna conjugated as a C60[>CPAF-(MN6(+)C3)2]-(I(-))10 nanostructure (LC15). We studied the ability of these compounds to mediate PDT of human cancer cells in vitro when excited by UVA light or by white light. Here we report the synthesis of a new fullerene derivative C60[>M(C3N6(+)C3)2][>M(C3N6C3)2]-(I(-))10 (LC16 derived from LC14), as a malonate bisadduct containing a covalently bound decatertiary amine arm. We investigated the relative abilities of the three compounds to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2), hydroxyl radicals (HO·), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) after excitation by UVA or by white light. We used three different classes of pathogenic microbial cells (Gram-positive bacterium, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, and fungal yeast Candida albicans). LC15 was the most powerful broad spectrum antimicrobial fullerenyl photosensitizer (FPS) followed by LC16, and LC14 was least powerful. Killing depended on both fullerene monoadduct concentration and light fluence. UVA was five times more effective than white light for killing, but not for generation of ROS and relative absorption was greater in white spectral region. Bacterial killing was not much inhibited by addition of azide anions and in some cases was potentiated. In the absence of oxygen, microbial photokilling was highly potentiated (up to 5 logs) by the addition of azide anions. We conclude that molecular functional addends that encourage a type I electron-transfer mechanism increase the ability of photoactivated fullerene monoadducts to kill microbial cells. Oxygen-independent photokilling is possible with fullerene monoadducts in the presence of

  12. Mechanistic insights into the distribution of carbohydrate clusters on cell membranes revealed by dSTORM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the carbohydrate-binding proteins (i.e., galectins) cross-linking their specific carbohydrate ligands. Our results clarify the organizational mechanism of carbohydrates on cell surfaces from their formation, stable existence and size-restriction, which promotes a better understanding of the relationship between the function and distribution of carbohydrates, as well as the structure of cell membranes.Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the

  13. Ecological and mechanistic insights into the direct and indirect antimicrobial properties of Bacillus subtilis lipopeptides on plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Falardeau, J; Wise, C; Novitsky, L; Avis, T J

    2013-07-01

    Members of the genus Bacillus produce a wide variety of antimicrobial compounds. Cyclic lipopeptides (CLP) produced by Bacillus subtilis strains have been shown to protect host plants from a numbers of pathogens. The representative families of these CLP (surfactins, fengycins, and iturins) share a polypeptide ring linked to a lipid tail of varying length. CLP provide plant protection through a variety of unique mechanisms. Members of the surfactin and fengycin families elicit induced systemic resistance in certain host plants, and they also function by directly affecting the biological membranes of bacterial and fungal pathogens, mainly resulting in membrane pore formation. Specific pore forming mechanisms differ between CLP families, causing differential activities. CLP also may aid in enhanced B. subtilis colonization of the plant environment in addition to potentially preventing the adhesion of competitive microorganisms. Several recent studies have highlighted the control of plant pathogens by CLP-producing B. subtilis strains. Strong ecological advantages through multifaceted activities of CLP provide these strains with immense promise in controlling pathogens in a variety of plant ecosystems.

  14. Connection of Nicotine to Diet-Induced Obesity and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Cellular and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P.; Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) poses a serious health hazard affecting 20–40% of adults in the general population in the USA and over 70% of the obese and extremely obese people. In addition to obesity, nicotine is recognized as a risk factor for NAFLD, and it has been reported that nicotine can exaggerate obesity-induced hepatic steatosis. The development of NAFLD has serious clinical complications because of its potential progression from simple hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Multiple mechanisms can be involved in nicotine plus high-fat diet-induced (HFD) hepatic steatosis. Emerging evidence now suggests that nicotine exacerbates hepatic steatosis triggered by HFD, through increased oxidative stress and hepatocellular apoptosis, decreased phosphorylation (inactivation) of adenosine-5-monophosphate-activated protein kinase and, in turn, up-regulation of sterol response-element binding protein 1-c, fatty acid synthase, and activation of acetyl-coenzyme A-carboxylase, leading to increased hepatic lipogenesis. There is also growing evidence that chronic endoplasmic reticulum stress through regulation of several pathways leading to oxidative stress, inflammation, perturbed hepatic lipid homeostasis, apoptosis, and autophagy can induce hepatic steatosis and its progression to NASH. Evidence also suggests a central role of the gut microbiota in obesity and its related disorders, including NAFLD. This review explores the contribution of nicotine and obesity to the development of NAFLD and its molecular underpinning. PMID:28239368

  15. Insights into Mechanistic Models for Evaporation of Organic Liquids in the Environment Obtained by Position-Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S; Parinet, Julien; Höhener, Patrick

    2015-11-03

    Position-specific isotope effects (PSIEs) have been measured by isotope ratio monitoring (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry during the evaporation of 10 liquids of different polarities under 4 evaporation modes (passive evaporation, air-vented evaporation, low pressure evaporation, distillation). The observed effects are used to assess the validity of the Craig-Gordon isotope model for organic liquids. For seven liquids the overall isotope effect (IE) includes a vapor-liquid contribution that is strongly position-specific in polar compounds but less so in apolar compounds and a diffusive IE that is not position-specific, except in the alcohols, ethanol and propan-1-ol. The diffusive IE is diminished under forced evaporation. The position-specific isotope pattern created by liquid-vapor IEs is manifest in five liquids, which have an air-side limitation for volatilization. For the alcohols, undefined processes in the liquid phase create additional PSIEs. Three other liquids with limitations on the liquid side have a lower, highly position-specific, bulk diffusive IE. It is concluded that evaporation of organic pollutants creates unique position-specific isotope patterns that may be used to assess the progress of remediation or natural attenuation of pollution and that the Craig-Gordon isotope model is valid for the volatilization of nonpolar organic liquids with air-side limitation of the volatilization rate.

  16. Mechanistic insights into the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics of BiOBr/CdS nanosheet heterojunctions for photovoltaic application.

    PubMed

    Jia, Huimin; Zhang, Beibei; He, Weiwei; Xiang, Yong; Zheng, Zhi

    2017-03-02

    The rational design of high performance hetero-structure photovoltaic devices requires a full understanding of the photoinduced charge transfer mechanism and kinetics at the interface of heterojunctions. In this paper, we intelligently fabricated p-BiOBr/n-CdS heterojunctions with perfect nanosheet arrays by using a facile successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction and chemical bath deposition methods at low temperature. A BiOBr/CdS heterojunction based solar cell has been fabricated which exhibited enhanced photovoltaic responses. Assisted by the surface photovoltage (SPV), transient photovoltage (TPV) and Kelvin probe technique, the photoinduced charge transfer dynamics on the BiOBr nanosheet and p-BiOBr/n-CdS interface were systematically investigated. It was found that the BiOBr/CdS nanosheet array heterojunctions were more efficient in facilitating charge carrier separation than both bare BiOBr and CdS films. The mechanism underlying the photoinduced charge carrier transfer behaviour was unravelled by allying the energy band of BiOBr/CdS p-n junctions from both the interfacial electric field and surface electric field. In addition, the CdS loading thickness in the p-BiOBr/n-CdS heterojunction and the incident wavelength affected greatly the transfer behavior of photoinduced charges, which was of great value for design of photovoltaic devices.

  17. Environmental drivers defining linkages among life-history traits: mechanistic insights from a semiterrestrial amphipod subjected to macroscale gradients

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Julio; Barboza, Francisco R; Defeo, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Determining the existence of interconnected responses among life-history traits and identifying underlying environmental drivers are recognized as key goals for understanding the basis of phenotypic variability. We studied potentially interconnected responses among senescence, fecundity, embryos size, weight of brooding females, size at maturity and sex ratio in a semiterrestrial amphipod affected by macroscale gradients in beach morphodynamics and salinity. To this end, multiple modelling processes based on generalized additive mixed models were used to deal with the spatio-temporal structure of the data obtained at 10 beaches during 22 months. Salinity was the only nexus among life-history traits, suggesting that this physiological stressor influences the energy balance of organisms. Different salinity scenarios determined shifts in the weight of brooding females and size at maturity, having consequences in the number and size of embryos which in turn affected sex determination and sex ratio at the population level. Our work highlights the importance of analysing field data to find the variables and potential mechanisms that define concerted responses among traits, therefore defining life-history strategies. PMID:24198949

  18. Structural Analysis of Glycine Sarcosine N-methyltransferase from Methanohalophilus portucalensis Reveals Mechanistic Insights into the Regulation of Methyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ru; Lin, Te-Sheng; Lai, Shu-Jung; Liu, Mu-Sen; Lai, Mei-Chin; Chan, Nei-Li

    2016-01-01

    Methyltransferases play crucial roles in many cellular processes, and various regulatory mechanisms have evolved to control their activities. For methyltransferases involved in biosynthetic pathways, regulation via feedback inhibition is a commonly employed strategy to prevent excessive accumulation of the pathways’ end products. To date, no biosynthetic methyltransferases have been characterized by X-ray crystallography in complex with their corresponding end product. Here, we report the crystal structures of the glycine sarcosine N-methyltransferase from the halophilic archaeon Methanohalophilus portucalensis (MpGSMT), which represents the first structural elucidation of the GSMT methyltransferase family. As the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the osmoprotectant betaine, MpGSMT catalyzes N-methylation of glycine and sarcosine, and its activity is feedback-inhibited by the end product betaine. A structural analysis revealed that, despite the simultaneous presence of both substrate (sarcosine) and cofactor (S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine; SAH), the enzyme was likely crystallized in an inactive conformation, as additional structural changes are required to complete the active site assembly. Consistent with this interpretation, the bound SAH can be replaced by the methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine without triggering the methylation reaction. Furthermore, the observed conformational state was found to harbor a betaine-binding site, suggesting that betaine may inhibit MpGSMT activity by trapping the enzyme in an inactive form. This work implicates a structural basis by which feedback inhibition of biosynthetic methyltransferases may be achieved. PMID:27934872

  19. Mechanistic insights and the role of cocatalysts in Aza-Morita-Baylis-hillman and Morita-Baylis-Hillman reactions.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dipankar; Patel, Chandan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2009-09-18

    The mechanism of the trimethylamine or trimethylphosphine catalyzed aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction between acrolein and mesyl imine is investigated by using ab initio and density functional methods. All key transition states are located at the CBS-4M as well as at the mPW1K/6-31+G** levels of theories. To account for the experimentally known rate enhancements through the use of polar protic cocatalysts, transition state models with explicit cocatalysts are considered. Inclusion of polar protic cocatalysts is found to have a profound influence in decreasing the activation barriers associated with the key elementary steps. The protic cocatalysts such as water, methanol, and formic acid are identified as effective in promoting a relay proton transfer. Interestingly, the efficiency of the relay mechanism results in relatively better stabilization of the proton transfer transition state as compared to the addition of enolate to the electrophile (C-C bond formation). The cocatalyst bound models suggest that the proton transfer could become the rate-determining step in the aza-MBH reaction under polar protic conditions. A comparison of the aza-MBH reaction with the analogous MBH reaction is also attempted to bring out the subtle differences between these two reactions. Enhanced kinetic advantages arising from the nature of the activated electrophile are noticed for the aza-MBH reaction. The difference in the relative energies between the transition states for the proton transfer and the C-C bond formation steps with bound cocatalyst(s) is found to be more pronounced in the aza-MBH reaction. In general, the reported results underscore the importance of considering explicit solvents/cocatalysts in order to account for the likely role of the specific interactions between reactants and solvents/cocatalysts.

  20. Simulating the effects of climate change on the distribution of an invasive plant, using a high resolution, local scale, mechanistic approach: challenges and insights.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Mark; Murphy, James E; Gallagher, Tommy; Osborne, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    The growing economic and ecological damage associated with biological invasions, which will likely be exacerbated by climate change, necessitates improved projections of invasive spread. Generally, potential changes in species distribution are investigated using climate envelope models; however, the reliability of such models has been questioned and they are not suitable for use at local scales. At this scale, mechanistic models are more appropriate. This paper discusses some key requirements for mechanistic models and utilises a newly developed model (PSS[gt]) that incorporates the influence of habitat type and related features (e.g., roads and rivers), as well as demographic processes and propagule dispersal dynamics, to model climate induced changes in the distribution of an invasive plant (Gunnera tinctoria) at a local scale. A new methodology is introduced, dynamic baseline benchmarking, which distinguishes climate-induced alterations in species distributions from other potential drivers of change. Using this approach, it was concluded that climate change, based on IPCC and C4i projections, has the potential to increase the spread-rate and intensity of G. tinctoria invasions. Increases in the number of individuals were primarily due to intensification of invasion in areas already invaded or in areas projected to be invaded in the dynamic baseline scenario. Temperature had the largest influence on changes in plant distributions. Water availability also had a large influence and introduced the most uncertainty in the projections. Additionally, due to the difficulties of parameterising models such as this, the process has been streamlined by utilising methods for estimating unknown variables and selecting only essential parameters.

  1. MicroRNAs: tools of mechanistic insights and biological therapeutics discovery for the rare neurogenetic syndrome Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND).

    PubMed

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs that modulate the translation of mRNA. They have emerged over the past few years as indispensable entities in the transcriptional regulation of genes. Their discovery has added additional layers of complexity to regulatory networks that control cellular homeostasis. Also, their dysregulated pattern of expression is now well demonstrated in myriad diseases and pathogenic processes. In the current review, we highlight the role of miRNAs in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), a rare neurogenetic syndrome caused by mutations in the purine metabolic gene encoding the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) enzyme. We describe how experimental and biocomputational approaches have helped to unravel genetic and signaling pathways that provide mechanistic understanding of some of the molecular and cellular basis of this ill-defined neurogenetic disorder. Through miRNA-based target predictions, we have identified signaling pathways that may be of significance in guiding biological therapeutic discovery for this incurable neurological disorder. We also propose a model to explain how a gene such as HPRT, mostly known for its housekeeping metabolic functions, can have pleiotropic effects on disparate genes and signal transduction pathways. Our hypothetical model suggests that HPRT mRNA transcripts may be acting as competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) intertwined in multiregulatory cross talk between key neural transcripts and miRNAs. Overall, this approach of using miRNA-based genomic approaches to elucidate the molecular and cellular basis of LND and guide biological target identification might be applicable to other ill-defined rare inborn-error metabolic diseases.

  2. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; ...

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  3. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  4. Metabolomic signatures of drug response phenotypes for ketamine and esketamine in subjects with refractory major depressive disorder: new mechanistic insights for rapid acting antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Rotroff, D M; Corum, D G; Motsinger-Reif, A; Fiehn, O; Bottrel, N; Drevets, W C; Singh, J; Salvadore, G; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2016-09-20

    Ketamine, at sub-anesthetic doses, is reported to rapidly decrease depression symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). Many patients do not respond to currently available antidepressants, (for example, serotonin reuptake inhibitors), making ketamine and its enantiomer, esketamine, potentially attractive options for treatment-resistant MDD. Although mechanisms by which ketamine/esketamine may produce antidepressant effects have been hypothesized on the basis of preclinical data, the neurobiological correlates of the rapid therapeutic response observed in patients receiving treatment have not been established. Here we use a pharmacometabolomics approach to map global metabolic effects of these compounds in treatment-refractory MDD patients upon 2 h from infusion with ketamine (n=33) or its S-enantiomer, esketamine (n=20). The effects of esketamine on metabolism were retested in the same subjects following a second exposure administered 4 days later. Two complementary metabolomics platforms were used to provide broad biochemical coverage. In addition, we investigated whether changes in particular metabolites correlated with treatment outcome. Both drugs altered metabolites related to tryptophan metabolism (for example, indole-3-acetate and methionine) and/or the urea cycle (for example, citrulline, arginine and ornithine) at 2 h post infusion (q<0.25). In addition, we observed changes in glutamate and circulating phospholipids that were significantly associated with decreases in depression severity. These data provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine and esketamine, and constitute some of the first detailed metabolomics mapping for these promising therapies.

  5. Metabolomic signatures of drug response phenotypes for ketamine and esketamine in subjects with refractory major depressive disorder: new mechanistic insights for rapid acting antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Rotroff, D M; Corum, D G; Motsinger-Reif, A; Fiehn, O; Bottrel, N; Drevets, W C; Singh, J; Salvadore, G; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, at sub-anesthetic doses, is reported to rapidly decrease depression symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). Many patients do not respond to currently available antidepressants, (for example, serotonin reuptake inhibitors), making ketamine and its enantiomer, esketamine, potentially attractive options for treatment-resistant MDD. Although mechanisms by which ketamine/esketamine may produce antidepressant effects have been hypothesized on the basis of preclinical data, the neurobiological correlates of the rapid therapeutic response observed in patients receiving treatment have not been established. Here we use a pharmacometabolomics approach to map global metabolic effects of these compounds in treatment-refractory MDD patients upon 2 h from infusion with ketamine (n=33) or its S-enantiomer, esketamine (n=20). The effects of esketamine on metabolism were retested in the same subjects following a second exposure administered 4 days later. Two complementary metabolomics platforms were used to provide broad biochemical coverage. In addition, we investigated whether changes in particular metabolites correlated with treatment outcome. Both drugs altered metabolites related to tryptophan metabolism (for example, indole-3-acetate and methionine) and/or the urea cycle (for example, citrulline, arginine and ornithine) at 2 h post infusion (q<0.25). In addition, we observed changes in glutamate and circulating phospholipids that were significantly associated with decreases in depression severity. These data provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine and esketamine, and constitute some of the first detailed metabolomics mapping for these promising therapies. PMID:27648916

  6. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  7. Gold-Catalyzed β-Regioselective Formal [3 + 2] Cycloaddition of Ynamides with Pyrido[1,2-b]indazoles: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinghua; Chen, Gui; Zhu, Lei; Liao, Yun; Wu, Yufeng; Huang, Xueliang

    2016-09-16

    Here, we report an unprecedented gold(I)-induced β-site regioselective formal [3 + 2] cycloaddition of ynamides with pyrido[1,2-b]indazoles, giving 3-amido-7-(pyrid-2'-yl)indoles in good to excellent yields. A complex of gold(I) catalyst with ynamide was isolated and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis for the first time. Mechanistic investigations suggest the reaction pathway involves a gold-stabilized carbocation intermediate, which in turn participated in sequential C-H bond functionalization of the ortho-position of the phenyl ring.

  8. Mechanistic Insight into the Reactivation of BCAII Enzyme from Denatured and Molten Globule States by Eukaryotic Ribosomes and Domain V rRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    In all life forms, decoding of messenger-RNA into polypeptide chain is accomplished by the ribosome. Several protein chaperones are known to bind at the exit of ribosomal tunnel to ensure proper folding of the nascent chain by inhibiting their premature folding in the densely crowded environment of the cell. However, accumulating evidence suggests that ribosome may play a chaperone role in protein folding events in vitro. Ribosome-mediated folding of denatured proteins by prokaryotic ribosomes has been studied extensively. The RNA-assisted chaperone activity of the prokaryotic ribosome has been attributed to the domain V, a span of 23S rRNA at the intersubunit side of the large subunit encompassing the Peptidyl Transferase Centre. Evidently, this functional property of ribosome is unrelated to the nascent chain protein folding at the exit of the ribosomal tunnel. Here, we seek to scrutinize whether this unique function is conserved in a primitive kinetoplastid group of eukaryotic species Leishmania donovani where the ribosome structure possesses distinct additional features and appears markedly different compared to other higher eukaryotic ribosomes. Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase II (BCAII) enzyme was considered as the model protein. Our results manifest that domain V of the large subunit rRNA of Leishmania ribosomes preserves chaperone activity suggesting that ribosome-mediated protein folding is, indeed, a conserved phenomenon. Further, we aimed to investigate the mechanism underpinning the ribosome-assisted protein reactivation process. Interestingly, the surface plasmon resonance binding analyses exhibit that rRNA guides productive folding by directly interacting with molten globule-like states of the protein. In contrast, native protein shows no notable affinity to the rRNA. Thus, our study not only confirms conserved, RNA-mediated chaperoning role of ribosome but also provides crucial insight into the mechanism of the process. PMID:27099964

  9. Mechanistic Insight into the Reactivation of BCAII Enzyme from Denatured and Molten Globule States by Eukaryotic Ribosomes and Domain V rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    In all life forms, decoding of messenger-RNA into polypeptide chain is accomplished by the ribosome. Several protein chaperones are known to bind at the exit of ribosomal tunnel to ensure proper folding of the nascent chain by inhibiting their premature folding in the densely crowded environment of the cell. However, accumulating evidence suggests that ribosome may play a chaperone role in protein folding events in vitro. Ribosome-mediated folding of denatured proteins by prokaryotic ribosomes has been studied extensively. The RNA-assisted chaperone activity of the prokaryotic ribosome has been attributed to the domain V, a span of 23S rRNA at the intersubunit side of the large subunit encompassing the Peptidyl Transferase Centre. Evidently, this functional property of ribosome is unrelated to the nascent chain protein folding at the exit of the ribosomal tunnel. Here, we seek to scrutinize whether this unique function is conserved in a primitive kinetoplastid group of eukaryotic species Leishmania donovani where the ribosome structure possesses distinct additional features and appears markedly different compared to other higher eukaryotic ribosomes. Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase II (BCAII) enzyme was considered as the model protein. Our results manifest that domain V of the large subunit rRNA of Leishmania ribosomes preserves chaperone activity suggesting that ribosome-mediated protein folding is, indeed, a conserved phenomenon. Further, we aimed to investigate the mechanism underpinning the ribosome-assisted protein reactivation process. Interestingly, the surface plasmon resonance binding analyses exhibit that rRNA guides productive folding by directly interacting with molten globule-like states of the protein. In contrast, native protein shows no notable affinity to the rRNA. Thus, our study not only confirms conserved, RNA-mediated chaperoning role of ribosome but also provides crucial insight into the mechanism of the process.

  10. Selective Alcohol Oxidation by a Copper TEMPO Catalyst: Mechanistic Insights by Simultaneously Coupled Operando EPR/UV-Vis/ATR-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rabeah, Jabor; Bentrup, Ursula; Stößer, Reinhard; Brückner, Angelika

    2015-09-28

    The first coupled operando EPR/UV-Vis/ATR-IR spectroscopy setup for mechanistic studies of gas-liquid phase reactions is presented and exemplarily applied to the well-known copper/TEMPO-catalyzed (TEMPO=(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl) oxidation of benzyl alcohol. In contrast to previous proposals, no direct redox reaction between TEMPO and Cu(I) /Cu(II) has been detected. Instead, the role of TEMPO is postulated to be the stabilization of a (bpy)(NMI)Cu(II) -O2 (⋅-) -TEMPO (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, NMI=N-methylimidazole) intermediate formed by electron transfer from Cu(I) to molecular O2 .

  11. Suppression of acetylpolyamine oxidase by selected AP-1 members regulates DNp73 abundance: mechanistic insights for overcoming DNp73-mediated resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bunjobpol, W; Dulloo, I; Igarashi, K; Concin, N; Matsuo, K; Sabapathy, K

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced resistance to chemotherapy has been correlated with high levels of Delta-Np73 (DNp73), an anti-apoptotic protein of the p53 tumor-suppressor family which inhibits the pro-apoptotic members such as p53 and TAp73. Although genotoxic drugs have been shown to induce DNp73 degradation, lack of mechanistic understanding of this process precludes strategies to enhance the targeting of DNp73 and improve treatment outcomes. Antizyme (Az) is a mediator of ubiquitin-independent protein degradation regulated by the polyamine biosynthesis pathway. We show here that acetylpolyamine oxidase (PAOX), a catabolic enzyme of this pathway, upregulates DNp73 levels by suppressing its degradation via the Az pathway. Conversely, downregulation of PAOX activity by siRNA-mediated knockdown or chemical inhibition leads to DNp73 degradation in an Az-dependent manner. PAOX expression is suppressed by several genotoxic drugs, via selected members of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors, namely c-Jun, JunB and FosB, which are required for stress-mediated DNp73 degradation. Finally, chemical- and siRNA-mediated inhibition of PAOX significantly reversed the resistant phenotype of DNp73-overexpressing cancer cells to genotoxic drugs. Together, these data define a critical mechanism for the regulation of DNp73 abundance, and reveal that inhibition of PAOX could widen the therapeutic index of cytotoxic drugs and overcome DNp73-mediated chemoresistance in tumors. PMID:24722210

  12. BRAF inhibitor-associated cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: new mechanistic insight, emerging evidence for a viral involvement, and perspectives on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Wu, J H; Cohen, D N; Rady, P L; Tyring, S K

    2017-01-27

    Mutations in the BRAF proto-oncogene occur in the majority of cutaneous melanomas. The commonly detected valine (V) to glutamate (E) mutation (V600E) is known to drive melanomagenesis and has thus been the target of two highly selective chemotherapeutic agents: vemurafenib and dabrafenib. While BRAF inhibitor therapy has revolutionized the treatment of metastatic melanoma, unanticipated cutaneous toxicities including the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs) are frequently reported and hinder therapeutic durability. However, the mechanisms by which BRAF inhibitors induce cutaneous neoplasms are poorly understood, thus posing a challenge for specific therapies. In this review, we summarize the clinical and molecular profile of BRAF inhibitor-associated cSCCs, with a focus on factors that may contribute to disease pathogenesis. In particular, we discuss the emerging evidence pointing toward viral involvement in BRAF inhibitor-induced cutaneous neoplasms and offer new perspectives on future therapeutic interventions. Continued clinical and mechanistic studies along this line will not only allow for better understanding of the pathogenic progression of BRAF inhibitor-induced cSCCs, but also lead to development of new therapeutic and preventative options for patients receiving targeted cancer therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanistic insight into the formation of acetic acid from the direct conversion of methane and carbon dioxide on zinc-modified H-ZSM-5 zeolite.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Feng; Yu, Si-Min; Wang, Wei David; Fan, Yan-Xin; Bai, Shi; Zhang, Chuan-Wei; Gao, Qiang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Wei

    2013-09-11

    Methane and carbon dioxide are known greenhouse gases, and the conversion of these two C1-building blocks into useful fuels and chemicals is a subject of great importance. By solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we found that methane and carbon dioxide can be co-converted on a zinc-modified H-ZSM-5 zeolite (denoted as Zn/H-ZSM-5) to form acetic acid at a low temperature range of 523-773 K. Solid-state (13)C and (1)H MAS NMR investigation indicates that the unique nature of the bifunctional Zn/H-ZSM-5 catalyst is responsible for this highly selective transformation. The zinc sites efficiently activate CH4 to form zinc methyl species (-Zn-CH3), the Zn-C bond of which is further subject to the CO2 insertion to produce surface acetate species (-Zn-OOCCH3). Moreover, the Brønsted acid sites play an important role for the final formation of acetic acid by the proton transfer to the surface acetate species. The results disclosed herein may offer the new possibility for the efficient activation and selective transformation of methane at low temperatures through the co-conversion strategy. Also, the mechanistic understanding of this process will help to the rational design of robust catalytic systems for the practical conversion of greenhouse gases into useful chemicals.

  14. A mechanistic insight into the effect of piperidine as an organocatalyst on the [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of benzalacetone with phenyl azide from a computational study.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, J; Bakavoli, M; Gholizadeh, M; Eshghi, H

    2016-07-26

    Several transition structures (TSs) for catalyst-free [3 + 2] cycloaddition and two plausible mechanistic pathways for the organocatalyzed [3 + 2] cycloaddition (32CA) between benzalacetone and phenyl azide were located by quantum chemistry methods. Calculations were carried out with B3LYP, MPWB1K and M06-2X functionals using 6-31G(d) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets in gas and solvent phases. The calculated activation barriers imply that the lowest barrier pathway is the catalyzed process producing 3-regioisomers through the iminium intermediate and not through the dienamine route. Electronic displacements along the reaction path have been examined using a topological analysis of the electron-localization function (ELF). ELF topological analyses along the intrinsic reaction coordinates (IRC) of both catalyzed and uncatalyzed 32CA reactions indicated that while the first C1-N1 single bond is formed as a dative bond, the formation of the second C2-N3 bond takes place via a C-to-N coupling between the interacting centers of the reagents. Moreover, the ELF analyses imply that the reaction mechanism is a two-stage one-step process in the presence of a piperidine organocatalyst, while bond formation in an uncatalyzed process is almost synchronous.

  15. PEG chain length impacts yield of solid-phase protein PEGylation and efficiency of PEGylated protein separation by ion-exchange chromatography: insights of mechanistic models.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Noriko; Isakari, Yu; Itoh, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2013-07-01

    The mechanisms behind protein PEGylation are complex and dictated by the structure of the protein reactant. Hence, it is difficult to design a reaction process which can produce the desired PEGylated form at high yield. Likewise, efficient purification processes following protein PEGylation must be constructed on an ad hoc basis for each product. The retention and binding mechanisms driving electrostatic interaction-based chromatography (ion-exchange chromatography) of PEGylated proteins (randomly PEGylated lysozyme and mono-PEGylated bovine serum albumin) were investigated, based on our previously developed model Chem. Eng. Technol. 2005, 28, 1387-1393. PEGylation of each protein resulted in a shift to a smaller elution volume compared to the unmodified molecule, but did not affect the number of binding sites appreciably. The shift of the retention volume of PEGylated proteins correlated with the calculated thickness of PEG layer around the protein molecule. Random PEGylation was carried out on a column (solid-phase PEGylation) and the PEGylated proteins were separated on the same column. Solid-phase PEGylation inhibited the production of multi-PEGylated forms and resulted in a relatively low yield of selective mono-PEGylated form. Pore diffusion may play an important role in solid-phase PEGylation. These results suggest the possibility of a reaction and purification process development based on the mechanistic model for PEGylated proteins on ion exchange chromatography.

  16. Insight into the interaction between layered lithium-rich oxide and additive-containing electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wenqiang; Xia, Pan; Zheng, Xiongwen; Ye, Changchun; Xu, Mengqiang; Li, Weishan

    2017-02-01

    Electrolyte additives have been found to be effective for the cyclic stability improvement of layered lithium-rich oxide (LRO), which is ascribed to the formation of cathode films derived from the preferential oxidation of the electrolyte additives. However, the detailed mechanism on the formation of the cathode film is unclear. This paper uncovers the interaction between LRO and additive-containing electrolyte through theoretical calculations, electrochemical measurements and physical characterizations. A representative LRO, Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2, is synthesized, and an electrolyte, 1 M LiPF6 in EC/DMC (1/2, in volume) using triethyl phosphite (TEP) as additive, is considered. Charge/discharge tests demonstrate that LRO suffers severe capacity fading and TEP can significantly improve the cyclic stability of LRO. Characterizations from SEM and TEM demonstrate that a cathode film exists on the LRO after cycling in the TEP-containing electrolyte. The theoretical calculations suggest that TEP traps the active oxygen and is then oxidized on LRO preferentially compared to the electrolyte, forming the cathode film. The further characterizations from FTIR and GC, confirm that the preferential combination of TEP with active oxygen is beneficial for the suppression of oxygen evolution, and that the resulting cathode film can suppress the electrolyte decomposition and protect LRO from destruction.

  17. The Ternary Complex of PrnB (the Second Enzyme in the Pyrrolnitrin Biosynthesis Pathway), Tryptophan, and Cyanide Yields New Mechanistic Insights into the Indolamine Dioxygenase Superfamily*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (3-chloro-4-(2′-nitro-3′-chlorophenyl)pyrrole) is a broad-spectrum antifungal compound isolated from Pseudomonas pyrrocinia. Four enzymes (PrnA, PrnB, PrnC, and PrnD) are required for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis from tryptophan. PrnB rearranges the indole ring of 7-Cl-l-tryptophan and eliminates the carboxylate group. PrnB shows robust activity in vivo, but in vitro activity for PrnB under defined conditions remains undetected. The structure of PrnB establishes that the enzyme belongs to the heme b-dependent indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) family. We report the cyanide complex of PrnB and two ternary complexes with both l-tryptophan or 7-Cl-l-tryptophan and cyanide. The latter two complexes are essentially identical and mimic the likely catalytic ternary complex that occurs during turnover. In the cyanide ternary complexes, a loop previously disordered becomes ordered, contributing to the binding of substrates. The conformations of the bound tryptophan substrates are changed from that seen previously in the binary complexes. In l-tryptophan ternary complex, the indole ring now adopts the same orientation as seen in the PrnB binary complexes with other tryptophan substrates. The amide and carboxylate group of the substrate are orientated in a new conformation. Tyr321 and Ser332 play a key role in binding these groups. The structures suggest that catalysis requires an l-configured substrate. Isothermal titration calorimetry data suggest d-tryptophan does not bind after cyanide (or oxygen) coordinates with the distal (or sixth) site of heme. This is the first ternary complex with a tryptophan substrate of a member of the tryptophan dioxygenase superfamily and has mechanistic implications. PMID:20421301

  18. Identification of the dominant photochemical pathways and mechanistic insights to the ultrafast ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 to Fe(CO)4EtOH

    DOE PAGES

    Kunnus, K.; Josefsson, I.; Rajkovic, I.; ...

    2016-02-09

    We utilized femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and ab initio theory to study the transient electronic structure and the photoinduced molecular dynamics of a model metal carbonyl photocatalyst Fe(CO)5 in ethanol solution. We propose mechanistic explanation for the parallel ultrafast intra-molecular spin crossover and ligation of the Fe(CO)4 which are observed following a charge transfer photoexcitation of Fe(CO)5 as reported in our previous study [Wernet et al., Nature 520, 78 (2015)]. We find that branching of the reaction pathway likely happens in the 1A1 state of Fe(CO)4. A sub-picosecond time constant of the spin crossover from 1B2 tomore » 3B2 is rationalized by the proposed 1B2 → 1A1 → 3B2 mechanism. Ultrafast ligation of the 1B2 Fe(CO)4 state is significantly faster than the spin-forbidden and diffusion limited ligation process occurring from the 3B2 Fe(CO)4 ground state that has been observed in the previous studies. We propose that the ultrafast ligation occurs via 1B2 → 1A1 → 1A' Fe(CO)4EtOH pathway and the time scale of the 1A1 Fe(CO)4 state ligation is governed by the solute-solvent collision frequency. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the importance of understanding the interaction of molecular excited states with the surrounding environment to explain the relaxation pathways of photoexcited metal carbonyls in solution.« less

  19. Intracellular siRNA delivery dynamics of integrin-targeted, PEGylated chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles: A mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Ragelle, Héloïse; Colombo, Stefano; Pourcelle, Vincent; Vanvarenberg, Kevin; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Bouzin, Caroline; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Feron, Olivier; Foged, Camilla; Préat, Véronique

    2015-08-10

    Integrin-targeted nanoparticles are promising for the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumor cells or tumor endothelium in cancer therapy aiming at silencing genes essential for tumor growth. However, during the process of optimizing and realizing their full potential, it is pertinent to gain a basic mechanistic understanding of the bottlenecks existing for nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery. We designed αvβ3 integrin-targeted nanoparticles by coupling arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) or RGD peptidomimetic (RGDp) ligands to the surface of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles. The amount of intracellular siRNA delivered by αvβ3-targeted versus non-targeted nanoparticles was quantified in the human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line H1299 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) using a stem-loop reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) approach. Data demonstrated that the internalization of αvβ3-targeted nanoparticles was highly dependent on the surface concentration of the ligand. Above a certain threshold concentration, the use of targeted nanoparticles provided a two-fold increase in the number of siRNA copies/cell, subsequently resulting in as much as 90% silencing of EGFP at well-tolerated carrier concentrations. In contrast, non-targeted nanoparticles mediated low levels of gene silencing, despite relatively high intracellular siRNA concentrations, indicating that these nanoparticles might end up in late endosomes or lysosomes without releasing their cargo to the cell cytoplasm. Thus, the silencing efficiency of the chitosan-based nanoparticles is strongly dependent on the uptake and the intracellular trafficking in H1299 EGFP cells, which is critical information towards a more complete understanding of the delivery mechanism that can facilitate the future design of efficient siRNA delivery systems.

  20. Identification of the dominant photochemical pathways and mechanistic insights to the ultrafast ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 to Fe(CO)4EtOH

    PubMed Central

    Kunnus, K.; Josefsson, I.; Rajkovic, I.; Schreck, S.; Quevedo, W.; Beye, M.; Weniger, C.; Grübel, S.; Scholz, M.; Nordlund, D.; Zhang, W.; Hartsock, R. W.; Gaffney, K. J.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Kennedy, B.; Hennies, F.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Techert, S.; Odelius, M.; Wernet, Ph.; Föhlisch, A.

    2016-01-01

    We utilized femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and ab initio theory to study the transient electronic structure and the photoinduced molecular dynamics of a model metal carbonyl photocatalyst Fe(CO)5 in ethanol solution. We propose mechanistic explanation for the parallel ultrafast intra-molecular spin crossover and ligation of the Fe(CO)4 which are observed following a charge transfer photoexcitation of Fe(CO)5 as reported in our previous study [Wernet et al., Nature 520, 78 (2015)]. We find that branching of the reaction pathway likely happens in the 1A1 state of Fe(CO)4. A sub-picosecond time constant of the spin crossover from 1B2 to 3B2 is rationalized by the proposed 1B2 → 1A1 → 3B2 mechanism. Ultrafast ligation of the 1B2 Fe(CO)4 state is significantly faster than the spin-forbidden and diffusion limited ligation process occurring from the 3B2 Fe(CO)4 ground state that has been observed in the previous studies. We propose that the ultrafast ligation occurs via 1B2 → 1A1 → 1A′ Fe(CO)4EtOH pathway and the time scale of the 1A1 Fe(CO)4 state ligation is governed by the solute-solvent collision frequency. Our study emphasizes the importance of understanding the interaction of molecular excited states with the surrounding environment to explain the relaxation pathways of photoexcited metal carbonyls in solution. PMID:26958587

  1. Crystal Structure of the Human Ubiquitin-activating Enzyme 5 (UBA5) Bound to ATP Mechanistic Insights into a Minimalistic E1 Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John-Paul; Walker, John R.; Ali, Mohsin; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2010-08-30

    E1 ubiquitin-activating enzymes (UBAs) are large multidomain proteins that catalyze formation of a thioester bond between the terminal carboxylate of a ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like modifier (UBL) and a conserved cysteine in an E2 protein, producing reactive ubiquityl units for subsequent ligation to substrate lysines. Two important E1 reaction intermediates have been identified: a ubiquityl-adenylate phosphoester and a ubiquityl-enzyme thioester. However, the mechanism of thioester bond formation and its subsequent transfer to an E2 enzyme remains poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structure of the human UFM1 (ubiquitin-fold modifier 1) E1-activating enzyme UBA5, bound to ATP, revealing a structure that shares similarities with both large canonical E1 enzymes and smaller ancestral E1-like enzymes. In contrast to other E1 active site cysteines, which are in a variably sized domain that is separate and flexible relative to the adenylation domain, the catalytic cysteine of UBA5 (Cys{sup 250}) is part of the adenylation domain in an {alpha}-helical motif. The novel position of the UBA5 catalytic cysteine and conformational changes associated with ATP binding provides insight into the possible mechanisms through which the ubiquityl-enzyme thioester is formed. These studies reveal structural features that further our understanding of the UBA5 enzyme reaction mechanism and provide insight into the evolution of ubiquitin activation.

  2. Oxidative N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed γ-Carbon Addition of Enals to Imines: Mechanistic Studies and Access to Antimicrobial Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng-Cheng; Cheng, Jiajia; Su, Shihu; Jin, Zhichao; Wang, Yu-Huang; Yang, Song; Jin, Lin-Hong; Song, Bao-An; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-07-06

    The reaction mechanism of the γ-carbon addition of enal to imine under oxidative N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis is studied experimentally. The oxidation, γ-carbon deprotonation, and nucleophilic addition of γ-carbon to imine were found to be facile steps. The results of our study also provide highly enantioselective access to tricyclic sulfonyl amides that exhibit interesting antimicrobial activities against X. oryzae, a bacterium that causes bacterial disease in rice growing.

  3. A phenoxo-bridged dicopper(ii) complex as a model for phosphatase activity: mechanistic insights from a combined experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Barman, Suman K; Mondal, Totan; Koley, Debasis; Lloret, Francesc; Mukherjee, Rabindranath

    2017-03-21

    A μ-phenoxo-bis(μ2-1,3-acetato)-bridged dicopper(ii) complex [Cu(L(1))(μ-O2CMe)2][NO3] (1) has been synthesized from the perspective of modeling phosphodiesterase activity. Structural characterization was done initially with 1·3Et2O (vapour diffusion of Et2O into MeOH solution of 1; poor crystal quality) and finally with its perchlorate salt [Cu(L(1))(μ-O2CMe)2][ClO4]·1.375MeCN·0.25H2O, crystallized from vapour diffusion of n-pentane into a MeCN-MeOH mixture (comparatively better crystal quality). An asymmetric unit of such a crystal contains two independent molecules of compositions [Cu(L(1))(μ-O2CMe)2][ClO4] and [Cu(L(1))(μ-O2CMe)2(MeCN)][ClO4] (coordinated MeCN with 0.75 occupancy), and two molecules of MeCN and H2O (each H2O molecule with 0.25 occupancy) as the solvent of crystallization. These two cations, each having five-coordinate (μ-phenoxo)bis(μ-acetato)-bridged Cu(II) ions, differ by only the coordination environment of only one Cu(II) ion, which has a weakly coordinated acetonitrile molecule in its sixth position. Temperature-dependent magnetic studies on 1 reveal that the copper(ii) centres are antiferromagnetically coupled with the exchange-coupling constant J = -124(1) cm(-1). Theoretically calculated J = -126.51 cm(-1), employing a broken-symmetry DFT approach, is in excellent agreement with the experimental value. The dicopper(ii) complex has been found to be catalytically efficient in the hydrolysis of 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenylphosphate (HPNP). Detailed kinetic experiments and solution studies (potentiometry, species distribution and ESI-MS) were performed to elucidate the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations were performed to discriminate between different possible mechanistic pathways. The free-energy barrier for HPNP hydrolysis catalyzed by 1 is comparable to that obtained from the experimentally-determined value. The involvement of non-covalent (hydrogen-bonding) interaction has also been probed by DFT calculations. The activity

  4. New Insights on Tropical Ozone from SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.

    2004-01-01

    The SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) ozone sounding network was initiated in 1998 to improve the coverage of tropical in-situ ozone measurements for satellite validation, algorithm development and related process studies. Over 2000 soundings have been archived at the website, , for 12 stations: Ascension Island; Nairobi and Malindi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island, Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil; Paramaribo, Surinam. Key results from SHADOZ will be described from among the following: 1) By using ECC sondes with similar procedures, 5-10% accuracy and precision (1-sigma) of the sonde total ozone measurement was achieved; 2) Week-to-week variability in tropospheric ozone is so great that statistics are frequently not Gaussian; most stations vary up to a factor of 3 in tropospheric column over the course of a year; 3) Longitudinal variability in tropospheric ozone profiles is a consistent feature, with a 10-15 DU column-integrated difference between Atlantic and Pacific sites; this causes a "zonal wave-one" feature in total ozone. 4) The ozone record from Paramaribo, Surinam (6N, 55W) is a marked contrast to southern tropical ozone because Surinam is often north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone; 5) Indian Ocean region pollution may contribute up to half of the excess ozone observed in the south tropical Atlantic paradox in the December-January-February period of the year.

  5. SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes): A Project Overview and New Insights on Tropical Tropospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    2004-01-01

    The SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) ozone sounding network was initiated in 1998 to improve the coverage of tropical in-situ ozone measurements for satellite validation, algorithm development and related process studies. Over 2000 soundings have been archived at the website, http://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/shadoz, for 12 stations: Ascension Island; Nairobi and Malindi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil; Paramaribo, Surinam. Key results from SHADOZ will be described from among the following: 1) By using ECC sondes with similar procedures, 5-10% accuracy and precision (1-sigma) of the sonde total ozone measurement is achieved; 2) Week-to-week variability in tropospheric ozone is so great that statistics are frequently not Gaussian; most stations vary up to a factor of 3 in tropospheric column over the course of a year; 3) Longitudinal variability in tropospheric ozone profiles is a consistent feature, with a 10-15 DU column-integrated difference between Atlantic and Pacific sites; this causes a "zonal wave-one" feature in total ozone; 4) The ozone record from Paramaribo, Surinam (6N, 55W) is a marked contrast to southern tropical ozone because Surinam is often north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  6. Learning Additional Languages as Hierarchical Probabilistic Inference: Insights From First Language Processing.

    PubMed

    Pajak, Bozena; Fine, Alex B; Kleinschmidt, Dave F; Jaeger, T Florian

    2016-12-01

    We present a framework of second and additional language (L2/Ln) acquisition motivated by recent work on socio-indexical knowledge in first language (L1) processing. The distribution of linguistic categories covaries with socio-indexical variables (e.g., talker identity, gender, dialects). We summarize evidence that implicit probabilistic knowledge of this covariance is critical to L1 processing, and propose that L2/Ln learning uses the same type of socio-indexical information to probabilistically infer latent hierarchical structure over previously learned and new languages. This structure guides the acquisition of new languages based on their inferred place within that hierarchy, and is itself continuously revised based on new input from any language. This proposal unifies L1 processing and L2/Ln acquisition as probabilistic inference under uncertainty over socio-indexical structure. It also offers a new perspective on crosslinguistic influences during L2/Ln learning, accommodating gradient and continued transfer (both negative and positive) from previously learned to novel languages, and vice versa.

  7. Mechanistic insights into c-di-GMP–dependent control of the biofilm regulator FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Bruno Y.; Krasteva, Petya V.; Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S.; Sondermann, Holger; Navarro, Marcos V. A. S.

    2016-07-05

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen that can cause fatal chronic infections, relies on the intracellular second-messenger c-di-GMP to form robust multicellular biofilms during host tissue colonization. c-di-GMP is sensed directly by the transcription regulator FleQ, which inversely regulates flagellar motility and exopolysaccharide secretion to secure a planktonic to sessile life-form transition. FleQ belongs to the diverse family of AAA+ ATPase enhancer-binding proteins, but how its noncanonical function on transcriptional regulation is controlled by c-di-GMP remains enigmatic. Here, we report structural and functional data that identify an unusual mode of c-di-GMP recognition accompanied by a major quaternary structure reorganization. Our analyses offer a consensus to previous studies and unique insights into the mechanism of action of FleQ and FleQ-like proteins.

  8. Investigation of the biological properties of Cinnulin PF in the context of diabetes: mechanistic insights by genome-wide mRNA-Seq analysis.

    PubMed

    Rafehi, Haloom; Ververis, Katherine; Balcerczyk, Aneta; Ziemann, Mark; Ooi, Jenny; Hu, Sean; Kwa, Faith A A; Loveridge, Shanon J; Georgiadis, George T; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating evidence of the beneficial effects of cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanni) in type-2 diabetes, a chronic age-associated disease, has prompted the commercialisation of various supplemental forms of the spice. One such supplement, Cinnulin PF(®), represents the water soluble fraction containing relatively high levels of the double-linked procyanidin type-A polymers of flavanoids. The overall aim of this study was to utilize genome-wide mRNA-Seq analysis to characterise the changes in gene expression caused by Cinnulin PF in immortalised human keratinocytes and microvascular endothelial cells, which are relevant with respect to diabetic complications. In summary, our findings provide insights into the mechanisms of action of Cinnulin PF in diabetes and diabetic complications. More generally, we identify relevant candidate genes which could provide the basis for further investigation.

  9. Investigation of the biological properties of Cinnulin PF in the context of diabetes: mechanistic insights by genome-wide mRNA-Seq analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rafehi, Haloom; Ververis, Katherine; Balcerczyk, Aneta; Ziemann, Mark; Ooi, Jenny; Hu, Sean; Kwa, Faith A. A.; Loveridge, Shanon J.; Georgiadis, George T.; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating evidence of the beneficial effects of cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanni) in type-2 diabetes, a chronic age-associated disease, has prompted the commercialisation of various supplemental forms of the spice. One such supplement, Cinnulin PF®, represents the water soluble fraction containing relatively high levels of the double-linked procyanidin type-A polymers of flavanoids. The overall aim of this study was to utilize genome-wide mRNA-Seq analysis to characterise the changes in gene expression caused by Cinnulin PF in immortalised human keratinocytes and microvascular endothelial cells, which are relevant with respect to diabetic complications. In summary, our findings provide insights into the mechanisms of action of Cinnulin PF in diabetes and diabetic complications. More generally, we identify relevant candidate genes which could provide the basis for further investigation. PMID:22953038

  10. Silver vanadium diphosphate Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}: Electrochemistry and characterization of reduced material providing mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Esther S.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Cheng, Po-Jen; Menard, Melissa C.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.

    2013-04-15

    Silver vanadium phosphorous oxides (Ag{sub w}V{sub x}P{sub y}O{sub z}) are notable battery cathode materials due to their high energy density and demonstrated ability to form in-situ Ag metal nanostructured electrically conductive networks within the cathode. While analogous silver vanadium diphosphate materials have been prepared, electrochemical evaluations of these diphosphate based materials have been limited. We report here the first electrochemical study of a silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}, where the structural differences associated with phosphorous oxides versus diphosphates profoundly affect the associated electrochemistry. Reminiscent of Ag{sub 2}VO{sub 2}PO{sub 4} reduction, in-situ formation of silver metal nanoparticles was observed with reduction of Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}. However, counter to Ag{sub 2}VO{sub 2}PO{sub 4} reduction, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} demonstrates a significant decrease in conductivity upon continued electrochemical reduction. Structural analysis contrasting the crystallography of the parent Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} with that of the proposed Li{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} reduction product is employed to gain insight into the observed electrochemical reduction behavior, where the structural rigidity associated with the diphosphate anion may be associated with the observed particle fracturing upon deep electrochemical reduction. Further, the diphosphate anion structure may be associated with the high thermal stability of the partially reduced Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} materials, which bodes well for enhanced safety of batteries incorporating this material. - Graphical abstract: Structure and galvanostatic intermittent titration-type test data for silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}. Highlights: ► First electrochemical study of a silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}. ► In-situ formation of Ag{sup 0} nanoparticles was observed upon electrochemical reduction.

  11. Probing the role of chemical enhancers in facilitating drug release from patches: Mechanistic insights based on FT-IR spectroscopy, molecular modeling and thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenting; Quan, Peng; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Chao; Lv, Siji; Zhao, Yongshan; Fang, Liang

    2016-04-10

    In patches, a drug must release from patches prior to its percutaneous absorption. Chemical enhancers have been used for several decades, but their roles in drug release from patches are poorly understood. In this work, the roles of chemical enhancers in bisoprolol tartrate (BSP-T) release from patches were probed in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, an innovative mechanism insight of chemical enhancers in drug release process was provided at molecular level. FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular modeling were employed to investigate the influence of chemical enhancers on drug-adhesive interaction. The results showed chemical enhancers like Span 80, which had a strong ability forming hydrogen bonds, could decrease drug-adhesive interaction leading to the release of drug from adhesive of patches. Thermal analysis was conducted to research the influence of chemical enhancers on the thermodynamic properties of patch system. It showed that chemical enhancers promoted the formation of free volume of adhesive, which facilitated drug release process. By contrast, the influence on the thermodynamic properties of BSP-T was less effective in influencing BSP-T release process. In conclusion, chemical enhancers played an important role in facilitating BSP-T release from the adhesive DURO-TAK® 87-2287 of patches by decreasing drug-adhesive interaction and promoting the formation of free volume of adhesive. This work may be an important step in understanding the important roles of chemical enhancers in drug release process.

  12. Review And Insights Into The Bleeding Mechanism Incited By Antithrombotic Therapy: Mechanistic Nuances Of Dual Pro-Hemorrhagic Substrate Incorporating Drug-Induced Microvascular Leakage.

    PubMed

    Stirbys Md PhD, Petras

    2015-01-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation antithrombotic prophylaxis for stroke is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Cerebrovascular risk-benefit ratio for oral anticoagulation therapies continues to be debated. Macro and/or microhematomas as well as visible or cryptic ones may appear unexpectedly in any anatomic region. The diagnostic and prognostic value of subcutaneous hematomas (petechia, ecchymosis, bruise) potentially predisposing intracerebral micro- or macrobleeding might be reconsidered. Hypothetically, subcutaneous hemorrhagic events are "transparent" signs and reflect the coexistence of remote vulnerable sites that are potential bleeding sources. Obviously vigilance is needed for early signs of drug-related petechiae evaluation to determine whether it is a local/superficial subtlety or a systemic problem. Any bleeding complication, regardless of its scale and anatomical location, might be treated as a worrisome clinical symptom requiring subtle correction of antithrombotic regimen. The focus of this article is to review the current knowledge of drug-related hemorrhage with special emphasis on underlying mechanisms and links between the visible bleeding (predominantly subcutaneous) and remote (such as cerebral) hemorrhagic sources. To mitigate inappropriate therapy, we should consider new conceptual insights and more individualized approaches to achieve an optimal balance of efficacy and safety. We hypothesize that bleeding complications occur as a result of two factors - impact of antithrombotic drugs and related detrimental effect on microvascular network. Most likely the microvasculature undergoes pro-hemorrhagic medication stress leading to unfavorable vascular wall "fenestration" with ensuing consequences. If so, it suggests the presence of dual substrate responsible for hemorrhagic events.

  13. Mechanistic insight into selective catalytic combustion of acrylonitrile (C2H3CN): NCO formation and its further transformation towards N2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Yuan, Xiaoning; Zhang, Runduo; Xu, Rongrong; Li, Yingxia

    2017-03-15

    A series of zeolite catalysts, M(Cu, Fe, Co)-ZSM-5, was prepared by an impregnation method and evaluated for the selective catalytic combustion of acrylonitrile (AN-SCC). Cu-ZSM-5, exhibiting the highest AN conversion activity and best N2 yield, was further selected for an AN-SCC mechanism investigation, wherein both experimental [in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS)] and theoretical [density functional theory (DFT)] approaches were employed. The in situ DRIFTS revealed that AN-SCC followed a hydrolysis mechanism at T < 300 °C via intermediates of acylamino species (-CONH2) and NH3, while it followed an oxidation mechanism at T > 300 °C via an intermediate of NCO. The DFT simulations gave much deeper insights suggesting that: (i) the NCO could be generated by oxidation of AN over [Cu](+) active sites, with an assistance of dissociated atomic O from gaseous O2; (ii) three types of reaction routes could be proposed for the further reaction of NCO to produce N2, namely NCO direct dissociation, NCO coupling, and NO + NCO reaction; and (iii) the last route (NO + NCO), possessing the lowest energy barrier, was the most probable reaction pathway, wherein the NO could be produced by oxidation of NCO. The DFT energy calculation results and microkinetic analyses revealed that the NCO generation step, possessing an energy barrier of 17.0 kcal mol(-1) and a forward reaction rate constant of 2.20 × 10(7) s(-1), was the rate-determining step of the whole catalytic cycle.

  14. Reaching for mechanistic consensus across life kingdoms: structure and insights into catalysis of the myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (mIPS) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Kimberly A; Yang, Hongying; Roberts, Mary F; Stec, Boguslaw

    2005-01-11

    myo-Inositol-1-phosphate synthase (mIPS) catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of l-myo-inositol-1-phosphate. We have solved and refined the structure of the mIPS from the hyperthermophilic sulfate reducer Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.9 A resolution. The enzyme crystallized from poly(ethylene glycol) in the P1 space group with one tetramer in the asymmetric unit and provided a view of the entire biologically active oligomer. Despite significant changes in sequence length and amino acid composition, the general architecture of the archaeal enzyme is similar to that of the eukaryotic mIPS from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and bacterial mIPS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The enhanced thermostability of the archaeal enzyme as compared to that from yeast is consistent with deletion of a number of surface loops that results in a significantly smaller protein. In the structure of the A. fulgidus mIPS, the active sites of all four subunits were fully ordered and contained NAD(+) and inorganic phosphate. The structure also contained a single metal ion (identified as K(+)) in two of the four subunits. The analysis of the electrostatic potential maps of the protein suggested the presence of a second metal-ion-binding site in close proximity to the first metal ion and NAD(+). The modeling of the substrate and known inhibitors suggests a critical role for the second metal ion in catalysis and provides insights into the common elements of the catalytic cycle in enzymes from different life kingdoms.

  15. Mechanistic implications of the enantioselective addition of alkylzinc reagents to aldehydes catalyzed by nickel complexes with α-amino amide ligands.

    PubMed

    Escorihuela, Jorge; Burguete, M Isabel; Ujaque, Gregori; Lledós, Agustí; Luis, Santiago V

    2016-11-29

    The enantioselective alkylation of aldehydes catalysed by nickel(ii)-complexes derived from α-amino amides was studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) and ONIOM (B3LYP:UFF) calculations. A mechanism was proposed in order to investigate the origin of enantioselectivity. The chirality-determining step for the alkylation was the formation of the intermediate complexes with the involvement of a 5/4/4-fused tricyclic transition state. The predominant products predicted theoretically were of (S)-configuration, in good agreement with experimental observations. The scope of the reaction was examined and high yields and enantioselectivities were observed for the enantioselective addition of Et2Zn and Me2Zn to aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes.

  16. Synthesis of Bridged Heterocycles via Sequential 1,4- and 1,2-Addition Reactions to α,β-Unsaturated N-Acyliminium Ions: Mechanistic and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Arife; Wille, Uta; Pyne, Stephen G

    2016-02-19

    Novel tricyclic bridged heterocyclic systems can be readily prepared from sequential 1,4- and 1,2-addition reactions of allyl and 3-substituted allylsilanes to indolizidine and quinolizidine α,β-unsaturated N-acyliminium ions. These reactions involve a novel N-assisted, transannular 1,5-hydride shift. Such a mechanism was supported by examining the reaction of a dideuterated indolizidine, α,β-unsaturated N-acyliminium ion precursor, which provided specifically dideuterated tricyclic bridged heterocyclic products, and from computational studies. In contrast, the corresponding pyrrolo[1,2-a]azepine system did not provide the corresponding tricyclic bridged heterocyclic product and gave only a bis-allyl adduct, while more substituted versions gave novel furo[3,2-d]pyrrolo[1,2-a]azepine products. Such heterocyclic systems would be expected to be useful scaffolds for the preparation of libraries of novel compounds for new drug discovery programs.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Shao, Jia; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  18. Crystal Structures of Type-II Inositol Polyphosphate 5-Phosphatase INPP5B with Synthetic Inositol Polyphosphate Surrogates Reveal New Mechanistic Insights for the Inositol 5-Phosphatase Family.

    PubMed

    Mills, Stephen J; Silvander, Camilla; Cozier, Gyles; Trésaugues, Lionel; Nordlund, Pär; Potter, Barry V L

    2016-03-08

    The inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase INPP5B hydrolyzes the 5-phosphate group from water- and lipid-soluble signaling messengers. Two synthetic benzene and biphenyl polyphosphates (BzP/BiPhPs), simplified surrogates of inositol phosphates and phospholipid headgroups, were identified by thermodynamic studies as potent INPP5B ligands. The X-ray structure of the complex between INPP5B and biphenyl 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexakisphosphate [BiPh(3,3',4,4',5,5')P6, IC50 5.5 μM] was determined at 2.89 Å resolution. One inhibitor pole locates in the phospholipid headgroup binding site and the second solvent-exposed ring binds to the His-Tag of another INPP5B molecule, while a molecule of inorganic phosphate is also present in the active site. Benzene 1,2,3-trisphosphate [Bz(1,2,3)P3] [one ring of BiPh(3,3',4,4',5,5')P6] inhibits INPP5B ca. 6-fold less potently. Co-crystallization with benzene 1,2,4,5-tetrakisphosphate [Bz(1,2,4,5)P4, IC50 = 6.3 μM] yielded a structure refined at 2.9 Å resolution. Conserved residues among the 5-phosphatase family mediate interactions with Bz(1,2,4,5)P4 and BiPh(3,3',4,4',5,5')P6 similar to those with the polar groups present in positions 1, 4, 5, and 6 on the inositol ring of the substrate. 5-Phosphatase specificity most likely resides in the variable zone located close to the 2- and 3-positions of the inositol ring, offering insights to inhibitor design. We propose that the inorganic phosphate present in the INPP5B-BiPh(3,3',4,4',5,5')P6 complex mimics the postcleavage substrate 5-phosphate released by INPP5B in the catalytic site, allowing elucidation of two new key features in the catalytic mechanism proposed for the family of phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases: first, the involvement of the conserved Arg-451 in the interaction with the 5-phosphate and second, identification of the water molecule that initiates 5-phosphate hydrolysis. Our model also has implications for the proposed "moving metal" mechanism.

  19. Imidazolium Sulfonates as Environmental-Friendly Catalytic Systems for the Synthesis of Biologically Active 2-Amino-4H-chromenes: Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Jacinto; Pérez-Mayoral, Elena; Calvino-Casilda, Vanesa; López-Peinado, Antonio J; Bañares, Miguel A; Soriano, Elena

    2015-09-10

    Ionic Liquids (ILs) are valuable reaction media extremely useful in industrial sustainable organic synthesis. We describe here the study on the multicomponent reaction (MCR) between salicylaldehyde (2) and ethyl cyanoacetate (3), catalyzed by imidazolium sulfonates, to form chromenes 1, a class of heterocyclic scaffolds exhibiting relevant biological activity. We have clarified the reaction mechanism by combining the experimental results with computational studies. The results reported herein suggest that both the imidazolium core and the sulfonate anions in the selected ILs are involved in the reaction course acting as hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, respectively. Contrarily to the most widely accepted mechanism through initial Knoevenagel condensation, the most favorable reaction pathway consists of an aldolic reaction between reagents followed by heterocyclization, subsequent dehydration, and, finally, the Michael addition of the second molecule of ethyl cyanoacetate (3) to yield the chromenes 1.

  20. Targeting the cubilin receptor through the vitamin B(12) uptake pathway: cytotoxicity and mechanistic insight through fluorescent Re(I) delivery.

    PubMed

    Viola-Villegas, Nerissa; Rabideau, Amy E; Bartholomä, Mark; Zubieta, Jon; Doyle, Robert P

    2009-08-27

    The intrinsic factor (IF) vitamin B(12) ileum anchored receptor, cubilin, mediates endocytotic uptake of the IF complex of vitamin B(12) to the blood serum. This receptor was targeted for the selective delivery and accumulation of a new bioprobe, a B(12) conjugate of rhenium 2, in the cubilin expressing placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cell line. Competitive uptake and cytotoxicity assays of 2 were investigated and interactions with nuclear DNA explored. In addition, the mechanism of internalization of 2 was confirmed to proceed in an IF-cubilin mediated fashion via siRNA transfection experiments. These studies show the great potential of cubilin as a new target for the delivery of B(12) based conjugates for cancer diagnostics and/or treatment.

  1. The dynamic behavior of microbubbles during long ultrasound tone-burst excitation: mechanistic insights into ultrasound-microbubble mediated therapeutics using high-speed imaging and cavitation detection

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, John J.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-microbubble (MB) mediated therapies have been shown to restore perfusion and enhance drug/gene delivery. Due to the presumption that MBs do not persist during long US exposure under high acoustic pressures, most schemes utilize short US pulses when a high US pressure is employed. However, we recently observed an enhanced thrombolytic effect using long US pulses at high acoustic pressures. Therefore we explored the fate of MBs during long tone-burst exposures (5 ms) at various acoustic pressures and MB concentrations via direct high-speed optical observation and passive cavitation detection. MBs first underwent stable or inertial cavitation depending on the acoustic pressure, and then formed gas-filled clusters that continued to oscillate, break up, and form new clusters. Cavitation detection confirmed continued, albeit diminishing acoustic activity throughout the 5-ms US excitation. These data suggest that persisting cavitation activity during long tone-bursts may confer additional therapeutic effects. PMID:26603628

  2. Mechanistic insights into the role of PC- and PCP-type palladium catalysts in asymmetric hydrophosphination of activated alkenes incorporating potential coordinating heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Yuan; Jia, Yu-Xiang; Tay, Wee Shan; Li, Yongxin; Pullarkat, Sumod A; Leung, Pak-Hing

    2016-09-14

    The impact of the structural attributes of chiral PC- and PCP-palladium catalysts was investigated in the asymmetric hydrophosphination of various heterocycle-functionalized enone substrates. Due to the architecture of the catalysts, they are confronted with potential catalyst deactivation arising from the coordination of the electron-rich heteroatoms (P, O, N and S) to the metal center. A systematic variation of the location and identity of the heteroatoms demonstrated the impact of structural modifications on the substrates, which have a significant influence on both yields (16-99%) and enantioselectivities (0-99%). A detailed discussion on the distinct catalytic mechanisms (intra- vs. inter-molecular addition) provides important information to explain the results obtained.

  3. Electronic fluxes during Diels-Alder reactions involving 1,2-benzoquinones: mechanistic insights from the analysis of electron localization function and catastrophe theory.

    PubMed

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Domingo, Luis R; Andrés, Juan; Berski, Slawomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2012-11-15

    By means of the joint use of electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory, a theoretical analysis of the energy profile for the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of 4-methoxy-1,2-benzoquinone 1 and methoxyethylene 2 has been carried out. The 12 different structural stability domains obtained by the bonding evolution theory have been identified as well as the bifurcation catastrophes (fold and cusp) responsible for the changes in the topology of the system. This analysis permits finding a relationship between the ELF topology and the evolution of the bond breaking/forming processes and electron pair rearrangements through the reaction progress in terms of the different ways of pairing up the electrons. The reaction mechanism corresponds to an asynchronous electronic flux; first, the O1-C5 bond is formed by the nucleophilic attack of the C5 carbon of the electron rich ethylene 2 on the most electrophilically activated carbonyl O1 oxygen of 1, and once the σ bond has been completed, the formation process of the second O4C6 bond takes place. In addition, the values of the local electrophilicity and local nucleophilcity indices in the framework of conceptual density functional theory accounts for the asychronicity of the process as well as for the observed regioselectivity.

  4. Mechanistic insights on azide-nitrile cycloadditions: on the dialkyltin oxide-trimethylsilyl azide route and a new Vilsmeier-Haack-type organocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Cantillo, David; Gutmann, Bernhard; Kappe, C Oliver

    2011-03-30

    The mechanism of the azide-nitrile cycloaddition mediated by the known dialkylltin oxide-trimethylsilyl azide catalyst system has been addressed through DFT calculations. The catalytic cycle for this tin/silicon complex-based mechanism has been thoroughly examined, disclosing the most plausible intermediates and the energetics involved in the rate enhancement. In addition, a new catalyst, 5-azido-1-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrolium azide, is presented for the formation of tetrazoles by cycloaddition of sodium azide with organic nitriles under neutral conditions. The efficiency of this organocatalyst, generated in situ from N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), sodium azide, and trimethylsilyl chloride under reaction conditions, has been examined by preparation of a series of 5-substituted-1H-tetrazoles. The desired target structures were obtained in high yields within 15-25 min employing controlled microwave heating. An in depth computational analysis of the proposed catalytic cycle has also been addressed to understand the nature of the rate acceleration. The computed energy barriers have been compared to the dialkylltin oxide-trimethylsilyl azide metal-based catalyst system. Both the tin/silicon species and the new organocatalyst accelerate the azide-nitrile coupling by activating the nitrile substrate. As compared to the dialkylltin oxide-trimethylsilyl azide method, the organocatalytic system presented herein has the advantage of higher reactivity, in situ generation from inexpensive materials, and low toxicity.

  5. Interactions between SIRT1 and AP-1 reveal a mechanistic insight into the growth promoting properties of alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticles in mouse skin epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swatee; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Tseng, Michael T; Wu, Peng; Florence, Rebecca L; Grulke, Eric A; Yokel, Robert A; Dhar, Sanjit Kumar; Yang, Hsin-Sheng; Chen, Yumin; St Clair, Daret K

    2008-10-01

    The physicochemical properties of nanomaterials differ from those of the bulk material of the same composition. However, little is known about the underlying effects of these particles in carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms involved in the carcinogenic properties of nanoparticles using aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)/alumina) nanoparticles as the prototype. Well-established mouse epithelial JB6 cells, sensitive to neoplastic transformation, were used as the experimental model. We demonstrate that alumina was internalized and maintained its physicochemical composition inside the cells. Alumina increased cell proliferation (53%), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) levels, cell viability and growth in soft agar. The level of manganese superoxide dismutase, a key mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, was elevated, suggesting a redox signaling event. In addition, the levels of reactive oxygen species and the activities of the redox sensitive transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) and a longevity-related protein, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), were increased. SIRT1 knockdown reduces DNA synthesis, cell viability, PCNA levels, AP-1 transcriptional activity and protein levels of its targets, JunD, c-Jun and BcL-xl, more than controls do. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that SIRT1 interacts with the AP-1 components c-Jun and JunD but not with c-Fos. The results identify SIRT1 as an AP-1 modulator and suggest a novel mechanism by which alumina nanoparticles may function as a potential carcinogen.

  6. Effect of Global Cardiac Ischemia on Human Ventricular Fibrillation: Insights from a Multi-scale Mechanistic Model of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kazbanov, Ivan V.; Clayton, Richard H.; Nash, Martyn P.; Bradley, Chris P.; Paterson, David J.; Hayward, Martin P.; Taggart, Peter; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Acute regional ischemia in the heart can lead to cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation (VF), which in turn compromise cardiac output and result in secondary global cardiac ischemia. The secondary ischemia may influence the underlying arrhythmia mechanism. A recent clinical study documents the effect of global cardiac ischaemia on the mechanisms of VF. During 150 seconds of global ischemia the dominant frequency of activation decreased, while after reperfusion it increased rapidly. At the same time the complexity of epicardial excitation, measured as the number of epicardical phase singularity points, remained approximately constant during ischemia. Here we perform numerical studies based on these clinical data and propose explanations for the observed dynamics of the period and complexity of activation patterns. In particular, we study the effects on ischemia in pseudo-1D and 2D cardiac tissue models as well as in an anatomically accurate model of human heart ventricles. We demonstrate that the fall of dominant frequency in VF during secondary ischemia can be explained by an increase in extracellular potassium, while the increase during reperfusion is consistent with washout of potassium and continued activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels. We also suggest that memory effects are responsible for the observed complexity dynamics. In addition, we present unpublished clinical results of individual patient recordings and propose a way of estimating extracellular potassium and activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels from these measurements. PMID:25375999

  7. Identification of function and mechanistic insights of guanine deaminase from Nitrosomonas europaea: role of the C-terminal loop in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bitra, Aruna; Hussain, Bhukya; Tanwar, Ajay Singh; Anand, Ruchi

    2013-05-21

    NE0047 from Nitrosomonas europaea has been annotated as a zinc-dependent deaminase; however, the substrate specificity is unknown because of the low level of structural similarity and sequence identity compared to other family members. In this study, the function of NE0047 was established as a guanine deaminase (catalytic efficiency of 1.2 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), exhibiting secondary activity towards ammeline. The structure of NE0047 in the presence of the substrate analogue 8-azaguanine was also determined to a resolution of 1.9 Å. NE0047 crystallized as a homodimer in an asymmetric unit. It was found that the extreme nine-amino acid C-terminal loop forms an active site flap; in one monomer, the flap is in the closed conformation and in the other in the open conformation with this loop region exposed to the solvent. Calorimetric data obtained using the full-length version of the enzyme fit to a sequential binding model, thus supporting a cooperative mode of ligand occupancy. In contrast, the mutant form of the enzyme (ΔC) with the deletion of the extreme nine amino acids follows an independent model of ligand occupancy. In addition, the ΔC mutant also does not exhibit any enzyme activity. Therefore, we propose that the progress of the reaction is communicated via changes in the conformation of the C-terminal flap and the closed form of the enzyme is the catalytically active form, while the open form allows for product release. The catalytic mechanism of deamination was also investigated, and we found that the mutagenesis of the highly conserved active site residues Glu79 and Glu143 resulted in a complete loss of activity and concluded that they facilitate the reaction by serving as proton shuttles.

  8. Mechanistic insight into peroxydisulfate reactivity: Oxidation of the cis,cis-[Ru(bpy)2(OH2)]2O4+ "Blue Dimmer"

    DOE PAGES

    Hurst, James K.; Roemeling, Margo D.; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2015-04-10

    One-electron oxidation of the μ-oxo dimer (cis,cis-[RuIII(bpy)2(OH2)]2O4+, {3,3}) to {3,4} by S2O82- can be described by three concurrent reaction pathways corresponding to the three protic forms of {3,3}. Free energy correlations of the rate constants, transient species dynamics determined by pulse radiolysis, and medium and temperature dependencies of the alkaline pathway all suggest that the rate determining step in these reactions is a strongly non-adiabatic dissociative electron transfer within a precursor ion pair leading to the {3,4}|SO42-|SO4•- ion triple. As deduced from the SO4•- scavenging experiments with 2-propanol, the SO4•- radical then either oxidizes {3,4} to {4,4} within the ionmore » triple, effecting a net two-electron oxidation of {3,3}, or escapes in solution with ~25 % probability to react with additional {3,3} and {3,4}, that is, effecting sequential one-electron oxidations. The reaction model presented also invokes rapid {3,3} + {4,4} → 2{3,4} comproportionation, for which kcom ~5×107 M-1 s-1 was independently measured. The model provides an explanation for the observation that despite favorable energetics, no oxidation beyond the {3,4} state was detected. As a result, the indiscriminate nature of oxidation by SO4•- indicates that its fate must be quantitatively determined when using S2O82- as an oxidant« less

  9. Mechanistic insight into the initiation step of the coupling reaction of oxetane or epoxides and CO2 catalyzed by (salen)CrX complexes.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Moncada, Adriana I

    2008-11-03

    The most active and robust current catalysts for the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides or oxetanes, (salen)CrX in conjunction with PPNX (PPN(+) = (Ph3P)2N(+)) or n-Bu4NX (X = Cl, N3, CN, NCO), are characterized both in solution by infrared spectroscopy and in the solid-state by X-ray crystallography. All anions (X) afford six-coordinate chromium(III) PPN(+) or n-Bu4N(+) salts composed of trans-(salen)CrX2(-) species. Of the X groups investigated in (salen)CrX, chloride is easily displaced by the others, that is, the reaction of (salen)CrCl with 2 equiv of N3(-), CN(-), or NCO(-) quantitatively provide (salen)Cr(N3)2(-), (salen)Cr(CN)2(-), and (salen)Cr(NCO)2(-), respectively. On the other hand, addition of less than 2 equiv of azide to (salen)CrCl leads to a Schlenk (ligand redistribution) equilibrium of the three possible anions both in solution and in the solid-state as shown by X-ray crystallography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. It was further demonstrated that all trans-(salen)CrX2(-) anions react with the epoxide or oxetane monomers in TCE (tetrachloroethane) solution to afford an equilibrium mixture containing (salen)CrX x monomer, with the oxetane adduct being thermodynamically more favored. The ring-opening steps of the bound cyclic ether monomers by X(-) were examined, revealing the rate of ring-opening of the epoxides (cyclohexene oxide and propylene oxide) to be much faster than of oxetane, with propylene oxide faster than cyclohexene oxide. Furthermore, both X anions in (salen)CrX2(-) were shown to be directly involved in monomer ring-opening.

  10. Mechanistic insight of platelet apoptosis leading to non-surgical bleeding among heart failure patients supported by continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Nandan K; Li, Tielou; Chen, Zengsheng; Chen, Hegang H; Sorensen, Erik N; Pham, Si M; Sobieski, Michael A; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2017-03-25

    Non-surgical bleeding (NSB) is the most common clinical complication in heart failure (HF) patients supported by continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs). In this study, oxidative stress and alteration of signal pathways leading to platelet apoptosis were investigated. Thirty-one HF patients supported by CF-LVADs were divided into bleeder (n = 12) and non-bleeder (n = 19) groups. Multiple blood samples were collected at pre-implant (baseline) and weekly up to 1-month post-implant. A single blood sample was collected from healthy subjects (reference). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in platelets, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL), expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, Bax and release of cytochrome c (Cyt.c), platelet mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m), activation of caspases, gelsolin cleavage and platelet apoptosis were examined. Significantly elevated ROS, oxLDL and depleted TAC were evident in the bleeder group compared to non-bleeder group (p < 0.05). Platelet pro-survival proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL) were significantly reduced in the bleeder group in comparison to the non-bleeder group (p < 0.05). Translocation of Bax into platelet mitochondria membrane and subsequent release of Cyt.c were more prevalent in the bleeder group. Platelet mitochondrial damage, activation of caspases, gelsolin cleavage, and ultimate platelet apoptosis in the bleeder group were observed. Oxidative stress and activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of platelet apoptosis may be linked to NSB in CF-LVAD patients. Additionally, biomarkers of oxidative stress, examination of pro-survivals and pro-apoptotic proteins in platelets, mitochondrial damage, caspase activation, and platelet apoptosis may be used to help identify HF patients at high risk of NSB post-implant.

  11. Effects of Acyclovir, Foscarnet, and Ribonucleotides on Herpes Simplex Virus-1 DNA Polymerase: Mechanistic Insights and a Novel Mechanism for Preventing Stable Incorporation of Ribonucleotides into DNA.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Ashwani Kumar; Kuchta, Robert D

    2016-02-23

    We examined the impact of two clinically approved anti-herpes drugs, acyclovir and Forscarnet (phosphonoformate), on the exonuclease activity of the herpes simplex virus-1 DNA polymerase, UL30. Acyclovir triphosphate and Foscarnet, along with the closely related phosphonoacetic acid, did not affect exonuclease activity on single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, blocking the polymerase active site due to either binding of Foscarnet or phosphonoacetic acid to the E-DNA complex or polymerization of acyclovir onto the DNA also had a minimal effect on exonuclease activity. The inability of the exonuclease to excise acyclovir from the primer 3'-terminus results from the altered sugar structure directly impeding phosphodiester bond hydrolysis as opposed to inhibiting binding, unwinding of the DNA by the exonuclease, or transfer of the DNA from the polymerase to the exonuclease. Removing the 3'-hydroxyl or the 2'-carbon from the nucleotide at the 3'-terminus of the primer strongly inhibited exonuclease activity, although addition of a 2'-hydroxyl did not affect exonuclease activity. The biological consequences of these results are twofold. First, the ability of acyclovir and Foscarnet to block dNTP polymerization without impacting exonuclease activity raises the possibility that their effects on herpes replication may involve both direct inhibition of dNTP polymerization and exonuclease-mediated destruction of herpes DNA. Second, the ability of the exonuclease to rapidly remove a ribonucleotide at the primer 3'-terminus in combination with the polymerase not efficiently adding dNTPs onto this primer provides a novel mechanism by which the herpes replication machinery can prevent incorporation of ribonucleotides into newly synthesized DNA.

  12. Leaf water deuterium enrichment shapes leaf wax n-alkane δD values of angiosperm plants I: Experimental evidence and mechanistic insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, Ansgar; Schefuß, Enno; Sachse, Dirk

    2013-06-01

    paleohydrological records. In addition, our finding opens the door to employ δD values of leaf wax n-alkanes as new ecohydrological proxies for evapotranspiration that can be applied in contemporary plant and ecosystem research.

  13. Mechanistic insights into protein precipitation by alcohol.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Hirano, Atsushi; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2012-04-01

    Ethanol is used to precipitate proteins during various processes, including purification and crystallization. To elucidate the mechanism of protein precipitation by alcohol, we have investigated the solubility and structural changes of protein over a wide range of alcohol concentrations. Conformation of hen egg-white lysozyme was changed from native to α-helical rich structure in the presence of ethanol at concentrations above 60%. The solubility of lysozyme was reduced with increasing ethanol concentration, although gel formation at ethanol concentrations between 60% and 75% prevented accurate solubility measurements. SH-modified lysozyme showed largely unfolded structure in water and α-helical structure in the presence of ethanol. More importantly, solubility of the chemically modified lysozyme molecules decreased with increasing ethanol concentration. There is no indication of increased solubility upon unfolding of the lysozyme molecules by ethanol, indicating that any favorable interaction of ethanol with the hydrophobic side chains, if indeed occuring, is offset by the unfavorable interaction of ethanol with the hydrophilic side chains and peptide bonds.

  14. Nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis: new mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Schauermann, Swetlana; Nilius, Niklas; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2013-08-20

    Metallic nanoparticles finely dispersed over oxide supports have found use as heterogeneous catalysts in many industries including chemical manufacturing, energy-related applications and environmental remediation. The compositional and structural complexity of such nanosized systems offers many degrees of freedom for tuning their catalytic properties. However, fully rational design of heterogeneous catalysts based on an atomic-level understanding of surface processes remains an unattained goal in catalysis research. Researchers have used surface science methods and metal single crystals to explore elementary processes in heterogeneous catalysis. In this Account, we use more realistic materials that capture part of the complexity inherent to industrial catalysts. We assess the impacts on the overall catalytic performance of characteristics such as finite particle size, particle structure, particle chemical composition, flexibility of atoms in clusters, and metal-support interactions. To prepare these materials, we grew thin oxide films on metal single crystals under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and used these films as supports for metallic nanoparticles. We present four case studies on specifically designed materials with properties that expand our atomic-level understanding of surface chemistry. Specifically, we address (1) the effect of dopants in the oxide support on the growth of metal nanoclusters; (2) the effects of size and structural flexibility of metal clusters on the binding energy of gas-phase adsorbates and their catalytic activity; (3) the role of surface modifiers, such as carbon, on catalytic activity and selectivity; and (4) the structural and compositional changes of the active surface as a result of strong metal-support interaction. Using these examples, we demonstrate how studies of complex nanostructured materials can help revealing atomic processes at the solid-gas interface of heterogeneous catalysts. Among our findings is that doping of oxide materials opens promising routes to alter the morphology and electronic properties of supported metal particles and to induce the direct dissociation and reaction of molecules bound to the oxide surface. Also, the small size and atomic flexibility of metal clusters can have an important influence on gas adsorption and catalytic performance.

  15. Nutraceuticals against Neurodegeneration: A Mechanistic Insight

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vivekkumar P.; Trivedi, Priyanka P.; Vikram, Ajit; Tripathi, Durga Nand

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders are complex and multifactorial; however, accumulating evidences suggest few common shared pathways. These common pathways include mitochondrial dysfunction, intracellular Ca2+ overload, oxidative stress and inflammation. Often multiple pathways co-exist, and therefore limit the benefits of therapeutic interventions. Nutraceuticals have recently gained importance owing to their multifaceted effects. These food-based approaches are believed to target multiple pathways in a slow but more physiological manner without causing severe adverse effects. Available information strongly supports the notion that apart from preventing the onset of neuronal damage, nutraceuticals can potentially attenuate the continued progression of neuronal destruction. In this article, we i) review the common pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the toxicants-induced neurotoxicity and neurodegenerative disorders with special emphasis on Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and ii) summarize current research advancements on the effects of nutraceuticals against these detrimental pathways. PMID:26725888

  16. Computer-assisted mechanistic structure-activity studies: application to diverse classes of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Loew, G H; Poulsen, M; Kirkjian, E; Ferrell, J; Sudhindra, B S; Rebagliati, M

    1985-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we have indicated how the techniques and capabilities of theoretical chemistry, together with experimental results, can be used in a mechanistic approach to structure-activity studies of toxicity. In the second part, we have illustrated how this computer-assisted approach has been used to identify and calculate causally related molecular indicators of relative carcinogenic activity in five classes of chemical carcinogens: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their methyl derivatives, aromatic amines, chloroethanes, chloroalkenes and dialkyl nitrosamines. In each class of chemicals studied, candidate molecular indicators have been identified that could be useful in predictive screening of unknown compounds. In addition, further insights into some mechanistic aspects of chemical carcinogenesis have been obtained. Finally, experiments have been suggested to both verify the usefulness of the indicators and test their mechanistic implications. PMID:3905382

  17. A versatile tripodal Cu(I) reagent for C-N bond construction via nitrene-transfer chemistry: catalytic perspectives and mechanistic insights on C-H aminations/amidinations and olefin aziridinations.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Vivek; Paraskevopoulou, Patrina; Das, Purak; Chi, Lingyu; Wang, Qiuwen; Choudhury, Amitava; Mathieson, Jennifer S; Cronin, Leroy; Pardue, Daniel B; Cundari, Thomas R; Mitrikas, George; Sanakis, Yiannis; Stavropoulos, Pericles

    2014-08-13

    A Cu(I) catalyst (1), supported by a framework of strongly basic guanidinato moieties, mediates nitrene-transfer from PhI═NR sources to a wide variety of aliphatic hydrocarbons (C-H amination or amidination in the presence of nitriles) and olefins (aziridination). Product profiles are consistent with a stepwise rather than concerted C-N bond formation. Mechanistic investigations with the aid of Hammett plots, kinetic isotope effects, labeled stereochemical probes, and radical traps and clocks allow us to conclude that carboradical intermediates play a major role and are generated by hydrogen-atom abstraction from substrate C-H bonds or initial nitrene-addition to one of the olefinic carbons. Subsequent processes include solvent-caged radical recombination to afford the major amination and aziridination products but also one-electron oxidation of diffusively free carboradicals to generate amidination products due to carbocation participation. Analyses of metal- and ligand-centered events by variable temperature electrospray mass spectrometry, cyclic voltammetry, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, coupled with computational studies, indicate that an active, but still elusive, copper-nitrene (S = 1) intermediate initially abstracts a hydrogen atom from, or adds nitrene to, C-H and C═C bonds, respectively, followed by a spin flip and radical rebound to afford intra- and intermolecular C-N containing products.

  18. Mechanistic investigations of CO-photoextrusion and oxidative addition reactions of early transition-metal carbonyls: (η(5)-C5H5)M(CO)4 (M = V, Nb, Ta).

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Hao; Su, Ming-Der

    2016-06-28

    The mechanisms for the photochemical Si-H bond activation reaction are studied theoretically using a model system of the group 5 organometallic compounds, η(5)-CpM(CO)4 (M = V, Nb, and Ta), with the M06-2X method and the Def2-SVPD basis set. Three types of reaction pathways that lead to final insertion products are identified. The structures of the intersystem crossings, which play a central role in these photo-activation reactions, are determined. The intermediates and transitional structures in either the singlet or triplet states are also calculated to provide a mechanistic explanation of the reaction pathways. All of the potential energy surfaces for the group 5 η(5)-CpM(CO)4 complexes are quite similar. In particular, the theoretical evidence suggests that after irradiation using light, η(5)-CpM(CO)4 quickly loses one CO ligand to yield two tricarbonyls, in either the singlet or the triplet states. The triplet tricarbonyl 16-electron intermediates, ([η(5)-CpM(CO)3](3)), play a key role in the formation of the final oxidative addition product, η(5)-CpM(CO)3(H)(SiMe3). However, the singlet counterparts, ([η(5)-CpM(CO)3](1)), play no role in the formation of the final product molecule, but their singlet metal centers interact weakly with solvent molecules ((Me3)SiH) to produce alkyl-solvated organometallic complexes, which are observable experimentally. This theoretical evidence is in accordance with the available experimental observations.

  19. Dehydrofluorination of Hydrofluorocarbons by Titanium Alkylidynes via Sequential C-H/C-F Bond Activation Reactions. A Synthetic, Structural, and Mechanistic Study of 1,2-CH Bond Addition and [beta]-Fluoride Elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Fout, A.R.; Scott, J.; Miller, D.L.; Bailey, B.C.; Pink, M.; Mindiola, D.J.

    2009-01-07

    The neopentylidene-neopentyl complex (PNP)Ti=CH{sup t}Bu(CH{sub 2}{sup t}Bu) (1); (PNP{sup -} = N[2-P(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-4-methylphenyl]{sub 2}) extrudes neopentane in neat fluorobenzene under mild conditions (25 C) to generate the transient titanium alkylidyne (PNP)Ti-C{sup t}Bu (A), which subsequently undergoes regioselective 1,2-CH bond addition of a fluorobenzene across the Ti-C linkage to generate (PNP)Ti=CH{sup t}Bu(o-FC{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (2). Kinetic and mechanistic studies suggest that the C-H activation process is pseudo-first-order in titanium, with the {alpha}-hydrogen abstraction being the rate-determining step and the post-rate-determining step being the C-H bond activation of fluorobenzene. At 100 C complex 2 does not equilibrate back to A and the preference for C-H activation in benzene versus fluorobenzene is 2:3, respectively. Compound 1 also reacts readily, and in most cases cleanly, with a series of hydrofluoroarenes (HAr{sub F}), to form a family of alkylidene-arylfluoride derivatives of the type (PNP)Ti=CH{sup t}Bu(Ar{sub F}). Thermolysis of the latter compounds generates the titanium alkylidene-fluoride (PNP)Ti=CH{sup t}Bu(F) (14) by a {beta}-fluoride elimination, concurrent with formation of o-benzyne. {beta}-Fluoride elimination to yield 14 occurs from 2 under elevated temperatures with k{sub average} = 4.96(16) x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and with activation parameters {Delta}H{sub {-+}} = 29(1) kcal/mol and {Delta}S{sub {-+}} = -3(4) cal/mol {center_dot}K. It was found that {beta}-fluoride elimination is accelerated when electron-rich groups are adjacent to the fluoride group, thus implying that a positive charge buildup at the arylfluoride ring occurs in the activated complex of 2. The alkylidene derivative (PNP)Ti=CHSiMe{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3}) (15) also undergoes {alpha}-hydrogen abstraction to form the putative (PNP)Ti'-CSiMe{sub 3} (B) at higher temperatures (>70 C) and dehydrofluorinates the same series of HArF when the reaction

  20. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-05

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species.

  1. The Wacker process: inner- or outer-sphere nucleophilic addition? New insights from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Comas-Vives, Aleix; Stirling, András; Lledós, Agustí; Ujaque, Gregori

    2010-08-02

    The Wacker process consists of the oxidation of ethylene catalyzed by a Pd(II) complex. The reaction mechanism has been largely debated in the literature; two modes for the nucleophilic addition of water to a Pd-coordinated alkene have been proposed: syn-inner- and anti-outer-sphere mechanisms. These reaction steps have been theoretically evaluated by means of ab initio molecular dynamics combined with metadynamics by placing the [Pd(C(2)H(4))Cl(2)(H(2)O)] complex in a box of water molecules, thereby resembling experimental conditions at low [Cl(-)]. The nucleophilic addition has also been evaluated for the [Pd(C(2)H(4))Cl(3)](-) complex, thus revealing that the water by chloride ligand substitution trans to ethene is kinetically favored over the generally assumed cis species in water. Hence, the resulting trans species can only directly undertake the outer-sphere nucleophilic addition, whereas the inner-sphere mechanism is hindered since the attacking water is located trans to ethene. In addition, all the simulations from the [Pd(C(2)H(4))Cl(2)(H(2)O)] species (either cis or trans) support an outer-sphere mechanism with a free-energy barrier compatible with that obtained experimentally, whereas that for the inner-sphere mechanism is significantly higher. Moreover, additional processes for a global understanding of the Wacker process in solution have also been identified, such as ligand substitutions, proton transfers that involve the aquo ligand, and the importance of the trans effect of the ethylene in the nucleophilic addition attack.

  2. Food for Thought ... Mechanistic Validation

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Thomas; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Stephens, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Validation of new approaches in regulatory toxicology is commonly defined as the independent assessment of the reproducibility and relevance (the scientific basis and predictive capacity) of a test for a particular purpose. In large ring trials, the emphasis to date has been mainly on reproducibility and predictive capacity (comparison to the traditional test) with less attention given to the scientific or mechanistic basis. Assessing predictive capacity is difficult for novel approaches (which are based on mechanism), such as pathways of toxicity or the complex networks within the organism (systems toxicology). This is highly relevant for implementing Toxicology for the 21st Century, either by high-throughput testing in the ToxCast/ Tox21 project or omics-based testing in the Human Toxome Project. This article explores the mostly neglected assessment of a test's scientific basis, which moves mechanism and causality to the foreground when validating/qualifying tests. Such mechanistic validation faces the problem of establishing causality in complex systems. However, pragmatic adaptations of the Bradford Hill criteria, as well as bioinformatic tools, are emerging. As critical infrastructures of the organism are perturbed by a toxic mechanism we argue that by focusing on the target of toxicity and its vulnerability, in addition to the way it is perturbed, we can anchor the identification of the mechanism and its verification. PMID:23665802

  3. A Top-Down Approach to Mechanistic Biological Modeling: Application to the Single-Chain Antibody Folding Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Scott; Raden, David; Petzold, Linda; Robinson, Anne Skaja; Doyle, Francis J.

    2008-01-01

    A top-down approach to mechanistic modeling of biological systems is presented and exemplified with the development of a hypothesis-driven mathematical model for single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) folding in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by mediators BiP and PDI. In this approach, model development starts with construction of the most basic mathematical model—typically consisting of predetermined or newly-elucidated biological behavior motifs—capable of reproducing desired biological behaviors. From this point, mechanistic detail is added incrementally and systematically, and the effects of each addition are evaluated. This approach follows the typical progression of experimental data availability in that higher-order, lumped measurements are often more prevalent initially than specific, mechanistic ones. It also necessarily provides the modeler with insight into the structural requirements and performance capabilities of the resulting detailed mechanistic model, which facilitates further analysis. The top-down approach to mechanistic modeling identified three such requirements and a branched dependency-degradation competition motif critical for the scFv folding model to reproduce experimentally observed scFv folding dependencies on BiP and PDI and increased production when both species are overexpressed and promoted straightforward prediction of parameter dependencies. It also prescribed modification of the guiding hypothesis to capture BiP and PDI synergy. PMID:18641066

  4. Insights into Tropical Tropospheric Ozone from the 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Data Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Volker, W.; Kirchhoff, J. H.; Posny, Franaoise; Gert, J.; Coetzee, R.; Hoegger, Bruno; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first overview of total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in the southern hemisphere tropics based on a three year, ten site record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) network. Observations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. The ozone data, with simultaneous temperature profiles to approximately 7 hPa and relative humidity to approximately 200 hPa, are at an archive: http://code9l6. gsfc.nasa.gov/Data_services/shadoz. Prominent features are highly variable tropospheric ozone, a zonal wave-one pattern in total (and tropospheric) column ozone, and signatures of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric ozone. Total, stratospheric and tropospheric column ozone amounts usually peak between August and November and are lowest in the first half of the year. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Indian and Pacific Ocean displays influences of the waning 1997-1998 Indian Ocean Dipole and ENSO (El Nino / Southern Oscillation), seasonal convection and pollution transport from Africa. Tropospheric ozone over the Atlantic Basin reflects regional subsidence and recirculation as well as pollution ozone from biomass burning.

  5. Insights Into Tropical Tropospheric Ozone From The 1998-2000 Shadoz (southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Posny, F.; Coetzee, G. J. R.; Hoegger, B.; Kawakami, S.; Ogawa, T.

    We describe the first overview of total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in the southern hemisphere tropics based on a 3-year, 10-site record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network. Ob- servations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Réunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristóbal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. The ozone data, with simultaneous tem- perature profiles to 7 hPa and relative humidity to 200 hPa, are at an archive: . Prominent features are highly variable tropospheric ozone, a zonal wave-one pattern in total (and tropospheric) col- umn ozone, and signatures of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric ozone. Total, stratospheric and tropospheric column ozone amounts usually peak be- tween August and November and are lowest in the first half of the year. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Indian and Pacific Ocean displays influences of the wan- ing 1997-1998 Indian Ocean Dipole and ENSO, seasonal convection and pollution transport from Africa. Tropospheric ozone over the Atlantic Basin reflects regional subsidence and recirculation as well as pollution ozone from biomass burning.

  6. Near-infrared and ultraviolet induced isomerization of crotonic acid in N{sub 2} and Xe cryomatrices: First observation of two high-energy trans C–O conformers and mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Kuş, Nihal; Fausto, Rui

    2014-12-21

    E-crotonic acid was isolated in cryogenic solid N{sub 2} and xenon matrices, and subjected to Laser ultraviolet (UV) and near-infrared (NIR) irradiations. In the deposited matrices, the two low-energy cis C–O E-cc and E-ct conformers, which are the only forms significantly populated in the gas phase, were observed. UV irradiation (λ= 250 nm) of the compound in N{sub 2} matrix allows for experimental detection, not just of the two low-energy cis C–O isomers of Z-crotonic acid previously observed in the experiments carried out in argon matrix [Z-cc and Z-ct; R. Fausto, A. Kulbida, and O. Schrems, J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 91, 3755–3770 (1995)] but also of the never observed before high-energy forms of both E- and Z-crotonic acids bearing the carboxylic acid group in the trans arrangement (E-tc and Z-tc conformers). In turn, NIR irradiation experiments in the N{sub 2} matrix allow to produce the high-energy E-tc trans C–O conformer in a selective way, from the initially deposited E-cc form. The vibrational signatures of all the 6 rotameric structures of the crotonic acids experimentally observed, including those of the new trans C–O forms, were determined and the individual spectra fully assigned, also with support of theoretically obtained data. On the other hand, as found before for the compound isolated in argon matrix, the experiments performed in xenon matrix failed to experimental detection of the trans C–O forms. This demonstrates that in noble gas matrices these forms are not stable long enough to allow for their observation by steady state spectroscopy techniques. In these matrices, the trans C–O forms convert spontaneously into their cis C–O counterparts, by tunnelling. Some mechanistic details of the studied processes were extracted and discussed.

  7. Near-infrared and ultraviolet induced isomerization of crotonic acid in N2 and Xe cryomatrices: first observation of two high-energy trans C-O conformers and mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Kuş, Nihal; Fausto, Rui

    2014-12-21

    E-crotonic acid was isolated in cryogenic solid N2 and xenon matrices, and subjected to Laser ultraviolet (UV) and near-infrared (NIR) irradiations. In the deposited matrices, the two low-energy cis C-O E-cc and E-ct conformers, which are the only forms significantly populated in the gas phase, were observed. UV irradiation (λ= 250 nm) of the compound in N2 matrix allows for experimental detection, not just of the two low-energy cis C-O isomers of Z-crotonic acid previously observed in the experiments carried out in argon matrix [Z-cc and Z-ct; R. Fausto, A. Kulbida, and O. Schrems, J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 91, 3755-3770 (1995)] but also of the never observed before high-energy forms of both E- and Z-crotonic acids bearing the carboxylic acid group in the trans arrangement (E-tc and Z-tc conformers). In turn, NIR irradiation experiments in the N2 matrix allow to produce the high-energy E-tc trans C-O conformer in a selective way, from the initially deposited E-cc form. The vibrational signatures of all the 6 rotameric structures of the crotonic acids experimentally observed, including those of the new trans C-O forms, were determined and the individual spectra fully assigned, also with support of theoretically obtained data. On the other hand, as found before for the compound isolated in argon matrix, the experiments performed in xenon matrix failed to experimental detection of the trans C-O forms. This demonstrates that in noble gas matrices these forms are not stable long enough to allow for their observation by steady state spectroscopy techniques. In these matrices, the trans C-O forms convert spontaneously into their cis C-O counterparts, by tunnelling. Some mechanistic details of the studied processes were extracted and discussed.

  8. Continually emerging mechanistic complexity of the multi-enzyme cellulosome complex.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven P; Bayer, Edward A; Czjzek, Mirjam

    2017-04-06

    The robust plant cell wall polysaccharide-degrading properties of anaerobic bacteria are harnessed within elegant, marcomolecular assemblages called cellulosomes, in which proteins of complementary activities amass on scaffold protein networks. Research efforts have focused and continue to focus on providing detailed mechanistic insights into cellulosomal complex assembly, topology, and function. The accumulated information is expanding our fundamental understanding of the lignocellulosic biomass decomposition process and enhancing the potential of engineered cellulosomal systems for biotechnological purposes. Ongoing biochemical studies continue to reveal unexpected functional diversity within traditional cellulase families. Genomic, proteomic, and functional analyses have uncovered unanticipated cellulosomal proteins that augment the function of the native and designer cellulosomes. In addition, complementary structural and computational methods are continuing to provide much needed insights on the influence of cellulosomal interdomain linker regions on cellulosomal assembly and activity.

  9. Identification of the dominant photochemical pathways and mechanistic insights to the ultrafast ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 to Fe(CO)4EtOH

    SciTech Connect

    Kunnus, K.; Josefsson, I.; Rajkovic, I.; Schreck, S.; Quevedo, W.; Beye, M.; Weniger, C.; Grübel, S.; Scholz, M.; Nordlund, D.; Zhang, W.; Hartsock, R. W.; Gaffney, K. J.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Kennedy, B.; Hennies, F.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Techert, S.; Odelius, M.; Wernet, Ph.; Föhlisch, A.

    2016-02-09

    We utilized femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and ab initio theory to study the transient electronic structure and the photoinduced molecular dynamics of a model metal carbonyl photocatalyst Fe(CO)5 in ethanol solution. We propose mechanistic explanation for the parallel ultrafast intra-molecular spin crossover and ligation of the Fe(CO)4 which are observed following a charge transfer photoexcitation of Fe(CO)5 as reported in our previous study [Wernet et al., Nature 520, 78 (2015)]. We find that branching of the reaction pathway likely happens in the 1A1 state of Fe(CO)4. A sub-picosecond time constant of the spin crossover from 1B2 to 3B2 is rationalized by the proposed 1B21A13B2 mechanism. Ultrafast ligation of the 1B2 Fe(CO)4 state is significantly faster than the spin-forbidden and diffusion limited ligation process occurring from the 3B2 Fe(CO)4 ground state that has been observed in the previous studies. We propose that the ultrafast ligation occurs via 1B21A11A' Fe(CO)4EtOH pathway and the time scale of the 1A1 Fe(CO)4 state ligation is governed by the solute-solvent collision frequency. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the importance of understanding the interaction of molecular excited states with the surrounding environment to explain the relaxation pathways of photoexcited metal carbonyls in solution.

  10. A RING to rule them all? Insights into the Map3k1 PHD motif provide a new mechanistic understanding into the diverse roles of Map3k1.

    PubMed

    Suddason, T; Gallagher, E

    2015-04-01

    Despite the sizable number of components that comprise Mapk cascades, Map3k1 is the only element that contains both a kinase domain and a plant homeodomain (PHD) motif, allowing Map3k1 to regulate the protein phosphorylation and ubiquitin proteasome systems. As such, Map3k1 has complex roles in the regulation of cell death, survival, migration and differentiation. Numerous mouse and human genetic analyses have demonstrated that Map3k1 is of critical importance for the immune system, cardiac tissue, testis, wound healing, tumorigenesis and cancer. Recent gene knockin of Map3k1 to mutate the E2 binding site within the Map3k1 PHD motif and high throughput ubiquitin protein array screening for Map3k1 PHD motif substrates provide critical novel insights into Map3k1 PHD motif signal transduction and bring a brand-new understanding to Map3k1 signaling in mammalian biology.

  11. From mechanistic to functional behaviorism.

    PubMed

    Moxley, R A

    1992-11-01

    A shift from mechanistic behaviorism to functional behaviorism is presented against the background of two historical traditions, one with an emphasis on form, the other with an emphasis on function. Skinner's work, which made more contributions to a functional behaviorism than to a mechanistic behaviorism, exemplifies this shift. The two traditions and an account of Skinner's development of functional relations are presented in order to show Skinner's contributions to aligning modern behavior analysis with the functional tradition.

  12. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  13. Kinetic and Mechanistic Investigations of Atom Abstraction Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Philip Stanford

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-flow system at 1-4 torr total pressure, employing resonance fluorescence detection of Br, Cl, O, H, N, and D, and laser magnetic resonance detection of OH and ClO, was used to measure the rate constants for a number of hydrogen and non-hydrogen atom abstraction reactions. The rate constants are examined within established reactivity trends in order to reveal the dominant forces governing the potential-energy surfaces. The activation energies for the F + rm H_2O/D_2O reactions are found to be smaller than that defined by the Evans-Polyani relationship between activation energy and exothermicity. The low activation energy and enhanced kinetic isotope effect for these reactions suggests that this deviation may be the result of quantum -mechanical tunneling. The rate constants for these and other heavy-light-heavy reactions are interpreted using transition-state theory and a one-dimensional tunneling model, in conjunction with ab initio calculations, to gain insight into the mechanism of these reactions. For the reactions of X + ClOCl to Products (X = Br, Cl, F, N), the rate constants correlate with the electron affinity of the radical, indicating that these mechanisms are dominated by electron transfer from ClOCl to X, similar to the reactivity of other non -hydrogen abstractions. The reactions of O and OH with ClOCl do not follow this trend, suggesting that electron transfer is not the only driving force in these reactions. These deviations are interpreted in terms of long-range attractive forces forming stable intermediates. The ClO + O_3 to ClOO + O_2 reaction has been proposed as an additional mechanism for ozone destruction within the antarctic vortex. Upper limits for the bimolecular rate constant for the ClO + O _3 reaction were measured directly between 233 and 413 K at 1-2 torr. The rate constants are several orders-of-magnitude smaller than estimated from the trend for non-hydrogen abstractions. From these results, it is concluded that this

  14. Dynamic Behavior of Microbubbles during Long Ultrasound Tone-Burst Excitation: Mechanistic Insights into Ultrasound-Microbubble Mediated Therapeutics Using High-Speed Imaging and Cavitation Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xucai; Wang, Jianjun; Pacella, John J; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound (US)-microbubble (MB)-mediated therapies have been found to restore perfusion and enhance drug/gene delivery. On the presumption that MBs do not persist during long US exposure under high acoustic pressures, most schemes use short US pulses when a high US pressure is employed. However, we recently observed an enhanced thrombolytic effect using long US pulses at high acoustic pressures. Therefore, we explored the fate of MBs during long tone-burst exposures (5 ms) at various acoustic pressures and MB concentrations via direct high-speed optical observation and passive cavitation detection. MBs first underwent stable or inertial cavitation depending on the acoustic pressure and then formed gas-filled clusters that continued to oscillate, break up and form new clusters. Cavitation detection confirmed continued, albeit diminishing, acoustic activity throughout the 5-ms US excitation. These data suggest that persisting cavitation activity during long tone bursts may confer additional therapeutic effects.

  15. Water-soluble NHC-Cu catalysts: applications in click chemistry, bioconjugation and mechanistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Díaz Velázquez, Heriberto; Ruiz García, Yara; Vandichel, Matthias; Madder, Annemieke; Verpoort, Francis

    2014-12-14

    Copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and terminal alkynes (CuAAC), better known as "click" reaction, has triggered the use of 1,2,3-triazoles in bioconjugation, drug discovery, materials science and combinatorial chemistry. Here we report a new series of water-soluble catalysts based on N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-Cu complexes which are additionally functionalized with a sulfonate group. The complexes show superior activity towards CuAAC reactions and display a high versatility, enabling the production of triazoles with different substitution patterns. Additionally, successful application of these complexes in bioconjugation using unprotected peptides acting as DNA binding domains was achieved for the first time. Mechanistic insight into the reaction mechanism is obtained by means of state-of-the-art first principles calculations.

  16. Mechanistic insight into peroxydisulfate reactivity: Oxidation of the cis,cis-[Ru(bpy)2(OH2)]2O4+ "Blue Dimmer"

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, James K.; Roemeling, Margo D.; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2015-04-10

    One-electron oxidation of the μ-oxo dimer (cis,cis-[RuIII(bpy)2(OH2)]2O4+, {3,3}) to {3,4} by S2O82- can be described by three concurrent reaction pathways corresponding to the three protic forms of {3,3}. Free energy correlations of the rate constants, transient species dynamics determined by pulse radiolysis, and medium and temperature dependencies of the alkaline pathway all suggest that the rate determining step in these reactions is a strongly non-adiabatic dissociative electron transfer within a precursor ion pair leading to the {3,4}|SO42-|SO4•- ion triple. As deduced from the SO4•- scavenging experiments with 2-propanol, the SO4•- radical then either oxidizes {3,4} to {4,4} within the ion triple, effecting a net two-electron oxidation of {3,3}, or escapes in solution with ~25 % probability to react with additional {3,3} and {3,4}, that is, effecting sequential one-electron oxidations. The reaction model presented also invokes rapid {3,3} + {4,4} → 2{3,4} comproportionation, for which kcom ~5×107 M-1 s-1 was independently measured. The model provides an explanation for the observation that despite favorable energetics, no oxidation beyond the {3,4} state was detected. As a result, the indiscriminate nature of oxidation by SO4•- indicates that its fate must be quantitatively determined when using S2O82- as an oxidant

  17. Mechanistic insights into C-H amination via dicopper nitrenes.

    PubMed

    Aguila, Mae Joanne B; Badiei, Yosra M; Warren, Timothy H

    2013-06-26

    We examine important reactivity pathways relevant to stoichiometric and catalytic C-H amination via isolable β-diketiminato dicopper alkylnitrene intermediates {[Cl2NN]Cu}2(μ-NR). Kinetic studies involving the stoichiometric amination of ethylbenzene by {[Cl2NN]Cu}2(μ-N(t)Bu) (3) demonstrate that the terminal nitrene [Cl2NN]Cu═N(t)Bu is the active intermediate in C-H amination. Initial rates exhibit saturation behavior at high ethylbenzene loadings and an inverse dependence on the copper species [Cl2NN]Cu, both consistent with dissociation of a [Cl2NN]Cu fragment from 3 prior to C-H amination. C-H amination experiments employing 1,4-dimethylcyclohexane and benzylic radical clock substrate support a stepwise H-atom abstraction/radical rebound pathway. Dicopper nitrenes [Cu]2(μ-NCHRR') derived from 1° and 2° alkylazides are unstable toward tautomerization to copper(I) imine complexes [Cu](HN═CRR'), rendering 1° and 2° alkylnitrene complexes unsuitable for C-H amination.

  18. Mechanistic insights on cooperative asymmetric multicatalysis using chiral counterions.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-08-15

    Cooperative multicatalytic methods are steadily gaining popularity in asymmetric catalysis. The use of chiral Brønsted acids such as phosphoric acids in conjunction with a range of transition metals has been proven to be effective in asymmetric synthesis. However, the lack of molecular-level understanding and the accompanying ambiguity on the role of the chiral species in stereoinduction continues to remain an unresolved puzzle. Herein, we intend to disclose some novel transition state models obtained through DFT(B3LYP and M06) computations for a quintessential reaction in this family, namely, palladium-catalyzed asymmetric Tsuji-Trost allylation of aldehydes. The aldehyde is activated as an enamine by the action of a secondary amine (organocatalysis), which then adds to an activated Pd-allylic species (transition metal catalysis) generated through the protonation of allyic alcohol by chiral BINOL-phosphoric acid (Brønsted acid catalysis). We aim to decipher the nature of chiral BINOL-phosphates and their role in creating a quaternary chiral carbon atom in this triple catalytic system. The study reports the first transition state model capable of rationalizing chiral counterion-induced enantioselectivity. It is found that the chiral phosphate acts as a counterion in the stereocontrolling event rather than the conventional ligand mode.

  19. Mechanistic insights into the regulation of circular dorsal ruffle formation

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Toshiki; Hasegawa, Junya

    2013-01-01

    Growth factor stimulations induce dynamic changes in the cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane. Among them is the formation of membrane ruffles organized in a circular array, called ‘circular dorsal ruffles’ (CDRs). Physiological functions of CDRs include downregulation of cell growth by desensitizing the signalling from growth factor receptors as well as rearrangement of adhesion sites at the onset of cell migration. For the formation of CDRs, not only the activators of actin polymerization, such as N-WASP and the Arp2/3-complex, but also membrane deforming proteins with BAR/F-BAR domains are necessary. Small GTPases are also involved in the formation of CDRs by controlling intracellular trafficking through endosomes. Moreover, recent analyses of another circular cytoskeletal structure, podosome rosettes, have revealed common molecular features shared with CDRs. Among them, the roles of PI3-kinase and phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase may hold the key to the induction of these circular structures. PMID:23175656

  20. Structural and mechanistic insights into Mps1 kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yuting; Gao, Yuefeng; Xu, Quanbin; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Songcheng; Old, William; Resing, Katheryn; Ahn, Natalie; Lei, Ming; Liu, Xuedong

    2010-11-05

    Mps1 is one of the several essential kinases whose activation is required for robust mitotic spindle checkpoint signalling. The activity of Mps1 is tightly regulated and increases dramatically during mitosis or in response to spindle damage. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying Mps1 regulation, we determined the crystal structure of the kinase domain of Mps1. The 2.7-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure shows that the Mps1 kinase domain adopts a unique inactive conformation. Intramolecular interactions between the key Glu residue in the {alpha}C helix of the N-terminal lobe and the backbone amides in the catalytic loop lock the kinase in the inactive conformation. Autophosphorylation appears to be a priming event for kinase activation. We identified Mps1 autophosphorylation sites in the activation and the P+1 loops. Whereas activation loop autophosphorylation enhances kinase activity, autophosphorylation at the P+1 loop (T686) is associated with the active kinase. Mutation of T686 autophosphorylation site impairs both autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of T676 may be a priming event for phosphorylation at T686. Finally, we identified two critical lysine residues in the loop between helices {alpha}EF and {alpha}F that are essential for substrate recruitment and maintaining high levels of kinase activity. Our studies reveal critical biochemical mechanisms for Mps1 kinase regulation.

  1. Mechanistic Insight into Heptosyltransferase Inhibition by using Kdo Multivalent Glycoclusters.

    PubMed

    Tikad, Abdellatif; Fu, Huixiao; Sevrain, Charlotte M; Laurent, Sophie; Nierengarten, Jean-François; Vincent, Stéphane P

    2016-09-05

    The synthesis of unprecedented multimeric Kdo glycoclusters based on fullerene and calix[4]arene central scaffolds is reported. The compounds were used to study the mechanism and scope of multivalent glycosyltransferase inhibition. Multimeric mannosides based on porphyrin and pillar[5]arenes were also generated in a controlled manner. Twelve glycoclusters and their monomeric ligands were thus assayed against heptosyltransferase WaaC, which is an important bacterial glycosyltransferase that is involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. It was first found that all the multimers interact solely with the acceptor binding site of the enzyme even when the multimeric ligands mimic the heptose donor. Second, the novel Kdo glycofullerenes displayed very potent inhibition (Ki =0.14 μm for the best inhibitor); an inhibition level rarely observed with glycosyltransferases. Although the observed "multivalent effects" (i.e., the enhancement of affinity of a ligand when presented in a multimeric fashion) were in general modest, a dramatic effect of the central scaffold on the inhibition level was evidenced: the fullerene and the porphyrin scaffolds being by far superior to the calix- and pillar-arenes. We could also show, by dynamic light scattering analysis, that the best inhibitor had the propensity to form aggregates with the heptosyltransferase. This aggregative property may contribute to the global multivalent enzyme inhibition, but probably do not constitute the main origin of inhibition.

  2. Mechanistic Insights in Ethylene Perception and Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Ju, Chuanli; Chang, Caren

    2015-09-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene profoundly affects plant growth, development, and stress responses. Ethylene perception occurs at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and signal transduction leads to a transcriptional cascade that initiates diverse responses, often in conjunction with other signals. Recent findings provide a more complete picture of the components and mechanisms in ethylene signaling, now rendering a more dynamic view of this conserved pathway. This includes newly identified protein-protein interactions at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, as well as the major discoveries that the central regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2) is the long-sought phosphorylation substrate for the CONSTITUTIVE RESPONSE1 protein kinase, and that cleavage of EIN2 transmits the signal to the nucleus. In the nucleus, hundreds of potential gene targets of the EIN3 master transcription factor have been identified and found to be induced in transcriptional waves, and transcriptional coregulation has been shown to be a mechanism of ethylene cross talk.

  3. Inhibition of insulin fibrillation by osmolytes: Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Sinjan; Kishore, Nand; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied here using a number of biophysical tools the effects of osmolytes, betaine, citrulline, proline and sorbitol which differ significantly in terms of their physical characteristics such as, charge distribution, polarity, H-bonding abilities etc, on the fibrillation of insulin. Among these, betaine, citrulline, and proline are very effective in decreasing the extent of fibrillation. Proline also causes a substantial delay in the onset of fibrillation in the concentration range (50–250 mM) whereas such an effect is seen for citrulline only at 250 mM, and in case of betaine this effect is not seen at all in the whole concentration range. The enthalpies of interaction at various stages of fibrillation process have suggested that the preferential exclusion of the osmolyte and its polar interaction with the protein are important in inhibition. The results indicate that the osmolytes are most effective when added prior to the elongation stage of fibrillation. These observations have significant biological implications, since insulin fibrillation is known to cause injection amyloidosis and our data may help in designing lead drug molecules and development of potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26616401

  4. Describing dengue epidemics: Insights from simple mechanistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Maíra; Stollenwerk, Nico; Kooi, Bob W.

    2012-09-01

    We present a set of nested models to be applied to dengue fever epidemiology. We perform a qualitative study in order to show how much complexity we really need to add into epidemiological models to be able to describe the fluctuations observed in empirical dengue hemorrhagic fever incidence data offering a promising perspective on inference of parameter values from dengue case notifications.

  5. Inhibition of insulin fibrillation by osmolytes: Mechanistic Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sinjan; Kishore, Nand; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2015-11-01

    We have studied here using a number of biophysical tools the effects of osmolytes, betaine, citrulline, proline and sorbitol which differ significantly in terms of their physical characteristics such as, charge distribution, polarity, H-bonding abilities etc, on the fibrillation of insulin. Among these, betaine, citrulline, and proline are very effective in decreasing the extent of fibrillation. Proline also causes a substantial delay in the onset of fibrillation in the concentration range (50-250 mM) whereas such an effect is seen for citrulline only at 250 mM, and in case of betaine this effect is not seen at all in the whole concentration range. The enthalpies of interaction at various stages of fibrillation process have suggested that the preferential exclusion of the osmolyte and its polar interaction with the protein are important in inhibition. The results indicate that the osmolytes are most effective when added prior to the elongation stage of fibrillation. These observations have significant biological implications, since insulin fibrillation is known to cause injection amyloidosis and our data may help in designing lead drug molecules and development of potential therapeutic strategies.

  6. Mechanistic insights into the antileukemic activity of hyperforin.

    PubMed

    Billard, C; Merhi, F; Bauvois, B

    2013-01-01

    Hyperforin is a prenylated phloroglucinol present in the medicinal plant St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum). The compound has many biological properties, including antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antitumor activities. This review focuses on the in vitro antileukemic effects of purified hyperforin and related mechanisms in chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - conditions that are known for their resistance to chemotherapy. Hyperforin induces apoptosis in both CLL and AML cells. In AML cell lines and primary AML cells, hyperforin directly inhibits the kinase activity of the serine/threonine protein kinase B/AKT1, leading to activation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bad through its non-phosphorylation by AKT1. In primary CLL cells, hyperforin acts by stimulating the expression of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Noxa (possibly through the inhibition of proteasome activity). Other hyperforin targets include matrix metalloproteinase-2 in AML cells and vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in CLL cells - two mediators of cell migration and angiogenesis. In summary, hyperforin targets molecules involved in signaling pathways that control leukemic cell proliferation, survival, apoptosis, migration and angiogenesis. Hyperforin also downregulates the expression of P-glycoprotein, a protein that is involved in the resistance of leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Lastly, native hyperforin and its stable derivatives show interesting in vivo properties in animal models. In view of their low toxicity, hyperforin and its derivatives are promising antileukemic agents and deserve further investigation in vivo.

  7. Mechanistic insights to the cytotoxicity of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Rárová, Lucie; Strnad, Miroslav; Bastida, Jaume; van Staden, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    With over 500 individual compounds, the Amaryllidaceae alkaloids represent a large and structurally diverse group of phytochemicals. Coupled to this structural diversity is the significant array of biological properties manifested by many of its members, of which their relevance in motor neuron disease and cancer chemotherapy has attracted considerable attention. To this extent, galanthamine has evolved into a successful commercial drug for Alzheimer's disease since its approval by the FDA in 2001. Concurrently, there have been several positive indicators for the emergence of an anticancer drug from the Amaryllidaceae due to the potency of several of its representatives as cell line specific antiproliferative agents. In this regard, the phenanthridones such as pancratistatin and narciclasine have offered most promise since their advancement into clinical trials, following which there has been renewed interest in the cytotoxic properties of these alkaloids. Given this background, this review seeks to highlight the various mechanisms which have been invoked to corroborate the cytotoxic effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.

  8. Insights on the Application of the Retro Michael-Type Addition on Maleimide-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles in Biology and Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Max R; Winger, Kathleen T; Ghiassian, Sara; Gobbo, Pierangelo; Workentin, Mark S

    2016-03-16

    The glutathione-mediated retro Michael-type addition reaction is demonstrated to take place at the interface of small water-soluble maleimide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Maleimide-AuNP). The retro Michael-type addition reaction can be blocked by hydrolyzing the Michael addition thioether adduct at the nanoparticle's interface under reaction conditions that do not cause AuNP decomposition. This procedure "locks" the molecule of interest onto the Maleimide-AuNP template for potential uses in medical imaging and bioconjugation, ensuring no loss of the molecular cargo from the nanocarrier. On the other hand, the glutathione-mediated retro Michael-type addition reaction can be exploited for delivering a molecular payload. As a proof of concept, a fluorogenic molecular cargo was incorporated onto a Maleimide-AuNP and delivered via the glutathione-mediated retro Michael-type addition reaction.

  9. Non-innocent additives in a palladium(II)-catalyzed C-H bond activation reaction: insights into multimetallic active catalysts.

    PubMed

    Anand, Megha; Sunoj, Raghavan B; Schaefer, Henry F

    2014-04-16

    The role of a widely employed additive (AgOAc) in a palladium acetate-catalyzed ortho-C-H bond activation reaction has been examined using the M06 density functional theory. A new hetero-bimetallic Pd-(μ-OAc)3-Ag is identified as the most likely active species. This finding could have far-reaching implications with respect to the notion of the active species in palladium catalysis in the presence of other metal salt additives.

  10. Mechanistic investigations of the ethylene tetramerisation reaction.

    PubMed

    Overett, Matthew J; Blann, Kevin; Bollmann, Annette; Dixon, John T; Haasbroek, Daleen; Killian, Esna; Maumela, Hulisani; McGuinness, David S; Morgan, David H

    2005-08-03

    The unprecedented selective tetramerisation of ethylene to 1-octene was recently reported. In the present study various mechanistic aspects of this novel transformation were investigated. The unusually high 1-octene selectivity in chromium-catalyzed ethylene tetramerisation reactions is caused by the unique extended metallacyclic mechanism in operation. Both 1-octene and higher 1-alkenes are formed by further ethylene insertion into a metallacycloheptane intermediate, whereas 1-hexene is formed by elimination from this species as in other reported trimerisation reactions. This is supported by deuterium labeling studies, analysis of the molar distribution of 1-alkene products, and identification of secondary co-oligomerization reaction products. In addition, the formation of two C6 cyclic products, methylenecyclopentane and methylcyclopentane, is discussed, and a bimetallic disproportionation mechanism to account for the available data is proposed.

  11. Insight into self-discharge of layered lithium-rich oxide cathode in carbonate-based electrolytes with and without additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianhui; Xing, Lidan; Zhang, Liping; Yu, Le; Fan, Weizhen; Xu, Mengqing; Li, Weishan

    2016-08-01

    Self-discharge behavior of layered lithium-rich oxide as cathode of lithium ion battery in a carbonated-based electrolyte is understood, and a simple boron-containing compound, trimethyl borate (TMB), is used as an electrolyte additive to suppress this self-discharge. It is found that layered lithium-rich oxide charged under 4.8 V in additive-free electrolyte suffers severe self-discharge and TMB is an effective electrolyte additive for self-discharge suppression. Physical characterizations from XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS and ICP-MS demonstrate that the crystal structure of the layered lithium-rich oxide collapses due to the chemical interaction between the charged oxide and electrolyte. When TMB is applied, the structural integrity of the oxide is maintained due to the protective cathode film generated from the preferential oxidation of TMB.

  12. Nutrient limitation in three lowland tropical forests in southern China receiving high nitrogen deposition: insights from fine root responses to nutrient additions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feifei; Yoh, Muneoki; Gilliam, Frank S; Lu, Xiankai; Mo, Jiangming

    2013-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition to tropical forests may accelerate ecosystem phosphorus (P) limitation. This study examined responses of fine root biomass, nutrient concentrations, and acid phosphatase activity (APA) of bulk soil to five years of N and P additions in one old-growth and two younger lowland tropical forests in southern China. The old-growth forest had higher N capital than the two younger forests from long-term N accumulation. From February 2007 to July 2012, four experimental treatments were established at the following levels: Control, N-addition (150 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)), P-addition (150 kg P ha(-1) yr(-1)) and N+P-addition (150 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) plus 150 kg P ha(-1) yr(-1)). We hypothesized that fine root growth in the N-rich old-growth forest would be limited by P availability, and in the two younger forests would primarily respond to N additions due to large plant N demand. Results showed that five years of N addition significantly decreased live fine root biomass only in the old-growth forest (by 31%), but significantly elevated dead fine root biomass in all the three forests (by 64% to 101%), causing decreased live fine root proportion in the old-growth and the pine forests. P addition significantly increased live fine root biomass in all three forests (by 20% to 76%). The combined N and P treatment significantly increased live fine root biomass in the two younger forests but not in the old-growth forest. These results suggest that fine root growth in all three study forests appeared to be P-limited. This was further confirmed by current status of fine root N:P ratios, APA in bulk soil, and their responses to N and P treatments. Moreover, N addition significantly increased APA only in the old-growth forest, consistent with the conclusion that the old-growth forest was more P-limited than the younger forests.

  13. New chemical insights using weakly supported voltammetry: the reductive cleavage of Aryl-Br bonds is reversible.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G

    2012-10-22

    Cyclic voltammetry carried out at a wide range of supporting electrolyte concentrations and compositions can elucidate additional kinetic and mechanistic details of the electrochemical reduction of aryl halides. The cleavage of the C-Br bond is reversible, driven by H abstraction and the second electron transfer. This is a new chemical insight, as the cleavage of such bonds has usually been regarded as irreversible.

  14. HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Moe

    2010-07-01

    The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

  15. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course.

    PubMed

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Hayes, Richard B; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M; Crout, Richard J; Marazita, Mary L; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D; Fox, Caroline S; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Demerath, Ellen W; Dyer, Thomas D; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Zillikens, M Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E; Cupples, L Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I

    2013-09-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10⁻⁸) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10⁻²³), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10⁻¹⁷), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10⁻¹⁷), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10⁻¹¹), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10⁻⁹), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10⁻⁸) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10⁻⁸) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10⁻⁵ after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18-90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M.; Crout, Richard J.; Marazita, Mary L.; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P.; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10−8) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10−23), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10−17), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10−17), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10−11), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10−9), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10−8) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10−8) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10−5 after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18–90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages. PMID:23669352

  17. INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC INFORMATION IN THE ARSENIC PBPK MODEL DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    INCORPORATING MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS IN A PBPK MODEL FOR ARSENIC

    Elaina M. Kenyon, Michael F. Hughes, Marina V. Evans, David J. Thomas, U.S. EPA; Miroslav Styblo, University of North Carolina; Michael Easterling, Analytical Sciences, Inc.

    A physiologically based phar...

  18. Mechanistic simulation of the vertical soil organic matter profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, M.; Beer, C.; Reichstein, M.; Hoosbeek, M.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes a large global pool of carbon that may play a considerable role for future climate. The vertical distribution of SOM in the profile may be important due to depth-dependence of physical, chemical, and biological conditions, and links to physical processes such as heat and moisture transport. The aim of this thesis is to develop a dynamic and mechanistic representation of the vertical SOM profile that can be applied for large scale simulations as a part of global ecosystem and earth system models. A model structure called SOMPROF was developed that dynamically simulates the SOM profile based on above and below ground litter input, decomposition, bioturbation, and liquid phase transport. Furthermore, three organic surface horizons are explicitly represented. Since the organic matter transport processes have been poorly quantified in the past and are difficult to observe directly, the model was calibrated with a Bayesian approach for two contrasting temperate forest sites in Europe. Different types of data were included in the parameter estimation, including: organic carbon stocks and concentrations, respiration rates, and excess lead-210 activity. The calibrations yielded good fits to the observations, and showed that the two sites differ considerably with respect to the relevance of the different processes. These differences agree well with expectations based on local conditions. However, the results also demonstrate the difficulties arising from convolution of the processes. Several parameters are poorly constrained and for one of the sites, several distinct regions in parameter space exist that yield acceptable fit. In a subsequent study it was found that radiocarbon observations can offer much additional constraint on several parameters, most importantly on the turnover rate of the slowest SOM fraction. Additionally, for one site, a prognostic simulation until 2100 was performed using the resulting a posteriori parameter

  19. Rational and Mechanistic Perspectives on Reinforcement Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This special issue describes important recent developments in applying reinforcement learning models to capture neural and cognitive function. But reinforcement learning, as a theoretical framework, can apply at two very different levels of description: "mechanistic" and "rational." Reinforcement learning is often viewed in mechanistic terms--as…

  20. New insights into the electroreduction of ethylene sulfite as an electrolyte additive for facilitating solid electrolyte interphase formation in lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Youmin; Wang, Yixuan

    2017-03-01

    To help understand the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation facilitated by electrolyte additives of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) the supermolecular clusters [(ES)Li(+)(PC)m](PC)n (m = 1-2; n = 0, 6 and 9) were used to investigate the electroreductive decompositions of the electrolyte additive ethylene sulfite (ES) as well as the solvent propylene carbonate (PC) with density functional theory. The results show that ES can be reduced prior to PC, resulting in a reduction precursor that will then undergo a ring opening decomposition to yield a radical anion. A new concerted pathway (path B) was located for the ring opening of the reduced ES, which has a much lower energy barrier than the previously reported stepwise pathway (path A). The transition state for the ring opening of PC induced by the reduced ES (path C, indirect path) is closer to that of path A than path B in energy. The direct ring opening of the reduced PC (path D) has a lower energy barrier than paths A, B and C, yet it is less favorable than the latter paths in terms of thermodynamics (vertical electron affinity or reduction potential and dissociation energy). The overall rate constant including the initial reduction and the subsequent ring opening for path B is the largest among the four paths, followed by paths A > C > D, which further signifies the importance of the concerted new path in facilitating the SEI formation. The hybrid models, the supermolecular clusters augmented by a polarized continuum model, PCM-[(ES)Li(+)(PC)2](PC)n (n = 0, 6 and 9), were used to further estimate the reduction potential by taking into account both explicit and implicit solvent effects. The second solvation shell of Li(+) in [(ES)Li(+)(PC)2](PC)n (n = 6 and 9) partially compensates the overestimation of solvent effects arising from the PCM for the naked (ES)Li(+)(PC)2, and the theoretical reduction potential of PCM-[(ES)Li(+)(PC)2](PC)6 (1.90-1.93 V) agrees very well with the experimental one (1.8-2.0 V).

  1. Insight into the electrochemical behaviors of 5V-class high-voltage batteries composed of lithium-rich layered oxide with multifunctional additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sang Hoo; Cho, Woosuk; Kim, Young-Jun; Yim, Taeeun

    2016-12-01

    (Trimethylsilyl)methanesulfonate (TMSOMs), functionalized with task-specific chemical moieties, is proposed as an interface-stabilizing additive to improve the electrochemical performance of 5V-class layered over-lithiated oxides (OLOs). TMSOMs offers a great opportunity to enhance the interfacial stability of an OLO material by providing an effective protective layer composed of sbnd SO3sbnd and sbnd Osbnd Sisbnd functional groups after its electrochemical oxidation over 4.0 V (vs. Li/Li+), which remarkably reduces the internal pressure of the cell associated with electrolyte decomposition. As a result, the cell employing TMSOMs affords excellent capacity retention (92.8% at 100 cycles) together with considerable rate performance, negligible transition metal dissolution, and stable high temperature performance based on its enhanced interfacial stability. These results are attributed to the synergistic effects of the sbnd SO3sbnd and sbnd Osbnd Sisbnd functional groups that once the sulfonic ester-based protective layer is developed on the electrode surface, it effectively mitigates decomposition of the electrolyte, while the sbnd Osbnd Sisbnd functional groups readily scavenge fluoride species in the electrolyte, leading to outstanding interfacial stability for the OLO material. On the basis of spectroscopic evidence, a comprehensive mechanism for the action of TMSOMs is suggested considering the specific role of each functional group.

  2. Bridging Mechanistic and Phenomenological Models of Complex Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Transtrum, Mark K.; Qiu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The inherent complexity of biological systems gives rise to complicated mechanistic models with a large number of parameters. On the other hand, the collective behavior of these systems can often be characterized by a relatively small number of phenomenological parameters. We use the Manifold Boundary Approximation Method (MBAM) as a tool for deriving simple phenomenological models from complicated mechanistic models. The resulting models are not black boxes, but remain expressed in terms of the microscopic parameters. In this way, we explicitly connect the macroscopic and microscopic descriptions, characterize the equivalence class of distinct systems exhibiting the same range of collective behavior, and identify the combinations of components that function as tunable control knobs for the behavior. We demonstrate the procedure for adaptation behavior exhibited by the EGFR pathway. From a 48 parameter mechanistic model, the system can be effectively described by a single adaptation parameter τ characterizing the ratio of time scales for the initial response and recovery time of the system which can in turn be expressed as a combination of microscopic reaction rates, Michaelis-Menten constants, and biochemical concentrations. The situation is not unlike modeling in physics in which microscopically complex processes can often be renormalized into simple phenomenological models with only a few effective parameters. The proposed method additionally provides a mechanistic explanation for non-universal features of the behavior. PMID:27187545

  3. Mechanistic Approach to Understanding the Toxicity of the Azole Fungicide Triadimefon to a Nontarget Aquatic Insect and Implications for Exposure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We utilized mechanistic and stereoselective based in vitro metabolism assays and sublethal exposures of triadimefon to gain insight into the extent of carbonyl reduction and the toxic mode of action of triadimefon with black fly (Diptera: Simuliidae) larvae.

  4. An enhanced plant lipidomics method based on multiplexed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry reveals additional insights into cold- and drought-induced membrane remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tarazona, Pablo; Feussner, Kirstin; Feussner, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    Within the lipidome of plants a few bulk molecular species hamper the detection of the rest, which are present at relatively low levels. In addition, low-abundance species are often masked by numerous isobaric interferences, such as those caused by isoelemental species and isotopologues. This scenario not only means that minor species are underrepresented, but also leads to potential misidentifications and limits the structural information gathered by lipidomics approaches. In order to overcome these limitations we have developed a multiplexed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry lipidomics platform able to achieve an enhanced coverage of plant lipidomes. The platform is based on a single extraction step followed by a series of ultra-performance liquid chromatography separations. Post-column flow is then directed to both a triple quadrupole analyzer for targeted profiling and a time-of-flight analyzer for accurate mass analysis. As a proof of concept, plants were subjected to cold or drought, which are known to trigger widespread remodeling events in plant cell membranes. Analysis of the leaf lipidome yielded 393 molecular species within 23 different lipid classes. This enhanced coverage allowed us to identify lipid molecular species and even classes that are altered upon stress, allowing hypotheses on role of glycosylinositolphosphoceramides (GIPC), steryl glycosides (SG) and acylated steryl glycosides (ASG) in drought stress to be addressed and confirming the findings from numerous previous studies with a single, wide-ranging lipidomics approach. This extended our knowledge on membrane remodeling during the drought response, integrating sphingolipids and sterol lipids into the current glycerolipid-based model.

  5. Noncanonical IFN Signaling: Mechanistic Linkage of Genetic and Epigenetic Events

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Chulbul M.

    2016-01-01

    The canonical model of cytokine signaling via the JAK/STAT pathway dominates our view of signal transduction but provides no insight into the significance of the simultaneous presence of activated JAKs and STATs in the nucleus of cells treated with cytokines. Such a mechanistic shortcoming challenges the usefulness of the model in its present form. Focusing on the interferon (IFN) cytokines, we have developed a noncanonical model of IFN signaling that naturally connects activated JAKs and STATs at or near response elements of genes that are activated by the IFNs. Specifically, cells treated with IFNγ showed association of activated STAT1α and JAK2 at the GAS element of genes activated by IFNγ. For IFNα treated cells, the association involved activated STAT1α and TYK2 JAK kinase at the ISRE promoter. The power of the noncanonical model is that it provides mechanistic insight into specific gene activation at the level of the associated epigenetics, akin to that of steroid/steroid receptor signaling. PMID:28077919

  6. Advancements in the mechanistic understanding of the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Berg, Regina; Straub, Bernd F

    2013-12-02

    The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is one of the most broadly applicable and easy-to-handle reactions in the arsenal of organic chemistry. However, the mechanistic understanding of this reaction has lagged behind the plethora of its applications for a long time. As reagent mixtures of copper salts and additives are commonly used in CuAAC reactions, the structure of the catalytically active species itself has remained subject to speculation, which can be attributed to the multifaceted aggregation chemistry of copper(I) alkyne and acetylide complexes. Following an introductory section on common catalyst systems in CuAAC reactions, this review will highlight experimental and computational studies from early proposals to very recent and more sophisticated investigations, which deliver more detailed insights into the CuAAC's catalytic cycle and the species involved. As diverging mechanistic views are presented in articles, books and online resources, we intend to present the research efforts in this field during the past decade and finally give an up-to-date picture of the currently accepted dinuclear mechanism of CuAAC. Additionally, we hope to inspire research efforts on the development of molecularly defined copper(I) catalysts with defined structural characteristics, whose main advantage in contrast to the regularly used precatalyst reagent mixtures is twofold: on the one hand, the characteristics of molecularly defined, well soluble catalysts can be tuned according to the particular requirements of the experiment; on the other hand, the understanding of the CuAAC reaction mechanism can be further advanced by kinetic studies and the isolation and characterization of key intermediates.

  7. Advancements in the mechanistic understanding of the copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary The copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is one of the most broadly applicable and easy-to-handle reactions in the arsenal of organic chemistry. However, the mechanistic understanding of this reaction has lagged behind the plethora of its applications for a long time. As reagent mixtures of copper salts and additives are commonly used in CuAAC reactions, the structure of the catalytically active species itself has remained subject to speculation, which can be attributed to the multifaceted aggregation chemistry of copper(I) alkyne and acetylide complexes. Following an introductory section on common catalyst systems in CuAAC reactions, this review will highlight experimental and computational studies from early proposals to very recent and more sophisticated investigations, which deliver more detailed insights into the CuAAC’s catalytic cycle and the species involved. As diverging mechanistic views are presented in articles, books and online resources, we intend to present the research efforts in this field during the past decade and finally give an up-to-date picture of the currently accepted dinuclear mechanism of CuAAC. Additionally, we hope to inspire research efforts on the development of molecularly defined copper(I) catalysts with defined structural characteristics, whose main advantage in contrast to the regularly used precatalyst reagent mixtures is twofold: on the one hand, the characteristics of molecularly defined, well soluble catalysts can be tuned according to the particular requirements of the experiment; on the other hand, the understanding of the CuAAC reaction mechanism can be further advanced by kinetic studies and the isolation and characterization of key intermediates. PMID:24367437

  8. Negative mechanistic reasoning in medical intervention assessment.

    PubMed

    Jerkert, Jesper

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, mechanistic reasoning has been assigned a negligible role in standard EBM (evidence-based medicine) literature, although some recent authors have argued for an upgrade. Even so, the mechanistic reasoning that has received attention has almost exclusively been positive--both in an epistemic sense of claiming that there is a mechanistic chain and in a health-related sense of there being claimed benefits for the patient. Negative mechanistic reasoning has been neglected, both in the epistemic and in the health-related sense. I distinguish three main types of negative mechanistic reasoning and subsume them under a new definition of mechanistic reasoning in the context of assessing medical interventions. This definition is wider than a previous suggestion in the literature. Each negative type corresponds to a range of evidential strengths, and it is argued that there are differences with respect to typical evidential strengths. The variety of negative mechanistic reasoning should be acknowledged in EBM, and it presents a serious challenge to proponents of so-called medical hierarchies of evidence.

  9. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA): piloting ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Modem methods in molecular biology and advanced computational tools show promise in elucidating complex interactions that occur between genes and environmental factors in diseases such as asthma; however appropriately designed studies are critical for these methods to reach their full potential. Objective: We used a case-control study to investigate whether genomic data (blood gene expression), viewed together with a spectrum of exposure effects and susceptibility markers (blood, urine and nail), can provide a mechanistic explanation for the increased susceptibility of asthmatics to ambient air pollutants. Methods: We studied 205 non-asthmatic and asthmatic children, (9-12 years of age) who participated in a clinical study in Detroit, Michigan. The study combines a traditional epidemiological design with an integrative approach to investigate the environmental exposure of children to indoor-outdoor air. The study includes measurements of internal dose (metals, allergen specific IgE, PAH and VOC metabolites) and clinical measures of health outcome (immunological, cardiovascular and respiratory). Results: Expected immunological indications of asthma have been obtained. In addition, initial results from our analyses point to the complex nature of childhood health and risk factors linked to metabolic syndrome (obesity, blood pressure and dyslipidemia). For example, 31% and 34% of the asthmatic MICA subjects were either overweight (BMI > 25) o

  10. Insights into large-scale cell-culture reactors: I. Liquid mixing and oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Sieblist, Christian; Jenzsch, Marco; Pohlscheidt, Michael; Lübbert, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, it is state of the art to produce recombinant proteins and antibodies with animal-cell cultures using bioreactors with volumes of up to 20 m(3) . Recent guidelines and position papers for the industry by the US FDA and the European Medicines Agency stress the necessity of mechanistic insights into large-scale bioreactors. A detailed mechanistic view of their practically relevant subsystems is required as well as their mutual interactions, i.e., mixing or homogenization of the culture broth and sufficient mass and heat transfer. In large-scale bioreactors for animal-cell cultures, different agitation systems are employed. Here, we discuss details of the flows induced in stirred tank reactors relevant for animal-cell cultures. In addition, solutions of the governing fluid dynamic equations obtained with the so-called computational fluid dynamics are presented. Experimental data obtained with improved measurement techniques are shown. The results are compared to previous studies and it is found that they support current hypotheses or models. Progress in improving insights requires continuous interactions between more accurate measurements and physical models. The paper aims at promoting the basic mechanistic understanding of transport phenomena that are crucial for large-scale animal-cell culture reactors.

  11. A framework for recognizing mechanistic reasoning in student scientific inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Rosemary S.

    A central ambition of science education reform is to help students develop abilities for scientific inquiry. Education research is thus rightly focused on defining what constitutes "inquiry" and developing tools for assessing it. There has been progress with respect to particular aspects of inquiry, namely student abilities for controlled experimentation and scientific argumentation. However, we suggest that in addition to these frameworks for assessing the structure of inquiry we need frameworks for analyzing the substance of that inquiry. In this work we draw attention to and evaluate the substance of student mechanistic reasoning. Both within the history and philosophy of science and within science education research, scientific inquiry is characterized in part as understanding the causal mechanisms that underlie natural phenomena. The challenge for science education, however, is that there has not been the same progress with respect to making explicit what constitutes mechanistic reasoning as there has been in making explicit other aspects of inquiry. This dissertation attempts to address this challenge. We adapt an account of mechanism in professional research science to develop a framework for reliably recognizing mechanistic reasoning in student discourse. The coding scheme articulates seven specific aspects of mechanistic reasoning and can be used to systematically analyze narrative data for patterns in student thinking. It provides a tool for detecting quality reasoning that may be overlooked by more traditional assessments. We apply the mechanism coding scheme to video and written data from a range of student inquiries, from large group discussions among first grade students to the individual problem solving of graduate students. While the primary result of this work is the coding scheme itself and the finding that it provides a reliable means of analyzing transcript data for evidence of mechanistic thinking, the rich descriptions we develop in each case

  12. Mechanistic Models for Soot Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-02

    This data is plotted in Fig. 1 along with k for the reverse diels - alder reaction (obtained from detailed balancing and the rate data from Benson and...extrapolation of the retro diels - alder rate constant at lower temperatures, the overall activation energy is significantly higher and the pre-exponential is...has suggested that the acetylene addition processes may be related to the reverse diels -ader reaction of acetylene addition to CPD to form

  13. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from the natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  14. Mechanistic equations for membrane transport of multicomponent solutions.

    PubMed

    Suchanek, G

    2006-03-01

    In the present article, mechanistic equations for membrane transport of N + 1-component solutions have been derived. The major specific investigation result is the introduction - for ternary solutions - of two diffusion coefficients omega(d1) and omega(d2) for solutes, as well as two cross coefficients omega(d12) and omega(d21) for these solutes. The latter parameters may be treated as coefficients of interdiffusion. The expansion of the description of substance transport to include the N + 1-component solutions does not formulate any additional physical phenomena other than those which are formulated by the transport equations for three-component solutions.

  15. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  16. Non-directed aromatic C–H amination: catalytic and mechanistic studies enabled by Pd catalyst and reagent design†

    PubMed Central

    Bandara, H. M. D.; Jin, D.; Mantell, M. A.; Field, K. D.; Wang, A.; Narayanan, R. P.; Deskins, N. A.; Emmert, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript describes the systematic development of pyridine-type ligands, which promote the Pd catalyzed, non-directed amination of benzene in combination with novel, hydroxylamine-based electrophilic amination reagents. DFT calculations and mechanistic experiments provide insights into the factors influencing the arene C–H amination protocol. PMID:28066540

  17. Applying mechanistic models in bioprocess development.

    PubMed

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Bodla, Vijaya Krishna; Carlquist, Magnus; Heins, Anna-Lena; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist V

    2013-01-01

    The available knowledge on the mechanisms of a bioprocess system is central to process analytical technology. In this respect, mechanistic modeling has gained renewed attention, since a mechanistic model can provide an excellent summary of available process knowledge. Such a model therefore incorporates process-relevant input (critical process variables)-output (product concentration and product quality attributes) relations. The model therefore has great value in planning experiments, or in determining which critical process variables need to be monitored and controlled tightly. Mechanistic models should be combined with proper model analysis tools, such as uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. When assuming distributed inputs, the resulting uncertainty in the model outputs can be decomposed using sensitivity analysis to determine which input parameters are responsible for the major part of the output uncertainty. Such information can be used as guidance for experimental work; i.e., only parameters with a significant influence on model outputs need to be determined experimentally. The use of mechanistic models and model analysis tools is demonstrated in this chapter. As a practical case study, experimental data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentations are used. The data are described with the well-known model of Sonnleitner and Käppeli (Biotechnol Bioeng 28:927-937, 1986) and the model is analyzed further. The methods used are generic, and can be transferred easily to other, more complex case studies as well.

  18. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study has been designed to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to examine the physiological and environmental factors that interact to increase the risk of asthmatic responses. MICA is primarily a clinically-bases obser...

  19. Reductive photocarboxylation of phenanthrene: A mechanistic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaitchik, A.V.; Rodgers, M.A.J.; Neckers, D.C.

    1996-02-09

    Mechanistic aspects of photochemicl reactions between phenathrene and carbon dioxide while in the presence of N,N-dimethylaniline was studied. Five products were produced as characterized by NMR and GC-MS. The authors related changes in product yields to changes in reaction conditions. 31 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects.

    PubMed

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R

    2015-11-22

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg(-1)) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes.

  1. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  2. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects

    PubMed Central

    Maino, James L.; Kearney, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg−1) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes. PMID:26609084

  3. Inositol 5-phosphatases: insights from the Lowe syndrome protein OCRL.

    PubMed

    Pirruccello, Michelle; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-04-01

    The precise regulation of phosphoinositide lipids in cellular membranes is crucial for cellular survival and function. Inositol 5-phosphatases have been implicated in a variety of disorders, including various cancers, obesity, type 2 diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and rare genetic conditions. Despite the obvious impact on human health, relatively little structural and biochemical information is available for this family. Here, we review recent structural and mechanistic work on the 5-phosphatases with a focus on OCRL, whose loss of function results in oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe and Dent 2 disease. Studies of OCRL emphasize how the actions of 5-phosphatases rely on both intrinsic and extrinsic membrane recognition properties for full catalytic function. Additionally, structural analysis of missense mutations in the catalytic domain of OCRL provides insight into the phenotypic heterogeneity observed in Lowe syndrome and Dent disease.

  4. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  5. Toward mechanistic classification of enzyme functions.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2011-06-01

    Classification of enzyme function should be quantitative, computationally accessible, and informed by sequences and structures to enable use of genomic information for functional inference and other applications. Large-scale studies have established that divergently evolved enzymes share conserved elements of structure and common mechanistic steps and that convergently evolved enzymes often converge to similar mechanisms too, suggesting that reaction mechanisms could be used to develop finer-grained functional descriptions than provided by the Enzyme Commission (EC) system currently in use. Here we describe how evolution informs these structure-function mappings and review the databases that store mechanisms of enzyme reactions along with recent developments to measure ligand and mechanistic similarities. Together, these provide a foundation for new classifications of enzyme function.

  6. New mechanistic interpretations for nitrone reactivity.

    PubMed

    Merino, Pedro; Tejero, Tomás; Delso, Ignacio; Matute, Rosa

    2017-03-22

    The reactivity of nitrones in cycloadditions and related reactions is revisited by introducing a topological perspective. In particular, the study of electron localization function (ELF) along a reaction pathway allows evaluating bond reorganization showing that in several cases the bonds are formed in a sequential way, the second one being formed once the first one is already formed. Both classical 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions and Mannich-type reactions revealed unexpected features often underestimated in classical mechanistic studies.

  7. Infection and atherosclerosis: emerging mechanistic paradigms.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S E; Zhou, Y F; Zhu, J

    1999-07-27

    Although definitive proof of a causal role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Moreover, both Chlamydia pneumoniae and cytomegalovirus exacerbate lesion development in animal models of atherosclerosis and restenosis. The fact that multiple pathogens have been associated with atherosclerosis implies that many "atherogenic" pathogens exist, and recent data suggest that the risk of atherosclerosis conveyed by infection relates to the number of atherogenic pathogens with which an individual is infected. It also is evident that variability in host susceptibility to the atherogenic effects of pathogens exists; this variability appears to be related at least in part to whether the host can generate an immune response that successfully controls pathogen inflammatory activity and in part to the specific pattern of immune response--humoral or cellular. The latter may relate to host capacity to control pathogen activity and to a pathogen-induced autoimmune component of the atherogenic process. Additional animal and human studies are necessary to further test the validity of the infection/atherosclerosis link and to provide more insight into the mechanisms by which infection may contribute to atherosclerosis, information critical for devising strategies to reduce or eliminate any contribution to atherosclerosis caused by infection.

  8. New web-based applications for mechanistic case diagramming.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R; Haugen, Thomas H; Kreiter, Clarence D

    2014-01-01

    The goal of mechanistic case diagraming (MCD) is to provide students with more in-depth understanding of cause and effect relationships and basic mechanistic pathways in medicine. This will enable them to better explain how observed clinical findings develop from preceding pathogenic and pathophysiological events. The pedagogic function of MCD is in relating risk factors, disease entities and morphology, signs and symptoms, and test and procedure findings in a specific case scenario with etiologic pathogenic and pathophysiological sequences within a flow diagram. In this paper, we describe the addition of automation and predetermined lists to further develop the original concept of MCD as described by Engelberg in 1992 and Guerrero in 2001. We demonstrate that with these modifications, MCD is effective and efficient in small group case-based teaching for second-year medical students (ratings of ~3.4 on a 4.0 scale). There was also a significant correlation with other measures of competency, with a 'true' score correlation of 0.54. A traditional calculation of reliability showed promising results (α =0.47) within a low stakes, ungraded environment. Further, we have demonstrated MCD's potential for use in independent learning and TBL. Future studies are needed to evaluate MCD's potential for use in medium stakes assessment or self-paced independent learning and assessment. MCD may be especially relevant in returning students to the application of basic medical science mechanisms in the clinical years.

  9. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the conserved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. Our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  10. A data-intensive approach to mechanistic elucidation applied to chiral anion catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Milo, Anat; Neel, Andrew J.; Toste, F. Dean; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of chemical reaction mechanisms can facilitate catalyst optimization, but extracting that knowledge from a complex system is often challenging. Here we present a data-intensive method for deriving and then predictively applying a mechanistic model of an enantioselective organic reaction. As a validating case study, we selected an intramolecular dehydrogenative C-N coupling reaction, catalyzed by chiral phosphoric acid derivatives, in which catalyst-substrate association involves weak, non-covalent interactions. Little was previously understood regarding the structural origin of enantioselectivity in this system. Catalyst and substrate substituent effects were probed by systematic physical organic trend analysis. Plausible interactions between the substrate and catalyst that govern enantioselectivity were identified and supported experimentally, indicating that such an approach can afford an efficient means of leveraging mechanistic insight to optimize catalyst design. PMID:25678656

  11. Mechanistic studies of carbon monoxide reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, G.L.

    1990-06-12

    The progress made during the current grant period (1 January 1988--1 April 1990) in three different areas of research is summarized. The research areas are: (1) oxidatively-induced double carbonylation reactions to form {alpha}-ketoacyl complexes and studies of the reactivity of the resulting compounds, (2) mechanistic studies of the carbonylation of nitroaromatics to form isocyanates, carbamates, and ureas, and (3) studies of the formation and reactivity of unusual metallacycles and alkylidene ligands supported on binuclear iron carbonyl fragments. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Mechanistic facility safety and source term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-06-09

    A PC-based computer program was created for facility safety and source term analysis at Hanford The program has been successfully applied to mechanistic prediction of source terms from chemical reactions in underground storage tanks, hydrogen combustion in double contained receiver tanks, and proccss evaluation including the potential for runaway reactions in spent nuclear fuel processing. Model features include user-defined facility room, flow path geometry, and heat conductors, user-defined non-ideal vapor and aerosol species, pressure- and density-driven gas flows, aerosol transport and deposition, and structure to accommodate facility-specific source terms. Example applications are presented here.

  13. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distribution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  14. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations hav e been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are pr esented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical sig nificance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distr ibution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  15. Mechanistic Perspectives of Maslinic Acid in Targeting Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Wei Hsum; Lim, Yang Mooi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation drives the development of various pathological diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. The arachidonic acid pathway represents one of the major mechanisms for inflammation. Prostaglandins (PGs) are lipid products generated from arachidonic acid by the action of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and their activity is blocked by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). The use of natural compounds in regulation of COX activity/prostaglandins production is receiving increasing attention. In Mediterranean diet, olive oil and table olives contain significant dietary sources of maslinic acid. Maslinic acid is arising as a safe and novel natural pentacyclic triterpene which has protective effects against chronic inflammatory diseases in various in vivo and in vitro experimental models. Understanding the anti-inflammatory mechanism of maslinic acid is crucial for its development as a potential dietary nutraceutical. This review focuses on the mechanistic action of maslinic acid in regulating the inflammation pathways through modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolism including the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)/COX-2 expression, upstream protein kinase signaling, and phospholipase A2 enzyme activity. Further investigations may provide insight into the mechanism of maslinic acid in regulating the molecular targets and their associated pathways in response to specific inflammatory stimuli. PMID:26491566

  16. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division

    PubMed Central

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size. PMID:27456660

  17. Simplified mechanistic models of gene regulation for analysis and design

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Edward J.; Stan, Guy-Bart; Arpino, James A. J.; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-01-01

    Simplified mechanistic models of gene regulation are fundamental to systems biology and essential for synthetic biology. However, conventional simplified models typically have outputs that are not directly measurable and are based on assumptions that do not often hold under experimental conditions. To resolve these issues, we propose a ‘model reduction’ methodology and simplified kinetic models of total mRNA and total protein concentration, which link measurements, models and biochemical mechanisms. The proposed approach is based on assumptions that hold generally and include typical cases in systems and synthetic biology where conventional models do not hold. We use novel assumptions regarding the ‘speed of reactions’, which are required for the methodology to be consistent with experimental data. We also apply the methodology to propose simplified models of gene regulation in the presence of multiple protein binding sites, providing both biological insights and an illustration of the generality of the methodology. Lastly, we show that modelling total protein concentration allows us to address key questions on gene regulation, such as efficiency, burden, competition and modularity. PMID:26063825

  18. A mechanistic physicochemical model of carbon dioxide transport in blood.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, David P; Robbins, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    A number of mathematical models have been produced that, given the Pco2 and Po2 of blood, will calculate the total concentrations for CO2 and O2 in blood. However, all these models contain at least some empirical features, and thus do not represent all of the underlying physicochemical processes in an entirely mechanistic manner. The aim of this study was to develop a physicochemical model of CO2 carriage by the blood to determine whether our understanding of the physical chemistry of the major chemical components of blood together with their interactions is sufficiently strong to predict the physiological properties of CO2 carriage by whole blood. Standard values are used for the ionic composition of the blood, the plasma albumin concentration, and the hemoglobin concentration. All Km values required for the model are taken from the literature. The distribution of bicarbonate, chloride, and H(+) ions across the red blood cell membrane follows that of a Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium. The system of equations that results is solved numerically using constraints for mass balance and electroneutrality. The model reproduces the phenomena associated with CO2 carriage, including the magnitude of the Haldane effect, very well. The structural nature of the model allows various hypothetical scenarios to be explored. Here we examine the effects of 1) removing the ability of hemoglobin to form carbamino compounds; 2) allowing a degree of Cl(-) binding to deoxygenated hemoglobin; and 3) removing the chloride (Hamburger) shift. The insights gained could not have been obtained from empirical models.

  19. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  20. Equation-free mechanistic ecosystem forecasting using empirical dynamic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Beamish, Richard J.; Glaser, Sarah M.; Grant, Sue C. H.; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Richards, Laura J.; Schnute, Jon T.; Sugihara, George

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that current equilibrium-based models fall short as predictive descriptions of natural ecosystems, and particularly of fisheries systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics. For example, model parameters assumed to be fixed constants may actually vary in time, models may fit well to existing data but lack out-of-sample predictive skill, and key driving variables may be misidentified due to transient (mirage) correlations that are common in nonlinear systems. With these frailties, it is somewhat surprising that static equilibrium models continue to be widely used. Here, we examine empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) as an alternative to imposed model equations and that accommodates both nonequilibrium dynamics and nonlinearity. Using time series from nine stocks of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River system in British Columbia, Canada, we perform, for the the first time to our knowledge, real-data comparison of contemporary fisheries models with equivalent EDM formulations that explicitly use spawning stock and environmental variables to forecast recruitment. We find that EDM models produce more accurate and precise forecasts, and unlike extensions of the classic Ricker spawner–recruit equation, they show significant improvements when environmental factors are included. Our analysis demonstrates the strategic utility of EDM for incorporating environmental influences into fisheries forecasts and, more generally, for providing insight into how environmental factors can operate in forecast models, thus paving the way for equation-free mechanistic forecasting to be applied in management contexts. PMID:25733874

  1. From patterns to emerging processes in mechanistic urban ecology.

    PubMed

    Shochat, Eyal; Warren, Paige S; Faeth, Stanley H; McIntyre, Nancy E; Hope, Diane

    2006-04-01

    Rapid urbanization has become an area of crucial concern in conservation owing to the radical changes in habitat structure and loss of species engendered by urban and suburban development. Here, we draw on recent mechanistic ecological studies to argue that, in addition to altered habitat structure, three major processes contribute to the patterns of reduced species diversity and elevated abundance of many species in urban environments. These activities, in turn, lead to changes in animal behavior, morphology and genetics, as well as in selection pressures on animals and plants. Thus, the key to understanding urban patterns is to balance studying processes at the individual level with an integrated examination of environmental forces at the ecosystem scale.

  2. Appropriateness of mechanistic and non-mechanistic models for the application of ultrafiltration to mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Henry; Ghosehajra, Malay

    2007-07-01

    This study asks two questions: (1) How appropriate is the use of a basic filtration equation to the application of ultrafiltration of mixed waste, and (2) How appropriate are non-parametric models for permeate rates (volumes)? To answer these questions, mechanistic and non-mechanistic approaches are developed for permeate rates and volumes associated with an ultrafiltration/mixed waste system in dia-filtration mode. The mechanistic approach is based on a filtration equation which states that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. The coefficients associated with this linear regression are composed of physical/chemical parameters of the system and based the mass balance equation associated with the membrane and associated developing cake layer. For several sets of data, a high correlation is shown that supports the assertion that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. It is also shown that non-mechanistic approaches, i.e., the use of regression models to are not appropriate. One models considered is Q(p) = a*ln(Cb)+b. Regression models are inappropriate because the scale-up from a bench scale (pilot scale) study to full-scale for permeate rates (volumes) is not simply the ratio of the two membrane surface areas. (authors)

  3. Tear gas: an epidemiological and mechanistic reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Craig; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2016-01-01

    Deployments of tear gas and pepper spray have rapidly increased worldwide. Large amounts of tear gas have been used in densely populated cities, including Cairo, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, Manama (Bahrain), and Hong Kong. In the United States, tear gas was used extensively during recent riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Whereas tear gas deployment systems have rapidly improved—with aerial drone systems tested and requested by law enforcement—epidemiological and mechanistic research have lagged behind and have received little attention. Case studies and recent epidemiological studies revealed that tear gas agents can cause lung, cutaneous, and ocular injuries, with individuals affected by chronic morbidities at high risk for complications. Mechanistic studies identified the ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 as targets of capsaicin in pepper spray, and of the tear gas agents chloroacetophenone, CS, and CR. TRPV1 and TRPA1 localize to pain‐sensing peripheral sensory neurons and have been linked to acute and chronic pain, cough, asthma, lung injury, dermatitis, itch, and neurodegeneration. In animal models, transient receptor potential inhibitors show promising effects as potential countermeasures against tear gas injuries. On the basis of the available data, a reassessment of the health risks of tear gas exposures in the civilian population is advised, and development of new countermeasures is proposed. PMID:27391380

  4. Tear gas: an epidemiological and mechanistic reassessment.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Craig; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Svendsen, Erik R; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-08-01

    Deployments of tear gas and pepper spray have rapidly increased worldwide. Large amounts of tear gas have been used in densely populated cities, including Cairo, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, Manama (Bahrain), and Hong Kong. In the United States, tear gas was used extensively during recent riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Whereas tear gas deployment systems have rapidly improved-with aerial drone systems tested and requested by law enforcement-epidemiological and mechanistic research have lagged behind and have received little attention. Case studies and recent epidemiological studies revealed that tear gas agents can cause lung, cutaneous, and ocular injuries, with individuals affected by chronic morbidities at high risk for complications. Mechanistic studies identified the ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 as targets of capsaicin in pepper spray, and of the tear gas agents chloroacetophenone, CS, and CR. TRPV1 and TRPA1 localize to pain-sensing peripheral sensory neurons and have been linked to acute and chronic pain, cough, asthma, lung injury, dermatitis, itch, and neurodegeneration. In animal models, transient receptor potential inhibitors show promising effects as potential countermeasures against tear gas injuries. On the basis of the available data, a reassessment of the health risks of tear gas exposures in the civilian population is advised, and development of new countermeasures is proposed.

  5. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  6. Tertiary and Quaternary Ammonium-Phosphate Ionic Liquids as Lubricant Additives

    DOE PAGES

    Barnhill, William C.; Luo, Huimin; Meyer, III, Harry M; ...

    2016-06-23

    In this work we investigated the feasibility of five quaternary (aprotic) and four tertiary (protic) ammonium ionic liquids (ILs) with an identical organophosphate anion as lubricant antiwear additives. Viscosity, oil solubility, thermal stability, and corrosivity of the candidate ILs were characterized and correlated to the molecular structure. The protic group exhibits higher oil solubility than the aprotic group, and longer alkyl chains seem to provide better oil solubility and higher thermal stability. Selected ILs were applied as oil additives in steel-cast iron tribological tests and demonstrated promising anti-scuffing and anti-wear functionality. The thickness, nanostructure, coverage and composition of the tribofilmmore » formed by the besting performing IL were revealed by surface characterization for mechanistic understanding of the tribochemical interactions between the IL and metal surface. Results provide fundamental insights of the correlations among the molecular structure, physiochemical properties and lubricating performance for ammonium-phosphate ILs.« less

  7. Tertiary and Quaternary Ammonium-Phosphate Ionic Liquids as Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, William C.; Luo, Huimin; Meyer, III, Harry M; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Papke, Brian L.; Qu, Jun

    2016-06-23

    In this work we investigated the feasibility of five quaternary (aprotic) and four tertiary (protic) ammonium ionic liquids (ILs) with an identical organophosphate anion as lubricant antiwear additives. Viscosity, oil solubility, thermal stability, and corrosivity of the candidate ILs were characterized and correlated to the molecular structure. The protic group exhibits higher oil solubility than the aprotic group, and longer alkyl chains seem to provide better oil solubility and higher thermal stability. Selected ILs were applied as oil additives in steel-cast iron tribological tests and demonstrated promising anti-scuffing and anti-wear functionality. The thickness, nanostructure, coverage and composition of the tribofilm formed by the besting performing IL were revealed by surface characterization for mechanistic understanding of the tribochemical interactions between the IL and metal surface. Results provide fundamental insights of the correlations among the molecular structure, physiochemical properties and lubricating performance for ammonium-phosphate ILs.

  8. Structural and Mechanistic Roles of Novel Chemical Ligands on the SdiA Quorum-Sensing Transcription Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Y.; Nguyen, Nam X.; Rogers, Jamie L.; Liao, Jun; MacMillan, John B.; Jiang, Youxing; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2015-05-19

    Bacteria engage in chemical signaling, termed quorum sensing (QS), to mediate intercellular communication, mimicking multicellular organisms. The LuxR family of QS transcription factors regulates gene expression, coordinating population behavior by sensing endogenous acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). However, some bacteria (such as Escherichia coli) do not produce AHLs. These LuxR orphans sense exogenous AHLs but also regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs. Importantly, this AHL-independent regulatory mechanism is still largely unknown. Here we present several structures of one such orphan LuxR-type protein, SdiA, from enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA is actually not in an apo state without AHL but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL), which is ubiquitously found throughout the tree of life and serves as an energy source, signaling molecule, and substrate for membrane biogenesis. While exogenous AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA binding affinity, OCL may function as a chemical chaperone placeholder that stabilizes SdiA, allowing for basal activity. Structural comparison between SdiA-AHL and SdiA-OCL complexes provides crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of AHL-dependent and -independent function of LuxR-type proteins. Importantly, in addition to its contribution to basic science, this work has implications for public health, inasmuch as the SdiA signaling system aids the deadly human pathogen EHEC to adapt to a commensal lifestyle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle, its main reservoir. These studies open exciting and novel avenues to control shedding of this human pathogen in the environment. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing refers to bacterial chemical signaling. The QS acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are recognized by LuxR-type receptors that regulate gene transcription. However, some bacteria have orphan LuxR-type receptors and

  9. Structural and Mechanistic Roles of Novel Chemical Ligands on the SdiA Quorum-Sensing Transcription Regulator

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, Y.; Nguyen, Nam X.; Rogers, Jamie L.; ...

    2015-05-19

    Bacteria engage in chemical signaling, termed quorum sensing (QS), to mediate intercellular communication, mimicking multicellular organisms. The LuxR family of QS transcription factors regulates gene expression, coordinating population behavior by sensing endogenous acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). However, some bacteria (such as Escherichia coli) do not produce AHLs. These LuxR orphans sense exogenous AHLs but also regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs. Importantly, this AHL-independent regulatory mechanism is still largely unknown. Here we present several structures of one such orphan LuxR-type protein, SdiA, from enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), in the presence and absence of AHL. SdiA is actually not inmore » an apo state without AHL but is regulated by a previously unknown endogenous ligand, 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol (OCL), which is ubiquitously found throughout the tree of life and serves as an energy source, signaling molecule, and substrate for membrane biogenesis. While exogenous AHL renders to SdiA higher stability and DNA binding affinity, OCL may function as a chemical chaperone placeholder that stabilizes SdiA, allowing for basal activity. Structural comparison between SdiA-AHL and SdiA-OCL complexes provides crucial mechanistic insights into the ligand regulation of AHL-dependent and -independent function of LuxR-type proteins. Importantly, in addition to its contribution to basic science, this work has implications for public health, inasmuch as the SdiA signaling system aids the deadly human pathogen EHEC to adapt to a commensal lifestyle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of cattle, its main reservoir. These studies open exciting and novel avenues to control shedding of this human pathogen in the environment. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing refers to bacterial chemical signaling. The QS acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are recognized by LuxR-type receptors that regulate gene transcription. However, some bacteria have orphan Lux

  10. Structural and functional analyses of the archaeal tRNA m2G/m22G10 methyltransferase aTrm11 provide mechanistic insights into site specificity of a tRNA methyltransferase that contains common RNA-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akira; Nishiyama, Seiji; Tamura, Toshihiro; Yamauchi, Ayano; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    N2-methylguanosine is one of the most universal modified nucleosides required for proper function in transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules. In archaeal tRNA species, a specific S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent tRNA methyltransferase (MTase), aTrm11, catalyzes formation of N2-methylguanosine and N2,N2-dimethylguanosine at position 10. Here, we report the first X-ray crystal structures of aTrm11 from Thermococcus kodakarensis (Tko), of the apo-form, and of its complex with SAM. The structures show that TkoTrm11 consists of three domains: an N-terminal ferredoxinlike domain (NFLD), THUMP domain and Rossmann-fold MTase (RFM) domain. A linker region connects the THUMP-NFLD and RFM domains. One SAM molecule is bound in the pocket of the RFM domain, suggesting that TkoTrm11 uses a catalytic mechanism similar to that of other tRNA MTases containing an RFM domain. Furthermore, the conformation of NFLD and THUMP domains in TkoTrm11 resembles that of other tRNA-modifying enzymes specifically recognizing the tRNA acceptor stem. Our docking model of TkoTrm11-SAM in complex with tRNA, combined with biochemical analyses and pre-existing evidence, provides insights into the substrate tRNA recognition mechanism: The THUMP domain recognizes a 3′-ACCA end, and the linker region and RFM domain recognize the T-stem, acceptor stem and V-loop of tRNA, thereby causing TkoTrm11 to specifically identify its methylation site. PMID:27325738

  11. On the mechanism of bifunctional squaramide-catalyzed organocatalytic Michael addition: a protonated catalyst as an oxyanion hole.

    PubMed

    Kótai, Bianka; Kardos, György; Hamza, Andrea; Farkas, Viktor; Pápai, Imre; Soós, Tibor

    2014-05-05

    A joint experimental-theoretical study of a bifunctional squaramide-amine-catalyzed Michael addition reaction between 1,3-dioxo nucleophiles and nitrostyrene has been undertaken to gain insight into the nature of bifunctional organocatalytic activation. For this highly stereoselective reaction, three previously proposed mechanistic scenarios for the critical CC bond-formation step were examined. Accordingly, the formation of the major stereoisomeric products is most plausible by one of the bifunctional pathways that involve electrophile activation by the protonated amine group of the catalyst. However, some of the minor product isomers are also accessible through alternative reaction routes. Structural analysis of transition states points to the structural invariance of certain fragments of the transition state, such as the protonated catalyst and the anionic fragment of approaching reactants. Our topological analysis provides deeper insight and a more general understanding of bifunctional noncovalent organocatalysis.

  12. Mechanistic issues in asparagine synthetase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1998-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of asparagine is an ATP-dependent process that utilizes the nitrogen atom derived from either glutamine or ammonia. Despite a long history of kinetic and mechanistic investigation, there is no universally accepted catalytic mechanism for this seemingly straightforward carboxyl group activating enzyme, especially as regards those steps immediately preceding amide bond formation. This chapter considers four issues dealing with the mechanism: (a) the structural organization of the active site(s) partaking in glutamine utilization and aspartate activation; (b) the relationship of asparagine synthetase to other amidotransferases; (c) the way in which ATP is used to activate the beta-carboxyl group; and (d) the detailed mechanism by which nitrogen is transferred.

  13. Obesity, Diabetes and Cancer: A Mechanistic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cifarelli, V; Hursting, SD

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 35% of adults and 20% of children in the United States are obese, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2. Obesity is an established risk factor for many cancers, and obesity-associated metabolic perturbations often manifest in Type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or the metabolic syndrome. As part of the growth-promoting, proinflammatory microenvironment of the obese and/or diabetic state, crosstalk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via metabolically-regulated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators to enhance cancer risk and/or progression. This review synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the associations between obesity, diabetes and cancer, with particular emphasis on enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes. These interrelated pathways represent mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-diabetes-cancer link, and several diabetes drugs, such as metformin and rosiglitazone, are being intensely studied for repurposing as cancer chemopreventive agents.

  14. Mechanistic interplay between ceramide and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Reali, Federico; Morine, Melissa J.; Kahramanoğulları, Ozan; Raichur, Suryaprakash; Schneider, Hans-Christoph; Crowther, Daniel; Priami, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    Recent research adds to a growing body of literature on the essential role of ceramides in glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling, while the mechanistic interplay between various components of ceramide metabolism remains to be quantified. We present an extended model of C16:0 ceramide production through both the de novo synthesis and the salvage pathways. We verify our model with a combination of published models and independent experimental data. In silico experiments of the behavior of ceramide and related bioactive lipids in accordance with the observed transcriptomic changes in obese/diabetic murine macrophages at 5 and 16 weeks support the observation of insulin resistance only at the later phase. Our analysis suggests the pivotal role of ceramide synthase, serine palmitoyltransferase and dihydroceramide desaturase involved in the de novo synthesis and the salvage pathways in influencing insulin resistance versus its regulation. PMID:28112248

  15. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2004-06-14

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media. Significant progress was made during this period on all three Tasks. Regarding Task 1, we continued comparisons of foam behavior in sandpacks with and without polymer and oil. As in our previous results, decane was moderately destabilizing to foam. Xanthan polymer did not stabilize foam in the presence of decane in this case. Rather, it appears to have destabilized foam, so that pressure gradient decreased in spite of the increase in aqueous-phase viscosity. Research on Task 2 included the first shake-down experiments with our new apparatus for gas-phase tracer tests for direct measurement of trapped-gas saturation with foam. In addition, we began to analyze CT images of gas-phase tracer in foam displacements, which offers an independent measure of trapped-gas fraction and insights into the roles of convection of tracer in flowing gas and diffusion into trapped gas. Research on Task 3 included foam generation experiments in heterogeneous sandpacks and beadpacks and modeling of discontinuous changes in state such as foam generation. The experiments found the same three regimes (coarse foam, strong foam, and intermediate regime) in heterogeneous sandpacks previously identified in homogeneous porous media. One implication is that there may be a minimum flow rate required for foam generation in even heterogeneous porous media. The dynamics in SAG foam processes in heterogeneous media are complex

  16. Splitting up the powerhouse: structural insights into the mechanism of mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Richter, Viviane; Singh, Abeer P; Kvansakul, Marc; Ryan, Michael T; Osellame, Laura D

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose shape is regulated by the opposing processes of fission and fusion, operating in conjunction with organelle distribution along the cytoskeleton. The importance of fission and fusion homeostasis has been highlighted by a number of disease states linked to mutations in proteins involved in regulating mitochondrial morphology, in addition to changes in mitochondrial dynamics in Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. While a number of mitochondrial morphology proteins have been identified, how they co-ordinate to assemble the fission apparatus is not clear. In addition, while the master mediator of mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related protein 1, is conserved throughout evolution, the adaptor proteins involved in its mitochondrial recruitment are not. This review focuses on our current understanding of mitochondrial fission and the proteins that regulate this process in cell homeostasis, with a particular focus on the recent mechanistic insights based on protein structures.

  17. Mechanistic understanding of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the thermal degradation of tires under various oxygen concentration atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Castaldi, Marco J

    2012-12-04

    The thermal degradation of tires under various oxygen concentrations (7-30%/Bal. N(2)) was investigated thermo-gravimetrically at 10 °C min(-1) heating rate over a temperature range from ambient to 1000 °C. Significant mass loss (~55%) was observed at the temperature of 300-500 °C, where the thermal degradation rate was almost identical and independent of oxygen concentrations due to simultaneous volatilization and oxidation. A series of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) measurements taken from the effluent of a thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) unit at temperature of 300-5000 °C leads to the overall thermal degradation mechanisms of waste tires and some insights for understanding evolution steps of air pollutants including volatile organic carbons (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In order to describe the fundamental mechanistic behavior on tire combustion, the main constituents of tires, styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and polyisoprene (IR), has been investigated in the same experimental conditions. The thermal degradation of SBR and IR suggests the reaction mechanisms including bond scissions followed by hydrogenation, gas phase addition reaction, and/or partial oxidation.

  18. Progress in the experimental observation of thiamin diphosphate-bound intermediates on enzymes and mechanistic information derived from these observations.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Frank; Nemeria, Natalia S

    2014-12-01

    Thiamin diphosphate (ThDP), the vitamin B1 coenzyme is an excellent representative of coenzymes, which carry out electrophilic catalysis by forming a covalent complex with their substrates. The function of ThDP is to greatly increase the acidity of two carbon acids by stabilizing their conjugate bases, the ylide/carbene/C2-carbanion of the thiazolium ring and the C2α-carbanion/enamine, once the substrate binds to ThDP. In recent years, several ThDP-bound intermediates on such pathways have been characterized by both solution and solid-state methods. Prominent among these advances are X-ray crystallographic results identifying both oxidative and non-oxidative intermediates, rapid chemical quench followed by NMR detection of several intermediates which are stable under acidic conditions, solid-state NMR and circular dichroism detection of the states of ionization and tautomerization of the 4'-aminopyrimidine moiety of ThDP in some of the intermediates. These methods also enabled in some cases determination of the rate-limiting step in the complex series of steps. This review is an update of a review with the same title published by the authors in 2005 in this Journal. Much progress has been made in the intervening decade in the identification of the intermediates and their application to gain additional mechanistic insight.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Statistical and Mechanistic Models of Escherichia coli at Beaches in Southern Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Safaie, Ammar; Wendzel, Aaron; Ge, Zhongfu; Nevers, Meredith B; Whitman, Richard L; Corsi, Steven R; Phanikumar, Mantha S

    2016-03-01

    Statistical and mechanistic models are popular tools for predicting the levels of indicator bacteria at recreational beaches. Researchers tend to use one class of model or the other, and it is difficult to generalize statements about their relative performance due to differences in how the models are developed, tested, and used. We describe a cooperative modeling approach for freshwater beaches impacted by point sources in which insights derived from mechanistic modeling were used to further improve the statistical models and vice versa. The statistical models provided a basis for assessing the mechanistic models which were further improved using probability distributions to generate high-resolution time series data at the source, long-term "tracer" transport modeling based on observed electrical conductivity, better assimilation of meteorological data, and the use of unstructured-grids to better resolve nearshore features. This approach resulted in improved models of comparable performance for both classes including a parsimonious statistical model suitable for real-time predictions based on an easily measurable environmental variable (turbidity). The modeling approach outlined here can be used at other sites impacted by point sources and has the potential to improve water quality predictions resulting in more accurate estimates of beach closures.

  20. Comparative evaluation of statistical and mechanistic models of Escherichia coli at beaches in southern Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safaie, Ammar; Wendzel, Aaron; Ge, Zhongfu; Nevers, Meredith; Whitman, Richard L.; Corsi, Steven R.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2016-01-01

    Statistical and mechanistic models are popular tools for predicting the levels of indicator bacteria at recreational beaches. Researchers tend to use one class of model or the other, and it is difficult to generalize statements about their relative performance due to differences in how the models are developed, tested, and used. We describe a cooperative modeling approach for freshwater beaches impacted by point sources in which insights derived from mechanistic modeling were used to further improve the statistical models and vice versa. The statistical models provided a basis for assessing the mechanistic models which were further improved using probability distributions to generate high-resolution time series data at the source, long-term “tracer” transport modeling based on observed electrical conductivity, better assimilation of meteorological data, and the use of unstructured-grids to better resolve nearshore features. This approach resulted in improved models of comparable performance for both classes including a parsimonious statistical model suitable for real-time predictions based on an easily measurable environmental variable (turbidity). The modeling approach outlined here can be used at other sites impacted by point sources and has the potential to improve water quality predictions resulting in more accurate estimates of beach closures.

  1. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  2. A windows based mechanistic subsidence prediction model for longwall mining

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, R.; Beheler, P.; Khair, A.W.

    1996-12-31

    The previously developed Mechanistic Subsidence Prediction Model (MSPM) has been incorporated into the graphical interface environment of MS Windows. MSPM has the unique capability of predicting maximum subsidence, angle of draw and the subsidence profile of a longwall panel at various locations for both the transverse and longitudinal orientations. The resultant enhanced model can be operated by individuals with little knowledge of subsidence prediction theories or little computer programming experience. In addition, predictions of subsidence can be made in a matter of seconds without the need to develop input data files or use the keyboard in some cases. The predictions are based upon the following input parameters: panel width, mining height, overburden depth, rock quality designation, and percent hard rock in the immediate roof, main roof and the entire overburden. The recently developed enhanced model has the capability to compare predictions in a graphical format for one half of the predicted subsidence profile based upon changes in input parameters easily and instantly on the same screen. In addition another screen can be obtained from a pull down menu where the operator can compare predictions for the entire subsidence profiles. This paper presents the background of the subsidence prediction model and the methodology of the enhanced model development. The paper also presents comparisons of subsidence predictions for several different sets of input parameters in addition to comparisons of the subsidence predictions with actual field data.

  3. Are Mechanistic and Statistical QSAR Approaches Really Different? MLR Studies on 158 Cycloalkyl-Pyranones.

    PubMed

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Garg, Rajni; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-07-12

    Two parallel approaches for quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) are predominant in literature, one guided by mechanistic methods (including read-across) and another by the use of statistical methods. To bridge the gap between these two approaches and to verify their main differences, a comparative study of mechanistically relevant and statistically relevant QSAR models, developed on a case study of 158 cycloalkyl-pyranones, biologically active on inhibition (Ki ) of HIV protease, was performed. Firstly, Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) based models were developed starting from a limited amount of molecular descriptors which were widely proven to have mechanistic interpretation. Then robust and predictive MLR models were developed on the same set using two different statistical approaches unbiased of input descriptors. Development of models based on Statistical I method was guided by stepwise addition of descriptors while Genetic Algorithm based selection of descriptors was used for the Statistical II. Internal validation, the standard error of the estimate, and Fisher's significance test were performed for both the statistical models. In addition, external validation was performed for Statistical II model, and Applicability Domain was verified as normally practiced in this approach. The relationships between the activity and the important descriptors selected in all the models were analyzed and compared. It is concluded that, despite the different type and number of input descriptors, and the applied descriptor selection tools or the algorithms used for developing the final model, the mechanistical and statistical approach are comparable to each other in terms of quality and also for mechanistic interpretability of modelling descriptors. Agreement can be observed between these two approaches and the better result could be a consensus prediction from both the models.

  4. Intriguing mechanistic labyrinths in gold(i) catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Obradors, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Many mechanistically intriguing reactions have been developed in the last decade using gold(i) as catalyst. Here we review the main mechanistic proposals in gold-catalysed activation of alkynes and allenes, in which this metal plays a central role by stabilising a variety of complex cationic intermediates. PMID:24176910

  5. Mechanistic kinetic models of enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis-a review.

    PubMed

    Jeoh, Tina; Cardona, Maria J; Karuna, Nardrapee; Mudinoor, Akshata R; Nill, Jennifer

    2017-02-28

    Bioconversion of lignocellulose forms the basis for renewable, advanced biofuels, and bioproducts. Mechanisms of hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulases have been actively studied for nearly 70 years with significant gains in understanding of the cellulolytic enzymes. Yet, a full mechanistic understanding of the hydrolysis reaction has been elusive. We present a review to highlight new insights gained since the most recent comprehensive review of cellulose hydrolysis kinetic models by Bansal et al. () Biotechnol Adv 27:833-848. Recent models have taken a two-pronged approach to tackle the challenge of modeling the complex heterogeneous reaction-an enzyme-centric modeling approach centered on the molecularity of the cellulase-cellulose interactions to examine rate limiting elementary steps and a substrate-centric modeling approach aimed at capturing the limiting property of the insoluble cellulose substrate. Collectively, modeling results suggest that at the molecular-scale, how rapidly cellulases can bind productively (complexation) and release from cellulose (decomplexation) is limiting, while the overall hydrolysis rate is largely insensitive to the catalytic rate constant. The surface area of the insoluble substrate and the degrees of polymerization of the cellulose molecules in the reaction both limit initial hydrolysis rates only. Neither enzyme-centric models nor substrate-centric models can consistently capture hydrolysis time course at extended reaction times. Thus, questions of the true reaction limiting factors at extended reaction times and the role of complexation and decomplexation in rate limitation remain unresolved. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;9999: 1-16. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mechanistic investigations on six bacterial terpene cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Rabe, Patrick; Schmitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary The products obtained by incubation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) with six purified bacterial terpene cyclases were characterised by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, allowing for a full structure elucidation. The absolute configurations of four terpenes were determined based on their optical rotary powers. Incubation experiments with 13C-labelled isotopomers of FPP in buffers containing water or deuterium oxide allowed for detailed insights into the cyclisation mechanisms of the bacterial terpene cyclases. PMID:27829890

  7. Mechanistically based mapping of human cardiac fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Junaid A. B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underpinning human cardiac fibrillation remain elusive. In his 1913 paper ‘On dynamic equilibrium in the heart’, Mines proposed that an activation wave front could propagate repeatedly in a circle, initiated by a stimulus in the vulnerable period. While the dynamics of activation and recovery are central to cardiac fibrillation, these physiological data are rarely used in clinical mapping. Fibrillation is a rapid irregular rhythm with spatiotemporal disorder resulting from two fundamental mechanisms – sources in preferred cardiac regions or spatially diffuse self‐sustaining activity, i.e. with no preferred source. On close inspection, however, this debate may also reflect mapping technique. Fibrillation is initiated from triggers by regional dispersion in repolarization, slow conduction and wavebreak, then sustained by non‐uniform interactions of these mechanisms. Notably, optical mapping of action potentials in atrial fibrillation (AF) show spiral wave sources (rotors) in nearly all studies including humans, while most traditional electrogram analyses of AF do not. Techniques may diverge in fibrillation because electrograms summate non‐coherent waves within an undefined field whereas optical maps define waves with a visually defined field. Also fibrillation operates at the limits of activation and recovery, which are well represented by action potentials while fibrillatory electrograms poorly represent repolarization. We conclude by suggesting areas for study that may be used, until such time as optical mapping is clinically feasible, to improve mechanistic understanding and therapy of human cardiac fibrillation. PMID:26607671

  8. Mechanistic simulation of line-edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biafore, John J.; Smith, Mark D.; Robertson, Stewart A.; Graves, Trey

    2007-03-01

    Physically-based photoresist models, such as those in PROLITH, have been very successful in describing photolithography from a continuum standpoint. These models allow engineers to accurately predict the final resist CD on the wafer and to analyze process robustness. However, as the critical dimension continues to shrink, yield-limiting phenomena are observed that are related to the molecular nature and reaction kinetics of photoresist materials. An example of these phenomena is line-edge roughness (LER). In this paper, the origin of LER is hypothesized to be caused by fluctuations occurring in the initial position of the reactants, fluctuations during the exposure process (shot noise) and fluctuations occurring during thermally-induced reaction-diffusion (post-exposure bake). We have developed a lattice-based mechanistic simulator to better understand the stochastic nature of reactant initial position, the exposure step, the importance of the discrete nature of the reactants, the coupling to the deprotection kinetics and the deep complexity evident in the diffusion-limited acid-quencher reaction.

  9. Mechanistic Reactive Burn Modeling of Solid Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Y.Horie; Y.Hamate; D.Greening

    2003-04-01

    This report describes a computational framework for reactive burn modeling of solid explosives and the development of a test case where physical mechanisms represent RDX or RDX-based materials. The report is a sequel to LA-13794-MS, ''A Unifying Framework for Hot Spots and the Ignition of Energetic Materials,'' where we proposed a new approach to the building of a general purpose model that captures the essential features of the three primary origins of hot-spot formation: void collapse, shear banding, friction. The purpose of the present report is to describe the continuing task of coupling the unifying hot-spot model to hydrodynamic calculations to develop a mechanistic reactive burn model. The key components of the coupling include energy localization, the growth of hot spots, overall hot-spot behavior, and a phase-averaged mixture equation of state (EOS) in a Mie-Grueneisen form. The nucleation and growth of locally heated regions is modeled by a phenomenological treatment as well as a statistical model based on an exponential size distribution. The Mie-Grueneisen form of the EOS is one of many possible choices and is not a critical selection for implementing the model. In this report, model calculations are limited to proof-of-concept illustrations for shock loading. Results include (1) shock ignition and growth-to-detonation, (2) double shock ignition, and (3) quenching and reignition. A comparative study of Pop-plots is discussed based on the statistical model.

  10. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  11. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  12. Exploiting the Imidazolium Effect in Base-free Ammonium Enolate Generation: Synthetic and Mechanistic Studies.

    PubMed

    Young, Claire M; Stark, Daniel G; West, Thomas H; Taylor, James E; Smith, Andrew D

    2016-11-07

    N-Acyl imidazoles and catalytic isothiourea hydrochloride salts function as ammonium enolate precursors in the absence of base. Enantioselective Michael addition-cyclization reactions using different α,β-unsaturated Michael acceptors have been performed to form dihydropyranones and dihydropyridinones with high stereoselectivity. Detailed mechanistic studies using RPKA have revealed the importance of the "imidazolium" effect in ammonium enolate formation and have highlighted key differences with traditional base-mediated processes.

  13. Design and mechanistic insight into ultrafast calcium indicators for monitoring intracellular calcium dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Podor, Borbala; Fine, Alan; Török, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin-based genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicators (GCaMP-s) are powerful tools of imaging calcium dynamics from cells to freely moving animals. High affinity indicators with slow kinetics however distort the temporal profile of calcium transients. Here we report the development of reduced affinity ultrafast variants of GCaMP6s and GCaMP6f. We hypothesized that GCaMP-s have a common kinetic mechanism with a rate-limiting process in the interaction of the RS20 peptide and calcium-calmodulin. Therefore we targeted specific residues in the binding interface by rational design generating improved indicators with GCaMP6fu displaying fluorescence rise and decay times (t1/2) of 1 and 3 ms (37 °C) in vitro, 9 and 22-fold faster than GCaMP6f respectively. In HEK293T cells, GCaMP6fu revealed a 4-fold faster decay of ATP-evoked intracellular calcium transients than GCaMP6f. Stimulation of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with five action potentials fired at 100 Hz resulted in a single dendritic calcium transient with a 2-fold faster rise and 7-fold faster decay time (t1/2 of 40 ms) than GCaMP6f, indicating that tracking high frequency action potentials may be limited by calcium dynamics. We propose that the design strategy used for generating GCaMP6fu is applicable for the acceleration of the response kinetics of GCaMP-type calcium indicators. PMID:27922063

  14. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.; Yin, Lu; Alexander, David L.; DuBois, Rebecca M.; López, Susana

    2016-11-02

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bind to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.

  15. Mechanistic insight into the catechol oxidase activity by a biomimetic dinuclear copper complex.

    PubMed

    Granata, Alessandro; Monzani, Enrico; Casella, Luigi

    2004-10-01

    The biomimetic catalytic oxidation of 3,5-di- tert-butylcatechol by the dicopper(II) complex of the ligand alpha,alpha'-bis(bis[1-(1'-methyl-2'-benzimidazolyl)methyl]amino)- m-xylene in the presence of dioxygen has been investigated as a function of temperature and pH in a mixed aqueous/organic solvent. The catalytic cycle occurs in two steps, the first step being faster than the second step. In the first step, one molecule of catechol is oxidized by the dicopper(II) complex, and the copper(II) centers are reduced. From the pH dependence, it is deduced that the active species of the process is the monohydroxo form of the dinuclear complex. In the second step, the second molecule of catechol is oxidized by the dicopper(I)-dioxygen complex formed upon oxygenation of the reduced complex. In both cases, catechol oxidation is an inner-sphere electron transfer process involving binding of the catechol to the active species. The binary catechol-dicopper(II) complex formed in the first step could be characterized at very low temperature (-90 degrees C), where substrate oxidation is blocked. On the contrary, the ternary complex of dicopper(I)-O(2)-catechol relevant to the second step does not accumulate in solution and could not be characterized, even at low temperature. The investigation of the biphasic kinetics of the catalytic reaction over a range of temperatures allowed the thermodynamic (Delta H degrees and Delta S degrees ) and activation parameters (Delta H( not equal) and Delta S( not equal)) connected with the key steps of the catecholase process to be obtained.

  16. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into the Pseudomonas fluorescens 2-Nitrobenzoate 2-Nitroreductase NbaA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Song, Wooseok; Kim, Jin-Sik; Jiao, Li; Lee, Kangseok; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial 2-nitroreductase NbaA is the primary enzyme initiating the degradation of 2-nitrobenzoate (2-NBA), and its activity is controlled by posttranslational modifications. To date, the structure of NbaA remains to be elucidated. In this study, the crystal structure of a Cys194Ala NbaA mutant was determined to a 1.7-Å resolution. The substrate analog 2-NBA methyl ester was used to decipher the substrate binding site by inhibition of the wild-type NbaA protein. Tandem mass spectrometry showed that 2-NBA methyl ester produced a 2-NBA ester bond at the Tyr193 residue in the wild-type NbaA but not residues in the Tyr193Phe mutant. Moreover, covalent binding of the 2-NBA methyl ester to Tyr193 reduced the reactivity of the Cys194 residue on the peptide link. The Tyr193 hydroxyl group was shown to be essential for enzyme catalysis, as a Tyr193Phe mutant resulted in fast dissociation of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from the protein with the reduced reactivity of Cys194. FMN binding to NbaA varied with solution NaCl concentration, which was related to the catalytic activity but not to cysteine reactivity. These observations suggest that the Cys194 reactivity is negatively affected by a posttranslational modification of the adjacent Tyr193 residue, which interacts with FMN and the substrate in the NbaA catalytic site.

  17. Mechanistic insights into caspase-9 activation by the structure of the apoptosome holoenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yini; Zhou, Mengying; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-chen; Huang, Weiyun; Shi, Yigong

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian intrinsic apoptosis requires activation of the initiator caspase-9, which then cleaves and activates the effector caspases to execute cell killing. The heptameric Apaf-1 apoptosome is indispensable for caspase-9 activation by together forming a holoenzyme. The molecular mechanism of caspase-9 activation remains largely enigmatic. Here, we report the cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of an apoptotic holoenzyme and structure-guided biochemical analyses. The caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) of Apaf-1 and caspase-9 assemble in two different ways: a 4:4 complex docks onto the central hub of the apoptosome, and a 2:1 complex binds the periphery of the central hub. The interface between the CARD complex and the central hub is required for caspase-9 activation within the holoenzyme. Unexpectedly, the CARD of free caspase-9 strongly inhibits its proteolytic activity. These structural and biochemical findings demonstrate that the apoptosome activates caspase-9 at least in part through sequestration of the inhibitory CARD domain. PMID:28143931

  18. Mechanistic insights into the dehalogenation reaction of fluoroacetate/fluoroacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda-Rojas, Sebastián; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2015-05-21

    Fluoroacetate is a toxic compound whose environmental accumulation may represent an important contamination problem, its elimination is therefore a challenging issue. Fluoroacetate dehalogenase catalyzes its degradation through a two step process initiated by an S{sub N}2 reaction in which the aspartate residue performs a nucleophilic attack on the carbon bonded to the fluorine; the second step is hydrolysis that releases the product as glycolate. In this paper, we present a study based on density functional theory calculations of the S{sub N}2 initiation reaction modeled through the interaction between the substrate and the propionate anion as the nucleophile. Results are analyzed within the framework of the reaction force and using the reaction electronic flux to identify and characterize the electronic activity that drives the reaction. Our results reveal that the selective protonation of the substrate catalyzes the reaction by decreasing the resistance of the structural and electronic reorganization needed to reach the transition state. Finally, the reaction energy is modulated by the degree of stabilization of the fluoride anion formed after the S{sub N}2 reaction. In this way, a site-induced partial protonation acts as a chemical switch in a key process that determines the output of the reaction.

  19. Energetics of methanol and formic acid oxidation on Pt(111): Mechanistic insights from adsorption calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbaugh, Trent L.; Karp, Eric M.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2016-08-01

    The catalytic and electrocatalytic oxidation and reforming of methanol and formic acid have received intense interest due to potential use in direct fuel cells and as prototype models for understanding electrocatalysis. Consequently, the reaction energy diagram (energies of all the adsorbed intermediates and activation energies of all the elementary steps) have been estimated for these reactions on Pt(111) by density functional theory (DFT) in several studies. However, no experimental measurement of these energy diagrams have been reported, nor is there a consensus on the mechanisms. Here, we use energies of key intermediates on Pt(111) from single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) to build a combined energy diagram for these reactions. It suggests a new pathway involving monodentate formate as a key intermediate, with bidentate formate only being a spectator species that slows the rate. This helps reconcile conflicting proposed mechanisms.

  20. Reactivity ratios, and mechanistic insight for anionic ring-opening copolymerization of epoxides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bongjae F.; Wolffs, Martin; Delaney, Kris T.; Sprafke, Johannes K.; Leibfarth, Frank A.; Hawker, Craig J.; Lynd, Nathaniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity ratios were evaluated for anionic ring-opening copolymerizations of ethylene oxide (EO) with either allyl glycidyl ether (AGE) or ethylene glycol vinyl glycidyl ether (EGVGE) using a benzyl alkoxide initiator. The chemical shift for the benzylic protons of the initiator, as measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy, were observed to be sensitive to the sequence of the first two monomers added to the initiator during polymer growth. Using a simple kinetic model for initiation and the first propagation step, reactivity ratios for the copolymerization of AGE and EGVGE with EO could be determined by analysis of the 1H NMR spectroscopy for the resulting copolymer. For the copolymerization between EO and AGE, the reactivity ratios were determined to be rAGE = 1.31 ± 0.26 and rEO = 0.54 ± 0.03, while for EO and EGVGE, the reactivity ratios were rEGVGE = 3.50 ± 0.90 and rEO = 0.32 ± 0.10. These ratios were consistent with the compositional drift observed in the copolymerization between EO and EGVGE, with EGVGE being consumed early in the copolymerization. These experimental results, combined with density functional calculations, allowed a mechanism for oxyanionic ring-opening polymerization that begins with coordination of the Lewis-basic epoxide to the cation to be proposed. The calculated transition-state energies agree qualitatively with the observed relative rates for polymerization. PMID:23226879

  1. Mechanistic insights into EGFR membrane clustering revealed by super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Ye; Cai, Mingjun; Pan, Yangang; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Ji, Hongbin; Wang, Hongda

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of membrane receptors such as EGFR is critical for various biological processes, for example cell signaling and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, we used a super resolution imaging technique, which has shattered the longstanding resolution barrier of light diffraction, to investigate the distribution of membrane EGFR on apical or basal surfaces of COS-7 cells and on the surface of suspended COS-7 cells. Our data show that more and larger EGFR clusters are detected on the apical surface in comparison with those on the basal surface and this difference is not affected by the EGFR activation state, whereas suspended COS-7 cells exhibit a moderate clustering state and a homogeneous distribution pattern, indicating that the external environment surrounding the cell membrane is the decisive factor in the EGFR clustering pattern. A dual-color dSTORM image reveals the significant colocalization of EGFR and lipid rafts; interestingly MβCD treatment leads to a dramatic decrease of the amount and size of EGFR clusters on both apical and basal surfaces, highlighting a key role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster formation. Altogether, our results illustrate the distribution pattern of EGFR in polarized cells and uncover the essential role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster maintenance.The clustering of membrane receptors such as EGFR is critical for various biological processes, for example cell signaling and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, we used a super resolution imaging technique, which has shattered the longstanding resolution barrier of light diffraction, to investigate the distribution of membrane EGFR on apical or basal surfaces of COS-7 cells and on the surface of suspended COS-7 cells. Our data show that more and larger EGFR clusters are detected on the apical surface in comparison with those on the basal surface and this difference is not affected by the EGFR activation state, whereas suspended COS-7 cells exhibit a moderate clustering state and a homogeneous distribution pattern, indicating that the external environment surrounding the cell membrane is the decisive factor in the EGFR clustering pattern. A dual-color dSTORM image reveals the significant colocalization of EGFR and lipid rafts; interestingly MβCD treatment leads to a dramatic decrease of the amount and size of EGFR clusters on both apical and basal surfaces, highlighting a key role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster formation. Altogether, our results illustrate the distribution pattern of EGFR in polarized cells and uncover the essential role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster maintenance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04962d

  2. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into the Pseudomonas fluorescens 2-Nitrobenzoate 2-Nitroreductase NbaA

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wooseok; Kim, Jin-Sik; Jiao, Li; Lee, Kangseok

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial 2-nitroreductase NbaA is the primary enzyme initiating the degradation of 2-nitrobenzoate (2-NBA), and its activity is controlled by posttranslational modifications. To date, the structure of NbaA remains to be elucidated. In this study, the crystal structure of a Cys194Ala NbaA mutant was determined to a 1.7-Å resolution. The substrate analog 2-NBA methyl ester was used to decipher the substrate binding site by inhibition of the wild-type NbaA protein. Tandem mass spectrometry showed that 2-NBA methyl ester produced a 2-NBA ester bond at the Tyr193 residue in the wild-type NbaA but not residues in the Tyr193Phe mutant. Moreover, covalent binding of the 2-NBA methyl ester to Tyr193 reduced the reactivity of the Cys194 residue on the peptide link. The Tyr193 hydroxyl group was shown to be essential for enzyme catalysis, as a Tyr193Phe mutant resulted in fast dissociation of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from the protein with the reduced reactivity of Cys194. FMN binding to NbaA varied with solution NaCl concentration, which was related to the catalytic activity but not to cysteine reactivity. These observations suggest that the Cys194 reactivity is negatively affected by a posttranslational modification of the adjacent Tyr193 residue, which interacts with FMN and the substrate in the NbaA catalytic site. PMID:26025888

  3. Novel colloidal carriers for psoriasis: current issues, mechanistic insight and novel delivery approaches.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Madhulika; Singh, Deependra; Singh, Manju Rawat

    2013-09-28

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disorder of the skin with relapsing episodes of inflammation and hyperkeratosis. Numerous approaches have been explored to treat this dreadful disease using different antipsoriatic drugs with different modes of action and routes of administration. But, till date there is no cure for psoriasis due to lack of an ideal carrier for safe and effective delivery of antipsoriatic drugs. Constant progression in the development of newer formulations utilizing colloidal drug delivery systems has led to effective treatment of psoriasis. Colloidal carriers include vesicular and particulate systems like liposome, transferosome, niosomes, ethosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, microspheres, micelles, dendrimers etc. have gained unique position as drug cargoes. Present review is an attempt to contemplate on psoriasis in terms of pathogenesis, role of cytokines, major hindrances in psoriasis treatment, currently available treatment options pertaining to mode of action, pharmacokinetics, marketed products, side effects of individual antipsoriatic drugs and recent developments in the delivery of various antipsoriatic drugs through novel colloidal drug carriers.

  4. Potential anticancer heterometallic Fe-Au and Fe-Pd agents: initial mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Lease, Nicholas; Vasilevski, Vadim; Carreira, Monica; de Almeida, Andreia; Sanaú, Mercedes; Hirva, Pipsa; Casini, Angela; Contel, María

    2013-07-25

    A series of gold(III) and palladium(II) heterometallic complexes with new iminophosphorane ligands derived from ferrocenylphosphanes [{Cp-P(Ph2)═N-Ph}2Fe] (1), [{Cp-P(Ph2)═N-CH2-2-NC5H4}2Fe] (2), and [{Cp-P(Ph2)═N-CH2-2-NC5H4}Fe(Cp)] (3) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Ligands 2 and 3 afford stable coordination complexes [AuCl2(3)]ClO4, [{AuCl2}2(2)](ClO4)2, [PdCl2(3)], and [{PdCl2}2(2)]. The complexes have been evaluated for their antiproliferative properties in human ovarian cancer cells sensitive and resistant to cisplatin (A2780S/R), in human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and in a nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293T). The highly cytotoxic trimetallic derivatives M2Fe (M = Au, Pd) are more cytotoxic to cancer cells than their corresponding monometallic fragments. Moreover, these complexes were significantly more cytotoxic than cisplatin in the resistant A2780R and the MCF7 cell lines. Studies of the interactions of the trimetallic compounds with DNA and the zinc-finger protein PARP-1 indicate that they exert anticancer effects in vitro based on different mechanisms of actions with respect to cisplatin.

  5. Mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes and cancer: Mechanistic insights gained from human genomics

    PubMed Central

    Kadoch, Cigall; Crabtree, Gerald R.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 4 years, nearly 100 exome sequencing studies have revealed the high frequency of mutations in the genes encoding the subunits of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers in human cancer. Most of these mutations are within the genes encoding subunits of the BAF (Brg/Brahma-associated factors) or mSWI/SNF complex, which is one of two dozen predicted ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes in mammals. Considering BAF complexes as a single entity, the 15 subunits encoded by 29 genes are mutated in >20% of human cancer, across a broad range of tumor types. These observations demonstrate that there is little redundancy in the oncogenic function of BAF complexes with the other remodeling complexes, underscoring their unique roles. Several important conclusions emerge from these genomic data: specific subunits appear to be mutated in specific cancers, highlighting tissue-specific protective roles; mutations can function as tumor suppressors or oncogenes; mutations can be homozygous or, more commonly, heterozygous, implying their dosage-sensitive roles in an unknown yet fundamental process used to suppress the genesis of cancer. These new human genetic findings paired with biochemical studies are challenging old ideas on how chromatin remodeling complexes function, generating new hypotheses with respect to their normal and oncogenic mechanisms and highlighting potential avenues for therapeutic intervention in human cancer. PMID:26601204

  6. Mechanistic insights into the dehalogenation reaction of fluoroacetate/fluoroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda-Rojas, Sebastián; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2015-05-01

    Fluoroacetate is a toxic compound whose environmental accumulation may represent an important contamination problem, its elimination is therefore a challenging issue. Fluoroacetate dehalogenase catalyzes its degradation through a two step process initiated by an SN2 reaction in which the aspartate residue performs a nucleophilic attack on the carbon bonded to the fluorine; the second step is hydrolysis that releases the product as glycolate. In this paper, we present a study based on density functional theory calculations of the SN2 initiation reaction modeled through the interaction between the substrate and the propionate anion as the nucleophile. Results are analyzed within the framework of the reaction force and using the reaction electronic flux to identify and characterize the electronic activity that drives the reaction. Our results reveal that the selective protonation of the substrate catalyzes the reaction by decreasing the resistance of the structural and electronic reorganization needed to reach the transition state. Finally, the reaction energy is modulated by the degree of stabilization of the fluoride anion formed after the SN2 reaction. In this way, a site-induced partial protonation acts as a chemical switch in a key process that determines the output of the reaction.

  7. Structural and mechanistic insights into the activation of Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Jin, Hao; Cai, Xiangyu; Li, Siwei; Shen, Yuequan

    2012-04-10

    Calcium influx through the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel is an essential process in many types of cells. Upon store depletion, the calcium sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum, STIM1, activates Orai1, a CRAC channel in the plasma membrane. We have determined the structures of SOAR from Homo sapiens (hSOAR), which is part of STIM1 and is capable of constitutively activating Orai1, and the entire coiled coil region of STIM1 from Caenorhabditis elegans (ceSTIM1-CCR) in an inactive state. Our studies reveal that the formation of a SOAR dimer is necessary to activate the Orai1 channel. Mutations that disrupt SOAR dimerization or remove the cluster of positive residues abolish STIM1 activation of Orai1. We identified a possible inhibitory helix within the structure of ceSTIM1-CCR that tightly interacts with SOAR. Functional studies suggest that the inhibitory helix may keep the C-terminus of STIM1 in an inactive state. Our data allowed us to propose a model for STIM1 activation.

  8. Mechanistic Insights into the Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels by Inhalational Anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Barber, Annika F; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Treptow, Werner; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2015-11-17

    General anesthesia is a relatively safe medical procedure, which for nearly 170 years has allowed life saving surgical interventions in animals and people. However, the molecular mechanism of general anesthesia continues to be a matter of importance and debate. A favored hypothesis proposes that general anesthesia results from direct multisite interactions with multiple and diverse ion channels in the brain. Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels and two-pore K+ channels are key players in the mechanism of anesthesia; however, new studies have also implicated voltage-gated ion channels. Recent biophysical and structural studies of Na+ and K+ channels strongly suggest that halogenated inhalational general anesthetics interact with gates and pore regions of these ion channels to modulate function. Here, we review these studies and provide a perspective to stimulate further advances.

  9. Mechanistic Insights into the Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels by Inhalational Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Barber, Annika F.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Treptow, Werner; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2015-01-01

    General anesthesia is a relatively safe medical procedure, which for nearly 170 years has allowed life saving surgical interventions in animals and people. However, the molecular mechanism of general anesthesia continues to be a matter of importance and debate. A favored hypothesis proposes that general anesthesia results from direct multisite interactions with multiple and diverse ion channels in the brain. Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels and two-pore K+ channels are key players in the mechanism of anesthesia; however, new studies have also implicated voltage-gated ion channels. Recent biophysical and structural studies of Na+ and K+ channels strongly suggest that halogenated inhalational general anesthetics interact with gates and pore regions of these ion channels to modulate function. Here, we review these studies and provide a perspective to stimulate further advances. PMID:26588560

  10. Structural and mechanistic insights into NDM-1 catalyzed hydrolysis of cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han; Ding, Jingjin; Zhu, Deyu; Liu, Xuehui; Xu, Xueyong; Zhang, Ying; Zang, Shanshan; Wang, Da-Cheng; Liu, Wei

    2014-10-22

    Cephalosporins constitute a large class of β-lactam antibiotics clinically used as antimicrobial drugs. New Dehli metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) poses a global threat to human health as it confers on bacterial pathogen resistance to almost all β-lactams, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. Here we report the first crystal structures of NDM-1 in complex with cefuroxime and cephalexin, as well as NMR spectra monitoring cefuroxime and cefixime hydrolysis catalyzed by NDM-1. Surprisingly, cephalosporoate intermediates were captured in both crystal structures determined at 1.3 and 2.0 Å. These results provide detailed information concerning the mechanism and pathways of cephalosporin hydrolysis. We also present the crystal structure and enzyme assays of a D124N mutant, which reveals that D124 most likely plays a more structural than catalytic role.

  11. Contact angle hysteresis on superhydrophobic surfaces: an ionic liquid probe fluid offers mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Krumpfer, Joseph W; Bian, Pei; Zheng, Peiwen; Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2011-03-15

    Silicon/silicon dioxide surfaces containing 3 μm (width) × 6 μm (length) × 40 μm (height) staggered rhombus posts were prepared using photolithography and hydrophobized using a perfluoroalkyl-containing monofunctional silane. These surfaces exhibit water contact angles of θ(A)/θ(R) = 169°/156°. Water drops come to rest on a carefully aligned horizontal sample but roll when the surface is tilted slightly. No visible trail or evidence of water "left behind" at the receding edge of the drop is apparent on surfaces that water drops have rolled on or on samples removed from water through the air-water interface. When dimethylbis(β-hydroxyethyl)ammonium methanesulfonate (N(+)S(-), a nonvolatile ionic liquid) is used as the liquid probe fluid (instead of water), contact angles of θ(A)/θ(R) = 164°/152° are observed and ∼3-μm-diameter sessile drops are visible (by scanning electron microscopy - SEM) on the top of every post of a sample drawn out of this liquid. We interpret the formation of these sessile microdrops as arising from microcapillary bridge failure that occurs during receding events and emphasize that the capillary bridges rupture in primarily a tensile failure mode. Smaller sessile drops could be prepared using mixtures of water and N(+)S(-). Microdroplets of N(+)S(-) were also observed to form selectively at particular features on surfaces containing square holes separated by ridges. This suggests that pinning sites can be identified using microscopy and this ionic liquid probe fluid.

  12. Mechanistic insight into the interaction of BLM helicase with intra-strand G-quadruplex structures.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sujoy; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Savitsky, Pavel; Sturzenegger, Andreas; Huttner, Diana; Janscak, Pavel; Hickson, Ian D; Gileadi, Opher; Rothenberg, Eli

    2014-11-24

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ family helicase BLM that is associated with growth retardation and predisposition to cancer. BLM helicase has a high specificity for non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures, which are formed by G-rich DNA strands and play an important role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we used single-molecule FRET to define the mechanism of interaction of BLM helicase with intra-stranded G4 structures. We show that the activity of BLM is substrate dependent, and highly regulated by a short-strand DNA (ssDNA) segment that separates the G4 motif from double-stranded DNA. We demonstrate cooperativity between the RQC and HRDC domains of BLM during binding and unfolding of the G4 structure, where the RQC domain interaction with G4 is stabilized by HRDC binding to ssDNA. We present a model that proposes a unique role for G4 structures in modulating the activity of DNA processing enzymes.

  13. Mechanistic Insight into the Interaction of BLM helicase with Intra-strand G-quadruplex Structures

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sujoy; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Savitsky, Pavel; Sturzenegger, Andreas; Huttner, Diana; Janscak, Pavel; Hickson, Ian D; Gilaedi, Opher; Rothenberg, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ family helicase BLM that is associated with growth retardation and predisposition to cancer. BLM helicase has a high specificity for non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures, which are formed by G-rich DNA strands and play an important role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to define the mechanism of interaction of BLM helicase with intra-stranded G4 structures. We show that the activity of BLM is substrate dependent, and highly regulated by a short ssDNA segment that separates the G4 motif from dsDNA. We demonstrate cooperativity between the RQC and HRDC domains of BLM during binding and unfolding of the G4 structure, where the RQC domain interaction with G4 is stabilized by HRDC binding to ssDNA. We present a model that proposes a unique role for G4 structures in modulating the activity of DNA processing enzymes. PMID:25418155

  14. Mechanistic insights into aqueous phase propanol dehydration in H-ZSM-5 zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2016-10-06

    Aqueous phase dehydration of 1-propanol over H-ZSM-5 zeolite was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The water molecules in the zeolite pores prefer to aggregate via the hydrogen bonding network and be protonated at the Brønsted acidic sites (BAS). Two typical configurations, i.e., dispersed and clustered, of water molecules were identified by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of the mimicking aqueous phase H-ZSM-5 zeolite unit cell with 20 water molecules per unit cell. DFT calculated Gibbs free energies suggest that the dimeric propanol-propanol, the propanol-water complex, and the trimeric propanol-propanol-water are formed at high propanol concentrations, which provide a kinetically feasible dehydration reaction channel of 1-propanol to propene. However, calculation results also indicate that the propanol dehydration via the unimolecular mechanism becomes kinetically discouraged due to the enhanced stability of the protonated dimeric propanol and the protonated water cluster acting as the BAS site for alcohol dehydration reaction. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  15. Mechanistic insights into induction of vitellogenin gene expression by estrogens in Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea glomerata.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi Kim Anh; MacFarlane, Geoff R; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong; O'Connor, Wayne A; Yu, Richard Man Kit

    2016-05-01

    Marine molluscs, such as oysters, respond to estrogenic compounds with the induction of the egg yolk protein precursor, vitellogenin (Vtg), availing a biomarker for estrogenic pollution. Despite this application, the precise molecular mechanism through which estrogens exert their action to induce molluscan vitellogenesis is unknown. As a first step to address this question, we cloned a gene encoding Vtg from the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata (sgVtg). Using primers designed from a partial sgVtg cDNA sequence available in Genbank, a full-length sgVtg cDNA of 8498bp was obtained by 5'- and 3'-RACE. The open reading frame (ORF) of sgVtg was determined to be 7980bp, which is substantially longer than the orthologs of other oyster species. Its deduced protein sequence shares the highest homology at the N- and C-terminal regions with other molluscan Vtgs. The full-length genomic DNA sequence of sgVtg was obtained by genomic PCR and genome walking targeting the gene body and flanking regions, respectively. The genomic sequence spans 20kb and consists of 30 exons and 29 introns. Computer analysis identified three closely spaced half-estrogen responsive elements (EREs) in the promoter region and a 210-bp CpG island 62bp downstream of the transcription start site. Upregulation of sgVtg mRNA expression was observed in the ovaries following in vitro (explants) and in vivo (tank) exposure to 17β-estradiol (E2). Notably, treatment with an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist in vitro abolished the upregulation, suggesting a requirement for an estrogen-dependent receptor for transcriptional activation. DNA methylation of the 5' CpG island was analysed using bisulfite genomic sequencing of the in vivo exposed ovaries. The CpG island was found to be hypomethylated (with 0-3% methylcytosines) in both control and E2-exposed oysters. However, no significant differential methylation or any correlation between methylation and sgVtg expression levels was observed. Overall, the results support the possible involvement of an ERE-containing promoter and an estrogen-activated receptor in estrogen signalling in marine molluscs.

  16. Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Mechanistic Insights into Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires iron for normal growth but faces a limitation of the metal ion due to its low solubility at biological pH and the withholding of iron by the mammalian host. The pathogen expresses the Fe3+-specific siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin to chelate the metal ion from insoluble iron and the host proteins transferrin, lactoferrin, and ferritin. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis, as knockout mutants, which were defective in siderophore synthesis or uptake, failed to survive in low-iron medium and inside macrophages. But as excess iron is toxic due to its catalytic role in the generation of free radicals, regulation of iron uptake is necessary to maintain optimal levels of intracellular iron. The focus of this review is to present a comprehensive overview of iron homeostasis in M. tuberculosis that is discussed in the context of mycobactin biosynthesis, transport of iron across the mycobacterial cell envelope, and storage of excess iron. The clinical significance of the serum iron status and the expression of the iron-regulated protein HupB in tuberculosis (TB) patients is presented here, highlighting the potential of HupB as a marker, notably in extrapulmonary TB cases. PMID:27402628

  17. Mechanistic Insights into the Structure-Dependent Selectivity of Catalytic Furfural Conversion on Platinum Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Qiuxia; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai

    2015-11-01

    The effects of structure and size on the selectivity of catalytic furfural conversion over supported Pt catalysts in the presence of hydrogen have been studied using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations and microkinetic modeling. Four Pt model systems, i.e., periodic Pt(111), Pt(211) surfaces, as well as small nanoclusters (Pt13 and Pt55) are chosen to represent the terrace, step, and corner sites of Pt nanoparticles. Our DFT results show that the reaction routes for furfural hydrogenation and decarbonylation are strongly dependent on the type of reactive sites, which lead to the different selectivity. On the basis of the size-dependent site distribution rule, we correlate the site distributions as a function of the Pt particle size. Our microkinetic results indicate the critical particle size that controls the furfural selectivity is about 1.0 nm, which is in good agreement with the reported experimental value under reaction conditions. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2013CB733501) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21306169, 21176221, 21136001, 21101137 and 91334103). This work was also partially supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  18. Mechanistic insights into solubilization of rice protein isolates by freeze-milling combined with alkali pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Li; Wang, Ren; Chen, Zhengxing

    2015-07-01

    The solubilization of rice protein isolates (RPIs) has been regarded as one of the critical and challenging processes affecting commercial availability. Simultaneous treatment with freezing and milling (freeze-milling) combined with alkali pretreatment can remarkably increase the maximum achievable amounts of soluble RPIs by up to 42 times. This study investigates the mechanism of solubilization of RPIs by freeze-milling (RPI(fm)). Structural analyses reveal that milling causes proteins to unfold with ice crystals formed inside protein bodies. Fluorescent and Fourier transform infrared spectra show that RPI(fm) possesses disrupted hydrophobic surface and exposed hydrophilic inner groups. Size exclusion chromatography results reveal that RPI(fm) exhibits disaggregation and strong water-protein interactions. These results indicate that freeze-milling may be a promising manufacturing technique in food industry.

  19. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of novel natural cathepsin L inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of a cancerous cell takes place when it ceases to respond to growth-inhibiting signals and multiplies uncontrollably and can detach and move to other parts of the body; the process called as metastasis. A particular set of cysteine proteases are very active during cancer metastasis, Cathepsins being one of them. They are involved in tumor growth and malignancy and have also been reported to be overexpressed in tumor cell lines. In the present study, a combinatorial approach comprising three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR), ligand-based pharmacophore modelling and search followed by cathepsin L structure-based high throughput screening was carried out using an initial set of 28 congeneric thiosemicarbazone derivatives as cathepsin L inhibitors. A 3D QSAR was derived using the alignment of a common thiosemicarbazone substructure. Essential structural features responsible for biological activity were taken into account for development of a pharmacophore model based on 29 congeneric thiosemicarbazone derivatives. This model was used to carry out an exhaustive search on a large dataset of natural compounds. A further cathepsin L structure-based screen identified two top scoring compounds as potent anti-cancer leads. Results The generated 3D QSAR model showed statistically significant results with an r2 value of 0.8267, cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 of 0.7232, and a pred_r2 (r2 value for test set) of 0.7460. Apart from these, a high F test value of 30.2078 suggested low probability of the model's failure. The pharmacophoric hypothesis chosen for searching the natural compound libraries was identified as DDHRR, where two Ds denote 2 hydrogen donors, H represents a hydrophobic group and two Rs represent aromatic rings, all of which are essential for the biological activity. We report two potential drug leads ZINC08764437 (NFP) and ZINC03846634 (APQ) obtained after a combined approach of pharmacophore-based search and structure-based virtual screen. These two compounds displayed extra precision docking scores of -7.972908 and -7.575686 respectively suggesting considerable binding affinity for cathepsin L. High activity values of 5.72 and 5.75 predicted using the 3D QSAR model further substantiated the inhibitory potential of these identified leads. Conclusion The present study attempts to correlate the structural features of thiosemicarbazone group with their biological activity by development of a robust 3D QSAR model. Being statistically valid, this model provides near accurate values of the activities predicted for the congeneric set on which it is based. These predicted activities are good for the test set compounds making it indeed a statistically sound 3D QSAR model. The identified pharmacophore model DDHRR.8 comprised of all the essential features required to interact with the catalytic triad of cathepsin L. A search for natural compounds based on this pharmacophore followed by docking studies further screened out two top scoring candidates: NFP and AFQ. The high binding affinity and presence of essential structural features in these two compounds make them ideal for consideration as natural anti-tumoral agents. Activity prediction using 3D QSAR model further validated their potential as worthy drug candidates against cathepsin L for treatment of cancer. PMID:24564425

  20. Mechanistic insights into lithium ion battery electrolyte degradation - a quantitative NMR study.

    PubMed

    Wiemers-Meyer, S; Winter, M; Nowak, S

    2016-09-29

    The changes in electrolyte composition on the molecular level and the reaction mechanisms of electrolyte degradation upon thermal aging are monitored by quantitative NMR spectroscopy, revealing similar rates of degradation for pristine and already aged electrolytes. The data analysis is not in favor of an autocatalytic reaction mechanism based on OPF3 but rather indicates that the degradation of LiPF6 in carbonate based solvents proceeds via a complex sequence of "linear" reactions rather than a cyclic reaction pattern which is determined by the amount of water present in the samples. All investigated electrolytes are reasonably stable at temperatures of up to 60 °C in the presence of minor amounts or absence of water hence indicating that chemical instability of electrolyte components against water is decisive for degradation and an increase in temperature ("thermal aging") just accelerates the degradation impact of water.

  1. Mechanistic Insights into the Antilithiatic Proteins from Terminalia arjuna: A Proteomic Approach in Urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amisha; Tandon, Simran; Singla, Surender Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2016-01-01

    Kidney stone formation during hyperoxaluric condition is inherently dependent on the interaction between renal epithelial cells and calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals. Although modern medicine has progressed in terms of removal of these stones, recurrence and persistent side effects restricts their use. Strategies involving plant based agents which could be used as adjunct therapy is an area which needs to be explored. Plant proteins having antilithiatic activity is a hitherto unexplored area and therefore, we conducted a detailed identification and characterization of antilithiatic proteins from Terminalia arjuna (T. arjuna). Proteins were isolated from the dried bark of T. arjuna and those having molecular weights > 3 kDa were subjected to anion exchange chromatography followed by gel filtration chromatography. Four proteins were identified exhibiting inhibitory activity against CaOx crystallization and crystal growth kinetics The cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic efficacy of these purified proteins was further investigated on oxalate injured renal epithelial cells (MDCK and NRK-52E) wherein, injury due to oxalate was significantly attenuated and led to a dose dependent increase in viability of these cells. These proteins also prevented the interaction of the CaOx crystals to the cell surface and reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Identification of these 4 anionic proteins from the bark of T. arjuna was carried out by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight Mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). This was followed by database search with the MASCOT server and sequence similarity was found with Nuclear pore anchor, DEAD Box ATP-dependent RNA helicase 45, Lon protease homolog 1 and Heat shock protein 90–3. These novel proteins isolated from T. arjuna have the potential to inhibit CaOx crystallization and promote cell survival and therefore, offer novel avenues which need to be explored further for the medical management of urolithiasis. PMID:27649531

  2. Structural and mechanistic insight into alkane hydroxylation by Pseudomonas putida AlkB.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Hernan; Kleifeld, Oded; Yeheskel, Adva; Ong, Poh C; Liu, Yu C; Stok, Jeanette E; De Voss, James J; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida GPo1 alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) is an integral membrane protein that catalyses the hydroxylation of medium-chain alkanes (C3-C12). 1-Octyne irreversibly inhibits this non-haem di-iron mono-oxygenase under turnover conditions, suggesting that it acts as a mechanism-based inactivator. Upon binding to the active site, 1-octyne is postulated to be oxidized to an oxirene that rapidly rearranges to a reactive ketene which covalently acylates nearby residues, resulting in enzyme inactivation. In analysis of inactivated AlkB by LC-MS/MS, several residues exhibited a mass increase of 126.1 Da, corresponding to the octanoyl moiety derived from oxidative activation of 1-octyne. Mutagenesis studies of conserved acylated residues showed that Lys18 plays a critical role in enzyme function, as a single-point mutation of Lys18 to alanine (K18A) completely abolished enzymatic activity. Finally, we present a computational 3D model structure of the transmembrane domain of AlkB, which revealed the overall packing arrangement of the transmembrane helices within the lipid bilayer and the location of the active site mapped by the 1-octyne modifications.

  3. Proteomics and metabolomics for mechanistic insights and biomarker discovery in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Chung, Yuen-Li; Mayr, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    In the last decade, proteomics and metabolomics have contributed substantially to our understanding of cardiovascular diseases. The unbiased assessment of pathophysiological processes without a priori assumptions complements other molecular biology techniques that are currently used in a reductionist approach. In this review, we highlight some of the "omics" methods used to assess protein and metabolite changes in cardiovascular disease. A discrete biological function is very rarely attributed to a single molecule; more often it is the combined input of many proteins. In contrast to the reductionist approach, in which molecules are studied individually, "omics" platforms allow the study of more complex interactions in biological systems. Combining proteomics and metabolomics to quantify changes in metabolites and their corresponding enzymes will advance our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and aid the identification of novel biomarkers for cardiovascular disease.

  4. Binding and Activation of N2O at Transition Metal Centers: Recent Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Tolman, William B.

    2010-01-01

    No laughing matter, nitrous oxide’s role in stratospheric ozone depletion and as a greenhouse gas has stimulated great interest in developing and understanding its decomposition, particularly through the use of transition metal promoters. Recent advances in our understanding of the reaction pathways for N2O reduction by metal ions in the gas phase and in heterogeneous, homogeneous, and biological catalytic systems have provided provocative ideas about the structure and properties of metal-N2O adducts and derived intermediates. These ideas are likely to inform efforts to design more effective catalysts for N2O remediation. PMID:20058284

  5. Structural and mechanistic insights into the bacterial amyloid secretion channel CsgG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Parveen; Krasteva, Petya V.; van Gerven, Nani; Gubellini, Francesca; van den Broeck, Imke; Troupiotis-Tsaïlaki, Anastassia; Jonckheere, Wim; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Howorka, Stefan; Fronzes, Rémi; Remaut, Han

    2014-12-01

    Curli are functional amyloid fibres that constitute the major protein component of the extracellular matrix in pellicle biofilms formed by Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria (predominantly of the α and γ classes). They provide a fitness advantage in pathogenic strains and induce a strong pro-inflammatory response during bacteraemia. Curli formation requires a dedicated protein secretion machinery comprising the outer membrane lipoprotein CsgG and two soluble accessory proteins, CsgE and CsgF. Here we report the X-ray structure of Escherichia coli CsgG in a non-lipidated, soluble form as well as in its native membrane-extracted conformation. CsgG forms an oligomeric transport complex composed of nine anticodon-binding-domain-like units that give rise to a 36-stranded β-barrel that traverses the bilayer and is connected to a cage-like vestibule in the periplasm. The transmembrane and periplasmic domains are separated by a 0.9-nm channel constriction composed of three stacked concentric phenylalanine, asparagine and tyrosine rings that may guide the extended polypeptide substrate through the secretion pore. The specificity factor CsgE forms a nonameric adaptor that binds and closes off the periplasmic face of the secretion channel, creating a 24,000 Å3 pre-constriction chamber. Our structural, functional and electrophysiological analyses imply that CsgG is an ungated, non-selective protein secretion channel that is expected to employ a diffusion-based, entropy-driven transport mechanism.

  6. Mechanistic Insight of Bivalent Compound 21MO as Potential Neuroprotectant for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Saathoff, John M; Liu, Kai; Chojnacki, Jeremy E; He, Liu; Chen, Qun; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Zhang, Shijun

    2016-03-25

    We have recently developed a bivalent strategy to provide novel compounds that potentially target multiple risk factors involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our previous studies employing a bivalent compound with a shorter spacer (17MN) implicated that this compound can localize into mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus interfering with the change of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) and Ca(2+) levels in MC65 cells upon removal of tetracycline (TC). In this report, we examined the effects by a bivalent compound with a longer spacer (21MO) in MC65 cells. Our results demonstrated that 21MO suppressed the change of MMP, possibly via interaction with the mitochondrial complex I in MC65 cells. Interestingly, 21MO did not show any effects on the Ca(2+) level upon TC removal in MC65 cells. Our previous studies suggested that the mobilization of Ca(2+) in MC65 cells, upon withdraw of TC, originated from ER, so the results implicated that 21MO may preferentially interact with mitochondria in MC65 cells under the current experimental conditions. Collectively, the results suggest that bivalent compounds with varied spacer length and cell membrane anchor moiety may exhibit neuroprotective activities via different mechanisms of action.

  7. Oleuropein aglycone induces autophagy via the AMPK/mTOR signalling pathway: a mechanistic insight

    PubMed Central

    Nediani, Chiara; Berti, Andrea; Cascella, Roberta; Pantano, Daniela; Nardiello, Pamela; Luccarini, Ilaria; Casamenti, Fiorella; Stefani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The healthy effects of plant polyphenols, some of which characterize the so-called Mediterranean diet, have been shown to arise from epigenetic and biological modifications resulting, among others, in autophagy stimulation. Our previous work highlighted the beneficial effects of oleuropein aglycone (OLE), the main polyphenol found in the extra virgin olive oil, against neurodegeneration both in cultured cells and in model organisms, focusing, in particular, autophagy activation. In this study we investigated more in depth the molecular and cellular mechanisms of autophagy induction by OLE using cultured neuroblastoma cells and an OLE-fed mouse model of amylod beta (Aβ) deposition. We found that OLE triggers autophagy in cultured cells through the Ca2+-CAMKKβ–AMPK axis. In particular, in these cells OLE induces a rapid release of Ca2+ from the SR stores which, in turn, activates CAMKKβ, with subsequent phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. The link between AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition was shown in the OLE-fed animal model in which we found that decreased phospho-mTOR immunoreactivity and phosphorylated mTOR substrate p70 S6K levels match enhanced phospho-AMPK levels, supporting the idea that autophagy activation by OLE proceeds through mTOR inhibition. Our results agree with those reported for other plant polyphenols, suggesting a shared molecular mechanism underlying the healthy effects of these substances against ageing, neurodegeneration, cancer, diabetes and other diseases implying autophagy dysfunction. PMID:26474288

  8. Mechanistic insights into the impairment of memory B cells and antibody production in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Aberle, Judith H; Stiasny, Karin; Kundi, Michael; Heinz, Franz X

    2013-04-01

    It is well established that immunologic memory generated early in life can be maintained into old age and mediate robust anamnestic antibody responses. Little is known, however, about the initiation of memory B cells in the elderly. We have conducted a prospective analysis of the quantities and functionalities of antigen-specific B cell responses and its association with the functional helper CD4(+)T cell responses. The ability of naïve B cells from old (60-80 years) and young (20-31 years) humans to establish functional memory was examined following primary and booster vaccination with an inactivated-virus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis. Our data show that the number of antigen-specific memory B cells generated during primary vaccination was ~3-fold lower in old than in young individuals. The maintenance and booster responsiveness of these memory B cells were not compromised, as evidenced by similar increases in specific memory B cell frequencies upon revaccination in old and young adults. In contrast, the Ab response mediated per memory B cell after revaccination was dramatically diminished in the elderly. Also, antigen-specific IL-2-positive CD4(+)T cell responses were strongly reduced in the elderly and displayed an excellent correlation with Ab titres. The data suggest that the dramatically lower antibody response in the elderly could only partially be accounted for by the reduced B cell numbers and was strongly correlated with profound functional defects in CD4 help.

  9. Structural and mechanistic insights into an extracytoplasmic copper trafficking pathway in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Katie L I M; Hough, Michael A; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2014-05-01

    In Streptomyces lividans an extracytoplasmic copper-binding Sco protein plays a role in two unlinked processes: (i) initiating a morphological development switch and (ii) facilitating the co-factoring of the CuA domain of CcO (cytochrome c oxidase). How Sco obtains copper once secreted to the extracytoplasmic environment is unknown. In the present paper we report on a protein possessing an HX₆MX₂₁HXM motif that binds a single cuprous ion with subfemtomolar affinity. High-resolution X-ray structures of this extracytoplasmic copper chaperone-like protein (ECuC) in the apo- and Cu(I)-bound states reveal that the latter possesses a surface-accessible cuprous-ion-binding site located in a dish-shaped region of β-sheet structure. A cuprous ion is transferred under a favourable thermodynamic gradient from ECuC to Sco with no back transfer occurring. The ionization properties of the cysteine residues in the Cys⁸⁶xxxCys⁹⁰ copper-binding motif of Sco, together with their positional locations identified from an X-ray structure of Sco, suggests a role for Cys⁸⁶ in initiating an inter-complex ligand-exchange reaction with Cu(I)-ECuC. Generation of the genetic knockouts, Δsco, Δecuc and Δsco/ecuc, and subsequent in vivo assays lend support to the existence of a branched extracytoplasmic copper-trafficking pathway in S. lividans. One branch requires both Sco and to a certain extent ECuC to cofactor the CuA domain, whereas the other uses only Sco to deliver copper to a cuproenzyme to initiate morphological development.

  10. Mechanistic insight into marine bioluminescence: photochemistry of the chemiexcited Cypridina (sea firefly) lumophore.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bo-Wen; Naumov, Panče; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2015-02-10

    Cypridina hilgendorfii (sea firefly) is a bioluminescent crustacean whose bioluminescence (BL) reaction is archetypal for a number of marine organisms, notably other bioluminescent crustaceans and coelenterates. Unraveling the mechanism of its BL is paramount for future applications of its strongly emissive lumophore. Cypridina produces light in a three-step reaction: First, the cypridinid luciferin is activated by an enzyme to produce a peroxide intermediate, cypridinid dioxetanone (CDO), which then decomposes to generate excited oxyluciferin (OxyCLnH*). Finally, OxyCLnH* deexcites to its ground state along with emission of bright blue light. Unfortunately, the detailed mechanism of the critical step, the thermolysis of CDO, remains unknown, and it is unclear whether the light emitter is generated from a neutral form (CDOH) or anionic form (CDO(-)) of the CDO precursor. In this work, we investigated the key step in the process by modeling the thermal decompositions of both CDOH and CDO(-). The calculated results indicate that the decomposition of CDO(-) occurs via the gradually reversible charge transfer (CT)-initiated luminescence (GRCTIL) mechanism, whereas CDOH decomposes through an entropic trapping mechanism without an obvious CT process. The thermolysis of CDO(-) is sensitive to solvent effects and is energetically favorable in polar environments compared with the thermolysis of CDOH. The thermolysis of CDO(-) produces the excited oxyluciferin anion (OxyCLn(-)*), which combines with a proton from the environment to form OxyCLnH*, the actual light emitter for the natural system.

  11. Modulation of MICAL Monooxygenase Activity by its Calponin Homology Domain: Structural and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Alqassim, Saif S.; Urquiza, Mauricio; Borgnia, Eitan; Nagib, Marc; Amzel, L. Mario; Bianchet, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    MICALs (Molecule Interacting with CasL) are conserved multidomain enzymes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization in nerve development, endocytosis, and apoptosis. In these enzymes, a type-2 calponin homology (CH) domain always follows an N-terminal monooxygenase (MO) domain. Although the CH domain is required for MICAL-1 cellular localization and actin-associated function, its contribution to the modulation of MICAL activity towards actin remains unclear. Here, we present the structure of a fragment of MICAL-1 containing the MO and the CH domains—determined by X-ray crystallography and small angle scattering—as well as kinetics experiments designed to probe the contribution of the CH domain to the actin-modification activity. Our results suggest that the CH domain, which is loosely connected to the MO domain by a flexible linker and is far away from the catalytic site, couples F-actin to the enhancement of redox activity of MICALMO-CH by a cooperative mechanism involving a trans interaction between adjacently bound molecules. Binding cooperativity is also observed in other proteins regulating actin assembly/disassembly dynamics, such as ADF/Cofilins. PMID:26935886

  12. Structural and mechanistic insights into cooperative assembly of dimeric Notch transcription complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, Kelly L.; Hass, Matthew; McArthur, Debbie G.; Ilagan, Ma Xenia G.; Aster, Jon C.; Kopan, Raphael; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2010-11-12

    Ligand-induced proteolysis of Notch produces an intracellular effector domain that transduces essential signals by regulating the transcription of target genes. This function relies on the formation of transcriptional activation complexes that include intracellular Notch, a Mastermind co-activator and the transcription factor CSL bound to cognate DNA. These complexes form higher-order assemblies on paired, head-to-head CSL recognition sites. Here we report the X-ray structure of a dimeric human Notch1 transcription complex loaded on the paired site from the human HES1 promoter. The small interface between the Notch ankyrin domains could accommodate DNA bending and untwisting to allow a range of spacer lengths between the two sites. Cooperative dimerization occurred on the human and mouse Hes5 promoters at a sequence that diverged from the CSL-binding consensus at one of the sites. These studies reveal how promoter organizational features control cooperativity and, thus, the responsiveness of different promoters to Notch signaling.

  13. Mechanistic Insights to the Influence of Adsorbed Organic Macromolecules on Nanoparticle Attachment Efficiency in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phenrat, T.; Song, J.; Cisneros, C. M.; Schoenfelder, D. P.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Tilton, R. D.; Lowry, G. V.

    2009-12-01

    Assessing the potential risks of natural or engineered nanoparticles to the environment and human health requires the ability to predict their mobility in porous media such as groundwater aquifers or sand filters used in water treatment. Semi-empirical correlations to predict the collision efficiency of electrostatically stabilized nanoparticles are available; however, they are not applicable to nanoparticles coated with natural organic matter (NOM) or polymeric surface coatings because the existing correlations do not account the electrosteric repulsions and lubrication afforded by coatings that inhibit or reverse nanoparticle attachment to surfaces. Regression analysis of published data on the collision efficiency of NOM-coated latex and hematite particles, and on new data collected for poly(styrene sulfonate)-, carboxy methyl cellulose, and polyaspartate-coated hematite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles was used to develop an empirical correlation of the collision efficiency of NOM- and polymer-coated nanomaterials and dimensionless parameters including the adsorbed layer-electrokinetic parameter (NLEK) representing electrosteric repulsions and lubrication afforded by adsorbed NOM or polyelectrolyte. An empirical correlation with three dimensionless parameters can predict the measured collision efficiency on coated metal oxide nanoparticles over a wide dynamic range in particle type, coating type, and solution conditions (~80 data points). This study indicates that including the adsorbed NOM and polymer layer properties of the properties is essential for understanding the transport and fate of NOM- and polymer-coated natural and manufactured nanomaterials in porous media.

  14. State of the art. Mechanistic heterogeneity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: insights from transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Elias, Jack A; Kang, Min Jong; Crothers, Kristina; Crouthers, Kristina; Homer, Robert; Lee, Chun Geun

    2006-08-01

    Alveolar destruction is a cardinal feature of emphysema but is not traditionally believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of "classical" asthma. However, the relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma is controversial and the variety of mechanisms that can mediate the alveolar destruction in emphysema have not been adequately defined. To address these issues, we used overexpression transgenic approaches to define the effects of Th1/Tc1 and Th2/Tc2 cytokines in the mature murine lung and compared findings in these transgenic systems to the effects of similar interventions after cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. In these experiments, the Th1/Tc1 and Th2/Tc2 cytokines IFN-gamma and interleukin (IL)-13, respectively, both caused emphysema. The IFN-gamma response was associated with neutrophilia but was not associated with mucus metaplasia or a major fibrotic response. In this setting, IFN-gamma was a potent stimulator of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cathepsins, and CXC and other chemokines while inhibiting secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI). Interestingly, IFN-gamma induced its destructive effects via at least two mechanisms, a CCR5/cathepsin-dependent and apoptosis-mediated pathway and an MMP-12-dependent/apoptosis-independent pathway. CS-induced inflammation, apoptosis, and emphysema were also induced by IFN-gamma- and CCR5-dependent mechanisms. In contrast, IL-13-induced emphysema was associated with eosinophilia, mucus metaplasia, and pulmonary fibrosis. In this setting, IL-13 stimulated MMPs, cathepsins, and a variety of CC chemokines while inhibiting alpha(1)-antitrypsin. A cathepsin-dependent apoptosis pathway also contributed to this remodeling response. Interestingly, abnormalities in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also appreciated with VEGF(165) excess producing an asthmalike pulmonary response and IFN-gamma abrogating this response while inducing emphysematous alveolar destruction. These findings provide molecular support for both points of view in the British/Dutch hypothesis controversy regarding the relationship between asthma and COPD. They also highlight the complexity of the pathways that can induce alveolar destruction and suggest that there is a continuum, based on VEGF, between asthma and COPD.

  15. Mechanistic insights into the stepwise Diels-Alder reaction of 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore

    2012-01-06

    The stepwise Diels-Alder reaction between 1-trimethylsiloxy-1,3-butadiene and 4,6-dinitrobenzofuroxan is explored using state-of-the-art computational methods. The results support a stepwise mechanism via a persistent intermediate, however, not the one previously reported (Lakhdar et al., Chem. Eur. J.2007, 16, 5681) but a heterocyclic adduct. The novel DFT functional M062X and the SCS-MP2 method were essential to reproduce a reasonable potential energy surface for this challenging system.

  16. Mechanistic insights into a TIMP3-sensitive pathway constitutively engaged in the regulation of cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Carmen; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Baron-Menguy, Celine; Chalaris, Athena; Ghezali, Lamia; Domenga-Denier, Valérie; Schmidt, Stefanie; Huneau, Clément; Rose-John, Stefan; Nelson, Mark T; Joutel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a leading cause of stroke and dementia. CADASIL, an inherited SVD, alters cerebral artery function, compromising blood flow to the working brain. TIMP3 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3) accumulation in the vascular extracellular matrix in CADASIL is a key contributor to cerebrovascular dysfunction. However, the linkage between elevated TIMP3 and compromised cerebral blood flow (CBF) remains unknown. Here, we show that TIMP3 acts through inhibition of the metalloprotease ADAM17 and HB-EGF to regulate cerebral arterial tone and blood flow responses. In a clinically relevant CADASIL mouse model, we show that exogenous ADAM17 or HB-EGF restores cerebral arterial tone and blood flow responses, and identify upregulated voltage-dependent potassium channel (KV) number in cerebral arterial myocytes as a heretofore-unrecognized downstream effector of TIMP3-induced deficits. These results support the concept that the balance of TIMP3 and ADAM17 activity modulates CBF through regulation of myocyte KV channel number. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17536.001 PMID:27476853

  17. Formic acid dehydrogenation with bioinspired iridium complexes: a kinetic isotope effect study and mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Hui; Xu, Shaoan; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-07-01

    Highly efficient hydrogen generation from dehydrogenation of formic acid is achieved by using bioinspired iridium complexes that have hydroxyl groups at the ortho positions of the bipyridine or bipyrimidine ligand (i.e., OH in the second coordination sphere of the metal center). In particular, [Ir(Cp*)(TH4BPM)(H2 O)]SO4 (TH4BPM: 2,2',6,6'-tetrahydroxyl-4,4'-bipyrimidine; Cp*: pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) has a high turnover frequency of 39 500 h(-1) at 80 °C in a 1 M aqueous solution of HCO2 H/HCO2 Na and produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide without carbon monoxide contamination. The deuterium kinetic isotope effect study clearly indicates a different rate-determining step for complexes with hydroxyl groups at different positions of the ligands. The rate-limiting step is β-hydrogen elimination from the iridium-formate intermediate for complexes with hydroxyl groups at ortho positions, owing to a proton relay (i.e., pendent-base effect), which lowers the energy barrier of hydrogen generation. In contrast, the reaction of iridium hydride with a proton to liberate hydrogen is demonstrated to be the rate-determining step for complexes that do not have hydroxyl groups at the ortho positions.

  18. Mechanistic insights into the rhenium-catalyzed alcohol-to-olefin dehydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Ties J; Jastrzebski, Johann T B H; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2013-09-23

    Rhenium-based complexes are powerful catalysts for the dehydration of various alcohols to the corresponding olefins. Here, we report on both experimental and theoretical (DFT) studies into the mechanism of the rhenium-catalyzed dehydration of alcohols to olefins in general, and the methyltrioxorhenium-catalyzed dehydration of 1-phenylethanol to styrene in particular. The experimental and theoretical studies are in good agreement, both showing the involvement of several proton transfers, and of a carbenium ion intermediate in the catalytic cycle.

  19. Mechanistic Insights from Vascular and Cardiac Impairments in Rats Inhaling Diesel Exhaust Particles and Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the causality has been established between air pollution and cardiovascular impairments, the molecular mechanisms are unknown. Moreover, cardiovascular effects of ozone have not been studied until recently. We hypothesize that vasculature and cardiac tissues are targets ...

  20. Evaluation of Colorimetric Assays for Analyzing Reductively Methylated Proteins: Biases and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Pamlea N.; Macnaughtan, Megan A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorimetric protein assays, such as the Coomassie blue G-250 dye-binding (Bradford) and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assays, are commonly used to quantify protein concentration. The accuracy of these assays depends on the amino acid composition. Because of the extensive use of reductive methylation in the study of proteins and the importance of biological methylation, it is necessary to evaluate the impact of lysyl methylation on the Bradford and BCA assays. Unmodified and reductively methylated proteins were analyzed using the absorbance at 280 nm to standardize the concentrations. Using model compounds, we demonstrate that the dimethylation of lysyl ε-amines does not affect the proteins’ molar extinction coefficients at 280 nm. For the Bradford assay, the response (absorbance per unit concentration) of the unmodified and reductively methylated proteins were similar with a slight decrease in the response upon methylation. For the BCA assay, the responses of the reductively methylated proteins were consistently higher, overestimating the concentrations of the methylated proteins. The enhanced color-formation in the BCA assay may be due to the lower acid dissociation constants of the lysyl ε-dimethylamines, compared to the unmodified ε-amine, favoring Cu(II) binding in biuret-like complexes. The implications for the analysis of biologically methylated samples are discussed. PMID:26342307

  1. T-tubule disruption promotes calcium alternans in failing ventricular myocytes: mechanistic insights from computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Nivala, Michael; Song, Zhen; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-02-01

    In heart failure (HF), T-tubule (TT) disruption contributes to dyssynchronous calcium (Ca) release and impaired contraction, but its role in arrhythmogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effects of TT disruption and other HF remodeling factors on Ca alternans in ventricular myocytes using computer modeling. A ventricular myocyte model with detailed spatiotemporal Ca cycling modeled by a coupled Ca release unit (CRU) network was used, in which the L-type Ca channels and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels were simulated by random Markov transitions. TT disruption, which removes the L-type Ca channels from the associated CRUs, results in "orphaned" RyR clusters and thus provides increased opportunity for spark-induced Ca sparks to occur. This effect combined with other HF remodeling factors promoted alternans by two distinct mechanisms: 1) for normal sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase (SERCA) activity, alternans was caused by both CRU refractoriness and coupling. The increased opportunity for spark-induced sparks by TT disruption combined with the enhanced CRU coupling by Ca elevation in the presence or absence of increased RyR leakiness facilitated spark synchronization on alternate beats to promote Ca alternans; 2) for down-regulated SERCA, alternans was caused by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load-dependent mechanism, independent of CRU refractoriness. TT disruption and increased RyR leakiness shifted and steepened the SR Ca release-load relationship, which combines with down-regulated SERCA to promote Ca alternans. In conclusion, the mechanisms of Ca alternans for normal and down-regulated SERCA are different, and TT disruption promotes Ca alternans by both mechanisms, which may contribute to alternans at different stages of HF.

  2. Nanoscale Silicon as a Catalyst for Graphene Growth: Mechanistic Insight from in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Share, Keith; Carter, Rachel E.; Nikolaev, Pavel; ...

    2016-06-08

    Nanoscale carbons are typically synthesized by thermal decomposition of a hydrocarbon at the surface of a metal catalyst. Whereas the use of silicon as an alternative to metal catalysts could unlock new techniques to seamlessly couple carbon nanostructures and semiconductor materials, stable carbide formation renders bulk silicon incapable of the precipitation and growth of graphitic structures. In this article, we provide evidence supported by comprehensive in situ Raman experiments that indicates nanoscale grains of silicon in porous silicon (PSi) scaffolds act as catalysts for hydrocarbon decomposition and growth of few-layered graphene at temperatures as low as 700 K. Self-limiting growthmore » kinetics of graphene with activation energies measured between 0.32–0.37 eV elucidates the formation of highly reactive surface-bound Si radicals that aid in the decomposition of hydrocarbons. Nucleation and growth of graphitic layers on PSi exhibits striking similarity to catalytic growth on nickel surfaces, involving temperature dependent surface and subsurface diffusion of carbon. Lastly, this work elucidates how the nanoscale properties of silicon can be exploited to yield catalytic properties distinguished from bulk silicon, opening an important avenue to engineer catalytic interfaces combining the two most technologically important materials for modern applications—silicon and nanoscale carbons.« less

  3. Mechanistic Insight into the Enzymatic Reduction of Truncated Hemoglobin N of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep; Thakur, Naveen; Oliveira, Ana; Petruk, Ariel A.; Hade, Mangesh Dattu; Sethi, Deepti; Bidon-Chanal, Axel; Martí, Marcelo A.; Datta, Himani; Parkesh, Raman; Estrin, Dario A.; Luque, F. Javier; Dikshit, Kanak L.

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogenic microorganisms have evolved hemoglobin-mediated nitric oxide (NO) detoxification mechanisms, where a globin domain in conjunction with a partner reductase catalyzes the conversion of toxic NO to innocuous nitrate. The truncated hemoglobin HbN of Mycobacterium tuberculosis displays a potent NO dioxygenase activity despite lacking a reductase domain. The mechanism by which HbN recycles itself during NO dioxygenation and the reductase that participates in this process are currently unknown. This study demonstrates that the NADH-ferredoxin/flavodoxin system is a fairly efficient partner for electron transfer to HbN with an observed reduction rate of 6.2 μm/min−1, which is nearly 3- and 5-fold faster than reported for Vitreoscilla hemoglobin and myoglobin, respectively. Structural docking of the HbN with Escherichia coli NADH-flavodoxin reductase (FdR) together with site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the CD loop of the HbN forms contacts with the reductase, and that Gly48 may have a vital role. The donor to acceptor electron coupling parameters calculated using the semiempirical pathway method amounts to an average of about 6.4 10−5 eV, which is lower than the value obtained for E. coli flavoHb (8.0 10−4 eV), but still supports the feasibility of an efficient electron transfer. The deletion of Pre-A abrogated the heme iron reduction by FdR in the HbN, thus signifying its involvement during intermolecular interactions of the HbN and FdR. The present study, thus, unravels a novel role of the CD loop and Pre-A motif in assisting the interactions of the HbN with the reductase and the electron cycling, which may be vital for its NO-scavenging function. PMID:24928505

  4. Mechanistic insight into the interaction of BLM helicase with intra-strand G-quadruplex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sujoy; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Savitsky, Pavel; Sturzenegger, Andreas; Huttner, Diana; Janscak, Pavel; Hickson, Ian D.; Gileadi, Opher; Rothenberg, Eli

    2014-11-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ family helicase BLM that is associated with growth retardation and predisposition to cancer. BLM helicase has a high specificity for non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures, which are formed by G-rich DNA strands and play an important role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we used single-molecule FRET to define the mechanism of interaction of BLM helicase with intra-stranded G4 structures. We show that the activity of BLM is substrate dependent, and highly regulated by a short-strand DNA (ssDNA) segment that separates the G4 motif from double-stranded DNA. We demonstrate cooperativity between the RQC and HRDC domains of BLM during binding and unfolding of the G4 structure, where the RQC domain interaction with G4 is stabilized by HRDC binding to ssDNA. We present a model that proposes a unique role for G4 structures in modulating the activity of DNA processing enzymes.

  5. Mechanistic insights aid the search for CFC substitutes: risk assessment of HCFC-123 as an example.

    PubMed

    Jarabek, A M; Fisher, J W; Rubenstein, R; Lipscomb, J C; Williams, R J; Vinegar, A; McDougal, J N

    1994-06-01

    An international consensus on the need to reduce the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone-depleting gases such as the halons led to the adoptions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol and Title VI of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, "Protecting Stratospheric Ozone." These agreements included major provisions for reducing and eventually phasing out production and use of CFCs and halons as well as advancing the development of replacement chemicals. Because of the ubiquitous use and benefits of CFCs and halons, an expeditious search for safe replacements to meet the legislative deadlines is of critical importance. Toxicity testing and health risk assessment programs were established to evaluate the health and environmental impact of these replacement chemicals. Development and implementation of these programs as well as the structural-activity relationships significant for the development of the replacement chemicals are described below. A dose-response evaluation for the health risk assessment of the replacement chemical HCFC-123 (2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane) is also presented to show an innovative use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. This is based on a parallelogram approach using data on the anesthetic gas halothane, a structural analog to HCFC-123. Halothane and HCFC-123 both form the same metabolite, trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), indicative of the same metabolic oxidative pathway attributed to hepatotoxicity. The parallelogram approach demonstrates the application of template model structures and shows how PBPK modeling, together with judicious experimental design, can be used to improve the accuracy of health risk assessment and to decrease the need for extensive laboratory animal testing.

  6. Antioxidant activity of ferulic acid alkyl esters in a heterophasic system: a mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Centini, Marisanna; Granata, Paola; Sega, Alessandro; Buonocore, Anna; Bernini, Andrea; Facino, Roberto Maffei

    2004-10-20

    The antioxidant activity of some esters of ferulic acid with the linear fatty alcohols C7, C8 (branched and linear), C9, C11, C12, C13, C15, C16, and C18 has been studied in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. Whereas in homogeneous phase all of the alkyl ferulates possessed similar radical-scavenging abilities, in rat liver microsomes they showed striking differences, the more effective being C12 (7) (IC50 = 11.03 M), linear C8 (3) (IC50 = 12.40 microM), C13 (8) (IC50 = 18.60 microM), and C9 (5) (IC50 = 19.74 microM), followed by C7 (2), C15 (9), C11 (6), branched C8 (4), C16 (10), and C18 (11) (ferulic acid was the less active, IC50 = 243.84 microM). All of the molecules showed similar partition coefficients in an octanol-buffer system. Three-dimensional studies (NMR in solution, modeling in vacuo) indicate that this behavior might be due to a different anchorage of the molecules with the ester side chain to the microsomal phospholipid bilayer and to a consequent different orientation/positioning of the scavenging phenoxy group outside the membrane surface against the flux of oxy radicals.

  7. Heavy Metals and Human Health: Mechanistic Insight into Toxicity and Counter Defense System of Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Azam, Mudsser; Siddiqui, Kehkashan; Ali, Arif; Choi, Inho; Haq, Qazi Mohd. Rizwanul

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals, which have widespread environmental distribution and originate from natural and anthropogenic sources, are common environmental pollutants. In recent decades, their contamination has increased dramatically because of continuous discharge in sewage and untreated industrial effluents. Because they are non-degradable, they persist in the environment; accordingly, they have received a great deal of attention owing to their potential health and environmental risks. Although the toxic effects of metals depend on the forms and routes of exposure, interruptions of intracellular homeostasis include damage to lipids, proteins, enzymes and DNA via the production of free radicals. Following exposure to heavy metals, their metabolism and subsequent excretion from the body depends on the presence of antioxidants (glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, etc.) associated with the quenching of free radicals by suspending the activity of enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase). Therefore, this review was written to provide a deep understanding of the mechanisms involved in eliciting their toxicity in order to highlight the necessity for development of strategies to decrease exposure to these metals, as well as to identify substances that contribute significantly to overcome their hazardous effects within the body of living organisms. PMID:26690422

  8. Mechanistic insights into neurotoxicity induced by anesthetics in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xi; Guo, Qihao; Zhang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence has shown that exposure to anesthetics used in the clinic can cause neurodegeneration in the mammalian developing brain, but the basis of this is not clear. Neurotoxicity induced by exposure to anesthestics in early life involves neuroapoptosis and impairment of neurodevelopmental processes such as neurogenesis, synaptogenesis and immature glial development. These effects may subsequently contribute to behavior abnormalities in later life. In this paper, we reviewed the possible mechanisms of anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity based on new in vitro and in vivo findings. Also, we discussed ways to protect against anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and their implications for exploring cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection. These findings help in improving our understanding of developmental neurotoxicology and in avoiding adverse neurological outcomes in anesthesia practice.

  9. Mechanistic insight into a peptide hormone signaling complex mediating floral organ abscission

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Julia; Brandt, Benjamin; Wildhagen, Mari; Hohmann, Ulrich; Hothorn, Ludwig A; Butenko, Melinka A; Hothorn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Plants constantly renew during their life cycle and thus require to shed senescent and damaged organs. Floral abscission is controlled by the leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK) HAESA and the peptide hormone IDA. It is unknown how expression of IDA in the abscission zone leads to HAESA activation. Here we show that IDA is sensed directly by the HAESA ectodomain. Crystal structures of HAESA in complex with IDA reveal a hormone binding pocket that accommodates an active dodecamer peptide. A central hydroxyproline residue anchors IDA to the receptor. The HAESA co-receptor SERK1, a positive regulator of the floral abscission pathway, allows for high-affinity sensing of the peptide hormone by binding to an Arg-His-Asn motif in IDA. This sequence pattern is conserved among diverse plant peptides, suggesting that plant peptide hormone receptors may share a common ligand binding mode and activation mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15075.001 PMID:27058169

  10. Heavy Metals and Human Health: Mechanistic Insight into Toxicity and Counter Defense System of Antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Azam, Mudsser; Siddiqui, Kehkashan; Ali, Arif; Choi, Inho; Haq, Qazi Mohd Rizwanul

    2015-12-10

    Heavy metals, which have widespread environmental distribution and originate from natural and anthropogenic sources, are common environmental pollutants. In recent decades, their contamination has increased dramatically because of continuous discharge in sewage and untreated industrial effluents. Because they are non-degradable, they persist in the environment; accordingly, they have received a great deal of attention owing to their potential health and environmental risks. Although the toxic effects of metals depend on the forms and routes of exposure, interruptions of intracellular homeostasis include damage to lipids, proteins, enzymes and DNA via the production of free radicals. Following exposure to heavy metals, their metabolism and subsequent excretion from the body depends on the presence of antioxidants (glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, etc.) associated with the quenching of free radicals by suspending the activity of enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase). Therefore, this review was written to provide a deep understanding of the mechanisms involved in eliciting their toxicity in order to highlight the necessity for development of strategies to decrease exposure to these metals, as well as to identify substances that contribute significantly to overcome their hazardous effects within the body of living organisms.

  11. Mechanistic and Evolutionary Insights from the Reciprocal Promiscuity of Two Pyridoxal Phosphate-dependent Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Valerie W. C.; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes that utilize the cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate play essential roles in amino acid metabolism in all organisms. The cofactor is used by proteins that adopt at least five different folds, which raises questions about the evolutionary processes that might explain the observed distribution of functions among folds. In this study, we show that a representative of fold type III, the Escherichia coli alanine racemase (ALR), is a promiscuous cystathionine β-lyase (CBL). Furthermore, E. coli CBL (fold type I) is a promiscuous alanine racemase. A single round of error-prone PCR and selection yielded variant ALR(Y274F), which catalyzes cystathionine β-elimination with a near-native Michaelis constant (Km = 3.3 mm) but a poor turnover number (kcat ≈10 h−1). In contrast, directed evolution also yielded CBL(P113S), which catalyzes l-alanine racemization with a poor Km (58 mm) but a high kcat (22 s−1). The structures of both variants were solved in the presence and absence of the l-alanine analogue, (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid. As expected, the ALR active site was enlarged by the Y274F substitution, allowing better access for cystathionine. More surprisingly, the favorable kinetic parameters of CBL(P113S) appear to result from optimizing the pKa of Tyr-111, which acts as the catalytic acid during l-alanine racemization. Our data emphasize the short mutational routes between the functions of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent enzymes, regardless of whether or not they share the same fold. Thus, they confound the prevailing model of enzyme evolution, which predicts that overlapping patterns of promiscuity result from sharing a common multifunctional ancestor. PMID:27474741

  12. Nickel-Catalyzed Allylic Alkylation with Diarylmethane Pronucleophiles: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Sha, Sheng-Chun; Jiang, Hui; Mao, Jianyou; Bellomo, Ana; Jeong, Soo A; Walsh, Patrick J

    2016-01-18

    Palladium-catalyzed allylic substitution reactions are among the most efficient methods to construct C-C bonds between sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms. In contrast, much less work has been done with nickel catalysts, perhaps because of the different mechanisms of the allylic substitution reactions. Palladium catalysts generally undergo substitution by a "soft"-nucleophile pathway, wherein the nucleophile attacks the allyl group externally. Nickel catalysts are usually paired with "hard" nucleophiles, which attack the metal before C-C bond formation. Introduced herein is a rare nickel-based catalyst which promotes substitution with diarylmethane pronucleophiles by the soft-nucleophile pathway. Preliminary studies on the asymmetric allylic alkylation are promising.

  13. (n-3) Fatty acids alleviate adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance: Mechanistic insights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with the metabolic syndrome, a significant risk factor for developing type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. A chronic low-grade inflammation occurring in the adipose tissue of obese individuals is causally linked to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the metaboli...

  14. Structural and mechanistic insight into covalent substrate binding by Escherichia coli dihydroxyacetone kinase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong; McDonald, Laura; Cui, Qizhi; Matte, Allan; Cygler, Miroslaw; Ekiel, Irena

    2011-01-25

    The Escherichia coli dihydroxyacetone (Dha) kinase is an unusual kinase because (i) it uses the phosphoenolpyruvate carbohydrate: phosphotransferase system (PTS) as the source of high-energy phosphate, (ii) the active site is formed by two subunits, and (iii) the substrate is covalently bound to His218(K)* of the DhaK subunit. The PTS transfers phosphate to DhaM, which in turn phosphorylates the permanently bound ADP coenzyme of DhaL. This phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to the Dha substrate bound to DhaK. Here we report the crystal structure of the E. coli Dha kinase complex, DhaK-DhaL. The structure of the complex reveals that DhaK undergoes significant conformational changes to accommodate binding of DhaL. Combined mutagenesis and enzymatic activity studies of kinase mutants allow us to propose a catalytic mechanism for covalent Dha binding, phosphorylation, and release of the Dha-phosphate product. Our results show that His56(K) is involved in formation of the covalent hemiaminal bond with Dha. The structure of H56N(K) with noncovalently bound substrate reveals a somewhat different positioning of Dha in the binding pocket as compared to covalently bound Dha, showing that the covalent attachment to His218(K) orients the substrate optimally for phosphoryl transfer. Asp109(K) is critical for activity, likely acting as a general base activating the γ-OH of Dha. Our results provide a comprehensive picture of the roles of the highly conserved active site residues of dihydroxyacetone kinases.

  15. Mechanistic Insights into the Relationship between Lung and Vascular Response to Ambient Particulate Matter (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms by which pulmonary-encountered ambient PM induces vascular response are not well understood. We examined lung and aortic response of rats following intratracheal instillation of three ambient PM. Chemically characterized PM10 and PM2.5 from th...

  16. Curcumin-loaded colloidal carrier system: formulation optimization, mechanistic insight, ex vivo and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Zrien; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2015-01-01

    The present work investigated the topical delivery potential of nanoemulsion gel loaded with curcumin (CR). CR nanoemulsion (CR-NE) was prepared by spontaneous emulsification method using oil (Labrafac PG/glyceryl triacetate), surfactant:cosurfactant (Smix) (tween 80/polyethylene glycol [PEG] 400) and water. The pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed and thermodynamic stability testing was performed. Droplet size and zeta potential were evaluated using photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron spectroscopy. Six formulations selected with an average droplet size ≤70±2.72 nm showed a fourfold increase in skin permeation as compared to crude CR solution in oil. The formulation CR-NE4 having a flux of 117.04±2.32 µg/cm2/h and with maximum retention (42.87%) was selected, characterized (droplet size =41.13±3.34 nm and zeta potential =−33.1±1.45 mV), and incorporated into gel using carbopol-980 (1% w/v). Skin dynamics analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed maximum deposition of CR up to a depth of 86.98 µm and was in concordance with differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies that confirmed lipid bilayer disruption, enhancing permeation. A 28-day anti-arthritic evaluation (body weight, paw edema, tibiotarsal joint thickness, TNF-α and IL-1β levels, and histopathology) on Freund’s complete adjuvant induced arthritic rat model after topical application of CR-NE gel in Wistar rats demonstrated substantial reversal of arthritic symptoms. Thus, CR-NE gel possesses potential for therapeutic effects locally in inflammatory arthritic disorders with improved topical bioavailability. PMID:26170665

  17. Mechanistic insights into energy conservation by flavin-based electron bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Lubner, Carolyn E; Jennings, David P; Mulder, David W; Schut, Gerrit J; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Hoben, John P; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Berry, Luke; Nguyen, Diep M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Bothner, Brian; Jones, Anne K; Miller, Anne-Frances; King, Paul W; Adams, Michael W W; Peters, John W

    2017-04-10

    The recently realized biochemical phenomenon of energy conservation through electron bifurcation provides biology with an elegant means to maximize utilization of metabolic energy. The mechanism of coordinated coupling of exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions by a single enzyme complex has been elucidated through optical and paramagnetic spectroscopic studies revealing unprecedented features. Pairs of electrons are bifurcated over more than 1 volt of electrochemical potential by generating a low-potential, highly energetic, unstable flavin semiquinone and directing electron flow to an iron-sulfur cluster with a highly negative potential to overcome the barrier of the endergonic half reaction. The unprecedented range of thermodynamic driving force that is generated by flavin-based electron bifurcation accounts for unique chemical reactions that are catalyzed by these enzymes.

  18. Hydrodecarboxylation of Carboxylic and Malonic Acid Derivatives via Organic Photoredox Catalysis: Substrate Scope and Mechanistic Insight.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Jeremy D; Zeller, Mary A; Nicewicz, David A

    2015-09-09

    A direct, catalytic hydrodecarboxylation of primary, secondary, and tertiary carboxylic acids is reported. The catalytic system consists of a Fukuzumi acridinium photooxidant with phenyldisulfide acting as a redox-active cocatalyst. Substoichiometric quantities of Hünig's base are used to reveal the carboxylate. Use of trifluoroethanol as a solvent allowed for significant improvements in substrate compatibilities, as the method reported is not limited to carboxylic acids bearing α heteroatoms or phenyl substitution. This method has been applied to the direct double decarboxylation of malonic acid derivatives, which allows for the convenient use of dimethyl malonate as a methylene synthon. Kinetic analysis of the reaction is presented showing a lack of a kinetic isotope effect when generating deuterothiophenol in situ as a hydrogen atom donor. Further kinetic analysis demonstrated first-order kinetics with respect to the carboxylate, while the reaction is zero-order in acridinium catalyst, consistent with another finding suggesting the reaction is light limiting and carboxylate oxidation is likely turnover limiting. Stern-Volmer analysis was carried out in order to determine the efficiency for the carboxylates to quench the acridinium excited state.

  19. Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Arylhalogenation of Alkenes: Synthetic Scope and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Dipannita; Satterfield, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of a Pd-catalyzed reaction for the arylhalogenation (halogen = Cl or Br) of diverse α-olefins by oxidatively intercepting Mizoroki-Heck intermediates. These transformations afford synthetically useful 1,2- and 1,1-arylhalogenated products in good yields with good to excellent selectivities that can be modulated by changing the nature of the halogenating reagent and/or the reaction conditions. The selectivity of these reactions can be rationally tuned by: (i) controlling the relative rates of oxidative functionalization versus β-hydride elimination from equilibrating PdII-alkyl species and (ii) stabilization of organometallic PdII intermediates through the formation of π-benzyl adducts. These arylhalogenations exhibit modest to excellent levels of stereospecificity, and the key carbon-halogen bond-forming step proceeds with predominant retention of stereochemistry at carbon. PMID:20515033

  20. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  1. Mechanistic insights into the chemistry of RuII complexes containing Cl and DMSO ligands.

    PubMed

    Mola, Joaquim; Romero, Isabel; Rodríguez, Montserrat; Bozoglian, Fernando; Poater, Albert; Solà, Miquel; Parella, Teodor; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Fontrodona, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2007-12-10

    Two new isomers trans,mer-[RuIICl2(bpea)(DMSO)], 2a, and cis,fac-[RuIICl2(bpea)(DMSO)], 2b, (bpea = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylamine), as well as the bis-DMSO complex trans,fac-[RuIICl(bpea)(DMSO)2]Cl, 3, have been synthesized and characterized by cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy in solution. Their solid-state structure has also been solved by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. All the three complexes display a ruthenium metal center possessing a distorted-octahedral type of coordination, where the bpea ligand is coordinated in a meridional fashion in 2a and in a facial fashion in 2b and 3. The isomer 2a is the kinetically favored and thus can be thermally converted into 2b, that is the thermodynamically favored one. A thorough kinetic analysis strongly points toward a dissociative mechanism, where in the first step a chloro ligand is removed from the metal coordination sphere, followed by a geometric rearrangement before the chloro ligand coordinates again, generating the final complex. DFT calculations agree with the experimental data for the proposed mechanism and allow us to further characterize the mechanism of the 2a --> 2b rearrangement by obtaining the intermediates and transition state.

  2. Direct observation of failing fibers in muscles of dystrophic mice provides mechanistic insight into muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Claflin, Dennis R; Brooks, Susan V

    2008-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by the absence of the protein dystrophin. Dystrophin's function is not known, but its cellular location and associations with both the force-generating contractile core and membrane-spanning entities suggest a role in mechanically coupling force from its intracellular origins to the fiber membrane and beyond. We report here the presence of destructive contractile activity in lumbrical muscles from dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice during nominally quiescent periods following exposure to mechanical stress. The ectopic activity, which was observable microscopically, resulted in longitudinal separation and clotting of fiber myoplasm and was absent when calcium (Ca(2+)) was removed from the bathing medium. Separation and clotting of myoplasm were also produced in dystrophin-deficient muscles by local application of a Ca(2+) ionophore to create membrane breaches in the absence of mechanical stress, whereas muscles from control mice tolerated ionophore-induced entry of Ca(2+) without damage. These observations suggest a failure cascade in dystrophin-deficient fibers that 1) is initiated by a stress-induced influx of extracellular Ca(2+), causing localized activation to continue after cessation of stimulation, and 2) proceeds as the persistent local activation, combined with reduced lateral mechanical coupling between the contractile core and the extracellular matrix, results in longitudinal separation of myoplasm in nonactivated regions of the fiber. This mechanism invokes both the membrane stabilization and the mechanical coupling functions frequently proposed for dystrophin and suggests that, whereas the absence of either function alone is not sufficient to cause fiber failure, their combined absence is catastrophic.

  3. Evaluation of colorimetric assays for analyzing reductively methylated proteins: Biases and mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Brady, Pamlea N; Macnaughtan, Megan A

    2015-12-15

    Colorimetric protein assays, such as the Coomassie blue G-250 dye-binding (Bradford) and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assays, are commonly used to quantify protein concentration. The accuracy of these assays depends on the amino acid composition. Because of the extensive use of reductive methylation in the study of proteins and the importance of biological methylation, it is necessary to evaluate the impact of lysyl methylation on the Bradford and BCA assays. Unmodified and reductively methylated proteins were analyzed using the absorbance at 280 nm to standardize the concentrations. Using model compounds, we demonstrate that the dimethylation of lysyl ε-amines does not affect the proteins' molar extinction coefficients at 280 nm. For the Bradford assay, the responses (absorbance per unit concentration) of the unmodified and reductively methylated proteins were similar, with a slight decrease in the response upon methylation. For the BCA assay, the responses of the reductively methylated proteins were consistently higher, overestimating the concentrations of the methylated proteins. The enhanced color formation in the BCA assay may be due to the lower acid dissociation constants of the lysyl ε-dimethylamines compared with the unmodified ε-amine, favoring Cu(II) binding in biuret-like complexes. The implications for the analysis of biologically methylated samples are discussed.

  4. Hollow alloy nanostructures templated by Au nanorods: synthesis, mechanistic insights, and electrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mengmeng; Tan, Yiwei

    2014-11-07

    A unique methodology having access to Au nanorods (AuNRs)-based hollow alloy nanostructures has been developed. The syntheses and characterization of the hollow Pt-Au nanoalloys with ellipsoidal and cylindrical shapes together with a rattle-type hollow Cu-Au nanoheterostructure are described. Unlike the conventional nanoscale Kirkendall process, the formation of these AuNRs-based hollow nanostructures occurs under extremely mild conditions, indicating a distinctive underlying mechanism. The key step for this present synthesis method is the incubation of AuNRs with CuCl2 at 60 °C in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC). The selective etching of the tips of AuNRs caused by Cu(2+) ions combined with the dissolved molecular oxygen promotes the generation of defects and vacancies, leading to a facile alloying reaction by the crystal fusion of AuNRs. Particularly, the results of the formation of the hollow nanoalloys in conjunction with various control experiments demonstrate that the halide ions that are specifically adsorbed on the AuNR surface afford sinks for vacancy accumulation and condensation during the unbalanced interdiffusion of alloying atoms, presumably because of the disproportion in the equilibrium concentration of vacancies. Thus, the void formation becomes kinetically favorable. The Pt-Au nanocages can provide modified surface electronic structures, resulting from their non-uniform crystalline structures and the surface segregation of Pt in the nanocages. These characteristics enable them to exhibit excellent electrocatalytic performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR).

  5. Mechanistic insight with HBCH2CoA as a probe to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shrestha, Ruben; Buckley, Rachael M; Jewell, Jamie; Bossmann, Stefan H; Stubbe, JoAnne; Li, Ping

    2014-08-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases catalyze the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A (HBCoA) to produce polyoxoesters of 1-2 MDa. A substrate analogue HBCH2CoA, in which the S in HBCoA is replaced with a CH2 group, was synthesized in 13 steps using a chemoenzymatic approach in a 7.5% overall yield. Kinetic studies reveal it is a competitive inhibitor of a class I and a class III PHB synthases, with Kis of 40 and 14 μM, respectively. To probe the elongation steps of the polymerization, HBCH2CoA was incubated with a synthase acylated with a [(3)H]-saturated trimer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTCoA). The products of the reaction were shown to be the methylene analogue of [(3)H]-sTCoA ([(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA), saturated dimer-([(3)H]-sD-CO2H), and trimer-acid ([(3)H]-sT-CO2H), distinct from the expected methylene analogue of [(3)H]-saturated tetramer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTet-CH2-CoA). Detection of [(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA and its slow rate of formation suggest that HBCH2CoA may be reporting on the termination and repriming process of the synthases, rather than elongation.

  6. Mechanistic Insights into the Retaining Glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate Synthase from Mycobacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Urresti, Saioa; Albesa-Jové, David; Schaeffer, Francis; Pham, Ha T.; Kaur, Devinder; Gest, Petra; van der Woerd, Mark J.; Carreras-González, Ana; López-Fernández, Sonia; Alzari, Pedro M.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Jackson, Mary; Guerin, Marcelo E.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in our understanding of the structural basis of glycosyl transfer. Yet the nature and relevance of the conformational changes associated with substrate recognition and catalysis remain poorly understood. We have focused on the glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (GpgS), a “retaining” enzyme, that initiates the biosynthetic pathway of methylglucose lipopolysaccharides in mycobacteria. Evidence is provided that GpgS displays an unusually broad metal ion specificity for a GT-A enzyme, with Mg2+, Mn2+, Ca2+, Co2+, and Fe2+ assisting catalysis. In the crystal structure of the apo-form of GpgS, we have observed that a flexible loop adopts a double conformation LA and LI in the active site of both monomers of the protein dimer. Notably, the LA loop geometry corresponds to an active conformation and is conserved in two other relevant states of the enzyme, namely the GpgS·metal·nucleotide sugar donor and the GpgS·metal·nucleotide·acceptor-bound complexes, indicating that GpgS is intrinsically in a catalytically active conformation. The crystal structure of GpgS in the presence of Mn2+·UDP·phosphoglyceric acid revealed an alternate conformation for the nucleotide sugar β-phosphate, which likely occurs upon sugar transfer. Structural, biochemical, and biophysical data point to a crucial role of the β-phosphate in donor and acceptor substrate binding and catalysis. Altogether, our experimental data suggest a model wherein the catalytic site is essentially preformed, with a few conformational changes of lateral chain residues as the protein proceeds along the catalytic cycle. This model of action may be applicable to a broad range of GT-A glycosyltransferases. PMID:22637481

  7. Structure-Based Mechanistic Insights into DNMT1-Mediated Maintenance DNA Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jikui; Teplova, Marianna; Ishibe-Murakami, Satoko; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2012-03-26

    DNMT1, the major maintenance DNA methyltransferase in animals, helps to regulate gene expression, genome imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. We report on the crystal structure of a productive covalent mouse DNMT1(731-1602)-DNA complex containing a central hemimethylated CpG site. The methyl group of methylcytosine is positioned within a shallow hydrophobic concave surface, whereas the cytosine on the target strand is looped out and covalently anchored within the catalytic pocket. The DNA is distorted at the hemimethylated CpG step, with side chains from catalytic and recognition loops inserting through both grooves to fill an intercalation-type cavity associated with a dual base flip-out on partner strands. Structural and biochemical data establish how a combination of active and autoinhibitory mechanisms ensures the high fidelity of DNMT1-mediated maintenance DNA methylation.

  8. Controlled Cavitation to Augment SWL Stone Comminution: Mechanistic Insights In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has been documented to result from mechanical stresses conferred directly to the stone, as well as the activity of cavitational microbubbles. Studies have demonstrated that the presence of this cavitation activity is crucial for stone subdivision; however, its exact role in the comminution process remains somewhat weakly defined, in part due to the fact that it is difficult to isolate the cavitational component from the shock waves themselves. In this study, we further explored the importance of cavitation in SWL stone comminution through the use of histotripsy ultrasound therapy. Histotripsy was utilized to target model stones designed to mimic the mid-range tensile fracture strength of naturally occurring cystine calculi with controlled cavitation at strategic time points in the SWL comminution process. All SWL was applied at a peak-positive pressure (p+) of 34 MPa and a peak-negative pressure (p−) of 8 MPa; a shock rate of 1 Hz was used. Histotripsy pulses had a p− of 33 MPa and were applied at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 100 Hz. Ten model stones were sonicated in-vitro with each of five different treatment schemes: A. 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks) with 0.7 seconds of histotripsy interleaved between successive shocks (totaling to 42,000 pulses); B. 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks) followed by 10 minutes histotripsy applied in 0.7 second bursts (1 burst per second, totaling to 42,000 pulses); C. 10 minutes histotripsy applied in 0.7 second bursts (42,000 pulses) followed by 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks); D. 10 minutes SWL-only (600 shocks); E. 10 minutes histotripsy-only applied in 0.7 second bursts (42,000 pulses). Following sonication, debris was collected and sieved through 8, 6, 4, and 2 mm filters. It was found that SWL-only generated a broad range of fragment sizes, with an average of 14.9 ± 24.1% of the original stone mass remaining >8 mm. Histotripsy-only eroded the surface of stones to tiny particulate debris that was small enough to pass through the finest filter used in this study (<2 mm), leaving behind a single primary stone piece (>8 mm) with mass 85.1 ± 1.6% of the original following truncated sonication. The combination of SWL and histotripsy (schemes A, B, and C) resulted in a shift in the size distribution toward smaller fragments and complete elimination of debris >8 mm. When histotripsy controlled cavitation was applied following SWL (B), the increase in exposed stone surface area afforded by shock wave stone subdivision led to enhanced cavitation erosion. When histotripsy controlled cavitation was applied prior to SWL (C), it is likely that stone surface defects induced by cavitation erosion provided sights for crack nucleation and accelerated shock wave stone subdivision. Both these effects are likely at play in the interleaved therapy (A), although shielding of shock waves by remnant histotripsy microbubble nuclei may have limited the efficacy of this scheme. Nevertheless, these results demonstrate the important role played by cavitation in the stone comminution process, and suggest that the application of controlled cavitation at strategic time points can provide an adjunct to traditional SWL therapy. PMID:23357904

  9. Potential Anticancer Heterometallic Fe-Au and Fe-Pd Agents: Initial Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Nicholas; Vasilevski, Vadim; Carreira, Monica; de Almeida, Andreia; Sanaú, Mercedes; Hirva, Pipsa; Casini, Angela; Contel, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A series of gold(III) and palladium(II) heterometallic complexes with new iminophosphorane ligands derived from ferrocenyl-phosphanes [{Cp-P(Ph2)=N-Ph}2Fe] (1), [{Cp-P(Ph2)=N-CH2-2-NC5H4}2Fe] (2) and [{Cp-P(Ph2)=N-CH2-2-NC5H4}Fe(Cp)] (3) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Ligands 2 and 3 afford stable coordination complexes [AuCl2(3)]ClO4, [{AuCl2}2(2)](ClO4)2, [PdCl2(3)] and [{PdCl2}2(2)]. The complexes have been evaluated for their antripoliferative properties in human ovarian cancer cells sensitive and resistant to cisplatin (A2780S/R), in human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and in a non-tumorigenic human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293T). The highly cytotoxic trimetallic derivatives M2Fe (M = Au, Pd) are more cytotoxic to cancer cells than their corresponding monometallic fragments. Moreover, these complexes were significantly more cytotoxic than cisplatin in the resistant A2780R and the MCF7 cell lines. Studies of the interactions of the trimetallic compounds with DNA and the zinc-finger protein PARP-1 indicate that they exert anticancer effects in vitro based on different mechanisms of actions with respect to cisplatin. PMID:23786413

  10. Mechanistic insights into protonation state as a critical factor in hFPPS enzyme inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, David; Ortega-Castro, Joaquin; Mariño, Laura; Perelló, Joan; Frau, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Zoledronate and risedronate are the most powerful available nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates used in the treatment of bone-resorption disorders. Knowledge about inhibition mechanisms of these molecules is based on available crystallographic structures of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (hFPPS). However, there is a lack of information explaining the inhibition potency of these two molecules compared to the natural substrate, dimethylallyl pyrophosphate. We carried out a molecular dynamics study that shown: (1) that NBPs potency is related to higher electrostatic interactions with the metallic cluster of the active site than to the natural substrate, and (2) the protonation of the R2 side chain is a critical factor to stabilize the NBPs into a closely irreversible ternary complex with the hFPPS.

  11. Mechanistic insights into the anchorage of the contractile ring by anillin and Mid1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingfei; Guan, Ruifang; Lee, I-Ju; Liu, Yajun; Chen, Mengran; Wang, Jiawei; Wu, Jian-Qiu; Chen, Zhucheng

    2015-01-01

    Anillins and Mid1 are scaffold proteins that play key roles in anchorage of the contractile ring at the cell equator during cytokinesis in animals and fungi, respectively. Here, we report crystal structures and functional analysis of human anillin and S. pombe Mid1. The combined data show anillin contains a cryptic C2 domain and a Rho-binding domain. Together with the tethering PH domain, three membrane-associating elements synergistically bind to RhoA and phospholipids to anchor anillin at the cleavage furrow. Surprisingly, Mid1 also binds to the membrane through a cryptic C2 domain. Dimerization of Mid1 leads to high affinity and preference for PI(4,5)P2, which stably anchors Mid1 at the division plane, bypassing the requirement for Rho GTPase. These findings uncover the unexpected general machinery and the divergent regulatory logics for the anchorage of the contractile ring through the anillin/Mid1 family proteins from yeast to humans. PMID:25959226

  12. Mechanistic insights into selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent cancer cells by arctigenin.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Karin; Riebel, Virginie; Couttet, Philippe; Paech, Franziska; Wolf, Armin; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Pognan, Francois; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Uteng, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Arctigenin has previously been identified as a potential anti-tumor treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanism of how arctigenin kills cancer cells is not fully understood. In the present work we studied the mechanism of toxicity by arctigenin in the human pancreatic cell line, Panc-1, with special emphasis on the mitochondria. A comparison of Panc-1 cells cultured in glucose versus galactose medium was applied, allowing assessments of effects in glycolytic versus oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent Panc-1 cells. For control purposes, the mitochondrial toxic response to treatment with arctigenin was compared to the anti-cancer drug, sorafenib, which is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor known for mitochondrial toxic off-target effects (Will et al., 2008). In both Panc-1 OXPHOS-dependent and glycolytic cells, arctigenin dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential, which was demonstrated to be due to inhibition of the mitochondrial complexes II and IV. However, arctigenin selectively killed only the OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells. This selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells was accompanied by generation of ER stress, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and caspase activation leading to apoptosis and aponecrosis.

  13. Mechanistic Insights into the Carbon Dioxide/Cyclohexene Oxide Copolymerization Reaction: Is One Metal Center Enough?

    PubMed

    González-Fabra, Joan; Castro-Gómez, Fernando; Kleij, Arjan W; Bo, Carles

    2017-03-22

    A detailed study on the mechanism for the alternating copolymerization of cyclohexene oxide (CHO) and CO2 mediated by an [Al{amino-tri(phenolate)}]/NBu4 I binary catalyst system was performed by using DFT-based methods. Four potential mechanisms (one monometallic and three bimetallic) were considered for the first propagation cycle of the CHO/CO2 copolymerization. The obtained Gibbs free energies provided a rationale for the relative high activity of a non-covalent dimeric structure formed in situ and thus for the feasibility of a bimetallic mechanism to obtain polycarbonates quantitatively. Gibbs free energies also indicated that the alternating copolymerization was favored over the cyclic carbonate formation.

  14. Oleanolic acid (OA) as an antileishmanial agent: Biological evaluation and in silico mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Melo, Tahira Souza; Gattass, Cerli Rocha; Soares, Deivid Costa; Cunha, Micael Rodrigues; Ferreira, Christian; Tavares, Maurício Temotheo; Saraiva, Elvira; Parise-Filho, Roberto; Braden, Hannah; Delorenzi, Jan Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Although a worldwide health problem, leishmaniasis is considered a highly neglected disease, lacking efficient and low toxic treatment. The efforts for new drug development are based on alternatives such as new uses for well-known drugs, in silico and synthetic studies and naturally derived compounds. Oleanolic acid (OA) is a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely distributed throughout the Plantae kingdom that displays several pharmacological activities. OA showed potent leishmancidal effects in different Leishmania species, both against promastigotes (IC(50 L. braziliensis) 30.47 ± 6.35 μM; IC(50 L. amazonensis) 40.46 ± 14.21 μM; IC(50 L. infantum) 65.93 ± 15.12 μM) and amastigotes (IC(50 L. braziliensis) 68.75 ± 16.55 μM; IC(50 L. amazonensis) 38.45 ± 12.05 μM; IC(50 L. infantum) 64.08 ± 23.52 μM), with low cytotoxicity against mouse peritoneal macrophages (CC(50) 235.80 ± 36.95 μM). Moreover, in silico studies performed to evaluate OA molecular properties and to elucidate the possible mechanism of action over the Leishmania enzyme sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) suggested that OA interacts efficiently with CYP51 and could inhibit the ergosterol synthesis pathway. Collectively, these data indicate that OA is a good candidate as leading compound for the development of a new leishmaniasis treatment.

  15. A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Daniel; Turner, Alyna; Lauder, Sue; Gigler, Margaret E.; Berk, Lesley; Singh, Ajeet B.; Pasco, Julie A.; Berk, Michael; Sylvia, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence that exercise has been found to be effective in the treatment of depression, it is unclear whether these data can be extrapolated to bipolar disorder. Available evidence for bipolar disorder is scant, with no existing randomized controlled trials having tested the impact of exercise on depressive, manic or hypomanic symptomatology. Although exercise is often recommended in bipolar disorder, this is based on extrapolation from the unipolar literature, theory and clinical expertise and not empirical evidence. In addition, there are currently no available empirical data on program variables, with practical implications on frequency, intensity and type of exercise derived from unipolar depression studies. The aim of the current paper is to explore the relationship between exercise and bipolar disorder and potential mechanistic pathways. Given the high rate of medical co-morbidities experienced by people with bipolar disorder, it is possible that exercise is a potentially useful and important intervention with regard to general health benefits; however, further research is required to elucidate the impact of exercise on mood symptomology. PMID:25788889

  16. Warming will affect phytoplankton differently: evidence through a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Huertas, I Emma; Rouco, Mónica; López-Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo

    2011-12-07

    Although the consequences of global warming in aquatic ecosystems are only beginning to be revealed, a key to forecasting the impact on aquatic communities is an understanding of individual species' vulnerability to increased temperature. Despite their microscopic size, phytoplankton support about half of the global primary production, drive essential biogeochemical cycles and represent the basis of the aquatic food web. At present, it is known that phytoplankton are important targets and, consequently, harbingers of climate change in aquatic systems. Therefore, investigating the capacity of phytoplankton to adapt to the predicted warming has become a relevant issue. However, considering the polyphyletic complexity of the phytoplankton community, different responses to increased temperature are expected. We experimentally tested the effects of warming on 12 species of phytoplankton isolated from a variety of environments by using a mechanistic approach able to assess evolutionary adaptation (the so-called ratchet technique). We found different degrees of tolerance to temperature rises and an interspecific capacity for genetic adaptation. The thermal resistance level reached by each species is discussed in relation to their respective original habitats. Our study additionally provides evidence on the most resistant phytoplankton groups in a future warming scenario.

  17. Warming will affect phytoplankton differently: evidence through a mechanistic approach

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, I. Emma; Rouco, Mónica; López-Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Although the consequences of global warming in aquatic ecosystems are only beginning to be revealed, a key to forecasting the impact on aquatic communities is an understanding of individual species' vulnerability to increased temperature. Despite their microscopic size, phytoplankton support about half of the global primary production, drive essential biogeochemical cycles and represent the basis of the aquatic food web. At present, it is known that phytoplankton are important targets and, consequently, harbingers of climate change in aquatic systems. Therefore, investigating the capacity of phytoplankton to adapt to the predicted warming has become a relevant issue. However, considering the polyphyletic complexity of the phytoplankton community, different responses to increased temperature are expected. We experimentally tested the effects of warming on 12 species of phytoplankton isolated from a variety of environments by using a mechanistic approach able to assess evolutionary adaptation (the so-called ratchet technique). We found different degrees of tolerance to temperature rises and an interspecific capacity for genetic adaptation. The thermal resistance level reached by each species is discussed in relation to their respective original habitats. Our study additionally provides evidence on the most resistant phytoplankton groups in a future warming scenario. PMID:21508031

  18. Modeling Bird Migration under Climate Change: A Mechanistic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    2009-01-01

    behavior can be maintained over increasing and sustained environmental change. Also, the problem is much more complex than described by the current processes captured in our model. We have taken some important and interesting steps, and our model does demonstrate how local scale information about individual stop-over sites can be linked into the migratory flyway as a whole. We are incorporating additional, species specific, mechanistic processes to better reflect different climate change scenarios

  19. Application of Mechanistic Toxicology Data to Ecological Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ongoing evolution of knowledge and tools in the areas of molecular biology, bioinformatics, and systems biology holds significant promise for reducing uncertainties associated with ecological risk assessment. As our understanding of the mechanistic basis of responses of organ...

  20. Additional insights. Commentary on “the musical stroop effect: opening a new avenue to research on automatisms” by l. Grégoire, P. Perruchet, and B. Poulin-Charronnat (Experimental Psychology, 2013, vol. 60, pp. 269–278).

    PubMed

    Akiva-Kabiri, Lilach; Henik, Avishai

    2014-01-01

    In their paper "The Musical Stroop Effect: Opening a New Avenue to Research on Automatisms," Grégoire, Perruchet, and Poulin-Charronnat (2013) use a musical Stroop-like task to demonstrate the automaticity of musical note naming in musicians. In addition, the authors suggest that music training can serve as a tool in order to study the acquisition of automaticity. In the following commentary, we aim to address three main issues concerning the paper by Grégoire et al. (2013). First, we will suggest some additional interpretations of the results; specifically, we will relate to the association between music and space. Second, we will discuss a methodological issue dealing with interference, facilitation, and the role of the neutral condition. We suggest that the study by Grégoire et al. (2013) lacks a proper neutral condition and thus it is impossible to assert that the congruency effect is interference based. Third, we will discuss the authors' suggestion of using the musical Stroop effect as a tool for studying automatism. We consider the practical relevance of music training as a tool for studying the acquisition of automaticity by pointing out that music training is highly heterogeneous.

  1. Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    efficacy of veliparib and NAD as agents for suppressing inflammation and improving outcomes after traumatic brain injury. The animal models include...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0091 TITLE: Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...COVERED 25 Sep 2014 - 24 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI 5b. GRANT

  2. Extending the family table: Insights from beyond vertebrates into the regulation of embryonic development by FGFs.

    PubMed

    Tulin, Sarah; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2010-09-01

    Since the discovery of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) much focus has been placed on elucidating the roles for each vertebrate FGF ligand, receptor, and regulating molecules in the context of vertebrate development, human disorders and cancer. Studies in human, mouse, frog, chick, and zebrafish have made great contributions to our understanding of the role of FGFs in specific processes. However, in recent years, as more genomes are sequenced, information is becoming available from many non-vertebrate models and a more complete picture of the FGF superfamily as a whole is emerging. In some cases, less redundancy in these FGF signaling systems may allow for more mechanistic insights. Studies in sea anemones have highlighted how ancient FGF signaling is and helped provide insight into the evolution of the FGF gene family. Work in nematodes has shown that different splice forms can be used for functional specificity in invertebrate FGF signaling. Comparing FGFs between urochordates and vertebrates as well as between different insect species reveals important clues into the process of gene loss, duplication and subfunctionalization of FGFs throughout evolution. Finally, comparing all members of the FGF ligand superfamily reveals variability in many properties, which may point to a feature of FGFs as being highly adaptable with regards to protein structure and signaling mechanism. Further studies on FGF signaling outside of vertebrates is likely to continue to complement work in vertebrates by contributing additional insights to the FGF field and providing unexpected information that could be used for medical applications.

  3. Combining solvent isotope effects with substrate isotope effects in mechanistic studies of alcohol and amine oxidation by enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin- and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  4. Synergistic Relationships Among Stress, Depression, and Troubled Relationships: Insights from Psychoneuroimmunology

    PubMed Central

    Jaremka, Lisa M.; Lindgren, Monica E.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2013-01-01

    Stress and depression consistently elevate inflammation. Stress and depression are often experienced simultaneously, which is exemplified by people in troubled relationships. Troubled relationships also elevate inflammation, which may be partially explained by their ability to engender high levels of stress and depression. People who are stressed, depressed, or in troubled relationships are also at greater risk for health problems than their less distressed counterparts. Inflammation, a risk factor for a variety of age-related diseases including cardiovascular disease, Type II diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and frailty, may be one key mechanistic pathway linking distress to poor health. Obesity may further broaden the health implications of stress and depression; people who are stressed or depressed are often overweight, and adipose tissue is a major source of proinflammatory cytokines. Stress, depression, and troubled relationships may have synergistic inflammatory effects; loneliness, subclinical depression, and major depression enhance inflammatory responses to an acute stressful event. The relationship between distress and inflammation is bi-directional; depression enhances inflammation and inflammation promotes depression. Interesting questions emerge from this literature. For instance, some stressors may be more potent than others and thus may be more strongly linked to inflammation. In addition, it is possible that psychological and interpersonal resources may buffer the negative inflammatory effects of stress. Understanding the links among stress, depression, troubled relationships and inflammation is an exciting area of research that may provide mechanistic insight into the links between distress and poor health. PMID:23412999

  5. Mechanistic Studies of Combustion and Structure Formation During Synthesis of Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, A.; Lau, C.; Mukasyan, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    reactants occurs within each particle, and mixtures of elemental powders, where interparticle contacts are important for the reaction; and 3) Mechanistic Studies of Phase Separation in Combustion of Thermite Systems. Studies are devoted to experiments on thermite systems (metal oxide-reducing metal) where phase separation processes occur to produce alloys with tailored compositions and properties. The separation may be either gravity-driven or due to surface forces, and systematic studies to elucidate the true mechanism are being conducted. The knowledge obtained will be used to find the most promising ways of controlling the microstructure and properties of combustion-synthesized materials. Low-gravity experiments are essential to create idealized an environment for insights into the physics and chemistry of advanced material synthesis processes.

  6. A translational preclinical model of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension: mechanistic pathways driving disease pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Elizabeth R.; Khambata, Valerie S.; Yun Ye, Li; Cheung, Kenneth; Thomas, Matthew; Duggan, Nicholas; Jarai, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease, in which a decline in patient prognosis is frequently associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Animal models exhibiting principle pathophysiological features of IPF and PH could provide greater insight into mechanistic pathways underlying disease progression and a means for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches for intervention. Here, we describe an in vivo disease model, in which animals develop progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and associated PH, as defined by the presence of fibrotic foci adjacent to areas of alveolar injury and remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Associated changes in physiological parameters included a decline in lung function and increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) >25 mmHg. The early fibrotic pathology is associated with a profibrogenic microenvironment, elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteases, MMP‐2, MMP‐7, and MMP‐12, TIMP‐1, the chemoattractant and mitogen, PDGF‐β, and the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL12, that are associated with the recruitment of macrophages, mast cells, and fibrocytes. Principle mechanistic pathways associated with disease pathogenesis are upregulated in the lungs and pulmonary arteries, with sustained increases in gene transcripts for the profibrotic mediator TGF‐β1 and components of the TGF‐β signaling pathway; PAI‐1, Nox‐4, and HIF‐1α. Therapeutic treatment with the ALK‐5/TGF‐β RI inhibitor SB‐525334 reversed established pulmonary fibrosis and associated vascular remodeling, leading to normalization in clinically translatable physiological parameters including lung function and hemodynamic measurements of mPAP. These studies highlight the application of this model in validating potential approaches for targeting common mechanistic pathways driving disease pathogenesis. PMID:25214520

  7. Molecular mechanistic associations of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study of relationships between human diseases provides new possibilities for biomedical research. Recent achievements on human genetic diseases have stimulated interest to derive methods to identify disease associations in order to gain further insight into the network of human diseases and to predict disease genes. Results Using about 10000 manually collected causal disease/gene associations, we developed a statistical approach to infer meaningful associations between human morbidities. The derived method clustered cardiometabolic and endocrine disorders, immune system-related diseases, solid tissue neoplasms and neurodegenerative pathologies into prominent disease groups. Analysis of biological functions confirmed characteristic features of corresponding disease clusters. Inference of disease associations was further employed as a starting point for prediction of disease genes. Efforts were made to underpin the validity of results by relevant literature evidence. Interestingly, many inferred disease relationships correspond to known clinical associations and comorbidities, and several predicted disease genes were subjects of therapeutic target research. Conclusions Causal molecular mechanisms present a unifying principle to derive methods for disease classification, analysis of clinical disorder associations, and prediction of disease genes. According to the definition of causal disease genes applied in this study, these results are not restricted to genetic disease/gene relationships. This may be particularly useful for the study of long-term or chronic illnesses, where pathological derangement due to environmental or as part of sequel conditions is of importance and may not be fully explained by genetic background. PMID:20815942

  8. Mechanistic basis of desmosome-targeted diseases.

    PubMed

    Al-Jassar, Caezar; Bikker, Hennie; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2013-11-01

    Desmosomes are dynamic junctions between cells that maintain the structural integrity of skin and heart tissues by withstanding shear forces. Mutations in component genes cause life-threatening conditions including arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and desmosomal proteins are targeted by pathogenic autoantibodies in skin blistering diseases such as pemphigus. Here, we review a set of newly discovered pathogenic alterations and discuss the structural repercussions of debilitating mutations on desmosomal proteins. The architectures of native desmosomal assemblies have been visualized by cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, and the network of protein domain interactions is becoming apparent. Plakophilin and desmoplakin mutations have been discovered to alter binding interfaces, structures, and stabilities of folded domains that have been resolved by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. The flexibility within desmoplakin has been revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering and fluorescence assays, explaining how mechanical stresses are accommodated. These studies have shown that the structural and functional consequences of desmosomal mutations can now begin to be understood at multiple levels of spatial and temporal resolution. This review discusses the recent structural insights and raises the possibility of using modeling for mechanism-based diagnosis of how deleterious mutations alter the integrity of solid tissues.

  9. Uncertainty analysis in a mechanistic model of bacterial regrowth in distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Digiano, Francis A; Zhang, Weidong

    2004-11-15

    The first generation of mechanistic models of bacterial regrowth in distribution systems (DS) provides insight into cause-and-effect relationships. However, the state of knowledge about the processes included in these models is insufficient to warrant deterministic predictions. Even if the process descriptions are reasonable, the uncertainty in values of key system constants limits predictions of bacterial growth. A new mechanistic model was developed to incorporate the accepted knowledge of physical, chemical, and biological processes with the hydraulic features in order to capture the unsteady state behavior of the DS. Sensitivitytesting showed that the extent of bacterial regrowth was affected mainly by the rate constants for chlorine decay reactions in bulk water and on the pipe wall and by the maximum growth rate constant of attached bacteria. A simple hypothetical network was used to evaluate the effects of uncertainty in these three system constants by running 100 Monte Carlo simulations. Cumulative probability plots showed a wide range of predictions for concentrations of bacteria and chlorine in bulk water at various nodes in the DS. The magnitude of these concentrations and the range of values were greatly affected by water residence time to each node. Once the chlorine residual is depleted, bacterial growth is mainly influenced by the amount of substrate available. However, high values of the coefficients for the maximum growth rate of attached bacteria, the chlorine decay in bulk water, and the chlorine decay by wall reaction did not necessarily lead to the maximum bacterial growth at a given location.

  10. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    DOE PAGES

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; ...

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, whichmore » coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.« less

  11. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  12. Exploiting Bioprocessing Fluctuations to Elicit the Mechanistics of De Novo Lipogenesis in Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Andrew M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Despite substantial achievements in elucidating the metabolic pathways of lipogenesis, a mechanistic representation of lipid accumulation and degradation has not been fully attained to-date. Recent evidence suggests that lipid accumulation can occur through increases of either the cytosolic copy-number of lipid droplets (LDs), or the LDs size. However, the prevailing phenotype, or how such mechanisms pertain to lipid degradation remain poorly understood. To address this shortcoming, we employed the–recently discovered–innate bioprocessing fluctuations in Yarrowia lipolytica, and performed single-cell fluctuation analysis using optical microscopy and microfluidics that generate a quasi-time invariant microenvironment. We report that lipid accumulation at early stationary phase in rich medium is substantially more likely to occur through variations in the LDs copy-number, rather than the LDs size. Critically, these mechanistics are also preserved during lipid degradation, as well as upon exposure to a protein translation inhibitor. The latter condition additionally induced a lipid accumulation phase, accompanied by the downregulation of lipid catabolism. Our results enable an in-depth mechanistic understanding of lipid biogenesis, and expand longitudinal single-cell fluctuation analyses from gene regulation to metabolism. PMID:28052085

  13. Desmosomes in the heart: a review of clinical and mechanistic analyses.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipal M; Green, Kathleen J

    2014-06-01

    Desmosomes have long been appreciated as intercellular junctions that are vital for maintaining the structural integrity of stratified epithelia. More recent clinical investigations of patients with diseases such as arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy have further highlighted the importance of desmosomes in cardiac tissue, where they help to maintain coordination of cardiac myocytes. Here, we review clinical and mechanistic studies that provide insight into the functions of desmosomal proteins in skin and heart during homeostasis and in disease. While intercellular junctions are organized differently in cardiac and epithelial tissues, studies conducted in epithelial systems may inform our understanding of cardiac desmosomes. We explore traditional and non-traditional roles of desmosomal proteins, ranging from adhesive capacities to nuclear functions. Finally, we discuss how these studies can guide future investigations focused on determining the molecular mechanisms by which desmosomal mutations promote the development of cardiac diseases.

  14. Explanation and inference: mechanistic and functional explanations guide property generalization.

    PubMed

    Lombrozo, Tania; Gwynne, Nicholas Z

    2014-01-01

    The ability to generalize from the known to the unknown is central to learning and inference. Two experiments explore the relationship between how a property is explained and how that property is generalized to novel species and artifacts. The experiments contrast the consequences of explaining a property mechanistically, by appeal to parts and processes, with the consequences of explaining the property functionally, by appeal to functions and goals. The findings suggest that properties that are explained functionally are more likely to be generalized on the basis of shared functions, with a weaker relationship between mechanistic explanations and generalization on the basis of shared parts and processes. The influence of explanation type on generalization holds even though all participants are provided with the same mechanistic and functional information, and whether an explanation type is freely generated (Experiment 1), experiment